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Member SIPC

In this Issue... Nevada Cattlemen’s Assn..............pgs. 3-6 Eye on the Outside........................... pgs. 9 Nevada Rangeland Resource Commission......................pg. 10

Nevada’s Priority Agricultural Weeds: Cheatgrass............................pgs. 28-29, 31 Nevada’s Priority Agricultural Weeds: Russian Thistle..........................pgs. 30-31 HWCWMA: Russian Knapweed.....pg. 32

Ramblings of a Ranch Wife............. pg. 11 Fumes from the Farm.......................pg. 12

Range Plants for the Rancher: Green Molly......................................pg. 33

Nevada Feedlots...............................pg. 14

Van Norman Results...................pgs 34-35

South Dakota Blizzard.....................pg. 16

Lessons from Down Under..............pg. 36

A Rancher’s Dream and Quest.........pg. 18

Nick Dowers Wins ..........................pg. 37

3B Egg & Livestock.........................pg. 19

Carlin Branding Results...................pg. 38

NV Stallion Stakes Results.......pgs. 20-21

Edward Jones: Financial Focus........pg. 38

Elko Co. Fair Results................pgs. 22-24

Coloring Page...................................pg. 39

Nutritional Properties of Windrowed & Standing Basin Wildrye...................pg. 25

Obituaries...................................pgs. 40-41

Beef Checkoff...................................pg. 26

Look Up: Ranchers: Ideal Stewards of the Land?.......................pg.43

The Progressive Rancher Owner/Editor/Publisher – Leana Stitzel progressiverancher@elko.net

Graphic Design/Layout/Production – Julie Eardley julie@jeprographics.com

Cover Photo: “Etherially Western” by Jessica Olsen Published 9 times each year, The Progressive Rancher is mailed to more than 7,000 approved addresses, and has digital and print readership reaching more than 30,000. The Progressive Rancher is published monthly. The views and opinions expressed by writers of articles appearing in this publication are not necessarily those of the editor. Letters of opinion are welcomed by The Progressive Rancher. Rates for advertising are available upon request. Advertising in The Progressive Rancher does not necessarily imply editorial endorsement. Liability for any errors or omissions in advertisements shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by the error or omission. The Progressive Rancher is free to people working and active in the livestock industry. The Progressive Rancher is donated to the agricultural industry. If you are not currently receiving this magazine on a regular basis, and would like to be a part of The Progressive Rancher family, contact us by e-mail at progressiverancher@elko.net, today, so we can include you on our mailing list. If you have moved or changed addresses, please notify us, by e-mail, so we can keep you informed. All requests for the magazine must be made by e-mail.

Leana Stitzel, Owner/Editor

1188 Court St., #81, Elko, NV 89801 (208) 733-1828 • progressiverancher@elko.net

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2 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


I

know what we are all about. There is a perception that ranchers sit behind a big desk all day either sipping coffee or whiskey and smoking big cigars while watching workers toil in the fields beyond our plate glass window. I imagine the filmmaker and her camerawoman were disappointed with my first impression. I had been up most all night trying to bale up the last of some rained on, stinking brown grain hay. I was far from in a good mood and dam sure wasn’t dressed in my Roy Rogers best when I stepped down from the tractor to answer the question they posed… “who are you?” The look on their faces was classic when I told them I was who they were looking for. They then asked what I was doing and why. The next hour was spend explaining that there is far more to ranching than living off of perceived government subsidies while grazing public lands at what the internet declares “government subsidies rates.” I must say I don’t know if I have ever had a more attentive audience. Maybe it was the grease smear on the end of nose, or the grungy baseball cap upon my head that they were staring at, but I honestly can say I held their attention. As the next couple days went along, I had the chance to explain the working of a family ranching operation in Nevada and how the purchased grazing permits associated with our ranches played a key role in not only making the ranch work, but they held a true value and had been purchased. This was news to them as well. They never knew that we have property rights associated with our ranches outside the private property fences. They didn’t know that no one else pumps water for wildlife and wild horses. They damn sure didn’t know you could drive for half a day, never hit pavement and never pass anyone else. It was on the final day of our time together that the filmmaker told me to tell the story of our businesses, our livelihoods, and how our own government is taking away our businesses and our ability to earn a living. That is when it hit me…the average American doesn’t understand how we make a living and that these permits and ranches are our businesses, our factories. Yes, we often refer to our cows are factories (thank you Mr. Griggs), but what we don’t convey is how our rangelands are what our business is housed in. We must educate the American public on how taking half of a business away in an attempt to appease others is not only morally wrong, but it is also a taking. Can you imagine the outrage on the media if the government walked into a factory and told the owner that the business could only use half what it had purchased and built and the other half was going to be given to a not for profit organization to occupy. Now not only would that business have to struggle to stay economically viable, but as a kicker, they would have to pay the utility bills for the non-profit organization as well. I can see Anderson Cooper and Sean Hannity both doing pieces on how wrong this would be, but I am yet to see anyone come out west and do a story on how purchased grazing permits are being reduced without compensation. I haven’t seen a story on how ranching operations are supposed to continue to survive and serve as an economically stable backbone for our rural communities while being chipped away at by the federal government and courts. I am not going to say I fully got my message across the way I wanted to, but I took a chance and told our story. We will have to see what comes out in 2015 and if our message is delivered our not. Regardless of how this one opportunity eventually plays out, we ALL must do more to tell our story and to defend our businesses. This isn’t about a way of life anymore. It is about being able to survive economically as a ranch, a family, a community, a state, and a nation. In closing, I would like to again thank everyone for the opportunity to serve as the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association President. It has been one hell of an experience and I hope that I did some good along the way. My family’s door is always open to any of you and I will always be a phone call away if you want to chew me out or just chew the fat. I pledge to continue to be an advocate for our industry and I will continue to fight for our livelihoods. It is going to feel good to know that on November 17th, Ron’s phone will be ringing first thing in the morning. Adios my friends.

UPDATE UPDATE

t is hard to believe how fast the last two years have gone. It seems like only a few weeks ago, Sally and I discussed my moving up into NCA leadership and how the timing was right without us having kids and having the time to commit to the role. That first morning I was officially the President, the phone rang at 6:30 a.m. and my first issue dealing with horses and water rights was at the forefront. We still laugh at just how short the honeymoon period was. Now, we have two beautiful little girls (one of which constantly reminds me that I have too many meetings) and it is time to pass the baton or club of leadership to Ron Torell and spend more time at home. I have thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity given to me by the livestock industry in Nevada. Your faith in me fueled me on as we endured some of the toughest years our industry has seen in recent times. While I know that I am not alone in saying I wish I could have achieved more, I am confident that the association and our leadership team will continue to push ahead and defend our livestock industry in the years to come. We have many issues that we must continue to fight back on. From mismanagement of wild horses to fire and drought, we are under constant attack and most of these issues play directly into the biggest threat we face today, the anticipated decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on the Greater Sage Grouse. If the recent decision on the Bi-State population is any indication of what is to come, and I truly believe that is exactly what it is, the special designations that come behind a determination of threatened or endangered are what we need to fear. The livestock industry in Nevada has a good group of individuals working on the issue and this group will continue to engage in the process as the next 18 months progress. It is imperative that everyone realize and remember how we got here. This is a court mandated process we are going through with rigid timelines attached to it. It was never truly about the bird or even the bird’s habitat. It was a high jacking of the Endangered Species Act and sympathetic courts that have led to where we are. I see more and more editorial pieces attacking the individuals working to represent agriculture appearing in the press. They question why we are not doing more to push back on the need for the decision in the first place. Let me say, that I am willing to bet almost all agricultural representatives agree with that, however; we cannot argue the validity of the court decision during this process. I for one would love to spend more time at home with my family and on the ranch, but we must participate in the process before us and use it to achieve the best outcome possible for us at this point. If we allow ourselves to fragment and go separate ways in our fight to defend our rights and way of life, we will lose. There has never been a more critical time to stand united and push back. Whether it is a court case to force the proper management of wild horses, an appeal of water applications that could negatively impact agriculture, or the crafting of a plan to help manage our sagebrush ecosystems, we cannot continue to go different directions and hope to win. The opposition to our industry is united and pushing forward with court cases and public perception. These are two areas in which we have done a miserable job. It is my hope that as we move forward over the next few months and years, we can do a better job of successfully using legal actions where needed to defend our industry and most of all, we need to do a better job of getting our message to the public. Over the last two years I have constantly pleaded with everyone to engage their families and friends, their co-workers and acquaintances and tell our side of the story. I know it is difficult to get our message heard at times, but maybe we are telling the wrong message in the wrong way. We all know what we are doing is respectable and that we are truly caretakers of our lands. What recently became very clear to me is that the average person doesn’t think about that. I had the opportunity to spend several days with a filmmaker from Connecticut this fall. She is making a movie about mustangs and had never been out to the heart of Nevada and wanted to see what this “cow vs. horse thing” and bickering was all about. I have to admit I was a little hesitant to open my ranch and family up to an eastern movie maker, but I know it is time to take our message to another level, so I jumped in with both feet. As the first day went along, it became very apparent to me that folks back east truly don’t

J.J.

Goicoechea DVM

Nevada Cattlemen’s Association President www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 3


Nevada Cattlemen’s Association By Desiree Seal, Nevada Cattlemen’s Association Executive Director

T

48th Annual Fallon Bull Sale

he 48th Annual Fallon All Breeds Bull Sale is coming soon. The sale will be held February 15, 2014 at the Fallon Livestock Exchange at 11:00 a.m. Sifting of the bulls will be February 14 at 8:00 a.m. For the past 47 years, producers from Nevada and the surrounding states have worked to bring the best quality range-ready bulls and participate in the sale. Bulls, ranging from yearlings to two-year-olds of different breeds, are bought and sold at the annual sale. Last year, the sale average for yearling bulls was $3,192 on 34 bulls and 2-year old bulls was $3,775 on 72 bulls! Consignments for this year’s sale close December 1, 2013 and are filling fast. For consignment information, please contact the NCA office. On the evening of February 14, all are welcome to enjoy the Fallon Bull Sale Dinner and Dance hosted by the Churchill County Cowbelles at the Fallon Convention Center. Social hour begins at 5:30, dinner at 6:30 and dancing to follow. If you have questions regarding the sale or would like a copy of the sale catalog please contact the sale office at 1-775-738-9214 or email the sale secretary at nca@nevadabeef.org. The catalog will also be posted on the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association web page www. nevadacattlemen.org

I

Convention Preparation

t’s that time of year again…. Mark your calendars for our 78th Annual Nevada Cattlemen’s Association Joint Convention and Trade Show to be held November 14-16, 2013 in Sparks, NV, held in conjunction with California Cattlemen’s Association. As NCA members around the state gather in Sparks, we will celebrate a lifetime of traditions, revise and review policies, and take a chance to enjoy our friends and neighbors. Leadership and staff have been busy preparing for committee meetings for our 78th Annual Convention. Committees have met to discuss new issues or resolutions to be proposed at convention and review past resolutions. For more information on each committee, please contact the Committee Chairs or NCA Executive Director. Animal Health and Livestock Issues Committee: Topics of Discussion • Animal Disease Traceability implementation state and nationwide • Brand Inspections and Movement Permits within the state • Trich disease management • Review and revision to expiring resolutions Chairmen: Tom Barnes and Boyd Spratling Private Lands, Wildlife and Environmental Management: Topics of Discussion • Predation management • Issues arising from intermixed private and public lands Hometown Solutions_EighthPageAd_sans.pdf

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• Review and revision to expiring resolutions Chairmen: Craig Spratling and Dave Baker Public Lands Committee: Topics of Discussion • Support of Sagebrush Ecosystem Council • Support of research and review being completed by Nevada Land Task Force • Wild horse populations and management strategies • Issues arising from intermixed private and public lands • Drought management for BLM and grazing permittees • Review and revision to expiring resolutions Chairman: Ron Cerri

An Industry Thank You to J.J. Goicoechea

from friend and past NCA President, Ron Cerri I’d like to say thank you and “job well done” to Nevada Cattlemen’s soon to be past president, J.J. Goicoechea. As someone who is also a past president, I know you can leave that position with a degree of satisfaction, yet also disappointment. Satisfaction because you met a lot of great people that you probably wouldn’t have otherwise had the opportunity to meet; satisfaction when you know you did make a difference because you attended a meeting or spoke on behalf of the cattlemen in our state at the legislature or other important gathering. Disappointment comes as a result of realizing you weren’t able to accomplish or resolve some important issue even though you worked tirelessly in that effort. Every President seems to have one specific issue that takes the majority of their focus and I’m sure Jage will agree with me that his was Sage Grouse. Anyone who knows Jage knows that he is very passionate when it comes to the agriculture industry. He has gotten involved in a number of committees, councils and is a county commissioner mostly because he believes agriculture needs a voice in the process. Having a thriving veterinary practice that covers most of northern and central Nevada and a ranch that he operates along with his father Pete would be enough for most people to handle, but not Jage. As his friend and also as his Public Lands Chairman for NCA, we talked many times a week. Many mornings he’d gotten up at 3 a.m. to be at a ranch by daylight to preg cows or bangs vaccinate heifers, and at 10 o’clock at night he’d still be going strong representing the Eureka County Commission at some meeting. He also works for our industry as Chairman of the Sagebrush Ecosystem Council, Eureka County’s representative to NACO and is a member of the committee looking at the feasibility of Nevada assuming control of federal lands in the state. All these duties require his focus even between meetings, time that could be devoted to his wife and children. I wish I could say now that your term as NCA President is over you can take some time off for some well deserved rest. Spend some time with your wife Sal and your daughters, Jules and Emilia, but that just is not going to happen. I know you lie awake nights worrying (because you’ve told me so) about the future of public land ranching and whether your children and ours will be able to carry on the family ranching tradition. That is why, even though your stint as NCA President has ended, your responsibility, as well as mine and others, is to keep up the fight. It has been my pleasure to serve as your Public Lands Chairman and I look forward to working together with you in the future to protect and preserve our way of life for future generations. Thank you for all your hard work my friend. The cattlemen’s lifestyle isn’t just about animals. It’s about beliefs and values passed down through generations insuring things are left better for those yet to come. — American Cattlemen

Farm ■ Ranch ■ Agribusiness 4 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


NCA Convention Schedule Thursday, November 14, 2013

11:30 am - 3:00 pm 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

5:45 pm - 6:45 pm

8:00 pm

Central Committee Meeting; Speaker: Jason King, State Water Engineer, DCNR Nevada Land Action Association Meeting Research and Education Committee Meeting; Speakers: “Mark Curtis, GBC President, Ron Pardini, UNR-CABNR Interim Dean” Private Lands, Wildlife and Environmental Management Committee Meeting; Speakers: Jason King, State Water Engineer, Tony Wassley, Director NDOW President’s Reception

Friday, November 15, 2013 7:30 am - 8:30 am 7:30 am - 11:30 am 7:30 am - 9:30 am 8:45 am - 9:15 am 9:30 am - 11:30 am 12:00 am - 1:00 pm 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

NCA Inspirational Breakfast; Speaker: Ellington Peak NV WoolGrowers Breakfast CA/NV CattleWomen’s Breakfast Legislative Affairs Committee Meeting Animal Health and Livestock Issues Committee Meeting; Speaker: Michael Greenlee, DVM State Veterinarian CCA/NCA Beef Promotion Lunch Public Lands Committee Meeting; Speaker: Raul Morales, BLM NV CattleWomen’s BOD Meeting Cattlemen’s College Session #1: The Value of Genetics & Future Economic Drivers for the Industry; Speaker: Scott Brown, Ph.D. Cattlemen’s College Session #2: Keeping the Family Farm in the Family; Speaker: Mark Burrell Allied Industry Council Wine And Cheese Reception CCA/NCA Dinner — Centennial Awards Presented and CCA POSSEE Auction

UPCOMING SALES

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3RD Silver Legacy, Reno, NV Catalog Deadline: Wednesday, Nov. 13th

Saturday, November 16, 2013 8:00 am - 9:00 am 9:15 am - 10:15 am 10:00 am - 11:00 am 11:00 am - 12:00 pm 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

CCA/NCA Cattlefax Breakfast Cattlemen’s College Session #3: Efficacy of Modified Live Vaccines Versus Killed Vaccines; Speaker: Richard Linhart, DVM NCA Membership Meeting; Speaker: Dustin Van Liew, NCBA-PLC Cattlemen’s College Session #4: Using DNA Technology to Improve Your Cowherd Profitability; Speaker Larry Gran Lunch in the Trade Show NCA BOD Meeting Happy Hour in the Trade Show Cocktail hour NCA Awards Banquet

Bi-State DPS of Greater Sage Grouse Listing/ Critical Habitat Meeting Set for November 15

Most of you are probably aware by now that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has released a proposed rule to list a distinct population segment (DPS) of the greater sage grouse as threatened and designate critical habitat. The DPS includes sage grouse in 46 leks located in Alpine, Mono and Inyo Counties in California and Carson City, Lyon, Douglas, Mineral and Esmeralda Counties in Nevada. The 46 leks are identified in six Population Management Units (PMUs) labeled as Pine Nut, Desert Creek-Fales, Mount Grant, Bodie, South Mono and White Mountains totaling anywhere between 376 – 1,288 birds on 4,524,432 acres. To be clear, this DPS proposed listing does not include the greater sage grouse located outside the counties mentioned above. Grazing has been identified as a threat to the DPS and critical habitat. The proposed rule provides a 4(d) exemption for agricultural activities that either 1) are located on private lands within the boundaries and operating under NRCS’ Sage Grouse Initiative (SGI) or the Bi-State Local Area Working Group Action Plan or 2) agricultural activities that are not specifically managed under the SGI but are consistent with the SGI. Given the proposed rule to list the Bi-State DPS of greater sage grouse as threatened, we will be holding a meeting with permittees and interested parties at our upcoming convention. The meeting will be held on Friday, November 15, 2013 at 6:30 a.m. at The Nugget in Sparks, NV. www.progressiverancher.com

WATCH & LISTEN TO THE SALE on the Web at:

For details call (530) 347-3793 or the representative nearest you:

Gary Nolan

Mark Venturacci

Steve Lucas

Elko, NV

Fallon, NV

Paradise Valley, NV

(775) 934-5678

(775) 427-8713

(775) 761-7575

Brad Peek— — (916) 802-7335 or email us at wvm@wvmcattle.com Look for the catalog and pictures on our website www.wvmcattle.com

Market your cattle with the professionals!

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 5


December 2013

RIDING FOR THE NCA BRAND Ron Torell, President, Nevada Cattlemen’s Association

O

Town Hall Meeting to Cover Front Burner Issues

ne could say that NCA’s small camp stove is jam-packed and about to boil over. Sitting on the front burner on full heat is the potential endangered species listing of the bi-state and greater sage grouse. Brewing on the burner immediately to the side is the ongoing wild and free roaming horse debate which has been looming since 1971. Let’s not forget about the public land grazing issues that continue to simmer including wildfires and rehabilitation of our public lands. Add to this mix numerous other topics that include but are not limited to water and property rights, water and air quality and urban encroachment. Front burner issues continue to demand the majority of NCA’s energy and resources. These concerns are social, political and environmentally driven yet should be science-based with the best interest of the land, animals and resources in mind. In an effort to properly represent the livestock industry, NCA needs the input of those who are involved in management and utilization of our resources in the Great Basin. This includes everyone: livestock producers, energy exploration, hunters, miners and outdoor enthusiasts. The call for involvement and full understanding of the facts and science surrounding these issues includes you, regardless if you are an NCA member or not (you’re always welcome to join). These front burner issues impact the livelihood of all rural Nevada and the management and well-being of our natural resources. For an opportunity to garner a better understanding of these issues and the science and politics behind them, NCA invites you to participate in an interactive video Town Hall Meeting on January 16, 2014, 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at a location near you. The purpose of this NCA Town Hall meeting is to present the scientific facts surrounding these and other issues facing the livestock industry then solicit your input to guide NCA in our efforts to promote, preserve and protect a dynamic and profitable Nevada beef industry. Representing NCA and the livestock industry on the Nevada Sagebrush Ecosystem Council (Sage Grouse Committee) and available for comment at this Town Hall meeting are livestock industry representative Steve Boise of Jackpot and county representative JJ Goicoechea of Eureka. Members of the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Committee and available for comment at the Town Hall meeting will be co-chair Dr. Boyd Spratling, D.V.M. of Starr Valley and livestock management representative John Fallen of

Orovada. NCA’s Public Lands Chairman Ron Cerri of Orovada along with Co-chairman JJ Goicoechea and others will be on hand for Public Lands issue comments. In addition to NCA leadership, Federal Lands representatives, State and Federal Wildlife officials, county commissioners, elected officials, University of Nevada faculty and other interested parties will also be present for comment at this all-encompassing Town Hall meeting. Most importantly NCA wants to hear from you, our membership and industry. Please e-mail questions to be posed to NCA leadership and others during the Town Hall meeting or attend and ask the questions yourself. Send questions and comments to nca@nevadabeef. org If there are other issues affecting your portion of the state that you feel NCA should be addressing please include those suggestions as well. On-site registration begins at 3:30 p.m. at all January 16 interactive Town Hall locations. There will be an initial one hour production presentation beginning promptly at 4:00 p.m. (See side bar story). Following the one hour production presentation, NCA’s two hour Town Hall meeting will take place concluding promptly at 7:00 p.m. There is no charge to attend and you do not have to be a NCA member to participate in any segment of the program. Program locations include: • Elko - Great Basin College GTA 130 • Ely - Great Basin College 114 • Eureka - Eureka County Cooperative Extension • Winnemucca - Great Basin College 109 • Fallon - Churchill County Cooperative Extension • Gardnerville - Douglas County Cooperative Extension • Caliente - Lincoln County Cooperative Extension • Tonopah - Northern Nye and Esmeralda County Extension Office Nevada Cattlemen’s Association’s mission continues to be to promote, preserve and protect a dynamic and profitable Nevada beef industry. Should you like to visit with NCA staff or leadership feel free to contact NCA at 775-738-9214 or my NCA e-mail address ncapresident@nevadabeef.org

(Pre-Town Hall) Genomic-Enhanced EPD Technology Seminar When: January 16, 2014, 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. (registration at 3:30 p.m.) Where: Program Locations Include: • Elko - Great Basin College GTA 130 • Ely - Great Basin College 114 • Eureka - Eureka County Cooperative Extension • Winnemucca - Great Basin College 109 • Fallon - Churchill County Cooperative Extension • Gardnerville - Douglas County Cooperative Extension • Caliente - Lincoln County Cooperative Extension • Tonopah - Northern Nye and Esmeralda County Extension Office Why: Expected progeny differences (EPDs) were developed by various breed associations in the early 1980’s and were readily adopted by the beef industry as a useful tool for genetic selection. The widespread use of EPDs over the past 30 years is largely credited to the improvement of the world’s bovine genetic base in the areas of performance, profitability and consumer satisfaction. EPD technology has continued to evolve from the original birth and growth trait numbers useful solely to the cow-calf producer to present EPDs which address the feedlot and packer segments of our industry, to carcass traits which have increased consumer satisfaction and acceptance of our product.

6 November./December 2013

EPDs continue to evolve and the latest addition to this technology is Genomicenhanced EPDs (GE-EPDs). Genomic-enhanced EPDs are important because they make use of the results from the DNA test in addition to all other sources of information to provide added accuracy and reliability to the animal’s EPD. In fact, depending on the trait, GE-EPDs on unproven animals have the same amount of accuracy as if they had already sired 8-20 calves. Why would Genomic-enhanced EPD technology be important to you and how can you utilize this new technology as an aid in your bull buying decisions? Come find out! The Nevada Cattlemen’s Association Fallon Bull Sale in cooperation with the American Angus Association (AAA) and Angus Genetic Incorporated (AGI), Great Basin College, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and United State Department of Agriculture Risk Management Agency is providing a free one hour presentation on Genomic-enhanced EPD technology. Tonya Amen, Genetic Service Director for AGI of St. Joseph, Mo., will explain this new technology in laymen’s terms and describe how the commercial cattlemen should interpret and utilize this technology in their bull buying decisions. Genomic-enhanced EPD technology is here to stay and a tool of the future so do not miss the opportunity to learn more about it. There is no charge to attend and you do not have to be a NCA member to participate. For additional information contact Nevada Cattlemen’s Association at nca@nevadabeef. org 775-738-9214.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


OFFICE: 775-423-7760 JACK PAYNE

Cell: 775-217-9273 Alt: 775-225-8889

Email: nevadalm@yahoo.com

Full-Service Cattle Sales & Marketing serving the Fallon, Nevada and Outlying Areas.

S A LE

Sales Results from

October 16 and 17, 2013 Regular Butcher Cow, Bull & Feeder Sale

Sales Results from

October 16 and 17, 2013

MIX

STR

340

$232.50

Every Wednesday

31

MIX

STR

392

$219.50

Small Barn at 10:30 AM

6

BLK

STR

324

$230.00

10

MIX

STR

398

$209.00

Crawford Cattle Co

Winnemucca 10

BLK

STR

320

$226.00

Crawford Cattle Co

Winnemucca 13

BLK

STR

403

$215.00

Seller

City

# Head Desc.

Shane Mathews

Panaca

13

Shane Mathews

Panaca

Tyson Torvik

Fallon

Tyson Torvik

Fallon

Karl Hostman

Type Weight Price CWT

Lovelock

7

BLK

STR

371

$215.50

Roger & Nancy Johnson

Winnemucca

5

BLK

STR

406

$209.00

Roger & Nancy Johnson

Winnemucca

9

BLK

STR

456

$186.00

Lovelock

4

BLK

STR

395

$209.00

Fallon

16

MIX

STR

414

$208.50

Safford & Safford Mary Risi Mary Risi Kiel & Sons Ronnie & Laura Hummel

Fallon

40

MIX

STR

555

$166.50

Lovelock

7

BLK

STR

394

$205.00

Winnemucca

3

BLK

STR

398

$205.00

R Hanging 5

Winnemucca 15

MIX

STR

448

$189.50

R Hanging 5

Winnemucca 11

MIX

STR

504

$174.50

Dennis & Sharon Brown

Winnemucca

3

MIX

STR

418

$189.00

Orovada

5

MIX

STR

514

$171.00

Fallon

1

BLK

STR

410

$171.00

Reese River Valley LLC

Austin

77

BLK

STR

558

$169.00

Grace Iratcabal

Sparks

8

MIX

STR

627

$165.00

Deanna Porter Michael & Claudia Casey

Peggy & Patricia Harmon

Unionville

9

BLK

STR

605

$165.00

Triple D Ranches

Dyer

10

BLK

STR

626

$165.00

Triple D Ranches

Dyer

52

BLK

STR

727

$158.75

UC Cattle Co LLC

Orovada

11 CHAR STR

598

$162.00

Daniel McDougall

Fallon

2

578

$157.50

Tracy Clark

BCHX STR

Reno

7

BLK

STR

687

$157.50

Round Mtn.

5

RD

STR

607

$157.00

Fallon

9

MIX

STR

633

$156.00

Gonzalo Carlos

Winnemucca

2

BLK

STR

754

$151.00

Uriel Castaneda

Paradise Vly.

3

BLK

STR

754

$151.00

Earl Allen

Fallon

3

BLK

STR

775

$150.50

Richard & Lilla Allegre

Fallon

3

MIX

STR

548

$150.00

Arlington Ranch Co

Dyer

10

MIX

STR

598

$148.00

Paradise Vly.

4

MIX

STR

825

$148.00

Fallon

2

MIX

STR

548

$146.00

Randy Osterhoudt Phillip & Kylie Amos

Jerry & Nancy Harper Jock & Tammy Mcerquiaga Jason & Josh Cassinelli

Paradise Vly. 15

MIX

STR

699

$145.50

Ted Melsheimer

Carson City

23

BLK

STR

908

$141.50

Ely

2

BLK

STR

903

$141.00

Double U Livestock

Yerington

19

MIX

STR

951

$136.50

Nevada First Land & Cattle

Masini Ranch

Winnemucca

8

BLK

STR

925

$135.50

Carlo Foregone

Winnemucca

4

BLK

STR 1060

$119.50

Shane Mathews

Panaca

65

BLK

HFR

$190.00

www.progressiverancher.com

411

Kiel & Sons

Lovelock

Sterling Lambert Darin Bloyed Home Ranch LLC UC Cattle Co LLC

Feeder Sale

Naggin' Woman Ranch

in conjunction with our Regular Wednesday sale

December 4 & 5

Butcher cows on Wednesday Feeder cattle on Thursday starting at 11 AM

CafĂŠ

Open on Sale Days Stop by and have a Homestyle Burger Look for Weekly Market Reports at www.nevadalivestock.us

We have 4 cattle trains available for your cattle hauling needs. We can haul approx. 80,000# of cattle per load either to our sale or in the country. Give us a call for pricing.

TO ALL OF OUR

CONSIGNORS & BUYERS The Progressive Rancher

HFR

365

$182.00

Winnemucca 21

BLK

HFR

404

$177.00

Fallon

4

MIX

HFR

448

$168.00

Lovelock

3

MIX

HFR

475

$164.00

Austin

55

BLK

HFR

514

$156.75

Orovada

10 CHAR HFR

547

$156.50

Orovada

21 CHAR HFR

547

$156.50

MIX

HFR

512

$155.00

18

MIX

HFR

581

$154.00

Lindell Smart

McDermitt

1

BLK

HFR

455

$152.00

Reno

6

BLK

HFR

636

$152.00

Fallon

4

BLK

HFR

599

$151.50

Lovelock

12

MIX

HFR

392

$150.00

Winnemucca

1

BLK

HFR

581

$150.00

Arlington Ranch Co

Dyer

8

MIX

HFR

642

$146.00

Daniel McDougall

Fallon

8

MIX

HFR

629

$145.50

Jiggs Goodwin

John Uhalde & Co

th

BLK

Unionville

James Estill

th

Type Weight Price CWT

11

Peggy & Patricia Harmon

Richard Hucke

November 20th & 21st

# Head Desc.

Winnemucca 11

Tracy Clark

November 6th & 7th

December 18 & 19

City

Reese River Valley LLC

Feeder Cattle at 1:00 PM

th

Seller

Crawford Cattle Co

Butcher Cows at 11:30 AM

th

Regular Butcher Cow, Bull & Feeder Sale

Ely

6

BLK

HFR

670

$145.50

Tom Inglis

Fallon

3

BLK

HFR

605

$145.50

Peraldo Brothers

Fallon

8

MIX

HFR

703

$142.00

Roger & Nancy Johnson

Winnemucca 14

BLK

HFR

869

$140.50

Ted Melsheimer

Carson City

15

BLK

HFR

832

$140.50

Steve & Denice Cerini

Lovelock

2

BLK

HFR

600

$140.00

Winnemucca

4

BLK

HFR

886

$139.00

Elko Land & Livestock

Battle Mtn.

3

BLK

HFR

850

$139.00

Masini Ranch

Yerington

4

MIX

HFR

880

$133.00

Fallon

8

BLK

HFR

543

$131.00

Manuel Jimenez

Winnemucca

1

RD

HFR

795

$126.50

MacKenzie Ranch

Jordan Valley

1

BLK HFRTT 835

$116.00

MacKenzie Ranch

Jordan Valley

1

BBF HFRTT 990

$100.00

Buddy Howard

Nuttall Livestock LLC

Home Ranch LLC

Orovada

1

BLK HFRTT 1010

$94.00

Crawford Cattle Co

Winnemucca

1

BLK HFRTT 1535

$89.50

Nevada First Land & Cattle

Winnemucca

1

BLK

COW 1855

$88.50

Roger & Nancy Johnson

Winnemucca

1

BLK

COW 1415

$88.50

Battle Mtn.

1

RD

COW 1125

$88.00

Jiggs Goodwin

Winnemucca

1

BLK

COW 1540

$88.00

John & Jhona Bell

Paradise Vly.

1

RBF HFRTT 1230

$84.50

Lovelock

1

RBF

COW 1170

$81.00

Ely

1

BLK

COW 1250

$80.50

Jonathan Young

Round Mtn.

1

BLK

COW 1145

$80.50

Keystone Ranch Inc

Paradise Vly.

1

RD

COW 1385

$80.50

Orovada

1

BLK

COW 1130

$72.50

Ely

1

MIX

BULL 1335

$89.50

Dyer

1

RBF

BULL 1770

$86.00

Elko Land & Livestock

Michael & Marian Gottschalk Holder Land & Cattle

Lloyd Sherburn Carolyn & Stacy Drayton Arlington Ranch Co

November/December 2013 7


BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

Sifting: Friday, February 14, 2014

B

Bull Sale

B

Churchill Co. Cowbelles Dinner/Dance and FBS Awards Presentation February 14, 2014

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Fallon Convention Center

11:30 a.m. Fallon Livestock Exchange Fallon, NV B

FBS Invitational Cowdog Trial TO BENEFIT THE FIGHT AGAINST CANCER February 13, 2014: Handlers Draw Party February 14, 2014: Handlers Meeting at 7:00 a.m. B Trial at 7:30 a.m. February 14, 2014: Cowdog Auction to be held after Dinner at the Fallon Convention Center

BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

For more information or a sale catalog, please call the Sale Office. Nevada Cattlemen’s Association 775-738-9214 B PO Box 310, Elko, NV 89803 B nca@nevadabeef.org 8 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


By Joe Guild

T

he word “sustainable” gets thrown about a lot lately like a wild pitch, this being the post season of baseball. In fact, there was a very good article in the last issue of this publication entitled “Characteristics of Sustainable Agricultural Producers”. This piece was well-done. It was an outline of what the author considered to be important traits for ranchers who want to continue their operations into the next generation. There is another side to the story, however, which needs more expanded commentary. Ranchers obviously want their peers and themselves to survive and continue to prosper. Suggestions on how ranchers can be sustainable are welcome. To the extent the article mentioned above helps to do that, it is valuable and I recommend any one to read it. But, without resources to grow and harvest there would be no agriculture. What is a sustainable anything? Here’s a good definition of “sustainable” I read recently: being a method of harvesting a resource so that the resource is not depleted or permanently damaged; or, “sustained yield”- Production of a biological resource under management procedures which ensure replacement of the part harvested by regrowth or reproduction before another harvest occurs. I remember hearing criticism of farmers and ranchers decades ago for the destruction of soils, wildlife habitat and ranges, and you name it. The logical response to such criticism from ranchers was why would I harm my production capabilities. It makes no sense that I would destroy my ranges for short term gain when my livelihood and my ability to provide for my family and the next generation depend on taking care of my resources. Thus, it is counter-productive to overgraze, not take care of my animals or erode my soil. I don’t believe I ever heard the word sustainable in those conversations, but ranchers were saying that very thing. They wanted to sustain their resources and not deplete or permanently damage them. Their point of view is more valid today than ever before. Years ago, I attended a ceremony when an agency was celebrating the transfer of some pristine property into its hands from a private landowner. The owner had decided for estate planning purposes to sell some of his holdings. Naturally, some of the most desirable parcels were those coveted for public use. This day was to commemorate the public obtaining one of those desirable parcels. The old rancher was asked to make some remarks. In effect, he said you wouldn’t have wanted this place if we had not cared for the land for one hundred years. We used it to graze cattle and sheep. Those animals provided for our family. They used this resource part of every one of those one hundred years and now I have to let it go. So take it, it’s yours now. I just hope you take as good a care of it as we did. There are groups and people in our nation, and around the world who believe they know more about managing renewable resources than those actually living and working the land. These groups have agendas which often include doing away with the very activities that help to keep the resource sustainable. These folks truly think they know what is right for the resource and most of the time that means “preserving “ it and “restoring” it to what it used to be. Of course, no one can really know what it used to be or what place in time it should be preserved to. Conservation organizations have bought big parcels of land and historic ranches to preserve the resources on that land. After a number of years they have made the decision to lease part of the land back to ranch interests to help manage the land because they realize the resource needs to be used to sustain it. There are other examples of wildlife refuges established to protect a certain species. All livestock grazing has been prohibited in such places. The numbers of the species being protected is greater off the refuges than on the refuges because there is active management by ranchers off the refuges. Thus, there is more plant and animal diversity and greater numbers of all animals domestic and wildlife. I know of an endangered species habitat in Nevada that coexists with an active grazing allotment. Within that allotment, there is a fenced off refugia for the endangered species. The species also exists in other places on the allotment where there is species interaction between the livestock and the protected animal. Guess where the greater numbers of the endangered species are? It is well known the nation’s cow herd is smaller than it has been for a generation. And www.progressiverancher.com

yet the ranchers are producing about the same pounds of beef for our consumption as they did a generation ago. This means fewer cattle are using the resources necessary to produce food for our citizens. Or, another way to put it, using the definition above, ranchers are harvesting a resource so that the resource is not depleted or permanently damaged. Sounds like a sustainable practice to me. I was recently asked what I thought of the move to urban agriculture. Across the country vacant lots in cities, roof tops and old warehouses are being used for growing crops. Particularly interesting to me is the conversion of old manufacturing and warehouse space to indoor hydroponic growing facilities. I told the questioner I was all for it. Innovations such as those being tried now can only benefit all agricultural practices on into the future. The need to feed a growing world population without depleting production resources will mean all viable agricultural enterprises must be tried first and used extensively when they are proven to work. My questioner was a little surprised at my answer. But when I told him I wanted to sustain my enterprises and not harm them, he understood why I support alternatives to traditional agriculture. So long as these enterprises are successful, they will help feed a huge world population. By helping in this endeavor the businesses I am interested in can continue their activities and not put their resources in jeopardy. I guess the bottom line question for me is- what do the critics of agriculture really want? Is it no modern agriculture even though advancements have obviously resulted in more sustainability? Is it a return to a dreamed of past where we all (or at least most of us) worked on farms to help feed and clothe ourselves? Is it a return even further back before most organized agriculture was developed and most of us hunted and tried to gather our food? If we do revert to the “good old days” I can tell you exactly what will happen. Human innovation and progress will cease. Do you like your computer and the ability to hop in your car and go on a road trip anywhere at any time you desire? How are you going to sustain that lifestyle when most of your days are devoted to growing or finding food and obtaining the fuel to cook it and keep you warm? Does this sound like a great way to sustain your future and that of your family? If so, I say go for it! Happy days are here again. Let’s get real. The modern rancher works every day, in every way known to keep the ranch and all of its resources sustainable. This hard work helps all of society. Over time, the entire human race benefits from such dedication, from whatever the source, to maintain all of our resources in a sustainable manner. Does anyone really believe that a hungry mouth in a third world country or an inner city in the United States cares where the food comes from? I don’t think so. On the other hand, a farmer or rancher does care that their operation will be around for a long, long time so that mouth will have food. I’ll see you soon.

NORTE TRAILERS Call Mitch, to get your Norte Horse Trailer! Mitch Goicoechea

775-224-0905 hounddogs2010@hotmail

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 9


Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission

Great Basin Water Network Grant Recipient

Nevada Ranchers Caretakers of our

N

Rangelands

Cowboys and sheepherders produce food and fiber for the nation. Growing food on Open range is a natural biological process.

Grazing actually benefits the land with hoof action and natural fertilization. Plants are healthier and regenerate faster after the herds move to a new range.

Antelope and other game animals and birds take advantage of the improvements made by ranchers.

Grazing cattle and sheep coexist peacefully with native wildlife and, in fact, make a friendlier habitat for many species.

Sheep often graze on steep terrain and can control cheatgrass, a major fuel for wildfires.

by Rachel Buzzetti, Executive Director

evada Rangeland Resources Commission supports groups and projects to encourage public education and awareness of agriculture and ranching in Nevada. Great Basin Water Network has received funding from NRRC to further these goals. Great Basin Water Network was founded in 2004 in response to the massive effort by Southern Nevada Water Authority to control all the “unappropriated” water in Snake, Spring, Cave, Dry Lake and Delamar Valleys in White Pine and Lincoln Counties. GBWN is comprised of organizations, businesses, and individuals committed to careful assessment of water projects and their environmental, economic and social consequences. Its mission is to protect locally sustainable water uses, natural resources and the public interest through coordination, communication, research, science, education, and advocacy for water in the extended Great Basin. GBWN believes that the long-standing balance between human and natural uses of the Great Basin’s water could collapse under proposed massive water transfers. Since 2004, GBWN has taken on the water grab issue at the local, state, and federal levels, in the courts, and in the court of public opinion. During that time the cost of SNWA’s massive project has grown from $ 3.5 billion to $ 15.5 billion. The project would extend an 84” diameter pipeline north from Las Vegas to Spring Valley, west of Great Basin National Park. The entire project includes capturing the groundwater of Snake Valley on the Nevada-Utah border. GBWN has been involved in public education and outreach during the extensive BLM Environmental Impact Statement process. The EIS disclosed the extent to which the project would destroy an area larger than the state of Vermont, including loss of springs, streams, wildlife habitat; and subsidence as a result of massive pumping. But ultimately, BLM chose to approve the right of ways to allow the construction of the pipeline. GBWN is in the process of preparing a lawsuit to challenge that decision at the federal level. GBWN along with White Pine County have also taken the lead in challenging SNWA’s applications and the Nevada State Engineer’s decisions. GBWN’s attorney also represents a spectrum of farm and ranch families, local governments and individuals for whom the groundwater export project will be disastrous. The Nevada Supreme Court ruled in favor of GBWN regarding due process and other issues, resulting in a second lengthy hearing on water in four valleys. When the NSE again ruled in favor of SNWA, GBWN and other plaintiffs including the LDS church, tribes, and Utah counties appealed the ruling to district court. The judge’s decision is expected before the end of 2013. Disaster is the theme of a new DVD entitled “The Consequences of Transporting Snake Valley Water to Satisfy a Thirsty Las Vegas.” The DVD, available from GBWN, is a “virtual tour” of Baker Ranches and Snake Valley narrated by Dean Baker and Dennis Golden. Dean has given countless tours of his ranch over the years to show firsthand that there is no extra water. The DVD was produced by Baker Ranches with the support of GBWN and NRRC. Its theme is that the costly groundwater development project will hurt Las Vegas as much as eastern Nevada, because there is no dependable long term water supply. One of GBWN’s strengths is its grassroots support. The Snake Valley Festival, held in Baker the third weekend in June, is a celebration of rural community preservation to raise money for GBWN to continue the water fight. For more information about GBWN or to request a copy of the DVD: www.greatbasinwaternetwork.org; P.O. Box 75, Baker, NV 89311. Phone 775/881-8304. info@greatbasinwaternetwork.org.

Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission was created by the State of Nevada to promote responsible public land grazing. Representatives come from Nevada state grazing boards, Nevada Woolgrowers, Nevada Farm Bureau, and Nevada Cattlemen’s Association.

Dean Baker

4780 East Idaho Steet, Elko, NV 89801 • 775-738-4082 WWW.NEVADARANGELANDS.ORG This ad is funded through the NRRC’s assessment of 10 cents an AUM paid by public land ranchers.

10 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


January 6, 2014 Reno

Registration 10 a.m. Washoe County Cooperative Extension Office 4955 Energy Way Reno, NV 89502 Via Interactive Video to: Logandale, Caliente, Tonopah, Lovelock, and Eureka.

OF A RANCH WIFE

J. B. Wh i te l e y

I

Pay Day

n ranching, payday doesn’t come every Friday, every two weeks, or even monthly. Payday comes in the fall when you sell your calves. It is also the time of year that you get to see what all of your hard work over the past 12 months has been for. The late nights calving with no sleep, the cold below zero mornings feeding cows, and late dinners during cow work have all been for this. I have to tell you, watching the gate of a cattle truck close on that last animal feels pretty good. Up until recently for the Cow Boss and me, selling our claves consisted of a rushed trip to Twin Falls with a horse trailer loaded with a handful of uneven steers and heifer calves. It was more stressful than pleasant, worrying about if we would get enough for them to pay the pasture bill for the year. This fall is different. Last spring an opportunity fell into our laps to buy some heifer calves. The plan was to breed them this summer and sell part as bred heifers and keep part to increase our herd. We had a place to run them, our only obstacle was getting the money to buy them. We have learned a lot about equity, operating loans, balance sheets, and how to fill out loan applications. This week, we shipped our heifers we sold. We had enough for ½ a truck load and were able to split a truck with the ranch we work for. It’s the first time we’ve had a semi for our own cattle. I can now tell you, watching our own heifers load on a truck and the gate closing feels really good, and we are on the hunt for more heifers to buy!

l

The University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE), College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources (CABNR) with financial support from local sponsors and the USDA, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Beginning Farmer and Rancher Program

Present

2014 Cattlemen’s Update University program updates and research results impacting the Nevada livestock industry will be discussed. Come join us and receive your Red Book and Proceedings. For additional information, contact: Jennifer Kintz Mineral County Cooperative Extension (775) 945-3444 ext. 12 kintzj@unce.unr.edu

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

January 6, 2014 Fallon

Registration 6 p.m. Churchill County Fair Grounds Multipurpose Building 225 Sheckler Road Fallon, NV 89406

l January 7, 2014 Wellington

Registration 9:30 a.m. Smith Valley Community Hall 2783 State Route 208 Wellington, NV 89444

l January 8, 2014 Ely

Registration 6 p.m. White Pine Convention Center 150 6th Street Ely, NV 89301

l January 9, 2014 Elko

Registration 12:30 p.m. Great Basin College Solarium 1500 College Parkway Elko, NV 89801

l January 10, 2014 Winnemucca

Registration 10:30 a.m. Humboldt County Extension Office 1085 Fairgrounds Rd. Winnemucca, NV 89445

November/December 2013 11


Fumes From The Farm by Hank Vogler

W

here in the world did this year go? Time flies when you are having fun. I must be having a ball or my affliction, old dementia disease or “ODD”, has created so many skips in my eight track tape that every day is a rewind. After last year, just walking around is great. I was carved on twelve times in eleven months, racking up thirty hours on the operating table. The only side effect that is noticeable for me now is at Thanksgiving. It is a difficult time for me. I look down at the carving block, and it has become impossible for me cut the turkey, as I know what he is about to go through. I hope no one panicked during the government shut down. Out here on The Need More we hardly missed the chaos. We grow our own chaos in sheep and sheep herding. Throw in a few calves and some mules and horses, and panic is not an option. The government and special interest groups long ago turned the B.L.M. away from multiple uses into an experiment in au natural Mother Nature hug fest. The problem is Mother Nature won’t let herself

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12 November./December 2013

be molded into the image that the factless scientists would like to tell us is best for all fuzzy critters. Hard as it may be for some to believe, we at the end of the road don’t need letters informing us of the impending doom due to drought. People that know four hundred different uses for baling wire have a keen sense of place and purpose when it comes to adverse weather. The only upside to the condescending nature of a drought letter is that it is always received during a rainstorm. What none of us enjoy is a salaried bureaucrat lurking around to find the slightest infraction of their individual interpretation of range management while overlooking the fact that the Western ranges are in such good shape that they have become dangerous to life, limb, and wallet due to huge fires. It occurred to me during the shutdown of government that it would be a great time to declare war on the USA. If history is any guide to repetition, how could I lose? In the lack of a functioning governing body it seems a perfect opportunity to form a more perfect union, and writing my own laws would be appropriate. If my new country failed, the United States would rebuild my country and give me foreign aid and favored nation status, protect me forever with their military so my new country could compete against the United States, as our money would go toward development and not raising an army. I refer to Japan, Germany, Vietnam and the rest of the countries that have seen the light. If we really want to punish Syria, send Obama over to be their President for a couple of years; that’ll learn em!!! Having dealt with deficit spending most of my life, Bernie Madeoff would be my secretary of the treasury. The biggest expense would be printing treasury bills. We would back them with another treasury bill of “equal value”. When a note would come due we would just take a new treasury bill from our pile and declare the debt paid. Ownership and skill with firearms would be required. My new country would have more to do than protect the citizenry; they can protect themselves. My new country would be a country of laws that would not be upheld by police state harassment. Vegetable terrorists would be outlawed. I don’t care if you don’t eat meat; just quit telling me to quit. If a nice lamb chop or a juicy steak will kill me before I wind up in some nursing home puking my teeth out in a bowl of mush, wearing a diaper and not knowing who I am, please tell me about the downside to eating meat again. Vegetable terrorism is like a religion. The vegetable terrorist wants to tell me about his way, but he doesn’t want to hear about my way. P.E.T.A, aka, people eating tasty animals will be left alone. In my utopia, however, the models that get naked for animal rights will be tolerated after passing a photo selection process. The department of education will not be funded. In private enterprise, success or earnings is the measure of accomplishment. Since Billy Carter’s dumber brother created this department test scores have tumbled. It is time to stop looking up a dead horse’s, well you know. Billy Carter’s dumber brother also came up with the department of energy. The department of energy has become an impediment to energy development. These folks can surely find a job as Wal-Mart greeters or hold signs for some pizza business? No solutions, no progress, no department- end of story. If Paco don’t have no stinking green card, then we will send him home. Try and be illegal in Mexico and find out about civil liberties. In this new world, welfare will be gone. Christian charity is fine, but making a permanent underclass that votes themselves benefits is bad medicine. This will also eliminate illegal immigration as the people drawing welfare now will have to take minimum wage jobs or a hollow belly will remind them what value even minimum wage jobs have. Washington, D.C., will be turned into a theme park. No lobbyists will be allowed to practice their witchcraft, and the national government will meet for one week a year to clean up and remove laws from the books that are no longer needed. Any person passing a new law will be barred from public office as soon as the new law goes into effect. Medical people, not bureaucrats, will run medicine. The biggest cost in medicine is red tape. It should be gauze and Band-Aids. Solutions to problems will be rewarded. Perpetuation of problems will be punished. Sonny Davidson Thomas Jefferson and his friends Jason B. Land formed a republic. They said that government closest to the people governs best. 2213 N. 5th St. , Elko, NV 89801 Happy New Year!!!!!!!!!!!!! Hang and 775-738-8811, 800-343-0077 rattle. Hank www.edwardjones.com

Happy ys! Holida

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


Ship ’Em To

LLON A F

MARKET REPORT

October 19th & 21st, 2013 Weight

TOP OFFERINGS Steer

300-400 181.00-221.00 400-500 191.00-219.00 500-600 167.00-186.00 600-700 158.00-168.00 700-800 151.00-161.00 800-900 147.75-154.75 Lite Holstein (under 600#) Heavy Holstein (over 600#)

Heifer

186.65-201.00 166.31-189.50 155.75-175.00 144.50-157.50 139.50-147.75 114.25-124.00 80.00-88.00 70.00-80.00

*Single, Small Framed or Plainer Cattle 15.00 to 20.00 less than top offerings

BUTCHER COWS & BULLS

Livestock Exchange, Inc. www.fallonlivestock.com

Sale Every Tuesday at 11:00 AM Selling All Classes of Livestock: • Cattle • Horses • Sheep • Goats • Pigs 10th Annual

SPECIAL SLAUGHTER COW AND BULL SALE Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 1:00 pm

SILVER STATE CLASSIC

10th Annual

SPECIAL CALF AND YEARLING SALE Saturday, December 14, 2013 at 1:00 pm Calf

Best we l Specia ach e e hav Year!

— Expecting More than 2500 Head! —

The market is very “strong” and we will have buyers on the seats. Sale sponsored by the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association and we invite you to consign your good cattle to this sale, and support the Association.

No Sales on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 or Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from the entire Crew at Fallon Livestock Exchange, Inc.

And a HUGE BIG THANK YOU to our Consignors and Buyers alike for a Great Year!

And looking forward to Next Year – 2014

Fallon Livestock Exchange, Inc.

2055 Trento Lane • Fallon, Nevada 89406 • 775-867-2020 For more marketing information, or to arrange trucking needs: Call Monte Bruck, Manager, at 775-426-8279

Breakers (Fat Cows) Boners (Med Flesh) Cutters (Lean) Holstein Cows Butcher Bulls Shelly (Thin) Bulls Shelly Cutters (Thin) Young Feeder Cows Heiferettes Holstein Heiferettes Holstein Bulls Feeder Bulls Cutting Bulls Used Roping Steers Preg Tested Cows (3, 4, 5 yr. old solid mouth) Pairs (solid mouth) 3-6 yrs Pairs (older)

68.00-72.00 72.00-78.00 60.00-68.00 35.00-77.50 75.00-85.00 40.00-60.00 20.00-40.00 68.00-75.00 82.00-96.00 77.00-89.00 86.00-95.00 70.00-80.00 80.00-95.00 72.00-80.00 NT NT NT

TODAY’S COWS Top Cow Top 10 Cows Top 50 Cows Top 100 Cows Top Butcher Bull Top Holstein Cows Top 10 Holstein Cows

Avg. Wt 1370 1352 1274 1199 2410 1470 1400

Avg. Cost 87.00 82.16 73.87 65.82 91.50 83.00 69.04

CALVES-SHEEP-GOATS-PIGS-HORSES

Beef Calves (HD) Dairy Calves Feeder Lambs Fat Lambs Ewes (CWT) Bucks (CWT) Small Goats (under 65 lbs.) (HD) Large Goats (over 70 lbs.) (HD) Weaner Pigs Feeder Pigs Top Hogs Butcher Sows Horses (under 1100 lbs.) Horses (over 1100 lbs.)

60.00-320.00 2.00-35.00 95.00-110.00 90.00-110.00 20.00-33.00 22.00-35.00 20.00-90.00 95.00-185.00 45.00-95.00 60.00-130.00 60.00-75.00 20.00-45.00 8.00-15.00 24.00-33.00

MARKET TREND: Feeder cattle were 14-25 higher with very strong buyer demand on same kind and quality depending on fill. Cattle went to Nebraska, Colorado, Idaho, California, and Nevada. Very good buyer attendance. There were 83 different consignors, very good cattle Fallon Livestock is a key market for the livestock industry, where buyers and sellers meet each week with a professional staff with over 50 years of experience in marketing livestock. PLEASE call us ahead with your consignments. It helps us market your cattle. We talk to buyers all the time–they want you to know what’s coming in. We are seeing good demand on weigh up cows & bulls. It sure makes a big difference on how they are sorted. Let our crew sort and class your cows. This will help you receive full market value for your cows.

We have trucks available for your hauling needs, pasture to pasture or from your Ranch to the sale yard.

See you and your Friends at Ringside Soon! www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 13


LINK IN THE Nevada Feedlots ABEEF INDUSTRY CHAIN

F

eedlots in Nevada are an integral link in the agriculture chain between the cow on the range and a family’s dinner plate. The importance of the feedlot for the Nevada agriculture industry cannot be underestimated as the link that holds together beef production in Nevada. According to David Stix, Jr., co-owner of Western Nevada Cattle Feeders, that link creates a symbiotic chain. The feedlots can’t survive if there were no cow/calf operations and no local production facilities. “The range starts the chain because it’s affordable,” he said. “No one can do everything from start to finish because of the costs.” Feed and commodity prices have been so high over the past few years that it makes more sense to start a calf on the range and grow it on natural forage. As a yearling then, that calf is sold to the intermediate, grower feedlots where it is fed hay and roughage until the calf is big enough to go to a finishing feedlot for fattening on grain and corn before it is sent on to a processing facility. Historically there have been four feedlots operating in Nevada, each having the capacity to feed anywhere from 4,000 to 10,000 head of cattle. Stix said besides the Lovelock finishing facility which can hold 10,000 animals, they have a grower lot in Fernley with a 4,000 head capacity. Steve Lucas owns the Sandhill Feedlot in Winnemucca with a capacity of 4,000, and Lucy Rechel manages Snyder Livestock Company in Yerington which has a 5,000 head capacity. While over 80% of the cattle raised in Nevada are exported to larger finishing lots in the Midwest, and California, Stix said the Nevada feedlots are able to provide Nevada beef to the small local processing facilities which are then distributed to the Nevada consumer. There are only a few of these small processing facilities, York Meats, Mori Meats, and Lahontan Valley Meat Packing in Fallon, along with Butcher Boy and Wolf Pack Meats in Reno, which process four to five animals a day as compared to the large feedlots outside Nevada which process up to 4,000 head of beef a day. These small, local facilities do provide a service that keeps Nevada beef production and consumption possible. Eight years ago Steve Lucas brought his 30 years of experience feeding cattle to Winnemucca. With a background in the California Dairy industry he now feeds nearly 4,000 head of cattle at the Sandhill Feedlot. He sits on the sevenmember Nevada Beef Council as a representative from the feedlot industry and the Northern part of the State. According to Lucas Nevada is a large state geographically, but only 14 states have less cattle that does Nevada. “We grow up here thinking its cattle country because the vast range and the public land grazing, but we don’t have the feed productivity for more cattle,” he said, “farming equals feedlot.” He said that feed and commodity prices are so high it doesn’t make sense to pay additional shipping costs to import the expensive feed it takes to finish an animal. “We feed grow-rations until the animal is a certain weight and then sell it to the big feedlots in the Midwest or California, or the Northwest.” Lucas explains that the large processing plants are located in those areas as well,

14 November./December 2013

By Rachel Dahl, Special Assignment Writer

and most of the Nevada beef is sent outside the state for processing. In fact, an analysis of the agriculture industry in Nevada, released in January this year by the Nevada Department of Agriculture, shows a gap between cattle being sold outside the state and processed beef imported back into the state. Statistically, the value of cattle ranching and farming exported outside the state is $143 million, while $780 million in processed animal is being imported. “It doesn’t make sense to finish a calf here because the large packing houses are too far away and then you have freight costs,” Lucas said. “When they’re fat you can only get so many animals on a truck, whether you have 40 or 100, the cost is the same.” Lucas said the feedlot industry is a real viable industry in Nevada that provides employment, a market for equipment, a market for feed, and allows the opportunity for people to “do agriculture—we get to do what we want to do for a living,” he said. Besides the cost of feed and shipping there are other challenges to the feedlot industry. “We can’t have a heavy hand from the environmental sector or from the government,” said Lucas. “We try to raise the best beef as responsibly as we can without someone pointing a finger telling us ‘you can’t do that’.” Rechel echoes those concerns at an even deeper level. “We have allowed the perception of the feedlot industry to be shaped by the buzzwords of our critics,” she said. “They accuse us of factory farming, using hormones and antibiotics, forcing an unnatural diet, and accuse us of animal cruelty. We haven’t combatted the negative perceptions very well.” Managing Snyder Livestock Company, Rechel runs the feedlot in Yerington to provide custom feeding for several pure bread cattle producers. She is also the Chair of the Nevada Beef Council. She said Nevada feedlots help grow calves to yearling to better prepare them for the finishing process at an affordable cost. At Snyder Livestock the goal is to provide the best care for the customer’s animals, but she also puts in extensive time to educate people on the economy and the health benefits of eating beef. “We need to help people understand the economies and efficiencies in the feedlot have improved beef production for not only the United States, but for the world,” said Lucas. Although agriculture has moved toward garden farming and buy local niche food markets, “what the American Farmer is really good at is producing food for humans really efficiently,” said Rechel. “We are tremendously effective and roundly criticized.” “We make a living,” said Rechel “because we take care of our cattle.” She explained that one of the reasons for the advances in production, is the animals are safe. They have food and water brought to them every day and they have no predators so they have no fear. Because people love freedom the activists have assigned that quality to animals and think animals love freedom. “Animals love safety, they love the easy life,” she said. “If you come to my feedlot, you’ll see a The Progressive Rancher

whole lot of happy cows.” Rechel said the “eat local” movement is attempting to change the way we view the world, but “there is a reason we don’t raise tomatoes in South Dakota, or cranberries in Arizona.” The reason we raise cattle on grazing land in Nevada is that’s what it can be used for. “The desert outside of Elko can’t be used to grow alfalfa or cotton,” said Rechel. “Americans love grain-fed beef,” said Rechel and explains the feedlot industry is the epitome of efficiency. Citing evidence provided by the Beef Council, she said that the technology available; the science of genetics, nutrition, better pasture management, pharmaceuticals, and mineral supplements, allows producers to enhance the amount of protein produced on an acre of resource. Since the late 1970’s the beef industry has been able to increase beef production by 4 billion pounds with 37 million less cattle. According to the data, if beef was still produced at the 1955 levels of efficiency it would require 165 million more acres to produce the amount of beef produced today. “We produce more protein with less greenhouse gas, less water, and less fuel than we ever have,” said Rechel. Rechel said critics think producers should go all natural and walk away from those advances. “Most of those people who are telling us what not to do have never known want, have never gone hungry.” “When 70% of the world’s population is starving or food insecure, it is just arrogant to say we can’t use technology to enhance protein production.” According to Rechel the advances in the feedlot industry have kept food affordable, especially for third-world countries where animal protein is a treat and would enhance the health and quality of life of entire populations. “The efforts to prevent the use of technology are just a huge slap in the face,” she said. Jim Barbee, the Director of the Department of Ag, said the feedlot industry is absolutely a necessary component of the agriculture industry in the state. “Especially in light of the study (January 2013, Department of Ag),” he said, “which identified the gap we have in the cow/calf/feed production and the import of the final beef product back into the state after we export to the other states.” According to Barbee, “it’s the feedlot industry that is vital in closing that gap and ensuring that Nevadans are eating more Nevada product.” He said the key to a more stable economy is trying to get the processing in Nevada. “That feedlots exist in Nevada puts us part way there as an important piece in the puzzle to close the gap in livestock production.” Along with the other beef producers in the state, Rechel also said how important it is that Nevada have a feedlot industry. “Even though big groups of cattle are going out of the state now, there are small groups that need to go to market, and it is good that we have the industry in Nevada.” Barbee emphasizes the importance of the feedlot industry for a Nevada beef industry that “takes us from the production start-up to the final product at the retail grocery store.” www.progressiverancher.com


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. S ou t h Da kota Bl i z z a r d ,

Understanding What Happened Written collaboratively by Dave Ollila and Rosie Nold

Originally published at iGrow.org, a Service of South Dakota State University Extension. Reprinted with permission.

The high death loss from the early October blizzard in South Dakota has producers and the public wondering “How could this happen?” We tend to think about winter storms, extreme cold and other stressful conditions that cattle, horses and sheep on western range often successfully cope with and ask “Why was this storm so much worse?” A number of factors all happened simultaneously to create a situation of very high energy needs and high stress in cattle and other livestock. Any one of the following factors could have an impact by itself, but when all combined, it was simply too much for the animals and they most likely succumbed to hypothermia. The contributing factors included:

1. Animals were not adapted to winter conditions. Cattle will grow a thicker hair coat in response to shorter days, and cooler temperatures. But temperatures prior to the storm were in the 70°’s. For cattle, this meant they had thin hair coats and little protection from the elements. 2. Snow was preceded by hours of rain. A wet hair coat reduces the “insulation” that the hair and hide provide and increases the rate of heat loss from the body. For example, a cow with a wet hair or summer hair coat has critical temperature of 59°, while one with a dry, heavy winter coat has a critical temperature of 18°. The critical temperature is the temperature at which the animal must increase its metabolism, or burn its own energy, to maintain its body temperature. The further the effective temperature is below the critical temperature, the more energy the animal must use to maintain its body temperature. See “Spring Storms and Cold Stress” for more detailed information. https://igrow. org/livestock/beef/spring-storms-and-cold-stress/ 3. Winds in this blizzard were recorded up to 60 mph. Both research and practical experience show what a difference “wind chill” has on effective temperature. The range and pastures that are grazed during summer months are typically “open” – without constructed windbreaks, and usually very few natural windbreaks.

With the storm so early in the year, most livestock were still out on summer range and pastures. Thus, animals felt the full intensity of the wind.

4. The hair coat, temperature, moisture and wind combination meant the animals’ energy needs to maintain body temperature were much higher than even during a “normal” winter blizzard. 5. Coupled with the very high energy needs of the animals was the fact that most of the feed the cattle were currently eating was quite low in energy. Cattle grazing lush green grass makes a beautiful picture, but the reality is that lush, rapidly growing green grass is very high in moisture and low in energy per pound of feed consumed. The unusually large rainfall in September had created this rapidly growing grass in many areas. Under normal weather conditions, cattle were able to consume large quantities of grass to meet and even exceed their energy needs. But under blizzard conditions, it was not possible for them to consume adequate amounts of forage to meet their much higher than normal energy needs. 6. To try to escape or reduce the harsh wind, cattle will walk with the wind and seek areas of shelter, such as draws and ravines. Walking through heavy, wet and deep snow increased their energy needs even more. The severity of the snow fall also meant that the animals were walking blind, and could easily fall in to gullies, walk into a stock dam or creek, or gather into a fence corner and face crushing and trampling. With all the factors above combining effects, exhaustion and the inability to maintain their own body temperature finally caused cattle to simply stop and succumb to hypothermia. It’s important to note that the factors above were beyond the control of ranchers, owners, or anyone else. Cattle that survived the storm most likely have used up all or most of their energy reserves. This means they may need more supplemental feed than is normal for this time of year, particularly if there is added stress from rain and colder temperatures.

Bit #122 $475 NV. Sales tax 6.85% S&H $12

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16 November./December 2013

The rancher looked toward heaven And said, “God where have you been? Did you know we had a blizzard, With rain and snow and wind? You know I built this herd of mine, With blood and sweat and tears. You know the work and worry, As I struggled through the years. Now as I stand and look around, I know that it is gone. I don’t know if I have the strength, To rebuild or to go on.” God looked down from heaven – Saw the pain there in his eyes. He heard the sadness in his voice, He knew the sacrifice. He said, “My son, you’re not alone. I’m walking there with you – I’ll give you all the strength you need For what you have to do. I’ll give you courage to go on, Through all this loss and pain. I’ll give you hope to start once more, And build your herd again. I know that this is who you are – And not just what you do. And as you’re making your fresh start, I’ll be right there with you. Do not think this is a failure, Or that you’ve done something wrong. You’re an example of the spirit, That makes South Dakota strong. So stand up straight and tall my son, For I have faith in you. Put yesterday behind you now, For we have work to do!”

— by Bobette Schofield

A few options to help South Dakota ranchers:

Garcia Bits & Spurs -gifted! The gift that won’t be re

The Rancher’s Prayer

Black Hills Area Community Foundation (605)342-0429 P.O. Box 231, Rapid City, SD 57709 www.giveblackhills.org http://www.sdcattlemen.org 500 Commercial St. Elko, NV 89801

On facebook, visit: https://www.facebook.com/RanchersRelief. They are hosting a stallion service auction, and making plans for other types of fundraisers.

Phone: (775) 738-5816

https://www.facebook.com/pledgeheifer. They are organizing to allow the donation of cattle to help replace herds.

Fax: (775) 738-8980

capriolas.com

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


Nevada Ag in the Classroom Volunteer of the Year Award Winner Announced

The Nevada Agricultural Foundation would like to announce that Gardnerville resident Tonja Dressler has won the 2013 Ag in the Classroom Volunteer of Year the Award.

Dressler has been an active Ag in the Classroom volunteer for more than 10 years. She has organized and managed Ag Days throughout the Douglas County School District. In addition to organizing Ag Days in Douglas County, Dressler has been involved in planning and coordinating events in Carson City, Nye County, Lyon County, and Clark County.

The Ag in the Classroom Volunteer of the Year Award is a part of the Nevada Agricultural Foundation’s “Excellence in Education” program. “The Nevada Agricultural Foundation is pleased to be able to provide awards to the teachers and volunteers for their dedication in teaching our youth about agriculture,” said Sue Hoffman, Executive Director of the Nevada Agricultural Foundation. The award will be formally presented on November 22 during the 2013 Nevada Farm Bureau Annual Convention in Las Vegas.

WATER R IGHTS

Bullying and Rural Cleansing — Do you have a story to tell? — By Karen Budd-Falen

I looked up the definition of “bully” in the dictionary. It read, “a blustering browbeating person; especially: one habitually cruel to others who are weaker.” While I certainly would not characterize every child in a school-yard as a bully, nor every person working for the federal government as abusive, there are some individuals who fit that description. They may be the exception, but the label still fits. The problem is that while there are actions you can take to stop a school- yard bully, there are NO actions you can take to stop a bureaucratic bully. We must get Congress to change that paradigm. I am asking for your help. On October 29, 2013, a group of ranchers are going to testify before a Congressional Committee, telling their stories of being targeted and bullied by federal government employees simply based upon their ownership and use of private property and private property rights. The result is not only harm to the individual, but a “cleansing” of rural America as the free-market system fails. Their stories are compelling, and on October 29, will be told to Congress and the Nation. But we want to tell your stories too. At the end of this request, I will let you know how to help. In 1871, Congress passed the Civil Rights Act. The Act allows private citizens to bring litigation against individual state and local government employees who, “under the color of any statute, ordinance, regulation, custom, or usage” cause that citizen the loss of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured by the U.S. Constitution and U.S. laws. The Civil Rights Act did not create any new rights. Rather, the Act permits individuals to sue state and local public officials in the federal district court for alleged Constitutional and statutory bullying. Yet this same remedy is not available against federal government officers who, “under the color of any statute, ordinance, regulation, custom, or usage,” cause a citizen the loss of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured by the U.S. Constitution and U.S. laws. This gaping omission was highlighted in the U.S. Supreme Court case of Wilkie v. Robbins, 551 U.S. 537, 577 (2007). In that case, although the Supreme Court recognized that certain federal employees may have harmed and harassed landowner Frank Robbins because Robbins would not voluntarily surrender his property rights to the federal government, the Court refused to allow Robbins access to the federal courts to even plead his case. However, the Justices also noted that the Congress could (and should) create a legal “cause of action” in the federal courts for those cases where federal employees use and abuse the “color of their office” to harass or bully someone for standing up for their Constitutionally protected rights. The purpose of the October 29, 2013 hearing is to tell these stories to Congress and the American people and urge Congress to allow access to the courts for America’s citizens who are suffering long-continued harassment and harm at the hands of individual federal employees. That is not to say that all adverse government decisions are always politically or personally motivated, nor does it guarantee that private citizens will always win, but as it is now, the courthouse door is shut and locked and access is completely denied. That is the problem that has to be fixed–private citizens should have the right to access the courts, so that judges and juries can decide those claims with merit. www.progressiverancher.com

Based upon the Robbins Supreme Court opinion, other private property owners who are being harassed and intimidated because they refuse to turn over their private property outside the guarantees of the U.S. Constitution have no forum in which they can vindicate their claims. The Robbins decision is a complete bar to the judicial branch of the government, regardless of the extreme nature of the federal officials’ actions. The second aspect of this story is the destruction of free-markets and rural economies and communities because there is a void in the protection of private property ownership, use and rights. Secure use of private property rights is the cornerstone of a free- market economic system, but that security is threatened by government official interference under “color of law.” Voluntary exchange and free markets depend on private property ownership and use, since every participant in a free-market system is a property owner who must be responsible for himself and his possessions. This holds true whether the private property is land, other property rights and interests, tangible goods, ideas, or the person himself. Yet, with no access to the courts against federal employees who use their office to hamper private property use and ownership, the free-market system and economic fabric of rural communities are being destroyed. Private property ownership encourages the development and use resources in a way that is advantageous and can be traded or sold to others. Private ownership makes people accountable for their actions. But in many cases, that is not the way it works now. Because there is no method to require personal accountability of federal employees who use the power of their federal agency to violate our Constitutional guarantees, property owners are being forced to severely limit their businesses, and in some cases, lose their property and livelihoods altogether. These losses, particularly in rural communities and economies, translate to lost economic revenue, lost jobs and lost opportunities, which, in turn, translates to lost community services such as fire protection, deteriorating roads and vacant schools. Rural cleansing is occurring in America as those who rely on the use of their property are forced to relinquish their rights and move to more urban settings in search of jobs. It is time for Congress to act to provide a legal cause of action when federal bureaucrats use the power of their offices to violate our U.S. Constitutional guarantees. That process will start with the hearing on October 29, 2013. If you have a story involving federal bullying and harm, I encourage you to send your information to buddfalenlaw@gmail.com. With your permission, we will take these stories to Washington D.C. and present them with the stories of those attending the hearing. This is a chance for you to tell Congress if you have been the subject of selective and continued harassment and pressure to give up your Constitutionally guaranteed rights. Not all federal employees are bullies and some counties and communities are still clinging to the rural way of life. But for the victims of the bullies and the communities who suffer, Congress must provide access to the judicial system for a chance for relief. Please help us get the message to Congress; send your stories of bullying or letters and e-mails of support to buddfalenlaw@gmail.com Thank you.

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 17


GROWN NEVADA IN

A Rancher’s Dream and Quest by Linda Drown Bunch

When that delicious, sizzling, melt-inDiana had developed an interest in the Wagyus and had begun researchyour-mouth tender steak is placed before ing the breed and discovered that they not only produced a smaller, calving you at a fancy restaurant featuring “home ease calf, but had been proven genetically superior to other breeds as meat grown” or “locally grown” meat and produce, producers. Armed with the knowledge that the ranch possessed the genetics undoubtedly there is a real human story be- in their bulls and the twenty-five head of personal Angus cows that remained hind it. from the split, the decision was made. The Wagyus stayed, and they were off For over sixty years, the high desert of on their quest to raise beef that they “did want to eat.” northeastern Nevada has been home to the Along with the good Angus cows and registered Wagyu bulls, there were Van Norman Ranches, a cow/calf stocker Robin and Dan’s farming skills to produce the grain and alfalfa, Dan and his operation and farming enterprise fifty miles northwest of Elko, Nevada. The mother Diane’s previous successful experience raising and marketing hogs Van Norman family has always been a steward of the land and prides itself on a custom basis, and Diana’s vision and belief in the concept. Add to this on following the traditions established by their parents and grandmix, mountain pastures, fertile agricultural ground, established parents, the late Charlie and Della Van Norman. irrigation systems, and the equipment to do the job as Charlie and Della had two sons, Robin and Bill, well as the expertise of Darrin and Kelly Pfeifer who who along with their families managed the Van manage and care for the cattle. Norman holdings. Bill and his family handled In the spring of 2011, Dan and Diana atthe horse and cattle end of the operation tended the Small Farms Conference in Fallon while Robin and his family took care of the which was sponsored by Specialty Crop Infeed production and maintenance. Charlie stitute of Western Nevada Community Colalways boasted that he and Della had the lege. This was the beginning of the growth perfect set-up, and he took great pride in of a network of contacts that have not only the role that his sons and their children helped build the business to where it is had assumed on the ranch. As a result of today but helped set their sights higher. a series of life-altering events beginning That conference is just another example of with the passing of Charlie in 1996, Della pieces falling into place and was the catain 2000, Bill in 2006, and Bill and Geri’s lyst to beginning the search for additional younger son Troy in 2008, Van Norman outlets for their beef. Ranches, Inc. was separated into two inThat conference also introduced Dan dependent entities in 2010. Bill’s older son and Diana to Mike Holcomb of Wolf Pack Ty and his wife Ronda and his mother Geri Meats, a division of the UNR Department and sister Tilly continued the horse operaof Agriculture. Wolf Pack Meats features Nevada Wagyu Gothic tion known as Van Norman Quarter Horses, onsite USDA inspections of the slaughterInc. Robin and Diane along with their son Dan and his wife Diana retained ing as well as the cutting and wrapping process. The discovery of Edible the original Van Norman holdings which included the bulk of the farming Reno-Tahoe magazine (www.ediblerenotahoe.com) and the subsequent inoperation which continues the name and tradition of Van Norman Ranches, troduction to publishers Amanda Burden and Jaci Goodman was invaluable Inc. One of the key components of the division involved the dispersal of the in locating Reno-area restaurateurs keen on serving locally raised, fresh, cattle herd in the summer of 2010, leaving both families with the need to clean food. explore alternative sources of income. In the summer the cows and calves graze on the rich upland grasses of It is a common insider joke among many cattle ranchers that “the rancher the northern Great Basin. Upon weaning in the fall, they are fed through the doesn’t eat his own beef,” the idea being that what they kept for themselves winter on an orchard grass/alfalfa mix, and then turned out on the range again was generally not grain feed and finished. Diana Van Norman who was new until fall. By this time they are approaching 18 months of age and will put to the family in 2009 recounts her first experience with the rancher being last on a feed regimen of ground barley and “haylage” (similar to silage but with on his own list. Ty’s wife Ronda had come to the house with a receipt from alfalfa). They never receive any growth hormones and receive only essential an Elko butcher for processing some beef for ranch use and told Diana that vaccinations and medications. Any chronically sick cattle or those exhibiting if she would like some, they had some to share. Being newly wed and new other undesirable traits are removed from the herd early on. As they reach to the ranch, Diana was enthusiastic at the prospect of cooking and eating the desired weight, butcher cattle are taken to Wolf Pack Meats in Reno for “their own ranch beef.” How romantic! Ronda immediately dampened her processing. It is sold whole, by the half, quarter, or in 40-pound boxes and enthusiasm with the comment, “You don’t want to eat THIS meat its not will be cut and wrapped to the customer’s individual specifications. tender and fatty.” The Van Norman program is rooted in the desire to provide the cleanThis was the point when Diana began digging deeper and asking “why est, highest quality beef possible. During 2011, the first year of the project, a can’t we raise beef for our own table that is as good as or better than what we handful of leppies and a few Wagyu/Angus calves were finished at the ranch would buy at the store?.” All the pieces were there to do just that. It was just and sold to friends and relatives with a very positive response. In 2012 the a matter of laying them out on the table and taking the first step. number had risen to 20 head, 25 head in 2013, with a projection of 40 head On the advice of a veterinarian friend in the late 1990’s, Bill Van Nor- finished and marketed in 2014. After hundreds of miles of travel in pursuit man began using Japanese Wagyu bulls on his first-calf heifers. The rationale of outlets, hauling butcher cattle to the processor in Reno, picking up and behind this was to produce a small, resilient calf that would also appeal to delivering the finished product, several restaurants in the Reno area are now prospective buyers, unlike the longhorn bulls he had tried using in the past. featuring Van Norman Ranches Wagyu/Angus beef. Just as important are At the time of the separation of Van Norman Ranches, Inc. and the subsequent the individuals and families who are enjoying the taste and health benefits of dispersal of the cattle, the six Wagyu bulls were also heading for the sale barn. this “meat you WANT to eat”—a true Nevada product from start to finish.

The Japanese Wagyu were initially developed 500 years ago as work animals. It was only relatively recently that they were discovered to have extraordinary meat qualities, resulting in this cattle breed becoming one of the most coveted in the world. Genetically different from the traditional American breeds, Wagyu are world renowned for their marbling abilities resulting in taste and tenderness far surpassing the traditional American experience. The majority of the Wagyu or “Kobe” meat sold in the US is a 50/50 cross between a Wagyu and Angus. Wagyu contributes its intense marbling; Angus contributes size and growth, resulting in meat that is a significant improvement over 100% Angus. From a nutritional perspective, while there is a higher percentage of marbling, the monounsaturated fat content is significantly higher than in traditional beef breeds and the saturated fat content is lower. For more on the health ramifications of Wagyu/Angus beef visit this website. (http:// lonemountaincattle. com/pdf/articles/ Beef_Plus_Added_ Health_Benefits.pdf)

Submitted Photos

18 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


3B Egg and Livestock Company Like farmers from the beginning of time, The Behimer Boys, Nick age 10, Bob age 6, and Ethan age 4 are financially motivated entrepreneurs who see the natural connection between using their resource to meet the needs of people and make a living along the way. Guided by their mother Erica and with inspiration from their Aunty Carey Gantt who raised chickens of her own, the little band of brothers decided they could raise their own chickens and make money selling eggs. “We just want to make money, we like to have our own money so we can buy whatever we want,” said Bob. Two years ago they got their first batch of chicks from Aunt Carey; five hens and one rooster. They successfully raised them into producing hens, started another batch of chicks and began selling eggs to their friends and family. Things were going so well the boys decided to walk around their neighborhood and began selling their eggs door-to-door to the neighbors. “They got pretty good at that,” said Erica, “and then they started selling to The Slanted Porch.” Currently the 3B Egg Company is going through the process of getting certification from the USDA. The boys are now looking to expand their operation with the production of good beef cattle. Nick recently sold his 4-H steer through the Fallon Junior Livestock Show to The

Wells FFA by Rachel Johnny, the Wells FFA Chapter Reporter.

From the beginning of June and up to now, the Wells FFA Chapter has been busy as usual. Over the summer, some of our members participated in the Ruby Mountain FFA show and sale, and sold the market pigs that they have been raising since April, developing their Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAE). Our chapter members also participated in the usual “Angle Lake Road Adopt a Highway” once every month this summer, allowing us to give back to the community that supports us throughout the year. Also at the beginning of summer, twelve members and advisors attended the Summer Leadership Camp (SLC) in Lake Tahoe. At Lake Tahoe, for SLC, the officers learned how to better their positions, and the members got to further their knowledge on how to be more involved on the community, chapter, and student levels, and got to meet people they will associate with throughout the remainder of their FFA careers. In July, the chapter officers and advisors traveled to the Great Basin National Park to hold our annual Chapter Officer Retreat. At the three day retreat, the officers discussed yearly goals, organized the yearly calendar of events, learned about their individual leadership styles, and discussed great fundraising ideas. All was not work at the retreat, the chapter officer team spent good quality time bonding by hiking, visiting the Lehman Caves, and talking around the fire late into the night! Our members were also invited out to the Kirk and Ramona Dahl ranch to participate in the LEPA Studies program every Thursday, of every week during the summer. Our advisors would take about two or three students out to Ruby Valley so that everyone would get to experience these studies. At the Dahl Ranch, the students would get to manually test soil moisture. It was an educational and surprisingly entertaining experience! After all that was done for the duration of the summer, it, unfortunately, came to end, and the school year started. Since then, our chapter has hosted multiple meetings, had our usual Jerky Sale fundraiser, and did the usual monthly community service project, the Angle Lake Road Adopt a Highway, as well as prepare food for the Community Pep Rally. At this Pep Rally on September 23rd, the Wells Rural Electric Company (WREC) sponsored a free dinner to the people of our community and hosted a pep rally afterwards. As free food naturally appeals to people, the Wells FFA Chapter prepared 460 plates of tri tip, sides, and deserts for each person that showed up on that Monday night. With those two fundraisers successfully accomplished, the Wells FFA is ready to take 17 qualifying members to the National Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. Four teams will be competing at Nationals; these teams consist of Parliamentary Procedure, Meats Evaluation, Floriculture, and Poultry. We will be leaving the night of the 29th and returning on November the 2nd. In this five day time period, we plan on doing things from competing to ice skating! The National Convention is always a mesmerizing experience, and our members are excited to be able to attend such a renowned conference in this amazing organization! www.progressiverancher.com

Slanted Porch as well. But Bob had a hand in that, too. Each of the boys has a few mother cows of their own, and Bob had a nice steer that Nick wanted to use for his 4-H project. Bob fronted him the steer and when Nick sold it to The Slanted Porch he was able to pay off his brother and all the boys learned valuable business lessons. Currently Nick is in the 4-H Beef Club, and all three boys are in the Hotwings poultry club. They show their birds in shows all over the state and are continually learning about poultry husbandry. Last week the boys were in the Lyon County fair where Ethan participated in his first show as a Pee-Wee. The chicken business has been good to the boys, they were able to pay all their own fees at the shows this summer and are completely self-sufficient with their chicken operations. They buy all their own feed and grain, pay for all their entry fees for the poultry shows, and as Erica says, “then they go buy silly things like ice cream.” 3B Egg and Livestock Company has a strong presence in the social media world and can be found on Facebook and Twitter under “3B Egg Company”. Their most recent client was a result of the social media presence when they were approached by Nancy Horn of Dish Café in Reno. It turns out even Governor Sandoval follows the boys on Twitter and when they found out there was an incredible, edible celebration. Erica said Bob was out of his skin and said, “I can’t believe it! That guy is like the President of Nevada and he’s following us!”

The United States has the most abundant and safest food system in the world, due to U.S. Farmers and Rancher being the most productive in the history of the world. The Nevada Agricultural Foundation salutes, Nevada Farmers and Ranchers for their contributions to our Nation’s abundance.

Nevada Agricultural Foundation 775/673-2468

|

sue@nvagfoundation.org

P.O. Box 8089 Reno, NV 89507 2165 Green Vista Dr., Suite 204, Sparks, NV 89431

To Promote and Strengthen Agriculture in Nevada by Providing Financial Assistance to Deserving Groups or Individuals Involved in Research or Education.

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 19


NEVADA STALLION STAKES & Elko County NRCHA Show —————August 24 & 25 ————— NSS LIMITED SNAFFLE

Rein

Fence

Total

R

Herd

H

Dualin With Voodoo

Mister Dual Pep

Caleb Jantz

Caleb Jantz

67

72.5

73

212.5

T Birds Flossie Gal

Thunderbird 2002

Corinne Elser

Corinne Elser

69

71

71

211

Smart Teena Cash

Very Smart Remedy

Kyla Rianda

Kyla Rianda

66

70

70.5

206.5

Hobbys Hotrodin Chic

Colonels Hot Java

Jess & Vicki Reid

Jess Reid

65

0

66

131

71

70

214

F

Horse

Sire

Owner

Rider

Hi Point Champion Nevada Stallion Genuine Rednic Champion Stallion Pretty Boy Boon

Reserve Champion Stallion One Time Pepto

NSS OPEN HACKAMORE CLASSES

Feathers N Lace

Pretty Boy Boon

Billie Filippini

Brad Bowlen

73

Lenas Chex Doc

Lenas Chex N Smart

Tamara Casey

Matt Hoekenga

65

72

70

207

This Cats Tangy

WR This Cats Smart

Elizabeth Younger

Elizabeth Younger

70

68.5

63.5

202

Dera Cat

Smooth As A Cat

Harry DeHaan

Harry DeHaan

64

70

71

205

Flint Lee

71

71.5

72.5

215

NSS OPEN SNAFFLE

1

SG Time Zone

One Time Pepto

Jennifer Sanford

2

JP Show Berry

Showstoppin Boon

Triple D Ranches

Nick Dowers

70

72

71.5

213.5

3

DR Pepto First Shot

Freckled Lil Pepto

Rhoads Ranch Dean & Sharon

Flint Lee

69

71.5

72.5

213

4

Smokedakitty

Catadance

Lynn Cafferty

Gary Stark

67.5

70

73.5

211

NSS LAE 3 YR OLD CLASS

1

SG Time Zone

One Time Pepto

Jennifer Sanford

Flint Lee

71

71.5

72.5

215

6

Darling Boon

Boons Milienmium

Gary Stark

Gary Stark

71.5

68.5

70

210

7

Little One Time

One Time Pepto

Jennifer Sanford

Flint Lee

70.5

68.5

67

206

10

Smoke Dat Cat

Catadance

Brad Sapp

Gary Stark

70

67

68

205

13

Smart N Gotta Gun

Spooks Gotta Gun

Flint Lee

Flint Lee

66

69.5

67.5

203

1

Fairlea Steady Betty

Smart Steady Date

Darrel & Cari Norcutt

Darrel Norcutt

73

71

72

216

2

Alberts Bro Rusti

Chex In My Genes

Karl & Pam Smith

Karl Smith

72.5

72

68.5

213

13

Kickback Nic

Nic It In the Bud

Amelia Spratling

Taylor Wakely

71.5

68.5

71.5

211.5

High Point Nevada Stallion: Genuine Rednic, ridden by Flint Lee, owned by John & Sandra Friberg.

NSS BRIDLE CLASSES - OPEN

NRCHA OPEN HACKAMORE CLASSES

Feathers N Lace

Pretty Boy Boon

Billie Filippini

Brad Bowlen

73

71

70

214

Lenas Chex Doc

Lenas Chex N Smart

Tamara Casey

Matt Hoekenga

65

72

70

207

68

66.5

63

197.5

NRCHA LIMITED OPEN HACKAMORE CLASSES

Lipstick on a Cat

Highlight Cat

Janet Kubichek

Leonardo Valdez

Dera Cat

Smooth As A Cat

Harry DeHaan

Harry DeHaan

64

70

71

205

Im A Hickory Girl

Call Me Doc's Hickory

Mike Neville

Mike Neville

62

68.5

63

193.5

NRCHA NON PRO HACKAMORE CLASSES

NSS Open Snaffle Champion: SG Time Zone, with Flint Lee, owned by Jennifer Sanford. Ty Van Norman presented the Buckle they sponsored.

NSS Limited Snaffle Champ: Caleb Jantz

20 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

Champion Nevada Bred Limited Snaffle: Docs Sierra Sage sired by RSR Im A Cut Above, owned by Nancy Marler ridden by JD Thacker

NSS Champion Open Hackamore Feathers N Lace, riden by Brad Bowlen, owned by Billie Filippini. Horse is also sired by Pretty Boy Boon (Champion Stallion) www.progressiverancher.com


NRCHA LIMITED OPEN BRIDLE CLASSES

Sire

71.5

68.5

71.5

211.5

65

68.5

70

203.5

65.5

69

70.5

205

Amelia Spratling

65.5

69

70.5

205

Darrel & Cari Norcutt

Darrel Norcutt

73

71

72

216

Owner

Rider

4

Kickback Nic

Nic It In the Bud

Amelia Spratling

Taylor Wakely

11

Smart Zanee Lena

Smart Zan O Lena

Shane & Roxie Demler

Trevor Fuhriman

12

Pokey Lena Cash

Nu Cash

12

Pokey Lena Cash

Nu Cash

4

Fairlea Steady Betty

Total

Horse

Fence

F

Rein

R

Herd

H

NRCHA NOVICE NON PRO BRIDLE CLASSES

Amelia Spratling

Amelia Spratling

NRCHA NON PRO BRIDLE CLASSES

Amelia Spratling NRCHA OPEN BRIDLE CLASSES

Smart Steady Date

5

Alberts Bro Rusti

Chex In My Genes

Karl & Pam Smith

Karl Smith

72.5

72

68.5

213

8

Kickback Nic

Nic It In the Bud

Amelia Spratling

Taylor Wakely

71.5

68.5

71.5

211.5

11

Judge Roy Boon (bridle)

Pretty Boy Boon

Lita West

Karl Smith

71.5

71.5

67

210

Karl Smith

67

70.5

70

207.5

Darrel Norcutt

62

69.5

0

131.5

Judge Roy Boon, ridden by Karl Smith, owned by Lita West, sired by Pretty Boy Boon (Champion Stallion), won the NRCHA 2-rein.

NRCHA TWO REINED CLASSES

Judge Roy Boon (2 REIN)

Pretty Boy Boon

Lita West

Miss Little Ruby

Smart Little Pepinic Karen Gardella NRCHA LAE

SG Time Zone

One Time Pepto

Jennifer Sanford

Flint Lee

71

71.5

72.5

215

Darling Boon

Boons Milienmium

Gary Stark

Gary Stark

71.5

68.5

70

210

Little One Time

One Time Pepto

Jennifer Sanford

Flint Lee

70.5

68.5

67

206

This Cat Will Play

This Cat Will Do

Janet Kubichek

Leonardo Valdez

65

69

72

206

NRCHA- NON PRO LIMITED ($5K)

Cash Bond Lady

Dry Spec a Pepper

Lorien Stroud

Lorien Stroud

71

69

73

213

Miss Little Ruby

Smart Little Pepinic

Karen Gardella

Karen Gardella

68

68

65

201

Lynette Phillips

Lynette Phillips

60

68

0

128

HR More Time To Play

Lorien Stroud, riding Cash Bond Lady, won the Non Pro Limited

RANCHERS SELECT Bred Heifer Sale

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 21


RESULTS August 24 through September 2 Judge: Mark Matson, California Scribes: Debbie Armuth, Kim Jackson, Kim Satterwaite J.M. Capriola’s Outstanding Horse: Tallulah Fox, Owner/Rider, Katie DeLong

LIMITE D SNAFFLE BIT HORSE

Entries: 9 OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Hobby Hotroddin Chic

Jess Reid

Jess Reid

206.5

Cash Light My Fire

Millie Spratling

Millie Spratling

205.5

Smoothie

Katie Groves

Katie Groves

200.5

Playin Donny

Jared & Jaylene Callister

Jared Callister

194.5

OPE N SNAFFLE BIT

Entries: 9

HORSE

OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Little One Time

Tammy Lee

Flint Lee

220

JP Colonel Blackcatt

Van Norman Quarter Horses

Ty VanNorman

211

Rabbits Mirror Image

Charlie Amos

Matt Mori

210

Boonie

Katie Groves

Doug Groves

208

NON PRO COWHORSE HORSE

Katie DeLong winning the Non-Pro Cow Horse class and theJ.M. Capriola’s Outstanding Horse “Tallulah Fox”

Entries: 6 OWNER

RIDER

Women’s Class Champion: Jennifer Black riding Rolly owned by Jolynn Maynard, of Lund NV LIMITE D HACKAMORE

SCORE

HORSE

Entries: 5 OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Tallulah Fox

Katie DeLong

Katie DeLong

138

Smart Teena Cash

Kyla Rianda

Kyla Rianda

203.5

Jackie

Millie Spratling

Millie Spratling

133.5

DW Nic N Pepper

Dennis Bieroth

Casey Bieroth

203

Ace

Wyatt Lear

Wyatt Lear

132

Scotch

Suzann Lemaire

Suzann Lemaire

197

Pic

Kaaren Ross

Kaaren Ross

62

Sparkling Nu Penny

Suzi Barnes

Matt Barnes

196.5

Nevada Hackamore Champ: Matt Hoekenga riding Lenas Chex Doc 22 November./December 2013

Limited Snaffle Bit Winner: Jess Reid riding Hobby Hotroddin Chic The Progressive Rancher

Two Reined Champ: Tammy Lee riding Sheza Shiney Chex www.progressiverancher.com


NEVADA HACKAMORE HORSE

Entries: 7 OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Lenas Chex Doc

Tamara Casey

Matt Hoekenga

213.5

DR Peptos First Shot

Dean & Sharon Rhoads

Flint Lee

212

Feathers N Lace

Billie Filippini

Brad Bowlen

210.5

Magic Cat

Lynn & Gary Zahegian

Dave Thacker

209

TWO RE INE D

Entries: 9

HORSE

OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Sheza Shiney Chex

Tammy Lee

Tammy Lee

213.5

Hesa Pleasen Prize

Kyla Rianda

Kyla Rianda

206

R Diamond Cat

Kenny Lee

Kenny Lee

205

Polly

Millie Spratling

Millie Spratling

204

NV CATTLE WORKING HORSE

Entries: 10 OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Genuine Rednic

Sandra Friberg

Flint Lee

141

Rosie

Amelia Spratling

Taylor Wakley

140.5

IX Smart Starlight

Liz Younger

Matt Hoekenga

140

A Smooth Quixote

Jeff Garijo

Jeff Garijo

140

WOME N'S CLASS

Co-ed Branding Champs 2013: C Ranches – Suzanne Lemaire, Mindy Filippini, Jim Filippini, George Barton Second Place Team: DeLong / Garijo—Will DeLong, Katie DeLong, Jeff Garijo, Jaci Garijo. Third Place Team: Mori / Krenka / Snow—Pete Mori, Kelsey Krenka, Michael Mori, Abra Sno. Fourth Place: 2-4 Ranch—Jessica Jackson, Russ Jackson, Danielle Jackson, Kade Saylor

Entries: 7

HORSE

OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Rolly

Jolynn Maynard

Jennifer Black

206.5

Master Chexx

Janie Welch

Janie Welch

203.5

DR Freckles Tigermas

Jeff Garijo

Jacki Garijo

202.5

Pattys Quick Pic

Suzann & Lyle Lemaire

Suzann Lemaire

197

LIMITE D BRIDLE

Entries: 11

HORSE

OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Jackie

Millie Spratling

Millie Spratling

204

JP Royal Showgirl

Ty & Ronda VanNorman

Ronda VanNorman

203

Riata Cash

Mindy Goemmer

Mindy Goemmer

200.5

Miss Kitty

April Kelley

April Kelley

196.5

RANCH DOCTORING

Open Branding Champs 2013: Big O Tires & Express Lube – Mark Eldridge, Quinn Mori, Hanes Holman, Ramon Cardova Second Place: Jim Ranch—Dirk Jim, Steven Jim, Ira Walker, Woody Harney. 3rd Place Team: C Lazy L Ranch—Robert Crutcher, RC Crutcher, Nathan Kelly Sr, Nathan Kelly Jr

First Place: Walker Ranch — Mark Eldridge, Ira Walker, Quinn Mori and Hanes Holman. Second Place: NK Ranch — Nathan Kelly Jr., Nathan Kelly Sr., Wilfred Harney Jr. and Woody Harney. Third Place: OE Bar — Asher Freeman, Barak Freeman, Pete Mori and Michael Mori.

More results on page 24.

David Kimble Photos Limited Bridle Champion: Millie Spratling riding Jackie www.progressiverancher.com

Women’s Branding Champs: Lee Livestock – Sandy Kiel, Bea Venable, Natalie Norcutt, Kathi Wines. Second Place: Flying M Ranch—Timmy Lynn DeLong, Rita Fowler, Tammy Lee, Georgia Black. Third Place: Tuscareka—Rhonda Garaventa, Rosie Bliss, Renee Jackson, Andrea Sestanovich

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 23


OPE N BRIDLE

Entries: 6

HORSE

OWNER

RIDER

SCORE

Genuine Rednic

Sandra Friberg

Flint Lee

215.5

Smart Smokum Chic

Kenneth Jones

Todd Fitch

214.5

A Smooth Quixote

Jeff Garijo

Jeff Garijo

214

Rosie

Amelia Spratling

Taylor Wakley

207.5

NV CHAMPION COWHORSE HORSE

RESULTS

Young Buckaroos 8 & Under: Hannah Kelley

Skeeta Blue Star

Tom Barnes

SCORE

Jimmy

Fred Bailey

Fred Bailey

288

Genuine Rednic

Sandra Friberg

Flint Lee

285.5

A Smooth Quixote

Jeff Garijo

Jeff Garijo

281.5

Guido

Doug & Pat Groves

Katie Groves

278

HORSE

SCORE

Hannah Rose Kelley

143.5

Megan

Zane Wines

Zane Wines - BEST BOY

138

Bo

TI Ranches

Jackson Dahl

137

Freddie

Emma Garijo

Emma Garijoe - BEST GIRL

135

143.5

Best Boy, Young Buckaroos 8 & Under: Zane Wines

JUNIOR RIDE RS 13-16

SCORE

Anthony Barnes

RIDER

The Kelley Family

Best Girl, Young Buckaroos 8 & Under: Emma Garijo

RIDER

Entries: 17

OWNER

Miss Tari Oak

Entries: 15 OWNER

RIDER

YOUNG BUCKAROOS 8 & UNDE R

JUNIOR RIDE RS 9 -12 HORSE

Entries: 11

OWNER

HORSE

MR C

Entries: 6 OWNER

Eddie King

RIDER

Caden Wiley

SCORE

198.5

Bueno Chex Sandy

Lyle & Suzann Lemaire

Emma Lemaire - BEST GIRL

143.5

Shortsnort

Camme Marvel

Caleb Logan

198.5

Tia

Joe & Traci Wines

Matt Wines - BEST BOY

142

Chino

Shawn & Mindy Goemmer

Dally Goemmer

197.5

25

Kaylee Filippini

Kaylee Filippini

138.5

Oscar

Joe Marvel

Luke Logan

190

Best Girl, Junior Riders 9-12: Emma Lemaire 24 November./December 2013

Junior Riders 9-12 Champion: Skeeta Blue Star & Anthony Barnes The Progressive Rancher

Best Boy, Junior Riders 9-12: Matt Wines

www.progressiverancher.com


Nutritional Properties of Windrowed and Standing Basin Wildrye Stephen S. Foster, Extension Educator, UNCE, Pershing County

This past week I received a call from a rancher near Austin, NV who was looking for an economical, high producing forage that could be used as a winter forage in his beef cattle production system. Although there are many alternative forages and small grains that can be rotated with alfalfa, or used in pastures such as: Teff, Wheat, Barley and traditional grass hays. A forage that is sometimes over looked, but common to Nevada and the Intermountain West is Basin wildrye (Elymus cinereus). Resent on farm research conducted at the University of Nevada Reno’s Gund Ranch, compared principle nutrient/mineral content of June cut, windrowed and free-standing basin wildrye; and assessed the effect of managed fire on basin wildrye standing crop. Basin wildrye can produce a large amount of forage and can be found on many different ecological sites within the 8 to 20 inch precipitation zone. Basin wildrye is a very tall, robust grass that has been used for winter grazing since early settlement times. Beginning with settlement in the 1860s, basin wildrye was recognized as a superior winter forage that was abundant on vast areas of intermountain basins within the larger Great Basin. Today, many of these areas are entirely shrub dominated with only remnant stands of this once abundant native grass. The species is also characterized with elevated meristematic growing points, and because of this feature, spring and early summer grazing as well as mowing is not recommended since both can remove and reduce the number of growing points causing a decline

Nevada Farm Bureau and Department of Agriculture to hold

in plant vigor and survival. However, when used as late summer, fall, or winter forage, growing point concerns become less of an issue when the plants become dormant. Traditional methods of mechanical harvest also tend to remove the elevated growing points, but when mechanical harvesters are adjusted so that cutting bars are elevated mostly above growing points, this problem is effectively eliminated. Leaving more residual stubble height also reduces smothering problems for plants under the windrow. Protein content fluctuates dramatically with season ranging from a peak of about 20% in early summer to 7% in winter. Like many grass forages, basin wildrye should have greater nutritional value if it is cut near the growing season peak and windrowed as stockpiled forage to be subsequently grazed later in the year. Because of relatively low nutrient value and palatability (coarse, wolfy stems) if left standing after the growing season, it has lost favor as a standing stockpile of forage and ignored by many ranchers as a potential forage source. Basin wildrye characteristically responds with significantly higher forage production after prescribed burning or wildfire fire ignitions. This presents the prospect of significantly increasing Basin wildrye forage production by using prescribed fire as a tool. The implications of this study were- Forage production was increased by prescribed burning. The quality of the windrowed forage was well above the standing crop version. Windrowing Basin wildrye provides an opportunity for improved access to quality forage in fall and winter. Increased production combined with the advantages of windrowing will provide ranchers with additional winter feed options without requiring a great deal of new input capital. However, work remains to determine actual cost effectiveness and if repeated mowing will cause any long-term decline to the basin wildrye. Source: Nutritional Properties of Windrowed and Standing Basin Wildrye over Time, B. Bruce1,5 PAS, B. Perryman2, T. Shenkoru2, K. Conley3, and J. Wilker4,

2013 Southern Nevada Agriculture Conference

SPARKS, Nev. – The Nevada Farm Bureau Federation and the Nevada Department of Agriculture are holding the 2013 Southern Nevada Agriculture Conference Thursday, Nov. 21 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Las Vegas. The event is at the Santa Fe Station Hotel and Casino. Lunch will be provided for attendees. During the conference, participants can attend sessions to hear from experts in the fields of agriculture exporting, selling local, marketing, food safety, business planning, hydroponics and aquaponics. Speakers from Nevada agriculture organizations like NevadaGrown, the University of Nevada, Reno Cooperative Extension, Hungry Mother Organics and others will be presenting. “As Nevada agriculture continues to grow, we plan to provide valuable educational resources like the Southern Nevada Agriculture Conference to effectively grow and promote the state industry,” said Jeff Sutich, international marketing coordinator at the Department of Agriculture. Nevada Farm Bureau President Hank Combs said, “We are excited to jointly host the Southern Nevada Agriculture Conference with the Nevada Department of Agriculture. The conference will give farmers and ranchers great information that will benefit their farms and ranches.” The Nevada Farm Bureau Convention provides farmer/rancher members the opportunity to give policy input and direction that sets the course for the organization. “Farm Bureau is a grassroots advocacy organization with member-developed policy,” said Combs. “The organization’s policy positions guide Farm Bureau through legislative and regulatory meetings.” Participants are encouraged to register early for the event. Interested individuals should visit agri.nv.gov and click the link for the Southern Nevada Agriculture Conference. Early bird registration is $55 until Nov. 14 and $60 after that date. Registration will include lunch for the conference. For more information about the Southern Nevada Agriculture Conference, its sessions and registration, please visit agri.nv.gov or nvfb.org/newsroom/annual-convention/. www.progressiverancher.com

JEROME, IDAHO

Beef Sales Every Tuesday Selling Stocker and Feeder Cattle Slaughter Cows/Bulls Sale-time: 9:30 AM

Friday Sale Selling Slaughter Cows/Bulls Sale-time: 11:00 AM

Round the clock yard service Call for consignment information Office: (208)324-4345

The Progressive Rancher

Dan Schiffler: (208)539-4933

plmajerome@hotmail.com November/December 2013 25


CHECKOFF NEWS News From the Nevada Beef Council

Beef Chili Five Ways

A

t the Nevada Beef Council (NBC), a day’s work often consists of educating consumers about the many health benefits of beef, working with the food service and retail sectors to enhance beef sales, and generally promoting this most delicious of proteins, all in an effort to help increase beef demand. In this update, we’d like to share just a few of the current ways the NBC –and your Beef Checkoff—are working hard for you.

Beef: It’s What’s for Tailgating

Nothing says “comfort food” quite like a bowl of delicious beef chili. This simple recipe offers five variations to help you ward off that winter chill. INGREDIENTS – Basic Recipe 1. 1 pound Ground Beef (93% lean or leaner) 2. 1 can (15-1/2 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained 3. 1 can (14 to 14-1/2-ounce) reduced-sodium or regular beef broth 4. 1 can (14-1/2 ounces) diced tomatoes with green chiles 5. 2 tablespoons chili powder Toppings: 1. Shredded Cheddar cheese, chopped fresh cilantro, minced green onion (optional) INSTRUCTIONS Step 1: Heat large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add Ground Beef; cook 8 to 10 minutes, breaking into 3/4-inch crumbles and stirring occasionally. Pour off drippings. Step 2: Stir in beans, broth, tomatoes and chili powder; bring to a boil. Step 3: Reduce heat; cover and simmer 20 minutes to develop flavors, stirring occasionally. Garnish with Toppings, as desired. RECIPE VARIATIONS Moroccan: Prepare as directed, adding 1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice and 1/4 cup chopped pitted dates or golden raisins with ingredients in step 2. Serve over hot cooked couscous. Garnish with toasted sliced almonds, chopped fresh mint and Greek yogurt, as desired. Mexican: Prepare as directed, adding 1 tablespoon cocoa powder with ingredients in step 2. Garnish with chopped fresh cilantro, pepitas (pumpkin seeds) and corn tortilla chips, as desired. Serve with corn tortillas. Italian: Prepare as directed, adding 1-1/2 teaspoons fennel seed with ingredients in step 2. Before removing from heat, stir in 3 cups fresh baby spinach. Cover; turn off heat and let stand 3 to 5 minutes or until spinach is just wilted. Serve over hot cooked orecchiette or cavatappi, if desired. Garnish with grated Parmesan cheese and pine nuts, as desired. Cincinnati: Prepare as directed, adding 3 tablespoons white vinegar and 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon with ingredients in step 2. Serve over hot cooked elbow macaroni. Garnish with chopped white onion, sour cream and shredded Cheddar cheese, as desired. Nutrition information per serving*: 256 calories; 9 g fat (4 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat); 78 mg cholesterol; 524 mg sodium; 16 g carbohydrate; 5.6 g fiber; 30 g protein; 6.6 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 2.3 mcg vitamin B12; 4.7 mg iron; 18.9 mcg selenium; 6.1 mg zinc; 81.4 mg choline. *Based on basic recipe.

This recipe is an excellent source of fiber, protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, iron, selenium and zinc; and a good source of choline. For more classic beef recipes, visit www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com.

26 November./December 2013

It’s football season, and the Nevada Beef Council is howling with the Wolf Pack! Tailgating is a great football tradition, and a natural complement to beef. This football season the NBC is joining 92.1 The Wolf, Reno’s New Country, in their booth for some of this year’s home games. The booth is in a great location, not far from the North entrance of Mackay Check out the NBC Stadium, and in prime range to greet lots of tailgaters at these upcoming and talk about what’s on the grill. UNR home games! For the first home game on September 7 against the Aggies of UC Davis, NBC’s Manager of Con• Saturday, Nov. 16 sumer Communications, Annette Kassis, talked beef (vs. San Jose State) and barbeques with Wolf Pack fans, handed out some great recipes and cooking information, and applied • Saturday, Nov. 30 lots of “Beef: It’s what’s for Dinner” temporary tat(vs. BYU) toos on football fans. In addition to our presence on-site for tailgating, the NBC is airing a six-week schedule of commercials on 92.1 the Wolf. The sixty-second commercial airing through September links lean beef and its unsurpassed taste, smell and sizzle with two other very basic elements: fire and someone to cook for. The commercial plays off the fact that beef is one of the few foods that’s actually fun to watch cook, which is why people tend to gather around the grill. The commercial that airs through October and November is a celebration of tailgating. As the commercial notes, sometimes dinner is at 11 a.m., your kitchen is “Lot B” and lean beef brings fans together for a delicious, nutritious meal before kickoff. Both commercials include a tag that lets fans know the Nevada Beef Council will be making the rounds in the Mackay Stadium parking lot to see what Wolf Pack fans put on the grill. At the home opener, tailgaters were delighted to have the NBC stop by, chat about the beef on the grill, and take a photo or two for our Facebook page. As the season progresses, we’re hoping a few of those grill masters will let us share some of their grilling tips on Twitter and Facebook. To learn more about these and other exciting NBC updates, be sure to “like” us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or visit us at www.nevadabeef.org.

Spreading the Good Word on Nutrition Did you know that three ounces of lean beef contains fewer grams of fat than a skinless chicken thigh? Or that the same amount of beef carries more vitamin B6 than 6.5 cups of raw spinach, more vitamin B12 than 7.5 skinless chicken breasts, and more zinc than 13.5 servings of salmon? You may already be familiar with these important facts about beef nutrition, but many consumers don’t yet realize just how many nutritional benefits a well-balanced diet that includes beef can provide. That’s why the NBC is working hard to help people of all ages understand the nutritional powerhouse that is beef. Every year, the NBC is a prominent participant in events such as the Northern and Southern Nevada Dietetic Associations’ annual meetings, the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Luncheon, and other health-oriented events. According to James Winstead, RD, who is the NBC’s new Director of Food and Nutrition Outreach, playing a role in these types of events is important to elevating the nutritional advantages of beef. “By partnering with organizations that have a strong health focus, we can help counter any misperceptions that might exist about beef, share important nutritional information, and provide suggestions for creative and delicious ways to incorporate beef into a healthy diet,” says Winstead. Want to learn more about how you can help answer questions about beef’s nutritional value? E-mail us at askus@nevadabeef.org.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


“My beef checkoff can address the health benefits of beef.” “Our checkoff-funded beef nutrition program addresses what is really on the minds of Americans — where their food comes from; whether it’s good for them; whether it’s safe; and how it’s produced,” says Lucy Rechel, feedyard operator from Yerington, Nev. When beef producers invest in the checkoff, influential dietitians and health professionals receive positive, credible beef nutrition messages that they can share with their clients. “These professionals have a huge impact on the eating decisions people make,” says Lucy. “And, checkoff dollars are limited, so reaching these influential audiences is an important aspect of what our investment does.” My beef checkoff …reaching influential professionals to help build beef demand.

Lucy Rechel

Snyder Livestock Company Yerington, Nev.

Get to know your checkoff — visit Nevada Beef Council at www.nevadabeef.org, e-mail askus@nevadabeef.org, or call (877) 554-BEEF (2333). www.progressiverancher.com

Funded by the Beef Checkoff.

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 27


Nevada’s Priority Agricultural Weeds:

Cheatgrass C

Brad Schultz, Extension Educator, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Winnemucca, Nevada.

eliminating most seed production heatgrass, also known as and reducing the seedbank to low downy brome (Bromus levels. Cheatgrass, however, has tectorum L.) is an annual, cool tremendous reproductive plasticseason grass that was introduced ity. Plant density can reach into the from Eurasia in the late 1800’s. It hundreds per square foot, with each typically grows on disturbed sites, small plant often producing only which may include linear corridors one seed. At low densities, a single used for roads, railways and energy cheatgrass plant per square foot may transport; ephemeral stream chanproduce hundreds of viable seeds, nels; mine works and gravel pits; particularly if competition from rangeland, pasture and small acredesired perennial grasses is absent. age lots that lack a dense population Cheatgrass seeds can germinate of perennial grasses; the boarders immediately after dispersal if suffiof production fields; farm or ranch cient precipitation occurs. Seed that areas that are managed as baredoes not germinate the first growing ground locations; abandoned agriseason generally only lives for 2 to cultural lands; industrial sites; and 3 years; however, a small percenturban waste areas. Cheatgrass can age may survive up to 5 years. A also become a serious pest in many key point to remember is that when crops, especially grains and forages. seed production is in the millions of In central and northern Neseeds per acre, even a “small pervada, and much of the Intermouncentage” is a large number. For extain West, cheatgrass can be found ample, if one million live seeds were from the valley floors to at least produced on an acre in 2013and the 9,000 feet elevation, and probably Figure 1. The basic growth unit of a grass plant, including cheatgrass, and how these growth five-year survival is one-tenth of even higher on the south and west units are organized in each tiller (stem) and plant. Leaf blades grow from the growing point one percent, in 2018 that acre will facing slopes, where the amount of (technically called the intercalary meristem) at the base of the leaf blade, and leaf sheaths still have 1,000 live seeds, even if bare-ground (potential germination grow from the growing point at their base. Additional tillers can develop from an axillary no other seed production occurs in sites) is often greater. The abunbud found at each node. As cheatgrass (and most desired grasses) grows, most of nodes and the next five years. Seed germinadance of cheatgrass tends to have an growing points become elevated and can be removed by livestock or mowing. Removal of tion and seedling establishment inverse relationship with the abuncheatgrass’ growing points late in the growth phase, when soil moisture is low, can prevent generally increase when a thatch dance of deep-rooted perennial most seed production and help control the weed. Conversely, removing most of the growing layer is present or the seed is buried grasses. That is, as the proportion of points on desired grasses and not allowing adequate regrowth can have adverse effects on at a shallow depth. Controlling the the ground surface that is occupied their growth in subsequent years. Figure from Briske (1991). Developmental Morphology and depth and distribution of the thatch by the deep-rooted perennial grasslayer is a key component for manages increases, the annual biomass Physiology of Grasses. In: Grazing Management: An Ecological Perspective. Available at: http:// ing cheatgrass. produced bycheatgrass declines. cnrit.tamu.edu/rlem/textbook/textbook-fr.html The root system of cheatgrass For any specific location, generally is shallow with most of cheatgrass may be the primary forthe root biomass is the top several age species, a significant nuisance, or even July at upper elevations if late season rains occur. a serious problem (think fire and its potential effects on your Air temperatures are important for knowing when to apply inches of the soil. If the growing conditions are particularly operation) or better than the probable alternative (i.e., a less herbicide treatments. If air temperatures become unusually good some roots may extend to 12 inches or deeper. There useful weed, such as yellow starthistle). It’s even possible cold plant growth can slow dramatically and even stop for a are no buds on the roots; thus, tillage that breaks up the that all four of these conditions may occur simultaneously. while, which can reduce herbicide uptake and transport to root system does not result in additional plants. Tillage, however, may bring deeply buried seeds to a shallow depth The management approaches used to control cheatgrass the growing points. will vary widely depending upon which of these conditions Being an annual plant, cheatgrass completes its entire or increase soil-seed contact. Both conditions can increase take priority on your land or even on adjacent lands that life-cycle in one growing season. The length of the growing a seed’s germination potential. Understanding how mowing or grazing treatments can could affect your operation. As always there is no one-size season, however, can vary widely from one year to the next. fits all answer to managing cheatgrass or any other weed. For plants that germinate in the fall, the leaves and their as- control any weed requires some knowledge about how the sociated growing points can overwinter in a near dormant weed grows. Each cheatgrass plant can produce one to many Plant Biology state. Growth resumes in the late winter or early spring tillers (stems), with each tiller producing several to many Cheatgrass is a cool season annual grass. The term when soil and air temperatures warm. Plants that germinate leaves, and usually one to many seeds. Like all grasses, each “cool season” means the seed germinates, the seedling in May typically produce seed and die by early to mid-June, tiller is composed of multiple growth units that elongate emerges, and most of the vegetative growth occurs during particularly at lower elevations where soils can dry rapidly. (rise above the ground) as the growing season progresses a time of the year when temperatures are relatively cool. Regardless of when the seed germinates and the seedlings (Figure 1). Each growth unit consists of four basic parts, This may be in the fall (typically September to November) emerge, when the soil becomes dry cheatgrass plants will each of which has a growing point. These are: 1) the leaf as days become shorter and cooler, or in the late winter quickly produce their seed and die shortly thereafter. blade, which develops from the growing point at its base; 2) through mid-spring. The latter period typically occurs from Populations of cheatgrass persist and increase only the leaf sheath, which also develops from a growing point late February through May at lower elevations, and June through seed production. Control of this weed requires at its base, and is attached to a tiller at a node; 3) the node

28 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

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itself; and 4) an axillary bud, which occurs at each node and can produce a new tiller, often called a daughter tiller. Daughter tillers typically develop from the oldest node (closest to the ground) when the terminal growing point (i.e., the potential seedheads) on the original tiller is “clipped off” before it has produced seed or completed its lifecycle. Early in the growing season all growing points reside near the soil surface and are difficult to remove by grazing or mowing. As the plant develops and grows larger most of the nodes, leaves and their associated growing points become elevated and can be removed by grazing, mowing or other methods of cutting the plant near the ground surface. However, there is almost always a basal bud or node very close to the ground that is not removed and can provide new growth if sufficient soil moisture remains. Using grazing or mowing as a control treatment requires timing the treatment to coincide with low soil moisture so that regrowth does not occur or is insufficient to permit the regrowth to reach the reproductive state.

Control Methods Cheatgrass is a ubiquitous component of most landscapes in the Intermountain West. Even under the best management schemes, cheatgrass will be present because human and non-human caused disturbance will always occur, and cheatgrass like all weeds thrives on disturbance. On most management units, whether it’s a small acreage parcel, a large ranch or farm, or a large federal grazing allotment, long-term effective control of cheatgrass will require an integrated pest management (IPM) approach. The first and foremost control strategy is cultural and involves maintaining a robust stand of perennial grasses on pasture, rangeland and other wildland settings. Dense stands of desired perennial bunchgrasses that are vigorous, and have large and deep root systems are going to occupy more space, and capture more soil moisture and nutrients than are sparse stands, or plant communities composed of largely shallow-rooted species. A dense population of deep-rooted species results in fewer resources being available for cheatgrass (or other weeds) to establish and grow, which results in fewer and smaller cheatgrass plants. Mechanical or physical control approaches are intended to uproot and kill plants before seed production occurs, but should occur after the soil is dry enough to prevent additional seed germination or seedling survival. When mowing or other cutting methods are possible, the flowers or developing seedheads can be separated from the plant which prevents seed production. The ideal stubble height of the cut plants would be about two-inches. Mowing at earlier phonological stages typically results in regrowth because there is enough soil moisture to allow growth to continue from any of the remaining growing points. If mowing is used as a treatment option, you have to be prepared for a follow-up treatment of some type. Mowing typically leaves at least one growing point on a plant: often a bud at the lowest node, near the base of a tiller (See Figure 1). If the soil moisture is recharged by late season precipitation, or cool weather permits the cut plant to make better use of the remaining soil moisture, growth can continue and seed production is possible. Fire is not appropriate for all situations but can be effective in both the spring and fall. Spring burning before the seed matures can kill the plant and prevent seed production. The amount of heat needed is low and only needs to be enough to kill, not consume the plant. Unless there has been fall germination, fall burning is not intended to kill the plant and often does not kill all of the seed in the plant litter or which resides on the soil surface. Fall burning, however, can consume most and perhaps the entire thatch layer, which reduces the probability of seed germination. There are no approved biological control agents for cheatgrass. A number of soil borne pathogens (e.g., Pyrenophora semeniperda, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7, and probably others) are known to prevent/reduce seed germination of cheatgrass but none have been captured and encapsulated with a workable delivery method. The Pyrehophora pathogen also is known to inhibit the germination of at least some desired species. Livestock grazing may or may not be a useful tool to control cheatgrass. The outcome depends upon how grazing, not whether grazing occurs. Spring grazing can be problematic because forage availability from cheatgrass is largely unknown until just before grazing occurs. Furthermore, forage availability after grazing starts can change dramatically if spring precipitation is above average, or only average but well timed. Spring forage from cheatgrass is a continuously moving target that is hard to accurately match when livestock numbers are relatively static. Also, the desired perennial grasses that we would like to see increase can be very susceptible to misuse in the spring if they ————————— Continued on page 31 www.progressiverancher.com

Table 1. Active ingredients and representative products known to control Cheatgrass. Not all representative products are listed. Many of the active ingredients listed also come in pre-mixed formulations with other products and those products are not listed in the table. A complete list of all active ingredients and products labeled to control Russian thistle can be searched for at the CDMS (http://www.cdms.net/LabelsMsds/LMDefault. aspx?pd=7607&t=) and Greenbook (http://www.greenbook.net/) websites. The order of chemicals below does not reflect any preference or efficacy. Active Ingredient

Representative Products

Selective

Soil Residual

Glyphosate

Roundup and many others

No

No

Post-emergent: seedlings and immature plants with rapid growth

Imazapyr

Arsenal, Habitat

No

Yes

Pre- or post-emergent

Growth Stage

Simazine

Princep 4L

Not at high rates

Yes

Pre-emergent

Propoxycarbazone

Canter R+P Olympus

Variable

Yes

Post-emergence from 2 –leaf to 2-tiller stage and active growth

Aminopyralid

Milestestone

Yes, but declines at high rates

Yes

Pre-emergent through heading

Aminopyralid with tebuthiruon

Milestone and Tordon 22K

Yes, but declines at high rates

Yes

Pre-emergent (fall)

Sulfometuron

Oust and others

Mixed, but perennial grasses usually safe

Yes

Pre- to early post-emergence

Sulfosulfuron

Outrider, Maverick

Mixed, but perennial grasses usually safe

Yes

Early postemergence, preferably when perennials are dormant

Metribuzin

Sencor

Mixed

Yes, especially sandy soil

Pre- or postemergent before weeds are 2 inches tall or wide

Hexazinone

Velpar

Mixed

Yes

Pre- to early postemergent: best absorption is by roots

Rimsulfuron

Matrix, Solida

Yes

No

Early post-emergent to actively growing weeds

Clethodim

Select, Envoy

Yes

No

Post-emergent (2-6 inches tall) during active growth

Trifluralin

Treflan

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent

Indaziflam

EsplAnade 200 SC

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent

Pronamide

Kerb

Yes

Yes

Pre- to early post-emergent

Imazamox

Raptor, Beyond

Yes

Yes

Post-emergent less than 3 inches tall

Sulfometuron with Chlorsulfuron

Landmark

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent to seedling

Imazapic

Plateau

Yes

Yes

Pre- or postemergent until plants are 3 inches tall

Terbacil

Sinbar WDG

Yes

Yes

Pre- to early postemergent: best absorption is by roots

Listing a commercial herbicide does not imply an endorsement by the authors, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension or its personnel. Product names were used only for ease of reading, not endorsement. Herbicides should be selected for use based upon the active ingredient and the specific bio-environmental situation.

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 29


Nevada’s Priority Agricultural Weeds:

Russian Thistle Brad Schultz, Extension Educator, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Winnemucca, Nevada.

R

for miles. As the weed tumbles it drops seed onto the soil surface all along its journey. One study found that each tumbling plant dispersed about 57 percent of its seed. The seed is highly viable and most will germinate or die by the end of the next growing season. One year after dispersal, less than one percent of the seed remains alive in the soil (i.e., the seed bank). The seed bank is usually even smaller in irrigated fields because of higher germination rates. There is some evidence that in dry-land grain fields, seed longevity may approach three years for a very small percentage of the seed. Even a very small percentage of viable seed after three years Figure 1. Russian thistle seedling can result in a large number of potential plants in a given area. For developing from the fully differexample, if 250,000 live seeds are dispersed onto one acre, and three entiated, coiled seed that permits years later, only one-tenth of one percent of them remain alive, that rapid early growth during short is 250 live seeds (e.g., potential plants). periods of favorable growing The seed of Russian thistle can germinate across a broad range conditions. (Photo by F. L. Young, of soil temperatures (45 to 90°F). Seed may germinate when nightUSDA-ARS, Pullman, Wash.). From: Plant Biology time temperatures fall below freezing provided the daylight temperaFrank Young and others. 1995. tures remain above freezing. Seedlings, however, are susceptible As an annual plant, Russian thistle has no growing points below Managing Russian Thistle Under to frost. Seedling emergence many begin as early as late March or the ground surface; therefore, there are no buds on the roots that must Conservation Tillage in Crop-Falearly April, and increases as soil temperatures warm in May and be eliminated to control an existing plant. Flowers can develop as low Rotations. PNW-492. Washingearly June, provided the top inch or two is moist. Germination and quickly as four weeks after seedling emergence and often are present ton State University. emergence may occur throughout the summer if the seedbed receives by mid-June or earlier in warmer areas. Seeds typically start to maas little as one-tenth of an inch of moisture. Seedling emergence is ture in August and seed maturation may occur into October or even highest when seed is buried less than one inch deep and the soils are loose. November for plants that emerged in late spring or summer, provided fall temperatures are Seed germination occurs rapidly because the seed is a naked (no seed coat or shell), warm enough for plant growth. A mature Russian thistle plant can produce upwards of 250,000 seeds, but most plants coiled embryo (Figure 1). As little as one-tenth of an inch of moisture can allow the embryo probably produce around 50,000 seeds. When the plants mature in the fall, the stem breaks to begin to uncoil and extend a taproot into the soil: a process that takes as little as 12 hours. off at ground level and strong winds allow the weed “tumble” across the landscape, often Once the taproot reaches the soil it grows quite rapidly and eventually reaches depth of 2 to

ussian thistle is a generic name used to address two species: Salsola tragus (Russian thistle) and Salsola paulsenii (Barbwire Russian thistle). Russian thistle grows in every state except Florida and barbwire Russian-thistle is confined to Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon and Utah. For this article, Russian thistle collectively refers to both species. Russian thistle is a warm season (summer) annual forb that initially was introduced to South Dakota form Eurasia in 1873, as a contaminant in flax seed. These plants generally inhabit disturbed ground, vacant lots, waste areas, fence lines, roadsides, abandoned agricultural fields, post-harvest grain fields and plant communities that have been disturbed and experienced a reduction in the density and/or abundance of deep-rooted perennial plants. Russian thistle grows best on loose or sandy soil, and tolerates alkaline and very arid conditions quite well.

Table 1. Active ingredients and representative products known to control Russian thistle. Not all representative products are listed. Many of the active ingredients listed also come in pre-mixed formulations with other products: those products are not listed in the table. A complete list of all active ingredients and products labeled to control Russian thistle can be searched for at the CDMS (http://www.cdms.net/LabelsMsds/LMDefault.aspx?pd=7607&t=) and Greenbook (http://www.greenbook.net/) websites. The order of chemicals below does not reflect any preference or efficacy. Active Ingredient

Representative Products

Selective

Soil Residual

Growth Stage

Active Ingredient

Representative Products

Selective

Soil Residual

Growth Stage

2,4-D

Many

Yes

No

Post-emergent: young plants

Flumioxazin

Chateau

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent

Glyphosate

Roundup and many others

Yes

No

No

Post-emergent: seedlings to before seed set

Bromoxynil-Octanoic acid ester

Buctril, Broclean

No

Post-emergent: actively growing young plants

Carfentrazone-ethyl

Aminopyralid

Milestone

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent only

AimEW

Yes, for labeled crops

No

Post-emergent to actively growing plants to 4 inches tall

Chlorsulfuron

Telar

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent to seedling

Metsulfuron methyl

Ally XP, Patriot

Yes

Yes

Post-emergent to actively growing young plants

Trifluralin

Treflan

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent

Pyraflufen-methyl

Edict 2SC, Vida

Yes

No

Post-emergent, small plants

Topramezone

Armezon, Impact

Yes

Yes

Post-emergent: actively growing to 4 inches tall

Indaziflam

EsplAnade

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent

Thifensulfuron-methyl

Harmony

Yes

Days

Post-emergent

Aminocyclopyrachlor

Method

Dose dependent

Yes

Pre- and post-emergent

Imazapyr

Arsenal, Habitat

No

Yes

Pre- or post-emergent

Dicamba

Banvel, Clarity

Yes

Highly variable

Post-emergent: seedlings to rapidly growing young plants

Imazamox

Raptor. Beyond

Yes

Yes

Post-emergent: actively growing to 3 inches tall

30 November./December 2013

Listing a commercial herbicide does not imply an endorsement by the authors, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension or its personnel. Product names were used only for ease of reading, not endorsement. Herbicides should be selected for use based upon the active ingredient and the specific bio-environmental situation.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


6 feet, with a lateral spread of up to 15 feet. This extensive root system provides the plant access to soil moisture from deeper soil layers throughout the summer months. Russian thistle can extract moisture from very dry soil because it accumulates oxalates (and perhaps salts and other chemicals) in its leaves and stems. These chemicals reduce the water pressure in the plant to the point that it is less than the water pressure in the soil. Water flows from the “higher” pressure potential in the soil towards the “lower” pressure potential in the plant. This allows transpiration and photosynthesis to occur, even during mid- to late-summer when soils are quite dry at all depths. Obviously, soils that received irrigation earlier in the year (e.g., harvested grain fields) will have residual soil moisture available for Russian thistle following harvest of the crop. Soil moisture also is readily available for Russian thistle in wildland settings when the vegetation is primarily shallow rooted plants like cheatgrass or Sandberg’s bluegrass (Poa Sandbergii). Most of their roots are in the top few inches of soil. The rapidly growing roots from Russian thistle can quickly establish in the deeper soil layers, accessing soil moisture throughout the summer. Vigorous, deep-rooted perennial plants with well- developed vertical and horizontal root systems that can extract soil moisture from the entire soil profile reduce soil moisture availability for Russian thistle. Seedling emergence and establishment of Russian thistle are highest in loose soils. That is why Russian thistle is much more common on soils that are sandy to loamy sands, or physically disturbed soils that have lost much of their structure and are crumbly and loose. In part, the loose nature of the soil is what allows for rapid growth of the taproot into the moist subsoil. There is less mechanical impedance to root growth.

Control Approaches Non-chemical Mechanical or physical approaches (e.g., disking, mowing, cutting, pulling) can be effective, particularly for small infestations. There are no growing points on the roots of Russian thistle; therefore, any action that severs the taproot below the growing points near the base of the main stem typically kills the plants. Mowing can be successful, but the result often depends upon how close the mower’s blade can come to the soil surface. The closer the mower blade is to the soil, the greater the number of axillary buds (i.e., potential new stems and flowers) removed from the upright stems. Mowing typically stimulates the development of axillary buds located at plant nodes. The buds produce new stems that eventually produce flowers and seed. Since Russian thistle can extract soil moisture throughout the summer a single mowing event often stimulates regrowth from buds that were close to the ground, below the mower’s blade. Regrowth often has a very low profile, potentially reducing the effectiveness of any subsequent treatment with a mower. Mowing often is most effective when it occurs just before flower maturation. Seed production may be prevented for that year if the remainder of the growing season is too short to allow for regrowth and/or flower development. Once seed has matured, mowing will only spread the seed and enhance the infestation. Any physical or mechanical approach is likely to require a sustained effort for several years to deplete the seed bank. In the shortwww.progressiverancher.com

term, tillage techniques often enhance Russian thistle germination and establishment. In the long-term, this can facilitate reductions in the seed bank provided annual inputs to the seed bank are prevented. Russian thistle is often readily consumed by all grazing animals at the seedling to immature (before spines develop) growth stages. This period often is brief; thus, the use of livestock as a biological control requires significant flexibility in an operators overall grazing plan. Also, Russian thistle accumulates chemicals in its leaves and stems that can become toxic at high levels of intake. It should never provide the primary forage for grazing animals. The best cultural approach to controlling Russian thistle is to maintain high plant cover or density of desired species. Russian thistle does not compete well when it is heavily shaded, particularly under irrigated conditions. On sites that receive little or no irrigation, maintaining a high abundance of deep-rooted perennial grasses creates an environment that adversely affects Russian thistle. These include shade and extraction of soil moisture throughout much of the soil profile. Less access to sunlight, soil moisture and nutrients reduces seed germination, emergence, seedling survival, and growth rates, which typically results in less seed production for those plants that do survive. When grain crops are grown, winter wheat generally provides better control and suppression of Russian thistle than spring wheat. Winter grain crops typically have more canopy cover earlier in the growing season, than do spring crops. This provides more shade on the soil surface when Russian thistle seed germinates and seedlings emerge. Russian thistle seedlings that establish in the spring, when canopy cover from spring planted grain crops is low, often survive quite well and resume rapid growth after the grain is harvested in July or early August. There are two biological controls listed for Russian thistle: the leaf mining moth Coleophora klimeschiella and the stem boring moth Coleophora parthenica. Neither has provided any successful control. Chemical Control Chemical control of Russian thistle is most effective at the pre-emergent to seedling growth stage. Control with herbicides becomes more difficult as the plants mature and become spiny. There are many herbicides known to control Russian thistle (Table 1). Collectively, they address just about all possible environmental and growing conditions. These include various levels of selectivity for non-target species; different degrees of soil activity and duration of soil residual activity; pre- and post-emergent applications; and chemicals labeled for different crops, non-crop situations, and wildland settings. Any weed control and management program for Russian thistle should consider using an integrated approach that applies two or more methods of weed control. Very seldom does a single approach work long-term. Furthermore, all approaches, except the purposeful management of an area for bare-ground, must consider how to increase, and is some cases establish, a high density of desired species (whether a harvested crop or wildland plants) on the infested site. A dense, vigorous stand of desired herbaceous species provides the least risk for experiencing a sudden large scale establishment event from Russian thistle. The Progressive Rancher

Cheatgrass Continued from page 31————————— are heavily defoliated and/or grazed multiple times, and most of their growing points are removed. Both conditions tend to prevent sufficient regrowth so the perennials can restore their energy reserves, which are needed to survive summer and winter dormancy, and initiate regrowth the next growing season. Fall (dormant season) grazing of cheatgrass has been tested at small scales and shows promise. By the late summer or early fall, the amount of forage available is known and it is fairly easy to calculate the number of animals needed to remove most of the standing crop. The risk toward the desired perennial species from improper use declines dramatically because they are not actively growing, unless fall green-up has occurred. Another potential advantage of fall grazing is that much of the litter layer is also consumed. Green succulent forage in the spring precludes the use of dead plant litter located on the soil surface, but in the fall the thatch layer has similar nutrition to the standing dead cheatgrass, especially if it contains many seeds. Reduction of the thatch layer reduces the quality of the seedbed for cheatgrass seed and could lead to reduced germination and/ or other losses to the seedbank. There are two caveats to successful fall grazing: having adequate water and protein supplement to keep the livestock from losing body condition and being able to move them across the area targeted for grazing. There are seldom enough livestock to graze all areas infested with cheatgrass, and water and protein supplements usually cannot be provided everywhere. Whenever livestock are being considered for the control of cheatgrass on large landscapes the tool should be considered in a strategic sense. That is, how can grazing benefit other resource management goals (e.g, fuels management) while meeting livestock production needs. Some locations obviously are better suited than others. There are many herbicides that work effectively on cheatgrass (Table 1). Many of these chemicals can also kill the desired residual perennial species found on infested sites. The effect on the perennials can vary widely depending on the dose applied, and the maturity and growth stage of the perennial species. There may be no effect on mature or dormant plants, or plants late in their annual growth cycle. Conversely, mortality can be very high for seedlings or mature plants that are in the early stages of their annual growth (e.g, greenup). The suite of herbicides shown in Table 1 covers a broad range of sites (e.g., industrial, non-crop, agricultural, rangeland, etc.) on which cheatgrass grows. You should read the latest product labels thoroughly to reduce the risk that any herbicide treatment will have unintended consequences on the desired plants you want to increase after weed control. No treatment approach should ever have a long-term adverse effect on the desired species unless you are willing to implement a full blown reseeding/restoration effort. The next article in this series will address perennial pepperweed, a long-lived perennial forb with tremendous regrowth potential from a large root system with many growing points. November/December 2013 31


Russian Knapweed

H

ello from the Humboldt Watershed CWMA! The HWCWMA was developed to address the invasive weed problem and subsequent decline in water quality within the entire 16,843 square mile watershed, which covers most of Northern Nevada. The primary function of HWCWMA has been to provide land managers, owners and weed control groups assistance in the areas of funding, agency and weed group coordination and cooperation. This month we would like to introduce you to one of Nevada’s state listed noxious weeds, Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens). Russian knapweed is a native of Eurasia, introduced in North America about 1898 as a contaminant of Turkistan alfalfa. Russian knapweed is a perennial that has a rhizomatous, or extensive, root system. Russian knapweed can grow up to three feet in height and forms dense colonies due to this root system. Roots are also distinguishable by their black color, bark-like texture, and by buds that develop into shoots. Leaves at all stages are a gray green in color due to the fine whitish hairs that over the leaves. Leaves are alternate. Lower stem leaves are lance-shaped and deeply lobed. The upper leaves are oblong, toothed, and become progressively smaller. Seedlings are oval, hairy and grey-green in color, but Russian knapweed is more likely to reproduce by root than by seed. This plant is bushy and from June to September, produces a pink to purple flower that, when mature, becomes more cream colored. Bracts below the flowers have rounded papery tips. Seeds are ivory white and have hairy tips which fall off the seed as it matures. A single plant may produce up to 1,200 seeds annually. Several allelopathic compounds have been found in Russian knapweed that can inhibit other plants. Russian knapweed is generally avoided by grazing animals due to its bitter taste, and too much ingestion of Russian knapweed by horses causes a fatal neurological disorder. Prevention of Spread of Russian Knapweed New infestations at Russian Knapweed may be reduced by planting weed free seed, feeding materials free of Russian Knapweed seed and cleaning equipment before leaving infested fields. Close attention should be placed on any feed or seed materials imported from the northern and northwestern states. Quick identification and destruction of Russian Knapweed plants is essential to prevent its spread. Control of Russian Knapweed shall mean preventing production of viable seed and destroying the plant’s ability to reproduce by vegetative means.

PINENUT

LIVESTOCK SUPPLY INC. 263 Dorral Way Fallon, Nevada

Reno Highway across from

Herbicides Approved for Controlling Russian Knapweed The following herbicides may be used by landowners. Other products labeled and registered for use on this noxious weed in Nevada may be used in accordance with label directions. Be sure to follow all label directions and precautions. • 2,4-D Low Volatile Ester. Apply at the early bud stage. Follow label directions and precautions. • Dicamba (Banvel, Clarity, Vanquish). Application shall be at the early bud stage in the spring and fall on pastures, rangeland and noncropland. Follow label directions and precautions. • Picloram (Tordon 22k). Restricted use pesticide. Follow label directions and precautions. • Imazapic (Plateau). Apply during senescence in the fall. Follow label directions and precautions. • Imazapic + Glyphosate (Journey). Apply during senescence in the fall. Follow label directions and precautions. Please notify the HWCWMA if you see Russian knapweed growing along the Humboldt River. Our staff can provide the property owner or appropriate public agency with site-specific advice on how best to remove it. We have an opportunity to stop it from spreading if we act quickly. We map all known locations of regulated noxious weeds such as Russian knapweed in order to help us and others locate new infestations in time to control them. The Humboldt Watershed CWMA has also developed a website to serve as a clearinghouse for information on weeds in the Humboldt Watershed. Our website (http://www. humboldtweedfree.org) contains fact sheets for state listed noxious weeds in Nevada, Board of Director’s information, funding partner’s links, and many more features including a detailed project proposal packet that you can print, fill out and mail back to us at your convenience. We are looking to expand our project area outside of the Humboldt River and always welcome new funding opportunities. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Andi Porreca, HWCWMA Coordinator at (775) 762-2636 or email her at aporreca@humboldtweedfree.org. Or you may speak with Rhonda Heguy, HWCWMA President at (775) 738-3085, email: hwcwma@ gmail.com.

Legislative Commission Defers Proposed Trap Registration

Las Vegas, Nev - Legislators serving on the Legislative Commission deferred a proposed regulation when they met on October 22 that would require all traps to be registered, including those used to protect

private property. The Legislative Commission unanimously deferred the regulation until after the 2015 Legislative Session. The language of SB 213 did not adequately reflect legisla-

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32 November./December 2013

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tive intent that allows for property owners to use traps to protect their property. It was indicated in the discussions by individual legislators that the bill was intended for commercial trappers to register traps used to take furbearing mammals. The language of SB 213 included all traps used to take all mammals, including mousetraps. “This is a victory for private property owners who use traps to protect their property,” said Nevada Farm Bureau Lobbyist Doug Busselman. “We are very appreciative of the way legislators dealt with the matter. The language for the law will be up for debate in the 2015 Legislature, and hopefully the language will result in a private property exemption.” Nevada Farm Bureau would also like to thank Farm Bureau members and other interested Nevadans who took the time to contact the Legislative Commission asking that the proposed regulation be rejected. www.progressiverancher.com


Range Plants for the Rancher By Paul T. Tueller, Ph.D., CRMC

W

Green Molly

e find numerous shrubs and so-called subshrubs throughout the Great Basin. One of these is sometimes called Green Molly, Summer Cypress or often just referred to simply as Kochia or sometimes forage Kochia. The Scientific name is Kochia Americana S. Wats. Although I find that another name is being used, Neokochia Americana. Also these plants were first referred to as belonging to the genus Bassia. About 30 to 40 species have been named with only two occurring in North America, the others in the Old World and Australia. A subshrub or dwarf shrub is a short woody plant. Prostrate shrub is a similar term. The term often is used interchangeably with bush. The definition of a subshrub is not clearly distinguishable from that of a shrub; examples of reasons for describing plants as subshrubs include ground-hugging stems or low growth habit. They may be largely herbaceous, with overwintering perennial woody growth much lower-growing than deciduous summer growth. Some plants described as subshrubs are only weakly woody and some persist for only for a few years. Forage kochia (Kochia americana) is native to the western United States from California to Montana to Texas and varies in elevation from 600 to 2100 m. A closely related species is also called Forage Kochia (Kochia prostrata) and is a nonnative species introduced from Eurasia. This latter species is touted as a cure for cheatgrass and has been widely seeded on western rangelands primarily in the saltdesert shrub zone. Kochia prostrate is native to the arid and semiarid regions of central Eurasia. It was introduced into the United States in 1966 and released as a perennial forage shrub in 1984. Previously, Kochia american, a native North American species was erroneously referred to as Kochia prostrata. These species are habitually quite similar. Kochia prostrata (Linnaeus) Schrader, the Eurasian subshrub 15-100(-150) cm tall, with linear to filiform, flat or scarcely fleshy leaves 5-25 × 1-2 mm, is known in North American range management literature as “forage kochia” or “prostrate summer-cypress.” It is extremely variable mor-

Kochia Americana

Kochia Americana

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phologically and widely distributed in Eurasia, especially in steppe, semidesert, and desert zones. This species is being tested and already used locally as a forage plant for western United States ranges and is an escaped or naturalized alien plant in several western states. Breeding is being researched to find taller varieties that may protrude above the snow on winter ranges. My description here is for Kochia americana a member of the Chenopodiaceae or Goosefoot family of plants. This species is a 4 to 16 inch subshrub, woody and much branched at the base, simple and herbaceous above. Stems are grayish-white. Plants flower in late summer. They reproduce from seed. The flowers are small, without stalks, extremely hairy and white and the fruit is a utricle (a small, tin-walled, one-seeded bladdery-inflated fruit). The leaves are alternate or opposite, often occurring in fascicles (similar to a pine tree). The blades are narrow, fleshy, and about ½ inch long. Surfaces are dark green and covered with long silky hairs. The stems are grayish and hairy and are covered in small, fleshy, knobby leaves less than 2 centimeters long. The stems and foliage are sometimes slightly hairy. Leaf anatomy is of the “C3 type” with a thick-walled aqueous tissue. White-woolly flowers appear singly or in small clusters. The fruiting perianth (calyx and corolla of a flower collectively and similar in appearance) is 5-winged. Forage kochia (Kochia Americana) is a perennial native plant found in desert valleys, flats, marshes, roadsides and foothills of the cold desert often found growing in alkaline soils. New growth, especially the leaves, often dries to a black color. They are found associated with saltbush, shadscale, black sagebrush, Indian ricegrass, and saltgrass. Forage kochia (primarily Kochia prostrata) has been seeded on western rangelands to improve plant community diversity, aesthetics, plant cover species richness, forage for livestock and wildlife, fire prevention, and soil stability. It tends to suppress or eliminate the invasion of alien annual weeds like cheatgrass, halogeton, Russian thistle, and medusahead rye. It is not highly invasive and does not spread aggressively into healthy plant communities. It does not compete well with perennial grasses. Forage kochia provides excellent forage for sheep, cattle, and deer. It is often used as winter forage for sheep. It is high in protein during the fall and before the first frosts the crude protein is fairly high (about 13 percent).but is much lower in the winter. There is some evidence that it may accumulate nitrates. Recent research at the University of Nevada Reno by Dr. Barry Perryman and colleagues sheds some further light on the subject. Studies with Kochia prostrata suggest that the plant can cause frothy bloat if too much of the plant is grazed in the fall when it may be the only plant with some green. Therefore there is need to be careful when this species is grazed. However, a rancher with good stands of this palatable species in his pastures is indeed fortunate and if used properly good additional forage is provided.

Kochia Prostrata

The Progressive Rancher

November/December 2013 33


Van Norman Stockhorse Challenge Results T

he Van Norman Stockhorse Challenge was again held in conjunction with the Van Norman and Friends Production Sale on September 13, 2013 in Elko, Nevada. Eighteen participants in four divisions vied for awards and cash prizes. Seven youth participated in the 10 and under class, and four youth participated in the 11-16 class. A variety of special awards were also given. In the $3000 Limited Snaffle or Hackamore class: • 1st : Casey Bieroth and DW Nic and Pepper, a past Van Norman & Friends Sale horse • 2nd : Jacob McKay and Jackie Chan • 3rd : Leah Mori and current sale horse, Frederica Pine Other contestants in this division were Levi Chandler on sale horse Chickasha Samson and Katie Groves on Smooth To Dual. In the Open 6 and Under Snaffle or Hackamore class: • 1st: Ty Van Norman on Colonel Black Catt • 2nd : Flint Lee on current sale horse, DR Peptos Firstshot • 3rd : Rolly Lisle on reference sire, Frettin (owned by Randy & Linda Bunch) In the $3000 Limited Two-rein or Bridle class: • 1st: Casey Bieroth on JP Freckles Fudd, a past sale horse • 2nd: Casey Gallagher on Sonny Smokes • 3rd: Tana Gallagher on past sale horse, Funny Little Bayboy Other contestants in this division were Andrew Evans on current sale horse Spooky Wright On, Ronda Van Norman on JP Royal Showgirl, and Jackie Rowland riding Dry Doubt. In the Open 7 and Over Two-Rein or Bridle class: • 1st: John Schutte on Ima Champ Like Lena. • 2nd: Cory Shelman on reference sire, DW He Be A Playgun (owned by Shelman/Bunch) Other participants were Jim Davis on Done It In A Mudslide and Jennifer Black riding Call Me Docs Hickory. In the Division A (10 years and Under) youth class: • 1st: Hannah Rose Kelley on Miss Tari Oak. • 2nd: Isaac Mori on Bright Eyes • 3rd: Anna Van Norman of Tuscarora on Van Norman Reference Sire, Peptos Playboy • 4th: Keaton Sorenson on Ace • 5th: Charlie Wright on Slick • 6th: Audrey Wright on Meo, a past sale horse • 7th: Trent Whitely on Guido. In the Division B (11 to 16 year old) youth class: • 1st: Dally Goemmer on Chino • 2nd: Riata Goemmer on Rooster. • 3rd: Kayson Sorenson Doc. • 4th: Justin Sorenson on Blue Banjo. In all four adult divisions, first place winners received headstalls from Fred Buckmaster of Fallon, NV; second place winners received certificates for customized palm hats rom Becky Hendrix-Herr, Kimberly, ID, and third place received halters from Kelly Pfeifer of Tuscarora, NV. In the Senior Youth Division, first place received a snaffle bit from Norm Harris, Pocatello, ID; second place in both youth divisions received wild rags from Becky Hendrix-Herr, and third place received halters from IFA. Special Awards: • Casey Bieroth and JP Freckles Fudd - Top Scoring Previous Sale horse, adult division(Tooled-leather padfolio donated by Andy Stevens, Spring Creek, NV) • Audrey Wright on Meo for High Scoring Previous Sale Horse, youth division(Pendant donated by Linda Bunch) • Flint Lee on Rhoads Ranch horse DR Peptos Firstshot for Top Current Sale horse(Stirrups donated by Cristi Walker of Owyhee, NV) • Rolly Lisle-Top Competing Reference Sire, Frettin (Custom stirrups donated by Jessica Kelly, Owyhee, NV) • Flint Lee-Top Reference Sire Freckled Lil Pepto owned by Dean & Sharon Rhoads (Mecate by Norm Harris, Jr. Pocatello, ID)

J.B. Whitely Photos

Casey Bieroth and JP Freckles Fudd receiving padfolio from Andy Stevens for High Point Horse purchased in previous Van Norman Sale. • Tana Gallagher -Top Lady Rider (Buckle donated by Teresa Murphy) • Leah Mori -Hard Luck Award(Blingy dog Tag from Teresa Murphy) • Dally Goemmer -High Scoring Youth (Trophy buckle from JM Capriola Co.) • John Schutte- Overall High Score (Bridle donated by Van Norman Quarter Horses) The management of the Van Norman Stockhorse Challenge would like to thank Judge Sue Abel, scribe Megan Harney, Blake Nuffer for announcing, Becky Lisle for putting together the awards, John Griggs for the cattle, those of you who helped with the cattle, our many sponsors and supporters, and the participants themselves. Also special thanks to our sponsors: Elko Federal Credit Union, Elko Convention and Visitors Authority, Ellison Ranching Company, Dennis and Karan Ferreira, Billie Filippini, Gallagher Ford, , Porath Quarter Horses, and Zoetis (formerly Pfizer) and to all those friends previously noted who donated awards.

At Right: Rolly Lisle and Frettin in Open Snaffle Bit/ Hackamore

34 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

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Shelman/Bunch Reference Sire DW He Be A Playgun with eight of his offspring consigned to Van Norman and friends Production Sale

2013 Van Norman and friends Production Sale Results I

t was a good weekend for a horse sale. Rain over Labor Day followed by an unsettled weather pattern over northern Nevada several days befoe the sale where the skies darkened in the afternoon and delivered welcome showers in the early evening only to be followed by beautiful sun-drenched mornings not only relieved the chokehold the two-year drought had had on the parched earth, but also renewed the spirits of those gathered at the Elko County Fairgrounds on Friday and Saturday, September 13 and 14. Beginning on Friday, the Van Norman Stockhorse Challenge ushered in the sale weekend. Eighteen adults and eleven kids vied for prizes, cash, and glory in the three event working cow horse competition. The roping segment was especially exciting with results in most of the events hinging on a well-placed or misplaced loop. That evening, JM Capriolas held their ranch roping event which featured a two-head horse roping and a two-head muley steer roping where the ropers had to switch ends on the second animal. A damp arena and the threat of more showers did little to dampen the enthusiasm of contestants and audience alike. Saturday, sale day, began with fog and a soft drizzle which was replaced by ten o’clock with warm sunshine and gentle breezes. There was a positive aura as prospective buyers lined the fence and sat in the grandstand in front of the arena to view the preview of the thirty-six riding horses. This proceeded smoothly and efficiently with ample time between the preview and the auction for closer inspection of prospective purchases, visiting with consignors, and partaking of a delicious lunch prepared by Van Norman Ranches, Inc. which featured their own Wagu/Angus beef. Auctioneers Blake Nuffer and Ted Odle kept the bidding lively as they went through 85 horses in about 31/2 hours. Both the phone lines and the internet manned by High-seller: JP Royal Pepto Chex Alan Taylor of horseauctionslive.com were active as absentee bidders were able to watch the live webcast and bid either online or on the phone. Comments such as “you sure have a good set of horses” and “you are having a great sale” were not uncommon. Prices were much stronger than the past couple of years with fewer pass outs. In addition to Nevada, horses found new homes in California, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Arizona, Oregon, and Mexico. The finishing touch to the weekend High-selling weanling: An unnamed was the Low Stress Cattle Handling buckskin colt Clinic with Martin Black which took place after the sale. Nine people actually participated on horseback in the arena with about fifty others observing from www.progressiverancher.com

the grandstand. Plans are already being formulated for the 2014 event which will be the same weekend, September 12 and 13. Also we will be having another Internet Sale in July of 2014. Stay tuned!!!! High-seller: JP Royal Pepto Chex, a 2011 Blue Roan Stallion by Peptos Playboy out of Royal Doc Bar Chex consigned by Van Norman Quarter Horses was purchased by Rustin Smith of Jiggs, NV, for $12,200. High-selling weanling: An unnamed buckskin colt (a full brother to last year’s high selling weanling) by DW He Be A Playgun out of Olena Buffy consigned by Linda Bunch and Dean Shelman sold to Jorge Gonzalez, Vera Cruz, Mexico, for $3500. Top 10 riding horse average: $7445.00 Top 20 average: $5,517.50 Visit www.vannormansale.com for complete results.

PRODUCTION SALE Thank you to all our consignors, buyers, contestants, donors, and sponsors for your support of the 17th Annual Van Norman and friends Production Sale, Van Norman Stockhorse Challenge, Martin Black Low Stress Cattle Handling Demonstration, and JM Capriola Ranch Roping

Join us September 12 and 13, 2014 for our sale, horse show, ranch roping, and a very special surprise to be announced!!!

Pre-Catalog Internet Sale July 29-30, 2014 www.horseauctionslive.com

www.van norm ansa le.co m

The Progressive Rancher

Visit us on Facebook www.facebook.com/vannormansale

November/December 2013 35


Lessons from Down Under A

s many westerners have known for years, the current management methods of the BLM’s Wild Horse & Burro program are unsustainable, both ecologically and financially. The year 2013 has brought a broader spectrum of attention to the issue, with the release of a National Research Council (NRC) study as well as articles in national magazines and opinion columns dedicated to the issue, bearing titles such as “Wild Horses, We’ll Eat Them Someday,” and “The West is on the brink of a wild horse apocalypse—no, really.” The original Wild Horse & Burro Act states that excess animals for which no demand for adoption exists be destroyed as humanely as possible; however, action from “wild” horse advocates has resulted in an effectual ban on killing healthy “mustangs” Thus, the BLM currently houses more feral horses in long-term holding (over 45,000) than are living on the range. The total number for appropriate management levels (AMLs) for the 179 herd management areas (HMAs) is 23,622, but even having removed approximately 195,000 horses from the range over the years (as of 2012), the current on-range population is estimated to be around 33,000-- 10,000 over AML. If the program continues on its current path, costs are estimated by Science magazine contributors Robert A. Garrott and Madan K. Oli to reach as high as $1.1 billion between 2013 and 2030, with the bulk of expense going toward caring for unadoptable horses in long-term holding. The potential devastation to rangeland resources and native wildlife habitat is of even more concern. The NRC report concluded that if feral horses were left unmanaged, their numbers on public lands would triple every six to eight years, inevitably leading to poor health, suppressed reproduction, and mass die-offs due to starvation and dehydration, and resulting in degraded rangeland condition for native wildlife and all of the mandated multiple uses of

Ruby Valley: Two adjoining Ranches will make one good ranch! Total of 2,174 deeded with 470.31 Water righted acres out of creeks and springs. USFS permit for 95 head. Split by paved State Rt.229. Modest improvements. Combined price: $1,650,000. Clover Valley Farm: 243 Acres with 160 acres with underground water rights, two irrigation wells, a stock well and a good domestic well. Large modern home with detached 5 car garage, 3500 and 5000 sq. ft metal buildings and greenhouse. All for only $500,000. Or buy the farm land for $225,000. Elko Co. 10,706 deeded with BLM grazing permit: These private sections are in the checkerboard area and are intermingled with public lands. The ranch has historically been a Spring Sheep range. The BLM permit is only 29% public lands. Price includes 50% of the mineral rights on all but 320 acres. Price:$130/acre. Or $1,392,000. Considering adding the property below to it to make a year around unit.

Elko Co. Humboldt River Property: 650 acres located between the Ryndon and Osino Exits on I-80. This property has over 300 acres of surface water rights out of the Humboldt River. The BLM permit for the 10,706 acres above is a short distance from this property with a stock driveway on this property. Price:$1.2 million. Tent Mountain Ranch: Approx. 3500 deed acres in Starr Valley. Nice larger home on paved road plus mountain cabin. Great summer range with water from numerous creeks and seeps. This ranch is made of up of over 20 separate parcels if a buyer were more interested in Investment property vs. Agricultural property. Over 135 acres with surface water rights. Price $3.5 million. Indian Creek Ranch: 126 acre Homestead with large Spring and at the foot of the Cherry Creek Range in White Pine County. Certificated and permitted water rights on the spring for 60 acres. Price reduced to $275,000.

For additional information on these properties go to: BOTTARIREALTY.COM

We need more Ranch and Farm listings!

Paul D. Bottari, Broker

Work: 775-752-3040

paul@bottarirealty.com

1222 6th St., P.O. Box 368 Wells, NV 89835

Home: 775-752-3809 • Fax: 775-752-3021

36 November./December 2013

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by Becky Lisle federal land. Thus, the NRC found that the BLM must actively manage the feral horse and burro population, but would have to initiate management changes to put it on a sustainable path. This is, of course, easier said than done when the BLM is met at every turn by litigation instigated by “mustang” advocates. Garrott and Oli estimate that the typical 15 to 20% annual population increase of feral horse herds could potentially be halved by means of contraceptive vaccines, but with many variables in play, the effectiveness and practicality of gathering and administering vaccines to large numbers of horses is questionable, especially considering that the vaccine is only effective for a maximum of three years and repeated doses would be necessary. Cost-wise, Garrott and Oli found that: “every horse that does not enter long-term holding facilities would save, because of contraceptive application, $16,110 in maintenance cost (or savings of $1 million for every 62 horses), not considering the modest costs of contraceptive application,” and that eventually, the BLM would only have to remove 2,000 to 3,000 horses annually to maintain appropriate management levels as established with “thriving ecological balance” in mind. However, they suggest that it would take as long as a decade to refine the contraceptive program to the point that it would work as necessary, which begs the question: what happens in the meantime? Across the globe, Australia faces the issue of feral horse and camel overpopulation, with the feral horse population exceeding 400,000. Feral horses in Australia are officially categorized as pest animals. They were first recognized as such in the 1860’s after having arrived on the continent with colonists in 1788. Just as America has “mustang” advocates, Australia has the Waler Horse Society of Australia (WHSA), which maintains that Waler horses played an important historical role and merit protection. The society was formed in 1986 in response to a controversial management method: mass aerial culling. The pragmatic technique was implemented due to Australia’s vast size, otherwise inaccessible landscape, and frequent droughts. Considering that even the most routine BLM gathers are met with opposition, it is highly unlikely that aerial culling would be implemented in the US—even though the very same method is used in some southern American states to thin the destructive feral hog population. The Central Land Council (CLC) manages 750,000 square kilometers in Australia’s Northern Territory. While the primary purpose of an aerial cull is to alleviate the suffering and deaths caused by starvation and dehydration, the CLC’s concerns also include the environmental impact of myriad horse carcasses around water resources, the resulting increase in scavenger populations, and the potential effects of both on commercial livestock and more vulnerable native species. In May 2013, an estimated 3,500 feral horses on the Tempe Downs Station, southwest of Alice Springs, Northern Territory, were gunned down from helicopters, despite a petition from the WHSA. The CLC followed up with a welfare study, with two veterinarians assessing the killing of 2,000 horses and performing autopsies on 100. Sam Rando of the CLC was quoted as saying: “The average time to death was eight seconds and 58 per cent of those 2000-odd horses died instantaneously…(the vets) also measured the pursuit time - that’s the time that the horses respond to the distant sound of helicopters approaching them - and the average time was 73 seconds.” Rando also reported that shooters aim for the head, neck, and chest of the horses, and that the vets recorded that 97 percent of them were shot in one of the three target areas, and there were no animals wounded. Thus, the aerial culling method was decided to be humane. Rando stated, “… whether people feel there’s some cultural value of a particular type of horses, as far as I’m concerned it’s irrelevant. The animal welfare issue is the same.” In the western United States, while we are far from throwing another “wild” horse on the barbie as suggested by one columnist, one can only hope that we don’t have to reach the point of a wild horse apocalypse to bring about responsible, common sense management. References: www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/prog/whbprogram/history_and_facts/quick_facts.html. http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6148/847.full http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-08-26/wild-horses-we-ll-eat-them-someday.html http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/08/26/ the-west-is-on-the-brink-of-a-wild-horse-apocalypse-no-really/ http://www.daff.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/51961/IPA-Feral-Horses-RiskAssessment.pdf http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-13/animal-welfare-horse-culling/4873726 http://horsetalk.co.nz/2013/05/11/planned-aust-aerial-cull-target-10000horses/#axzz2gmkBX3o3

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NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity Champions Nick Dowers and Time for The Diamond.

Nick Dowers Wins NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity Championship on Time For The Diamond

Primo Morales photo.

In his first trip to the National Reined Cow Horse Association Snaffle Bit Futurity Open finals, Nick Dowers, Dyer, Nev., claimed the $100,000 Championship aboard Time For The Diamond (One Time Pepto x Diamonds With Style x Playin Stylish), a horse he owns under the name of his family’s Triple D Ranches, LLC. Dowers, 31, piloted the sorrel stallion to a total 661 score (218.5 herd/218.5 rein/224 cow), earning a deafening ovation every time he entered the arena. “I wasn’t sure I would be able to hear the horn at the end of my fence work,” he said, smiling. “This is surreal. It hasn’t even sunk in. I’ve been telling my wife for a year - I got the horse to do it. If I can get things done right, I got a shot.” Besides the six-figure paycheck, Dowers won two Bob’s Custom Saddles sponsored by Jeffrey & Sheri Matthews/One Time Pepto and the NRCHA; two custom saddle racks sponsored by Sunmoon Ranch; two Gist buckles sponsored by Hooker Creek Ranch and Lone Oak Veterinary Clinic; the Dorothy Jenkins Bush Perpetual Trophy, sponsored by the Ralph Gragg Family and Keith Christie; a polar fleece cooler from Classic Equine; Platinum Equine from Platinum Performance, a 30x hat from JW Brooks Custom Hats; Back On Track product sponsored by Back On Track; and a 10 pound bucket of UltraCruz Sand Clear plus a $50 gift certificate and a coffee tumbler in a cooler tote bag, sponsored by San Juan Ranch, a division of Santa Cruz Animal Health. “I was totally confident in my horse and his abilities. It sounds clichéd, but I woke up this morning knowing it was my day. I really did. I never got nervous. There were a couple shows this summer when I was more nervous than I was tonight,” Dowers said. “My horse tries so, so hard. He has so much try, it’s unbelievable. He felt more trained tonight than he did when I got here. Usually they come unraveled.” Time For The Diamond was bred by Gardiner Quarter Horses, Ashland, Kansas. Dowers purchased him as a yearling at the 2011 NRCHA Snaffle Bit Futurity Sale. “I saw his head and neck sticking out of the stall, and I was, like, ‘Wow.’ He’s got the prettiest head and neck of any horse here, in my opinion. And that’s what drew me to him.” Dowers started and trained “Cactapus,” nicknamed by his 5-year-old daughter, Tuli, and never considered selling him until an elite NRCHA professional threw a six-figure offer on the table after seeing Dowers show the stallion at a pre-futurity this summer. “I stewed over it for three or four days. It was a hard decision, because I really needed an indoor arena at my house because the weather’s just brutal. So I could have bought an indoor arena or kept my horse,” he said. “I called a good friend and mentor and asked him what he thought. He said, ‘Well, is your dream worth that?’ I was, like, ‘You’re right. It isn’t.’ So that was my decision. My dream of this, tonight, wasn’t worth the price. Now I have my indoor arena and I still have my horse!” Dowers, who competed against five NRCHA Million-Dollar Riders and Hall of Fame horsemen in the finals, arrived in Reno with just over $73,000 in prior NRCHA earnings. The colt-starting specialist said winning the crown jewel of reined cow horse www.progressiverancher.com

competition won’t change him or his training style, but it will attract a higher caliber of horseflesh to his program. “I don’t feel like I need to have a huge barn, but this is definitely going to bring in some of those better horses, and I’m going to ride them,” he said, smiling. He appreciated his herd help, Phillip Ralls, Corey Cushing, Jake Telford and Todd Bergen, and especially thanked his wife, Jackie. The couple has three children: Tuli, 5; Crue, 3; and Jovi, 1.

Price: $650,000

BRUNO’S COUNTRY CLUB Gerlach, NV Includes: Restaurant, Bar, Banquet Room and Motel & Apartments (53 units)

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For Information Contact: Tom Corty

CORTY R EAL ESTATE 775-746-4442 tomcorty@att.net

November/December 2013 37


Right: Coed 1st place Team, J Lazy N

Carlin Team Branding Competition

Left: Mens 1st place Team, NK Ranch

The 2013 Carlin Team Branding Competition was held August 3rd at the Carlin Equestrian Park. In its second year the branding drew in thirty five teams who competed for buckles, prizes, and money. The City of Carlin would like to thank the event sponsors, the volunteers, and the Tomera family for helping make this event another success. The winners of the team branding competition are as follows: Mens:

1st NK Ranch- Nathan Kelly Jr., Will Knight, Marshall Smith, Nathan Kelly Sr. 2nd Wines/Sharp- Steve Wines, Sam Wines, Joe Wines, Lanny Morrison 3rd Rigos Team- Rigo Cordova, Ramone Cordova, Alan Malotte, Isaiah Jones 4th Venturacci Livestock- Daniel Venturacci, Fred Bailey, Beau Buchanan, Gary Garaventa

Womens: 1st Petan Ranch- Danielle Jackson, Jessica Jackson, Jessica Kelly, Abra Snow 2nd Tuscareka- Renee Jackson, Andrea Sestanovich, Rhonda Garaventa, Rosie Bliss 3rd Susan Wines Team- Susan Wines, Kathi Wines, Tana Gallagher, Jaci Garijo

Right: Womens 1st place Team, Petan Ranch

Coed:

Submitted Photos

1st J Lazy N team- Nathan Kelly Jr. , Crystal Kelly, Jessica Kelly, Will Mike 2nd Buzzetti/Wines- Rachel Buzzetti, Joe Wines, Andy Wines, Kathi Wines 3rd Souza Family- Jerry Souza, Karen Souza, Stephanie Souza, Clayton Souza 4th Rising Sun Team- Gary Garaventa, Fred Bailey, Rosie Bliss, Rhonda Garaventa

Financial Focus Presented by Sonny Davidson and Jason Land, Financial Advisors, Edward Jones in Elko, Nevada 2213 North 5th Street, Suite A | 775-738-8811

A

What Does Shutdown Mean to Investors?

s you’re well aware, a partial government shutdown began on October 1. No matter what one’s views are on the political issues that led to this event, it’s probably fair to say that a shutdown is not particularly good news, on many fronts. Although essential services will continue, including Social Security and Medicare payments, other governmental functions will be disrupted, and hundreds of thousands of workers will be furloughed. So, as a citizen, you may well have concerns about the shutdown. But how will the shutdown affect you as an investor? First of all, you may want to take to heart the slogan popularized by the British in World War II: “Keep calm and carry on.” You don’t need to panic, nor do you need to make massive changes to your investment portfolio or even take a “time out” from investing. It’s highly likely that, like all political/economic traumas in the past, this one, too, shall pass. To gain some perspective, you might be interested in knowing that the current situation is not unique. We’ve had 17 government shutdowns in the past, most recently in 1996. And the overall effect of these shutdowns on the financial markets has not been particularly negative. Stocks dropped during nine of these shutdowns and rose during the other eight. Once the shutdowns ended, the average stock market gain was 2.5% over the following three months and 13.3% over the following 12 months, according to an analysis of the S & P 500 stock market index. Of course, as you’ve no doubt heard, “past performance cannot guarantee future results,” so you shouldn’t necessarily expect the market to turn in similar results once this

38 November./December 2013

current shutdown is over. Nonetheless, the history of the market’s performance following government shutdowns does tell us something about the tremendous ability of the financial markets to absorb short-term crises — and then move on. This isn’t to say that you won’t see some volatility in the days and weeks ahead if the shutdown continues for a while. The financial markets do not like uncertainty, and while some of this uncertainty may already have been “factored in” during the past few weeks, as the possibility of a shutdown increased, we may still see some significant price gyrations. Try not to overreact to these price swings, if they do occur. If you feel you must do something with regard to your investments, why not take this opportunity to look over your long-term strategy to make sure it’s still properly aligned with your goals, risk tolerance and time horizon? Over time, your personal situation can change in many ways, so it’s always a good idea to review your investment portfolio, and to make those changes that can help you continue making progress toward your objectives, such as a comfortable retirement. Furthermore, if we do see some price declines, you may well be presented with the opportunity to buy quality investments at good prices, so stay alert for these possibilities. Above all else, don’t let the headlines of today scare you away from investing for tomorrow. With patience, discipline and the ability to maintain a long-term perspective in spite of short-term events, you can develop good investment habits that will serve you well for a lifetime. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

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The Progressive Rancher Coloring Page

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November/December 2013 39


Allie Bear

Real Estate

Spec ializing in hunting, ranching, and horse properties Davis Ranch

Great little ranch north of Elko about 14 miles out. 157.19 acres. Fenced, cross fenced, large barn, stalls, tack room, corrals, round pen, arena. 3 Bedroom / 2 bath home with covered deck, 4-car garage. $500,000

Flying M Ranch

Great ranch, Just minutes from I-80 (Imlay, NV) & not far from Winnemucca. Approx. 23,000 acres of deeded ground with more than 23 miles on the river. Winter outside-no feeding. One of the oldest water rights along the river. $15,000,000

J and M Farm

Very nice farm just minutes from Battle Mountain, Nevada. 169 acres of which 130 are in production. Feedlot, corrals, new shop & equipment shed. New 3 bed, 2 bath mobile with mature landscape.

J M Farm (Winnemucca) 58 acre well maintained farm just 3 miles from downtown Winnemucca. Approx. 43 acres planted in alfalfa/grass mix. Water rights included in sale. Includes two homes, mature landscaping, several outbuildings, barn and horse corrals. Farm equipment will be negotiated with sale. $780,000 Starr Valley Pasture

Unique fenced 1,104 acres on Boulder Creek bordering U.S. Forest Service in Starr Valley, Nevada. Water-righted with nice meadows. $1,400,000

South of Eureka (Duckwater) 830± head cattle ranch operation with 4,851.52 deeded acres. Irrigated meadowland, rangeland in undulating and mountainous native land. Elevation 5,300’ to 6,300’ at highest point. BLM and Forest Service grazing permits.

Marla Griswold 1930 — 2013

Marla Griswold, a long time Nevada ranch woman, died Saturday, April 27 at the age of 82. She was born December 29, 1930 in Stockton, CA, the daughter of Glee Cassaretto Mason and Howard Herschel Mason. After graduating from high school in Lodi, CA she attended the University of Nevada Reno where she was a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority. She married Eyer Boies on March 9, 1951 while they were students at UNR. They settled on his family’s ranch in Elko County, where they raised three children and where Marla remained actively involved for 62 years. Eyer passed away in 1976 and in 1980, she married Don Griswold. She was proud of her service on the Elko County Commission, the Nevada State Environmental Commission and the federally appointed Nevada State ASCS Committee. Marla also served on the Salmon River Cattleman’s Association Board of Directors. She was also active in Cattleman’s and Cattlewomen’s associations. Friends and family will remember her for her love of world travel, the outdoors, quilting, photography, cooking, canning and as an accomplished potter. She was an avid fan of horse racing and a successful owner of race horses. Marla never missed the Elko County Fair where she always had

Ronald Dee (R.D.) Damele 1937 — 2013 R.D. passed away April 26, 2013 at the age of 75, with his family by his side, at the Winter Range, Pancake Summit, White Pine Co.,NV, doing what he loved-gathering, working and shipping cows. R.D. was born August 11,1937 at the Eureka County Hospital to John Charles (Charlie) and Juanita Julie (Nita) Damele. He attended Eureka County Schools and graduated in 1955. Upon graduation he was involved in the Family Ranching Business. In 1958 he, Charles Damele and Earle Borgna bought the Eureka Garage and operated it for several years. R.D. and Charles started a construction business in 1965 and operated until 1976. R.D. was in the farming business in Diamond Valley and also in Mining for 15 years. He was elected Eureka County Commissioner in 1978 and served four years. During his retirement years he ran the Hay Squeeze for his sons and played an

Recanzone Ranch

Neat ranch in Paradise Valley. 900 + acres, 300 AUMs, right by town. Original Sandstone House. Easy access to Hinkey Summit & surrounding mountains. Includes Barn, Outbuildings and Corrals. $1,500,000

Ruby Mountain Ranch

31.39 acres. Beautiful 3 bed/2 bath perm. manuf. home with enclosed porch addition, 3 car garage. Fully landscaped yard. Fenced and cross fenced with metal gates. Corrals, sheds, chicken coop, shop, horse stalls, large building w/cover, fuel storage, yard light, squeeze chute and metal panels. Both domestic and irrigation well and supplement water rights. $535,000

sold

Diamond Springs Ranch View comple listings at:

www.ARanchBroker.com

775-738-8535 Allie Bear, Broker/Realtor

something to exhibit, connected with friends and cheered on the race horses. Her grandchildren will remember her as their first instructor in learning to drive, fish and hunt. As the grandchildren grew older she helped them pursue their higher education and was a trusted advisor in business ventures. Marla is survived by her children, Eyla (Richard) Kaufman of San Diego, CA, Nina (John) Hollifield of Jerome, ID and Steve (Robin) Boies of Wells, NV; seven grandchildren, Claire and Ben Kaufman, Teema, Nathan, and Sam Boies, OJ Hollifield and Janet Hollifield Lott; seven great-grandchildren; one brother, Howard Mason; and Don Griswold’s children, Anita Keogh of La Sal, Utah and William Griswold of Dickinson, ND, and many extended family members and friends. She is preceded in death by her parents and two husbands. Memorial Services were held, Saturday, May 4, 2013, at the Wells LDS Church. Marla’s family suggests that in lieu of flowers, memorials be made in her name to: The American Cancer Society, 691 Sierra Rose Dr Ste A, Reno, NV 89511; or the College of Southern Idaho Foundation, PO Box 1238, Twin Falls, ID 83303; or Northeastern Nevada Historical Society and Museum, 1515 Idaho Street, Elko, NV 89801.

ongoing and vital role in helping the boys with their cows. R.D. was preceded in death by his parents and brother, Stephen Douglas Damele. He is survived by his wife Arlene Weatherford Damele and four sons, Ronald (Kathy), James (Garney), Mark (Amy) of Eureka, NV, and John (Ashley) of Sparks, NV. He was lovingly called PAPA by his 12 grandchildren- Pat, Mike and Gracie; Melissa, Megan and Jamie; Emily, Deanna, Beth and Katie; Corrine and Cameron-who were his pride and joy. R.D. is survived by his brother Charles (Patty) of Richfield, ID. Whether it was working, celebrating a birthday or holiday with family, R. D. found such joy in having his family close to him. He was such an influential part of our daily lives.

775-777-6416

40 November./December 2013

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Dorothy S. Gallagher

Dorothy Sewell Gallagher, a fourth generation Nevadan, was born on September 14, 1925 to J. Harvey and Mollie Sewell, in Elko, Nevada. She spent her earliest years in Salt Lake City, moving with her parents and younger sister Mary Lou, to Reno to attend a year at Billinghurst Middle School before attending high school at Holy Rosary Academy in Woodland, California. Her father Harvey was a noted Nevada banker and owned the Sewell grocery chain with his two brothers. She returned to Reno in the fall of 1943 to attend the University of Nevada, where she met the love of her life, Thomas H. Gallagher, who was also attending the university. During her years at the university, she was president of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority. She was graduated with a pre-med (zoology) degree in the spring of 1947 and married Tom August 30, 1947. They spent four years in San Francisco while Tom attended dental school at P and S (now the University of the Pacific.) During those years, two of their three sons were born. Dorothy and her family returned to Elko in 1951, where Tom began the practice of dentistry with his father and brother. In 1953, their youngest son was born, and Dorothy immersed herself in the business of motherhood, becoming actively involved in PTA and performing the duties of den mother to a brood of rowdy Cub Scouts. She also became heavily involved in the day-to-day operations of the family

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1925 — 2013

ranches in Lamoille, Pine Valley and Diamond Valley. The ranches were sold in 1979 and Dorothy was elected to her first of many terms as a University Regent in 1980. Her territory spanned the state from the Idaho border to Pahrump and encompassed 11 of Nevada’s 17 counties. During her 30-year tenure as a regent, Tom would often fly Dorothy to the outlying counties, Reno, or Las Vegas for various university-related meetings. Also during that time, Dorothy joined the Board of Directors for Nevada National Bank and remained on that board for ten years, until its sale to Security Pacific Bank. Dorothy was always active in other philanthropic community activities, while maintaining her business and family responsibilities with her typical attention to detail and aplomb. This included time as an elected member of the Elko County Hospital Board of Trustees and as a member of the board of directors of Vitality House, a substance abuse rehabilitation center. Dorothy was frequently honored by organizations for her commitment to public service, diligence, and innovative thinking. These honors include: • University of Nevada Distinguished Nevadan (an honor also shared by her husband Tom and Father Harvey Sewell; • University of Nevada Honorary Doctorate;

The Progressive Rancher

• University of Nevada Alumnus of the Year-2009; • Nevada Women’s Fund Hall of Fame Award for Education; • Elko General Hospital Legacy Award; • Junior Achievement Northern Nevada Business Leader’s Hall of Fame; • Nevada Hospital Association Trustee Excellence Award; • Mining and Metallurgical Society of America, Gold Medallion (first women to be so-honored) Dorothy peacefully passed away on the morning of May 15, 2013. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Thomas H. Gallagher, sons Michael (Tana), Thomas (Bonnie), Frank (Sally), five grandchildren and three great grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister, Mary Lou Gallagher and her three children. The Gallagher family thanks her diligent and compassionate physicians, A.N. Reddy, M.D., Louis Bergeron, M.D., and Kirin Madden, M.D. The Gallagher family also extends special gratitude to Linda Cordell, her personal secretary and caregiver. It is suggested any memorial donations be directed to Great Basin College, Health Sciences program in honor of Dorothy S. Gallagher.

November/December 2013 41


A specialized industry deserves our specialized attention. From operating lines and equipment financing to livestock purchases and real estate, we have supported Nevada’s farmers and ranchers for over half a century. That knowledge and experience is personified by John Hays, our agricultural banking specialist. He’ll come to you, and will get to work finding the right financial solutions,* so you can plan, prepare, and grow. Bring your banking home. John Hays, Agricultural Banking Specialist 775.525.6744 nsbank.com I 53 years in Nevada 50 branches statewide *Loans subject to credit approval, restrictions apply. 42 November./December 2013

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LookUP by Pastor Diana Gonzalez

T

hat’s a good question to ponder. Let’s look in our owner’s manual and see what the Bible says about the stewardship of the land, and who’s in charge of its care and use. Let’s start at the beginning. In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Genesis 1:1 (NKJV) And the earth brought forth grass, the herb that yields seed according to its kind, and the tree that yields fruit, whose seed is in itself according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:12 Then God said, “Let the earth bring forth the living creature according to its kind: cattle (domestic animals) and creeping things (reptiles, insects) and beasts (wild animals) of the earth, each according to its kind,” and it was so. And God made the beast of the earth according to its kind, cattle according to its kind, and everything that creeps on the earth according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. Then God said, “Let us make man in Our image according to Our likeness; let them (man) have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth. Genesis 1:24-26 God chose to reproduce His characteristics in mankind, He chose to give him dominion over the earth and the animals, He created man to be His agent, to rule and subdue God’s creation. Man is different from the rest of creation. God made man in His image. Man consists of spirit, soul (mind, will and emotions), and body. He is a moral being whose perception and intelligence exceed that of the rest of creation (although man sometimes acts like that’s a secret to be kept!). God gave man prominence and worth over the rest of creation, but with this added ability and capacity comes added responsibility and accountability concerning His (God’s) creation. So man needs to take his office of dominion over earth and over animals, but he must also be a faithful steward over God’s creation, over his life and the blessings that God gives him. In Exodus 20 God gives us His ten commandments (not suggestions). In verse 3 God says, “You shall have no other gods before me.” Pretty plain, right? We are to worship the one true God. We are to put nothing above Him. Not trees, not grass, not horses, not cattle, not our truck, or even our family (Genesis 22). God should always come first. God is a god of order and balance. If we seek to obey His commandments, and seek His righteousness (His right way of doing things, Matthew 6:33), things will go well with us, the land and the animals. Most ranchers I know are prime examples of good stewards of God’s creation. Of course, there are always exceptions, those who used and abused the land and the animals then moved on to destroy some more, but those are few and far between. Of course, those are the ones the public hears about. Man is to steward the land and animals, and the land and animals are to serve man. So how is man to steward the land and cattle? Man goes out to his work, and to his labor until the evening. Psalm 104:23

You are invited to COWBOY CHURCH!

Hwy. 395 /A3 — Standish 4-H Hall

Sounds like most ranchers I know. Be diligent to know the state of your flocks, attend to your herds. The hay is removed, and the tender grass shows itself. Proverbs 27:23&25 Why? Why do we work so hard to care for our land and stock? So that they in turn can serve us. The lambs will provide your clothing and the goats the price of a field (or what ever your needs). You shall have enough goat’s milk (or cow’s milk) for your food, for the food of your household, and the nourishment of your maidservant (or your hired help). Proverbs 27:26-27 He (God) causes the grass to grow for the cattle and vegetation for the service of man, that he may bring forth food from the earth. Psalm 104:14 Then He (God) will give the rain for your seed with which you sow the ground and bread of the increase of the earth; it will be fat and plentiful. In that day your cattle will feed in large pastures. Isaiah 30:23 A nice, fat, grain-fed beef sounds good to me! With people and with animals, we have the productive and the non-productive, the caretakers, and the takers. If you stop and think about it, I believe you will agree that most ranchers and farmers fall into the productive, caretaker category. They work and tend the land, their flocks and herds, to feed the world – productive and non-productive alike – those who would bless them, and those who would curse them. Sounds like Someone else I know. Happy Trails from everyone at Harmony Ranch Ministry. May God richly bless you. We love you and would love to hear from you. If you would like someone to pray with, or just have a question, please give us a call at (775) 867-3100. ‘Til next time….

IT’S NOT JUST CATTLE IT’S YOUR LIVELIHOOD Purchase livestock, machinery, real estate and more with our intermediate term loans. We’ll design a plan that’s right for you.

Are you having a Rodeo or Livestock event? Give us a call.

1st Saturday of every month Standish, CA @ 6:00 p.m.

Ranchers: Ideal Stewards of the Land?

We would love to come to your event or ranch and host Cowboy Church for you.

Call 800.800.4865 today or visit AgLoan.com

Harmony Ranch Ministry 3767 Keyes Way  Fallon, NV 89406 

Tom J. Gonzalez Diana J. Gonzalez, Pastor threecrossls@cccomm.net 

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RENO • ELKO • FALLON

(775) 867-3100 Cell (775) 426-1107

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A part of the Farm Credit system. Equal Opportunity Lender.

1

1/22/2013 12:34:24 PM November/December 2013 43


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID Permit # 3280 Salt Lake City, UT

3 TOP SONS OF CONSENSUS 7229 SELL

THESE FLUSH BROTHERS BY WK BOBCAT OUT OF A VRD X OSCAR BRED DAM SELL CED BW WW YW SC CEM M CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $QG $YG $B CED BW WW YW SC CEM M CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $QG $YG $B CED BW WW YW SC CEM M CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $QG $YG $B

-1 +3.4 +55 +97 +.68 +5 +31 +26 +.80 +.39

+.011 +30.23 +38.78 +39.83 +35.16 +4.67 +79.06

+3 +3.0 +58 +105 +.99 +7 +31 +28 +.75 +.37

+.009 +29.78 +47.25 +38.27 +33.96 +4.31 +80.29

+3 +1.8 +58 +107 +1.23 +7 +33 +24 +.61 +.26

+.004 +33.95 +49.79 +34.41 +30.19 +4.22 +72.17

CED BW WW YW SC CEM M CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $QG $YG $B

Bobcat Z24

Birthdate: 03/04/2012

CED BW WW YW SC CEM M CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $QG $YG $B

Bobcat Z27

Birthdate: 03/09/2012

+6 +.8 +56 +92 +1.06 +10 +17 +34 +.36 +.37

• 1 pm (MST)

Bobcat Consensus Z65

+.010 +35.66 +32.31 +24.48 +21.48 +3.0 +70.97

Birthdate: 03/20/2012

Connealy Consensus 7229 x Rally Dutchman 219 +5 +2.3 +63 +105 +1.23 +8 +27 +40 +.73 +.70

Bobcat Consensus Z29

+.029 +39.15 +44.82 +37.46 +33.45 +4.01 +90.01

Birthdate: 03/10/2012

Connealy Consensus 7229 x WK Miss Angus 1403 (Granddam of WK Bobcat)

CED BW WW YW SC CEM M CW MB RE FAT $W $F $G $QG $YG $B

Bobcat Z34

Birthdate: 03/12/2012

+11 +1.5 +62 +98 +.32 +11 +15 +39 +.79 +.57

Bobcat Consensus Z57

+.012 +39.73 +36.70 +39.40 +34.94 +4.46 +90.40

9TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE

MONDAY NOVEMBER 25, 2013 Western Livestock Auction • Great Falls, Montana

www.bobcatangus.com ALL BULLS 50K & GENETIC DEFECT TESTED

Birthdate: 03/18/2012

Connealy Consensus 7229 x Connealy Danny Boy

SELLING: 50 Bull Calves 50 Fall Yearling Bulls 50 Coming Two-Year-Old Bulls 500 Commercial Angus Bred Heifers • 1 pm •Synchronized A.I. Bred to WK Bobcat (MST) •Ultrasounded for calving dates and sex 110 Coming Three-Year-Old Commercial Bred Cows •A.I. bred to Mytty 4-Stroke & cleaned up with X Factor sons 35 Ten-Year-Old Commercial Bred Cows 25 Registered Bred Heifers 30 Seven-Year-Old Registered Bred Cows

Bryan Ratzburg: (406) 937-5858 Cell: (406) 788-3272 Ernie Ratzburg: Cell: (406) 788-3244 John Goggins: (406) 698-4159 Shane Whiteman: (406) 937-0688 Cell: (406) 366-0688 265 Bobcat Angus Loop, Galata, MT 59444 Email: bobcatangus@northerntel.net

44 November./December 2013

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


ProgRancher Novdec13 prproof