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NCA 2009 President’s Award Recipient


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In this Issue... Nevada Cattlemen’s Assn.............pgs. 3-4

Beef Checkoff.............................pg. 30-31

Nevada Rangeland Resource Commission.......................pg. 5

Range Plants for the Rancher: Desert Marigold............................... pg. 32

Talking About NCBA........................pg. 6 Eye on the Outside........................... pgs. 8 Ramblings of a Ranch Wife............. pg. 13 Fumes from the Farm.................... pgs. 15 Buy Nevada: Churchill Vineyards.................. pgs. 16-17

Nevada’s Priority Agricultural Weeds: Puncturvine............................... pgs. 34-35 HWCWMA: Mayweed Chamomile......................pg. 36 Edward Jones: Financial Focus................................ pg. 37 Look Up: Just a Slow Learner.........pg. 39

NV Farm Bureau Young Farmers & Ranchers........................................... pg. 21

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NO! Inspectors / NO! Processing....pg. 40

A Bull Can Make a Difference..................................pgs. 22-23

Coloring Page...................................pg. 42

The Organic Movement: Part 1..........................................pgs. 24-25

NACO and NV Farm Bureau File Suit Against the BLM..............................pg. 44

NV Farm Bureau Photo Contest Winners ...................pg. 29

Get your Horse to Stop by Backing Up................................... pg.47

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Cover Photo: 2013 Fallon Bull Sale, by Leana Stitzel Published 9 times each year, The Progressive Rancher is mailed to more than 7,000 approved addresses, and has digital and print readership reaching more than 30,000.

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Rates for advertising are available upon request. Advertising in The Progressive Rancher does not necessarily imply editorial endorsement. Liability for any errors or omissions in advertisements shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by the error or omission. The Progressive Rancher is free to people working and active in the livestock industry. The Progressive Rancher is donated to the agricultural industry. If you are not currently receiving this magazine on a regular basis, and would like to be a part of The Progressive Rancher family, contact us by e-mail at progressiverancher@elko.net, today, so we can include you on our mailing list. If you have moved or changed addresses, please notify us, by e-mail, so we can keep you informed. All requests for the magazine must be made by e-mail.

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RIDING FOR THE NCA BRAND Ron Torell, President, Nevada Cattlemen’s Association

Will the Greater Regional Sage-Grouse (GRSG) become known as the Great Basin Spotted Owl (GBSO)?

T

he comment period for the draft Land Use Plan Amendment (LUPA) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of the Nevada and Northeastern California Greater Sage-Grouse (GRSG) has come and gone (January 29, 2014). Interested parties, including the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association (NCA), have poured through the three-inch high Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and United States Forrest Service (USFS) documents containing 1,015 pages of repeated use of 188 acronyms, tables, maps and Government verbiage. I apologize upfront for the excessive use of acronyms in this article but I want the reader to get a sense of the tone of a government EIS. This grueling review process was done in an effort to draft and submit meaningful comments in accordance with the guidelines outlined in the EIS draft document. If you or your ranching operation took the time to comment on this very complex and important issue you certainly share in the frustrations of the process. NCA leadership has heard from many of our members relative to the potential listing of the GRSG. As a result of these many conversations we surmised there is a general misunderstanding on several key points about the draft EIS document and the endangered species listing process. At the forefront of misunderstood points is that this draft EIS document put out by the BLM/USFS is not an EIS for the potential Endangered Species (ES) listing of the GRSG. Actual listing of the GRSG is determined by the United States Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS) not the BLM or USFS. Listing by the USFWS is scheduled to be determined and announced in the fall of 2015. The USFWS determined that changes in management of GRSG habitats are necessary to avoid the continued decline of populations. The BLM/USFS draft EIS considers six possible management alternatives and sets out to determine which of those alternatives (or portions of those alternatives) best accomplish favorable habitat changes for maintaining and increasing habitat for GRSG. More than 17 million acres of habitat are managed by the BLM and USFS in the affected area. It seems the burden of proof on many public land use management issues often falls on the users and caretakers of the land and not the decision makers. The decision makers often live far away and are far removed from the land. One thing is for certain. If a management option is not selected and implemented that maintains and increases habitat for GRSG, a USFWS determination of “endangered” is likely to occur. If an endangered species listing were to occur the socio-economic impact

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would be similar to what happened to those in the Pacific Northwest where and when the spotted owl was listed as endangered. GRSG might then become known as my own newly formed acronym GBSO (Great Basin Spotted Owl). No one wants GBSO to become a reality. With an endangered listing the rural way of life would be clearly impacted. Every land use entity including livestock, miners, energy, hunters, rural governments, and outdoor enthusiasts would be affected. As discussed in the various management options contained in the daft EIS it is both coincidental and ironic that many land users have historically worked toward land habitat restoration and continue to do so through good stewardship of the land practices. Good stewardship is the right thing for the bird, the land, the people and the cow. Habitat restoration requires on-the-ground habitat projects such as water improvements, spring and meadow restoration, invasive species management, green-stripping, fire management (including fuels reduction through strategic and planned grazing), reseeding rangelands, etc. It is much easier to perform these projects on private ground rather than public lands. Undeniably there are legal, political, environmental and social obstacles associated with public lands which are not associated with private land management. Slowing habitat restoration on public lands are lawsuits by radical environmental groups, management of feral horses, government bureaucracy, predator and wildlife management. Let’s concentrate on the issues we have control of: habitat restoration of our private lands and to the best of our ability our public grazing allotments. Good stewardship of the land is always the right path to take. When all is said and done, that is the intent of the draft Land Use Plan Amendment (LUPA) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of the Nevada and Northeastern California Greater Sage-Grouse (GRSG). I would like to express my appreciation for their many hours working on the laborious sage grouse issue to NCA’s public lands co-chairpersons, Ron Cerri and JJ Goicoechea, along with Nevada Sagebrush Ecosystem Council (Sage Grouse Committee) member representing ranching, Steve Boise, in addition to NCA Executive Director, Desiree Seal, for her efforts in submitting meaningful comments on behalf of the Nevada livestock industry. Should you like to visit with any of these individuals or the NCA staff, please feel free to contact NCA at 775-738-9214 or my NCA e-mail address ncapresident@nevadabeef.org Through this monthly column our hope is to update those involved in the Nevada Livestock industry about the issues NCA is working on for our mission continues to be to promote, preserve and protect a dynamic and profitable Nevada beef industry.

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 3


Nevada Cattlemen’s Association By Desiree Seal, Nevada Cattlemen’s Association Executive Director

N

Town Hall Meeting A Success

evada Cattlemen’s Association (NCA) recent interactive video Town Hall Meeting was a huge success reaching over one-hundred Cattlemen at eight remote locations throughout the state. The three hour event discussed the scientific facts and received grass roots input on several front burner resource management issues facing the livestock industry as well as addressed the timely use of genomic enhanced expected progeny differences (EPD’s). Of primary focus at the multi-community interactive meeting was a discussion of the draft Land Use Plan Amendment (LUPA) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of the Nevada and Northeastern California Greater Sage-Grouse (GRSG). The deadline for comments on the draft EIS is January 29 so talking points for making sub-

Association Holds Young Cattlemen Recruitment Christmas Social

T

he Nevada Cattlemen’s Association (NCA) recently held a Christmas social for young cattlemen interested in membership and participation in NCA’s mission to promote, preserve and protect a dynamic and profitable Nevada beef industry. The meal, social and membership recruitment event was sponsored by Zoetis Animal Health and was held at the Red Lion Inn and Casino. Zoetis is an animal health pharmaceutical company that has always shown strong support to the livestock industry. “We need membership of all ages but are actively seeking younger individuals”, states Ron Torell, President of NCA. “Our present membership is aging while fewer young people are entering the industry willing to take on the many political issues that affect our lifestyle. We are seeking out those potential members between the ages of 18 and 40 who are actively involved in the production of beef cattle. The beef industry needs your membership and participation in the political activities of NCA,” concludes Torell. If you are interested in becoming a dues paying member of NCA and would like to be included in future NCA membership recruitment activities such as the recent Christmas social, please contact the NCA office at 775738-9214 or nca@nevadabeef.org.

4 February 2014

stantive comments as well as where and how participants could easily submit their comments prior to that deadline were provided to attendees. Other issues addressed included the ongoing wild and free roaming horse debate which has been looming since 1971 as well as the Elk over population and management issue. Most importantly NCA heard from its membership and industry relative to their stand on these and other important issues facing the livestock industry. In addition to NCA leadership, members of the Nevada Sagebrush Ecosystem Council, members of the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Committee, county commissioners, University of Nevada faculty and other interested parties were present and commented on the allencompassing Town Hall meeting. The three hour program was sponsored by the Nevada

Cattlemen’s Association Fallon Bull Sale in cooperation with the American Angus Association (AAA) and Angus Genetic Incorporated (AGI), Great Basin College, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and United State Department of Agriculture Risk Management Agency. This was the first time NCA has hosted an interactive Town Hall meeting and it worked well. It is a cost saving method which minimizes travel yet reaches membership and the livestock industry throughout the state. Nevada Cattlemen’s Association’s mission continues to be to promote, preserve and protect a dynamic and profitable Nevada beef industry. Should you like to visit with NCA staff or leadership feel free to contact NCA at 775738-9214 or nca@nevadabeef.org

Listing the Greater Regional Sage Grouse (GRSG)

Will have a Huge Economic Impact on Rural Nevada and the Livestock Industry By Ron Torell, President Nevada Cattlemen’s Association

During several recent public forums focusing on the potential listing of the Greater Regional Sage Grouse (GRSG) the United States Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS) State Supervisor Ted Koch grossly downplayed the economic impact the listing would have on local economies, rural Nevada and the ranching industry. The USFWS will decide the fate of the bird and federal land users in late 2015 by announcing a decision of either endangered or threatened for the GRSG under the endangered species act (ESA). Either listing would be disastrous to those who use federal lands. The Nevada Cattlemen’s Association (NCA) supported an effort by Texas A&M University and University of Nevada, Reno researchers to analyze the economics of alternative range management options for ranchers in Nevada following the addition of GRSG to the endangered species list which would result in reductions of grazing permits. The economic study and article titled Economic Analysis of Management Options Following a Closure of BLM Rangeland due to Sage Grouse population in Elko County, Nevada was recently published by these two universities and authors. Elko County, Nevada was selected for the analysis because the region has suffered several large range fires over the past ten years and contains significant prime sage grouse habitat. A panel of NCA ranching members representative of full-time, moderate to large cow/calf operations in the region, were interviewed to obtain specific information for the analysis. Habitat protection for the sage grouse in the West is a significant problem for the economic viability of ranches due to the potential permanent loss of thousands of acres of grazing lands. Ranchers who depend on federal land grazing for part or all of their pasture are limited in their management options when habiThe Progressive Rancher

tat protection prevents their use of federal land. Reducing the herd or retiring is their remaining option due to limited available private land for lease. The purpose of this study was to analyze the economic consequences of reducing the herd size on a representative ranch in Northeast Nevada if the ranch was faced with permanent loss of federal rangeland due to habitat protection for sage grouse. An economic model of a representative ranch with 650 mother cows in Elko County, Nevada was used to analyze alternative scenarios of decreasing herd size as the federal grazing land was reduced due to habitat protection. The results showed that should the ranch be forced to reduce the herd size by more than 25%, the ranch might have to look at ways to retire or acquire more private land to survive. The state of Nevada is 87% public owned land so purchasing more acreage is implausible. The protection of the GRSG at the cost of grazing land for cattle in the West could have a significant negative impact on the livelihood of ranchers and supporting industries across the region. This is a much different story than what was stated by USFWS Nevada State Supervisor Ted Koch.

Reference: Economic Analysis of Management Options Following a Closure of BLM Rangeland due to Sage Grouse population in Elko County, Nevada. The authors are James W. Richardson, Brian Herbst, and Tom Harris, respectively, Regents Professor & Texas AgriLife Research Senior Faculty Fellow, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University; Research Associate, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University; Professor, State Extension Specialist, and Director, Department of Economics, University of Nevada, Reno. www.progressiverancher.com


Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission by Rachel Buzzetti, Executive Director

Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission is Accepting Funding Proposals

T

he Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission (NRRC) is accepting funding proposals until February 18, 2014. The NRRC will accept any application, in which the objective goals are to promote public land ranching, thru advertising or supporting the responsible control, management, or use of grazing lands. NRRC funding is supported by all permittees in the state, who pay ten cents an AUM. It is mandatory that you pay as stated in NRS Chapter 563, therefore NRRC feels it is critical that we prioritize our goals when spending the dollars. It is our hope that the foundation we build now will create a growing awareness about the benefits of public land grazing. NRRC looks forward to hearing new ideas for 2014. A meeting has been scheduled for the beginning of March in Winnemucca to listen to all of the proposals. If you are interested in submitting a proposal our funding application is available on our website at www.nevadarangelands.org .

Nevada Ranchers Caretakers of our

Rangelands

Cowboys and sheepherders produce food and fiber for the nation. Growing food on Open range is a natural biological process.

NRRC Helps Reproduce Set of Agricultural Posters

Grazing actually benefits the land with hoof action and natural fertilization. Plants are healthier and regenerate faster after the herds move to a new range.

Antelope and other game animals and birds take advantage of the improvements made by ranchers.

Grazing cattle and sheep coexist peacefully with native wildlife and, in fact, make a friendlier habitat for many species.

Sheep often graze on steep terrain and can control cheatgrass, a major fuel for wildfires.

I

n 2002 the Nevada Heritage Foundation along with the Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission (NRRC), the Ag Council, and Northern Nevada Dairymen created a set of seven posters depicting major commodities produced in Nevada. The set of posters has been widely distributed over the years and used in the classroom to improve the agricultural literacy of urban students as well as at fairs, career days, and conferences. This year the NRRC assisted in re-printing 1,000 sets of the beef and sheep posters. The posters have been updated and printed. If you would like a set for your Ag in the Classroom project please contact Dennis Hellwinkel at the Nevada Farm Bureau 775-674-4000. www.progressiverancher.com

Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission was created by the State of Nevada to promote responsible public land grazing. Representatives come from Nevada state grazing boards, Nevada Woolgrowers, Nevada Farm Bureau, and Nevada Cattlemen’s Association.

4780 East Idaho Steet, Elko, NV 89801 • 775-738-4082 WWW.NEVADARANGELANDS.ORG This ad is funded through the NRRC’s assessment of 10 cents an AUM paid by public land ranchers.

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 5


Talking About NCBA Joe Guild, 6th Region Vice President

T

he publisher has asked me to write another monthly column dealing solely with news and opinion about the NCBA. I will continue to write my column “Eye on the Outside”. So much of what affects ranchers emanates out of Washington D.C. and other policy making places. The NCBA has a Washington D.C. office to monitor issues relevant to the Nation’s cattle producers and to advocate for positions created by NCBA membership from the grass roots up. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association is a member funded industry association which has its roots in an organization started over 100 years ago in 1898. The National Livestock Association of the United States was the predecessor of the current NCBA which was organized in 1996. Over this long period of time, the volunteer leaders and paid staff have worked as hard as they know how to further the interests and protect the cattle industry. In fact that is happening today. This column will talk about the specific things NCBA is doing in that regard. NCBA is a producer driven, grassroots organization which operates on policies developed at the lowest levels of our industry. Sometimes an approved policy will come out

of a county association meeting and eventually be adopted by the whole industry at a national convention. The bulk of the readership of this publication is from California, Oregon, Idaho and Nevada. Sixteen Presidents of the NCBA and its predecessor associations have come from our region. Many of you readers have known some of these people personally. Closely joined in partnership with the NCBA is the Public Lands Council which was created in 1968 to pay particular attention to federal lands issues facing ranchers in the Intermountain West and on the National Grasslands. Many people do not realize that the PLC is affiliated with the NCBA on the same level. Many times letters concerning public lands are sent to Congress and the Federal Land Management agencies signed by the Presidents of both the PLC and NCBA. In other words, in relation to these specific issues the two organizations are co-equal. The other formal connection between these associations is found on the board of the PLC. The Chairman of the NCBA Federal Lands Committee sits on the Board of Directors of the PLC. This creates a relationship back to the larger NCBA membership because many of the policies developed in the PLC’s processes wind up as NCBA policies as well. The other important connection is in Washington D.C. The PLC staff works hand in glove with NCBA’s staff out of the same offices in our nation’s capital. Necessarily then, as I write a column about NCBA, I will also focus a great deal of attention on the work PLC and

NCBA do together and especially that work in Washington. There are obviously issues NCBA deals with that are more broadly of concern to the entire cattle industry and that will be on this agenda too. NCBA is concerned about international trade, bio-security, mandatory country of origin labeling, animal welfare, consumer preferences, trends in eating habits and customer perceptions about health and nutrition and product safety. These will be topics I will write about as well. Just to give the reader an idea of the number and complexity of legislative and regulatory issues currently on the Washington D.C. office plate I will list them in no particular order of priority. Future columns will deal with these subjects in more detail. • Farm Bill • Permanent repeal of the estate tax • FDA antibiotic guidance • EPA clean water act guidance • Equal Access to Justice Act reform • Grazing Improvement Act • Catastrophic Wildfire Prevention Act • Congressional Oversight of National Monument Designations • Appropriations Bills for The Department of Agriculture and Department of the Interior • Water Rights Protection Bill • Endangered Species Act Reform

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The Progressive Rancher

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• Opening of the Japanese Beef Market This list could grow to a whole page so I will stop here. I appreciate the opportunity to write about these subjects because the beef industry in this country is so diverse and widespread no one person can begin to know everything about in any detail. So we will try to learn together in this effort. Each of you in this business does something amazing every day. You provide the safest, most nutritious and inexpensive protein product in the world. You have thankless job not often recognized for its value by the very people you feed. A little more knowledge of your value to our society and by you about the outside factors affecting your livelihood will benefit us all. I’ll see you soon.

NV Dept. of Agriculture Creates Program to Promote The State’s Food and Agriculture Businesses SPARKS, Nev. -- The Nevada Department of Agriculture today announced its newly created Buy Nevada brand program to promote Nevada food and agriculture. “Buy Nevada has been in planning for more than a year,” said Jim Barbee, director of the Nevada Department of Agriculture. “We have been actively seeking to have a program that promotes the state’s food and agriculture industry as a whole because of the Department’s statutory mandate to advance Nevada agriculture.” Buy Nevada promotes food and agriculture businesses such as food processors, small farmers, large growing operations, restaurants, retailers and distributors. The recently released study on the economic impact of the agriculture industry to the state – estimated as having a $5.3 billion impact – demonstrated the importance of recognizing Nevada’s diverse agriculture sectors and the longstanding contribution to the state’s economy. First Lady Kathleen Sandoval expressed support for the program. “As Nevadans look to make healthy dietary choices, we hope you will also Buy Nevada food and agriculture products,” she said. Buy Nevada has tiered memberships ranging from free to higher-level sponsorships. Money received into the program will further promote Nevada food and agriculture businesses. Businesses may sign up online: http://buynevada.org/membership/join/. Please visit, for more information, www.buynevada.org.

NRCS Accepting Applications for Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program

Reno, Nev.—The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is accepting applications for fiscal year 2014 funding for the Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program (FRPP). The purpose of FRPP is to protect agricultural use and related conservation values of eligible land by limiting non-agricultural uses of the land through the acquisition of conservation easements. The deadline to submit applications to be considered in the first ranking period for fiscal year 2014 funding consideration is Monday, March 3, 2014. Applications are accepted on a continual basis; however, applications received after that date will be accepted and considered for funding if funds are available after first cycle applications are processed. Landowners interested in participating in the program work through an eligible non-governmental organization (NGO), or state, tribal or local governments that have an existing farm or ranch land protection program. The eligible NGO, or state, tribal, or local government then submits FRPP proposals to the NRCS State Conservationist. Participating organizations are required to provide at least 25 percent matching funds with NRCS contribution not to exceed 50 percent of the fair market value determined by an appraisal of the property offered for the program. NGOs, or state, tribal, and local governments that have an existing farm or ranch land protection program are encouraged to contact their local NRCS District Conservationist or call Gary Roeder, Assistant State Conservationist – Programs at (775)857-8500 Extension 103 to obtain more information to determine if the FRPP is a good fit to their land preservation objectives. Please Note: Authorizations for the Grassland Reserve Program (GRP) and the Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) expired Sept. 30, 2013. No new applications for these programs can be accepted. NRCS will continue to service prior-year contracts. To learn more, contact your local NRCS office or go online to: www.nv.nrcs.usda.gov.# www.progressiverancher.com

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February 2014 7


By Joe Guild

S

age grouse, Sage grouse and Sage grouse. I do not mean to be picky but it seems this issue is dominating the news and my thoughts lately. That great rural Nevada newspaper, the Reno Gazette-Journal has had an article every week for the last couple of months, it seems, on the cute little sage chicken. To be fair, some of the reporting has been on the negative impacts listing the bird as an endangered species would have on Nevada’s rural economy. However, in this column I will explain much of the dialogue surrounding this bird misses a very important point which most ranchers and other resource users will understand. Advocates for listing the bird at the expense of these users will ignore my point or dispute its veracity to continue to pursue an anti- ranching agenda. To illustrate, the above-mentioned paper had two stories about sage grouse in its edition of Sunday, January 12th, 2104. One story was about Governor Sandoval’s understandable concern about the decision of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to list the so-called bi-state species of the sage grouse as threatened. This decision came in spite of a decade-long effort to undertake conservation and habitat restoration initiatives by ranchers and other users to provide a plan for protection of this sub-species. By all accounts the bird has stabilized or increased in numbers over this same period. In this article the regional director for the USFWS was described as saying in response to the Governor’s letter that the state had not defined how Nevada’s “conservation strategy will mesh with federal conservation plans prepared by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service and how threats posed by overgrazing will be addressed.” You might imagine that last clause got my blood boiling, but more on that a little further on. So the negative outweighs the positive here. Think about it. Instead of creating a strategy whereby the federal land management agencies “mesh” their strategies and plans with those of the state to protect the bird and the other legitimate interests out here living and working with the bird which would be a positive win/ win solution, the answer is to just list the bird and create a win/ lose solution, or, quite possibly, as I will explain below, a lose/ lose situation. This is your government, choosing the easy way out, at work folks. The other article in the same addition of the paper dealt with the growing frustration of the ranching community about proposed legislation to create wilderness protection areas for the bird. There is talk about litigation by some interests which is boiling over because of this frustration. I do not intend to deal with the pros and cons of the proposed legislation or the frustration about it in this column. Perhaps that is a subject for another day. However, once again in this article, reference was made to the myth still propounded by some mis-guided interests that a loss of sage grouse habitat can be attributed to overgrazing. It is very well established by all of the peer-reviewed papers I have read the chief cause of loss of habitat, particularly in Nevada, is the wildfire/cheat grass, invasive species cycle. In fact, well-managed livestock grazing is the best tool land managers have to reduce the fine fuel loads which feed that cycle. So to all you nay-sayer, antilivestock folks out there I say, wake up and realize the most important tool to help you save the sage grouse is now staring back at you on the plate next to your French fries. Grazing livestock are subject to strict conditions of permitted numbers, timing and duration of the season of use of the public ranges. The last time I checked cows and sheep were not predator species with an eye to put sage grouse on the dinner menu. On the other hand, ravens, another protected species, coyotes, foxes, hawks and other raptors do like to put the sage grouse on the dinner menu and they order off that menu every day in sage grouse country. Another excuse I have heard the agencies use is there is not enough funding dedicated in the state plan to implement the bi-state strategy. This is in spite of the fact that ranchers in this area have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars over the

8 February 2014

last decade to improve conditions for the grouse and its habitat. So, if I understand the logic, the agency can list the bird and then say they have no money to protect it prior to listing or even after listing. Following this line of reasoning, the bird will be perpetually listed because there are no resources to help it recover. Brilliant! In a recent issue of the Las Vegas Sun a rancher from central Nevada, Duane Coombs, pointed out the obvious. He repeated this notion in the Reno Gazette Journal, in an op-ed piece about ten days later. Every rancher knows what he was talking about. Indeed, every person who has ever hunted a sage grouse knows what he was talking about. The places you find the highest concentrations of sage grouse are near or actually on irrigated agricultural meadows and hay fields. Secondarily, sage grouse will be found in close proximity to streams and springs with flowing water. The water, as we all know, is owned, for the most part, by ranchers who for the last 150 years have developed these water resources and who have improved and maintained their irrigated fields and pastures. Most readers of this publication also know that livestock grazing in the Great Basin and adjacent areas is dependent to one degree or another on public land ranges for at least part of each year. Cattle and sheep have grazed these ranges for the same 150 years alongside the sage grouse. These grouse use the sage brush dominated eco systems for food and for protected brooding sites. But after the chicks hatch there is a need for increased nutrition for the hens and chicks. The birds simply do not find the bio diversity they need in the sage brush dominated landscapes. They find insects, green shoots of new grass and crops and most importantly, water on the developed agricultural lands adjacent to the sagebrush. I have ridden horseback at the edge of an irrigated meadow in central Nevada and flushed two dozen sage grouse in a distance of about two miles. I have also ridden all day through sage brush dominated lands on that same ranch a few miles away from the irrigated meadows and never seen a sage grouse. I am certain my experience through the years is not an isolated instance in personal contact with the sage grouse from that of most ranchers. Duane Coombs made the same point I am attempting to make. If the bird is listed without any accommodation to the interests of the ranching resource users, the best friend the bird has out there, the goal of protecting the bird and its habitat will never be reached. Let me explain. As I said above, ranchers in the states with the most important sage grouse habitat are also mostly public land ranchers who graze their livestock on the public ranges at least part of each year. If the grouse is listed in spite of the efforts made by ranchers to protect the bird in the past, and the plans being formulated to protect the grouse now, the listing will directly impact those ranchers. For the most part the impact will be negative. There are dire predictions from some there will be significant reductions in permitted numbers, at the very least, and, at worst, complete stoppage of grazing on some allotments in favor of “ protecting” the sage grouse. The theory is that the only way to protect the bird is to eliminate all livestock grazing in certain designated areas. If those reductions or eliminations occur, the only option for some ranchers will be to develop their private land. If that happens the areas the grouse needs during the most critical times each year, the irrigated pastures and hay fields, will ultimately be gone because the only reason for their development historically was to support the range livestock for part of the year in the winter months. In recent decades, ranches have begun to use the irrigated agricultural ground for warm season grazing and switched to cool and cold season grazing of the ranges. Whatever season they are used, the public lands are integral to any intermountain western ranch. Discontinuing or limiting grazing on these lands ostensibly to protect the grouse and its habitat will be the death knell of public land ranching and the sage grouse. Mark my words. I’ll see you soon.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


OFFICE: 775-423-7760 JACK PAYNE

Cell: 775-217-9273 Alt: 775-225-8889

Email: nevadalm@yahoo.com

Full-Service Cattle Sales & Marketing serving the Fallon, Nevada and Outlying Areas.

S A LE

Sales Results from

JANUARY 15

TH

AND

16 , 2014 TH

Regular Butcher Cow, Bull and Feeder Sale Seller

Marge Shepard

City

# Head Desc.

Fallon

3

Type

Weight

Price CWT

X-Bred MIX Young Cows 1247 $1,250.00/ hd

Nevada First Land & Cattle Winnemucca 21

BLK

STR

364

$228.00

Nevada First Land & Cattle Winnemucca 16

BLK

STR

425

$220.25

Tommy & Barbara Moore

Jordan Vly

12

MIX

STR

394

$225.00

Tommy & Barbara Moore

Jordan Vly

23

MIX

STR

419

$221.00

Ray or Cheryl Kretschmer

Round Mtn

1

BBF

STR

340

$222.00

Ninety Six Ranch

Paradise Vly

28

MIX

STR

341

$220.00

Ninety Six Ranch

Paradise Vly

6

MIX

STR

506

$193.50

Ray & Lynn Kretschmer Ronald & Travis Berg Dale Johnson Inc Ronnie & Laura Hummel Corkill Bros Inc Corkill Bros Inc

Tonopah

1

BLK

STR

305

$220.00

Round Mtn

2

BLK

STR

325

$220.00

Every Wednesday Small Barn at 10:30 AM Butcher Cows at 11:30 AM Feeder Cattle at 1:00 PM

Feeder Sale in conjunction with our Regular Wednesday sale

Sales Results from

JANUARY 15TH AND 16TH, 2014 Regular Butcher Cow, Bull and Feeder Sale Seller

# Head Desc.

Type

Weight

Price CWT

Winnemucca

4

BLK

STR

439

$182.00

Douglas George Jr

Duckwater

3

BLK

STR

583

$178.00

Douglas George Jr

Duckwater

4

BLK

STR

769

$157.00

Fernley

5

BLK

STR

648

$177.00

Jersey Vallley Cattle Co

Wild Horse Cattle Co

City

Simon Fisher

Gardnerville

6

MIX

STR

616

$175.00

Simon Fisher

Gardnerville

12

MIX

STR

702

$163.00

Matt Hoekenga

Fallon

2

BLK

STR

595

$171.00

Winnemucca

1

BBF

STR

570

$165.00

Round Mtn

1

BCHX

STR

415

$157.50

Irvin Plank

Eureka

2

BLK

STR

668

$157.00

Hendrix Ranch

Fallon

6

BLK

STR

718

$156.50

Richard & Teresa Braun Anna & Tana Berg

Lovelock

2

BLK

STR

358

$218.00

Travis Agee

Alamo

14

BLK

STR

699

$154.00

Winnemucca

4

MIX

STR

348

$216.00

Art Villalobos

Orovada

11

BLK

STR

795

$153.00

Fallon

15

BLK

STR

437

$211.00

Bruce Estes

Reno

1

RD

STR

510

$152.50

February 19 & 20, 2014

Fallon

9

BLK

STR

533

$198.25

UC Cattle Co LLC

Orovada

1

CHAR

STR

635

$152.50

Espil Ranch

Gerlach

6

MIX

STR

467

$210.00

Charles & Harlene Shepherd

Reno

2

BLK

STR

790

$150.00

Greg Kilgore

Round Mtn

2

BLK

STR

323

$210.00

Wesley Viera

Fallon

5

BLK

STR

782

$150.00

Greg Kilgore

Round Mtn

4

BLK

STR

415

$195.00

Michael Laca

Fallon

23

MIX

STR

911

$148.75

Yerington

44

MIX

STR

503

$208.75

Tonopah

4

BLK

HFR

333

$214.50

Sunrise Ranch LLC Jessie & Rebecca Nuttall

Fallon

6

MIX

STR

508

$206.75

Jessie & Rebecca Nuttall

Fallon

30

MIX

STR

619

$186.75

Jessie & Rebecca Nuttall

Fallon

25

BLK

STR

722

$161.00

Tracy Clark

Reno

3

BLK

STR

382

$205.00

Tracy Clark

Reno

4

BLK

STR

486

$198.00

Orovada

5

MIX

STR

490

$204.00

Winnemucca 16

MIX

STR

543

$202.25

Bartell Ranch LLC Naggin' Woman Ranch

Tonopah

1

MIX

STR

430

$200.00

Marge Shepard

Anthony Perchetti

Fallon

2

BLK

STR

498

$200.00

John Guerrero

Wadsworth

1

CHAR

STR

480

$197.00

March 19 & 20, 2014 Butcher cows on Wednesday Feeder cattle on Thursday starting at 11 AM

CafĂŠ

Open on Sale Days Stop by and have a Homestyle Burger

Dirk Pearson & S. Shaw Bob Carbari

Jordan Vly

3

MIX

HFR

352

$197.00

Bob Carbari

Jordan Vly

2

BLK

HFR

493

$181.00

Naggin' Woman Ranch

Winnemucca 16

MIX

HFR

441

$195.50

Ninety Six Ranch

Paradise Vly

14

MIX

HFR

438

$189.50

Reno

9

BLK

HFR

431

$186.50

Alan & Mimi Mendes

Reno

23

BLK

HFR

505

$180.50

Corkill Bros Inc

Fallon

15

BLK

HFR

488

$185.00

Alan & Mimi Mendes

Calvin & Billie Sample

Lovelock

5

WF

HFR

474

$183.00

Calvin & Billie Sample

Lovelock

20

WF

HFR

611

$165.00

Alamo

1

MIX

HFR

410

$183.00

Jerry Johnson

John Guerrero

Wadsworth

1

MIX

STR

355

$190.00

Espil Ranch

Gerlach

11

MIX

HFR

451

$182.00

Todd Chambers

Round Mtn

2

BLK

STR

475

$196.00

Michael & Marian Gottschalk

Lovelock

15

MIX

HFR

533

$176.25

Daniel Berg

Round Mtn

8

BLK

STR

502

$195.00

Russell Berg

Round Mtn

2

BLK

STR

503

$195.00

Russell Berg

Round Mtn

2

MIX

STR

418

$176.00

Janet Lind

Alamo

1

MIX

STR

525

$194.00

Jerry Johnson

Alamo

3

MIX

STR

525

$194.00

Walter & Sonja Winder

Fallon

4

BLK

STR

570

$192.50

Wayne Hage

Tonopah

1

RBF

STR

305

$192.50

Courtney Ranches

Gerlach

2

RD

STR

553

$191.00

Dirk Pearson & S. Shaw

Tonopah

1

BLK

STR

510

$190.00

Glorene Guerrero

Wadsworth

4

MIX

STR

355

$190.00

Ronald & Travis Berg

Round Mtn

2

BLK

STR

440

$190.00

Yerington

5

MIX

STR

572

$189.50

Star Bar Cattle

www.progressiverancher.com

Look for Weekly Market Reports at www.nevadalivestock.us

We have 4 cattle trains available for your cattle hauling needs. We can haul approx. 80,000# of cattle per load either to our sale or in the country. Give us a call for pricing.

TO ALL OF OUR

CONSIGNORS & BUYERS The Progressive Rancher

Michael & Marian Gottschalk

Lovelock

24

MIX

HFR

690

$147.00

Courtney Ranches

Gerlach

8

MIX

HFR

476

$173.00

Bartell Ranch LLC

Orovada

38

MIX

HFR

586

$170.50

Jake & Lydia Dempsey Jessie & Rebecca Nuttall Karl Baker

Winnemucca

3

MIX

HFR

508

$170.00

Fallon

22

MIX

HFR

585

$168.00

Doyle

16

MIX

HFR

660

$164.50

Orovada

6

BLK

HFR

663

$156.50

Jock or Tammy McErquiaga

Fallon

2

RD

HFR

423

$150.00

Julian Cattle Company

Fallon

3

BLK

HFR

772

$145.50

Michael Laca

Fallon

12

BLK

HFR

843

$143.00

Robert & Debra Depaoli

Lovelock

9

BLK

HFR

940

$122.00

Roaring Springs Ranch

French Glen

1

RD

COW

1365

$85.00

Art Villalobos

February 2014 9


Overall 2012 Champion of one of America’s toughest tests!

CAIN GOODNIGHT 7211

Spread bull with efficiency! A time-tested pedigree with many of the breed greats represented!

Bringing 4 Good Long Yearlings to Fallon Bull Sale All of our bulls have been Genomic tested and are ready to go.

Registered Angus Cattle

March 9, 2014

Snyder Livestock’s

Bulls for the 21st Century Yerington, NV • 1 pm (PST)

CED +12 CW 21

Marb .64

BW -1.6

2/26/11 WW 53

REA .18 BW 72

Reg#: 16976149 YW M 90 31

Fat .036 WW 725

$W 36.18 YW 1282

$F 29.21 ADG 3.82

SC -.08 $G 29.17

Greg & Louise Schafer

$EN -14.18 $B 58.65

RFI -4.3

Mitch Cain 24551 Hwy 140 E Dairy, OR 97625

(h) 541-545-6075 (c) 541-892-5900 wildwestangus.com

6986 County Rd 6 Orland, CA 95963

Home: 530-865-3706 Cell: 209-988-6599

2 Polled Hereford & 2 Horned Hereford Bulls Consigned to the Fallon All Breeds Bull Sale, February 15 Bulls are sired by bulls in the top 5% of the breed for carcass indexes

HAWLEY HARRISON AND SONS Clay: 208-670-1429

Steve Smith ANGUS & GELBVIEH

Heyburn, Idaho 83336

Hawley: 208-678-7931

R A O N D GUS A M A

Performance Bred Bulls and Heifers at Reasonable Prices

Nevada Cattlemen’s All Breeds Bull Sale

AWARD WINNING BULLS

Using Leading Association Sires

8 SELL AT

Fallon Bull Sale February 15

5 Angus | 3 Balancer

The Brand You Can Tru 6 Bulls Consigned to

15 CONSIGNED TO WAR ALLIANCE 9126

• Gelbvieh • Angus • Balancer Bulls Private Treaty “READY TO GO TO WORK”

Snyder’s Bulls for the 21st Century March 9

10 Angus 3 Balancer | 2 Gelbvieh

• Easy Calving • Good Disposition • Deep & Easy Fleshing Call Steve @ (801) 768-8388 Cell # (801) 368-4510 Fax # (801) 768-3910 10 February 2014

Or Stop by @ 9200 W. 8570 N. Lehi, Utah 84043

Bulls for the 21st Century

Fallon Bull Sale February 15, 2014

March 9, 2014

3 Breed-leading Growth and Carcass Bulls

11 Bulls Sired by

3 Low-input, Calving-ease Prospects

A A R Ten x 7008 S A Connealy In Focus 4925 Connealy Right Answer 746 SAV Angus Valley 1867 B/R New Day 454

sired by Sitz Upward 307R

2 Bulls sired by GDAR Game Day 449 1 Bull sired by SAV 004 Predominant 4438

Thank You to our Past Buyers! Ed: 209-595-3056

The Progressive Rancher

Josh: 209-499-9182 www.progressiverancher.com


BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

Sifting: Friday, February 14, 2014

B

Bull Sale

B

Churchill Co. Cowbelles Dinner/Dance and FBS Awards Presentation February 14, 2014

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Fallon Convention Center

11:30 a.m. Fallon Livestock Exchange Fallon, NV B

FBS Invitational Stock Dog Trial TO BENEFIT THE FIGHT AGAINST CANCER February 13, 2014: Handlers Draw Party February 14, 2014: Handlers Meeting at 7:00 a.m. B Trial at 7:30 a.m. February 14, 2014: Cowdog Auction to be held after Dinner at the Fallon Convention Center

BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

For more information or a sale catalog, please call the Sale Office. Nevada Cattlemen’s Association 775-738-9214 B PO Box 310, Elko, NV 89803 B nca@nevadabeef.org www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 11


Ship ’Em To

LLON A F

MARKET REPORT

January 11 & 14, 2014 Head Sold this week: 2131 Weight

TOP OFFERINGS Steer

300-400 190.00-221.00 400-500 197.00-217.00 500-600 185.00-204.00 600-700 168.00-188.00 700-800 150.0-160.00 800-900 139.00 Lite Holstein (under 600#) Heavy Holstein (over 600#)

Heifer

168.00-196.00 158.00-183.00 157.00-172.00 154.00-170.00 140.00-149.00 121.00-130.00 80.00-85.00 70.00-80.00

*Single, Small Framed or Plainer Cattle 15.00 to 20.00 less than top offerings

Livestock Exchange, Inc. www.fallonlivestock.com

is pleased to Announce the 10th Annual

Early Spring

SPECIAL CALF & YEARLING SALE Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 1:00 pm (Along with the Regular Sale)

The market is good right now, so call early with your consignments so buyers can be notified early, it makes a Huge Difference. Remember you can bring your cattle in early Saturday, Sunday, or Monday at no extra charges (only feed). There will be buyers on the seats… Fallon All Breeds Bull Sale: Saturday, February 15th, 11:00 a.m. – 150 Bulls Consigned Dog Trials on Friday, February 14th, at 8:00 a.m.

BUTCHER COWS & BULLS

Breakers (Fat Cows) Boners (Med Flesh) Cutters (Lean) Holstein Cows Butcher Bulls Shelly (Thin) Bulls Shelly Cutters (Thin) Young Feeder Cows Heiferettes Holstein Heiferettes Holstein Bulls Feeder Bulls Cutting Bulls Used Roping Steers Preg Tested Cows (3, 4, 5 yr. old solid mouth) Pairs (solid mouth) 3-6 yrs Pairs (older)

71.00-80.00 82.00-90.00 65.00-70.00 60.00-79.00 80.00-99.00 40.00-60.00 20.00-40.00 70.00-80.00 85.00-100.00 77.00-88.00 80.00-90.00 70.00-80.00 80.00-95.00 65.00-72.00

1300-1375.00 1100-1275.00 NT

TODAY’S COWS Top Cow Top 10 Cows Top 50 Cows Top 100 Cows Top Butcher Bull Top Holstein Cows Top 10 Holstein Cows

Avg. Wt 1000 1340 1070 11040 2160 1350 1476

Avg. Cost 91.00 85.05 75.65 72.22 99.00 81.00 74.72

CALVES-SHEEP-GOATS-PIGS-HORSES

Beef Calves (HD) Dairy Calves Feeder Lambs Fat Lambs Ewes (CWT) Bucks (CWT) Small Goats (under 65 lbs.) (HD) Large Goats (over 70 lbs.) (HD) Weaner Pigs Feeder Pigs Top Hogs Butcher Sows Horses (under 1100 lbs.) Horses (over 1100 lbs.)

60.00-410.00 2.00-35.00 180.00-200.00 150.00-180.00 40.00-65.00 40.00-60.00 30.00-95.00 95.00-185.00 45.00-95.00 60.00-130.00 60.00-75.00 20.00-45.00 8.00-15.00 15.00-20.00

MARKET TREND:

Fallon Livestock Exchange, Inc.

Feeder cattle were 14.00 higher with very strong buyer demand on same kind and quality depending on fill. Cattle went to Washington, Idaho, Colorado, Nebraska, and Nevada. There were 72 different consignors. Buyers comments: very good cattle, sale was well organized and ran very smoothly.

Sale Every Tuesday at 11:00 AM

Fallon Livestock is a key market for the livestock industry, where buyers and sellers meet each week with a professional staff with over 50 years of experience in marketing livestock.

Selling All Classes of Livestock: • Cattle • Horses • Sheep • Goats • Pigs

PLEASE call us ahead with your consignments. It helps us market your cattle. We talk to buyers all the time – they want to know what's coming in. We are seeing good demand on weigh up cows& bulls. It sure makes a big difference on how they are sorted. Let our crew sort and class your cows. This will help you receive full market value for your cows.

2055 Trento Lane • Fallon, Nevada 89406 • 775-867-2020 For more marketing information, or to arrange trucking needs: Call Monte Bruck, Manager, at 775-426-8279

We have trucks available for your hauling needs.

See you and your Friends at Ringside Soon! 12 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


J. B. Wh i te l e y OF A RANCH WIFE

Quote of the Week

W

ednesday was the day from hell. I’m not gonna lie, it got me down and stomped all over me. Literally and figuratively. I’m not going to go into details because a bad day cowboying still beats a good day with a town job. At one point QT and I were trying (emphasis on trying) to bring some heavy cows to the house. QT hasn’t rode much on his own, but was doing his best on TR’s “Only good horse left” Cowboy. After nearly being brushed off in the willows twice and losing his hat again, I told him to just leave it. We were almost to the gate and the cows were about to break (again). I decided it would be in my best interest to just go back and get it later. The snow was over my knees every time I got off to retrieve the hat, and I was tired of chasing cows through the deep snow and worrying about QT keeping up and not falling off.

Things really fell apart after that. One heifer went one way, the rest of the cows went another and about the time I had them to the gate, QT was sitting in the gate and wouldn’t move. I finally lost the heifer I needed. Then I got QT out of the gate and out of the way. I locked what was left in the corral and went to gather up QT and his hat. I decided the heifer could tough it out on her own, I was done with her! He was sitting on Cowboy and looked just like the end of the trail. Reins were dropped over the horn, head hanging down. He looked pretty pitiful. So I reached over and touched his arm and told him how much I appreciated his help and was glad he was there. He looked at me and said “I’m just trying to be a cowboy mom and I don’t even have a hat!” It’s really hard to be a good cowboy if you don’t have a hat!

There is no mama like a Hereford-sired mama Hereford— gentle bulls making black better.

8

ull Sale B n o l l a to F allon, NV F , h t 5 1 . Feb lds and

e ar - o 6 — 2-y arlings 2 Fall ye on s o f

6 G r a n ds g n i d u l c in ye SHF Ribe 17 M326 R1

www.progressiverancher.com

6

ereford H d e l l o P t on test a s g n i l r a Ye es t ver Bull T i R e k a n S March 7

Net income of $51 more per cow per year and a 7% advantage in conception rate compared to straight Angus females. All this from a bull that is known for its fertility and easy going nature. Hereford bulls—better mamas and no headaches. Adding Hereford genetics to your herd makes perfect business sense in a cost-driven economy. Excellent conversion, hardiness, fertility, longevity and even disposition can help reduce input costs. These Hereford efficiencies Dan and are ideal for your herd, your business and your plans for Teresa Daniels the future in the beef industry. Low-maintenance cattle, long term profit.

Daniels

Hereford Ranch 208-339-2341 - 1350 N. 2100 W. Malad Idaho 83252 danielsherefordranch@yahoo.com - Dan.Daniels@itd.idaho.gov - Find on Facebook @ danielsherefordranch

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 13


SNAKE RIVER Bull TesT

The BRAND of “REAL WORLD” excellence in Hereford Genetics. Proven for 36 years on the High Deserts of Nevada, Idaho, Oregon and California foothills. Lilla and Woodie Bell Dan and Theresa Bell P.O. Box 48, Paradise Valley, NV 89426 (775) 578-3536 • Cell (775) 304-2157 e-mail: bellranches@gmail.com

llc Watch for our POWERFUL consignments in 2014:

FRidAy, MARCh 7

Winnemucca Ranch Hand Rodeo Invitational Bull Sale — February 28 Snake River Bull Test and Sale — March 7 and 13 Bulls for Snyder’s “Bulls for the 21st Century Sale” — March 9 Also selling Private Treaty Bulls & Females

Twin Falls livestock Commission Co. Twin Falls, idaho

Selling 130+ BullS And FAnCy heiFeRS The best bulls100 from 35 different ranches – “THERE’S ALWAYS ROOM AT THE TOP”

Angus - Hereford - Red competing for the top spot. Angus

There is Always PERFORMANCE BULL RoomTESTED at the TopSALE

MarchFeaturing 7, 2014 the Best Bulls from Twin Falls 32 Livestock ReputationComm. Ranches – Angus,AllHereford, Red Competing forAngus the Top Spot Selling 130 bulls & 100 heifers Growth. Maternalfancy & Carcass

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GROWTH

MATERNAL PleASe ConTACT uSCARCASS To RequeST A SAle Book:

www.snakeriverbulltest.com Jason Anderson: 208-420-7352 Ben eborn: 208-399-2350

snakeriverbulltest.com

Visit us on Facebook: Bell Ranch Herefords

www.bellranchherefords.com

Dahl Angus Ranch 4 Bulls in the

Snake River Bull Test March 7

Private Treaty 7 Purebred Angus Bulls 2 Sim-Angus Bulls

Custom Farming Sires used: Connealy Final Solution, SAV Iron Mountain 8066, WK Power Up 9412, Duff Encore 702

Jason Anderson (208) 420-7352 Ben Eborn (208) 399-2350 thd

HC 64 Box 78, Deeth, NV 89823

©

14 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

775-934-6443 www.progressiverancher.com


Fumes FROM THE Farm by Hank Vogler

W

hat do you get when you cross a spotted owl with a sage hen? A perfect trifecta of destroying all new wealth jobs in the West. Agriculture, mining, and timber create new wealth. Agriculture and timber are both renewable resources. Mining a mineral creates modern tools and with recycling the mineral can be used over and over again. Your basic eco-terrorist doesn’t recognize that. The true zealots dream of emigration until the United States gets back to a population of around one hundred seventy five million people. I guess with the destruction of resource use the new world will be defenseless and hungry and cold and also the only source of income will be taking in each other’s laundry. Whoops! Without agriculture, no clothes could be produced unless you go back to wearing animal skins as hunter gathers. The eco-terrorists would have trouble with the bunny huggers on that one. Far out dude, maybe they are on to something? The success of the eco-terrorists with the spotted owl has energized them beyond belief. The politicians look like a wounded fawn when the question is asked; don’t you like the little baby bunnies? Spotted Al Gore wrote the book “The Inconsistent Truth” and has made millions with his carbon foot print green slime and other fear mongering. The folks studying “Global Warming” in the Antarctic spent time stuck in the ice in the middle of the Southern Hemisphere’s summer and the two rescue icebreakers also got stuck. Even the penguin’s must be yucking it up. In the real world of capitalism, ”Adam Smith’s invisible hand”, results must benefit the public or it goes away. If the product has no market a new ideas and product will replace old failed ideas and products. For whatever mystic reason, the eco-terrorists are held to no standards at all. There appears to be no peer review. Failure and destruction of the original plan is counted in idled resources without direction makes you a bigger hero. As long as you ruin rural communities and middle class working people the more revered the movement becomes. The spotted owl is a perfect example of what is to come with the sage hen. The forests of the Northwest are in worse shape than ever in modern times. Watersheds are going dry because of the density of forests without management. Beetles and other pests have killed huge acreages of forest. Fires have ravaged the forest at great costs. Eliminating selective harvest logging and grazing reductions have made the fire hazards huge. Somehow it is better to spend millions to put out fires than use the lumber for houses and have middle class jobs in rural communities. One of the reasons used to stop logging and grazing was that silt entered the streams and hurt the fishery. I wonder what happens when tons of ash and soil that now pours into the streams after a fire and the rains come, is some how better for the fish? Tourism didn’t save the rural towns as predicted by the eco-terrorists. Fire is the new industry of the West and is paid for by all taxpayers and creates nothing. A forest is like a wheat field; the harvest cycle is just different. Many of the mines have displaced workers from the Pacific Northwest fiasco of the destruction of the timber industry. For them it must be like the movie “Ground Hogs Day”, with Bill Murray having the day repeat itself over and over. The basic eco-terrorist uses the sage hen the same as the spotted owl was used. It is “ENDANGERED” so the end justifies the means!!! It is a tool to end ranching and mining. These folks could care less about the sage hen. Well what happened to the spotted owl? Is its numbers skyrocketing? Oh contraire. The little darlings have been going to pick up bars and falling for the BARRED OWL’s, hustle. Yes, instead of “what’s your sign”, as a pick up line, Love your spots has turned offspring hybrids that are genetically modified resulting in another crossbred more vigorous species that is pushing the spotted owl around. The geniuses have now decided to hunt down the crossbred owls and kill them. With luck the new little buggers have a message of … --- … on their chests to help save them from the eco-terrorist. I am just glad the public hasn’t fallen for some idea to bring back the saber-toothed tiger. The real dilemma that is unfolding for me, is the question of how dense must your head be to drink the Kool-Aid and believe the male bovine fecal matter. The endangered species www.progressiverancher.com

act, I believe is for animals that their numbers have fallen to near nothing. The Sage hen in Nevada, according to the experts is over one hundred thousand. The only way to get it listed is to declare small groups as isolated sub groups. That is like saying the people in Gabbs need extra protection because there are fewer people living there than in Las Vegas. Maybe small groups are doing just fine. The federallies that are supposed to be making the big push to help the sage hen are all as green as Ireland. Couldn’t have an ulterior motive there now, or could they. United States Fish and Wildlife Service is to make the determination to list the sage hen. No mention of the number one culprit is the raven. Over fifty percent of the nesting failure is blamed on the raven, yet all that is talked about is curtailing mining and grazing. Also USF&W is the group that controls the number of poison eggs that can be used against ravens. There has been an estimated increase in raven populations of over one thousand percent. USF&W will only allow three thousand eggs to be used against ravens. That is the equivalent of dipping a five-gallon bucket into the ocean and expecting the water level to drop. Our own state anti-grazing and mining coalition aka Nevada Department of Wildlife still sanctions hunting sage hens. They say that hunters only kill around five percent of the birds. NDOW has studied the sage hen for over twelve years. If they had not hunted the birds for that same period of time, the sage hen population should have doubled. This would have protected far more birds and new wealth jobs in mining and agriculture than that would have been lost in hunting revenue. Even though the sage hens in my area have had thirty seven percent increases in Spring Valley and twenty seven percent increases in Antelope Valley, where we have a huge predator control project to protect our livestock, the NDOW answer is to put all my lambing range and summer range as critical habitat and grazing must be curtailed or modified or stopped, no mention of raven control. Domestic livestock and the sage hen have survived in a symbiotic relation for over one hundred and fifty years. As a matter of fact when cows and sheep were at their zenith in Nevada, sage hens would get up off of a meadow and blacken the sky. The horse-trading didn’t start yesterday. Did anyone notice how easy it was for the eco-terrorists to sign off on the pipeline to Las Vegas? This pipeline goes through “critical” sage hen habitat. Desert Tortoise habitat and God knows what other “eco-sensitive” areas, yet hardly a peep from the big groups with the big guns from the eco-terrorists. Only a small group of farmers and ranchers pointed out the eco-holocaust that was about to happen and a few groups came to help. Oh and for some strange reason, a whole bunch of wilderness areas were created in White Pine and Lincoln Counties while the pipeline to nowhere was unfolding. Even now the politicians are dangling wilderness areas as mitigation to stop the listing of the sage hen. Wilderness is in your mind. A person from New York may see Chicago as the wilderness, while some one from Alaska may see a rain forest as wilderness. Wilderness is another example of decadence that has failed. Millions of board feet of lumber burned in fires last year that could have been used but is now lost. Most people in a wilderness area wouldn’t know if a beaver or a chain saw cut the tree. Wilderness is just another tool to destroy the West. I guess that middle class jobs in rural areas from new wealth jobs of mining a agriculture will be replaced by good clean jobs in studying why America after a couple hundred years of freedom will now bow down to mother earth and forget the rule of law and let the Republic turn to eco-terrorist subversion. Hang and Rattle Hank

Thompson Angus Ranch Quality Registered Angus Bulls for more than 25 Years Bulls available at

John or Marjorie Vipham

Snake River Bull Test and Sale — March 7, 2014 and Private Treaty at Ranch

Sarah Vipham

AI sired, offering both calving ease and growth bulls

 VDAR Really Windy 4097  Connealy Consensus 7229  Werner War Party  B/R New Day 454  Poss Total Impact 743

HC 35 Box 50 Mountain City, Nevada 89831 775-763-6638

Hearty, sound bulls for the commercial producer.

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 15


Experimenting and Expanding Alternative Agriculture –

Churchill Vineyards

By Rachel Dahl In 2001 Charlie Frey planted his first grapes at the Frey ranch south of Fallon after married in 2010. They now have seven-month old Alice who they pass between them as receiving a hodge-podge of grants through the University of Nevada, the USDA, and the they walk through the winery and then pick their way through the pieces of still equipNevada Department of Agriculture. In the early years of what has become a very success- ment waiting placement in the new building, explaining the evolution at the ranch from ful experiment in testing the concept of wine grapes in Nevada, Charlie and Jay Davison, wine grapes to distilled grains. Colby points out the glowing copper pot still, explains the long tubes of metal as the Alternative Crops and Forage Specialist at Cooperative Extension, made the rounds speaking to every conceivable community group that would listen. Their idea was to try the “tall still” which is capable of processing ten-times the pot still, and then points out growing wine grapes in the Lahotnan Valley as an alternative crop that would use less the “vodka column” which finishes the extensive process of making the high-proof clear water and yield a higher profit per acre. It took five years before the first harvest in 2006 alcohol. He talks about the general processes that begin with fermenting and boiling, and made Churchill Vineyards the home of Nevada’s only estate winery. This year, Churchill Vineyards released the first bottles of brandy which started then collecting the vaporized alcohol, explaining that brandy is the spirit of wine, and life in 2006 when the Vineyard was granted a distillers license, and expansion plans are whiskey is the spirit of grain. Colby then goes on to explain the process for making and currently under way for a new distillery building. Managed now by Charlie’s son Colby using sour mash, and then points out the basket used for making gin. The Freys will use and his wife Ashley, Churchill Vineyard is one of the newest members of the Department wheat, rye, barley, and corn that is grown right on the ranch and will be stored in the silos of Agriculture’s Buy Nevada program, the latest effort by the state to promote food and right next to the new distillery. This will be Nevada’s first Estate Distillery and one of the few in the western United agriculture products made and produced in Nevada. As Colby and Ashley have worked to expand the vineyard by adding the distilling States. Ashley explained that everything will be grown, bottled, and produced right on processes, they try to buy all their supplies and equipment as locally as possible. Al- the farm, and Colby added, “the still came the farthest, but the fermenters are local, the though the still was made in Louisville, Kentucky by Vendome, the company that makes grain will be stored in the silos and harvested in the fields right behind this building.” “We buy everything as local as possible,” said Colby, “we grow all our own grains, the stills for Jack Daniels, the rest of the equipment is all local, including the fermenting we’ll sell the by-product to the dairy next door (Storm’s Oasis Dairy), and then we’ll use tanks which were made in Mound House. “We like this program because they promote local, and make us aware of local the manure from the dairy to fertilize the fields—it’s a big circle.” Colby explains this allows total control of the process which important because then companies like the tank company,” said Colby. “They let everyone know about us, too.” Ashley said the new Buy Nevada program is good because there is an application he knows exactly what’s been done to everything. “If you buy something on the open process. “They look into your to make sure you’re actually growing or making a Nevada market you don’t really know.” He said, for instance, that drought -stressed gains make a better quality whiskey. Because barley has to be malted—a process where it is sprouted, product,” she said. “We fall under two categories, growers and processors.” The Frey family is infectious in their enthusiasm for the new distillery process part and then the rootlets are dried, producing more fermentable sugars and enzymes, it won’t of the business. Colby and Ashley met while they were both in college at UNR and were germinate as well when the barley is grown with too much nitrogen.

A view from inside what will be the tasting room of the new distillery, looking north through the room that will house the stills toward the silos that store the wheat, rye, barley, and corn grown on the Frey Ranch that will used in the distillery process.

16 February 2014

These jars of grain that will be used in the distillery process, corn, barley, wheat, and rye, sit atop pieces of the stills that will be assembled in the new distillery building at the Frey Ranch, and produce Nevada’s first legal Estate Distillery whiskeys.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


“It’s hard to test for that kind of quality, so it’s just better to grow all our own product so we know what we’re getting,” said Colby. According to Colby, who has been at this work since they received their distillery license in 2006, barley is important in most whiskey for the enzymes. Bourbon must be 51% corn, and rye whiskey is 51% rye, and normally there is a blend of at least three grains, corn and barley and then some have wheat and some have rye. He said Maker’s Mark uses wheat and Jim Beam uses rye. While whiskey is made from grains, brandy has to be made from wine, and grappa is made by distilling the by-products of wine making, such as skins and pulp. Another interesting detail to the distilling process that Colby shared is that all alcohol is clear when distilled. Brown alcohol is the result of aging in barrels over several years. Most barrels are made out of oak, and then “toasted” on the inside for wine, and “charred” on the inside for whiskey. It is the toast that makes the difference in the taste, along with the type of wood used in the barrel. The Freys use barrels made in Kentucky of American Oak for their 53 gallon whiskey barrels, and their 59 gallon wine barrels are made of French Oak, which are toasted light, medium, or heavy for different flavors. A barrel will cost between $800 to $1,200 a piece. The whole “alternative agriculture” process has been an interesting experiment for the Frey family as well as the Fallon community. This gem in the desert continues to expand and intrigue, and create curiosity in what will come next from this creative family. Although focused on the future, they have a strong appreciation for the past. Colby said in the early days of Churchill Vineyard, in honor of the history of Hearts O’ Gold cantaloupe in the Lahontan Valley, his dad did make some cantaloupe grappa as well as cantaloupe brandy and there is still some left in the family basement. It is this continual experimentation that led to one of the latest projects at the farm, Colby explained, “we just re-leveled that field,” pointing south of the winery buildings. He said it used to drain to the south and now will drain to the east. They filled in a large irrigation ditch, by laying in in 4,400 feet of three-foot diameter pipe. “It’s really deep,” said Colby, “so we’ll get more drainage, the pipe is perforated and all encased in rock, and there will be no more sloughing and we’ll gain about eight acres of field space.” While the wine grapes produce about 1,000 cases of wine per year, it is an expensive process and impossible to expand quickly when a new plant takes anywhere from three to five years to produce enough grapes to make wine. But the distillery will be capable of producing 120,000 bottles a month if it is operating at full production and it will use the grains the Frey family has been growing in Nevada since the 1850’s. They can still sell the grain to dairies like they always have, they just build the distillery process into the middle of the field-to-cow-to-field circle. Ashley is currently working on the name, and is leaning toward Frey Ranch Estate Distillery. While the name Churchill Vineyards works for wine and Brandy, the grains will be a different label. “If this works,” said Colby, “it will be great for Fallon and for Churchill County.” Currently, Churchill Vineyards is open by appointment and can be reached by calling 775-423-4000. They are located at 1045 Dodge Lane, south of Fallon, Nevada, off Highway 95.

Inside the winery building at Churchill Vineyards are the oak barrels and tasting room.

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 17


USDA Designates 9 Counties in Nevada as Primary Natural Disaster Areas

(Reno, NV), Jan. 16, 2014 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated nine counties in Nevada as primary natural disaster areas due to a recent drought. Those counties are: Churchill, Lander, Mineral, Pershing, Clark Lyon, Nye, Washoe, Humboldt

Our hearts go out to those Nevada farmers and ranchers affected by recent natural disasters,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “President Obama and I are committed to ensuring that agriculture remains a bright spot in our nation’s economy by sustaining the successes of America’s farmers, ranchers, and rural communities through these difficult times. We’re also telling Nevada producers that USDA stands with you and your communities when severe weather and natural disasters threaten to disrupt your livelihood.” Farmers and ranchers in the following counties in Nevada also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous. Those counties are: Douglas, Esmeralda, Lincoln, White Pine Elko, Eureka, Storey, Carson City Farmers and ranchers in the following counties in Arizona, California, Idaho and Oregon also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous. Those counties are: Arizona: Mohave California: Inyo, Modoc, Nevada, San Bernardino, Lassen, Mono, Placer, Sierra Idaho: Owyhee Oregon: Harney, Lake Malheur All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas on Jan. 15, 2014, making all qualified farm operators in the designated areas eligible for low interest emergency (EM) loans from USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA), provided eligibility requirements are met. Farmers in eligible counties have eight months from the date of the declaration to apply for loans to help cover part of their actual losses. FSA will consider each loan application on its own merits, taking into account the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability. FSA has a variety of programs, in addition to the EM loan program, to help eligible farmers recover from adversity. The Obama Administration remains committed to helping the thousands of farm families and businesses struggling with natural disasters. Actions taken by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack in 2012 to provide assistance to producers impacted by the drought included: • Extended emergency grazing on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acres, freeing up a record 2.8 million acres and as much as $200 million in forage and feed for ranchers during a challenging time. • Purchased $170 million of pork, lamb, chicken,

18 February 2014

and catfish for federal food nutrition assistance programs, including food banks, to help relieve pressure on American livestock producers and bring the nation’s meat supply in line with demand.

• Reduced the emergency loan rate, from 3.75 percent to 2.875 percent, as well as making emergency loans available earlier in the season. • Allowing haying or grazing of cover crops without impacting the insurability of planted 2013 spring crops. • USDA worked with crop insurance companies to provide flexibility to farmers, and one-third of all policyholders took advantage of the extended payment period. • Authorized $16 million in existing funds from the Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP) and Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to target states experiencing exceptional and extreme drought. • Transferred $14 million in unobligated program funds into the Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) to help farmers and ranchers rehabilitate farmland damaged by natural disasters and for carrying out emergency water conservation measures in periods of severe drought. • Authorized haying and grazing of Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) easement areas in drought-affected areas where haying and grazing is consistent with conservation of wildlife habitat and wetlands. • Lowered the penalty on CRP acres used for emergency haying or grazing, from 25 percent to 10 percent in 2012. • Simplified the Secretarial disaster designation process and reduced the time it takes to designate counties affected by disasters by 40 percent. Additional programs available to assist farmers and ranchers include the Emergency Conservation Program, Federal Crop Insurance, and the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. Interested farmers may contact their local USDA Service Centers for further information on eligibility requirements and application procedures for these and other programs. Additional information is also available online at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov. Secretary Vilsack also reminds producers that Congress has not funded the five disaster assistance programs authorized by the 2008 Farm Bill. These are SURE; the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP); the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-Raised Fish (ELAP); the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP); and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP). Production losses due to disasters occurring after Sept. 30, 2011, are not eligible for disaster program coverage. The Progressive Rancher

Apply by Feb. 21 for Conservation Funding

Reno, Nev.—The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is offering an additional application batching period for agricultural producers to apply for funding to implement conservation practices on their private land and public land allotments. Producers are encouraged to apply for several Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) fund pools by Feb. 21, 2014 to be considered in the Fiscal Year 2014 USDA Conservation Program second batching period. EQIP is a voluntary, financial assistance program that helps fund conservation practices to protect cropland, rangeland, water resources, soil resources and wildlife habitats. “EQIP is adaptable to meet various needs of our landowners and address their natural resource challenges,” said Bruce Petersen, Nevada NRCS State Conservationist. “We are pleased to be able to provide an additional opportunity for agricultural producers to sign up for these types of projects that are so critical to the conservation effort here in Nevada.” Funding remains available for organic production or transitioning to organic production practices. Funding also is available for the Energy Initiative, including the development of Energy Conservation Activity Plans and practices. Other statewide fund pools available include: Tribal Grazing Management, Fire Rehabilitation, Wildlife Habitat Conservation, Seasonal High Tunnels and Sage Grouse Initiative fund pools. In FY 2013, NRCS awarded more than 100 EQIP contracts in Nevada totaling more than $7.2 million. USDA Financial Assistance Programs like EQIP give producers the opportunity to construct or improve water management or irrigation structures, plant trees for windbreaks or to improve water quality. They also can mitigate risk through production diversification, or by implementing innovative management strategies including soil erosion control, integrated pest management or transitioning to organic farming. “Applications for EQIP are accepted year-round on a continuous basis with periodic closing dates being announced so that applications can be ranked and funded,” said Gary Roeder, Assistant State Conservationist for Programs. Applicants must meet USDA program eligibility requirements for land eligibility and person eligibility, including Adjusted Gross Income limitations for individuals and entities seeking to participate. Applications received before 4 p.m. on Feb. 21, 2014 will be considered in the next FY 2014 ranking period. Farm Bill programs have strict payment limits, and the amount of financial assistance producers may receive varies by program and will depend on future allocations received under the Farm Bill authority. Limited resource producers, beginning farmers and ranchers, or socially disadvantaged agricultural producers may be eligible for up to 15 percent higher payments, not to exceed 90 percent of the estimated cost to install the practice. To learn more, contact your local NRCS office or go online to: www.nv.nrcs.usda.gov. www.progressiverancher.com


Shaw Cattle Co. Production Sale

February 19, 2014 - 12 p.m. (MST)

400 Hereford, Angus & Red Angus Bulls

SITZ DIMENSION 8607 52 Sons Sell

• • •

First Season Breeding Guarantee All cattle PI tested negative for BVD Ultrasound and RFI/Feed Efficiency data available • All bulls are born and raised on our ranch. No Cooperators. • SIGHT UNSEEN PURCHASES FULLY GUARANTEED • Family Owned and Operated for over 65 years

Shaw Cattle Co.

22993 Howe Rd. Caldwell, ID 83607 www.shawcattle.com greg@shawcattle.com www.progressiverancher.com

CONNEALY FINAL PRODUCT

SCHU-LAR RED BULL 18X

68 Sons Sell

16 Sons Sell

Other AI sires include Redeem, 175, Peerless, 8502 & Efficient. Watch the sale on RFD-TV

THR THOR 4029 18 Sons Sell

S

Angus Hereford Red Angus

The Bull Business Brand The Progressive Rancher

Greg: (208) 459-3029 Sam: (208) 453-9790 Tucker: (208) 455-1678 Ron Shurtz: (208) 431-3311 February 2014 19


snyder’s buLLs For The 21sT CenTury Consignors: anguS

amador angus bar Lr angus Cardey ranches Cooper Cattle diablo valley angus Fox angus venture gomez angus ranch gudel Cattle Company hone ranch pozzi ranch roman Cattle schafer ranch smoky’s angus ranch steve smith angus and gelbvieh Westwind ranch angus Wild West angus

charolais

Jorgensen ranch

gelbvieh/balancer

Cardey ranches steve smith angus and gelbvieh

hereford

bell ranch shamrock herefords

Lim-Flex

easterly romanov ranch

red angus

mcphee red angus moore Creek red angus phillips red angus Trotter red angus

Shorthorn

Cardey ranches

you’LL Find onLy The besT

aT The ToughesT damn buLL TesT... period

Snyder

buLL teSt and SaLe Sunday, March 9

only the best of the 180 bulls on test from california, utah nevada and oregon sell having completed one of the toughest bull tests in the west ... • • • • • •

Weaning perFormanCe FerTiLiTy - dam and individuaL gain on TesT ConFormaTion and musCLing Feed eFFiCienCy uLTrasound CarCass CharaCTisTiCs

Bull Buyer’s Seminar & Social sat., march 8, 4 p.m., pioneer crossing convention center, yerington, nevada FeaTuring a paneL disCussion abouT CLimaTe Change WiTh nCba’s daren WiLLiams serving as moderaTor. paneLisTs inCLude uC davis’ Frank miTLoehner, ph.d., James TayLor and oTher indusTry experTs.

Snyder LiveStock company, inc. Lucy Rechel/Eddie Snyder • Office (775) 463-2677 Lucy’s Cell: (775) 790-0801 • www.slcnv.com Funded in part by grants from the City of yerington and Lyon County Tax boards.

20 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

THD ©

www.progressiverancher.com


Nevada Farm Bureau nd Ranchers Young Farmers a    by Anna-Lisa Giannini, Chairman

A

On the Horizon of a Successful New Year

s the New Year rolls around many of us decide on things we want to change. It seems like everyone is on a new diet, cutting out certain foods, striving to exercise, vowing to get more sleep and the like. Not only is the New Year a great chance to improve your health, but it’s also a time to do some goal setting. This year the Nevada Farm Bureau Young Farmers and Ranchers have set goals we hope will improve involvement throughout the state and will also help all Nevadans understand the important role of agriculture. A major outreach opportunity that we have participated in for years is a national program called Harvest for All. This food drive program engages YF&R members to gather food and money for the two Feeding America food banks in Nevada, Three Square in Las Vegas and the Northern Nevada Food Bank in Reno. We are looking forward to having more participation in the coming year. Last year the group in Clark County even had a “milk cow” outside the store where they set up their drive. Not only is Harvest for All a great opportunity to gather food for needy families in Nevada, but it’s also an opportunity to share agriculture’s story with our urban dwelling counterparts. Another important program we are ramping up this year is the Agriculture Literacy Project. Through this program, Nevada Farm Bureau purchases accurate agriculture books that have been selected by the American Farm Bureau Federation and then young farmer and rancher members take the books to classrooms of local schools, read the book to the class and then donate them to the classroom’s library. What a great opportunity to share information about farming and ranching with young people! This month, Cory Shrecengost will represent Nevada at the National Young Farmers and Ranchers Discussion Meet in Virginia Beach, Va. Another YF&R committee member, and a member of NVFB staff and I will attend the National convention as well. We hope to come back with new ideas, tons of energy and excitement to have a great year! What are your goals for the New Year?

PINENUT

LIVESTOCK SUPPLY INC. 263 Dorral Way

COWBOY LOGIC “If you think you’re a person of some influence, try orderin’ someone else’s dog around.” Courtesy PCC Update www.progressiverancher.com

Fallon, Nevada Reno Highway across from A&K Earth Movers

Stop by and see us, we look forward to seeing you!

PHONE: 775-423-5338 john@pinenutlivestocksupply.com

Thirteen Like Our 2012 Snyder Champion

Our 2014 offering is sired by LT Silver Distance 5342P • LT Cheyenne Blend 7142P LT Easy Blend 5125 PLD • DR Revelation 467 Hoodoo Diamond 1142 • LT Blue Grass 4017P

“BULLS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY” SALE Sunday, March 9, 2014 For the West’s Best in Charolais Genetics Call us today

JORGENSEN RANCH Fred & Toni Jorgensen

530-865-7102 • 209-602-8130 25884 Moller Ave. • Orland, CA 95963

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 21


STRONGHOLD

2013 High Selling Bull at Snyder’s Bulls for the 21st Century Sale

A Bull Can Make a Difference

Join one young Angus breeder and cancer survivor to raise funds for Make-A-Wish Idaho.

Selling 12 Bulls

Last summer, 17-year-old Kyle Bratton, Caldwell, Idaho, decided to use his upcoming senior project to give back to an organization that helped he and his family through a difficult time as he faced a life-threatening diagnosis. When Kyle was

at Snyder’s Bulls for the 21st Century Sale, Sunday, March 9, 2014 — 1 sired by LJT Citadel 812 —

half brother to last year’s champion and finished #1 in early Fall RFI test

— 5 sired by Red Northline Fat Tony 605U — — 2 sired by Becton Epic R397 K — — 2 sired by Messmer Packer S008 —

They’re ModerATe! They’re Thick!

— 1 sired by LJT Packer 028 — Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters Trotters

Citadel II 215 Epic 217 Packer 222 Tony 225 Epic 226 Tony 232 Tony 235 Tony 236 Tony 238 Packer 239 Tony 248 T-Bone 256

CED 6 5 6 2 4 7 6 6 4 3 5 2

BW -2.6 -3.1 -3.0 0.6 -2.1 0.2 -0.6 -1.8 1.3 -1.8 1.0 -1.0

WW 60 64 61 59 61 52 54 50 66 62 53 62

YW 92 100 95 92 95 83 85 80 103 94 87 93

MARB 0.38 0.44 0.51 0.23 0.60 0.42 0.31 0.35 0.33 0.59 .038 0.56

They Sell! And

REA 0.05 0.23 0.42 0.17 0.21 0.09 0.27 0.26 0.41 0.32 0.17 0.24

RiBeye of 15.88” • adG of 4.08 lBs on test loT 4852 365-day BW of 78 lBs • 205-day Wt of 812 lBs • 365-day Wt of 1375 lBs RiBeye of 13.94” • adG of 3.88 lBs on test loT 4851 365-day BW of 72 lBs • 205-day Wt of 812 lBs • 365-day Wt of 1306 lBs

• Averaged a 3.92 lbs/day of gain on test • 8 RFI efficient with minus scores

• 5 calving ease

• All will have a 50K DNA test for more accurate information on their progeny • Well adapted to a variety of terrains—from rolling hills to a mountain elevation of 4000 feet. • Received no creep feed. Only what Mom and the range provided for them.

Trotter Red Angus Raising registered Red Angus since 1965

(661) 548.6652 | CELL (661) 330.4617 Rt. 4, Box 206a, Porterville, CA 93257 | lanaj548@gmail.com

22 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

loT 4852

WW 50 • yW 102 Ced 11 • BW-1.7

MGs: eXlR BenChMaRk 145l siRe: sydGen Mandate 6079

loT 4852

=

WW 42 • yW 87 Ced 12 • BW-2.4

MGs: Wulfs GuaRdian 5074G Sire: hoover dAM

loT 4851

Ranch Romanov Easterly From www.progressiverancher.com


14, he received treatment for Hodgkins Lymphoma. During his hospital stay, he found out he’d been nominated to receive a wish through Make-A-Wish Idaho. The organization sent Kyle, his best friend, and his parents, George and Chris Brat-

ton, on a 10-day trip to Walt Disney World. “I can never fully repay the debt of kindness shown to me during my experience, but I thought I could start with this,” says Kyle, about his decision to raise funds. “Make-A-Wish grants wishes to children who don’t have much hope. I hope to earn enough money to send at least three deserving families on a trip of their dreams.” When Kyle decided to give back to Make-A-Wish Idaho, he felt it was important to give something himself, rather than just ask people for money. He decided to donate a registered Angus bull he raised to the cause. Kyle developed a bull syndicate, where individuals or groups can purchase donation shares of the bull, B A R Wish Granter 837, AAA #17463447. Each share sells for $50 and people can purchase one or multiple shares of the PVF All PayDay son, thus, becoming part of the “Wish Granter” Syndicate. Wish Granter will be auctioned off at the Gem State Classic Sale on Feb. 8, 2014, in Twin Falls, Idaho, as part of the Idaho Angus Association’s annual consignment sale. At that time, the Syndicate will purchase the bull, then donate him back to be auctioned off to the highest bidder, who will take possession of the bull. All proceeds from the Syndication, as well as the actual sale of the bull will be donated to MakeA-Wish Idaho. “It’s really unique to see that Kyle has taken his passion—Angus cattle—and turned it into something powerful to help others,” says Torene Bonner, CEO of MakeA-Wish Idaho. “It’s a very positive thing for him to do.” Through his efforts thus far, Kyle has raised nearly $8,000, and will continue accepting donations through March 1, 2014. For more information about B A R Wish Granter, or to purchase donation shares of the bull, please contact George or Kyle Bratton at (208) 861-8442 or brattonangusranch@hotmail.com. A website, www.barwishgranters.com has been set-up as well. Don’t miss your opportunity to own a bull who’s making a difference.

BULLS AVAILABLE AT THE RANCH AND THE SNYDER LIVESTOCK 21ST CENTURY BULL SALE MARCH 9, 2014

Selling at

Snyder’s Bulls for the 21st Century Sale Sunday, March 9, 2014

ng Calvi Ease

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BW

WW

YW

Milk

ME

201

0.3

71

105

.40

.04

202

-1.0

67

106

.29

.05

205

-1.0

68

103

.39

.06

208

-0.6

72

108

.22

.05

209

-0.4

75

113

.33

.06

Calvi ng Ease

All bulls sired by Beckton Epic R 397 K

Ron Paregien - 18445 Ave. 304 - Visalia, CA 93292

(559) 592-5024 - (559) 799-8000 www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 23


C I N A G R : THE O T N E M E V O M Part I. of I I I. T

Stephanie Licht

Born near Santa Monica, California’s palm-lined beaches, three year old Stephanie’s singular, far-fetched wish was to become a real “cowboy.” Though raised on Pasadena’s Great Plains she spent summers at an Aunt’s 12 acre McDonald’s Farm in Sonoma, CA, and then progressed through Cal Poly – San Luis Obispo’s “learn by doing” programs. Earning a BS in Animal Science, MS in General Agriculture and a lifetime Vo Ag Teaching Credential, Stephanie taught high school ag in California’s Antelope Valley, where she met and married Deputy Sheriff Al Licht. Taking early retirement, the couple “cowboyed” over twelve years for ten ranches across NE Nevada. Al’s bad hip ended ranch work, so the couple settled in Spring Creek, and Stephanie found work substitute teaching, working for Nevada Woolgrowers and Sheep Commission, the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association, and spent almost 10 years lobbying the Nevada Legislature for the sheep industry and Elko County. Al passed away in 1993, and in 1997 Stephanie married Ken Hall, a heavy equipment operator and “biker.” After lobbying ended, Stephanie briefly sold motorcycle insurance for Harley-Davidson, and was later hired to fill the “Field Representative” position for Nevada Farm Bureau where she served for almost nine years. In November 2013 the Farm Bureau “Field” position was eliminated and the Field Office closed. Stephanie’s experience and “can do” attitude are back in the job market, interested in opportunities to make a positive difference wherever and in whatever position she lands. Stephanie wishes everyone a Happy New Year, and can be reached at slicht@elkonv.com.

24 February 2014

he saying about opinions is, “Everyone has one.” When people found out they could measurably increase their price of just about any product by adding the word “organic,” sha-zam! They were instantly part of the “organic movement.” There are thousands of websites on the subject containing mixes of fact, fiction, and plenty of opinions – it seems everyone, their dog, the dog’s friends and all barnyard animals have an opinion about the “organic movement.” People are not a bit bashful about bearing their very narrow views and personal opinions with the universe via the web about what “organic” really is, even if those beliefs sometimes conflict with “sound science,” or the fixed laws of Mother Nature. There is a mantra stating, “There is nothing new under the sun.” Yet thundering herds of “enlightened” folks wrapped up in the new “foodie” crusade have convinced themselves, and are trying to beat everyone else into admitting, that through their 21st Century anti-corporate-factory farm agriculture they have invented backto-nature food production. Other popular opinion held by some of the enlightened also denies the existence of deity and with it any biblical literature. Thus knowing about the Garden of Eden and that it may have been the first “organic” farm doesn’t exist for them. And when graingrowing Cain assassinated his sheep herding brother Abel that may also have been the point where food fights began, and the point from which who is right or wrong about farms, farming methods and food production have been going on ever since… but we digress…. With the “Organic Movement” information

The Progressive Rancher

by Stephanie Licht

overload in movies, television, magazines, news media, and the Tsunami of websites, just how do we sift out what the “Organic Movement” really is? There are facts; there are fables; and there is the application of the word “organic” as a clever marketing tool frequently used to generate fun and profit. Today there is not only “organic” food but cosmetics, bath products, medicinals, clothing, dog shampoo, candy, duck calls, etc. ad nauseum. Some believe “organic” farming began when the first people advanced from hunter-gatherers to the planting of crops. Some admit the “organic movement” is more a renaissance, or a revival of former practices, than a revolution. Dictionary says “or·gan·ic” means: “…Of, relating to, or derived from living organisms: organic matter.” “Or·gan·ic” simply means anything in the animal and vegetable category of living things, as opposed to “in·or·gan·ic” things in the mineral category, Periodic Table of Elements and synthetically produced laboratory chemicals. Or·gan·ic products are defined as: “…Of, marked by, or involving the use of fertilizers or pesticides that are strictly of animal or vegetable origin;” “…Raised or conducted without the use of drugs, hormones, or synthetic chemicals;” and/or, “…Simple, healthful, and close to nature.” Up until about the 1920’s all agriculture was generally organic in that ranchers and farmers used naturally produced materials and labors to replenish their soils and reduce vermin and pest damages. Around 1924 Austrian philosopher Rudolph Stiener wanted to stimulate critical thinking and inspired sensitivity in his fellows. Stieners agricultural lectures on Biodynamics focused on how weather, the sun, moon and other extra-terrestrial forces affected plants which were dependent on what was taking place in the soil. About then English botanist Sir Albert Howard, considered the father of modern “organic” agriculture, was studying the ancient successful yield producing techniques being used by farmers in India. Sir Howard developed theories and methods of organic farming, many still in use today. Fierce territorial battles protecting an animal’s family food supply are natural. Man’s version of territorial conflicts play out in brutal wars the basic object of which is to take control of all the neighbors’ stuff, thinly disguised as the need to change others’ philosophies or social practices. Whichever, the evolution of better killing methods through industrial chemistry were methods deployed in WWII. The nerve gas and ammonium nitrate explosives developed for war subsequently came home with the troops to the ranches and farms. The gas became insecticides. www.progressiverancher.com


e n o y r e “Ev ” … e n O Ha s

Ammonium nitrate when used as fertilizer rapidly produced high yielding crops (but is still explosively popular today in the Middle East). These “effective” chemicals were then unquestioningly adopted into the modern agriculture of the 1940’s and 1950’s, pushing traditionally slower organic farming methods aside. By the 1960’s American scientist Rachel Carson, who also served as U.S. Fish and Wildlife publication Editor-in-Chief, was disturbed by the “…profligate use of synthetic chemical pesticides…” She thus wrote “Silent Spring,” expressing her personal theories (some as yet scientifically unconfirmed) warning the public and challenging agricultural scientists’ and government practices. Carson called for a change in the way humans viewed their natural world. This created a springboard platform from which the rising counter-culture “be natural” generations of the 60’s and 70’s launched their green movements. This intense focus on conservation, environmental ethics, and nutritional health evolved over time into the “organic market.” Consumer demands for “organic” then spread from specialty market “health food stores” of the ’70’s and ’80’s to corners of the supermarket in the ’90’s. American farmers rethought “organic” farming methods and views of “organic” policies. Today “organic products” have taken over prime shelf space in the big chain supermarkets, are prominently featured in celebrity chefs’ upscale restaurants, and are the bread and butter of companies such as Whole Foods. Some retail stores will not carry products without signed contracts mandating adherence to “organically” driven environmental practices. Where the “organic” label brought better prices, producers were not necessarily abiding by non-use of synthetic chemicals. This caused problems for a new and growing “organic” industry. A lack of strict nationalized uniformity might cause consumer confusion and undermine “organic” integrity. Multi-ingredient organic food products had labeling and marketing difficulties due to differences between local industry, state and regionally developed “standards.” Without “federal” meat, poultry and seafood standards USDA’s Food Safety & Inspection Service and the Food & Drug Administration would not permit these products to be labeled as “organic,” limiting consumer choice and additional marketing opportunities. Without consistent US “organic” standards, access to potentially lucrative international organic market$ was hampered. Therefore, Congress passed the “Organic Foods Production Act (OFPA) of 1990,” regulating “standard organic farming practices” and created a “National List” of acceptable inputs, including some fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides. (See: 2013 amended update https://www. federalregister.gov/articles/2013/05/28/2013-12504/national-organic-program-nop-amendments-to-the-national-list-of-allowed-and-prohibitedsubstances; and http://www.beyondpesticides.org/organicfood/nos/. ) By law “certifiers” are to visit facilities to ensure producers, processors and handlers are following the strict, uniform “organic” minimum standards and regulations set forth for the methods and materials used in organic production. Specific “Standards” cover crop and livestock production and the processing labeling and packaging of “certified organic” products. Commodities and goods labeled “organic” must be officially certified as such and may then display the official logo label. The full “OFPA” text and government information can be found at http:// www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELPRDC5060370 (a 21 page PDF file of OPFS 1990 as amended in 1997); at the Organic Trade Association http://www.ota.com/pp/legislation/backgrounder. html; and then there’s QuackWatch’s expose: http://www.quackwatch. com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/organic.html . Next time will be devoted to exploring some Fractured Fables related to “organic” products.

www.progressiverancher.com

Farmer Ad 4.8x11.indd The ProgressiveMAA-Prog Rancher

1

1/20/14 12:09 PM February 2014 25


SALT TOLERANT AND DROUGHT-HARDY VARIETIES AVAILABLE

Alfalfa is All We Do! Conventional Alfalfa Varieties

Round Up Ready Alfalfas        

FD 4 4 4.3 5 5 6 4 5

Liberator 6497R (New) Mutiny 6516R (New) 6547R (New) Revolt WL 356 HQRR WL 367 HQRR

WH VH VH VH H VH

  

Oats • Cayuse • Monida Wheat • Twin • PR 1404 Peas Corn Soghum Sudan • BMR • Piper Sudan Grass • Sweet RN Honey

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Grain & Miscellaneous

Triticale • Forerunner (Beardless) Ryegrain • Gazelle - Spring • Prima - Fall • VNS Beardless Barley Millet Milo Sunflower Garrison Meadow Foxtail

630SQ (Somerset)

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Ron’s Dryland Mix Ron’s Rangeland Mix Forage Kochia Great Basin Wild Rye Ladak Alfalfa PNW Dryland Tall Wheatgrass Shadescale 4 Wing Saltbush Blue Flax

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Olympic Elite

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We Have Varieties Available That are Organically Approved

Clovers        

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Call or Stop In For Our Complete List of Seeds & Grains!

RON’S SEED & SUPPLY Serving Agricultur e for 31 Years

26 February 2014

710 Grass Valley Road • Winnemucca, NV 89445 775-623-5053 or 1-800-603-5053

YOUR SEED, FERTILIZER & CHEMICAL HEADQUARTERS FOR NEVADA The Progressive Rancher

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www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 27


BW +2.0 WW +60 YW +109

Mytty Forefront 77P

SC +1.45 MILK +21

annual bull sale

March 3, 2014 1 p.m. at the Ranch • Florence, Montana

Selling BW +3.4 WW +54 YW +97

Mytty Thunderstruck

SC +.95 MILK +26

120

Power Packed Yearling Bulls

The Mytty cow herd has produced the herd sires: “Nebraska”, “Mytty In Focus”, “Mytty Forefront 77P”, “Mytty Thunderstruck”,“Mytty In Line” and “Sitz Alliance 7544”.

Please call for more information

BW

Connealy Final Product

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+.8

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875 Sweeney Creek Loop • Florence, MT 59833

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(406) 777-0950 • Cell: (406) 360-8939 myttyangus@cybernet1.com www.MyttyAngus.com

SC +.88 MILK +43

Buford Bluestem 9974 Mytty 4-Stroke Connealy Cavalry SAV Final Answer HARB Windy 758 JH

28 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


“Horse Eye” by Katelyn Nester

“Sunset” by Melissa Purse

“Sweet Horses” by Holland Miller

Nevada Farm Bureau Announces Photo Contest Winners

SPARKS, Nev, – Eighty-six photographs were submitted to the 2013 Nevada Farm Bureau Photo Contest, which is sponsored by the Nevada Farm Bureau Women’s Leadership Committee. Three winners were chosen for both adult and youth categories. Categories for the 2013 contest featured photographs representing Nevada agriculture, Nevada’s landscape, and rural life. The Women’s Leadership Committee judged the winning photographs.

Winners in the adult category are: Janet Johnson, “Lone Cow,” Denio, Humboldt County Farm Bureau, first place; Helen Jenkins, “Watercolor Sunset,” Tonopah, Central County Farm Bureau, second place; Wayne Jenkins, “No Hunting Hawk,” Tonopah, Central County Farm Bureau, third place.

“Lone Cow” by Janet Johnson

Winners in the youth category are: Katelyn Nester, “Horse Eye,” Battle Mountain, Elko County Farm Bureau, first place; Melissa Pursel, “Sunset,” Yerington, Lyon County Farm Bureau, second place; Holland Miller, “Sweet Horses,” Jiggs, Elko County Farm Bureau, third place. Winning photographs in both categories will receive cash prizes of $100, $75, and $50 and will be on display during the 2013 Nevada Farm Bureau Annual Convention in Las Vegas. Many photographs that were submitted will be showcased in the 2014 Rural Tour, Nevada Farm Bureau’s annual member-only calendar. Other pictures will be used in Nevada Farm Bureau marketing and promotional materials. Visit the Nevada Farm Bureau website at www.nvfb.org to see the winning photographs.

“Watercolor Sunset” by Helen Jenkins Hometown Solutions_EighthPageAd_sans.pdf

Nevada Water Solutions LLC C

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2:21 PM

coverage offered through:

For a complete review of your insurance needs and details on coverage and credits available, contact our Farm & Ranch specialist:

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The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 29


CHECKOFF NEWS News From the Nevada Beef Council

Sharing the Power of Beef With Nevada Dietitians The Nevada Beef Council (NBC) recently met with the Southern Nevada Dietetic Association (SNDA) at Centennial Hospital in Las Vegas to share just how beneficial beef is in a balanced diet. The NBC’s Registered Dietitian, James Winstead, spoke to the audience of approximately 60 Southern Nevada dietitians and nutrition professionals about the nutritive properties of beef and the latest research on the benefits of a protein-rich diet. Winstead highlighted the basics of beef nutrition, the 10 essential nutrients found in beef (including protein, iron, zinc, B vitamins, selenium, phosphorous, and niacin) and how to incorporate beef into a heart-healthy diet. He also covered the benefits of a higher protein diet, noting the important role high-quality protein found in beef can have on stimulating muscle growth and managing weight. “Since the 1970s, beef has been demonized due to a misperception that it causes heart disease,” Winstead shared with the group. “When viewing the fatty acid profile of beef, you will notice that half the fats are mono-unsaturated fatty acids, the same fat that is found in olive oil, which is very important in building a heart-healthy diet.” Following the event, attendees turned to social media to share their feedback. One of

Beef Tenderloin with Blue Cheese Topping

W

Adapted from the beefitswhatsfordinner.com recipe collection.

hy make the trip to a steakhouse this Valentine’s Day when you can cook up this simple recipe that’s just as tasty as one prepared by a chef? Try this classic tenderloin recipe with a delicious blue cheese spread, and your Valentine will think Gordon Ramsay himself was in your kitchen. Total Recipe Time: 25 minutes 

Choose Your Calories by the Company They Keep A 3-ounce serving of lean beef (154 calories) contributes less than 10 percent of calories to a 2,000-calorie diet, yet it supplies more than 10 percent of the Daily Value for:

Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS 1. 4 beef tenderloin steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 1 pound) 2. 1 large clove garlic, halved

3. 1/2 teaspoon salt 4. 2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley

Blue Cheese Topping 1. 2 tablespoons cream cheese 2. 4 teaspoons crumbled blue cheese

3. 4 teaspoons plain yogurt 4. 2 teaspoons minced onion 5. Dash ground white pepper

48% PROTEIN

Beef is an Excellent Source of these nutrients

Beef is a Good Source of these nutrients

41% SELENIUM

37% B12

INSTRUCTIONS Step 1: Combine topping ingredients in small bowl. Rub steaks with garlic.

33% ZINC

Step 2: Place steaks on rack in broiler pan so surface of beef is 2 to 3 inches from heat. Broil 13 to 16 minutes for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning once. One to two minutes before steaks are done, top evenly with topping. *

25% NIACIN

20% 19% B

Step 3: Season with salt; sprinkle with parsley. (Remember to let the steak rest for five to 10 minutes before serving.)

6

*To grill, place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 10 to 14 minutes for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. One minute before steaks are done, top evenly with topping.

PHOSPHORUS

17% CHOLINE*

12% IRON

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION Nutrition information per serving: 209 calories; 10 g fat (5 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat); 78 mg cholesterol; 398 mg sodium; 1 g carbohydrate; 0.1 g fiber; 26 g protein; 7.1 mg niacin; 0.6 mg vitamin B6; 1.4 mcg vitamin B12; 1.7 mg iron; 29 mcg selenium; 4.6 mg zinc. This recipe is an excellent source of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, selenium and zinc.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 2009. USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 22. Nutrient Data Laboratory homepage www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/ foodcomp *A 3-ounce serving of lean beef provides approximately 17% of the highest adequate intake for choline (550mg). Dietary Reference Intakes, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2006. Guidance for Industry, A Food Labeling Guide. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, April 2008. http:// www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/2lg-toc.html © 2010, CATTLEMEN’S BEEF BOARD AND NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S BEEF ASSOCIATION

30 February 2014

10%

RIBOFLAVIN

The Progressive Rancher

The Beef Checkoff through the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

18-213 609500

www.progressiverancher.com


CHECKOFF NEWS News From the Nevada Beef Council

the dietitians who attended the presentation noted on Facebook, “Just got back from a nutrition session about beef. Suddenly, I want more of it in my life.” Educating that key influential audiences such as the dietetic and health-oriented communities have the latest and best information about beef nutrition is just one way in which the NBC works to influence beef demand in Nevada.

On the Road With Cattlemen’s Update Members of the NBC team recently joined the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and other agencies for the 2014 Cattlemen’s Update, a week-long tour throughout Nevada that brings educational topics and programs to beef producers. The NBC shared some of its ongoing efforts and goals with producers throughout the week, and offered insight on its programs designed to promote Nevada beef and grow beef demand. Bill Dale, Executive Director of the Nevada Beef Council, shared some history and background on the beef checkoff with producers, noting that it was established as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. The checkoff assesses $1 per head on the sale of live domestic and imported cattle. From there, 50 cents of that dollar are retained at the state level, and the remaining 50 cents go to the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board (CBB), which oversees the national checkoff program.

“One of the challenges we face is simply caused by the power of inflation over a period of time,” noted Dale during the presentations. “In today’s economy, it would take $1.90 to have the same buying power $1 had in 1985. So essentially, our spending power has decreased at the same time that the national cow herd is decreasing, making it necessary, now more than ever, for the Nevada Beef Council to invest its resources wisely and prudently.” Joining Dale from the Nevada Beef Council staff was Jill Scofield, Manager of Producer Communications. The NBC team is guided by a board of seven beef producers from throughout the state who represent all phases of the Nevada beef production process. To learn more, visit www.nevadabeef.org, or find us on Facebook and Twitter.

Interested in Serving on the NBC? The Nevada Beef Council will have a vacant board position in the near future, and is looking for beef producers who are interested in becoming a council member. If you represent the cow-calf, dairy or feeder sectors and would like to help guide the NBC team in its efforts to promote the beef industry throughout the state, please consider applying. The Council meets in person twice each year and provides feedback, guidance and input on the activities and programs of the NBC. For an application, visit www.nevadabeef.org, call us at 877554-BEEF (2333) or email askus@nevadabeef.org.

Your Nevada Beef Council Members • Lucy Rechel, Chair (Feeder, Yerington) • Jay Dalton, Vice Chair (Cow/Calf, Wells) • John Jackson (Cow/Calf, Tuscarora) • Susan Agee (Cow/Calf, Alamo) • Ray Callahan (Cow/Calf, Reno) • Bill Frade (Dairy, Yerington) • Steve Lucas (Feeder, Winnemucca)

Small Farm Pre-Conference Workshop Aims to Educate on Livestock Processing Options in the Area University Center for Economic Development looks to educate livestock producers on Federal and State regulations in small processing. Sparks, Nev. – The University of Nevada, Reno University Center for Economic Development is offering a marketing workshop prior to the Nevada Small Farm Conference for meat producers to help identify regulations to ensure producers are selling within the applicable laws. This is the third meat marketing workshop in a series of five to be held through June 2014. The pre-conference workshop will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,Thursday, Feb. 20, at John Ascuaga’s Nugget, 1100 Nugget Ave, Sparks. Cost is $45. Seating is limited, and registration is required and can be done online at http:// nevadafarmconference.org. “Understanding the regulations behind meat and poultry harvest, processing, and handling is essential for Nevada’s livestock producers, and this workshop will provide clarification and methods for limiting liability,” Maggie W. Cowee, food systems analyst with the University Center for Economic Development, said. Featured workshop speakers Chris Fuller and Dr. www.progressiverancher.com

David Thain will discuss state and Federal regulations, safe product handling and using animal quality assurance programs to protect the quality of meat products. There will also be a 90-minute session held during the Nevada Small Farm Conference including a panel of experts and round table discussion of alternatives and solutions to Nevada’s meat harvest and processing bottleneck. Workshop time and speakers to be announced.

About the featured speakers Chris Fuller is owner/operator of Fuller Consulting focused on small processing plant advising, private instruction, butchering parties, and demonstrations. Chris was instrumental in the opening of Alleghany Meats—which included hiring, training, branding, and establishing the business in Virginia. Chris will present Federal regulations in small processing, as well as advice to ensure producers limit their liability and are selling within the law. David Thain is a retired Nevada State Veterinarian and The Progressive Rancher

State Extension Veterinarian for the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. Thain has several decades of experience working directly with producers to address animal health and regulatory issues specific to Nevada agriculture. His presentation will focus on state regulations for red meat and poultry harvest and processing, animal quality assurance, and sales options for USDA-inspected versus custom exempt meat products. The University Center for Economic Development fosters economic development throughout Nevada by making the extensive resources of the University available to organizations and areas that can benefit from job and income creation and job retention efforts. Funding for this project is provided by the Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station, the Western Center for Risk Management Education at Washington State University and USDA/NIFA under Award Number 2012-49200-20030. For additional information, contact Maggie Cowee at 775-784-8050 or margaretc@unr.edu. February 2014 31


Range Plants for the Rancher By Paul T. Tueller, Ph.D., CRMC

F

Desert Marigold

or this issue I describe another desert forb, Baileya multiradiata Harv. & A. Gray. This plant is often called the Desert Marigold. Like many common names, “marigold” originated from the corruption of a foreign phrase. In this case, the original term was the Anglo-Saxon “merse-mear-gealla” - the “marsh marigold. Marigolds were associated with the Virgin Mary in the Middle Ages, and the word is often said to be derived from “Mary’s Gold.” The name Marigold has been given to several species of Asteraceae, the sunflower family, with their sunny yellow or orange flowers. In southern Nevada this plant is often referred to as the headache plant. My wife Sharon who was raised in the Mojave Desert says this is because it can give you a “headache.” The term “Baileya” honors Jacob Whitman Bailey (1811-1857), a chemist and botanist best known for his pioneering work using a microscope to study diatoms. “Multiradiata” refers to the numerous ray flowers in each head. The desert-marigold is an annual or short-lived perennial, generally 10 to 30 inches tall and up to 2 feet across with a basal rosette of one- to four-inch long, pinnate wooly, or hairy, leaves. They are characterized by individual florets arranged in dense heads (a sunflower) making the floretgroup look like one single flower. These single, one- to two-inch wide flower heads grow on the end of stems up to one foot above the leaves. Both rays (34 to 55) and disks (more than 100) are yellow. Rays are three-lobed. Its daisy-like flowers can form impressive mounds of nearly solid yellow. These long-lasting, bright-yellow flowers rise on nearly leafless stems above the mounds of woolly, gray foliage. The leaves are green with silver-white hairs, lobed, and grow very low on the thick stems. Hairs are an important desert plant adaptation because they both increase light reflection, resulting in lower leaf temperatures, and they block ultraviolet light. These plants can be further described as grayish, woolly plants, branched and leafy mostly in the lower half, with brilliant yellow flowers in heads, one borne at the end of each of many nearly leafless flower stalks. The flowers, which occur sporadically over a long bloom period, turn papery with age. Desert-marigolds are one of the most conspicuous spring wildflowers across the arid lands of the southwest. They begin to flower in March and will continue to bloom off and on until November. Rain triggers additional rounds of flowering. They commonly grow on stony slopes and sandy plains and mesas and are most abundant on roadsides, where they may form dense yellow carpets. They range in elevation from 1000 to 6500 feet. Their drought tolerance and long flowering season have made the desert-marigold a popular plant

32 February 2014

in the horticultural world. These plants can be found growing on sandy or gravelly soils of roadsides, plains, washes, mesas, and pinyon-juniper communities. Baileya species are used as food plants by the larvae of some insect species which feed exclusively on the genus. In May or early fall, one might find flower heads sealed into a ball. This is attributable to larvae of the desert-marigold moth (Schinia miniana), which construct the balls as cocoons, often building them in as little as 20 minutes. Moths in this genus are known as flower moths and are often nocturnal. One study of this plant/animal interaction suggested that the balled flower protected the larvae from predation and lowered the rate of desiccation. Adult desert-marigold moths have ocher colored forewings with two transverse white bands and wine red hindwings. It has been suggested that Schinia miniana is a major selection agent causing the desert marigold to generate the multiple flowers heads alluded to by its scientific name.” Birds such as black-throated sparrows consume the desert-marigold’s pale tan seeds in fall. The plant ranges across southern Arizona north into southern Nevada and southwestern Utah, south into Mexico, west to the Mojave Desert and east through the Chihuahuan Desert to Texas. Dense patches often form solid strips of yellow along miles of desert roadsides. However, while I have seen this conspicuous plant in southern Nevada I have only rarely seen it in the dense patches mentioned above. Desert marigolds typically have their main bloom in the spring, extending through July. Summer thunderstorms may enable a second bloom in October and even into November. Desert marigold either fresh or dried, are poisonous to goats and sheep. Sheep which have consumed desert-marigold on heavily grazed lands have sometimes died in large numbers. Horses and cattle do not seem to be affected as much. Nevertheless it is an interesting part of the desert panorama and one that is easily identified.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


Ward Ranches

PERFORMANCE GENETICS 8th Annual Production Sale

UNIVERSITY 50% SAL ERS / 50% ANGUS His sons sell February 16th!

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 1 p.m. at the Ranch Gardnerville, Nevada

Ward Ranches Optimizers “Balanced Business” Salers and Angus are both proven to be compatible for calving ease and marbling quality. Both breeds offer maternal and carcass qualities that are valued in the industry today. We have been blending the best of the two breeds to develop the ideal Optimizer bull. An Optimizer can be from 25% to less than 75% Salers. This has resulted in a superior individual with the qualities that increase profitability for you, our customer.

71% Salers / 25% Angus University son sold in our 2013 sale

70 FALL 2012 RANCH-READY BULLS SELL FEBRUARY 16 Angus • Salers • Salers/Angus Composites • Performance test and ultrasound results • Bulls fertility tested & unconditionally guaranteed • All bulls tested BVD–PI negative • Free delivery to central locations within 500 miles

The focus at Ward Ranches is to produce a quality product, year after year. We know that the Angus breed is known as the “Business Breed” and that the Salers breed is known as the “Balanced Breed.” Experience has taught us, and research has proven, that these two breeds complement each other well. “Balanced Business,” as we call it. Be sure to attend the Nevada Cattlemen All-Breed’s Bull Sale at Fallon on Saturday, and especially plan to join us

Sunday, February 16th, for the 8th Annual Ward Ranches Production Sale at Gardnerville! We are a 1.5 hour drive southwest of Fallon. www.progressiverancher.com

Purebred Angus son of DPL Daybreak K82 sold in our 2013 sale

Guest Consignor: Hunsaker Livestock

Buhl, Idaho

Not on our catalog mailing list? E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com

/

Ward Ranches “ Y OU R

The Progressive Rancher

GARY WARD & FAMILY

(775) 790-6148 P. O. Box 1404, Gardnerville, NV 89410 E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com Ranch: 1155 Foothill Rd., Gardnerville

Western G ENET I C SO UR C E ” February 2014 33


Nevada’s Priority Agricultural Weeds:

Puncturevine

Brad Schultz, Extension Educator, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Winnemucca, Nevada.

Puncturevine (Tribulus terrestris L.) is a prostrate warm season (summer) annual forb that spreads outward in all directions from a central crown. Mature plants may reach a diameter of 5 feet. Puncturevine grows best in soils with a dry and loose surface. Sandy soils, dunes, or loose windblown soil around the edges of production fields are quite susceptible. Puncturevine can inhabit heavier soils with more clay and/or silt, especially if they are fertile and moist, or are highly compacted areas that typify many roadsides, fence lines, or playgrounds. In essence, puncturevine is very common in areas that lack a good cover of crop, pasture or rangeland plants that can out-compete the weed and keep it from establishing. Common locations that lack adequate vegetation are corrals; stockyards; equipment storage areas; driveways; vacant fields, lots, and pivot corners with poor vegetation cover; fence lines and utility corridors; degraded pastures; fallow fields; cracks in sidewalks and streets, and bare or gravelly areas along driveways and streets. Puncture vine is poisonous to many animals; thus, grazing is not a control option. Cattle and especially sheep are the most susceptible species, with young animals and pregnant females being the most susceptible individuals. Pregnant animals often have an increased rate of abortion. Puncturevine has an annual growth cycle; therefore, every plant originates from seed produced by a previous generation, often many years earlier. Long-term control of puncturevine only occurs after the amount of viable seed is reduced to a small population. Seeds start to germinate by late spring and germination flushes can occur throughout the summer, until the first frost. The general requirement for seed germination and seedling emergence is soil that is moist and wet. Most seedlings emerge from seed located in the soil’s upper

two inches. Following germination, puncturevine seedlings rapidly develop a deep tap root which can access soil moisture from deep in the soil profile, long after the surface horizons have become dry. Flowers can develop 3 to 4 weeks after seedlings emerge, with additional flowers appearing throughout the entire growing season. The burrs that contain the seed may develop within six weeks of seedling emergence. Once they reach the dough stage the seed is likely to become viable, even if the mother plant is killed through tillage or other control efforts. The rapid formation of viable seed after seedling emergence dictates that the timeframe for successful control of puncturevine is during the first six weeks after seedling emergence. Control efforts that occur after the first six weeks of plant growth have an increased risk of being unsuccessful because viable seed will have been produced. Each mature puncture vine plant typically produces from several hundred to about 5,000 seeds, although single large plants growing without competition have produced as many as 500,000 to one million seeds. Thus, anywhere from a few to several thousand plants in one growing season can result in millions of potential plants the following growing season. Seeds are largely dormant at germination and about 50 percent of the seed dispersed in late summer or early fall will remain viable at the end of the following growing season. Other research has found that 15 percent of the seed remains viable up to 5 years after it is dispersed. A small percent probably survives one to several more years, and research on fine sandy loam soil’s has found that some seeds will be viable after 15 years. Fine sandy loam soils are widespread and common in Nevada and the surrounding Great Bain; thus, once puncturevine has gone to seed once a long-term infestation is likely.

Table 1. Some of the active ingredients and products known to control or suppress puncturevine. Not all representative products are listed. Some of the active ingredients listed also come in pre-mixed formulations with other products and those pre-mixed products are not listed in the table. They may be more appropriate for your specific situation because of a broader spectrum of weeds controlled. A complete list of all active ingredients and products labeled to control puncturevine can be searched for at the CDMS (http://www.cdms.net/LabelsMsds/LMDefault.aspx?pd=7607&t=) and Greenbook (http://www.greenbook.net/) websites. The order of chemicals shown below does not reflect any preference or efficacy.

Active Ingredient

Representative Products

Selective

Soil Residual

Imazapyr

Arsenal, Habitat, Stalker

No

Long

Dicamba

Banvel, Clarity

Yes

Yes

Post-emergence to rapidly growing young plants

Imazapic

Plateau

Yes

Yes

Post-emergence to rapidly growing young plants

Touchdown, Departure, Roundup and others

No

No

Post-emergence when runner length < 6 inches

Telar

Yes

Yes

Pre- or early post-emergence

Detail, Sharpen

Yes

Yes

Primarily post-emergent to runners < 6 inches long and actively growing

Many

Yes

No

Post-emergent to new seedlings

Oxyfluorfen

Collide, Goal

Yes

Yes

Primarily early post-emergence to seedlings with runners < 4 inches and actively growing

Flumioxazin

Broadstar, Chateau SW, Payload

Yes

Yes

Pre- or post-emergent to actively growing plants

Prosulfuron

Peak

Yes

Yes

Primarily post-emergent to weeds with runners < 8 inches and growing

Accumen, Pendulum, Prowl H2O

Yes

Yes

Primarily pre-emergent

Treflan, Trust

Yes

Yes

Pre-emergent with soil incorporation

Triasulfuron

Amber

Yes

Yes, but usually short

Bromacil

Hyvar

Depends on rate

Yes

Pre-emergent prior to rainfall or irrigation for soil incorporation

Paraquat

Gramoxone

No

No

Post-emergence to rapidly growing young plants

Rimsulfuron

Matrix

Rate and timing dependent

Generally short

Tribenuron methyl

Express

Yes

Very short

Glyphosate Chlorsulfuron Saflufenacil 2,4-D

Pendimethalin Trifuralin

Growth Stage Pre- or post-emergent to young plants

Usually post-emergent to plants < 6 inches diameter. Pre-plant or pre-emergence to winter or spring wheat, except Durum

Pre-emergence or early post-emergence with plants < 3 inches diameter Post-emergent to actively growing plants < 4 inches wide

Listing a commercial herbicide does not imply an endorsement by the authors, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension or its personnel. Product names were used only for ease of reading, not endorsement. Herbicides should be selected for use based upon the active ingredient and the specific bio-environmental situation.

34 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


Mechanical treatments, such as deep plowing or disking the soil, will kill the mother plant but have little effect on any puncturevine seed in the soil. In fact, the seeds are likely to become buried at relatively deep depths, which can increase their long-term survival and prolong the potential problem if future tillage brings them to the top inch or two of the soil’s surface. Hoeing, or shallow tillage up to one-inch deep, can successfully kill young immature plants and not bury pre-existing seed so deep that it prolongs its lifespan. For small populations that have developed seeds, the mature plants can pulled, bagged, sealed and properly disposed off. It is possible to burn the bags and kill the seed of the fire is hot enough for a long enough period. Mowing is not a viable control technique due to the plant’s very short stature. Cultural control is largely focused on planting desired competitive vegetation, to reduce the risk of large-scale establishment of puncturevine. Planting competitive vegetation cannot prevent a few puncture vine plants from becoming established as even dense stands of desired plants have thin spots in which a weed can become established. The goal is to reduce the risk of many plants becoming established in a short period. Placement of thick mulch (4 to 6 inches) on the soil’s surface can also reduce the potential of puncturevine becoming established. While not appropriate everywhere, mulch may be a practical solution for smaller areas. Fire generally is not useful because of puncturevines low growing nature and poor ability to carry a flame. Most fires would not be hot enough to kill any seeds on the plant or soil surface. Immature plants, however, could be very susceptible to flaming that occurs long enough to kill the leaves and stems. A novel approach for some situations is to attach carpet or some other sticky material to a roller and then roll the apparatus across the soil several times. This technique removes a substantial amount of seed from the soil’s surface. For a new infestation which has just gone to seed, and all of the seed resides on the soil surface, “carpet rolling” the soil surface may prevent a large seedbank from becoming established. Biological control is limited to a stem weevil (Microlarinus lypriformis) and a seed weevil (Microlarinus lareynii), which were introduced from Italy over 50 years ago. These two insects have led to successful control of puncturevine in some areas, particularly locations in the warmer southwestern states. Both insects are sensitive to prolonged periods of frost and may have their populations, hence, their effectiveness reduced during cold winters.

When each insect is used alone, the stem weevil is reported to be slightly more effective than the seed weevil. The best control happens when both weevils attack puncturevine simultaneously and the puncturevine plants are being adversely affected by moisture-stress. Many herbicides can effectively control puncture vine (Table 1). The use of a specific herbicide, however, depends on the context of the situation and long-term management goals for the treatment area. Some considerations include: 1) are desired plants growing with the puncturevine and could they be damaged by the herbicide treatment; 2) are there any roots of any desired plants growing beneath the area treated, and will the herbicide remain in the soil and eventually affect those roots and associated plants; 3) are there nearby plants that could be affected by the herbicide drifting off-site; 4) is the treatment area susceptible to its soil being moved off-site by wind, water, or other phenomena, and will any herbicide attached to those soil particles adversely affect the vegetation where the soil comes to rest; and 5) for pre-emergence applications that require soil incorporation do you have the mechanical equipment or irrigation water needed (if rainfall is unlikely) to move the herbicide into the soil to the appropriate depth. Puncture vine inhabits many areas that are intended to remain as bare-ground. These sites are often treated with a persistent herbicide that can remain in the soil for several years and eliminate the need for frequent retreatment. Soil persistent herbicides, however, should not be used on sites where the roots of trees or shrubs grow under the area where bare-ground is desired. These roots eventually will come in contact with the herbicide and it may kill the desired plants. Also, soil persistent herbicides also are not normally recommended for sites that will be replanted after treatment. Non-selective herbicides (chemicals that kill all plants) should not be used if desired plants also occupy the site and you want them to increase after treatment of the puncturevine. Herbicides are a very effective tool but the specific chemical used should be selected only after very carefully thought about your short- and long-term management goals, and potential for unintended consequences to arise. Herbicide characteristics, with respect to longevity, selectivity, mobility in the soil, and the chemicals ability to volatize and move off-site, should match the needs and constraints of the site treated and your specific management goals and objectives.

One of the West’s most outstanding offerings of yearling and coming two-year-old Gelbvieh, Angus and Balancer Bulls s

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Over 75 bulls sell

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Phone: 208-824-5531 • 208.430.5532 www.sheridancattle.com • Email: cordell@atcnet.net www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 35


Mayweed Chamomile

H

ello from the Humboldt Watershed Cooperative Weed Management Area! This month we would like to introduce you to another state listed noxious weed, mayweed chamomile (Anthemis cotula). Mayweed chamomile is initially native to Europe and North Africa. It has successfully migrated to North America, Southern Africa, Australia and New Zealand where it can be found growing on waste ground, alongside roads, and in fields. Anthemis cotula is considered a weed due to its propensity for invading cultivated areas. Mayweed chamomile is an annual plant in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). Mayweed chamomile has small, oval-shaped seed leaves. They are thick and smooth and become maroon on the underside with age. They are rarely seen, though, because they dry up rapidly as the plant begins to grow. The first true leaves grow opposite of each other on the stem, and are pointed and deeply divided. Subsequent leaves grow alternately along the stems, sparsely produce short hairs, and are finely divided several times. They release a distinctly foul odor and grow about 0.75-2.5 inches long and 1 inch wide. The mature plant is 0.5-2 feet tall with erect, branching, hairless stems. The plant produces a tap root and an extensive, fibrous root system that grows near the soil surface. Flowers are borne at the ends of branches and on 1-4 inch long, unbranched stalks in the axils of the leaf from May through October. The many yellow disk flowers are surrounded by 12-20 white ray flowers in one head. The white ray flowers each have 3 distinct teeth at their tips and flower heads are approximately 0.75-1 inch in diameter. Each flower head produces numerous (thousands per plant) single, smooth seeds. Mayweed chamomile germinates readily in the spring and fall. It has a dense, fibrous root system, which spreads rapidly during wet periods. Late summer and fallgerminated seedlings may overwinter as a rosette. In the spring, bolting commences with the elongation of the central stem. Overwintering plants flower in mid-May and spring germinated seedlings flower in June. Flowering stops after a killing frost. Contact with mayweed chamomile can cause skin rashes to humans. Livestock that graze mayweed chamomile can develop blistered noses and mouths, and irritated mucous membranes. It also imparts a strong off-flavor to the milk of dairy animals if they graze it or eat it in hay. Mayweed chamomile is competitive, allelopathic (slows or stops growth of other plants), requires control in cropping systems, and may contaminate seed crops, requiring costly seed cleaning. It is a particular problem in cereal crops and grasses grown for seed.

Mechanical and Cultural Control Isolated mayweed chamomile plants and small infestations can be removed by hand pulling and digging before viable seed is produced. Cultivation is most successful if done

36 February 2014

when the plant is in the seedling stage, before an extensive root system develops and before the plant flowers and produces seeds. Repeated cultivation may be necessary to control this weed. Mowing or flailing mayweed chamomile is not very effective. However, some success may be achieved if performed immediately before the plant flowers. If mowed too early, the plant grows more prostrate and can produce flowers below the height of a mower blade set to minimize damage to other desirable plants. A second mowing may be required to remove flowers when the season is long, moisture is available and the plants regrow and flower after the first mowing. Mayweed chamomile is not an exceptionally strong competitor, so maintaining a vigorous pasture with proper irrigation, fertilizer application, and harvesting can limit spread in forage production systems. Avoid overgrazing and excessive cultivation.

Chemical Control The Nevada Department of Agriculture website states that you can apply bromoxynil, dicamba, metsulfuron, picloram or tribenuron to actively growing plants by carefully following the instructions listed on the herbicide’s label.

Follow-up Prevent the establishment of new infestations of mayweed chamomile by minimizing disturbance and seed dispersal. Eliminate seed production to decrease the spread of this annual forb, and continue to deplete the seed bank for four to six years. Reseeding areas with perennial grasses for several years will reduce an infestation. As always, please notify the HWCWMA if you see mayweed chamomile growing within the Humboldt River watershed. Our staff can provide the property owner or appropriate public agency with site-specific advice on how best to remove it. We have an opportunity to stop it from spreading if we act quickly. We map all known locations of regulated noxious weeds in order to help us and others locate new infestations in time to control them. The Humboldt Watershed CWMA has also developed a website to serve as a clearinghouse for information on weeds in the Humboldt Watershed. Our website (http://www. humboldtweedfree.org) contains fact sheets for state listed noxious weeds in Nevada, Board of Director’s information, funding partner’s links, and many more features including a detailed project proposal packet that you can print, fill out and mail back to us at your convenience. We are looking to expand our project area outside of the Humboldt River and always welcome new funding opportunities and partnerships. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Andi Porreca, HWCWMA Coordinator at (775) 762-2636 or email her at aporreca@humboldtweedfree.org. Or you may speak with Rhonda Heguy, HWCWMA President at (775) 738-3085, email: hwcwma@ gmail.com.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


90 Bulls Sell

Financial Focus Presented by Jason Land, Financial Advisor, Edward Jones in Elko, Nevada 2213 North 5th Street, Suite A | 775-738-8811

Use “Tax Diversification” to Help Manage Retirement Income You need to save and invest as much as possible to pay for the retirement lifestyle you’ve envisioned. But your retirement income also depends, to a certain degree, on how your retirement funds are taxed. And that’s why you may be interested in tax diversification. To understand the concept of tax diversification, you’ll need to be familiar with how two of the most important retirement-savings vehicles — an IRA and a 401(k) — are taxed. Essentially, these accounts can be classified as either “traditional” or “Roth.” When you invest in a traditional IRA or 401(k), your contributions may be taxdeductible and your earnings can grow tax deferred. With a Roth IRA or 401(k), your contributions are not deductible, but your distributions can potentially be taxfree, provided you meet certain conditions. (Keep in mind, though, that to contribute to a Roth IRA, you can’t exceed designated income limits. Also, not all employers offer the Roth option for 401(k) plans.) Of course, “tax free” sounds better than “tax deferred,” so you might think that a Roth option is always going to be preferable. But that’s not necessarily the case. If you think your tax bracket will be lower in retirement than when you were working, a traditional IRA or 401(k) might be a better choice, due to the cumulative tax deductions you took at a higher tax rate. But if your tax bracket will be the same, or higher, during retirement, then the value of tax-free distributions from a Roth IRA or 401(k) may outweigh the benefits of the tax deductions you’d get from a traditional IRA or 401(k). So making the choice between “traditional” and “Roth” could be tricky. But here’s the good news: You don’t necessarily have to choose, at least not with your IRA. That’s because you may be able to contribute to both a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA, assuming you meet the Roth’s income guidelines. This allows you to benefit from both the tax deductions of the traditional IRA and the potential tax-free distributions of the Roth IRA. And once you retire, this “tax diversification” can be especially valuable. Why? Because when you have money in different types of accounts, you gain flexibility in how you structure your withdrawals — and this flexibility can help you potentially increase the amount of your after-tax disposable income. If you have a variety of accounts, with different tax treatments, you could decide to first make your required withdrawals (from a traditional IRA and 401(k) or other employer-sponsored plan), followed, in order, by withdrawals from your taxable investment accounts, your tax-deferred accounts and, finally, your tax-free accounts. Keep in mind, though, that you may need to vary your actual sequence of withdrawals from year to year, depending on your tax situation. For example, it might make sense to change the order of withdrawals, or take withdrawals from multiple accounts, to help reduce taxes and avoid moving into a different tax bracket. Clearly, tax diversification can be beneficial. So after consulting with your tax and financial advisors, consider ways of allocating your retirement plan contributions to provide the flexibility you need to maximize your income during your retirement years.

FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 2014 6:00 p.m. Sale Time

Spanish Fork Fairgrounds, 475 S Main St.

SPANISH FORK, UT

Bulls displayed and sell in one big building, inside, out of the weather! Dinner served at 5:00 p.m.!

Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors cannot provide tax or legal advice. You should consult your attorney or qualified tax advisor regarding your situation. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 37


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38 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


LookUP by Pastor Diana Gonzalez

E

ver heard that expression? You can hear it around the branding fire or at someone’s fifth wedding. Or how about the coyote chasing the roadrunner? He never quite figures out that with all the money he pays to the Acme Co., he could eat fried chicken every night. Just a slow learner, I guess. When you read the Old Testament, you tend to want to think that about the Hebrews. Boy, they could do and say some really dumb things. Then they would come to their senses, repent, and do well for a while, only to mess up again and again. Slow learners? So what caused them to mess up? The same thing that causes us to get fouled up sometimes. We tend to forget about God; we tend to go about our daily business, excluding Him from our thoughts and actions. When we do that, things never go as well for us, do they? We need to remember to love, honor and obey God. We’re His kids and like any good parent He wants to be part of our lives. 16b For you are the temple of the living God. As God has said: “I will dwell in them and walk among them. I will be their God, and they shall be My people.” Therefore “Come out from among them and be separate”, says the Lord. “Do not touch what is unclean, and I will receive you. 17

I will be a Father to you, and you shall be My sons and daughters”, says the Lord Almighty. 18

Therefore, having these promises, beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God. 7:1

II Corinthians 6:16b-7:1 NKJV Here in Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, we clearly see the heart of the Father, as he (Paul) quotes the Old Testament. He (God) wants to dwell in us. He wants to be our God. He wants us to be His people. He wants us to be holy, sanctified and set apart from the world. He’ll be a Father to us and receive us. Praise God! Let’s not be slow learners. Let’s study the Word of God and see how He loves and cares for us and all we put our hands to. Let’s learn Godly principles and apply our faith in God to them and see if we aren’t more successful in 2014. God’s not mad at or disappointed in us, but He does want us to give Him time and place in our lives (reference verses 16, 17, 18 above). He does want us to obey His Word and honor Him. And it’s for our good if we do. When the Hebrews turned their backs on God and lived any ol’ way they wanted,

You are invited to COWBOY CHURCH!

Hwy. 395 /A3 — Standish 4-H Hall

things would go badly for them. When their enemies beat them up bad enough, they would be sorry they had sinned against God. Then they would repent and ask God to forgive them (reconciliation). God, with His unfailing love, would rescue them. Then things would go well with them again. If you have let other things take first place in your heart, other than God, and it seems that life should be better than it is, why not ask God to forgive you in Jesus’ name (repentance). See if things don’t go better for you. Why not put your trust in God, not the world, not in your own ability. God wants to be your Daddy. Why not love Him and make Him the biggest part of your life? Stick to the Father and His Son; study His Word, and you’ll live a happier, more successful life. Never be called a slow learner. Happy New Year! Scripture readings: Isaiah 40:8-11 Isaiah 54 Jeremiah 29:11-13 Deuteronomy 30:15-20 Happy trails. May God richly bless you. We love you and would love to hear from you. If you would like someone to pray with, or just have a question, please give us a call at (775) 867-3100. ‘Til next time…

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Harmony Ranch Ministry 3767 Keyes Way  Fallon, NV 89406 

Tom J. Gonzalez | Diana J. Gonzalez, Pastor threecrossls@cccomm.net 

www.progressiverancher.com

RENO • ELKO • FALLON

(775) 867-3100 Cell (775) 426-1107

The ProgressiveAAC_ProgRanchr_cattlefinancing_4.8x5.425_bw.indd Rancher

A part of the Farm Credit system. Equal Opportunity Lender.

1

February1/22/2013 2014 12:34:24 39 PM


Barker Cattle Company Bull & Female Production Sale Tuesday, March 4 2014 Burley, Idaho - 1:00 pm th

SELLING OVER 70 BULLS

& 40+ simmy/angus heifers

O’Reilly Factor - Purebred Angus

Featuring bulls sired by O’Reilly Factor, Game Day, Net Worth, Copyright, Shear Force, Upgrade, Amigo, Fat Butt, Saginaw, Black jack, and Vendetta. Spring will be here before you Know it! Mark your calendars for this year’s sale!

Final Answer - Crossbred Bull

NO! Inspectors — by Becky Lisle, Special Assignment Writer

India has its sacred cows, and despite several years of intense effort by horse industry advocates, America may be on the way to having its sacred horses. In mid-January, efforts to resume domestic horse processing were dealt a substantial blow with the agriculture appropriations bill for fiscal year 2014, which ends on September 30th. The bill does not include funding for the USDA inspection of horse processing facilities, and will again effectively ban the practice on US soil. All US plants are subject to the Federal Meat Inspection Act (FMIA) of 1906, which requires USDA inspection of all cattle, sheep, swine, goats, and equines slaughtered and processed into products for human food. The bill’s arrival comes amidst a lengthy spate of lawsuits by animal rights groups delaying the opening of domestic plants. While the potential opening of domestic plants has been very deliberately sabotaged through litigation, at the same time, even the shipping of unwanted horses to Canada and Mexico is in danger on the legislative front, due to the SAFE (Safeguard American Food Exports) Act. HR 1094 was introduced by Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-PA) in March 2013 and referred to committee, and companion bill, S 541, was introduced by Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA) and referred to committee. The bill hinges upon the fallacy that horse meat is drugtainted and therefore unsafe for human consumption. HSUS stated: “The SAFE Act would prohibit the transport and export of horses to slaughter for human consumption to protect our nation’s horses, and the public, from the predatory horse slaughter industry by ensuring American horses are not part of the pipeline to foreign slaughterhouses while protecting people from toxic horsemeat. Horses are not raised for food in this country, they are routinely given hundreds of drugs over their lifetimes that can be toxic to humans if ingested and therefore prohibited by the FDA from being used in animals intended for human consumption.” With over 100,000 horses shipped annually to be processed abroad, hay prices at alltime highs, and an overflowing equine rescue network, the SAFE Act would eliminate a

Oppressive Bullying Government in the Hen House by Leana Stitzel

Blackjack - Simmental

Ruel & tyler Barker 801-792-1036 801-372-0996 Upgrade - Simmental Bull

tom & Sally Ottley 208-312-3085 208-638-5571 Email: tosalott@atcnet.net

Gameday - Simmental/Angus

These bulls and many more sell! More on www.barkercattle.com 40 February 2014

The busy little white hen had lived in the chicken yard happily for some years until one day the “Rooster” started plucking out her feathers. Henny was a busy little lady who was always tending to the needs of others, looking after the business of the chicken coop, making sure the coop looked good and well-educated. Henny was so busy taking care of others, she did not realize the “Rooster “ had plucked her bald. Yes! Bald! Although she had no feathers, she still walked around proudly thinking nothing of being plucked bald as the slow conditioning of time and a few less feathers every day was slow. This gradual process had left her numb to the fact she was no longer feathery, shiny, and healthy in appearance. Instead, she was just clueless, skinny and really odd-looking. She did not know she was bald! All the other hens who had prospered by little Henny’s good housekeeping and balanced management could have told her, but they did not! One day after a rain shower, Henny started to shake her feathers dry and realized she had no feathers left to shake. “Damned that pesky rooster!” she seethed. Time passed and the feathers began to grow back, first little black prickly pin feathers and finally a full-beautiful white plumage, more beautiful than that had been ravaged by “Rooster.” Upon seeing this, “Rooster” approached to start plucking feathers again, but this time Henny was ready. She straightened her little body to its full height, looked “Rooster” right in the eye, and whispered, “If you touch one more of my lovely new feathers, you will never cockledoodledoo again!” And the rat’s tail fell off.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


— NO! Processing very necessary humane end of life option for thousands unwanted horses.

What you can do?

Horsemen, industry supporters, and those concerned with the well-being of thousands of unwanted horses are urged to contact the appropriate house committees, preferably via letters or emails, to keep the bill from passing out of committee • House Energy & Commerce Committee: 2125 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 www.energycommerce.house.gov Chairman: Fred Upton Health Subcommitee Chairman: Joe Pitts

YORK RANCHES

6th Annual Production Sale in Alturas, Cali fornia

Sat., march 15, 1 p.m. 20 open yearling registered heifers

• House Committee on Agriculture 1301 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 2051 www.agriculture.house.gov Chairman: Frank Lucas Livestock, Rural Development, and Credit Subcommittee Chairman: Rep. Eric Crawford • Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions 428 Senate Dirksen Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 Chairman: Tom Harkin Sample letter: (feel free to use as is or edit to personalize) Dear Rep/Senator (last name): I am writing to express my opposition to (appropriate bill number for House or Senate), also known as the SAFE Act, which would prevent the sale and transport of unwanted horses to Canada and Mexico under the guise of food safety. The premise for this bill is fallacious and misleading. Modern food safety testing standards help ensure that no contaminated meat enters the food chain. Most livestock receive drugs; there is no reason to believe that horses are drug contaminated when other species are not. An estimated 150,000 horses are shipped across our borders annually. These are horses that are unwanted for a variety of reasons. The cost of keeping horses is higher than ever, and with the overflowing rescue network struggling to stay solvent, there is simply nowhere for unwanted horses to go. Cases of neglect and abandonment have risen drastically as horse owners find themselves without sufficient end of life options for unwanted horses, as veterinary induced euthanasia and carcass disposal can be cost prohibitive. Some Indian reservations are over-run with feral horses, which destroy wildlife habitat and agricultural lands. The captive bolt gun used in horse processing plants is deemed by the American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Association of Equine Practitioners to be a humane kill method for horses. A swift, humane end in a regulated plant is a far more humane death for animals than prolonged suffering. I urge you to oppose the SAFE Act, for its false premises, and for the increase in neglect, abandonment, and abuse it will surely create.

All Bulls Sell Zoetis HD 50K Tested

watch and bid live

Registered Heifers Ready to Breed

Sons and Grandsons of These Breed Leaders Sell ... S a V FiNaL aNSwer 0035 Sitz Traveler 8180 x Bon View Bando 598

BW

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-1.0

+61

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+25

+1.37

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LCC New StaNDarD

BW

775-224-0905 hounddogs2010@hotmail

www.progressiverancher.com

WW

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+56

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+38

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CoNNeaLy right aNSwer 746

NORTE TRAILERS

Mitch Goicoechea

$B

BV New Design 1407 x War Venture 8030 6008 -.5

Call Mitch, to get your Norte Horse Trailer!

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+.48 +51.76

SAV Final Answer 0035 x Hyline Right Time 338 BW -.3

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+1.11

+.47

RE +.04

$B $64.34

KeSSLerS FroNtMaN r001 Connealy Front Page 0228 x TC Rancher 056 BW

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York ranches

P.O. Box 18, Alturas California 96101 Terry & TOdd yOrk, OwnerS • Russ Davis, ManageR (530) 233-4538 office • THD (530) 708-0487 cell ©

The Progressive Rancher

RE +.88

$B $48.12

Matt Macfarlane Marketing (530) 633-4184 • (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net • www.m3cattlemarketing.com

February 2014 41


The Progressive Rancher Coloring Page

42 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 43


NACO and NV Farm Bureau File Suit Against the BLM

“Qual ity Comes First”

BULL SALE

March 17, 2014 • 1 p.m. at the ranch near Parma, Idaho

Sons Sell! BW: -.1 WW: +66 YW: +123 Milk: +21 Marb: -.01 re: +.78 $W: +42.20 $F: +71.83 $G: +13.93 $B: +66.77 Bushs sure Deal 33 sire: Vin-Mar O’reilly Factor Dam’s sire: VrD

Sons Sell!

BW: -1.3 WW: +56 YW: +103 Milk: +31 Marb: +.85 re: +.30 $W: +40.99 $F: +49.12 $G: +32.52 $B: +73.59

OFFEring:

80

yearling, Fall yearling & Two-year-old Angus & Hereford Bulls

WK POW-WOW sire: WK Power up Dam’s sire: Bon View New Design 1407

Why buy a Malson bull?

• Added power and performance • Ultrasound data and EPDs • Free delivery within 250 miles • Sight-unseen guarantee • First-year breeding guarantee • Bidding available on:

Call or email to request a salebook! www.malsonangus.com

by Becky Lisle, Special Assignment Writer he Bureau of Land Management’s Wild Horse & Burro (WH&B) Program is no stranger to lawsuits. However, a suit filed on December 30, 2013 by the Nevada Association of Counties (NACO) and Nevada Farm Bureau Federation (NFBF) is quite the opposite of most complaints brought against the BLM regarding “wild” horses and burros. While the vast majority of legal action against the BLM comes from “wild” horse “advocates” protesting gathering practices and even gathering itself, the suit by NACO and NFB comes from quite the opposite perspective: one that calls for accountability for the overpopulation of “wild” horses and burros in Nevada, the resulting damages to resources, and dangers to not only native (and potentially endangered) wildlife species, but to Nevada citizens and their private property as well. The suit makes the important distinction between wild and feral, stating: “the use of the term ‘wild’ in the allegations of this Complaint is used as a term contained in the Act and is not intended to indicate or agree that said animals are ‘wild animals’ in the technical or legal sense as they are not wild animals for such purposes, but are feral animals within the meaning of Nevada law and the law of most, if not all, states, particularly in Nevada water law or wild animal regulations.” The suit names defendants Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell; principal Deputy Director, Neil Kornze; Assistant Director of Renewable Resources & Planning, Edwin Roberson; and Nevada State Director, Amy Leuders. Starting in the fall of 2012, several letters urging corrective action were sent by NACO to the heads of the BLM, including then-Secretary Salazar, with greatly delayed and evasive responses. An invitation to a meeting originally suggested by defendant Edwin Roberson was accepted by NACO, but NACO’s further correspondence to set a meeting date has as yet gone unanswered. Thus, with “no application or appeal process mandated by law, or even available, for NACO, or any party to use to restore or ensure compliance with the Act by the BLM or the Forest Service,” filing suit was the only option. Plainly stated, the plaintiffs want the BLM to follow their own laws, which require managing wild horses and burros as mandated by the original Act, which states that public lands be managed in a manner that maintains a thriving, natural ecological balance and adheres to the multiple use ideal, and that the range be protected from deterioration associated with overpopulation. The plaintiffs accuse the BLM of past and on-going willful mismanagement and unlawful inaction resulting in existing and potential further harm to wildlife, natural habitats, private property, water resources, Nevada citizens, and to the very animals the Wild Horse & Burro Act was set forth to protect. In addition, the plaintiffs cite the BLM’s blatant disregard for the section of the Act which states that “the Secretary shall cause additional excess wild free roaming horses and

T

Where Quality Comes First

BUllS SirED By: WK Uptown 9372 Soo line Alternative 9127 Pine ridge Hammer S322 VAr rocky 80029 Mark & Carla Malson & Family Koupals B&B identity 2901 SW 9th Ave. • Parma, ID 83660 Sitz Upward 307r Mark (208) 739-1059 C 112K Cowboy 8150 ET Josh (208) 739-0725 Joe (208) 550-7251 info@malsonangus.com

44 February 2014

Garcia Bits & Spurs -gifted! The gift that won’t be re Bit #122 $475 NV. Sales tax 6.85% S&H $12

The Progressive Rancher

Spur #273 $475 NV. Sales tax 6.85% S&H $12

500 Commercial St. Elko, NV 89801 Phone: (775) 738-5816 Fax: (775) 738-8980

capriolas.com

www.progressiverancher.com


burros for which an adoption demand by qualified individuals does not exist to be destroyed in the most humane and cost efficient manner possible.” . The BLM openly disregards this section of the Act on their website, stating that: “The Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Land Management care deeply about the well-being of wild horses, both on and off the range, and therefore, the BLM does not and has not sold or sent horses or burros to slaughter. Consequently, as the Government Accountability Office noted in a report issued in October 2008, the BLM is not in compliance…” The plaintiffs state that the BLM’s lack of funding for gathers and on-range management is “a self-inflicted handicap” caused by the practice of warehousing animals at great cost in long term holding. Currently, there are more horses and burros in long term holding than there are on public lands, and the majority of the program budget goes toward the feed and care of those captive animals. The BLM’s website lists the total population count of horses and burros on Nevada’s public rangeland as 20,195, while the mandated appropriate management level (AML) is 12,789. While many public land users have speculated that the counts were far below actual numbers on the range, in 2013, the American Academy of Sciences determined that the BLM does not utilize “scientifically valid methodologies to make their estimates, or make an actual, accurate inventory, erring on the side of grossly undercounting horses.” With wild horse populations capable of doubling every four years, the plaintiffs estimate that without corrections in management, and without a mass die-off due to disease or starvation, current management practices could easily result in a population of well over 40,000 horses and burros on Nevada’s rangelands within a decade. The lawsuit’s filing is especially timely, considering that nine of Nevada’s seventeen counties were recently declared natural disaster areas by the USDA due to the ongoing drought. Another point made by the plaintiffs addresses the BLM’s response to drought conditions in some areas, which required livestock permit holders to reduce or completely remove stock from some areas, while populations of wild equids remained, often utilizing the privately held stock water rights. In one such instance, an allotment’s horse population was 1200 % over AML, and at least 393% over AML on the entire complex. Also, while the impact of domestic livestock on sage grouse populations has long been under close scrutiny, the effects of an ever-growing overpopulation of feral horses and burros on the potentially endangered bird have been largely overlooked. Quite simply, the lawsuit means that the proverbial elephants in the room of Nevada range management can no longer be ignored.

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

February 2014 45


150 Registered Angus Bulls Fall Yearlings & Yearlings 10 Sim/Angus Bulls 50 Open Commercial Angus Heifers

r t e x E m t o es N , e c n a l Bulls Bred For Ba , IN ROUGH COUNTRY S N O I T I D N O ERCIAL C RAISED UNDER COMM

Selling sons of:

Selling sons of CONNEALY FINAL PRODUCT

CONNEALY FINAL PRODUCT

-CED +3 BW +.8 WW +65 YW +119 Milk +44 -CED +3 BW +.8 WW +65 YW +119 Milk +44

Selling sons of:

VDAR REALLY WINDY 4097

-CED +16 BW -1.4 WW +62 YW +99 Milk +19

Selling sons of:

SAV PIONEER 7301

-CED +5 BW +2.0 WW +60 YW +109 Milk +34

Also offering sons of:

Hoover Dam • Apex Windy 078 • CCA Emblazon 702

Wednesday, March 19, 2014 1:00 PM MST • Lunch at Noon Blackfoot Livestock Auction • Blackfoot, Idaho

Sale Catalog also available on our website CarterCattleCo.com

CattleCo.com

46 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


GET YOUR HORSE TO STOP by Backing Up T

hink of stopping your horse as if you are driving your car. Instead of pushing the car into park to get a great stop, you want put the car into reverse. Of course this would ruin a cars transmission, but it’ll get your horse to stop harder, deeper, and do it with much less resistance. Horses that stop hard do it because they are preparing themselves to have to back up. Possibly the most important part of teaching the stop, and most overlooked, is teaching our horses to back up. Why? When a horse backs up correctly, it drops its butt, rounds its back, and drives its hind legs underneath itself. The same body position of a great stop. To get a great stop you must first get a great back up. A great back up goes like this: 1. Rider lifts the reins and makes light direct contact with the horses mouth.

Randy White, White Performance Horses

Use the back up to teach your horse to stop by: 1. As you walk, ensuring the reins are hanging loose with no pressure on the bit. 2. Gently lift the reins, say whoa, release any leg pressure, and ask the horse to back up(reapply leg pressure to help back up). 3. Once the horse is backing up and soft in the bit, let go. 4. Repeat this drill until the horse responds quickly and correctly 90% of the time. 5. Once the horse can do this at a walk, repeat this drill at a trot, then at a lope. Pay attention to: • You’ll notice a hesitancy between the horse waking forward and backing up, the key to a great stop is to make that hesitancy disappear. This will happen through repetition of the drill, as the horse gets more comfortable and understands better the cue. www.progressiverancher.com

Real Estate

Spec ializing in hunting, ranching, and horse properties Davis Ranch

Great little ranch north of Elko about 14 miles out. 157.19 acres. Fenced, cross fenced, large barn, stalls, tack room, corrals, round pen, arena. 3 Bedroom / 2 bath home with covered deck, 4-car garage. $500,000

Flying M Ranch

• Your horse may have stiffness to the bridle, this may dissipate as the horse gains more understanding of the cues, or the horse may need softening drills and exercises, or it may have physical ailments causing it pain, such as wolf teeth or an ill fitting bit. • Horses are born great, average, or poor stoppers. Great stoppers have God given talents and abilities that make them so, the same as some of us run faster, jump higher, or sing

better than others. Some horses simply are born for stopping, and others are not. Our job as trainers and riders is to give our horses the tools and skills they need to stop at their highest potential, whether that be high or low. No matter how well the horse is going to stop, the skills needed to perform it are the same. These drills aren’t guaranteed to make your horse slide 30 feet, or drag the base of its tail in the dirt, but they are guaranteed to get your horse stopping as hard as it can.

2. Horse drops his nose towards its chest to relieve the pressure from the bit, causing the back to round. 3. Horse backs off the bit by backing up.

Allie Bear

Ruby Valley: Two adjoining Ranches will make one good ranch! Total of 2,174 deeded with 470.31 Water righted acres out of creeks and springs. USFS permit for 95 head. Split by paved State Rt.229. Modest improvements. Combined price: $1,650,000. Clover Valley Farm: 243 Acres with 160 acres with underground water rights, two irrigation wells, a stock well and a good domestic well. Large modern home with detached 5 car garage, 3500 and 5000 sq. ft metal buildings and greenhouse. All for only $500,000. Or buy the farm land for $225,000. Elko Co. 10,706 deeded with BLM grazing permit: These private sections are in the checkerboard area and are intermingled with public lands. The ranch has historically been a Spring Sheep range. The BLM permit is only 29% public lands. Price includes 50% of the mineral rights on all but 320 acres. Price:$130/acre. Or $1,392,000. Considering adding the property below to it to make a year around unit.

Elko Co. Humboldt River Property: 650 acres located between the Ryndon and Osino Exits on I-80. This property has over 300 acres of surface water rights out of the Humboldt River. The BLM permit for the 10,706 acres above is a short distance from this property with a stock driveway on this property. Price:$1.2 million. Tent Mountain Ranch: Approx. 3500 deed acres in Starr Valley. Nice larger home on paved road plus mountain cabin. Great summer range with water from numerous creeks and seeps. This ranch is made of up of over 20 separate parcels if a buyer were more interested in Investment property vs. Agricultural property. Over 135 acres with surface water rights. Price $3.5 million. Indian Creek Ranch: 126 acre Homestead with large Spring and at the foot of the Cherry Creek Range in White Pine County. Certificated and permitted water rights on the spring for 60 acres. Price reduced to $275,000.

For additional information on these properties go to: BOTTARIREALTY.COM

We need more Ranch and Farm listings!

Paul D. Bottari, Broker

Work: 775-752-3040

paul@bottarirealty.com

1222 6th St., P.O. Box 368 Wells, NV 89835

Home: 775-752-3809 • Fax: 775-752-3021

www.bottarirealty.com

The Progressive Rancher

Great ranch, Just minutes from I-80 (Imlay, NV) & not far from Winnemucca. Approx. 23,000 acres of deeded ground with more than 23 miles on the river. Winter outsideno feeding. One of the oldest water rights along the river. $15,000,000

J and M Farm

Very nice farm just minutes from Battle Mountain, Nevada. 169 acres of which 130 are in production. Feedlot, corrals, new shop & equipment shed. New 3 bed, 2 bath mobile with mature landscape.

J M Farm (Winnemucca) 58 acre well maintained farm just 3 miles from downtown Winnemucca. Approx. 43 acres planted in alfalfa/ grass mix. Water rights included in sale. Includes two homes, mature landscaping, several outbuildings, barn and horse corrals. Farm equipment will be negotiated with sale. $780,000 Starr Valley Pasture

Unique fenced 1,104 acres on Boulder Creek bordering U.S. Forest Service in Starr Valley, Nevada. Water-righted with nice meadows. $1,400,000

South of Eureka (Duckwater) 830± head cattle ranch operation with 4,851.52 deeded acres. Irrigated meadowland, rangeland in undulating and mountainous native land. Elevation 5,300’ to 6,300’ at highest point. BLM and Forest Service grazing permits.

Recanzone Ranch

Neat ranch in Paradise Valley. 900 + acres, 300 AUMs, right by town. Original Sandstone House. Easy access to Hinkey Summit & surrounding mountains. Includes Barn, Outbuildings and Corrals. $1,500,000

View complete listings at:

www.ARanchBroker.com

775-738-8535 Allie Bear, Broker/Realtor 775-777-6416

February 2014 47


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID Permit # 3280 Salt Lake City, UT

Angus and Hereford Bull Sale Monday, March 10th, 2014 1:00 PM at Spring Cove Ranch in Bliss, Idaho

Selling 150 Angus Bulls Yearlings & Falls

50 Hereford Bulls 3 Red Angus yr. Bulls Yearlings, Falls & 2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

25 Angus yr. Heifers 13 Hereford yr. Heifers

Selling sons of CCA Emblazon 702 Reg 15980098 CED+16 BEPD-1.8 WEPD+60 YEPD+106 MEPD+22 SC+1.01 CW+30 MARB+.50 RE+.63 $W+51.22 $B+79.37

Selling sons & grandsons of SLL Overload T18 Reg 15843888 CED+7 BEPD+1.3 WEPD+60 YEPD+100 MEPD+18 SC+1.12 CW+50 MARB+.71 RE+.57 $B+107.78

Selling sons & daughters of KCF Bennett 9126J R294 Reg P42651401 CED+10.1 BW-1.5 WW+54 YW+96

Selling sons of Apex Windy 078 Reg 16237970 CED+1 BEPD+3.9 WEPD+72 YEPD+110 MEPD+40 SC+1.60 CW+41 MARB+.38 RE+.16 $W+51.02 $B+76.03

M+33 Milk & Growth +60 SC+1.4 RIB+.06 MARB+.58 CHB+$39

For Catalogs Call: 208-352-4332 www.springcoveranch.com

48 February 2014

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


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