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INTRODUCTION

PURPOSE AND LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Efficient use of land is a vital function for all communities and therefore an essential part of the General Plan. In this element, land use refers not only to the use and management of land but also the zoning designations that accompany the land. The Land Use Element as part of the City of Guadalupe’s General Plan is meant to accommodate future growth and identify areas to improve existing land use conditions. By relating directly to all the other elements, the Land Use Element facilitates the efficient and compatible use of land now and into the future. The Land Use Element complements the Circulation Element (Chapter XX) directly, per The Governor’s Office of Planning & Research (OPR, 2003) Guidelines, to ensure that the anticipated level of land development is met by the appropriate level of transportation network development. Many required topics are also discussed in the Land Use chapter of the Background Report (XX), which details existing conditions and policies currently in effect in Guadalupe. The Land Use Element addresses these topics as they relate to the future of Guadalupe, and outlines goals, objectives, policies, and programs that attempt to guide Guadalupe to a desired future condition.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

EXISTING LAND USES

The Existing Land Use Map is derived from the land use inventory conducted in 2013 by the students in the City and Regional Planning General Plan Studio from Cal Poly. The map represents the uses that are currently existing in Guadalupe as of October 2013. All land uses were collected and transferred to a database using the most current aerial and ground level photography available via Google Maps and Google Earth, and as it was found to be appropriate or necessary, field surveys were completed to verify accuracy of initial inventory. Existing land use data (including Assessor’s Parcel Numbers (APN), maps and parcel acreage) from the County of Santa Barbara was used to supplement and assist the field survey. The field survey involved travelling the City by foot and car and recording land uses that were not obtainable or verifiable from the available photo records alone. The existing land uses that have been inventoried, which can be seen in Figure XXX, are: •  Industrial •  Commercial •  Single Family Residential •  Multi-Family Residential •  Mixed-Use •  Agriculture •  Open Space •  Parking •  Public Facilities •  Railroad •  Vacant/Unoccupied

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INVENTORY OF EXISTING USES IN GUADALUPE, CA

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City of Guadalupe General Plan

Source: Santa Barbara County GIS Data Created by: CRP 552, 2013 - 2014 Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo


Land Use Element

KEY ISSUES

Key issues relating to land use patterns within the City are outlined below: •  Most agricultural lands are in Williamson Act contracts, constraining outward development •  The Santa Maria River constrains expansion to the north because of potential flooding issues and significant habitat resources •  The occurrence of shallow groundwater limits development potential •  Lack of a buffer or transition areas separating urban, agricultural and industrial uses •  Limited area for heavy industrial uses due to neighborhood proximity •  The train tracks that bisect the City expose residents to an increased safety risk

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PROPOSED LAND USE MAP FOR GUADALUPE, CA

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Land Use Designations

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Railroad Guadalupe Boundary

Light Industrial General Commercial Low Density Residential Medium Density Residential High Density Residential Open Space Residential Planned Development Specific Plan

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Creeks Agriculture Santa Barbara County Boundary PROPOSED Medical Overlay District Residential Annexation High Density Residential Mixed-Use

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Transitional Buffer Light Industrial/ Industrial Commercial

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City of Guadalupe General Plan

Source: Santa Barbara County GIS Data Created by: CRP 552, 2013 - 2014 Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo


Land Use Element

PROPOSED LAND USES

PROPOSED LAND USES The following proposed land use amendments are the foundation for Guadalupe’s long range vision for growth. These land uses were developed through an analysis of the three alternatives highlighted in the background report (see XXX). There are a total of six proposals, each designed to guide development and shape the future form of Guadalupe. Medical District Overlay (#1 in map) The purpose of this overlay is to promote health care related services within the delineated area. Additionally, this overlay plans for and accommodates existing residential uses. Examples of health care services can include, but is not limited to, doctor offices, physical therapy, and clinic and pharmacy. Residential Annexation (#2 in map) When necessary, the City shall expand its boundaries through annexations to either the south of W. Main Street or east of Flower Avenue. High Density Residential (#3 in map) The area to the northeast of the Central Business District along Eleventh Street to high density residential will be rezoned in order to accommodate future growth from the adjacent R-3 zone. This area is ideal for higher density development and both Highway 1 and the Central Business District are easily accessible. Mixed-Use (#4 in map) The Mixed Use district was created in anticipation of the DJ Farms development, and does not currently exist within the City. The M-U designation was designed to accommodate a variety of development proposals. Mixed use developments generally include retail commercial services on the first floor and residential and/or small offices on the upper floors.

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In order to establish a continuous development pattern the industrial area with frontages along the western portion of Highway 1 shall be rezoned to mixed use. The area to be rezoned begins at Highway 166 and ends on 5th Street. The location along Highway 1 provides direct access to the Amtrak Station, a unique opportunity to attract tourism to Guadalupe. Examples of allowable uses are high density residential, hotel, hostel, motel, mixed use, commercial mixed use etc. Transitional Buffer (#5 in map) Industrial uses shall provide and maintain a buffer between themselves and adjacent less intensive uses. This can be done using a Transitional Land Use such as light industry, heavy commercial, or open space. The same can also be achieved using alternatives such as landscaping or other buffering techniques. Light-Industrial/Industrial Commercial (#6 in map) The City will encourage a diversity of uses within compatible light industrial development to boost tourist and residential activity near the train station.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

AGRICULTURE GOAL

1. A City that embraces its agriculture industry as the primary economic driver.

The purpose of the agricultural section is to promote and protect local agriculture through the adoption of policies and programs designed to achieve the goal and objective. The policies are intended to provide clear guidelines for decision-making. The policies also are intended to express the commitment to specific programs and strategies that will ensure the continued success of the local agricultural industry and productivity of agricultural lands. It is important for a balance to be maintained between urban centers and the preservation of rural landscapes. Rural landscapes will be both productive and ecologically diverse, with abundant and healthy natural resources. This vision will be achieved by the careful application of land use policies, implementation of action items identified here and elsewhere in the General Plan, and through the continued participation and vigilance of the City’s citizens. Allowable Uses Those uses that are compatible with agriculture lands intended for soil-dependent uses.

GOAL 1 A City that embraces its agriculture industry as the primary economic driver.

Objective 1.1 Promote collaboration between municipalities and the private sector to ensure that all land uses adjacent to agriculture are compatible.

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Policy Policy 2.1.1 Encourage the development of land within the planning area boundaries to minimize land use impacts on surrounding agricultural land. Policy 2.1.2 The continuation of agricultural uses in the unincorporated areas which do not cause adverse effect to the City will be encouraged. Policy 2.1.3 Prime agricultural lands characterized by having Class I or II soils within a Williamson Act Agricultural Preserve shall be protected from urban development until it is established that conversion to other uses is necessary for the viability of the City. Program Program 2.1.1 Collaborate with Santa Barbara County to keep an annual inventory of all Williamson Act contracts on surrounding County and City owned agricultural lands. Program 2.1.2 Promote an agricultural support system including physical components (such as farm labor housing, equipment supply and repair) and institutional components (such as 4-H, FFA, agricultural and natural resources education and experimentation).

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

OPEN SPACE GOAL

1. A full range of parkland and open space amenities to for all Guadalupe residents.

The open space designation will be applied to public, private, and parkland open space within the City. Open space includes areas subject to hazards such as flooding, as well as areas to be preserved for their visual, biological and/or recreational value. Open space provides opportunities for various community benefits including: greenbelts, parks, ponds, drainage retention facilities, wildlife habitats, and recreation areas. Open space uses are distributed throughout the City, and are within walking distance of the majority of residential neighborhoods. Currently, Guadalupe has 52 acres of open space that are essentially unimproved (lacking facilities or major improvements) and 21.5 acres of developed parkland including three community parks and four pocket parks. Trends from 2000-2014 show a reduction of park space per resident within the City. In 2000, the ratio was 1/166 (1 acre for every 166 residents), it has decreased to 1/334 in 2014. Continuing to provide and enhance open space and recreational opportunities will allow for sustained development while linking the community to its environment. Allowable Uses •  Neighborhood, Community, and Regional Parks; •  Outdoor recreational and public facilities; and, •  Passive open space recreation such as trails and bikeways, wildlife and habitat preservation, drainage ways, and community serving gardens. Development Standards: Minimum lot area and dimensions, minimum yard and setback requirements, height limitations, off-street parking and offstreet loading, shall be included within the conditions of approval for any conditional use permit granted in this district.

GOAL 2 A full range of parkland and open space amenities to all Guadalupe residents.

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Objective 2.1 To preserve, enhance, and where possible, expand Guadalupe’s existing parks and open space system, to providing all residents with easy access to a visually appealing amenity that provides opportunities for healthy recreation and circulation. Policy Open space system aimed at connecting developed areas and providing recreational opportunities

Policy 2.1.1 Utilize streetscapes as public spaces in the community by improving them with landscaping, shade trees, pedestrian facilities and other enhancements that promote active and passive recreation, while creating a system of green connections throughout the City. Policy 2.1.2 The City shall approve density bonuses for projects that will protect and/or promote open space. Policy 2.1.3 Lands designated Open Space should be used for purposes which do not need urban services, major infrastructure, or extensive landform changes. Policy 2.1.4 Maintain a close relationship between the natural environment and developed areas through a park, recreation, and open space system aimed at connecting developed areas. Policy 2.1.5 The City shall ensure that public facilities, parkland, and essential services are equitably distributed throughout the City. Policy 2.1.6 Encourage new public and quasi-public space opportunities within new developments to include: landscaped areas, gathering spaces and play areas. Policy 2.1.7 The City will seek to improve and expand sports and recreational facilities throughout the community.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

Program Program 2.1.1 Encourage the programming of new and existing open space throughout the City with cultural activities and entertainment events that highlight local artists and attract tourism. Program 2.1.2 Work with other public agencies to incorporate recreational pathways into area transportation projects. AREAS SUBJECT TO FLOODING Government Code Section 65302-D requires the Land Use Element to identify areas subject to flooding. Figure XXX identifies areas subject to flooding in accordance with the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Flood Insurance Study for Santa Barbara County. FIGURE LU-1 Areas Subject to Flooding in Guadalupe, CA

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SANTA MARIA RIVER MANAGEMENT OBJECTIVES The City should manage its floodplains and associated open space to achieve the coequal objectives of: •  Maintaining the natural conditions of fish and wildlife habitat; •  Preventing loss of life and minimizing property damage from flooding; and •  Providing recreational opportunities for area residents and visitors. The Santa Maria River and its floodplain provides opportunities for recreation and wildlife habitat

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT GOAL

1. A Central Business District that provides opportunities for economic growth and welfare of the community.

The City’s Central Business District is the core commercial base and allows both local and regional-serving uses. It supports both new and infill development within walking distance of existing neighborhoods which serves to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. As the commercial core for the City, the Central Business District celebrates the historic nature of Guadalupe. Its unique character provides a sense of place where residents and visitors will be attracted to shop, work and live. The Plan emphasizes and invites future commercial development along Highway 1 to provide a full range of retail, commercial, office and industrial uses. The Central Business District contributes to Guadalupe’s economic vitality through the support of neighborhood, community, and regional needs and has the capacity to provide diverse retail, commercial, and employment options.

GOAL 3 A Central Business District that provides opportunities for economic growth and welfare of the community.

Objective 3.1 Maintain a healthy and diverse Central Business District that contributes to a high quality of life, community character, and economic vitality by carefully balancing the needs of residents, businesses, and visitors. Policy

Historical buildings in Guadalupe’s Central Business District establish a sense of place that is attractive to residents and visitors.

Policy 3.1.1 Establish a mix of land uses to meet the diverse needs of Guadalupe’s residents and businesses by developing vacant and under-utilized land within the Central Business District.

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Policy 3.1.2 Designate sufficient land to enable a broad range of long term viable commercial uses in Guadalupe’s Central Business District to enhance the quality and well being of the community. Policy 3.1.3 Ensure Guadalupe’s Central Business District serves both local and regional needs, reducing the need for residents to travel to adjoining communities and capturing a greater share of local spending. The current building form in the Central Business District provides an opportunity for ground floor retail and second floor residential.

Policy 3.1.4 Provide community and regional commercial businesses appropriate to a pedestrian-oriented environment. The City will encourage residential activity above compatible office and retail uses in the Central Business District as an important housing resource and customer base for local businesses. Policy 3.1.5 Reserve the Central Business District for uses which primarily provide retail and service businesses Program Program 3.1.1 Amend zoning code to allow for temporary commercial uses in vacant lots and vacant and underutilized buildings. Uses should serve to attract additional patrons to the Central Business District, such as a farmer’s market, flea market, vendors, or craft fair. Program 3.1.2 Re-evaluate the Central Business District boundary every five years to allocate sufficient land for expansion. Program 3.1.3 Establish a program which focuses on tourism; including improved way-finding at key arterials, suggested sites for hotels, motels and/or hostels, and branding identity.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

COMMERCIAL

The City’s commercial land provides a variety of local services for residents, business owners, and visitors. As previously mentioned, the commercial core is the Central Business District which is oriented along Highway 1 and contains uses appropriate for retail business and commercial needs. These uses serve the local community as well as visitors to the area. The General Commercial District encompasses the remaining commercial space within the City. Some examples of the diverse commercial uses found in Guadalupe are retail stores, offices, restaurants, neighborhood markets, as well as other personal, commercial, and automotive services. Where the commercial base of Guadalupe is agglomerated in the walkable Central Business District, the General Commercial District is spread throughout, causing it to be primarily auto-oriented. To limit the amount of auto traffic, businesses are located to the west of Highway 1 and south of the Central Business District, as well as along the south side of West Main Street. The General Commercial District supports the needs of residents, as well as the activities of nearby industrial and farm land.

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FIGURE LU-2. Commercial Land Uses by Acreage and Percentage

The City currently has a total of 12 acres of commercial land. For the purposes of the above analysis mixed use and vacant commercial buildings located within the Central Business District were included in the summation of the total existing commercial uses; however this total is not represented on the existing uses map (Figure XXX). This was done to emphasize the large percentage of vacant commercial buildings, which make up 32 percent of all commercial land. The next largest commercial land uses are in general retail trade followed by vehicle services, which account for 18percent and 15 percent respectively.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

Allowable Uses Guadalupe identifies five designations relating to commercial land uses: GENERAL COMMERCIAL DISTRICT (G-C) The General Commercial District is the primary commercial zone for the City. The zone encompasses most of the Central Business District and provides for a variety of commercial uses and activities. The purpose is to provide an area for the orderly expansion and development of the business district as a retail shopping area to serve present and future needs of the residential community, in conformance with the General Plan. (Ord. 189 Art. 3 ยง6.1, 1980)

An agglomeration of entertainment based businesses can stimulate economic growth.

INDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL DISTRICT (M-C) The Industrial-Commercial District is meant to allow for heavy-industrial based uses and activities, including manufacturing operations and equipment storage. There are restrictions that require certain uses to be conducted inside a building, and adequate buffering is required. The purpose is to provide a district for the combined industrial and commercial enterprises necessary to serve the residents, industries and nearby farms. (Ord. 189 Art. 3 ยง7.1, 1980). COMMERCIAL SERVICE DISTRICT (C-S) The Commercial Service District was created in anticipation of the DJ Farms development, and does not currently exist within the City. The purpose is to accommodate business-related services, businesses that require larger buildings or outdoor storage areas, limited fabrication of merchandise sold on the premises, or farm-related businesses. (Ord. 93-324 ยง1) NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL DISTRICT (C-N) The Neighborhood Commercial District was created in anticipation of the DJ Farms development, and does not currently exist within the City. The purpose of the district is to provide retail sales and personal services primarily for the convenience of surrounding residential neighborhoods.

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Neighborhood commercial uses should provide several types of merchandise, as opposed to a business offering a wide selection of a single type of merchandise. (Ord. 93-324 ยง1) COMMERCIAL RECREATION DISTRICT (C-R) The Commercial Recreation District was created in anticipation of the DJ Farms development, and does not currently exist within the City. The purpose of the C-R district is to accommodate businesses who cater to the recreation needs of the community. (Ord. 93-324 ยง1) MEDICAL OVERLAY DISTRICT (MD-O) The purpose of this overlay is to promote health care related services within the delineated area. Additionally, this overlay plans for and accommodates existing residential uses. Examples of health care services can include, but is not limited to, doctor offices, physical therapy, and clinic and pharmacy. MIXED USE (M-U) The Mixed Use district was created in anticipation of the DJ Farms development, and does not currently exist within the City. The M-U designation was designed to accommodate a variety of development proposals. Mixed use developments generally include retail commercial services on the first floor and residential and/or small offices on the upper floors.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

FIGURE LU-3 Development Standards

Notes: 1. Except that the street yard of an adjacent street other than where the main project entrance is located shall be 10 feet, and the street yard for Highway 166 shall be no less than 20 feet. 2. Except where commercial development adjoins a residential zone, in which case the minimum other yard setback shall be 20 feet. 3. For dwellings, the requirement shall be a minimum of 100 square feet of private, usable open space for each dwelling unit, with a minimum dimension of 7 feet.

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COMMERCIAL GOAL

1. An adequate amount of land designated for diverse commercial uses that serves the needs of current and future populations.

GOAL 4 An adequate amount of land designated for diverse commercial uses that serves the needs of current and future populations.

Policy Policy 4.1.1 Future commercial uses should be designated only as the urban area expands and not isolated in advance of complementary residential development. Policy 4.1.2 Development of commercial parks or other specialized clusters of supportive commercial activities shall be encouraged. Specifically, an agglomeration of entertainment based businesses shall be promoted. Policy 4.1.3 Commercial development shall meet design and architectural standards, as well as standards outlined in overlay districts as established by the City. Policy 4.1.4 Amend all specific plans and the zoning code to allow for grocery stores in commercial designated areas that are larger than 2,000 square feet.

Well maintained commercial areas are welcoming to the public and invite tourist activity.

Program Program 4.1.1 Allow streamlining of permits for developments that are entertainment based and/or will generate high tax revenue for the City. Program 4.1.2 Develop a Tourist Related Area Plan (TRAP) on parcels immediately west of the Amtrak Station and Highway 1. The TRAP will encompass the mixed use proposal located south of the Central Business District to create a variety of visitor-serving amenities. Program 4.1.3 In order to establish a continuous development

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

pattern the industrial area with frontages along the western portion of Highway 1 shall be rezoned to mixed use. The area to be rezoned begins at Highway 166 and ends on 5th Street. The location along Highway 1 provides direct access to the Amtrak Station, a unique opportunity to attract tourism to Guadalupe. Examples of allowable uses are high density residential, hotel, hostel, motel, mixed use, commercial mixed use etc.

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RESIDENTIAL

The City recognizes and respects that housing is a basic human need. The City is committed to preserving and promoting a variety of housing options for the equal enjoyment of all citizens. This includes a variety of housing options ranging from single family to multifamily. Additionally, nontraditional forms of housing such as mixed use, planned developments and secondary dwelling units will be encouraged in order to support and cater to the varied housing needs of Guadalupe. Achieving this healthy balance of housing requires goals, policies and programs in place to guide future development in Guadalupe. Currently the City has three land use designations. The designations range from low density housing to medium density and high density housing. This division exists to provide variety in the housing stock in order to meet the needs of all citizens. While this section outlines guidelines and parameters, the Guadalupe Municipal Code provides further detail and direction about the zoning designations that fall under the three land use designations. The code does state that building heights may not exceed two stories or 36 feet and that one covered parking space shall be provided for each unit. Allowable Uses Within the umbrella of residential housing, the Guadalupe Municipal Code lists five zones and one overlay for planned developments. The allowed uses are listed below:

Single family housing can help meet the growing needs of the different types of families in Guadalupe.

City of Guadalupe General Plan

R-1 SINGLE FAMILY (LOW DENSITY) The R-1 designation is limited to properties with singlefamily homes. These properties shall not have more than one dwelling and one customary accessory building per parcel. Furthermore, the overall density is set at five dwellings per acre. The Guadalupe Municipal Code specifies minimum lot size, setbacks, height restrictions, parking requirements and regulations for accessory structures.


Land Use Element

R-1-M SINGLE FAMILY (MEDIUM DENSITY) The R-1-M designation, medium density lots are smaller than those in the single family- low density zone. The medium density zone allows up to ten dwellings per acre. This designation permits the same uses as listed in the R-1 Single family zone. The Guadalupe Municipal Code specifies minimum lot size, setbacks, height restrictions, parking requirements and regulations for accessory structures. R-2 MULTIPLE DWELLING (MEDIUM DENSITY) The purpose of the R-2 district is to provide housing in the form of multiple dwellings or attached dwellings. These are typically duplexes, condominiums and apartments. This zone is denser than the previous zones and allows for up to ten units per gross acre. The municipal code does not provide any guidelines in terms of lot sizes, setbacks or accessory structures. The code does state that building heights may not exceed two stories or 36 feet and that one covered parking space shall be provided for each unit. Multifamily housing can help to increase the housing stock while catering to the diverse population of Guadalupe.

R-3 MULTIPLE DWELLING (HIGH DENSITY) The R-3 zone is similar to that of the R-2 zone. The only difference is that the R-3 zone is denser and allows up to 20 dwelling units per gross acre. Like the R-2 zone, the R-3 does not have any information regarding lot sizes, setbacks or accessory structures within the municipal code. Building heights and parking requirements are the same as the R-2 zone. PD Planned Development Overlay District The following uses are permitted in the PD Overlay District, provided the use is permitted in the underlying zoning district and subject to approval of the associated development plan by the City Council: •  Single-family residences, with or without one attached or detached second unit •  Duplexes and triplexes

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•  Apartments, condominiums, and townhomes •  Cluster housing •  Other attached or detached multiple family developments •  Accessory structures and uses, as allowed in the underlying zone district Development Standards LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL This designation ensures that detached single family housing is prioritized and is the only allowable use within this designation. Density may not exceed six units per gross acre. Any density below the maximum amount is permitted so long as environmental constraints are respected and urban services can be reasonably provided. MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL Housing types to be promoted within this designation include single family homes, duplexes and triplexes, townhouses and similar multiple unit residential development. Density may not exceed ten units per gross acre. Location of this type of housing must be consistent and compatible with the surrounding neighborhood and should consider access, proximity to commercial services and neighboring impacts. HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL Housing types within this designation include apartments, townhouses or other multi-family housing structures which do not exceed three stories. Density is limited to twenty acres per gross unit. Flexibility and innovation should be encouraged for these types of projects. RESIDENTIAL PLANNED DEVELOPMENT The purpose of the planned unit development is to encourage creative and innovative design and to offer more flexibility than normal standards would allow. This serves to benefit the City or project and aims to produce better projects.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

To approve a “Planned Development” overlay designation, the Planning Commission must recommend and City Council will find that the project fulfills the general purpose of this section and meets one or more of the following criteria: •  Provides facilities or amenities suited to a particular occupancy group (such as the elderly or families with children). •  Transforms allowable development within a site from areas of greater environmental sensitivity or hazard to areas of less sensitivity or hazard. •  Provides a greater range of housing types and costs than would be possible wit development of uniform dwellings throughout the project site or neighborhood. •  Features of the particular design achieve the intent of conventional standards (privacy, usable open spaces, etcetera) as well as or better than the standards do. •  Incorporates features which result in consumption of significantly less materials, energy or water than conventional development. The 2013 Cal Poly land use inventory showed that many of the designations do not match what is currently built. This is indicative that the current policies are not meeting the needs of Guadalupe residents. What was gleaned from the inventory is that density is higher than what is codified in policies. Multi-family housing units can be found in the low density zone (single family zone) which is prohibited by the Guadalupe Municipal Code. Additionally low density housing was also found in the high density housing zone. Furthermore, the inventory showed that there are more single family homes than multi-family housing within the high density housing zones. An important takeaway from the inventory is that the market and Guadalupe residents have spoken. The zoning as it currently stands does not meet the housing needs of residents. The goals, policies, and programs below strive to more closely meet the needs of the residents. Housing is a basic need that should be fulfilled and all residents of Guadalupe have the right to satisfy their needs accordingly. The aim of the following policies is to provide the foundation for needed development to occur. 27


RESIDENTIAL GOALS

1. An adequate supply of ownership and rental housing that is safe, healthy, and affordable to people of all income levels, races, ages, and suitable for their various needs. 2. Housing that encourages safe, livable, and sustainable neighborhoods.

GOALS Goal 5.1.1 An adequate supply of ownership and rental housing that is safe, healthy, and affordable to people of all income levels, races, ages, and suitable for their various needs. Goal 5.1.2 Housing that encourages safe, livable, and sustainable neighborhoods.

Objective 5.1 Provide a variety of housing options to meet future population and community needs in order to reach desired vacancy rates. Policy Policy 5.1.1 New residential development of four dwelling units per acre or more will be permitted only when public services including central water and sewer service are available or provided by the developer. Policy 5.1.2 Protect residential areas from higher intensity uses through buffer zones or other comparable methods. Policy 5.1.3 Incentives may be allowed in the form of a bonus density not to exceed 15% for projects of superior quality and design, providing a variety of amenities that through their innovation and high standards promote a better community and neighborhood vitality and are developed as a planned development

Greenery can help to create a buffer and separate housing from other uses.

Policy 5.1.4 Provide incentives through the use of density bonuses in order to encourage development and the utilization of existing infrastructure on vacant parcels within Guadalupe. Policy 5.1.5 In any residential category developed as a planned development, limited acreage not to exceed 6.25% gross acreage may be developed as Neighborhood Commercial for subdivisions of at least 40 acres and 200 dwelling units. A

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

building permit shall not be issued within this Neighborhood Commercial area until 50% of the dwelling units in the planned development have been completed. Policy 5.1.6 Planned development projects with innovative designs such as a mixture of densities and uses and common open space shall be encouraged. Policy 5.1.7 Increase density in multi-family housing zones through the use of incentives. Policy 5.1.8 When necessary, the City shall expand its boundaries through annexations to either the south of W. Main Street or east of Flower Avenue. Program Program 5.1.1 Review the feasibility and appropriateness of creating affordable housing requirements for projects that receive benefits from the City, including projects that receive City subsidies or City land, projects receiving zone changes that result in significantly more units than otherwise permitted, as well as projects that obtain a Development Agreement. Program 5.1.2 Aim to adopt affordable housing requirements through an ordinance. Program 5.1.3 Identify existing housing units that can be retrofitted to accommodate different life stages. Program 5.1.4 Establish a task force to review current City codes to ascertain where changes can be made for those needing to ‘age-in-place’. Program 5.1.5 Provide incentives for the adaptive reuse of existing commercial buildings into mixed use structures to provide housing.

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INDUSTRIAL

The industrial uses in Guadalupe provide opportunities for local employment and an improved tax base. Industrial uses serve both local and regional areas, and are generally located adjacent to each other. The Industrial core is located along Highway 1 in a concentrated area. In accordance with the 2002 General Plan, there are three land use designations for Industrial. These include Light Industrial, General Industrial, and Planned-Development Industrial. There are about 120 acres of land designated as Industrial in Guadalupe. More than 112 acres of land in Guadalupe are designated as General Industrial. About eight acres are designated as Light Industrial. Industrial land uses are divided into three categories in the 2002 General Plan: •  Light Industrial •  General Industrial •  *Planned Development-Industrial Light Industrial will have a character of use that does not have smoke, fumes, or other noxious effects. General Industrial may have the same effects as Light Industrial. However, if these effects can’t be fully avoided, all industrial uses will be a subject to performance standards concerning noise, appearance, traffic, and air pollution. *Since 2002, Planned Development-Industrial is listed but not further described in the General Plan and does not appear on the land use map. Allowable Uses There are four zoning designations related to Industrial Uses. They include General Industrial (G-I), Industrial Commercial (M-C), Light Industrial – Specific Plan (I-SP), Urban Reserve/ Light Industrial – Specific Plan (UR/I-SP). These zoning

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Land Use Element

designations were all derived from the Guadalupe Municipal Code. The Specific Plan Industrial Zones (I-SP and UR/I-SP) are further discussed in the Specific Plan section of this chapter. GENERAL INDUSTRIAL (G-I) The General Industrial (G-I) district permits agricultural processing or supports industries and other general industrial uses that conform to the land use element of the General Plan. The uses permitted in this district include: INDUSTRIAL-COMMERCIAL (M-C) The purpose of the Industrial-Commercial (M-C) district is to provide a district for the combined industrial and commercial enterprises necessary to serve the residents, industries, and nearby farms.

FIGURE LU-4. Industrial Zoning Designation

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INDUSTRIAL GOAL

1. An array of industrial uses that provide a sound economic base for Guadalupe, while also reducing potential negative health impacts to the community

GOAL 6 An array of industrial uses that provide a sound economic base for Guadalupe, while also reducing potential negative health impacts to the community Policy Policy 6.1.1 The City will encourage diversity of uses within compatible light industrial development. Policy 6.1.2 The City will encourage industrial development which serves to improve the local economy and does not otherwise detract from the Guadalupe environment. Policy 6.1.3 Industrial uses shall provide and maintain a buffer between themselves, and adjacent less intensive uses. This can be done using a Transitional Land Use such as light industry, heavy commercial, or open space. It can also be achieved using other alternatives such as landscaping and other buffering devices. Policy 6.1.4 Ingress and egress to industrial projects shall be consolidated in order to mitigate traffic and land use impacts.

Landscaping buffer for industrial property adjacent to other uses.

City of Guadalupe General Plan

Policy 6.1.5 The City shall promote the development of nonpolluting industries that do not pose health risks to locate in City. Policy 6.1.6 Industrial uses shall provide and maintain a buffer between themselves and adjacent less intensive uses. This can be done using a Transitional Land Use such as light industry, heavy commercial, or open space. The same can also be achieved using alternatives such as landscaping or other buffering techniques.


Land Use Element

Program Program 6.1.1 Develop and implement an industrial infill program. Program 6.1.2 Provide incentives for clean industries. Program 6.1.3 Continue to review City land use and zoning maps, determine the industrial development potential, and evaluate potential industrial demand. Based on the findings, continue to re-zone and re-designate as appropriately consistent with goals and policies. Example of a landscaping buffer in a zoning ordinance.

Program 6.1.4 The City will encourage a diversity of uses within compatible light industrial development (near #6 on the Proposed Land Use map) to boost tourist and residential activity near the train station.

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City of Guadalupe General Plan


2 circulation

CIRCULATION

35


INTRODUCTION

PURPOSE AND LEGAL FRAMEWORK

Efficient circulation is a vital function of all communities and therefore is an essential part of the General Plan. In this element, circulation refers not only to the “general location and network of existing and proposed major thoroughfares” but also to the “means for transporting people and goods in and around the city and its surrounding region.” The Circulation Element as part of the City of Guadalupe’s General Plan is meant to accommodate future growth and improve infrastructure as well as inventory current conditions. By relating directly to the Land Use Element, the Circulation Element facilitates unobstructed and efficient movement to and from shopping, schools, work and other activity centers in the community now and into the future. The Governor’s Office of Planning & Research (OPR, 2003) requires that circulation elements relate directly to the Land Use Element and address the following fundamental sections: • Major thoroughfares • Transportation routes • Terminals • Other local public utilities and facilities The City’s General Plan includes a stand-alone Public Facilities Element with information related to public services and infrastructure. As such, the required local public utilities and facilities topics will be included in Chapter XX. Many required topics are also discussed in the Circulation chapter of the Background Report (XX), which details existing conditions and policies currently in effect in Guadalupe. The Circulation Element addresses these topics as they relate to the future of Guadalupe, and lays out goals, objectives, policies, and programs that determine the course of action for deliberate progress toward the future of the City.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

CONSISTENCY WITH REGIONAL PLANS

Per OPR standards (2003), the Circulation Element must maintain consistency with regional air quality and transportation plans. In the case of Guadalupe, such plans are prepared primarily by Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG) and California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). Selected relevant plans are included here. For a full list, see the accompanying City of Guadalupe General Plan Update Background Report. • Regional Transportation Plan (RTP), which provides a 20-year overview for public policy decisions related to transportation infrastructure. Such plans are required by Federal and State law. The forthcoming update to the RTP is required to include a Sustainable Communities Strategy per Senate Bill 375, and therefore the General Plan must be developed accordingly. • Regional Transportation Improvement Programs, produced in five-year increments, which act as programs for upcoming projects. The General Plan must be in agreement with all projects therein. • Congestion Management Program, which includes thresholds for all projects and requires mitigation for any project that exceeds them. Therefore all programming in the General Plan must adhere to such thresholds. • North County Investment Plan, which provides Guadalupe with funding for various circulation improvements, including Safe Routes to School (SRTS). The City of Guadalupe should allocate money accordingly. • California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) owns and operates Highway 1 and Highway 166, two major thoroughfares in Guadalupe. Any plans pertaining to these two highways will require direct involvement with Caltrans and will need to meet state transportation standards.

2


ORGANIZATION

The Circulation Element is structured by mode of transportation. This is a variation from the traditional organization and is in alignment with the Complete Streets concept that will be discussed in the following section. This organization emphasizes the needs of all modes and users of Guadalupe streets, and addresses these needs in a comprehensive, safe, efficient, and sustainable way. This chapter begins with the vision for Complete Streets in Guadalupe then outlines information pertaining to Pedestrians, Bicycles, Transit, Automobiles, and Regional Transportation & Goods Movement. The chapter concludes with information about Street Classification. Each section includes information related to current conditions; the role of the mode in Guadalupe’s circulation; current issues; goals, objectives, policies and programs; and relevant visuals.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

COMPLETE STREETS VISION

On September 30, 2008, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Assembly Bill 1358, the California Complete Streets Act. The Act states: “In order to fulfill the commitment to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, make the most efficient use of urban land and transportation infrastructure, and improve public health by encouraging physical activity, transportation planners must find innovative ways to reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and to shift from short trips in the automobile to biking, walking, and use of public transit.” The California Office of Planning and Research released an update to the 2003 General Plan Guidelines to include mandated Complete Streets legislation. The 2010 Update to the General Plan Guidelines: Complete Streets and the Circulation Element includes new instructions on how to include multimodal transportation as part of the Circulation Element. The California Complete Streets Act requires all updates to the Circulation Elements to plan for the development of multimodal networks as of January 2011. Therefore, the previous City of Guadalupe General Plan must be updated in order to be compliant with the changes in Federal and State laws, including the Complete Streets Act. Two of Guadalupe’s main roads (Highway 1 and 166) are under the jurisdictions of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and must also align with the Caltrans Deputy Directive 64-Revision #1: Complete Streets: Integrating the Transportation System (DD-64-R1) which supports many of the policies from the Complete Streets Act. The Circulation Element builds upon potential land development and changes from the Land Use Element to accommodate an adequate level of transportation need by residents. By encouraging the use of alternative forms of transportation, the Guadalupe Complete Streets Vision strives to create a safer, healthier Guadalupe for all ages and abilities while helping to reduce Guadalupe’s role in releasing greenhouse gases. As a part of the Guadalupe Complete Streets Vision, the Circulation Element hopes to connect residents with downtown Guadalupe through walking or bicycling in order to facilitate economic development. The Circulation Element should also provide for equal accessibility to community resources for all segments of the population including the disadvantaged, the young, the elderly, and the disabled. 4


For Guadalupe, this legislation will expand the circulation system to include all modes and infrastructure for transportation purposes beyond auto-oriented uses. These networks will allow Guadalupe to move toward a circulation system that enables all users to effectively travel as a pedestrian, bicyclist, in an automobile, and by transit to reach key destinations within the community and the larger region. For this reason, this Circulation Element plans for each mode individually as part of the larger Complete Streets system and includes all systems that move people and goods. Future traffic studies should be conducted to provide better empirical evidence for any new right-of-ways or future dedications as prescribed under this Circulation Element. By specifically identifying goals, objectives, policies, and programs for each mode, Guadalupe will be able to incorporate all modes and users where feasible. The following goals and objectives support overall Complete Streets principles which apply to all modes and users.

Details the components of complete streets.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

CIRCULATION GOAL 1. A circulation network that provides for adequate and safe access for all users of all ages and abilities including pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and commercial operators.

GOAL 1 A circulation network that provides for adequate and safe access for all users of all ages and abilities including pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and commercial operators.

Objective 1.1 Coordinate planned land uses in order to incorporate an adequate multimodal transportation network and promote the efficient transport of goods and the safe and effective movement of all segments of the population. Policy Policy 1.1.1: Use traffic calming measures in the Central Business District and residential areas including, but not limited to: narrower travel lanes, roundabouts, raised medians, speed tables, planting strips, pedestrian refuges, etc. However, these traffic calming measures should not disrupt the flow of commercial traffic. Policy 1.1.2: Separate performance or level-of-service standards for bicycle and pedestrian traffic or integrated performance and level-of-service standards that include multiple modes shall be utilized. Policy 1.1.3: Include shade trees, green medians, and landscaping in the design of streets, roads, highways, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Program Program 1.1.1: Create an Implementation Plan to detail further funding and design of Guadalupe’s circulation network and include other mode specific plans. Program 1.1.2: Amend the Zoning Code to include transportation-oriented development standards near transit accessible areas and the Central Business District that allow access by multiple modes. These changes shall also reflect SB 375, the California Sustainable Communities Strategy, where feasible. Program 1.1.3: Update street design standards to include, but not be limited to: street trees, context sensitive medians, lighting, street furniture, pedestrian and bicycle buffers, and other amenities. 6


PEDESTRIAN

Pedestrian pathways can increase connectivity, promote physical activity and social interaction

Walkable streets attract pedestrian traffic and can stimulate the local economy City of Guadalupe General Plan

A pleasant pedestrian experience is vital to the health of a city’s circulation system. Walking is the most basic form of transport and has countless benefits to the community. It is a healthful, active, economical and convenient mode of transit, particularly in small, compact towns like Guadalupe. A walkable community reduces the number of short trips made by automobile, which are commonly targeted by transportation demand management planning due to their disproportionate addition to GHG emissions. Walkability creates a culture of community cohesiveness and can have a positive impact on the economic environment of a community by promoting pass-by patronage of businesses. It is therefore important that Guadalupe develops a quality pedestrian network that allows for safe, accessible and efficient travel by pedestrians within and between residential and commercial districts. A viable pedestrian network should account for present need and future growth of the City. Opportunities exist to enhance the pedestrian network. Current pedestrian infrastructure is inconsistent within the City and does not provide comfortable connectivity within regions. Future street design should make sidewalks and paths readily available and consistent, providing routes, which access all parts of town as well as public transportation. The pedestrian environment should allow users to feel safe and comfortable. Achieving this goal requires adequate street lighting, crosswalks, and traffic-calming features. Additionally, design and infrastructure choices should easily accommodate all users including disabled, young and elderly persons.


Circulation Element

CIRCULATION GOAL

GOAL 2 A safe, convenient and integrated pedestrian network that encourages walkability.

2. A safe, convenient and integrated pedestrian network that encourages walkability.

Objective 2.1 Develop a pedestrian network in both existing and new neighborhoods that ensures safe, attractive, convenient, connected and continuous routes for pedestrian travel. Policy Policy 2.1.1: Ensure pedestrian safety at all times by providing well-marked crosswalks, bulb-outs, on-street parking, audible warnings, or median refuges that reduce crossing distances. Policy 2.1.2: Prioritize pedestrian access to retail and commercial businesses from the street, rather than from a parking lot. Policy 2.1.3: Provide routes that offer pedestrian access to public transportation stations (bus stops, Amtrak station, etc.).

Program Program 2.1.1: Require new subdivisions and large-scale developments to include safe pedestrian walkways that provide direct links between streets and important destinations such as transit stops, schools, parks, shopping centers, and jobs. Program 2.1.2: Develop street design standards for areas with high levels of pedestrian activity (such as schools, employment centers, residential areas, and mixed-use areas) that support safe pedestrian travel by providing detached sidewalks, bulbouts, on-street parking, enhanced pedestrian crossings, and medians. Program 2.1.3: Ensure that new construction generates development that prioritizes pedestrian access rather than auto-centric access, as achieved by ground-floor uses; massing; site planning; setbacks; and signage guidelines.

8


BICYCLES

Bicyclists stop for snacks at a local market.

Bicycling improves public health, allows for better air quality, benefits the local economy, helps create a more vibrant and sustainable economy, and provides residents with a lowcost and convenient mobility option. Guadalupe is a small community with temperate year-round weather, flat terrain, mostly wide streets with low automobile traffic, and a large proportion of low-income residents. It therefore should be an ideal place for bicycles to comprise a large modal share of transportation. However, according to survey data, few residents bike to school and work. The majority of residents commute by automobile, with only 0.5 percent of residents bicycling to work. The objective of this chapter is to improve the desirability of bicycling and increase the proportion of bicycle travel through the adoption of bicycle friendly goals and policies. These policies should promote travel by bicycle as a safe, convenient, socially acceptable, and accessible mode of transit. Safety and fear of automobiles is the biggest barrier to bicycling for most people. Road design, signal design, traffic calming, and designated bike lanes can all make bicycling feel safer and increase bicycle ridership. Convenience is a crucial element in encouraging residents to make the decision to bike instead of drive. Bicycle theft, inconveniently placed bike racks, and lack of connection of bike lanes with transit options are all barriers to bicycling convenience. The League of American Bicyclists says, “There are two basic requirements for bicycle riding: a bicycle and you.” Access to a bicycle is essential to the success of a bicycle plan. Perceptions of bicycling are also important to bicycle ridership. Many communities view bicycling as a fringe activity, or as a means of transit for the poor. Reducing the stigma of bicycle ridership is important in gaining the ridership of the “willing but wary” type of cyclist. The City has obtained contracted services to prepare a Bicycle/Pedestrian Master Plan. An extensive inventory has been compiled of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, community meetings have been held, and the final draft is being prepared concurrently with this report. The final draft will need to be incorporated in a General Plan amendment upon completion.

Guadalupe’s climate makes it ideal for year-round riding. City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

CIRCULATION GOAL

GOAL 3 A bicycling environment that is safe, convenient, socially acceptable and accessible.

3. A bicycling environment that is safe, convenient, socially acceptable and accessible.

Objective 3.1 Promote the safety of all cyclists. Policy Policy 3.1.1: Include sharrows, painted bicycle lanes, bicycle signals, railroad crossings and signage where appropriate. Policy 3.1.2: Facilitate traffic calming measures that slow car speeds and make bicycling safer and more enjoyable. Program Program 3.1.1: Adopt a complete streets plan that prioritizes all types of transit, including bicycles, pedestrians, public transit, and automobiles. Program 3.1.2: Work with regional transit authorities to develop a separated bicycle lane along Highway 166 that extends from Guadalupe to Santa Maria to facilitate safe, pleasant bicycle commuting.

Objective 3.2 Create convenient bicycle parking and connections with other transit. Policy Policy 3.2.1: Require bike parking in new development and major remodels, parking lots, office buildings, government buildings, and at large civic events. Policy 3.2.2: Allow bicycles on all transit busses. Policy 3.2.3: Allow the installation of bicycle lockers and storage at bus stations, stops, and at the train station.

10


Objective 3.3 Promote bicycling as a socially acceptable means of transit. Policy Policy 3.3.1: Encourage bicycle education in elementary, high schools, and drivers education. Policy 3.3.2: Promote bicycle friendliness in the Central Business District by installing bicycle racks, providing incentives and discounts for employees and customers who arrive by Program Program 3.3.1: Local sponsorship of “Bike to Work Month�, partnering with local businesses and organizations to create additional incentives. Program 3.3.2: Implement a Safe Routes to Schools Plan connecting neighborhoods to the elementary school and middle school. Program 3.3.3: Implement Police Bicycle patrols in addition to car patrols, providing officers with more opportunity for positive contact with the community, the ability to reach areas not accessible by car, and to send a signal that bicycles are a legitimate form of transportation.

Objective 3.4 Ensure access to bicycles and bicycle service. Policy Policy 3.4.1: Provide incentives and remove barriers to bike shops or bicycle non-profits interested in locating in Guadalupe. Policy 3.4.2: Provide bicycles for government employees for use for meetings, client services, errands, lunch breaks, etc. Program Program 3.4.1: Increase access to bicycles by sponsoring a bike redistribution program that facilitates the transfer of abandoned or donated bicycles to low-income residents. City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

12


TRANSIT

Additional local and regional transit services will allow for better access and connectivity, and would help to decrease congestion.

Improved transit facilities and infrastructure. City of Guadalupe General Plan

A high-quality public transit system makes transit ridership more convenient, provides greater opportunity for community members who are unable or prefer not to drive, and leads to increased social integration. A transit system well tailored to Guadalupe’s setting with increased regional and local connections is an effective method for moving residents and visitors throughout the City, and to and from neighboring Santa Maria and adjacent unincorporated areas. As Guadalupe and its surrounding communities increase in population, a well planned and financed transit system will allow for greater access, connectivity, and decreased congestion. A well adapted transit system can also serve to balance other modes such as bicycles, automobiles, and pedestrians. The City of Guadalupe currently provides both fixed-route and demand-response service within the City and to and from Santa Maria. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 20072011 American Community Survey, approximately 4.6% of Guadalupe residents use public transit as their primary means of getting work. Many residents also currently utilize public transit connections between Guadalupe and Santa Maria for recreational and educational purposes. The City currently has one deviated fixed-route service, the Guadalupe Flyer, which operates between Guadalupe and Santa Maria. In addition, the City owns one reserve bus and one ADA van for ondemand service. All transit is currently owned and operated by SMOOTH Inc. (Santa Maria Organization of Transportation Helpers), which had a total of 113,642 boardings system-wide in the fiscal year 2010/2011. Because Guadalupe is a rural town, transportation is heavily oriented toward the automobile. Therefore, there is an opportunity to increase public transportation options for residents in order to reduce automobile dependency and decrease vehicle miles traveled for commuting. Certain groups of residents benefit greatly from increased public transit availability and patronage. Transit can allow for increased mobility for groups such as agricultural workers, students, elderly, low income residents, and young residents who do not have access to a car. Currently Guadalupe’s only fixed route bus service, the Guadalupe Flyer, is limited in terms of weekend and evening service, reducing transit options for residents who do not own a vehicle. The City currently lacks a fixed route line designed to circulate passengers solely within the city limits of Guadalupe. The Flyer links Guadalupe to Santa Maria,


Circulation Element

but its stops within Guadalupe are infrequent, which detracts riders from using it as a local transit system. The policies and programs detailed in this section seek to improve public transit in Guadalupe by increasing reliability, increasing connectivity, minimizing cost, and ensuring rider safety and comfort for every trip. Proposed goals, policies and programs in this chapter are designed to complement the forthcoming Guadalupe Short Range Transit Plan. The overall goal for public transit in Guadalupe envisions continued coordination with local and regional transit partners to invest in improved transit infrastructure, and increase connections within and surrounding Guadalupe.

Figure 6: Transit Ridership GUADALUPE TRANSIT RIDERSHIP Service Guadalupe Flyer Guadalupe Shuttle Guadalupe ADA

% Change FY 2008/2009 FY 2009/2010 FY 2010/2011 FY 2011/2012 in past year 96,686 86,186 89,520 87,160 -3 23,645 24,488 23,732 24,847 5 652 364 390 852 118

SB County Health Clinic Shuttle Amtrak CalVans*

1,365 NA NA

1,491 10,018 NA

NA 10,649 NA

NA 11,250 NA

NA -1 NA

*proposed, not  yet  in  service

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CIRCULATION GOAL

GOAL 4 A public transportation system that is safe, efficient, costeffective, and meets the needs of all residents and visitors.

4. A public transportation system that is safe, efficient, costeffective, and meets the needs of all residents and visitors.

Objective 4.1 Work with local and regional transit providers to plan and implement additional transit services within and to the City in order to improve connections between Guadalupe and the surrounding communities, and to increase transit ridership for all types of trips. Policy Policy 4.1.1: Work with transit providers to increase regional transit connections between Santa Maria and other regional destinations including San Luis Obispo, Orcutt, Lompoc, and Santa Barbara. Policy 4.1.2: Work with regional transit partners to achieve seamless transfers between transit systems, including scheduling and fare systems. Policy 4.1.3: Locate transit stops in areas that support existing or future transit-oriented development patterns and uses, thereby increasing the potential for transit use. Policy 4.1.3: Develop strategies to maximize off-peak transit use. Policy 4.1.4: At major transit stops, prioritize land uses and patterns that generate high transit ridership. Policy 4.1.5: Link all new development to current transportation routes. Program Program 4.1.1: Seek funding from regional, state, and federal agencies to improve transportation connections, and to expand schedules and routes to meet the needs of riders during night and weekend hours.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

Program 4.1.2: Coordinate with Allan Hancock College to improve bus frequency and scheduling for students. Program 4.1.3: Establish the Amtrak station as a transit hub, and coordinate public bus service with Amtrak scheduling as necessary to support increased commuter rail service.

Objective 4.2 Work with local transit providers to ensure a public transit system that is safe, timely, cost-effective, and responsive to growth patterns and existing and future demand. Policy Policy 4.2.1 Ensure the financial stability of transit services. Program Program 4.2.1: Seek funding from regional, state, and federal agencies to improve transit facilities and infrastructure including bus shelters, sidewalk improvements, benches, wayfinding signs, bike parking facilities, and trash receptacles. Program 4.2.2: Work with transit planning agencies and transit providers in assessing transit demand and efficiency of existing transit services (SRTP). Program 4.2.3: Improve connections between transit and bicycling by expanding the bus bike rack program and providing secure parking at major bus stops.

Objective 4.3 Consider the transit needs of senior, disabled, minority, lowincome, and transit-dependent persons when implementing new transit services. Program Program 4.3.1: Expand Santa Barbara County Community Partners for Caring dial-a-ride transit service for elderly persons in Guadalupe. Program 4.3.2: Improve transit service for agricultural workers in Guadalupe by working with CalVans to establish a daily route from Guadalupe to Santa Maria. 16


AUTOMOBILES

Automobiles provide freedom of travel and have become the dominant mode of personal mobility in post-World War II America. In the absence of congestion, they provide an efficient means of travelling long distances quickly, especially in comparison to other modes such as bicycling and walking. Automobiles navigate the city on highways, arterials, collectors and residential streets. The major thoroughfare for automobiles is Highway 1, also referred to as Guadalupe Street, which runs north-south through the City. The major east-west route is Highway 166, referred to as Main Street. These two routes intersect at the south end of the City. Average daily trips in the City along Highway 1 are 5,520 and 7,100 for Highway 166 (SBCAG 2030 Travel Forecast). In the City of Guadalupe, automobiles are accessible to 98 percent of citizens. Sixty-three percent of workers travel to their place of employment alone in an automobile (U.S. Census Bureau, 2007-2011 American Community Survey, Table S0801), almost half of which travel about 10 miles to Santa Maria (North County Regional Transit Plan, SBCAG, 2006). Therefore, driving is an essential part of life for a majority of those residing in Guadalupe.

A grid pattern street network promotes the efficient circulation of automobiles.

Future parking facilities should incorporate renewable energy and/or low-impact development features. City of Guadalupe General Plan

When used in inefficient ways, automobiles produce an excess of greenhouse gas emissions and related pollution. Biking and walking are suitable alternatives to replace the automobile for trips less than three miles. This becomes important when noting that about half of all personal trips taken in the U.S. are less than three miles and nearly 90% of those trips are taken by car. Automobile use could be made more efficient in Guadalupe by making other modes more efficient as well. Short trips that can be made by biking or walking should be made using those modes, thereby keeping unnecessary cars off the road and reducing congestion for other users. The same can be said of making public transportation more viable, especially to Santa Maria. Currently, the Level of Service (LOS) for highway segments within Guadalupe ranges from “A” to “C”. This indicates that all state highway segments perform to the standards as set by Caltrans. More information on LOS can be found in the accompanying Background Report. Guadalupe suffers from no congestion issues, per the SBCAG Congestion Management Plan (SBCAG, 2009). Issues that affect automobile travel in


Circulation Element

Guadalupe include the existence of large ditches on either side of Highway 166. SBCAG’s RTIP accounts for this improvement. Data from Guadalupe Police Department shows a total of eight collisions between motorists and pedestrians between 2007and 2011 (see Background Report). The goals, objectives, policies and programs in this section are a means for Guadalupe to ameliorate the aforementioned issues and promote the theme of integrated mobility throughout the city. Particular focus is paid to safety, convenience, efficiency and compatibility.

18


CIRCULATION GOAL

GOAL 5 A safe, efficient street network for automobiles as part of a transportation system that accommodates multiple modes.

5. A safe, efficient street network for automobiles as part of a transportation system that accommodates multiple modes.

Objective 5.1 Provide an interconnected network of streets for ease and variety of travel. Policy 5.1.1: Approve land use changes only when those proposals include specific strategies in which the transportation system will support existing and proposed development needs based on access, safety, and alternative modes of transportation. Program Program 5.1.1: Design streets so as to minimize construction and use-related environmental impacts. Program 5.1.2: Ensure that all streets are well-maintained.

Objective 5.2 Sustain and increase street safety for pedestrians, motorists, and the City as a whole. Policy Policy 5.2.1: Design ways to manage the speed of vehicles along Highway 1 for the safety and comfort of other road users. Policy 5.2.2: Ensure that traffic controls and signals are adequate to balance roadway efficiency with a high standard of traffic safety. Policy 5.2.3: Ensure low emergency response times, even with increased density and implementation of any traffic calming efforts. Program Program 5.2.1: Increase citizen capacity for dialogue with Caltrans concerning the design, use, and maintenance of Highway 1.

City of Guadalupe General Plan

Program 5.2.2: Implement the Guadalupe Ditches Project per SBCAG RTIP.


Circulation Element

CIRCULATION GOAL

GOAL 6 Adequate parking facilities that serve multiple uses and make efficient use of space.

6. Adequate parking facilities that serve multiple uses and make efficient use of space.

Objective 6.1 Provide sufficient parking for businesses and residents, while balancing other interests. Policy Policy 6.1.1: Ensure that residential development accommodates parking needs on-site, in accordance with subdivision and zoning ordinances. Policy 6.1.2: Allow shared parking where appropriate, especially in mixed-use areas where peak parking demands do not overlap. Program Programs 6.1.1: Promote the use of parking space for multiple uses and community benefits. Program 6.1.2: Parking infrastructure should be equipped with low-impact development and other environmentally-friendly features where possible (e.g. pervious pavement, solar panels, LED lighting). Program 6.1.3: In conjunction with future bus or rail service, consider the feasability of local park-and-ride facilities. Program 6.1.4: In the Central Business District, explore ways to lessen parking requirements to avoid large expanses of pavement, including amending current parking standards.

Objective 6.2

Increase availability of bike parking and other related facilities in accordance with demand. Policy Policy 6.2.1: Ensure that all development along Highway 1 and other major bike routes accommodates bicycle parking. Policy 6.2.2: Install bike lockers and repair kiosks. Program Program 6.2.1: The City should limit on-street parking where feasible along roadways which are designated as primary bicycle routes in order to accommodate increased bicycle ridership and space. 20


REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION & GOODS MOVEMENT

The regional transportation network allows for the movement of people and goods into and out of the community. This network includes highways, arterial roads, and the rail line. Since the movement of agricultural goods is important to the economy, having an efficient, safe, and reliable system via trucks and railroads is critical to Guadalupe’s success. The roadway system in Guadalupe currently accommodates a substantial volume of trucks entering the City limits. Within the City, trucks are coming to and from the six main packing sheds located along Highway 1. These packing sheds account for approximately 90 percent of all truck traffic traveling in the area (2003 SBCAG - Highway 166 Truck Study Final Report). On average, the heaviest of the City’s truck traffic is between 1:00 PM - 7:00 PM (SBCAG, 2003). Trucks are required by the state to travel along designated truck routes, allowing truck traffic to pass through communities with minimal impact on the sensitive land uses such as residential neighborhoods. In Guadalupe, the designated truck routes are Highway 1 and Highway 166. Since much of the industry is not directly located on Highway 1, Obispo Street serves as an industrial collector for agricultural truck traffic to and from the packing sheds. This can be seen in the map below. Trucks go directly through the downtown core creating increased congestion, pedestrian conflicts, and noise pollution.

Union Pacific Rail, view from the Guadulape Amtrak Station.

View of one of the at-grade crossings in Guadalupe.

City of Guadalupe General Plan

The Union Pacific Railroad and Santa Maria Valley Railroad own and operate freight rail services in Guadalupe. The rail system facilitates movement of agricultural and industrial products through the City reducing congestion on the streets. However, the rail line is at-grade, creating safety issues between the street system movements and the train movement. There are three at-grade crossings: Highway 166, 10th Street, and 11th Street. These at-grade crossings present a safety hazard as well as noise and air pollution. Along the rail line in residential areas there are fences to serve as a buffer around the tracks and to minimize collisions. Freight trains make both day and night trips through Guadalupe, seven days a week. The rate of speed through the City is 25 miles per hour, while the trip duration is between five and ten minutes, resulting in intermittent noise disturbance to residents.


Circulation Element

22


CIRCULATION GOAL

GOAL 7 A regional transportation network that balances the movement of commercial goods with community priorities.

7. A regional transportation network that balances the movement of commercial goods with community priorities.

Objective 7.1 Minimize negative impacts on local circulation and on noisesensitive land-uses. Policy Policy 7.1.1: Continue to keep heavy truck traffic outside residential neighborhoods by enforcing the designated truck routes. Policy 7.1.2: Promote safety at railroad crossings through the following measures as needed: Installation of additional warning signage and or channelization; Improvements to pedestrian warning devices at existing railroad crossings; Collaboration with Union Pacific Rail to create a safety awareness program to educate the public about the hazards of at-grade crossings.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

STREET CLASSIFICATION AND DESIGN

The network of streets in Guadalupe should provide an adequate level of functionality for all of the modes discussed throughout this Element. In order to ensure that the needs of all modes and users are accommodated, the previous roadway designs must be updated to better align with Complete Streets principles. This section provides an overview the various street levels found in Guadalupe and details the role that each street plays in allowing residents to travel easily and efficiently. Examples of existing street cross-sections and the proposed dimensional changes within the right-of-way are meant to show how the roadways could be transformed. While the updating of infrastructure is often an expensive endeavor, many of the changes can be made through re-striping the roadway to dedicate space to alternative modes of transportation. When funds become available or reconstruction of street infrastructure is deemed necessary, roadways should be built in alignment with the new cross-sections provided in this chapter. The given right-of-ways managed by the City vary in width and the prescribed measurements in this section should be adapted to fit specific right-of-way circumstances. Natural stormwater runoff catchment systems and bioswales should be designed to help reduce the amount of potential stormwater runoff. New technologies or designs should be incorporated to help manage stormwater; this could include such things as permeable pavement and low impact site, roadway, and parking lot development. STREET CLASSIFICATIONS MAP The three types of streets in Guadalupe include: arterials, collectors, and local streets. The roadway network in this plan does not include the addition of new streets. However, this plan provides more distinction between the roles and design of the streets. The following map shows the street hierarchy by type of roadway.

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City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

ROLE & DESIGN The various roles and associated design changes are detailed in order to encourage the City to re-dedicate or build any roads with Complete Streets concepts in mind. ARTERIALS Arterials function as high-capacity thoroughfares primarily concerned with moving traffic safely and efficiently. Highway 1 and Highway 166 are the two main thoroughfares that run through the City of Guadalupe but are managed by Caltrans. As stated previously in this chapter, any design changes to Highway 1 and Highway 166 must be planned with Caltrans, but the changes should closely resemble those provided in this document. Highway 1 bisects the City in the north-south direction. Highway 166 crosses the City from west to east. Highway 166 Highway 166 runs from Guadalupe to Santa Maria. It begins at its intersection with Highway 1 and continues east approximately seven miles to Santa Maria. Within Guadalupe, Highway 166 is called West Main Street. This name continues east until the middle of the City of Santa Maria where is it changes to East Main Street. Highway 166 is the primary connection to Santa Maria and Highway 101, and it is the most traveled highway in Guadalupe. It is a two-lane highway with eight to ten foot shoulders on each side and no median. Highway 166 will need to be upgraded when the DJ Farms development begins construction. With commercial uses proposed along Highway 166 in the DJ Farms development, the street design should incorporate multimodal facilities to allow residents to easily access the site. While Caltrans manages Highway 166, the City should encourage them to incorporate facilities that closely resemble the cross-section of Highway 1 through downtown Guadalupe with less on-street parking. Highway 1 Highway 1 is the main street in downtown Guadalupe and is called Guadalupe Street within the City limits. Highway 1 is a two-lane highway with Class II bicycle lanes on both sides of the road. Class II bicycle lanes are demarcated specifically for bicycle usage. The highway connects to Grover Beach to the north and Lompoc to the south. The speed limit is reduced from 55 mph to 25 mph to accommodate the commercial land uses of the Central Business District. The reduction in speed 26


helps to enable alternative modes of transportation and facilitate pedestrian crossings; however, there are currently only three crosswalks that traverse Highway 1. There is a conflict between the street’s service as a statewide transportation route and the need for it to serve a pedestrian-friendly local downtown. The average right-of-way through downtown Guadalupe is 74 feet in width. Parking is located on both sides of the street and is retained in the examples below. However, it could be feasible to have rows of street parking that alternate availability through the downtown and extra pedestrian features could be incorporated through curb extensions. Curb extensions could also provide parklets and space for restaurants to incorporate street-facing outdoor seating. Figure 7.2: Existing cross-section example with dimensions for Highway 1

Figure 7.3: Proposed cross-section example with dimensions for Highway 1

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

COLLECTOR STREETS Collectors are defined as streets that lead residential traffic to and from various destinations. These roadways are used to transition between highways or arterials and local streets. These streets are focused on guiding users to designated land uses. The following are collector streets in Guadalupe: • West Main Street (Highway 166 west of Highway 1): This street collects traffic from the Guadalupe/Nipomo Dunes Reserve and residential developments in southwest Guadalupe, distributing traffic to Highway 1 and Highway 166. • Eleventh Street (east of Highway 1): This street routes traffic from the north side of Guadalupe to Highway 1 or Simas Road. The street also serves as an alternate connection between Highway 1 and Highway 166. • Simas Road (north of Highway 166): This road collects traffic from the north side of the City and distributes it to Highway 1 or Eleventh Street. It also acts as an alternate connection between Highway 1 and Highway 166. • Obispo Street (north of Highway 166): Obispo Street moves traffic from the southeast side of Guadalupe to Highway 166. Obispo Street is designated as an industrial collector, serving as a route for agricultural truck traffic • Pioneer Street (north of west Main Street): This street collects residential traffic from the southwest side of Guadalupe and distributes it to West Main Street. The typical collector has a right-of-way that is 56 feet wide. This allows ample space to incorporate Class III bicycle lanes and preserve on-street parking within residential neighborhoods. In areas where a transit stop is required, onstreet parking spaces could be removed to provide enough room for a bus to pull out of the travel lane. An example of a collector street with transit is additionally provided below to show how to preserve bicycle facilities while incorporating transit accessibility.

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Figure 7.4: Existing cross-section example with dimensions for a typical collector street

Figure 7.5: Proposed cross-section example with dimensions for a typical collector street

Figure 7.6: Proposed cross-section example with dimensions for a typical collector with transit

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

LOCAL STREETS Local streets provide access to abutting properties, utility easements, and firebreaks between properties. Their low-speed design discourages through traffic, excludes heavy trucks, maintains safety, and discourages noise. Local streets within Guadalupe generally resemble two different right-of-way widths. The varying right-of-way are normally attributed to the amount of roadway that is deemed appropriate for different types of land use and density mixes. Local streets are often the responsibility of a developer of a particular subdivision. For this reason, two examples are provided below to detail possible local road options that would compliment the existing right-of-ways found throughout the City. The different right-of-way widths are 52 feet and 58 feet. Higher density areas should incorporate buffers to protect pedestrians and provide street trees to shade residents who chose to walk to nearby amenities. Both higher and lower density areas should include sharrows and/or other signage to alert drivers that the roadway is a shared space.

Figure 7.7: Existing cross-section example with dimensions for a typical local street with a rightof-way of 52 feet in a higher density area

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Figure 7.8: Existing cross-section example with dimensions for a typical local street with a right-of-way of 58 feet in a lower density area

Figure 7.9: Proposed cross-section example with dimensions for a typical local street with a right-of-way of 52 feet in a higher density area

Figure 7.10: Proposed cross-section example with dimensions for a typical local street with a right-of-way of 58 feet in a lower density area

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Circulation Element

CIRCULATION GOAL

8. An efficient street network that accommodates multiple modes and incorporates sustainable design principles.

GOAL 8 An efficient street network that accommodates multiple modes and incorporates sustainable design principles. Objective 8.1 Provide consistent street design standards. Policy Policy 8.1.1: Require all new streets and reconstruction projects to incorporate sustainable design features and stormwater runoff management. Program Program 8.1.1: Update street design guidelines to reflect the ideas presented in this section.

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City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element

3 housing 34


INTRODUCTION

The provision of quality housing for residents of Guadalupe is a primary concern of the City. The City of Guadalupe’s Housing Element was last updated in 2009. The initial phase of the update includes a background report followed by policies and objectives of the City concerning the mandatory elements provided in the General Plan. The background report comprises analysis of Census data as collected and related to the City’s Housing Element. The Census data contains information such as employment, demographics, and employment projection by sector. The background report also addresses the housing needs of residents and what housing will be required in the future to provide for people residing in Guadalupe boundaries. This housing element brings forth portions of the background report including community context, population growth, demographics, household income, rental cost, affordability and overcrowding and includes a housing action plan that lists policies and objectives that address the housing needs of the City.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element

COMMUNITY CONTEXT

Incorporated in 1946, the City of Guadalupe is located in the Santa Maria Valley, a rich agricultural region in the northwest portion of Santa Barbara County. Surrounded by farmland, the City serves as an agricultural service center for the productive Valley farms, providing the processing and shipping of many of the Valley’s crops. With the predominant land use being residential, the City provides homes for persons employed in the production, processing, and shipping of agricultural products. Compared to most other cities in the County, Guadalupe has been a relatively stable community, experiencing modest population growth over the past 30 years. As of 2010, the City had an estimated population of 7,080 residents, of which over 86 percent were Hispanic or Latino (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010). Approximately 37 percent of the population is foreign-born with the majority born in Latin America. With most workers being involved in agriculture, median household incomes are below the State average and there is a need for affordable workforce housing. Household incomes are also among the lowest in Santa Barbara County and as a result, many City residents qualify as those in the range for affordable housing units. Between 2000 and 2007, Guadalupe’s median home price has doubled to $230,952, significantly outpacing the area’s income growth (ESRI, 2008) . Historically, in part because of this increase in housing prices, overcrowding has been a major issue in Guadalupe, affecting up to 21 percent of households. This puts emphasis on the need for more affordable housing.

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DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIOECONOMIC TRENDS

POPULATION GROWTH TRENDS The City of Guadalupe has experienced substantial population growth between 2000 and 2010. Table 1 in the background report shows that between 1990 and 2000, the City’s population increased just 3 percent. Since 2000, however, the population increased by almost 25 percent. As of 2010 Guadalupe had a population of 7,080, representing 1.7 percent of Santa Barbara County’s total population of 423,895.

DEMOGRAPHICS Housing needs are influenced by the age characteristics of the population. Different age groups have different housing needs based on lifestyles, family types, income levels, and housing preference. Table 2 in the background report provides a comparison of the City’s and County’s population by age groups in 2010. This table shows that the age distribution of the City’s population is younger overall than Santa Barbara County as a whole (median age of 28.2 for the City vs. 33.6 for the County). In 2010, 46 percent of City residents were under the age of 25 and 73 percent of the population was under the age of 45. Senior citizens represented the smallest proportion of the population at 8 percent. The racial and ethnic composition of Guadalupe differs from Santa Barbara County in that the majority of City residents are Hispanic/Latino. Approximately 86 percent of City residents identify themselves as Hispanic or Latino in origin, whereas only 43 percent of County residents are in this category. Guadalupe’s proportion of Hispanic and Latino citizens has remained stable since 1990 (Table 3 in the background report). The City’s racial composition also differs from that of the County in that 48 percent of Guadalupe residents identify themselves white, while 70 percent of County residents identify themselves as white. The proportion of Guadalupe residents who identify themselves as white increased from 46 percent in 2000 to 48 percent in 2010.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing HOUSINGElement ELEMENT

The population data suggests that as Guadalupe’s population increases, the City should continue to provide housing for young adults and families. This includes both single family and multi-family residential units. It will be important to increase the housing supply, choice, and affordability in order to avoid overcrowded living quarters.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME Household income is a primary factor affecting housing needs in a community – the ability of residents to afford housing is directly related to household income. Table 10 shows the breakdown of households by income. According to the 2010 Census, the median household income in Guadalupe was the lowest of cities in Santa Barbara County at $42,978 (Table 11 in the housing element background report). Census data indicates that the median household income in Guadalupe increased from $31,205 in 2000 to $42,978 in 2010, but it still remains lower than that of neighboring jurisdictions such as Santa Barbara County, which has a median household income of $56,767. This demonstrates the need for affordable housing to adequately accommodate the residents with lower incomes. State law establishes four household income categories for purposes of housing programs based on area median income (AMI): very-low (less than 50 percent of AMI), low (51 to 80 percent of AMI), moderate (81 to 120 percent of AMI), and above-moderate (over 120 percent AMI). Table 12 shows the income range for these groups, as well as the number and percentage of Guadalupe households in each group. According to the 2010 Census and the Regional Housing Needs Plan, 36 percent of households in Guadalupe were in the very low-income bracket. 21 percent were in the low and 15 percent were in the moderate. 28 percent were in the above moderate income group. With 57 percent of households falling within the very low and low income bracket, this shows the need for more affordable housing within the City of Guadalupe.

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Guadalupe is projected to experience continued household growth throughout the planning period. In order to adequately accommodate residents, it will be essential to provide adequately sized and reasonably priced housing for family and non-family households. The demand for affordable homes and apartments is likely to remain very high, as a result of 72 percent of City households having moderate- or lowerincomes.

RENTAL COST With regard to rental units, the median rent in Guadalupe in 2012 was $841 per month for all types of housing. Table 18 in the housing element background report shows the number of units by value of contract rent payments in 2010. Historical rent data shows that the median rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Guadalupe is $1,050 per month (Rentometer. com). However, the rent for a two-bedroom apartment that is considered affordable (30 percent Area Median Income) in the County of Santa Barbara is $533 per month (Out of Reach Report 2013, National Low Income Housing coalition).

AFFORDABILITY AND OVERPAYMENT Housing is generally the greatest single expense item for California families. According to the HCD, a home is considered affordable when a household spends 30 percent or less of its gross income on housing. When a household spends more than 30 percent of its gross income on housing, it is considered to be overpaying or cost burdened. Table 19 in the housing element background report shows households by income range and the number of households overpaying by occupancy. The data reveals that a large percentage, almost 53 percent, of all Guadalupe residents are overpaying for housing (835 households). Of those households overpaying, 345 were homeowners and 490 were renters.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element HOUSING ELEMENT

OVERCROWDING Overcrowding is closely related to household income, housing prices, and the size of units within a community. The US Census Bureau considers a household to be overcrowded when there is more than one person per room, excluding bathrooms and kitchens. Severe overcrowding occurs when a unit has more than 1.5 occupants per room. Overcrowding can result when there are not enough adequately sized housing units within a community, or when high housing costs relative to income force too many individuals or families to share housing. Overcrowding can also accelerate deterioration of the housing stock. Table 20 in the housing element background report indicates that overcrowding in Guadalupe is substantially more prevalent than for Santa Barbara County as a whole. According to the 2010 Census, 21 percent of all households in Guadalupe were overcrowded, compared to 8 percent of households in the County. Table 20 also reveals that renter-occupied units are more crowded than owner-occupied units in Guadalupe, suggesting that more rental units are needed or a wider variety of affordable units.

HOUSING ACTION PLAN (OBJECTIVES, POLICIES AND PROGRAMS) This section provides a statement of the community’s goals, policies, programs, and quantified objectives relative to the maintenance, preservation, improvement, and development of housing in Guadalupe for the 2014 to 2022 planning period.

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HOUSING ELEMENT

HOUSING GOALS

1. An adequate supply of affordable housing for all residents in Guadalupe.

GOAL 1

AN ADEQUATE SUPPLY OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR ALL RESIDENTS IN GUADALUPE.

Affordable Housing Supply Objective 1.1 Develop an adequate supply of affordable housing for all income levels. Policy 1.1.1

The City shall provide an adequate number of housing sites for both rent and purchase to accommodate its share of regional housing needs, including the number of units for each income classification.

1.1.2 The City may pursue land annexation to enable an adequate supply of appropriately zoned land with public services to accommodate projected housing needs. 1.1.3

The City shall ensure that adopted policies, regulations, and procedures do not add unnecessarily to the cost of housing while still attaining other important City objectives.

1.1.4

The City shall give high priority for permit processing to low-income residential projects, and the highest priority for projects that provide housing units at the extremely-low income (ELI) level.

1.1.5 The City shall continue to support the efforts of the Santa Barbara County Housing Authority within the City.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element

1.1.6

The City shall, through the Santa Barbara County Housing Authority or in conjunction with nonprofit or for-profit developers, apply for funds from the State and Federal governments to construct housing for low- income households.

1.1.7 The City shall continue to provide Section 8 assistance to eligible households through the Santa Barbara County Housing Authority. 1.1.8

When reasonable, low-income housing produced through government subsidies and/or through incentives or regulatory programs shall be distributed throughout the City and not concentrated in a particular area or community.

1.1.9 The City shall require low-income housing units in density bonus projects to be available at the same time as the market-rate units in the project. 1.1.10 The City shall encourage the development of multi- family dwellings in locations where adequate facilities are available and where such development would be consistent with neighborhood character. 1.1.11 The City shall allow legal, non-conforming dwellings to be rehabilitated that do not meet current lot size requirements, setbacks yard requirements, and other current zoning requirements, so long as the non- conformity is not increased and there is no threat to public health and or safety. 1.1.12 To meet the City’s needs to provide housing at the extremely low income (ELI) level, the City shall encourage projects that meet the housing needs of ELI households by offering financial incentives, financial assistance, and/or regulatory concessions to encourage the development of ELI units, such as that provided by single-room occupancy units. The City shall consider prioritizing its affordable housing development assistance to one or more projects that meet the City’s ELI housing needs, as identified in the latest RHNA allocation. 42


Program 1.1.1

The City shall re-zone additional vacant residential sites over one acre in size to the R-3 zoning designation to accommodate its regional housing need for low, very low and extremely low income housing units.

1.1.2 The City shall create an inclusionary housing ordinance to generate affordable housing in proportion with the overall increase in market-rate residential units. To provide a continuing supply of affordable housing to meet the needs of existing and future Guadalupe residents in all income categories the City shall create an inclusionary housing ordinance that all residential and residential mixed use projects are required to have a minimum of 15% of their units be made affordable or that an in-lieu fee be paid, or a combination of both. City sponsored projects must provide 30% of the units as affordable. The required breakdown of the very-low, low, and moderate income units required as part of the inclusionary ordinance is based on the RHNA income breakdown percentages. 1.1.3 The City shall initiate annexation proceedings with Local Agency Formation Commission to add to the available land supply. 1.1.4

The City shall annually evaluate the adequacy of services and facilities for additional residential development Service deficiencies and the cost of correcting such deficiencies will be identified and priorities will be set.

1.1.5 The City shall establish priority water and sewer services procedures for developments with units affordable to lower-income households.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element

Secondary Units

1.1.6

The City will comply with California State law allowing secondary units, mobile and manufactured homes, licensed residential care facilities and group homes with fewer than six residents, rental housing, and transitional and supportive housing in all residential zones. These uses may only be subject to those development and management standards that apply to residential development within the same zone. The City will also promote the use of secondary units by providing a public awareness campaign to property owners, builders, and developers.

1.1.7

The City shall require a 30-year continued affordability condition in projects that receive a density bonus that also utilize government funds. As an additional incentive, projects that do not use any government monies may be eligible for bonuses if the units have at least 20 years of continued affordability. The City will ensure all options comply with State density bonus laws.

1.1.8

The City shall through a staff liaison continue to work with the Santa Barbara County Housing Authority, People’s Self Help Housing Corporation, or other non-profit agencies to secure funds through State and Federal programs for development of new low-income housing, and rehabilitation and/or room additions to relieve overcrowding for existing low-income households. Opportunities for the development of housing at the ELI level shall be a priority, until the City meets its ELI housing allocation in this RHNA cycle. The City will coordinate with the County applications for new funding and will provide letters of support and technical support to nonprofits. The City will also participate in the Housing Trust Fund of Santa Barbara County to leverage the City’s funding. A report will be provided annually to the City Council on progress in the endeavor.

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1.1.9

Redevelopment has been removed from the State of California, but when it is reinstated the City can look at reinstituting this program. - The City’s Redevelopment Agency shall continue to use a portion of its funds to develop low-income housing, including that at the ELI level, and rehabilitate and/or provide room additions for existing low-income households, beginning in the fiscal year. A portion of these funds should be prioritized for room additions for existing low-income households to help alleviate the impact of high overcrowding.

1.1.10 The City shall develop Design Guidelines that illustrate acceptable types of residential development to provide better certainty for the Design Review.

People’s Self Help Housing Corporation, River View Townhomes, a permanently affordable rental community Conservation and Rehabilitation

Objective 2.1 Conservation and rehabilitation of the City’s existing stock of affordable housing. Policy 2.1.1

Redevelopment has been removed from the State of California, but when it is reinstated the City can look at reinstituting this policy. - The City shall fund redevelopment agency rehabilitation loan program to low-income households as redevelopment monies become available.

2.1.2 The City shall continue to coordinate with the Housing Authority to maintain Section 8 rent subsidies.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element

2.1.3 The City shall apply for funds, including CDBG grants for the purpose of rehabilitating low cost, owner occupied and rental housing. 2.1.4 Private financing of the rehabilitation of housing shall be encouraged. 2.1.5

The City shall require the abatement of unsafe structures, while giving property owners ample time to correct deficiencies. Residents displaced by such abatement should be provided relocation assistance.

2.1.6

The demolition of existing multi-family housing shall be allowed when: a) the structure(s) is found to be substandard and unsuitable for rehabilitation; b) tenants are provided reasonable notice and an opportunity to purchase the property; and c) relocation assistance is provided.

Program 2.1.1

If grant application assistance is available from the Santa Barbara County Housing Authority, People’s Self Help Housing Corporation, or other groups, the City shall apply annually for CDBG and HOME rehabilitation funds to enable rehabilitation (including room additions to help relieve overcrowding as allowed by law), for low-income households. The City shall monitor application deadlines for these granting opportunities and ensure that applications are submitted timely and are complete. The City shall determine if grant application assistance is necessary and available by June 1 of each year.

2.1.2

The City shall coordinate its efforts with the Santa Barbara County Housing Authority to continue receiving Section 8 subsidy monies. A City staff liaison will have the responsibility of coordinating these efforts.

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At-Risk Units Objective 3.1 Preservation of all at-risk units in Guadalupe.

Policy 3.1.1 3.1.2

The City shall strive to preserve all at-risk dwelling units in the unincorporated County. At least two years notice shall be required prior to the conversion of any units for low-income households to market rate units in any of the following circumstances:

• • • •

The units constructed with the aid of government funding The units were required by an inclusionary zoning ordinance The project was granted a density bonus The project received other incentives

Such a notice shall be given at least to the following: • The City; • HCD; • Santa Barbara County Housing Authority; and • Residents of at-risk units. Program 3.1.1 Coordinate with the Santa Barbara County Housing Authority to maintain a list of all dwellings within the City that are subsidized by government funding or low-income housing developed through regulations or incentives. The list shall include, at a minimum, the number of units, type of government program, and the date at which the units may convert to market-rate dwellings

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element

3.1.2

The City shall add to existing incentive programs, and include in all new incentive or regulatory programs, requirements, to give notice prior to conversion to market rate units.

Special Needs Objective 4.1 Adequate housing for special needs groups in Guadalupe, including farmworkers, people with disabilities, and large families.

Policy 4.1.1 The City shall encourage the development of housing for farmworkers and large families. 4.1.2 Rehabilitation of rooming houses in the downtown shall be encouraged. 4.1.3 The City will encourage the removal of housing restraints for those with disabilities as outlined in Senate Bill 520 (Chapter 671 California Code). 4.1.4 The City shall provide information to migrant farmworkers about housing opportunities and services for in the area. Program 4.1.1 The City shall seek financing for housing rehabilitation programs to rehabilitate rooming houses located in the downtown. Possible sources include CDBG rehabilitation funds, and other state and federal programs (listed in Chapter III, Resources). The City will review and apply for all possible funding sources as they become available. Responsible Department: Planning Department 48


City of Guadalupe General Plan

4.1.2

The City shall adopt a procedure to make reasonable accommodations (i.e. modifications or exceptions) in its zoning laws and other land use regulations and practices when such accommodations may be necessary to afford persons with disabilities and other special needs an equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling. The amendment to the Zoning Ordinance shall include a revised definition of family that is consistent with State housing law. It shall address all aspects of the Americans with Disabilities Act in regards to home construction, retrofitting restrictions, and parking requirements due to City Zoning Code. The City will also address financial incentives for home developers who address SB 520 issues in new construction and retrofitting existing homes.

4.1.3

The City shall continue to provide information about housing opportunities and services for homeless persons to migrant farmworkers through the Police Department, as well as City Hall; provide information in both English and Spanish and provide other additional language material to other minority languages in the community; and survey the community for the need of other language material.

4.1.4

The City shall cooperate with Santa Barbara County and other agencies in the development of programs aimed at providing farmworker housing. As part of this cooperation, the City shall identify one or more sites that could support a farmworker housing development and consult with the site owner and/or housing partners on the feasibility of developing the site for farmworker housing. The City shall contact farmworker advocacy groups to participate and hold the hearings in both English and Spanish.


Housing Element

Energy Conservation Objective 5.1 Energy efficient housing units that result in a reduction in energy costs to Guadalupe residents. Energy efficiency opportunities Policy 5.1.1 All new dwelling units shall be required to meet current State requirements for energy efficiency, and retrofitting of existing units shall be encouraged. 5.1.2 New land use patterns shall encourage energy efficiency, to the extent possible. Program 5.1.1 The City shall continue to implement Title 24 of the California Code on all new development. 5.1.2

The City shall work with PG&E to encourage existing residents to participate in energy efficiency retrofit programs. The City will consider sponsoring an energy awareness program, in conjunction with PG&E to educate residents about the benefits of various retrofit programs.

5.1.3 The City shall amend the subdivision ordinance to implement the subdivision map act related to subdivision orientation for solar access. 5.1.4 New annexations to the City shall be contiguous to the existing City to maintain compact urban form and energy efficiency.

City of Guadalupe General Plan

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HOUSING ELEMENT

5.1.5

The City shall apply for or support applications for affordable housing funds from agencies that reward and incentivize good planning. Examples include the HCD’s Multifamily Housing Program (MHP) and California Tax Credit Allocation Committee resources which provide competitive advantage for affordable infill housing and affordable housing built close to jobs, transportation, and amenities.

5.1.6

Partner with public utility districts and private energy companies to promote free energy audits for low-income owners and renters, rebate programs for installing energy efficient features/appliances and public education about ideas to conserve energy.

Equal Opportunity Housing Objective 6.1 To assure equal access to sound, affordable housing for all persons regardless of race, creed, age or sex. Policy 6.1.1

The City declares that all persons regardless of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, ancestry, familial status, source of income, or disability to have equal access to sound and affordable housing.

6.1.2 The City will promote the enforcement of the policies of the State Fair Employment and Housing Commission.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element

Program

City of Guadalupe General Plan

6.1.1

The City will continue to provide information from the Housing Authority and Department of Equal Housing and Employment regarding housing and tenant rights at City Hall. And the City will continue to provide information in Spanish as well as review the need for any third language information in Guadalupe.

6.1.2

The City will refer persons experiencing discrimination in housing to California Rural Legal Assistance. The City will cooperate with neighboring jurisdictions and local organizations that sponsor workshops on fair housing laws and how those who are victims of discrimination to address their grievances.

6.1.3

The City shall notify People’s Self Help Housing Corporation, Santa Barbara County Housing Authority, California Rural Legal Assistance and local churches, as well as post notices at significant public locations, prior to any public hearing where the City is considering amending or updating the housing element.

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HOUSING ELEMENT

Quantified Objectives Table 40 provides an estimate of the number of units likely to be constructed by income level during the planning period. The quantified objectives do not represent a ceiling on development, but rather set a target goal for the jurisdiction to achieve based on needs, resources and constraints. The target of 49 units in total meets the 2014-2022 RHNA plan adopted for the City of Guadalupe by SBCAG (refer to Section II for a discussion of the City’s allocation in the RHNA process). TABLE XXX. Quantified Objectives

Mixed Use Development Mixed use development in the City’s Central Business District on parcels zoned General-Commercial would provide additional housing opportunities, including those for lower income.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Housing Element

City of Guadalupe General Plan

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4

open space + recreation


INTRODUCTION

This element focuses on the goals, objectives, policies, and programs that support the vision for open space, parks, and recreation in Guadalupe. Open space is defined by the California Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR) General Plan Guidelines (2003) as “any parcel or area of land or water that is essentially unimproved and devoted to open space use” (p. 82). A city’s general plan must address the following topics related to open space: • Preservation of natural resources • Managed production of resources • Outdoor recreation • Public health and safety • Trail-oriented recreational use • Retention of all publicly owned corridors for future use • City and county trail routes linking segments of the California Recreational Trails System These topics are discussed in the background report in the Open Space, Recreation, and Conservation chapter. The Conservation Element and the Open Space and Recreation Element, together, address each of these topics as they relate to future visions of Guadalupe. Guadalupe enjoys a close proximity to the Pacific Ocean and is situated amongst abundant farmland, adding to the unique natural aesthetic character of the City. Guadalupe is a family-oriented community with the need for recreational opportunities for children and adults of all ages. This element reflects the importance of parks and open space to the quality of life in Guadalupe.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Open Space and Recreation Element

Proposed Features Proposed Multi-useTrail Proposed Bike Route Potential Campground Potential Park

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OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION GOALS 1. A safe, attractive, enjoyable, and diverse park system that supports the health and enjoyment of residents and visitors. 2. Permanent, enhanced open space areas.

GOAL 1 A safe, attractive, enjoyable, and diverse park system that supports the health and enjoyment of residents and visitors. The City of Guadalupe maintains approximately 22 acres of park space, including almost 15 acres at Jack O’Connell Park, and several small parks throughout the City. Amenities include those geared toward active recreation such as sports fields and playgrounds, as well as passive recreation such as native plant gardens and picnic tables. Guadalupe almost meets the desired ratio of park space per resident at one acre per 334 residents. Recreational opportunities also exist outside the City boundaries but in close proximity, including the Guadalupe Dunes, ocean beaches, and hiking and bicycle trails. Though park space is nearly adequate to serve the population, recreational needs remain in Guadalupe. The city will need to consider the needs of the growing population, including ample interest and involvement in sports, to better meet needs in terms of park acreage and type of facilities.

Objective 1.1 Develop a city park system suitable for residents of all ages and interests that provides a variety of recreational activities and experiences. Policies 1.1.1 Encourage variety in the design of parks and recreational facilities to meet the unique needs of the community.

City of Guadalupe General Plan

1.1.2

Development Projects shall incorporate open space and recreation opportunities to serve the needs of residents, and when possible contribute meaningfully to the park and open space system.

1.1.3

Ensure that three acres of useable and developed parkland, including an appropriate range of age- appropriate recreational amenities, continue to be provided for each 1,000 residents.


Open Space and Recreation Element

1.1.4

Ensure that each residential neighborhood has, to the extent feasible, adequate park and recreation resources and that all residences are within walking distance of a park.

Programs 1.1.1

Protect existing parks and develop a diversity of opportunities for recreation in new park areas including linear parks or trails, spaces for active recreation, and leisure activities.

1.1.2 Support expansion of a recreation program with a variety of opportunities for activity to suit differing interests of residents.

Objective 1.2 Foster access to recreational facilities and programs to citizens through financial assistance, outreach, and partnering with other service providers to leverage resources. Policies 1.2.1

Pursue opportunities to coordinate and cooperate with other agencies in maintenance of existing and procurement of new recreational facilities for maximum utilization of resources.

1.2.2 Increase visibility and access from the City to nearby regional parks and open spaces. 1.2.3 Encourage SBCAG to continue the Santa Maria Levee Trail west of Guadalupe to the coast to provide bicycle and pedestrian access to the dunes via a multipurpose Programs 1.2.1

Expand the capacity for the City to seek grants or other forms of assistance to dedicate or raise funds to finance regular maintenance, rehabilitation, and modernization of all park and recreation facilities.

1.2.2 Promote volunteer programs to plan, maintain and improve parks as opportunities arise.

59


1.2.3

Support the development of community gardens, reservable picnic spaces, and outdoor barbecue pits with special attention to utilizing existing underused park space.

1.2.4 Work with the Guadalupe School District to develop, use, and maintain recreational facilities available to the public.

Objective 1.3 Develop a comprehensive system of walking, hiking, and biking trails that are accessible, safe, and connect to homes, residences, parks, and other community destinations. Policies 1.3.1 Raise public awareness of the availability and health benefits of walking and bicycling, the safe use of the streets and sidewalks for active pursuits. 1.3.2 Enhance options for residents to access the Guadalupe Dunes and other county and state recreational facilities through transit, bicycle routes, and walking paths. 1.3.3 Strive to acquire, develop, operate and maintain parks and recreation areas that will serve the expanding needs of a growing Guadalupe. 1.3.4 Implement and install bicycle and pedestrian improvements consistent with the circulation element and the forthcoming Bike and Pedestrian Master plan. Programs 1.3.1

Develop green infrastructure or linear parks along the Santa Maria River, and provide connections to major roadways, neighborhoods, and the California Pacific Coast Bicycle Route.

1.3.2 Improve pedestrian and non-motorized transportation between neighborhoods and parks to promote active recreation and provide connectivity.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Open Space and Recreation Element

GOAL 2 Permanent, enhanced open space areas. Open space in the form of farmland and nature preservation areas is abundant in the areas surrounding Guadalupe, and approximately 52 acres of unimproved open space exist in the City limits. Balancing the desire for growth and the continued need to preserve farmland and habitat is of primary importance for Guadalupe.

Objective 2.1 Protect open space land surrounding Guadalupe from sprawling development Policies 2.1.1 Continue to require that all annexed parcels over 10,000 square feet that have not been prezoned are incorporated as open space (GMC 18.16.040). 2.1.2 Preserve aesthetic and visual amenities. Program 2.1.1 Work with the County of Santa Barbara to discourage parcelization of fringe open space and farmland, and encourage the viability of those areas until they are annexed and needed for community expansion and urban development.

Objective 2.2 Protect air and water resources for human benefit and environmental conservation. Policy 2.2.1 Protect and improve the habitat function of City open spaces through water quality protection and restoration, best management practices, and control of stormwater pollutants. Program 2.2.1 Support community and non-profit group public education efforts concerning the dunes, water quality, and other important functions in existing open spaces. 61


City of Guadalupe General Plan


5 conservation


INTRODUCTION

The Conservation Element deals with agricultural resources, wildlife preservation, air, and water quality. The Element encompasses the goals, objectives, policies and programs that will serve to aid in the preservation of such resources in Guadalupe. Agriculture is the primary industry in the City, and protection of agricultural lands is vital to the economic well-being of Guadalupe. Due to its significance, agricultural resources comprise a large portion of the Conservation Element. Virtually all land parcels adjacent to Guadalupe are agricultural, and many are encumbered by Williamson Act contracts that ensure land will remain agricultural. The County of Santa Barbara has implemented a Right to Farm Municipal Code, in which farmers and their land are protected from conflicts that may interrupt agricultural production or cause financial hardship to landowners. Property owners purchasing lands adjacent to agricultural areas are informed of the inherent risk of nuisance caused by agricultural production such as noise and pesticide spraying. Santa Barbara County has also organized an Agricultural Preserve Program in order to protect agricultural lands in the long term. This program helps to enroll landowners in Williamson Act contracts or Farmland Security Zoning contracts which protect these lands from development. Conservation easements are one tool for protecting wildlife habitat. Similar to Williamson Act contracts for agricultural uses, conservation easements allow cities to create a conservation contract between landowners and the municipality to preserve land for wildlife habitats which are protected from development. Incentives and tax breaks can encourage landowners to enter into such conservation agreements.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Conservation Element

65


CONSERVATION GOAL

GOAL A City where agricultural resources, wildlife habitat, air, and water quality are valued and protected, and will not be compromised by development.

1. A City where agricultural resources, wildlife habitat, air, and water quality are valued and protected, and will not be compromised by development.

Objective 1.1 Protection of prime agricultural resources. Policies 1.1.1 Create further economic incentives for local farmers to continue agricultural practices. 1.1.2 Encourage infill development as a means to limit infringement into prime agricultural lands and soils. Programs 1.1.1 Creation of a local farmer’s market to promote produce grown in Guadalupe. 1.1.2 Provide an easily obtainable document of all rights afforded to farmers under the County Right to Farm law.

Objective 1.2 Protection of critical habitat for local wildlife species. Policies 1.2.1 Dedicate open space and conservation easements in Guadalupe for the preservation of habitat for endangered and threatened wildlife species. 1.2.2 Engage and cooperate with County, State, and Federal agencies for the preservation and protection of wildlife habitats. City of Guadalupe General Plan


Conservation Element

Programs 1.2.1 Guadalupe should partner with the Fish and Wildlife Service and the California Department of Fish and Game to determine critical habitats and species.

Objective 1.3 Air quality that exceeds regulatory standards and does not impede upon daily activities. Policies 1.3.1 Discourage excess agricultural burning practices. Programs 1.3.1 Adopt the County day burn policy, which limits the amount of agricultural burning that is allowed, and is punishable by fine.

Objective 1.4 Local water resources that exceed regulatory standards for water quality. Policies 1.4.1 Allow for no further pollution of the Santa Maria River. Programs 1.4.1 Issue fines to residents and businesses dumping into the Santa Maria River. 1.4.2 Frequent water quality testing to monitor for pollutants.

67


City of Guadalupe General Plan


6 noise


INTRODUCTION

Throughout the rural City of Guadalupe, there is a variety of noise generated everyday from residents, visitors, and workers. Within Guadalupe, there is industry, roadways, the railroad, and residential communities contributing the City’s noise environment. One of the most significant noise sources is the roadways. Guadalupe generates and draws a fair amount of passenger and truck traffic as a result of Highway 1, Highway 166, and the agriculture industry’s use of these truck routes, which impact noise-sensitive land uses such as homes and schools. Another large noise producer for the city is railroad activity. Union Pacific Railroad, Santa Maria Valley Rail, and Amtrak all use the rail line through the city 24 hours of the day moving people and commercial goods. The Noise Element addresses these noise sources by providing the goals and strategies necessary to ensure an appropriately quiet environment for the residents, employees, and visitors in Guadalupe. The regulation of transportation noise sources primarily fall under either state or federal jurisdiction. However, Guadalupe has the opportunity to adjust local land use practices to limit volumes of noise generators and or the location of noise sensitive land uses. As development continues, the Guadalupe should carefully review proposals to ensure that land uses incompatible with the noise environment are avoided. This Element identifies noise issues within the City and provides goals and policies aimed at minimizing noise conflicts and furthering the public health, safety and welfare.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Noise Element

CURRENT STATE LEGISLATION

Listed below are current noise standards and ordinances set by the state. These standards will be upheld in the city and will be applied in projects throughout the Guadalupe. • Section 1092 of Title 25, Chapter 1, Subchapter 1, Article 4, of the California Administrative Code contains noise insulation standards. This code details specific requirements for new multi-family structures located within the 60 CNEL contour adjacent to roads, railroads, rapid transit lines, airports or industrial areas. These multi-family structures include hotels, motels, apartments, condos, and other attached dwellings. The code requires an acoustic analysis showing that these multi-family units have been designed to limit interior noise levels with doors and windows closed to 45 CNEL in any habitable room. • Title 21 of the California Administration Code (Subchapter 6, Article 2, Section 5014) also specifies that multi-family attached units incorporate noise reduction features sufficient to assure that interior noise levels in all habitable rooms do not exceed 45 CNEL. • Section 65302 (f) of the Government Code specifies that it is the responsibility of the local agency preparing the general plan to specify the manner in which the noise element will be integrated into the zoning plan and tied to the Land Use Element, Circulation Element, and the local Noise Ordinance. The Noise Element, once adopted, also becomes the guideline for determining compliance with the State noise insulation standards discussed above. • The Office of Noise Control, established by the California Noise Control Act of 1973, has developed criteria and guidelines for local agencies for use in setting standards for human exposure to noise and preparing noise elements. The noise standards developed by the Office of Noise Control and intended as guidelines for municipal noise elements are summarized in the background report.

71


UNDERSTANDING NOISE

The basic characteristics of sound are its loudness (amplitude) and frequency (pitch). Frequency of sound is significant because the human ear is not equally sensitive to all frequencies. At low frequencies, depicted as a rumble, the ear is not very sensitive. At higher frequencies, depicted as a screech, the ear is most sensitive. This varying sensitivity is typically reflected in an A-weighted decibel scale (dBA), which is used to measure the perceived loudness of a sound. Noise refers to sound pressure variations audible to the ear. This audibility depends on the sound’s amplitude and frequency and the individual’s capability to hear the sound. Other than amplitude and frequency, a listener’s judgment of noise is largely dependent on the current activity and attitude regarding the sound source. The average listener perceives an increase in 10 dBA as a doubling of sound. Examples of decibel levels of various noise sources are shown in Figure N -1. FIGURE N-1: Noise Levels 120

Jet

(500ft)

110

Sirens

100

Horns

Diesel Truck (Not Muffled)

90

Shop Tools

80

Blender

70

Dishwasher

60

Shout Loud Voice Normal Voice

(Muffled)

Automobile (70 mph)

Automobile (40 mph)

Automobile

Air Conditioner

50

Locomotive

Diesel Truck

(20 mph)

Rail Cars (50 mph)

Locomotive Idling

Urban

(Daytime)

Suburban (Daytime)

Rural

Refrigerator

(Daytime)

40 30 20 10 0

Noise Level (dBA)

Extremes

Home Appliances

Speech at 3 ft

Motor Vehicles at 50 ft

General Railroad Operations Community at 100 ft Environment

Data derived from U.S. Department of Transportation, 2011.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Noise Element

NOISE SOURCES

ROADWAY The roadway system in Guadalupe currently accommodates a substantial amount of trucks entering the city limits to export goods. The heaviest traffic is during peak hours 7-9 AM and 5-7 PM for automobiles on Highway 1 and Highway 166. The most truck traffic is between 1-7 PM as a result of the produce packing facilities found between Highway 1 and Obispo Street. These trucks are required by the state to travel along Highway 1 and Highway 166 because they are designated as truck routes. This allows truck traffic to pass through Guadalupe with minimal impact on the sensitive land-uses such as residential neighborhoods. SInce the main roadways go right through the downtown core, there is an increase congestion, pedestrian conflicts, and noise pollution. TRAIN The Union Pacific Railroad and Santa Maria Valley Railroad own and operate freight rail services in Guadalupe. The rail system facilitates movement of agricultural and industrial products through the city reducing congestion on the streets. However, the rail line is at-grade in the city, which creates an increase in noise pollution for residents. Freight trains make both day and night trips through Guadalupe, seven days a week. The rate of speed through the City is 25 miles per hour, while the trip duration is between 5 and 10 minutes, resulting in intermittent noise disturbance to, residents. INDUSTRIAL Industrial plant operations adjacent to the Union Pacific Railroad are another noise source for the City. Residents north of Eleventh Street are directly affected by the noise due to their location. There are packing sheds located between Highway 1 and Obispo Street which operate 24 hours of the day during peak production seasons. These facilities add to the noise environment; however, these facilities do not create a major noise disturbance for the population.

73


NOISE SENSITIVE AREAS IN GUADALUPE, CA

ELE ST

ST

D

SANC HEZ DR

LN

HERNANDEZ DR

ALLEY

Santa Barbara County Boundary Railroad

Zoning

GU

SECOND ST

BIRCH ST

SIMAS ST

FIR ST

ELM ST

THIRD ST

SECOND ST

STATE HWY 1

Guadalupe Boundary

HOLLY ST

CEDAR ST

ALMAGUER ST

W MAIN ST

OBISPO ST

ALLEY

FOURTH ST

FLOWER AV

CHAPMAN DR

IBIS C I

SA N

TA B A

BIR

PAGALING DR

ST

ALLEY

RUBIO RF

N LN

ST

TOG NAZ ZINI AV

PIONEER ST

R DY D LIN SU

RB AR

A ST

BLUE HE RO

THIRD

FIFTH ST

TH

LA

EIGHTH ST

SIXTH ST

VE N

LN

TH

TH

PER

IVE RA OL NIN

TE N

RT E

PIO

NE

ER

ST

ST

PA CH

EC

AL TA S

O

T

ST

/

AMBER ST STATE HWY 166

R-1 R-1-SP R/N-SP-CZ R-1-M

Creeks

R-2

Schools Parks

S SIM AS ST

Open Space Churches Offices Other Parcels

0

0.25

0.5 Miles

City of Guadalupe General Plan

Source: Santa Barbara County GIS Data Created by: CRP 552 Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo 2013 - 2014


Noise Element

NOISE GOAL

GOAL A city where the quality of life is not compromised by the presence of noise.

Objective 1.1 1. A city where the quality of life is not compromised by the presence of noise.

Achieve noise impact compatibility between city land uses through the land use planning/development review process. Policies 1.1.1 The City shall adopt a noise ordinance to guide current and future land use decisions. Including the following as maximum CNEL noise volumes. • Residential – Low Density (60 dB) • Residential – Multi-Family (65 dB) • Transient Lodging (65 dB) • Schools, Libraries, Churches, Hospitals (65 dB) • Auditoriums (60 dB) • Playgrounds, parks (65 dB) • Commercial Industrial (70 dB) 1.1.2 The City will consider the compatibility of proposed land uses with the noise environment when preparing, revising or reviewing development proposals. 1.1.3 The City shall require inclusion of noise reducing design features in development projects to address the impact of noise on residential development. Programs 1.1.1

The City shall establish a city noise ordinance, which includes a noise Impact study for the city. The results of the study should contribute in the development of specific noise standards the future use in reviewing noise sensitive development.

1.1.2

The city shall work with Caltrans, Union Pacific Railway, and other organizations to landscape or install mitigation elements along noise producing entities (Highway 1, Highway 166, rail line, etc.), which are adjacent to existing residential. 75


Objective 1.2 Reduce noise from transportation-related, train-related, and industrial-related noise sources. Policy 1.2.1 The City shall enforce, as applicable, state and federal regulations intended to abate or eliminate disturbances of the peace and other intrusive noise. 1.2.2

The City shall require mitigation where sensitive uses are to be placed along transportation routes and if located in the proximity of industrial or commercial zoned areas.

1.2.3

The City will consider the effects of truck routes, truck traffic, posted speed limits and future motor vehicle volumes on noise levels adjacent to transportation routes when.

Program

City of Guadalupe General Plan

1.2.1

The City should employ noise mitigation practices, as necessary, when designing future land uses and roadways when additions occur. Mitigation measures should emphasize the establishment of natural buffers or setbacks between the arterial roadways and adjoining noise-sensitive areas.

1.2.2

The City should encourage the development of alternative transportation modes such as bicycle paths and pedestrian walkways to minimize the number of automobile trips and noise.


Noise Element

77


7 safety

78


INTRODUCTION

The purpose of the Safety Element is to protect the general health and welfare of the community-at-large. The Safety Element accomplishes this by providing goals and policies to reduce the risk of death, injuries, property damage, and economic and social dislocation. The City of Guadalupe faces certain safety related issues based upon its geographical location and interaction with natural environmental forces, as well as certain risks posed by interactions with human and mechanized processes. The element is designed to identify ways in which to remedy identified safety risks in the background report (see Appendix XX). Under California state law, cities and counties are to adopt, at a minimum, policies concerning fire, flooding, and geologic hazards and could optionally expand the element to incorporate additional safety or hazard concerns. The Safety Element is the first step in addressing issues which could affect the City of Guadalupe through providing policy direction to prevent and recover from disaster. In order to reduce duplication throughout the General Plan, disaster responders such as Police and Firefighters are primarily incorporated into the Public Facilities chapter. The primary function of the Safety Element is to guide land development in a way that avoids the greatest amount of potential harm to structures and to people. However, the City of Guadalupe faces certain transportation-related hazards due to the high truck traffic along Highway 1 and the bisection of the town by a rail line. While it is essential to recognize and prepare as well as possible for predictable scenarios, not all hazards are possible to identify in advance. For this reason the Safety Element provides a broad overview of hazards within and immediately surrounding the City of Guadalupe. The information presented in the Background Report and the General Plan is not meant to supplement information for site-specific evaluations by qualified professionals.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Safety Element

SAFETY CONCERNS

NATURAL HAZARDS

Natural Hazards pose a significant threat to life and property and can occur at any time. Therefore, it is important for Guadalupe to be prepared, utilizing risk prevention and hazard mitigation policies in the event of a natural hazard. The natural hazards that have the highest potential risk in Guadalupe include: • fire; • flooding; and • seismic activity. Other natural hazards not specifically mentioned here have been researched and addressed, yet were not found to be a likely threat to Guadalupe, and can be found in the City’s Background Report. Fire Wildland fires and structural fires are both a risk to life and property within Guadalupe. Wildland fires and structural fires both are a risk to life and property within Guadalupe. A wildland fire is defined as “a fire occurring in a suburban or rural area which contains uncultivated lands, timber, range, watershed, brush, or grasslands. This includes areas where there is a mingling of developed and undeveloped lands. Wildland fires can start for a number of reasons, and the spread and severity can vary wildly depending upon topography, fuel, weather, and other conditions. As shown in Figure XXX, there is a “Very High Fire Severity” area located just north of the City boundaries. Although Guadalupe is considered a community at risk for wildfires, the Guadalupe Planning Team does not consider its critical facilities to be at risk of wildfire. Structural fires, or urban fires, typically occur in buildings located within the city limits and within buildings in residential, commercial, industrial, or public facility land uses. Some concerns regarding wildland and structural fires are preparedness, prevention, education, fire codes, and system adequacy. The Public Facilities element addresses level of staffing, response times for police and fire, as well as maintaining equipment in accordance with state, therefore refer to the Public Facilities section. 80


FIRE HAZARD SEVERITY ZONES IN GUADALUPE, CA

ELE ST

ST

SANC HEZ DR

LN

HERNANDEZ DR

Fire Hazard Severity Zones

GU HOLLY ST

THIRD ST

SECOND ST

BIRCH ST

SIMAS ST

FIR ST ELM ST

CEDAR ST

SECOND ST

STATE HWY 1

ALMAGUER ST

W MAIN ST

OBISPO ST

ALLEY

FOURTH ST

FLOWER AV

D

ALLEY

PIONEER ST

CHAPMAN DR

IBIS C I

SA N

AMBER ST STATE HWY 166

Major Roads

Very High

STATE HWY 1 STATE HWY 166

Parcels Santa Barbara County Boundary

W MAIN ST Creeks

Guadalupe Boundary

S SIM AS ST

TA B A

BIR

PAGALING DR

ST

ALLEY

RUBIO RF

N LN

ST

TOG NAZ ZINI AV

R DY D LIN SU

RB AR

A ST

BLUE HE RO

THIRD

FIFTH ST

TH

LA

EIGHTH ST

SIXTH ST

VE N

LN

TH

TH

PER

RA IV E OL NIN

TE N

RT E

PIO

NE

ER

ST

ST

PA CH

EC

AL TA S

O

T

ST

/

Railroad

0

0.25

0.5 Miles

City of Guadalupe General Plan

Source: Santa Barbara County GIS Data Created by: CRP 552 Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo 2013 - 2014


Safety Element

Flooding Floods can be extremely hazardous in terms of lives lost and property damage. Due to Guadalupe’s close proximity to the Santa Maria River, flood events are a concern for the area and local residents. Within Guadalupe, flood events typically occur close to the Santa Maria River, which is one of the largest coastal drainage basins in California (draining approximately 1,880 square miles, or 1.2 million acres). A small area of the City is located within the 100-year floodplain, (figure XX)making flooding during high intensity rainfall events a concern for the City. Flooding along the Santa Maria River is mitigated through Flood control projects including channel improvements and water storage measures. The amount of the peak floodwater in the Santa Maria River is first reduced by the storage of floodwaters in Twitchell Reservoir. Secondly, levees have been constructed along the river to contain floodwaters. Although the levee system contains floodwater in the Santa Maria River, the levee system ends at Highway-1 in Guadalupe, leaving less flood protection for the City when compared to upstream locations.

Figure xxx. Areas subject 100-year flood inundation (GIS data from SBC, and FEMA 2005) * maps were developed by CRP 553 based on the best information currently available. floodplain maps are subject to change and may be updated

Potential flood events caused by the failure of Twitchell Dam would result in catastrophic downstream flooding damage to Guadalupe and surrounding areas, but is viewed to be an unlikely event. Furthermore, flood inundation from tsunami events poses a significant threat to much of the central coast and Santa Barbara County’s coastal areas. However because of the City of Guadalupe’s location within the county, it is not considered to be at risk of tsunami inundation. 82


Seismic Seismic activities present a significant safety risk throughout California. These activities are caused by the changing of geological conditions in terms of groundshaking, the composition of soils, fault rupture, and the effect of longerterm movements in the Earth’s crust and mantle. The frequency and strength of earthquakes generally depend on the location of the nearest faults and the historical activity of the faults. Risk factors related to seismic activities within the City of Guadalupe as compared to the more earthquake prone areas of the southern part of Santa Barbara are much smaller. Seismic activities specifically evaluated in Appendix XX. City of Guadalupe General Plan Background report include the following: ground rupture from fault movement, tsunamis and seiches, liquefaction, groundshaking, high groundwater, subsidence, slope stability and landslides, soil creep, expansive soils, and compressible/collapsible soils. It is important to take these conditions into account when examining the stability and resilience of structures throughout Guadalupe in order to ensure that buildings can adequately protect citizens. The City of Guadalupe is not on the list of cities affected by surface rupture and is not considered to have a high hazard risk of surface fault ruptures within in its boundaries. However, Guadalupe could still feel ground shaking from active faults within the surrounding region, but along with the rest of the greater Santa Maria area, is deemed to still have a potential for a small amount of groundshaking. Therefore, it is also important for the City of Guadalupe to examine the effect of groundshaking on unreinforced masonry buildings and ensure that potentially dangerous buildings are retrofitted in compliance with the California Unreinforced Masonry Law for areas in Seismic Zone 4. Liquefaction, the process in which water is forced into layers of sediment and causes soil instability, is generally not prevalent throughout Santa Barbara County but Guadalupe is deemed to have a moderate risk due to alluvium in the soil. While there is potential for groundwater to infiltrate the top layers of the soil in the event of an earthquake, there have been few instances to indicate liquefaction as a major concern. The faults that run nearest to Guadalupe and affect the severity of the seismic-related activities within Guadalupe are depicted in figure xx: City of Guadalupe General Plan


Safety Element Guadalupe Fault Lines

1:1,155,581

November 25, 2013 Displacement in the last 200 years Displacement in the last 11,700 years

0

12.5

25

50 ft

0

20

40

80 m

Displacement in the last 700,000 years Dispalcement undifferentiated Within Zone

Copyright:Š 2013 Esri, DeLorme, NAVTEQ, TomTom USG S Earthquak e Hazards Program (http://earthquake.usgs.gov /) and California Department of Conservation (http://www.c onserv ation.ca.gov/c gs/rghm/ap/Pages/Index.as px) Source: Es ri, DigitalG lobe, GeoEye, i-c ubed, USDA, USGS, AEX,

84


ANTHROPOGENIC HAZARDS

Anthropogenic or human-made hazards result from threats that have an element of human intent, negligence, or error; or involving a failure of a human-made system. Hazards in this category have the potential for both loss of life, and property damage. Guadalupe is at risk of anthropogenic hazards in areas that include: • activities relating to the release and storage of Hazardous materials, and chemical spills; and • nuclear exposure concerns. Hazardous Materials Hazardous materials are defined as substances or materials that are capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health, safety, and property. The City of Guadalupe has several industries that use and transport hazardous materials including the agricultural, and freight industries. Agriculture processing uses large quantities of ammonia to operate refrigeration systems, and significant quantities of fertilizers and pesticides stored in the community and dispensed in agricultural areas. Intentional or unintentional release of hazardous materials into the community poses risks directly to community members and indirect risks such as groundwater contamination. The second primary threat to the community comes from transportation of hazardous materials. Both trucking and the railroad industry move goods including hazardous materials through the City, namely using Highway 1, Highway 166, and the rail lines that bisect the City. Because of the close proximity to area homes, businesses and storm drains, a transportation related releases could affect large areas and also block local thoroughfares limiting evacuation routes.

City of Guadalupe General Plan

Nuclear Located roughly 25 miles northeast of Guadalupe is the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. Although potential for a nuclear disaster is limited, local, state, and federal agencies, and the electric utilities have emergency response plans in the event of a nuclear power plant incident. The plans define two emergency planning zones. One zone covers an area within a 10-mile radius of the plant, where it is possible that people could be harmed by direct initial radiation exposure. The second zone covers a broader area, usually up to a 50mile radius from the plant, where radioactive materials would migrate and could contaminate water supplies, food crops, and livestock.


Safety Element

SAFTEY GOALS 1. A resilient and educated community that is prepared for flooding, fire, earthquakes, and other natural disasters. 2. Reduce risk to the community from anthropogenic hazards.

GOAL 1 A resilient and educated community that is prepared for flooding, fire, earthquakes, and other natural disasters.

NATURAL HAZARDS Fire

Objective 1.1 Reduce the risk of death, injuries, property damage, and economic and social dislocation resulting from fire-related hazards Policies 1.1.1 Maintain a firefighting capacity on both sides of the railroad track. Ensure that a truck is accessible. 1.1.2 The city shall require property owners to have defensible space on their property, as mandated by the fire department. 1.1.3 Fire department shall maintain Fire and Building Code enforcement. 1.1.4 New development shall be constructed in accordance to fire safety standards per the California Fire and Building Codes and regulations. Programs 1.1.1 The Fire Department shall maintain fire and safety inspection program for public, commercial, and industrial buildings. 1.1.2 The Fire Department shall develop a community education program to address fire awareness and prevention. 1.1.3 Have an adequate fire fighting system capacity, such as water supply and access routes 86


Flooding

Objective 1.2 Reduce the risk of death, injuries, property damage, and economic and social dislocation resulting from water-related hazards. Policies 1.2.1

Maintain the operational integrity of critical facilities during flooding events, and ensure that new essential public facilities are located outside of the 100-year floodplain whenever feasible.

1.2.2 New residential development shall not be located within the 100-year floodplain. 1.2.3 Require all new urban development projects to include runoff reduction measures to minimize peak overland flows. 1.2.4 Fire and law enforcement agencies shall maintain and improve their ability to respond to water hazard emergencies throughout the City. 1.2.5 The City shall monitor flood levels during high intensity storm events. Programs 1.2.1 Establish and maintain cooperative working relation ships among public agencies with responsibility for flood protection to ensure flood related projects meet City needs. 1.2.2 Continue to participate in the National Flood Insurance Rate Program. 1.2.3 Seek funding to implement capital improvement projects for low-lying, or flood prone areas.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Safety Element

Seismic

Objective 1.2 Reduce the risk of death, injuries, property damage, and economic and social dislocation resulting from earthquake and seismic activity. Policies 1.3.1

Ensure that buildings are designed to withstand groundshaking, liquefaction, and seismic settling by continuing to require development projects be reviewed to ensure each project meets all necessary requirements of the California Building Code.

1.3.2

Ensure that all new critical facilities are in compliance with all state seismic and building standards including: police and fire stations, school facilities, hospitals, hazardous materials manufacture and storage facilities, bridges, large public assembly facilities, and any other structures subject to special seismic regulations.

1.3.3

Continue to enforce the Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Act which prohibits the development of buildings used for human occupancy on active surface faults.

Programs 1.3.1 Minimize risk from unreinforced masonry buildings through continuing and monitoring the retrofit program. 1.3.2Maintain consistency with, and enforce policies from the following: Santa Barbara Seismic and Safety Element, the Santa Barbara County Code Chapter 14 - Grading, Erosion and Sediment Control, Seismic Hazards Mapping Act, Surface Mining and Reclamation Act, and the Santa Barbara County Multi- Hazard Mitigation Plan. 1.3.3 Disseminate information to the public in order to increase awareness of potential hazards regarding seismic activity likely to occur within Guadalupe. 88


GOAL 2 ANTHROPOGENIC HAZARDS Hazardous Materials

Objective 2.1 Prevent or reduce the release of hazardous materials into the community. Policy 2.1.1 Limit and reduce where possible the storage and transportation of hazardous materials near residential zones Program 2.2.1

Coordinate with CalTrans and the California Highway Patrol to require use of approved routes and notification of all transport of hazardous materials utilizing routes through Guadalupe.

2.2.2

Maintain an accurate inventory of environmentally contaminated sites to inform the public about contamination from previous uses. To the extent feasible, work directly with landowners in the cleanup of these sites, particularly in areas with the potential for regeneration of sites/buildings.

2.2.3 Maintain a database of currently stored hazardous materials stored within the City.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Safety Element

Nuclear Saftey

Objective 2.2 Educate the public on nuclear safety and evacuation procedures. Program 2.2.1

Provide educational materials and trainings to ensure residents are prepared for natural disasters, know proper evacuation routes, and are aware of the potential for nuclear disasters from the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant.

2.2.2 Seek funding to improver evacuation routs and notification standards.

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City of Guadalupe General Plan


8

economic development


INTRODUCTION

A city’s economy plays a critical role in its physical development and in the stability of its local tax base (Office of Planning Research, 2003, p. 109). While an Economic Development Element is optional in the General Plan, it is essential to provide direction for a city’s economic structure. This Economic Development Element addresses critical issues that pertain to Guadalupe’s economic base and sets the overall goals, objectives, policies and programs related to the growth and character of the City. Based on the strengths and potential of the current local economy, the Economic Development Element provides direction for the City’s economic development initiatives through the year 2035. The goal of this Element is to maintain and enhance the economic character of Guadalupe’s community, as well as provide a framework for a stable annual budget. The goals, objectives, policies and programs in this chapter incorporate economic development strategies for job growth, business development and retention, and tourism. The City of Guadalupe should ensure that the economic development strategies outlined in this Element are reviewed regularly to be flexible and to respond to changes in the market.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Economic Development Element

BACKGROUND

EMPLOYMENT As stated in the Background Report, the unemployment rate in Guadalupe has been steadily increasing, from 5.6 percent in 2000 to 13.6 percent in 2012. In addition, Guadalupe has a lower level of educational attainment than both County and State averages, with only 11 percent of the City’s population over the age of 25 holding an Associate’s degree or higher. These findings indicate that future economic development strategies should anticipate an unskilled labor force. In order to meet the requirments of the current job market programs aimed at raising professional skills and encouraging a higher level of educational attainment are needed.

FIGURE E-1: JOB TRAINING PROGRAMS

Currently, of the 3,100 employed citizens of Guadalupe, only 2.9 percent hold jobs that are located within the City. Policies and programs aimed at acquiring an educated and skilled workforce, as well as increasing the number of local job opportunities, will help stabilize and sustain Guadalupe’s economy while providing a better quality of life for its residents.

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COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT Commercial and retail outlets located in the City would allow residents to purchase their food, clothing, and other necessities within City limits. When residents shop locally, the City generates sales tax revenue on items purchased, instead of allowing that revenue to be collected by neighboring municipalities. This revenue is imperative because it allows the City to accumulate enough capital to operate, pay expenses, and move forward with the projects, initiatives, and programs outlined in every chapter of this Plan. FIGURE E-2: COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT

This box is to show the space between each section, ie from objective to policy and from policy to program etc.

The results of a simple retail leakage analysis shown above demonstrate that across most business types, per capita sales for the City of Guadalupe are much lower than the average statewide per capita sales, which indicates that the City is losing most of its sales sales tax revenue. Determining which areas are experiencing the greatest leakage helps guide the City in knowing which commercial categories would be successful within City limits.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Economic Development Element

TOURISM Tourism can drive significant business growth and can increase revenue for municipalities and local businesses. Tourists bring outside money into an economy and often have a higher propensity to spend than City residents. Tourism is a major industry in California and in Santa Barbara County, especially allong Highway I. According to visitors’ centers along Highway 1, thousands of tourists pass through annually. FIGURE E-3: GUADALUPE-NIPOMO DUNES

Tourism was identified in the Background Report as a major potential revenue generator for Guadalupe, as its location along Highway 1 gives the City great potential to capture touristic activity and interest. The Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes are a noteworthy attraction as the second largest remaining dune system in California. In order to capture a portion of the tourism market, development of infrastructure such as campgrounds, hotels and/or hostels is required. Other amenities such as restaurants, lounges, rest stops, cafes, and coffee shops could serve both local community members and tourists. These amenities would attract tourists and generate revenue for the City.

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GOAL

1. A healthy and sustainable economy that is supportive of new and existing businesses, offers a variety of employment opportunities, and caters to a tourists.

GOAL

A healthy and sustainable economy that is supportive of new and existing businesses, offers a variety of employment opportunities, and caters to tourists.

Objective 1.1 Increase the number of local jobs by 20 percent by 2030. Guadalupe will establish policies and programs which will help it acquire an educated and skilled workforce in line with the needs of local and regional economies, and promote a diverse and balanced mix of employment opportunities. Policies 1.1.1

The City shall maintain positive relations with businesses already located in Guadalupe, as well as take action to attract new businesses in order to increase employment opportunities for residents.

1.1.2 The City shall adopt a home occupation ordinance in order to promote continued and new home business operations. 1.1.3 The City shall promote the education of its residents in both general and skilled-labor areas. 1.1.4 The City shall maintain commercial and industrial land supply to improve the current jobs-to-housing ratio. Programs 1.1.1

City of Guadalupe General Plan

Work with the Guadalupe Unified School District and Santa Barbara County Education Office to explore and actively encourage career and educational opportunities for local job growth.


Economic Development Element

1.1.2

Coordinate with the Santa Barbara County Office of Employment Training, educational institutions, and local trade unions to establish apprenticeship and other job training programs targeted at desired industry types for workers in Guadalupe.

1.1.3 Establish a program that educates residents about continuing education opportunities in surrounding communities. 1.1.4 Coordinate bus schedules with nearby colleges to enable students to use public transit while receiving a higher education. 1.1.5

Encourage the use of alternative workplaces by establishing a land use boundary within the Central Business District for a home occupation program, and make land use designations and zoning ordinances compatible with qualified home-based businesses and telecommuting.

1.1.6 Offer training and education to residents in proprietary business operations and to encourage new businesses.

Objective 1.2 Increase commercial development in Guadalupe by at least 25 percent by 2030. Guadalupe will promote and support business retention and expansion, while ensuring a commercial business mix in the community that provides feasible shopping opportunities for local residents.

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Policies 1.2.1

The City shall provide incentives (including tax credits, parking requirement exemptions, density bonuses, impact fees, and expedited permitting) for the establishment of businesses that offer basic services for local residents.

1.2.2 The City shall investigate and actively pursue grant funding for programs and projects that help to increase the amount of commercial activity in Guadalupe. 1.2.3 The City shall encourage infill development in the promotion of downtown revitalization. 1.2.4 The City shall explore feasibility of annexations to expand Guadalupe’s commercial development options. 1.2.5 The City shall encourage residential mixed-use development with bottom floor commercial to provide a local customer base in the CBD. Programs 1.2.1 Offer a tax-filing assistance program for local businesses in order to streamline the process for business owners. 1.2.2

Work with Santa Barbara County economic development entities including (but not limited to) the Santa Maria Economic Development Commission, the Economic Alliance of Northern Santa Barbara County, and the Santa Barbara County Small Development Center to improve the economic sustainability of the City by coordinating with a larger, stronger and more extensive network.

1.2.3 Establish a Business District Association or Chamber of Commerce that will promote and protect the interests of the existing and new local business community.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Economic Development Element

1.2.4

Maintain an efficient, timely, predictable and customer- focused permitting process, conducted in a manner that integrates multiple City departments into a coordinated entity.

Objective 1.3 Increase Guadalupe’s visitor serving potential. Guadalupe will provide tourism infrastructure and amenities that represent the vibrant local cultural identity, and build upon the City’s existing strengths and unique attributes. Policies 1.3.1 The City shall offer incentives for, and remove barriers to, the development of hospitality related businesses seeking to locate in Guadalupe. 1.3.2 The City shall actively pursue the development of hospitality services to gain Transit Occupancy Tax income. 1.3.3 The City shall cultivate ecotouristic opportunities that take advantage of Guadalupe’s year-round temperate climate, scenic views and proximity to the dunes, Oso Programs 1.3.1

Allocate a portion of current open space to be transformed into a campground for travelers and visitors, and develop a program for maintaining campground infrastructure.

1.3.2 Pursue the development of a Conference & Visitor’s Bureau Center, potentially located near the existing Dunes Center. 1.3.3

Expand the Dunes Center’s involvement with local and regional touristic events, and expand tourism marketing and advertising at county- and state-wide tourism offices. 100


City of Guadalupe General Plan


9 public facilities


INTRODUCTION

The Public Facilities Element is an optional element of the General Plan concerned with the necessary public services and infrastructure required in order to meet the needs of current population and provide for continued development and expansion of the City of Guadalupe. The Public Facilities Element establishes goals, policies and programs to ensure that the provision of public services keeps pace with new development, and that present infrastructure and service inadequacies are remedied. The element deals primarily with the police and fire protection; demand and delivery of water, wastewater, and solid waste; and schools within the City of Guadalupe. Well designed and maintained infrastructure systems are critical to the city’s growth, economic development, and overall general well being. As such, many communities choose to centralize all components into one element rather than disperse them throughout the entirety of the plan. PUBLIC FACILITY Cemetary City Hall Cultural Arts and Education Center Fire Department Historical Museum, Auditorium, Post Office Kermit McKenzie Junior High School Mary Buren Elementary School Police Department Senior Center Sewer Lift Station Sewer Lift Station Wastewater treatment plant Water tank and equipment Water tank and equipment Water tank and equipment Water tower

City of Guadalupe General Plan

ADDRESS 145 Guadalupe Street 918 Obispo Street 1065 Guadalupe Street 918 Obispo Street 1025 Guadalupe Street 4710 West Main Street 1050 Peralta Street 4490 10th Street 4545 10th Street 4200 Laguardia Lane 800 Pioneer Street 5125 West Main Street 300 Obispo Street 4550 10th Street 500 Block of Pioneer Street Pachecho Street


Public Facilities Element

POLICE & FIRE

Guadalupe’s police force has approximately 1.55 full-time officers per 1,000 residents. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics (2013), the national average is 2.3 per 1,000 residents. The department utilizes seven patrol vehicles with one dedicated for the chief, one undercover vehicle, one truck, and one humvee. Guadalupe’s firefighting force has approximately 1.3 volunteer firefighters per 1,000 residents. This is significantly lower than the national average of 3.6 per 1,000 residents in communities between 5,000 to 9,999 in population, according to a 2013 National Fire Protection Agency annual survey of US fire departments. The department currently has an inventory of two fire trucks, one rescue unit and one command unit .

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WATER

WASTEWATER

City of Guadalupe General Plan

The City derives its water supplies from two sources: local groundwater originating in the Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, and the State Water Project. Guadalupe’s allotment is 1,300 acre feet per year ( AFY) from groundwater and 550 AFY from State water. In 2012, the City produced a total of 924 AF of water; 521 AF from groundwater, and 403 AF from the State Water Project. The Public Works Department reported that the City sold 912 AF to customers in 2012, leaving a surplus of 12 AF.

Guadalupe operates a wastewater treatment plant located west of the developed portion of the city and north of Highway 166.The plant was upgraded in 2012 to meet the revised discharge standards of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board. The design upgrades brought the plant capacity to 960,000 gallons per day. The Public Works Department reported that the wastewater treatment plant currently collects and treats an average of 650,000 gallons of wastewater per day. This is well below the capacity of 960,000 gallons per day, leaving the plant with an unused capacity of 31,000 gallons per day.


Public Facilities Element

SOLID WASTE

Municipal solid waste is collected for the City of Guadalupe by the private collection service, Health Sanitation Services/ Waste Management. Solid waste is transported outside the City to the Santa Maria Transfer Station in Nipomo, California. From the Santa Maria Transfer Station, the collected solid waste is transferred to Chicago Grade Landfill in Templeton, California. The Chicago Grade Landfill also receives solid waste materials from Atascadero, Templeton, Santa Margarita, the unincorporated area of San Luis Obispo County as well as from the unincorporated area of Santa Barbara County and occasionally Monterey County.

SCHOOLS

The City of Guadalupe has an elementary school for grades kindergarten to five and junior high school for grades six to eight. High school-aged students from Guadalupe attend Righetti High School or Santa Maria High School in Santa Maria, which is operated by the Santa Maria Joint Union High School District.

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PUBLIC FACILITIES GOAL

POLICE & FIRE PROTECTION Objective 1.1 Meet the recommended levels of staffing in police and fire departments, as outlined by the appropriate governing agencies.

1. Adequate infrastructure and services related to police & fire protection, water, sewer, solid waste, and schools at a sufficient level for the demand of the current and future population.

Policy 1.1.1 Set a goal of maintaing two police and fire employees per 1,000 residents, in line with relevant recommendations.

Objective 1.2 Achieve recommended response times in police and fire departments.

Policies 1.2.1

Set a goal for all response times to be three minutes for Priority 1 police emergencies and fives minutes for Priority 1 fire emergencies, in line with relevant recommendations.

1.2.2 Locate police and fire stations in stratgic locations to ensure optimal response times

Objective 1.3 Maintain equipment in accordance with the appropriate state mandates.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Public Facilities Element

Objective 1.4 The City will ensure that all services are prepared for action on both sides of the railroad tracks.

Policies 1.4.1 1.4.2

California Fire Code requirements shall be adhered to for all new development. Strategically locate future stations to be able to adequately serve both sides of the railroad tracks.

WATER Objective 1.5 Provide an adequate system of supply and distribution of quality water to support the General Plan level of development and achieve resiliency in dealing with drought scenarios.

Policy

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1.1.5 New development of public facilities and services shall include water conservation features and drought resistant landscaping. Program 1.1.1 Adopt the 2013 Santa Barbara County Integrated Regional Water Management Plan upon its completion

WASTEWATER Objective 1.1 Develop a wastewater collection system and treatment plant master plan that will meet both existing and planned needs. Policy 1.1.1 The City will come up with an analysis of the waste water collection, wastewater treatment, and effluent disposal system at full build out of the City.

Objective 1.2 The City will maintain an adequate plant capacity to support the General Plan level of development and to meet discharge standards of the California Regional Water Quality Control Board Policy 1.1.1 All sewer collection improvements shall comply with the Public Works Construction Standards

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Public Facilities Element

Program 1.1.1 Adopt the wastewater collection system and treatment plant master plan upon its completion.

SOLID WASTE Objective 1.1 Reduce waste to landfills in line with state diversion mandates.

Policy 1.1.1 Implement an education and outreach initiative relate to recycling. 1.1.2 Maintain and update information related to recycling on the City’s offical website. 1.1.3 Institute mandatory commercial recycling plan per California Assembly Bill 341 (AB 341) requirements in order to reduce GHG emissions.

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PUBLIC FACILITIES GOAL

SCHOOLS Objective 1.1

1. 2. 3. 4.

Goal one type here Goal two type here Goal three type here Goal four type here

The City will assist, coordinate, and cooperate with the Guadalupe Union School District (GUSD) to provide adequate schooling for the current and future needs at all levels of education (K-8). Policy 1.1.1 Notify GUSD of newly proposed developments as soon in the review possible as the project has a complete description acceptable to the City to allow enough time for the assessment of of impacts on needs of the school facilities 1.1.2 Inform GUSD of any future growth demands in a coordinated manner in concurrence with the implementation of the General Plan and growth of the community

Objective 1.2 The City will encourage GUSD to develop and maintain a School’s Facilities Master Plan

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Public Facilities Element

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10

historic preservation + design

113


INTRODUCTION

City of Guadalupe General Plan

Historic Preservation and Community Design policies influence how the City of Guadalupe physically appears to enhance aesthetic appeal and quality of life. Robust historic preservation can protect and enhance the City of Guadalupe’s historic resources including buildings, structures, sites, districts, objects and archeological sites. In the same way, community design can increase privacy or visibility, raise property values, encourage people to interact in commercial areas and public places, and create a cohesive community image.


Historic Preservation + Design Element

HISTORIC PRESERVATION BACKGROUND

The City of Guadalupe has retained a great deal of its historic and small town character and feel since its humble beginnings as a land grant in 1841 and its incorporation 105 years later. During its early years, Guadalupe was known for its agricultural production. This is still apparent today, with Guadalupe growing and processing agricultural products all year round. Agricultural production, the Southern Pacific Railroad line, and later Highway 1 initially fueled development in Guadalupe. This initial period of development is still visible in the City today with standing structures that date back to early settlements. Additionally, structures stemming from the railroad boom and eventual incorporation are still present. This early development has resulted in Guadalupe possessing a substantial number of late 19th and early 20th century buildings. The majority of these buildings are located within the Central Business District. Additionally, Guadalupe has also maintained a number of historic homes, most of which are located in residential neighborhoods adjacent to the Central Business District. In terms of current preservation efforts, the city has yet to formally designate any structures on the national, state, or local levels. The only historic preservation taking place in Guadalupe is being conducted by the Rancho de Guadalupe Historical Society and is minimal due to lack of funding, buildings with no historic designation status, and overall cohesion. The Historical Society was founded in 1989 by residents of Guadalupe wishing to preserve the City’s rich cultural history. The volunteer non-profit agency collects and disseminates information to the public. The Historical Society maintains an informal list of potentially historic structures within the City but only has authority over the City’s historic jail which the society is the steward of. In addition to the old jail maintained by the Historical Society, the City maintains two other potentially historic sites, City Hall and the Veterans Memorial Building. It is worth noting that even though Guadalupe does not have any buildings on any historic registers, there is no shortage of potential historic buildings. These unique and character filled buildings need to

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be conserved if Guadalupe wishes to maintain connections to its rich cultural past. The lack of designation is problematic in that should a project come forth that either requires the demolition or alteration of a potential historic structure, there are no protections currently available. The lack of designation is not due to a lack of a historical designation ordinance. In fact, the City does have a designation ordinance within its Municipal Code. However, the ordinance lacks any listed criteria under which structures are to be designated. Additionally, the City outsources its designation process to the Santa Barbara County Advisory Landmark Committee. Once the County receives the application and the designation process begins, Guadalupe’s City Council is directed to set a date for public hearing. Once a structure has been added to the county’s list of landmarks a variance must be issued to perform any alterations to additions. However, the proposed alterations must not impact the buildings historic design or character. Design review is also necessary when the historic merit of a site is affected by a project. Even though the Municipal Code does not directly list criteria for historic designation, it does supply a definition of ‘historic’. According to Guadalupe’s Municipal Code (section 15.12.020), a historic structure is defined as one that is: listed individually in the National Register of Historic Places, recognized as historically significant by the Secretary of the Interior, individually listed on a state inventory by the Secretary of the Interior, or individually listed on a local inventory by the Secretary of the Interior. The historic preservation section is centered around the notion that in order to practice historic preservation a preservation program must be in place. The historic preservation program outlined for Guadalupe consists of seven different yet integral components. These components include: surveys, an ordinance, guidelines, incentives, education programs, recognition/awards, and a preservation plan. Each of these components is woven throughout the element as various goals, objectives, policies and programs. The first objective involves creating and outlining the initial historic preservation plan. The following programs detail the contents. City of Guadalupe General Plan


Historic Preservation + Design Element

HISTORIC PRESERVATION GOALS 1. Guadalupe’s cultural heritage promoted and conserved for future generations.

GOAL 1 Objective 1.1 Develop a historic preservation plan in two years and implement in five years. Plan Contents 1.1.1 Identify historic resources within Guadalupe. 1.1.2 Promote incentives for historic preservation through various funding resources. 1.1.3 Institute a program for historic preservation through a wide variety of regulatory programs in the next five years. 1.1.4 Develop a comprehensive education and outreach program for the public and developers. 1.1.5 Utilize Guadalupe’s historic past to promote tourism and economic development through a descriptive plan. 1.1.6 Encourage and promote the benefits of historic pres ervation to residents, property owners, and developers to maintain their historic structures. Programs 1.1.1 Historic Designation Program Components: • Contract with a consultant to survey the city for qualified resources. • Contract with a consultant to write a historic context statement. • Develop an ordinance based off of the guide lines set forth by the Office of Historic Preservation (OHP) to designate and protect historic resources at the city level. • Identify, designate and protect historically and culturally significant archaeological resources and sites. 117


1.1.2 Guidance and Funding Program Componets: • Actively seek funding for historic preservation activities (CLG status) • Participate directly in federal and state historic preservation programs and gain access to designated historic preservation funding. • Provide incentives to encourage and support historic preservation. 1.1.3 Regulatory Measures Program Componets: • Designate buildings and sites of historic significance at the federal, state and local level. • Alter existing Zoning Code and City Ordinances and create new ones aimed at the CBD in order to conserve the historic character of dowtown Guadalupe. • Develop a set of design guidelines based on the Secretary of Interior’s Standards. 1.1.4 Education Program Componets: • Designate buildings and sites of historic significance at the federal, state and local level. • Alter existing zoning codes and city ordinances and create new ones aimed at the CBD in order to conserve the historic character of dowtown Guadalupe. • Develop a set of design guidelines based on the Secretary of Interior’s Standards. 1.1.5 Tourism Program Componets: • Highlight the relationship between the City of Guadalupe and Hollywood filmmaking. • The City shall work with agencies, organizations, property owners and business interests to develop and promote heritage tourism opportunities, in part as an economic development tool.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Historic Preservation + Design Element

1.1.6 Land Use Program Componets: • Promote development alternatives in the CBD such as adaptive re-use, and architecturaly compatible new construction rather than demolition. • Promote and enhance the quality of historically notable housing within the city. • Assist and encourage property owners and tenants to maintain the integrity and character of historic resources and to restore and reuse historic resources in a manner compatible with their historic character. • Encourage the adaptive reuse of existing buildings for housing options. • Provide guidance for preserving and improving historic properties to all interested property owners. 1.1.7 Implementation Program Procedural Measures: • Track the progress of this plan using dedicated staff hours. • Apply for grants and funding to support staff hours. • Utilize the Historical Society as a means to assist with plan implementation. • Develop a plan for the Central Business District. • Develop a plan for the residential district surrounding downtown core.

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COMMUNITY DESIGN BACKGROUND

Community design brings together the principles of the other elements while creating a desirable environment in which to live, work, and play. The Community Design Element provides a sense of place for Guadalupe residents. For instance, City murals that are strategically placed in public spaces such as City Hall and in the Central Business District (CBD) illustrate the community’s Mexican/American cultural heritage, which continues to prevail. Architecturally fascinating storefront facades align the CBD with minimal setbacks to increase the pedestrian oriented corridor. Street furniture such as benches that face storefronts and away from traffic, as well as Victorian style light fixtures that accentuates the character of the City are harmoniously placed along the CBD. Including Community Design as a General Plan Element encourages and promotes the unique character of the City of Guadalupe. The Community Development program outlined for Guadalupe consists of three fundamentally important components. These components include: the Central Business District, industrial areas and residential neighborhoods. Each of these components are woven throughout the element as various goals, objectives, policies and programs.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Historic Preservation + Design Element Community Design

COMMUNITY DESIGN GOALS 1. Guadalupe’s growth is shaped in an orderly and sustainable manner, preserving the inherent aesthetic character of the area.

GOAL 1 Objective 1.1

Develop comprehensive community design guidelines that will both maintain and enhance the City’s inherent architectural character and appeal to the intrinsic beauty of the surrounding natural environment Policies 1.1.1 Identify potential design consultants and field proposals for comprehensive community de sign guidelines. 1.1.2 The City shall field proposals for multi-phased, scaled (cost), complete street build-outs in the central business district

Objective 1.2

Incorporate design elements that will foster, enhance, and protect pedestrians and those using active modes of transportation in the CBD. Policies 1.2.1 Where appropriate, the City will prohibit the addition of further on-street parking spaces in favor of off- street parking in the rear of businesses. 1.2.2 All new development within the CBD must feature pedestrian oriented building frontages that provide entrance/exit access to the public sidewalk. 1.2.3 Bicycle racks must be placed in visible, accessible, convenient locations, and out of pedestrian pathways so as not to cause obstruction. Programs 1.2.1 The City shall encourage the implementation of pedestrian, active transportation, and automobile safety infrastructure throughout the CBD. 1.2.2 The City shall explore opportunities to develop a culturally themed district that is reflective of the rich cultural heritage of Guadalupe. 121


COMMUNITY DESIGN GOALS

1.2.3 The City shall encourage the use of landscaping that promotes a high quality visual environment.

Objective 1.3

Establish residential design guidelines that are consistent with the community design fabric of existing neighborhoods, while adopting environmentally friendly and sustainable design principles. Policies 1.3.1 The City shall encourage developments that provide pedestrian and mobile transportation opportunities for residential zoned areas. 1.3.2 All new residential developments shall adhere to the standards outlined in the 2010 California Green Building Code. Programs 1.3.1 Adopt comprehensive Design Guidelines for the review of all new non-residential and multi- family development in the City. 1.3.2 The City shall institute a discretionary design review for all multi-family residential developments. 1.3.3 When appropriate, the City shall explore mixed-use projects (or redevelopments) that combine residential units over commercial buildings in the CBD.

City of Guadalupe General Plan


Historic Preservation + Design Element

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3 housing

City of Guadalupe General Plan


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5 noise

City of Guadalupe General Plan


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Write Element Name Here


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7 economic development

City of Guadalupe General Plan


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Write Element Name Here


9 historic preservation + design

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City of Guadalupe General Plan


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1 land use

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City of Guadalupe General Plan

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