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Elizabeth Castle Survey 2017


In July 2016 Jersey War Tours (JWT) asked Jersey Heritage (JH) if they could do a WWII survey of Elizabeth Castle. JH have kindly agreed and offered support with our work. This survey only looks at the period between 1940 to 1945, which is a tiny space of time in the grand history of the castle. It must be remembered that although this period is our main area interest, JH also have to maintain the castles other 300+ years of history. Our hope is that in the next few years our ideas and advice may help preserve these important sites and improve the castle for visitors interested in the Second World War. During the Occupation Elizabeth Castle was setup as as two Widerstandsnest (pockets of resistance) working together to create a Stützpunkt (strongpoint). Though it appears that the castle had German defence activity in mid 1941. The fortress strength bunker construction works started around April 1943. German Equipment believed to be in place 2 x 10.5cm K 331 (f) 4.7cm Pak K36 (t) with MG 37(t) 3.7cm KwK. 144 (f) with MG311 (f) Panzerabwehrkanone 36 (Pak 36 3.7cm) 3 x 60cm Searchlight 90cm Searchlight named “Anton” 3 x 2cm Flak 38 2 x sMG34 5 x leMG34

Personnel Widerstandsnest North 1 x NCOs & 13 Other Ranks 6th Infantry Regiment 582 Widerstandsnest South 2 x NCOs & 14 Other Ranks 6th Infantry Regiment 582 Anti-Aircraft 5x NCOs & 16 other Ranks IV./7.Gemflakabt

Our survey aims are as follows: Digitally document all of the remaining the WWII sites and their current state Provide research and document what they were used for Make a recommendation for preservation and maintenance Offer ideas for interpretation The team are as follows: Kimberley Farley Phil Marett Jonathan Bull Malcolm Amy


Contents 1. Tank Trap 2. 4.7 Anti-Tank Position 3. Searchlight Emplacement 4. Type 606 Searchlight Bunker 5. U/WaKo Fest Bunker 6. Communications position 7. Type 621 Personnel Bunker 8. APX Tank Turret 9. Fire Control Tower & Anti-Aircraft Position 10. MG Position A 11. MG Position B 12. MG Position C 13. MG Position C 14. Minefield Control Bunker 15. Jäger Casemate North 16. Jäger Casemate South 17. Latrine 18. OT Bridge 19. Searchlight Emplacement B 20. Searchlight Emplacement C 21. Garage Type Structure 22. Emplacement 23. Anti-Aircraft Positions


1. Tank Trap Design and Use Possibly put in place between 44 and 45 it blocked access to vehicles at the main entrance. It was strategically placed so that the 4.7cm Anti-Tank gun position would lie in wait for any tanks or engineers delayed by the obstacle. The girders were likely to have been removable at this location and holes with a cover were normally provided which allowed use of access and when required the girders were dropped into the holes and would then be covered by the 4.7 preventing infantry from removing them. Current Condition No trace of this trap remains as it was removed by Force 135 in 1945

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation No trace of this trap remains Ideas for Interpretation Should form a stop in any digital guides. Sources: Black and White Photo (Jersey Heritage)


2. 4.7 Anti-Tank Position Design and Use This was a reinforced field type construction for housing a 4.7cm Anti-Tank Gun with a range of 2,900 meters (1.8 miles). The 4cm kanĂłn vz. 36 was an anti-tank gun produced by the Ĺ koda Works in 1930s. The gun was used in Czechoslovak border fortifications and after German occupation of Czechoslovakia it saw service in Atlantic Wall fortifications under the designation 4,7 cm Pak K 36(t). This position, like other examples around the island, was not in a heavy fortress strength bunker. Looking at the RAF reconnaissance photos it is enclosed using a wooden shed type structure. The gun and the shelter were probably removed in the tidy up of weapons in 1945/46 by Force 135. This was the only Anti-Tank fixed weapon to be removed from the castle. Current Condition Poor, the gun emplacement requires protection care and the interpretation is in much need of improvement and modernisation.

The rear of the weapon position is overgrown with grass; flora and fauna adorn the wall and overhang the top of the position. The roots may be causing damage to the pointing in the wall the position is attached too, therefore in the long term the supporting wall may become unstable with loose granite stones/pointing which in turn open gaps and cracks allowing water/ice to penetrate causing the wall and the


concrete part of the gun position to become unstable and possibly start to detach itself from the supporting wall. Whilst plants can enhance and provide a “softer� frame for these types of structures their placement should be tightly controlled as to not allow invasive growth and detriment to the position itself. Grass is growing under and between the outlaying steel joists and will cause more damage over time. The moss and lichen growing directly onto the concrete position will need a specialist to advise how much damage is being caused and at what rate(1). Also the balance of removing this moss/lichen compared to leaving the naturally occurring moss/ lichen, which appears over time on any structure with the correct conditions. The concrete itself is starting to show signs of age, with cracks and reinforcing steels starting to show. This process will continue over time with further deterioration without any intervention. metal work on this position is showing serious signs of rusting/oxidisation and needs immediate treatment to prevent further corrosion. In comparison to the Ministry of Works shot below, the degradation and need for regular maintenance is clear.

The front of the position is also showing signs of degradation. The metal work (embrasure and ball) is severely rusted; the woodwork is open to the elements and showing signs of rot. Also pigeons are nesting here which results in guano deposits, which not only detract from the aesthetics of the position but also attract insects.


Guano also contains uric acid and traces of fungi. Both of these are detrimental to wood and will stain concrete. The 4.7cm position has a very large '1944' inscribed in the sloped concrete above the ball mount which is now almost invisible due to the lichen/moss growth. The surrounding wall in which the position is mounted in is thick with flora and fauna, please see previous notes.

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation The remains of this gun position require immediate protection. The metal work could possibly be stabilised using a Rust Converter and treatment, which needs to be repeated as necessary. Expert advice should be considered, Neil Mahrer Head conservator at Jersey Heritage, also possibly contacting a 3rd party Like The Mary Rose Trust who have experience in stabilising historic relics. Removal or trimming back of any invasive grasses, flora and fauna from the metal work should also be part of the maintenance schedule of the position. If paint is to be applied the correct colour should be researched and pantone matched before application. Currently a light grey paint has been applied to the rear of the embrasure, the Channel Occupation Society have a bunker at Millbrook with this weapon inside mounted in a similar embrasure which is painted a beige/yellow colour, however a similar weapon in Guernsey has the embrasure painted a grey colour(2). Contact with CIOS Jersey and Guernsey for the correct pantone for this position is advised(3).


The main body of concrete requires the cracks to be filled with a clear epoxy resin to prevent further moisture ingress and damage. We suggest clear resin so the repairs can be seen and no modern concrete is used on the position. A possibility of sealant over all of the concrete including the front area could be considered but as with the epoxy resin expert advice will need to be sought. The wood framing in front of the metal embrasure needs cleaning of bird droppings, any rot treated and stabilised with wood preserver. To prevent further birds nesting in this area the installation of plastic bird spikes or a sheet of Perspex over the entrance to prevent bird access but allow viewing of the position. Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area and this should include a photo of the type of gun. Photos from current CIOS Jersey and Guernsey installations are readily available; within Jersey Archive local photos of this type of weapon are available showing the “sheds/huts� they were mounted in in other locations around the Island (Jersey Archive ref - L/D/25/F1/1). Although this weapon was wall mounted these photos could be used in any interpretation to show what the original wooden structure it was housed in may have looked like. A 3d digital model showing the weapon mounted in the wall from the rear drawn up and shown in any signage. A description of the weapon with ranges and coverage area. The coverage of this weapon is graphically portrayed in the Green Books at Societe Jersiase (use to be agreed with Soc Jer). Should form a stop in any digital guides. Sources: 1 - http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php? script=sci_arttext&pid=S1517-83822013000400001 2 - http://www.germanoccupationmuseum.co.uk/images/big_img2.jpg 3 - http://www.ciosjersey.org.uk/bunkers/4-7cm-anti-tank-gun-casemate 4 - Black and White Photo Jersey Archive Reference C/B/K/A/3


3. Searchlight Emplacement Design and Use This was a reinforced field type construction for a 60cm Searchlight using a mic of concrete and stone. The searchlight was transported to the emplacement by rail from the type 606 bunker (covered in part 4). This emplacement is of a type unique to Jersey and only found with Type 606 shelters. These are 7 examples (Stp. Corbiere's 606 has 2) and this example is the only one to have integrated granite masonry put into the concrete. It is also unique for lacking the 2 emergency 'Foxhole' shelters normally found flanking the emplacement entrance. Current Condition The position is in a good condition with minimal signs of damage. The rail is in a very poor condition.


Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation The rail metal work could possibly be stabilised using a Rust Converter and treatment, which needs to be repeated as necessary. Expert advice should be considered, Neil Mahrer Head conservator at Jersey Heritage, also possibly contacting a 3rd party like the Mary Rose Trust who have experience in stabilising historic relics. Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area and this should include a photo of the Searchlight.

Photos from the CIOS Jersey collection of this Searchlight Emplacement with the 60cm Searchlight in place would be our recommended choice. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


4. Type 606 Searchlight Bunker Design and Use This was a fortress strength bunker designed as a garage for a 60cm Searchlight and a shelter for the searchlight crew. A type unique to the Channel Islands (6 x Jersey & 6 X Guernsey) which was dropped by the Army in favour of the Type L 411a when construction on the European Atlantikwall started some months after Jersey's construction program. You can see the transition at Wn. Le Fret where the normal U/ WaKoFest and 606 are dropped for a 621 and L 411a. This is also visible in Wn. Elizabeth Castle Sud. Current Condition Poor, interior access was not granted to the team. We only reached the interior access door, that has been modified, with a modern lock. The condition of the exterior pipework, electrical equipment and the rails to and from the garage are in an incredibly bad state which all require specialist metal repair and immediate action to stop any further deterioration. Peeking through the entrance defence you can see there are traces of the bunk bed holders on the wall as well as a air filtration pump.

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation Potential use of a light in the Garage area. With no access granted we cannot comment on interior maintenance. From a quick look at the two armoured stable


doors, both require rust removal and a fresh coat of protective paint. The pipework is badly damaged and needs urgent repair. The rail line is also in a very bad state and action must be taken soon to recover what is left. Access was not granted to the interior of the bunker due to it being used for black powder storage. We would like to recommend the castle consider only having one bunker used for the storage of the powder. If only this bunker was used the Type 621 Personnel bunker could be opened to the public.

Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area and this should include a photo of the type of searchlight used. A 3d map of the bunker and consideration to a small display of occupation photos within the garage. It could be a good area to display photos of the other bunkers of this type which can all still be found on Jersey. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


5. U/WaKo Fest Bunker Design and Use Unterstand Waffen Kommission Festungen (U/WaKo Fest) or Personnel shelter for 10 men, a unique design for the Channel Islands. Built to Fortress standard (2m thick walls and ceilings) and used by troops when nearby weapon positions were under air/sea attack for shelter until the attack ceased. 11 of these U/Wako Fest bunkers exist in Jersey. A recent German document dated 1944 lists these bunkers as: "Wa.Pruf. Fest Unterstande". The designation "U/WaKoFest" is not a military one and was made up by Rudi Rolf in the 90's from what information was available at the time to him so he could designate this type of bunker. Time to re-write a lot of books! The bunker is also a design per-dating the 600 series and is unique to the Channel Islands. It is also unusual as it serves as a passive defence structure where squads with light weapons (MG, Panzerfaust etc.) would lay up until called for to combat any enemy penetrations. Current Condition

Poor, the external doors are missing therefore the doorways are open to the elements and allow ingress of weather/water and wildlife into the structure. Upon entry the ceiling is showing major signs of degradation with internal steel reinforcement bar heavily rusted and showing through the concrete.


The metal ceilings inside the bunker are showing signs of rust and pitting under the paint and are painted different colours. In one room black paint has been used and in another red oxide. General cleanliness inside the whole structure is very poor with bird droppings and general dirt present in many areas. Metal fixings within the bunker, including doors, ventilation equipment, telecommunications equipment and electrical equipment are showing severe signs of rust and general dirt accumulation including evidence of bird droppings. Split door

Telephone communication box Ventilation system pipework with rusted holes Very poor condition fitting Modern pvc electrical conduit and joint boxes can be seen within the bunker, current use and condition of any wiring within is unknown and whether it conforms to current IEE wiring regulations. Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation Firstly, the bunker needs to completely cleaned and all dirt/debris/bird droppings need to be removed from all areas. Doors fitted to keep out the weather and wild life. Moving forward an electrical supply planned and installed with adequate lighting throughout the bunker, the modern PVC conduit utilised or removed and


replacements/replicas of the original wiring and fittings more in line with the period installed in its place. Parts of the bunker are being used as a store for lengths of wood/fencing and plastic, these items should be stored properly and not left leaning up against fittings and in random areas of the bunker. If the bunker is going to be open to the public these items should be removed and stored elsewhere. A trailing extension lead is also apparent and should be removed unless it is being used to temporarily provide power, a110v system is recommended. All metal work needs to be stabilised immediately to prevent further deterioration, expert advice must be taken on this as previously stated. The concrete areas, which are showing signs of degradation, also need to be considered for repair after any exposed reinforcing rods are stabilised. This can be achieved with epoxy or another substance. Again, expert advice must be sought. All rooms with metal ceilings will need complete stabilisation, the ceilings will need to be taken back to metal with any existing paint removed, stabilised and preserved using the correct paint colour. Contact with CIOS Jersey and Guernsey is advised, recently the team at STP Corbiere (Under CIOS care) have restored a metal ceiling as part of their maintenance program. I suggest contact with Malcolm Amy for advice on this process. The ventilation pipes with holes in them will need to be repaired by a professional immediately to avoid further degradation and any repairs need to be as seamless as possible.


The bunker walls throughout have been whitewashed and this will need to be stabilised/sanded (after cleaning) and repainted in the correct colour. Original doors within the bunker have had their seals painted over, this paint needs to be removed from the seals and the seals stabilised to prevent them perishing. The wooden rifle rack needs cleaning and restoring to its original colour. Inscriptions in the concrete need to part of the preservation plan. A clear decision and vision for this unique bunker needs to be decided upon by Jersey Heritage and acted upon. We recommend it being open to the public. An on-going maintenance and repair program will need to be put in place to secure the future of this bunker and avoid it degrading any further including cutting back of any flora and fauna externally. Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area, including a plan of the bunker type, labelling what all rooms were used for. Possible display of Occupation artefacts within the bunker, Jersey Heritage has thousands of Occupation artefacts at the Museum store at the rear of the Francis Cook Gallery which could be displayed within the Castle complex. Inscriptions in the concrete of this bunker need to be signed and preserved. Should form a stop in any digital guides. Sources CIOS Archive book No 9 Jersey Occupied by M Ginns ISBN 978-1-905095-29-2 www.forum.axishistory.com


6. Communications Position Design and Use Communication junction boxes, Kabel End Verschlusse or K.E.V boxes, part of Jersey’s Fortress Signals Network. Communication cables were routed between and into Fortifications and terminated into junction boxes. The pairs in each cable were then inter-connected within the junction boxes to allow communications between different positions. Current Condition

Very poor, both KEV boxes are in terrible condition. The right hand box has partially collapsed at the bottom and is full of bird droppings and dirt. The left hand box also has bird droppings and dirt but is slightly more stable. The cables wire shielding is showing and starting to rust and fall away, both KEV boxes are rusting and the area they are placed in shows signs of damp. The interpretation is in much need of improvement and modernisation. Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation The remains of this position require immediate intervention by experts, droppings and dirt removed and repairs made to the bottom of the right hand side KEV box. Efforts should be made to stabilise and restore these junction boxes and possibly fit them with Perspex lids to allow visual examination. The surrounding walls are showing dampness and should be stabilised with an anti damp/fungal paint. Anti bird measures should be adopted to prevent further damage from the droppings.


Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area and this should include a photo of similar KEV boxes telecoms equipment. We suggest contacting CIOS Jersey and Guernsey for access to their sites with similar KEV boxes for comparison. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


7. Type 621 Personnel Bunker Design and Use Fortress strength personnel bunker for 10 men. This is the only standard Altlantikwall

fortification at the Castle! A Wa.Pruf. Fest Unterstande should have been built and this suggests a later date of construction to the rest of the fortifications at the Castle and it probably served as an air raid shelter for the barracks. It is also unusual for its beautiful integration into the older structure.  Current Condition Unknown, as access was not granted to the team. We only reached the interior access door, which is a Gastür Type 19P7 (Gas Door) that has been modified, recently, with new locks. Chris Addy gained access and has given the following description and updated the below map. “I went into the 621 bunker on Thursday, and it appears to follow the standard pattern. I have attempted to mark some of the fittings and fixtures on to your plan apologies if they are not clear. The most important seem to be the escape hatch on the left hand side, and the apertures in the walls (marked MG) for machine guns I presume. All the gas doors are there and the main room is still partially lined. Some of the telephone kit is there, and the yellow box of the air filtration system.”


Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation Potential use of an LED light in the Ring-stand position. With no access granted we can not comment on interior maintenance. From a quick look at the 2 x StahltĂźr 434P01 (Armoured Stable (Door) both require rust removal and a fresh coat of protective paint. The equipment left in the ringstand for communications would benefit a clean, rust removal and protective coating.

Ideas for Interpretation Considerations could be made to move away from it being a black powder storage area and opened up to the general public. With both the Type 606 bunker and this bunker being used for storage, it would make more sense to only use the Type 606 bunker. The condition of this bunker from what we can see is good. Access to the Ring-stand connected to the bunker is open to all, it is not lit in anyway and really could to with signage explaining its role. There are also some great photos at SocJer of a before and after of the area the bunker was built. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


8. APX-R Tank Turret Position Design and Use The APX-R tank turret was originally fitted to Renault R35/40 Tanks. The Germans used the turrets from captured tanks separately in Ringstand positions. This turret was fitted with 3.7cm Kwk 144(f) weapon and a co axial machine gun MG 311(f). It was cast rather than plate and only 3 of these turrets survive in Jersey, one being emplaced at The Channel Island Military Museum at St Ouens (originally based at St Aubin’s Fort and the 3rd at Beauport Battery. The Castle example is the most complete example of all of them as it still mounts the 3.7cm weapon, although this is heavily decayed. No plan available as this position has been sealed for many years. Current Condition

Very poor, the APX Tank Turret requires immediate intervention. The interpretation is in much need of improvement and modernisation. The top and rear hatches are partially open allowing weather/moisture ingress; also in nesting season gulls use the position to nest in. Flora and fauna surround the turret and are encroaching on and into the turret itself. Bird droppings are evident, even more so in the summer months.


Inside the turret, is in disastrous condition and sadly does not look to be restorable.

The interior of an APX current in good condition.


Blocked Entrance above, hatch open below.


Without entry inside the position it is almost impossible to comment on the structures condition, however with water and weather ingress through the turret down into the Ringstand, conditions do not look favourable. Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation The remains of this rare Turret require immediate intervention by experts. The hatches need to be closed and the Turret made weather proof. All efforts should be made to try to save what is left of the inner workings at least to stabilise, as sadly restoration looks unlikely. The outer turret needs to be stabilised and restored after repairs are made and a colour scheme fitting for the period researched and applied. The position should be opened as soon as possible to allow JWT team to asses and record it, also to allow air through to dry out any moisture which has entered the position. A door should be fitted to allow access. Flora and fauna around the position needs to be cut back and maintained, anti bird measures should be adopted to keep the birds away from nesting and fouling on this position during nesting season. Ideas for Interpretation The position should be opened and public access allowed, new signage to explain this area and this should include details about the weapon and photos of what was inside the Turret itself along with range and coverage diagrams. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


9. Fire Control Tower & Anti-Aircraft Position Design and Use This is a reinforced construction used for Observation and plotting target locations to engage with the emplaced weapons. A large rangefinder would have been used to direct weapons towards targets. The Tower offered 360-degree views to allow maximum coverage for the rangefinder and observers. The Fire Tower itself had a 2cm Flak 38 weapon emplaced on the roof to engage with low flying aircraft. Current Condition Poor, the concrete is showing signs of age and rusting steel reinforcing bars are showing through in places.

The wooden flooring and wall cladding are original and preservation is needed of both. The cladding has attracted “Graffiti� scratched in from visitors, which should be discouraged. Signs of dampness are evident within the doorway to the crew quarters. Metalwork, especially the mounts for the Rangefinder, are rusty and in very poor condition.


On the roof of the Tower is the pedestal emplacement for the Flak 38 weapon and ammunition recesses. Evidence of moss/lichen growing on the cement is clear.


Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation The damaged concrete requires the cracks to be filled with a clear epoxy resin to prevent further moisture ingress and damage. We suggest clear resin so the repairs can be seen and no modern concrete is used on the position. A possibility of sealant over all of the concrete including the front area could be considered but as with the epoxy resin expert advice will need to be sought. The internal woodwork (floor, cladding and window frames) should have any rot treated and stabilised with wood preserver. To discourage any further graffiti perhaps a in the short term install a wifi camera with signage asking people not to damage the original cladding. Long-term protection perhaps covering the cladding with Perspex or some other media. This position likely has high footfall due to the commanding views and thought should be put in to preserving the original wooden flooring. Some form of cover or matting could be installed to prevent the higher than normal rate of wear with the number of visitors to the position. The metal work could possibly be stabilised using a Rust Converter and treatment, which needs to be repeated as necessary. Expert advice should be considered, Neil Mahrer Head conservator at Jersey Heritage, also possibly contacting a 3rd party Like The Mary Rose Trust who have experience in stabilising historic relics. If paint is to be applied the correct colour should be researched and pantone matched before application.The moss and lichen growing directly onto the concrete position will need a specialist to advise how much damage is being caused and at what rate. Also the balance of removing this moss/lichen compared to leaving the naturally occurring moss/lichen, which appears over time on any structure with the correct conditions. Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area and this should include a photo of the type of gun mounted on the top of the Tower with coverage and range information. Installation of a rangefinder, Jersey Heritage has a number of original rangefinders at their store in the rear of the Sir Francis Cook Gallery. If a suitable one cannot be found then perhaps a replica built and installed with signage explaining its use. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


10. MG Position A Design and Use This was a reinforced field type construction for a heavy machine gun with an effective range of 200-2000m. The emplacement could have been fitted with 2 weapons, either the MG34 or MG42. This WW2 MG position is built on an earlier emplacement. Current Condition Average, the gun emplacement requires protection. The concrete in places is showing small amounts of damage and cracks. The wall at the rear of the emplacement may need checking. Flora and fauna are prevalent in the wall and also within the emplacement itself. A heavy moss is growing heavily on the steps up to the emplacement and starting to grow within the emplacement. The older position, which this German position is built on, is also in average condition with flora and fauna also present. The recess below is showing signs of dampness. The interpretation is in much need of improvement and modernisation.

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation This gun position requires immediate protection with general cleaning needed, any drains dug out, cleared and reinstated where installed. Repairs to the concrete made, under expert advice. Flora, fauna and moss should be removed and kept from growing with regular treatment and maintenance. The rear concrete wall looks to be leaning, its base and stability should be checked as soon as possible. The recess below should be cleared and stabilisation considered to stop dampness. Drains to be dug out, cleared and reinstated where possible.


Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area and this should include a photo of the type of gun, details about the weapon and range. Utilisation of Societe Jersiase green books information and diagrams is advised. The older gun emplacement should also be included in any interpretation. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


11. MG Position B Design and Use This was a reinforced field type construction for a heavy machine gun with an effective range of 200-2000m. The emplacement could have been fitted with 2 weapons, either the MG34 or MG42. This WW2 MG position is built on an earlier emplacement. Current Condition   Average, the gun emplacement requires protection. The concrete in places is showing small amounts of damage and cracks. Flora and fauna are prevalent in the wall and also within the emplacement itself. Moss and lichen is growing in the emplacement. The recess below the emplacement is damp and is full of dirt and some building materials. The interpretation is in much need of improvement and modernisation.  Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation  This gun position requires immediate protection with general cleaning needed, any drains dug out, cleared and reinstated where installed. Repairs to the concrete made, under expert advice. Flora, fauna and moss should be removed and kept from growing with regular treatment and maintenance. Building items and dirt removed from the recess and stabilisation considered to stop dampness.


Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area and this should include a photo of the type of gun, details about the weapon and range. Utilisation of Societe Jersiase green books information and diagrams is advised.  The older gun emplacement should also be included in any interpretation. Should form a stop in any digital guides. 


12. MG Position C Design and Use This was a reinforced field type construction for a heavy machine gun with an effective range of 200-2000m. The emplacement could have been fitted with 2 weapons, either the MG34 or MG42. Current Condition   Average to poor, the gun emplacement requires protection. The concrete in places is showing small amounts of damage and cracks. Flora and fauna are heavily prevalent in the wall and also within the emplacement itself. Moss and lichen is growing in the emplacement. The recess behind the emplacement is damp and dirt/sand is present. The interpretation is in much need of improvement and modernisation.  Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation  This gun position requires immediate protection with general cleaning needed, any drains dug out, cleared and reinstated where installed. Repairs to the concrete made, under expert advice. Flora, fauna and moss should be removed and kept from growing with regular treatment and maintenance. Dirt removed from the recess and stabilisation considered to stop dampness.


Ideas for Interpretation New signage to explain this area and this should include a photo of the type of gun, details about the weapon and range. Utilisation of Societe Jersiase green books information and diagrams is advised.  Should form a stop in any digital guides. 


13. MG Position D Design and Use This was a reinforced field type construction for a heavy machine gun with an effective range of 200-2000m. The emplacement could have been fitted with 2 weapons, either the MG34 or MG42. Current Condition   The gun emplacement has been filled and only the platform remains.

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation The top remaining section of the MG platform needs to be protected from any further damage. Ideas for Interpretation  None


14. Mine Control Bunker Design and Use This is a mine control bunker is a grade B construction (2 metre thick concrete) and is a design unique to Jersey. One of a pair, this example had a Zundtisch (fire control panel) to detonate the mines blocking access to St Helier Harbour. Its twin lays to the South East of the JEC Power station and the setup was exactly the same. The mines were attached to the seabed due to the large tidal movements and using the control panel they could be detonated remotely from within the bunkers. Current Condition   Poor, due to its exposed position to the elements it is showing serious sign of degradation.

The concrete has serious cracks in the upper third of the bunker and shows exposed rusted reinforcement bar in many areas. Modern attempts (date unknown) have been made to repair parts of the bunker with cement; these are not in keeping with the rest of the original concrete works. The embrasure also has damage and most of the modern “repairs” are on this section. The wood within the embrasure looks possibly original but severely weathered and rust leeching though from the fixings. All exposed metalwork is in poor condition; the entrance door is severely rusted, as is the metal embrasure fitting. Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation


This bunker needs immediate intervention due to its exposed location; the constant ingress of saltwater and severe weather will make this rare build deteriorate very quickly. Expert advice must be taken to stop any further deterioration without altering the original build in any significant way. The modern “repairs” should possibly be removed and redone in keeping with the original concrete or a clear medium used. The roof should also be examined for damage. Stabilisation is needed on all metalwork, woodwork and a plan to seal the bunker against further damage put into place. Openings into the bunker should be sealed but still allowing airflow and drainage, perhaps sealed thick Perspex in exposed areas to still allow visual interpretation but keep out the weather. Expert advice should be sought on this matter. Access for measuring and documenting should be granted to a JWT team to establish exact dimensions of this bunker. Ideas for Interpretation The interpretation is in much need of improvement and modernisation. New signage to explain this area but the bunker should remain sealed to the public due to access issues. A computer graphical simulation of the mine bunkers and mines could be displayed within the Castle, possibly be interactive with a “Fire control panel” replica which could be used to detonate the mines one by one as sea targets enter the harbour on a screen. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


15. Jäger Casemate North Design and Use This was a fortress strength fortification with 8 rooms, including a gas lock. The Jäger Casemate was a special design made to hold a 10.5cm field gun. These bunkers are only found in the Channel Islands. The two Jäger casemates found on Elizabeth Castle are especially important as they still house their original 10.5cm guns. An interesting item of note in this bunker is the wooden tool rack in the gas lock which is a Westwall design and is the only known example to survive in the C.I. Current Condition Poor, Metal fixings within the bunker, including doors, ventilation equipment, telecommunications equipment and electrical equipment are showing signs of rust and general dirt accumulation including a fair amount of bird droppings.


The gun, a French Canon de 105 mle 1913 Schneider, was designated by the Germans as a K 331(f) and is in a terrible condition. It is indeed of expert care. As does the ventilation system found above gun and the gun room door.


Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation The bunker needs to completely cleaned and all dirt/debris/bird droppings need to be removed from all areas. All metal work needs to be stabilised immediately to prevent further deterioration, expert advice must be taken on this as previously stated in the survey. As this casemate, has retained its doors they all need to be preserved and action taken to recover them. The door to the gun room is an important part of the design and not easily found, so special care needs to be taken on ensuring it is protected.

Shuttering at Wn. L’Oielliere, St Brelades, Photo from the CIOS

Remains of the exterior Gun doors can be seen on this photo from the “Report from the Ministry of Works on Elizabeth Castle�, June 1955, Jersey Archive (C/B/K/A/2)


The Gun is in urgent need of restoration and requires immediate repair work to its armoured shield and other parts, like the optic mounts and firing system. It is in a challenging position due to the weather and sea so our recommendation is to have the gun embrasure weather shuttering reinstalled. The shuttering was there to protect the gun and gun room from sea spray and waves. This was part of the original design and the soldiers would have been able raise or lower shutters. The Jäger Casemate the CIOS have at Strongpoint Corbiere has a similar setup. The Gun its self needs some expert help, repairs of the metal work are needed and a recovery process will be required for the metal. Much care must be taken to make sure that as much of the gun remains in place at the castle as possible. Malcolm Amy, who has put together a team and recovered the 10.5 gun at Strongpoint Corbiere, would be an excellent advisor. If nothing is done soon this Gun will be lost forever.

Ideas for Interpretation Once the bunker has been cleaned up, we recommend that brighter lights should be installed, this will provide visitors with a better viewing opportunity. Each room would value signage to explain its purpose and a map of where the visitors are. As there are two of these bunkers it would make sense to have one setup, perhaps, as it would have been on the day of Liberation. Our recommendation is that this bunker should be set up as a gallery style information centre explaining the WWII history of the castle. It is the first multi roomed bunker visitors visit. The south Jäger could be setup to look as it did in May 1945, it also has more original features including the range map. There are 13 of these types of Bunkers still found on Jersey, a display of the other bunkers could be a feature in one of the bunkers rooms. Should form a stop in any digital guides.


16. Jäger Casemate South Design and Use This was a fortress strength fortification with 8 rooms, including a gas lock. The Jäger Casemate was a special design made to hold a 10.5cm field gun. These bunkers are only found in the Channel Islands. The two Jäger casemates found on Elizabeth Castle are especially important as they still house their original 10.5cm guns. In terms of completeness, this 10,5 cm K 331 (f) is the most complete and best original example of the 3 still in original position today (after the Castle the other is in K2 at Stp. Corbiere) and the same applies to the bunker for original completeness. The gun is 1 of only 6 examples left of a 10,5cm K 331 (f) mounted on a Guernseystand Lafette especially designed for the Jaegerstand/Guernseystand. The other 3 (after Stp. Elizabeth Castle & Stp. Corbiere) are at Wn. La Carriere (Originally from Wn. Rozel Fort), German Occupation Museum Guernsey ( Originally from Wn. Aubin Fort, Jersey) and Stp. Rotenstein at Fort Hommet, Guernsey (Originally from Wn. Le Fret, Jersey). Current Condition Average, Metal fixings within the bunker, including doors, ventilation equipment, telecommunications equipment and electrical equipment are showing signs of rust and general dirt accumulation. This of all of the bunker visited has the most original parts and features. Due to a locked gate access was not possible to the Entrance defence room and for safety reasons the ring stand or lookout position was not accessible.

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation The bunker needs to completely cleaned and all dirt/debris/bird droppings need to be removed from all areas. All metal work needs to be stabilised immediately to prevent further deterioration, expert advice must be taken on this as previously stated in the survey. As this casemate, has retained its doors they all need to be preserved and action taken to recover them. The door to the gun room is an important part of the design and not easily found, so special care needs to be taken on ensuring it is protected. The Gun its self needs some expert help, repairs of the metal work are needed and a recovery process will be required for the metal. Much care must be taken to make sure that as much of the gun remains in place at the castle as possible. Malcolm Amy, who has put together a team and recovered the 10.5 gun at Strongpoint Corbiere, would be an excellent advisor. Ideas for Interpretation Once the bunker has been cleaned up, we recommend that brighter lights should be installed, this will provide visitors with a better viewing opportunity. Each room would value signage to explain its purpose and a map of where the visitors are. As there are two of these bunkers it would make sense to have one setup, perhaps, as it would have been on the day of Liberation. Our recommendation is that this bunker should be setup as it was in May 1945. There is also an inscription by the forced workers which can only be found on the sea side of the gun embrasure. It should be documented somewhere in the castle that it is there. There is an entry in the German


Inscription by the forced workers “Built by the Spanish 1943”


17. Latrine Design and Use Simple cement lining design and used as an open urinal Current Condition Good, the privacy partition has signs of weathering and has been weakened by the weeds.

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation A tidy of the vegetation growing in the immediate area Ideas for Interpretation Could form a stop in any digital guides. Adds a human side to the WWII story.


18. OT Bridge Design and Use A bridge was made of wood to help transport the material used to build the fortifications from the dock. It is likely that this bridge had rails and potentially a pull system may have been in place and possibly powered by the forced labour.

Current Condition Only a small trace of where the bridge landed remains.


Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation None Ideas for Interpretation It is a key part of the construction & OT story and brings home the conditions the workers had to deal with. It would make an interesting stop in a digital guide or could feature an information sign on what came through that area of the wall.


19. Searchlight Emplacement B Design and Use Large searchlight position on rails with an area under the platform for a generator. This could be for the artillery Batterie Endras. The 90cm searchlight was named “Anton”. Current Condition   Upper area, medium the rail has some damage due to weathering. Lower, good just in need of a good tidy and clean.


Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation Upper area, The rail metal work could possibly be stabilised using a Rust Converter and treatment, which needs to be repeated as necessary. Expert advice should be considered. Lower area, Mind the head warnings and a general tidy of the growing weeds. Ideas for Interpretation  New signage to explain this area and should form a stop in a digital guide.


20. Searchlight Emplacement C Design and Use This was an area designed for a 60cm Searchlight using a mix of concrete and stone. The light was used by the north Jäger Casemate. Next to it is a sealed small bunker possibly for a generator or crew shelter. Current Condition   Little remains of the position and the area is now used for the canon firing display. Bunker closely is sealed with no access. Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation  None Ideas for Interpretation  Potential for adding in as a stop in a digital guide.


21. Garage Type Structure Design and Use Unknown could possibly of been a shelter for a Pak 36 Anti-tank gun which was pictured close to this site. Current Condition   The structure is sealed with no way of access.

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation Some roots are growing through the walls and this could lead to weakness. Ideas for Interpretation  None at this time


22. Emplacement Design and Use This could possibly have been an early position for one of the 2cm Flak 38 weapons. We will be updating this section once we confirm its use. Current Condition The base has been modified as a flag pole post.  

Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation None Ideas for Interpretation If this was indeed an emplacement for flak gun it would make an important stop on a digital guide.


23. Anti-Aircraft Positions Design and Use Two Gun positions for 2cm Flak 38 weapons. Both build on top of existing pre WWII gun emplacements. The 2 emplacements were fitted with standard concrete protective walls which were demolished in 1945 Current Condition Access is restricted from the view we could get the prewar wood is in need of some repair and protection. Recommendations for Maintenance & Preservation  Again our access was limited but the wood and gun bases require some repair and protective coatings for the weather. Ideas for Interpretation Updated signage providing details on the two guns and potentially the position prior to the war. Should for a stop on any digital tour.

Elizabeth Castle Survey 2017  

In July 2016 Jersey War Tours (JWT) asked Jersey Heritage (JH) if they could do a full WWII survey of Elizabeth Castle. JH have kindly agree...