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JENNY SCARBOROUGH Architecture Portfolio Miami University


jascarbo@umich.edu 303.945.0006

JENNY SCARBOROUGH

EDUCATION University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning Masters of Architecture Fall 2018 // Expected Graduation 2020

Miami University, Ohio

Bachelor of Arts in Architecture Minors in Political Science and Art & Architecture History 2014-2018

DIS Study Abroad

DIS Study Abroad, Copenhagen, Denmark Fall 2016 Semester Program

EXPERIENCE Architecture Summer Intern

Jacobs Engineering Group // Denver, Colorado May 2018-August 2018 Working with the architecture team of Jacobs’ Buildings and Infrastructure department, I assisted with design, documentation, research, and modeling for the expansion of the Denver International Airport. Using Rhino and Revit I was able to support and assist senior level designers with preparation of designs and drawings.

Dimensions Staff Member

University of Michigan // Ann Arbor, Michigan September 2018-Present Alongside 8 fellow architecture graduate and undergraduate students, an annual journal that highlights student work and interviews esteemed architecture professionals is curated and created. I assist with interviewing guest lecturers, graphic layout of the journal, copy editing, and communicating with the printer.

Architecture History Undergraduate Teaching Assistant

Miami University // Oxford, Ohio August 2017-May 2018 Working with 5 undergraduate assistances and 2 graduate assistants, I assisted students in understanding the History of Architecture I and II (ARC 221/222) course material. I worked with three groups of students ensuring they understood and succeeded with assigned research and design projects.

DIS Student Blogger

DIS // Copenhagen, Denmark August 2016-January 2017 I was selected by the DIS marketing team to represent DIS’s Architecture and Design Department as a spokes person for the American design students studying abroad in Copenhagen. My responsibilities included posting at least once a week about relevant topics detailing my experiences with travel, study tours, living, studies, and cultural differences while studying abroad in Denmark. My blog is still accessible from the official DIS website. www.JennAcorssThePond.weebly.com

SKILLS Adobe Suite (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects), AutoCAD, Google Sketchup, Maya, Rhino, Revit, Hand Sketching, Model Building, Photography, Graphic Design, Wacom, Fabrication

HONORS // CERTIFICATES Recipient of the Howard E. Gartner Scholarship Recipient of the Women’s Excellence in Architecture Scholarship College of Creative Arts Scholar Dean’s List for all 8 semesters of undergraduate study DOE Race to Zero Small Multifamily Housing Contest 1st Place Winner (2nd overall) DOE Building Science for Race to Zero 2018 Certificate Recruitment Chair for Alpha Rho Chi Architecture Fraternity Fall 2017 Graduated first in the Department of Architecture Class of 2018


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INTRODUCTION Architecture is a way of life and an expression of creativity.

Through techniques of craft, artistry, and digital technologies, I have combined theory and engineered design to create experiential and functional environments. The portfolio that follows is a collection of undergraduate academic work emulating my passion for design and architecture.


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HUESTON WOODS

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MUQARNAS

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CRAFT SUMMER

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CATALAN VAULT

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HARBOR BATH

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CUBE RECONSTRUCTION

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LANTERN RETREAT

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MILES HIGH CITY

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RACE TO ZERO

A center celebrating the experience of nature Fall 2015

An exploration of traditional Islamic vaults Spring 2017

Three independent studio and class spaces for the arts department

Fall 2015

The study and built interpretation of tile vault construction Spring 2017

A recreational gathering place on the harbor south of Copenhagen Fall 2016

The manipulation of the classic cube Fall 2017

An playful interpretation of a lighthouse Fall 2017

A design for the Evolo High-Rise competition Fall 2017

A net-zero energy building compeition for the Department of Energy Spring 2018


Located outside of Oxford, Ohio, Hueston Woods State Park is a destination for people across the country. A nature center has been proposed to compliment the lodge and campsite located within the park with the intention to educate and promote local

Using a site to the South-East of the lodge, this nature center will celebrate the beauty of nature through the dramatic escalation of forest and waterfront views. The center reflects the landscape

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research.

in the glass and wood facades using materials that blend with the surroundings while the geometry of the building influences movement in and around the center in an effortless and intuitive manner. Celebrating and encouraging education and research, this nature center is a beautiful addition to the Hueston Woods State Park.

HUESTON WOODS


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Quality of Views

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Great


Parti

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Site Plan


East Elevation

West Elevation


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MUQARNAS

Architects have always striven to create elegant spaces that are simple in beauty and intricate in design. The aspiration for increasingly complex space resulted in the development of muqarnas, ornamented Islamic vaults. While traditional muqarnas are somewhat obsolete, their implications in modern architecture

With the introduction of modern materials and the inherent strength of these forms, it is possible to use muqarnas as resilient structural systems, generating a provocative form celebrating light and space. John Knauft, could be profound.

Bryan Hicks, and I meticulously designed and constructed a muqarnas using a seven-fold symmetrical tile pattern. Using the most precise compasses and measuring tools, we created prisms that formed our tiling while custom jigs and the band saw were used to shape the inner pieces. With little to no margin of error, our model came together at 24 inches in length and width, weighing 40 pounds. While this was a group project, all work (besides the physical model) and photographs are my original work unless otherwise noted.


7 Fold Tile Pattern

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Interior

Interior Continued


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Component Diagrams


While one of the most beautiful and underutilized quads on Miami University’s campus, the Center for Performing Arts’ buildings lack classroom and studio spaces that offer natural daylight. Using the area in the center of the quad, three studio spaces (two conditioned and one open air) are to be

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designed for academic use. The

creation of these academic buildings will encourage academic achievement, creativity, and communication by providing students with lively, outdoor spaces.

Preserving and celebrating three old, iconic trees on the site, three walkways were developed that lead to the new studio spaces and a central gathering place. The corten steel landscaping pieces reinforce the movement towards and away from the center of the plaza as they become structural elements within the glass and wood buildings.

CRAFT SUMMER


Sketched Iterations


Elevation A

Structural Relations

Elevation B


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Site Plan


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CATALAN VAULT In early architecture, the structure of a building was often the driving design element due to construction constraints. However, as technologies and creative minds worked together, complex systems were developed to combine

Through an intensive one week study of arch and tile construction we designed and constructed a modern interpretation of a traditional Catalan Vault. Over the course of four days, John

structure and art into one.

Knauft, Bryan Hicks, McKenna Martin, and I researched and designed our vault. When our design was finalized, the CNC machine was used to construct non-structural form-work ensuring the arches of the vault were precise. We then constructed our vault using 6�x6� ceramic tiles, plaster, and cement grout in one weekend making a spectacle (and a mess) in the atrium of our architecture building. While this was a group project, all work (besides the physical model) and photographs are my original work unless otherwise noted. Click to view the timelapse of the construction process.


Vertical Dead Load: 3 kN (roughly 675 pounds)

Iteration 1

Iteration 2

0.21 kN

Iteration 3

Iteration 4

Iteration 5

Final Design (Collective)

0.19 kN 0.17 kN 0.15 kN

0.14 kN

0.12 kN


Form Diagram

0.1 kN

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0.06 kN 0.04 kN

Design Team: Bryan, Jenny, John, McKenna


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HARBOR BATH

Copenhagen is known widely for its playful use of recreational harbor bathing facilities that have become a community space of socializing and entertainment for people of all ages, yearround. A new harbor bath has been proposed for Nokken, a quiet and relaxed community made of garden allotments

This new structure, while attracting people to the area, will be subtle, elegantly blending into the shoreline with little encroachment or disruption to the neighborhood. The west side of the bath will located along the harbor South-East of Copenhagen.

be a sloping hill hiding the bath’s amenities beneath from view, leaving only beautiful green grass to be seen from the neighborhood. The East side of the bath will be made of wood decking allowing space for sun bathing, a gentle decent to the water, and a tower of stairs for jumping into the pools.


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Locker Rooms (Female) Locker Rooms (Male) Kitchen Storage Refreshment Stall Kitchen Locker Rooms (Life Guard) Storage Sauna Bicycle Storage


Site Plan

Section A

Section B

Section C


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The first assignment among many in the exploration of geometric shapes, was to reconstruct the cube: take the cube’s original form and manipulate its six

Beginning by playing simply with the facing of the cube, I worked towards using the verticies, faces, and sides to change the form of the cube into something new. This excercise enabled me to visualize geometries faces, 12 sides, and eight verticies to create something new.

and spaces in abstract and inventive manners.

CUBE RECONSTRUCTION


Plan

Iso

1 Elevation

Plan

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Elevation

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Plan

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Iso

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2 Elevation

Elevation

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Iso

Elevation

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Elevation

Pattern for Model


A one week design project for my Construction Materials

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class, this Lantern Retreat was intended to be a simple design with a focus on macro, micro, and nano building detail scales.

Placed on a remote coast in Nova Scotia, this abstract interpretation of a lighthouse was designed to discover how structural details can use light to create playful illusions. The structural glass and architectural stairs, demand attention as they create the illusion of floating spaces. When illuminated, this retreat will become a ribbon of light creating an intriguing and beautiful sign across the water.

LANTERN RETREAT


South

West

North

Partial North Elevation East


WATER DRAIN FLASHING EDPM RUBBER

CEDAR SIDING 1” TO 2” VAPOR BARRIER

INSULATION 1/4” P. FT. RISE

R19 BATT INSULATION 5/8” GYP. BOARD

2X6” STUD WALL 24” O/C

3/4” SUB-FLOOR 3/8” HARDWOOD FLOOR

2X12 ENGINEERED JOIST 24”O/C 5/8” GYP. BOARD

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STAINLESS PIN CLIP 2” DIA. 1” LOAD BARING GLASS STAINLESS STEEL SITTING : OG-445/2 1” STRUCTURAL GLASS FINS

WHITE COVER PLATE 2” PHILLIPS SCREW

2X6 ENGINEERED JOIST 24”O/C

7’ STAINLESS STEEL DOOR .5” GLASS

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.25” CAULK STAINLESS PIN CLIP 2” DIA.

DOOR SILL CONCRETE STEPS ANCHOR BOLT 3” GRAVEL BED DRAIN 1/2” REBAR 16” O/C

Section

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Evolo

MILES HIGH CITY

It is 2118 and the world has faced devastating catastrophe. Human conflict and greed have caused pollution and global warming to alter the way people are able to live on earth. No longer is it safe or feasible to live on the open air surface.

Miles High City, a new proposed high rise, towers above toxic clouds of pollution saving the lives upwards of 3.3 million people while completely enclosing the island of Manhattan, protecting the historic city from the cataclysmic effects of global warming. Miles High City is self sustaining using solar and wind to power its energy needs while utilizing pure southern light to grow all the food needed for its citizens. This high-rise is one of many spread across North America using the Hyper Loop and air transportation to safely travel between cities. This new city is an answer to the imminent problems our world is facing in the future. Project is in process, the competition is due Feb. 6


Portland Manchester Burlington Boston Haven Providence York Rochester Philadelphia Newark Wilmington

City Advancement The high rise is divided into 11 different city sectors representing a significant city from each state in the North East. Each sector has three city floors equaling one mile of vertical space. Each of the city floors is given full creative and organizational liberty allowing each city sector to develop organically City floors are large enough to sustain a healthy and diverse community while maintaining a scale that allows for walk-ability and easy navigation. Buildings within the city sectors extend from floor to floor allowing for inter-floor connectivity and added structural support.

Philadelphia Floor 2

Boston Floor 1

Residential

Business

Energy and Wellness

Recreation


Transportation One city sector is dedicated solely to air travel allowing for flying transportation to easily arrive and depart with runways extending the entire floor. Transportation between Miles High Cities will be met through the use of the Hyperloop. Each high rise has a Hyperloop that extends up the entire tower reaching each city sector allowing for efficient travel between sectors and neighboring cities.


Sustainability The upper miles above cloud line are exposed to unobstructed exposure to sunlight every single day. The glass creating these facades and walls are made of clear solar panels allowing the sun’s energy to be harvested while allowing natural light to illuminate the cities. Multiple platforms extending from each city contain thousands of wind turbines withstanding collecting energy from winds of up to 180 miles per hour. Through implementation of adding zinc oxide nanorods to all metals used in exterior construction, energy is harvested from the sound waves given off from city sectors’ everyday life. Ocean water is filtered within the lower city sectors of the high rise to be used in non-portable systems such as sinks and bathroom utilities. Within the base of the high rise, outside air is filtered through water relieving it of toxic particles before being circulated in the upper sectors of the high rise.

Poultry and Fish

Dairy and Eggs

Potatoes and Grains

Fruits and Vegetables

Transportation One city sector is dedicated solely to air travel allowing for flying transportation to easily arrive and depart with runways extending the entire floor. Transportation between Miles High Cities will be met through the use of the Hyperloop. Each high rise has a Hyperloop that extends up the entire tower reaching each city sector allowing for efficient travel between sectors and neighboring cities.


Freedom’s Path to Zero is a multifamily residential building located in Chillicothe, Ohio that provides safe and affordable housing for homeless U.S. veterans. Our team of multidisciplinary team of undergraduate architecture, interior design, and engineering students designed 58 one- and two-bedroom, net zero apartments that respond to high demands for housing by the veterans and their families.

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Through meeting both DOE Zero Energy Ready Home requirements and Passive House (PH) criteria, Freedom’s Path to Zero will be equipped to best serve those who have served us. Our project has concentrations in accessibility, universal design, durability, performancecost balance, individual control of interior environment, and degrees of privacy (from personal to communal). The design relies on PH building principles and compartmentalization to achieve these goals. Key passive and active strategies include: optimized site orientation, a tight envelope with high R-value insulation, photovoltaic roof array, and decentralized geothermal system for conditioning air. Team Members: Nicole Rusk, Jenny Scarborough, Joao Castro, Andrew Porten, McKenna Martin, Tingyu Zhang, Jacquie Edwards, and Trevor Hayes

FREEDOM’S PATH TO ZERO


DESIGN GOALS Housing First Passive House Universal Design and Accessibility Compartmentalization Community Renewable Resources

Cleveland

Chillicothe

Columbus

Cincinnati

Exterior Perspecti


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Pedestrian Network

Vegetataion

Wind

Functions of the site


FLOOR TWO Community Kitchen & Dining Area Laundry Room Exercise Room One Bedroom Unit Studio Unit Two Bedroom Unit

Two Bedroom Unit 915 sq. ft.

One Bedroom Unit 600 sq. ft.

Studio Unit 380 sq. ft.


Maine Grey Hush White

Harbor Grey Countertops

Maple Cork Floor Flaxseed Tweed Cotton Fabric

Studio Unit Interior Perspective


Monthly Utility Costs $224

Operations And Maintenance $4,500

Monthly Debt $38,996

Property Tax $6,458 Insurance $2,000

Mortgage $25,594

Foundations $374,320

Framing $769,973

Site Work $187,818

Exterior Finishes $633,848

Construction Costs $5,430,900 Common Spaces $1,523,326

Major Systems Rough-Ins $735,950

Interior Finishes $1,174,309

Final Steps $31,446

CONSTRUCTION AFFORDABILITY

The associated requirements coupled with those of Passive House work well together, but we discovered that fulfilling these needs would result in higher construction costs than anticipated. Our team opted for many high-quality and durable products in the desire to achieve these goals and sacrificed some aspects of affordability in the process. This is an area where further innovation will be required in the future for the zero-energy building industry. How can we economically achieve high-performance and universal accessibility for all with better economy? A goal of the team is to promote the use of locally sourcing materials to reduce embodied energy and impact on the environment. Many products we looked at for Passive House are very expensive locally, or contain too high of an embodied energy as they are imported internationally, or maybe do not perform to the anticipated level of effectiveness. Therefore, a premium was paid to provide the best local systems for all individual units, in line with compartmentalization requirements.


Vapor Profile

Metal Plate-Connected Wood Truss Roof (R-57)

From Exterior to Interior 5/8” 3/4” 4” 1/2” 2X6 5/8”

2X6 Wood-Framed Exterior Wall (R-38)

Parallel Chord Wood Truss Floor

Nichiha fiber cement board siding Ventilated air gap, 1x4 vertical wood furring strips Roxul Cavityrock DD Zip panel system (air and vapor barrier) Wood studs at 16” O.C., w/dense pack cellulose Gypsum wall board

CONTROL LAYER

Zip Panel

Glo W7 Triple Pane Aluminum Window (R-7)

Gypsum wall board Prosoco R-Guard air and water sealant EPS insulation Metal drip and insect screen

Concrete Foundation Slab And Footing (R-19)

Metal flashing w/drip edge on sloped sill

Thermally broken frame 1/2” Rigid Insulation Prosoco R-Guard


6 Fractal Iterations .8 Reduction, 50 Degree Rotation

Portfolio Fall 2018  

A portfolio of my work as an architecture student demonstrating my passion for all aspects of design.

Portfolio Fall 2018  

A portfolio of my work as an architecture student demonstrating my passion for all aspects of design.

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