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t n e v e l a v i t fes

guide

Spirit & Place is an initiative of The Polis Center, part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI


Home 2016

Welcome to the 21st Annual

S pirit & Place Festivalits!,

ex hib 10 days : 40 pe rf or ma nc es, s, an d mo re ! co nv er sat ion s, sc re en ing

al for We’ve cooked up a fantastic civic festiv recipe: you this year with our tried-and-true

es creativity. 1. Start with a compelling theme that invit ional, and civic organizations. 2. Combine over 100 cultural, congregat akers, scholars, and more. 3. Stir in dozens of artists, writers, filmm ingful connections, conversation, and fun! 4. Serve to a community that craves mean This year’s festival explores the nuances “Spirit and place are not of “Home” as a space, a place, and an idea le peop h, yout two beautiful words. ans, just through the lenses of veter They represent our time of faith, immigrants and refugees, foodies, to celebrate our dignity, range environmentalists, among others. Topics culture, and humanity.” ic to from pet ownership and the power of mus thing — KP Singh highways and homelessness. There is some Architectural Artist for everyone! This one-of-a-kind festival, along with our series on gentrification with Kheprw year-round activities (such as the discussion with Indiana Humanities) provide platforms Institute and the Civic Challenge project play. home in which we live, love, work, and to explore, celebrate, and strengthen this

Since 1996 »

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spiritandplace.org | festival@iupui.edu


Big Thanks

to our major donors! Major Partners Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation

Champion Partners Robin M. & Carole E. Thomas/Paradox Dental Center

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Visionary Partners Ken Honeywell

In honor of the children & families of Christel House

Leading Partners Gail Thomas Strong & Anthony L. Strong

David J. & Penny J. Bodenhamer

Special Thanks

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Rhonda Fox Waltz & Kevin L. Waltz


Home 2016

Table of Contents Welcome Message............................................................................2 Major Donors......................................................................................3 General Information..........................................................................5 Homework Assignment................................................................6-7 The Dog Ate My Homework: Opening Night........................... 10 Festival Events (listed in date order)....................................11-49 21st Annual Public Conversation..........................................50-51 Event Index...................................................................................... 52 Festival Partners.......................................................................54-55 Donors.........................................................................................56-57 Festival Team.............................................................................58-59 2017 Theme: POWER................................................................... 62 About Spirit & Place ...................................................................... 63

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General Information RSVP Please! Most events will gladly welcome you as a “walk-in.” But, it helps everyone plan for the best event possible if they know how many people to expect. Please RSVP to all FREE events by visiting spiritandplace.org or calling us at 317-274-2455. RSVP’ing to a fee-based event? You must contact the event organizers, not Spirit &Place, using the info provided in the description.

Award of Awesomeness Nominees Nine events have been recognized this year for exemplifying the values that make the Spirit & Place Festival so special. These events are all in the running for an “Award of Awesomeness” which includes a $1,000 prize! Winners will be announced at the Public Conversation on November 13.

Accessibility We believe that ideas, events, and resources should be widely available and accessible. • Most event locations are wheelchair accessible. • 82% of events are free. • IndyGo bus route information has been listed where possible. • Visit spiritandplace.org for more information.

Feedback We’ve modified our participant survey to make it quicker and easier to complete. • Hand in a completed paper evaluation form to a Spirit & Place volunteer at the event’s conclusion. • Visit spiritiandplace.org and click “feedback.”

Support Please visit spiritandplace.org and make a donation in support of our work. 93% of our budget is supported through community donations. Your contribution really does matter! *Give yourself ample time on Nov. 5 to travel to events due to the Monumental Marathon.

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Home 2016 HOMEwork Assignment Ugh. Homework.

»T his is fun homework, we promise!

Here’s the scoop, at either the opening night event or the Public Conversation, bring these completed pages—and proof of a social media post—to any Spirit & Place Festival volunteer and you’ll receive a snazzy goodie or a coupon from United State of Indiana (while supplies last).

History Quiz What do you know about the many people who have made Central Indiana their home? 1.) Which Native American group called Indiana home? a.) Potawatomi b.) Miami c.) Delaware d.) All of the above 2.) Many Germans migrated to Indiana after a series of revolts rocked Europe in what year? ________ 3.) In 1910, _____% of Indy’s residents were African Americans or immigrants. (Fun fact: Indy had the highest percentage of black residents

north of the Ohio River at this time.)

4.) The name of Indianapolis’s first synagogue was: a.) Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation b.) Shaarey Tefilla c.) Etz Chaim

Local Literature Draw a link matching the Hoosier writer to one of their works.

Kurt Vonnegut Mari Evans Susan Neville Phil Gulley

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The Invention of Flight Home to Harmony I Am a Black Woman Breakfast of Champions

spiritandplace.org | festival@iupui.edu


Current Events How well do you know Indy now? 1.) Indianapolis Public School students speak ____ languages and earlier this year IPS started a “Newcomer Program” to help immigrant and refugee students learn English as they adjust to living in the U.S. 2.) In Marion County, veterans make up _____% of adults experiencing homelessness. 3.) This Indy neighborhood boasts two James Beard award nominated chefs. a.) Broad Ripple b.) Meridian Kessler c.) Fountain Square

Artsy Fartsy When you think of “home,” what image pops into your mind?

Doodle it here.

Group Project Grab a friend—or make a new one— and snap a selfie to post using #SPIndy.

Answers History Quiz: D, 1848, 18%, A Current Events: 61, 25%, C Local Literature: Vonnegut/Breakfast of Champions; Evans/I Am a Black Woman; Nevile/The Invention of Flight; Gulley/Home to Harmony #SPindy | 317-274-2455

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Wed. Nov. 9 6:30-8:30pm Unitarian Universalist Church of Indianapolis

Wandering to Where We All Live Sat. Nov. 12 10am-12pm Holcomb Gardens (Meet at Canal Bridge)

Presented by IUPUI Senior Academy

Presented with IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute

Homes Before Highways: Communities Under the Exit Ramps

Chronicling Hoosier: Tracing Home in Historic Newspapers

Wed. Nov. 9 7-9pm Concord Neighborhood Center

Sat. Nov. 12 2-3:30pm Indiana State Library, Author’s Room

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Leaving Home

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Presented by IU School of Liberal Arts & IUPUI Department of Anthropology

Presented by IUPUI University Library

Refugees Welcome

Thurs. Nov. 10 6-8pm Indiana Medical History Museum

Sat. Nov. 12 2-4pm Northminster Presbyterian Church

Presented with IU School of Liberal Arts Medical Humanities and Health Studies Programs

Presented with The Polis Center

A Place to Call Home: A Workshop Where You Can Help End Homelessness Thurs. Nov. 10 9am-3pm Indiana Interchurch Center Presented with IU Public Policy Institute

Genius Loci: Herman B Wells and the Spirit of Place Sun. Nov. 13 1-2pm Harrison Center of the Arts-City Gallery Presented by Dr. Richard Gunderman

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My Home, My Earth, My Responsibility

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Our faculty, students, staff and alumni have helped create numerous stimulating and thought- provoking activities for this city-wide festival. Below are just a few examples. The Spirit & Place website, www.spiritandplace.org provides all the details. We hope to see you at one of our events!

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Home 2016

Festival of Events

Opening Night

Signature Event The Dog Ate My Homework: Opening Night Event featuring Tony Styxx Friday, November 4, 6:30—8:30pm “Dear Indy” debut at 7:30pm

tony styxx

Tube Factory artspace 1125 Cruft St. IndyGo: 13, 16, & 22 FREE 317-274-2455 / festival@iupui.edu Presented by Spirit & Place and Big Car.

Join Spirit & Place and Big Car to test your knowledge with fun homework assignments and games about Indy, experience the debut of a new spoken word piece by Tony Styxx, and view the exhibit Mari by artist Carl Pope. What makes this community our home? Why is it wonderful? How can it be hurtful? What is the “work of home” we need to tackle to make Central Indiana great for all? The Spirit & Place Festival is 10 days of exploration, conversation, and creativity around these questions. We’re excited to have commissioned spoken word poet and hip-hop artist Tony Styxx to kick-start the festival with his new piece, “Dear Indy,” and to debut it in Big Car’s new home, the Tube Factory artspace! Surrounded by food, drink, and music, you are also invited to play table games that will spark conversation about Indy’s changing neighborhoods, explore Mari—Carl Pope’s commissioned piece based off of the work of poet Mari Evans—, and learn about the exciting partnership between Big Car, Riley Area Development Corporation, and Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership to provide affordable homes for local artists in the Garfield Park neighborhood. See page 6 and 7.) Did we mention there will also be a homework assignment for everyone in attendance? Don’t worry . . . it’s easy, fun, and involves a prize!

Opening Night Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs encouraged at spiritandplace.org.

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Moving Stories Nov. 5—13

IndyGo busses & Julia M. Carson Transit Center $1.75 per ride Presented by Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation (IndyGo), Writing Futures at Marian University, CityWrite, IndyGo Transit Ambassadors, and The Arts Council of Indianapolis.

A moving exhibit—literally!—devoted to the stories and images of what makes Indy home for our community.

IndyGo

A “home” is greater than a place where you sleep. Home is a neighborhood, a community group, and a place for leisure. These are places we feel comfortable, safe, happy, and define and shape who we are. Mass transit plays a vital role as a connector to these places. Over the past summer, IndyGo’s partners and stakeholders have captured stories of community members who share threads of what defines Indy as our collective home. These stories are being shared through images and text on bus routes and at the Transit Center for all to relate to and enjoy. Hop on an IndyGo bus, pause and think about what makes Indy home, and then enjoy the special places that make this community our home. Bus fare purchased online at buy.indygo.net, on a bus, calling 317-635-3344, or at the Transit Center.

bold & Daring Awesomeness

nomination

To quote a Spirit & Place Festival Selection Committee member, “This isn’t an event—it’s an unexpected opportunity to happen upon.” We couldn’t agree more and are happy to have this opportunity to connect to new audiences … and encourage all Spirit & Place Festival fans to use mass transit! It’s so easy. Just go to indygo.net, map a route via the trip planner, and get going! Follow IndyGo on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to find which buses will feature stories each day or stop by the Transit Center.

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Home 2016

Festival of Events

I Am Home: Muslim Hoosiers Saturday, November 5— Friday, November 11, 10am-5pm Indiana Interchurch Center, Interchurch Gallery 1100 W. 42nd St.

Saturday, November 12, 10am-7pm University of Indianapolis, Schwitzer Student Center 1400 E. Hanna Ave. IndyGo: 34 & 26, respectively FREE 317-306-1998 / aliya.amin@indianamuslims.org. Presented by Muslim Alliance of Indiana and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation.

Photo and audio gallery experience of Muslim Hoosiers sharing what makes Indiana their home. Recent polls find 55% of Americans have a negative view of Islam and that more than 60% of Americans have never met a Muslim, at least they don’t think they have. The reality is Muslims are our neighbors, co-workers, coaches, and civil servants. People may not even realize they have met a Muslim because many Muslims do not fit the stereotypical appearance. Muslims come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and garb. It’s time to redefine “Muslim.” This exhibition, and its accompanying text and audio stories describing what “home” means to those in the photographs, hopes to shatter preconceived notions of what a “Muslim” is, looks, and sounds like. There will be portraits of and stories from people whose families have lived in Indiana for generations, as well as immigrants, refugees, and converts of all ages and careers. We will show that we are all unified as Hoosiers. Please note: The Muslim Alliance of Indiana will meet on November 12 at the University of Indianapolis for its annual convention and the exhibit will be relocated there for its last day of public viewing. Walk-ins welcome. Please remember to fill out an evaluation after leaving the exhibition!

Inclusive & Open-Minded I Am Home: Muslim Hoosiers challenges viewers to expand their vision of who Hoosiers are by recognizing our shared humanity. For these reasons, the Festival Selection Committee nominated this event as the most inclusive and open-minded.

Awesomeness

nomination

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Riverside Speaks! Past, Present, and Future Saturday, November 5, 9am—4pm Ebenezer Baptist Church & Rock n Riverside House 1901 N. Harding St. & 2501 N. Harding St. IndyGo: 5, 6, 10, 25, & 37 FREE 317-631-5946 / cb212be@gmail.com Presented by Ebenezer Baptist Church, Indiana Historical Society, Riverside Residents, and Insight Development Corp.

our Future

Riverside Speaks! celebrates a community with a “pop-up museum,” historic re-enactments, performances by Kenyetta Dance Co., and a church & home tour. Step back in time to 1960 when Ebenezer Baptist Church was founded to explore the history of this congregation and its neighborhood. A pop-up museum featuring docents in 1960s dress, visual artifacts, and stories by long-time residents will help you feel the richness of the Riverside area and the accomplishments of its people. In addition, the church’s sanctuary will host an ongoing (repetitive & abbreviated) contemporary African American worship experience including dance, song, and spoken word featuring actual congregants and members of the Kenyetta Dance Company. Either before or after visiting the church, you also have the opportunity to see a nearby renovated Riverside home, the first of many planned by Insight Development. On this self-tour of the home, you’ll get information about Rock n Riverside, a housing revitalization strategy that will acquire 50 currently boarded properties, renovate them, and make them available to sale to moderate-income buyers over the next 3 to 5 years. Come-and-go style event. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org. *A private residence, the Rock n Riverside home is not ADA compliant.

Rooted in Place Awesomeness

nomination

The congregants of Ebenezer Baptist and residents of the Riverside neighborhood are bursting with pride and want to share their story. The Selection Committee was deeply impressed with how Riverside Speaks! aims to honor the community’s past while looking towards the future and demonstrating the hard work being done by a community to invest in itself.

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Home 2016

Festival of Events

Slow Saunter Hike/Next Indiana Campfire Saturday, November 5, 2—5pm Morgan-Monroe State Forest 6220 Forest Rd., Martinsville $10 per person, RSVP by Nov. 2 (limit 40 per hike) 317-602-3692 / sandra@indianaforestalliance.org Presented by the Indiana Forest Alliance and Indiana Humanities.

Experience nature directly and encounter big ideas while hiking and discussing the works of noted environmental writers.

hike indiana

As part of the Indiana Forest Alliance’s Slow Saunter hiking series, which aims to inspire advocacy for Indiana’s forests, and Indiana Humanities’ Next Indiana Campfires, which connects nature, literature, and the Hoosier bicentennial, this hike and campfire discussion will explore the enduring yet often fraught relationship we have with the natural environment. Transportation to Martinsville is on your own and upon arrival you will be greeted and given a short history of Morgan-Monroe State Forest before venturing out on a guided 3-mile hike. Along the way, you’ll pause to read aloud the words of important environmental thinkers. Imagine hiking, and pausing for readings, while absorbing the sights, sounds, and smells of a forest teeming with native treasures. A forest ecologist will also join the group to answer questions about flora and fauna along the trail. Following the hike we’ll gather for a 90-minute campfire meal and discussion led by University of Indianapolis English professor Kevin McKelvey connecting the ideas of nature and home. The two readings include “Wilderness Letter,” Pulitzer-winning author Wallace Stegner’s landmark 1960 essay in praise of untouched wilderness, and “Stone,” an essay by Susan Neville from her 1994 book Indiana Winter. Ticket price includes meal and beer (for hikers 21+) from Upland Brewing. RSVP by November 2 at goo.gl/CgXBeF.

did you know » Did you know the state park system is a legacy project of Indiana’s centennial celebration in 1916? We’re proud to boast the 2016 Spirit & Place Festival is an official “legacy project” of the State’s bicentennial!

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Do It Again Recycled Art Market: Home is What We Make of It Saturday, November 5, 10am—3pm SullivanMunce Cultural Center 225 W. Hawthorne St., Zionsville IndyGo: 86 FREE 317-873-4900 / cynthiayoung@sullivanmunce.org Presented by Zionsville Cultural District, SullivanMunce Cultural Center, Boone County Solid Waste Management District, Zion Nature Center, and Zionsville Street and Stormwater Department.

Recycled Art

Fun, come-and-go, interactive, educational art & community fair focusing on conservation and preservation of our planet’s natural resources through art made of recycled and repurposed materials. The annual Do It Again Recycled Art Market offers an opportunity to understand the affect one person can have on our shared home—planet Earth! We will not only demonstrate how “home” is what we make of it, but how you can make art from your home. During the day, you can learn facts about the effect of trash on our environment, pick up tips for conserving natural resources, make art out of old household junk, exchange (10) plastic bags for a reusable shopping bag, participate in an up-cycle demonstration by Five Thirty Home—a local antique/repurpose shop—, bid on rain barrels painted by local artists, and peruse artist booths featuring goods made of reclaimed, reused, and recycled materials. Representatives from Cedar Street Builders will also provide information and touchable examples of some building materials needed to construct “passive homes,” which are ultra-low energy consuming buildings. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » Do It Again Recycled Art Market started six years ago with a few community members sharing a vision for a greener world by showcasing art made from recycled, reused, and reclaimed materials. Organizers say being a part of this year’s Spirit & Place Festival inspired them to think outside the box, offer more interactive aspects, and root the event with a solid thematic focus.

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Home 2016

Festival of Events

B3 Home: Bats, Bees, and Birds Saturday, November 5, 10am—1pm Garfield Park Arts Center 2432 Conservatory Dr. IndyGo: 13 & 22 FREE 317-916-7832 / srobertson99@ivytech.edu. Presented by Ivy Tech Community College, Garfield Park Arts Center, Arts for Learning Indiana, and Social Sketch Indy.

Family-friendly event where participants build and decorate houses for bats, bees, and birds while learning about the importance of these tiny creatures on our ecosystem.

family-friendly

Home is more than just for humans. Our animal, mammal, and insect companions on earth deserve to have their lives respected and researched. With a decrease in “homes” for bats, bees, and birds, our ecosystems and food supplies will dwindle. We need them for our global community! This family-friendly, all-ages event allows attendees to create art about bats, bees, and birds with teaching artists from ARTFORCE Art Camp, Social Sketch Indy, and the Garfield Park Arts Center’s Arts for Learning program. Everyone will be able to enjoy a communitycreated exhibition about bats, bees, and birds, art-making activities, educational programming, takeaways from conservation organizations—even beekeepers!—and food and drink (for purchase) by Ivy Tech culinary, Bee Coffee Roasters, and New Day Meadery. While supplies last, approximately 90 family units will be able to build bat, bird, or bee house with students and faculty from Ivy Tech’s Construction Technology program. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » After attending the rich and multi-faceted Spirit & Place Festival event The Inspiring Art of Quilting at the Stutz in 2015, Ivy Tech Fine Arts Chair Stephanie Robertson contacted the Garfield Park Arts Center, Social Sketch Indy, Arts for Learning Indiana, and several staff members at Ivy Tech to discuss how they could create a Spirit & Place Festival event that bridges art, technology, and environmental stewardship. What collaboration!

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Bloom Where You are Planted Saturday, November 5, 11am—1pm Paramount School of Excellence 3020 Nowland Ave. IndyGo: 11 FREE, RSVP by Nov. 4 317-775-6660 or school@paramountindy.org Presented by Paramount School of Excellence, Paramount Farm, TURN Festival, Love Handle, and Slow Food Indy.

Consider the potential of food and farm to transform urban neighborhoods and the power of the kitchen table as the heart of a home.

urban farming

Connecting to Indiana’s agricultural heritage is not exclusive to our state’s rural communities. In the urban core, people are reclaiming their connection to the land and “blooming where they are planted.” Within the midst of impoverished areas of the city, in communities robbed of food justice, people are establishing gardens and reclaiming sustainable “homemaking” skills. Paramount’s 5.5 acre urban farm is home to twenty-three chickens, six goats, and three hives of bees and offers a setting for a full-circle, hands-on experience. Participants will embark on a tour and taste circuit that includes stops at the hoop greenhouse and garden, apiary, cheese kitchen, goat milking station, and chicken coop. Following the tour, guests will return to the school for a soup meal and kitchen table talk centered on food as a staple of home and community. Leave with your own garden starter—potted herb seeds! RSVP by Nov. 4 at spiritandplace.org. (Limit 75)

did you know » Paramount School of Excellence exists to inspire learning and to transform communities by changing lives. The annual TURN (Transforming Urban Neighborhoods) Festival presented by Paramount centers on farm, food, health and environment. Periodic TURN-sponsored activities are the next progression in Paramount’s role as catalyst for knowledge and action in the urban corridor. This cross-organization partnership is establishing an expansive pathway for healthy habits to take root and to have a lifelong impact on people’s lives.

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Home 2016

Festival of Events

Home Grown: Building Strong Communities through Food Saturday, November 5, 2—5pm Central Library 40 E. St. Clair St. IndyGo: 19, 38, & 39 FREE 317-275-4090 / AskALibrarian@indypl.org Presented by Indianapolis Public Library, Indy Food Council, and Sun King Brewing.

Explore food systems, the slow food movement, and how efforts of local community gardening and access to healthy food choices affect the overall health of communities.

Novella Carpenter

When one thinks of home it can invoke ideas of comfort, security, and well-being. However, many of the places where we live do not have access to essential elements needed for thriving communities. Home Grown explores the ongoing efforts of communities to provide healthy food options and how we can close the gap of accessibility to healthy food. Bringing together the national conversation and the local dialogue, Novella Carpenter, author of Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer, will examine her experience of community gardening in a 90-minute presentation. Audience members will also have the opportunity to interact with local community organizations associated with the Indy Food Council that support community gardening and programs promoting healthy food sources in communities. Also available for viewing will be an exhibit by Kelley Jordan Photography featuring images of local community leaders and organizations in the slow food and urban gardening initiatives. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

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Finding Home: Indiana at 200 Saturday, November 5, 4pm & 8pm Sunday, November 6, 2pm Tuesday, November 8, 6:30pm Wednesday, November 9, 7:30pm Thursday, November 10, 7:30pm Friday, November 11, 7:30pm Saturday, November 12, 5pm & 9pm Sunday, November 13, 2pm

indiana’s Bicentennial

Indiana Repertory Theatre, Upperstage 140 W. Washington St. IndyGo: 2, 4, 11,12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 24, 25, 28, 31, 38, 39, & 55 Tickets start at $25—Order at irtlive.com or by calling 317-635-5252 Presented by Indiana Repertory Theatre and Indiana Historical Society.

A multifaceted look at Indiana’s life and times mixes music and history, comedy and drama, fact, and fable. Finding Home: Indiana at 200 is a collaboration of more than 30 Indiana writers—fiction writers, poets, journalists, historians and playwrights—from across the state coming together to celebrate the 200th birthday of Indiana. Interwoven with songs performed by Hoosier singer-songwriter Tim Grimm, this production allows you to delve into Indiana’s beloved icons and hidden gems. This original production showcases many notable stories about our home state—from Princess Mishawaka, the daughter of Chief Elkhart, to Madam C.J. Walker, the nation’s first African American female millionaire. Audience members will journey back in time with Abe Lincoln as he takes his first steps towards becoming a lawyer and with James Dean as he visits his high school drama teacher. Share in the memories of a middle-aged man recalling what it was like going to high school with Ryan White and eavesdrop on a conversation between William Henry Harrison and one of his descendants, eight generations later. Unique, engaging, and rooted in our shared history as Hoosiers, Finding Home: Indiana at 200 is a bicentennial treat for all! Purchase tickets at irtlive.com or by calling 317-635-5252.

Collaborative Awesomeness

nomination

The selection process to identify writers for Finding Home: Indiana at 200 was intentionally inclusive. The IRT sought out contributors of not only different writing backgrounds, but of various ages, races, genders, ethnicities, religions, and geographic homes within Indiana. A prime motivator of this project was to build an artistic collective that truly resembles Indiana and her people. Working with the Indiana Historical Society, audience members will learn not only from the play, but from exhibit components and educators can find online curriculum guides to aid in history education.

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Home 2016

Festival of Events

Closing in on The Homestretch: A Community Dialogue on Youth Homelessness Sunday, November 6, 1—4:30pm Central Library 40 E. St. Clair St. IndyGo: 4, 18, 19, 25, 28, 38, & 39 FREE 317-472-7636 / zalexander@chipindy.org Presented by Coalition for Homelessness Intervention and Prevention (CHIP), Spargel Productions, Homeless Youth Taskforce, Outreach, Inc., and Stopover, Inc.

homeless youth

Film screening and dynamic community dialogue on youth homelessness with the filmmakers of “The Homestretch.” The U.S. Department of Education defines homeless youth as those “who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.” Youth homelessness, while pervasive, is often subtle and hidden to the unaided eye. “The Homestretch” looks at youth homelessness in inner-city Chicago, exploring a multifaceted problem with no easy solution. Not all youth have a home and we must come together around this issue. “The Homestretch” will be screened at 1pm with a Q&A session immediately following with filmmaker Anne de Mare. Participants wishing to go deeper and really focus on what is occurring in Indianapolis are invited to stay longer and engage in small group conversations. These conversations will be guided by materials created by the filmmaker and local experts dedicated to ending homelessness in Indianapolis, including the Homeless Youth Taskforce, Outreach, Inc., and Stopover, Inc. Findings from the Homeless Youth Taskforce will also be shared at this time and participants will have the opportunity to share their thoughts and generate ideas on how to create effective strategies to address youth homelessness. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

Socially Meaningful The Continuum of Care, the umbrella of organizations addressing homelessness, held a Community Day last spring about gaps in service in Lawrence, Warren, and Center townships. This community-inclusive approach generated positive action steps which resulted in the creation of the Homeless Youth Taskforce. This event was designed to further fuel community discussion, hopefully bringing more youth to the table to talk about youth homelessness.

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Awesomeness

nomination

spiritandplace.org | festival@iupui.edu


Sounds of Home Sunday, November 6, 1—2:30pm Indiana State Museum 650 W. Washington St. IndyGo: 8 FREE 317-253-3441 x 209 / jhodes@bez613.org. Presented by The Alan & Linda Cohen Center for Jewish Learning & Living at Congregation Beth-El Zedeck, The Indianapolis Women’s Chorus, and Indiana State Museum.

celebration of sound and dance

Celebration of song and dance featuring the culturally rich diversity of people who call Indiana home. From a Native American singer who will honor those who first called Indiana home to Irish step dancers representing one of the many waves of 19th century immigrants to reach Indiana, this event seeks to build cultural bridges through the universal languages of music, song, and dance. Sing, clap, and chant along with the Indianapolis Women’s Chorus as they are joined on stage by other performers who will help the audience revel in the diversity of Indiana through German song, Jewish music, African American gospel, as well as the sounds of recent immigrants such as Latinos, Indians, and West Africans. Visual images and narration will further root the event in Indiana’s diverse cultural history before everyone performs “Back Home Again in Indiana” together in a beautiful melding of the sounds of our homes. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know »

Rabbi Sandy Sasso had the inspiration for an event about music and home and mentioned it to Spirit & Place Program Director Erin Kelley. Meagan Johnson of the Indianapolis Women’s Chorus had a very similar idea and also mentioned it to Erin, who suggested these two organizations talk. That was the beginning of a beautiful relationship! Spirit & Place loves this kind of matchmaking work. Got an idea? Contact Spirit & Place to discuss.

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Home 2016

Festival of Events

Being at Home with Loss, Death, & Dying Sunday, November 6, 2—3:30pm Central Christian Church, Indianapolis 701 N. Delaware St. IndyGo: 10 FREE 317-635-6397 / mehays@mac.com Presented by Central Christian Church and Threshold Singers.

conversations about loss

How to have conversation regarding loss and end-of-life issues to ease the grieving and dying process for all involved. Brace yourself: All of us will die. As a culture, we struggle to talk about death and dying. Yet, death is one experience we will all share. Being at home with our own mortality can make that reality less scary and less traumatic for those we leave behind. This informational and caring experience will help equip you with tools to move forward in tough conversations with loved ones about loss (of any kind), death, and dying. The Threshold Singers—a group that honors the ancient tradition of singing bedside for people at the end of life—will begin the event by singing and sharing stories on how music can impact the end-of-life process. Dan Moseley, author of Living with Loss (2008) and Lose, Love, Live: The Spiritual Gifts of Loss and Change (2011) will then discuss how we deal with the loss of loved ones and the life we loved with them. A self-paced information fair will close out the event. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » Earlier this year, Spirit & Place partnered with the IU School of Nursing to help host the first ever Before I Die Festival in the United States. From April 15—17, close to 800 people participated in art exhibitions, cemetery tours, film screenings, book discussions, panel presentations, clergy training, and “death cafes” as a way to reflect on how we manage death and dying. Thank you, Central Christian Church for keeping these conversations going.

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Signature Event From the Ground Up: A People-Centered Approach to Community Development Sunday, November 6, 3—6:00pm Kheprw Institute 3549 Boulevard Pl. IndyGo: 4, 18, 28, 30, 34, 38, & 39 FREE 317-329-4803 or gentrify@kheprw.org

community discussion

Presented by Kheprw Institute, Southeast Working Class Task Force, KI NuMedia, Scarabys Consulting, LLC, and Spirit & Place.

This hands-on workshop explores ways to develop a people-centered approach to community development. Community development is supposed to be a process grounded in the collective action and perspectives of community members. The trouble is, community development work often leaves people—the residents and other stakeholders who make a place “home”—out. Rather, institutional perspectives and goals are put first. How then do we work to help communities in a way that puts people first? This is a workshop for concerned neighbors, neighborhood association folks, congregations, community development professionals—anyone!— who wishes to gain new skills and ideas around grassroots, people-centered community development. Participants will learn how to put these skills to direct use as well as learn how to build a cohort of community change-makers to continue working together long past the Spirit & Place Festival. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know »

For the last year, Kheprw Institute and Spirit & Place have engaged in an 8-part community discussion series called Gentrify: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly. The Gentrify series was an organic process that brought in several new partners, both in- and out of state, to tackle a complex and often taboo topic in need of serious public discussion. From the Ground Up is the culmination of this on-going discussion.

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

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The Houses of Abraham Monday, November 7, 7—9pm The Interchurch Center 1100 W. 42nd St. IndyGo: 34 FREE 317-283-2730 / Charlie@mcdiii.com Presented by Christians for Peace and Justice in the Middle East, American Friends Service Committee, Islamic Society of North America, Jewish Voice for Peace—Indiana, Indianapolis Peace and Justice Center.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Panel highlighting the major sacred “homes” of the Abrahamic religions and focusing on what each place means to the faithful of that tradition. The Kotel (Western Wall), the Churches of the Nativity and the Holy Sepulchre, and the Dome of the Rock and Al-Aqsa Mosque are monuments that occupy a physical place, recognizable to its adherents. Each place contains within its structure a space for prayer and reflection. Each represents a spiritual idea in the hearts and minds of the faithful, which helps to foster a longing for the Divine, a spiritual intimacy, and inner peace. People will get to see beautiful images of each religious edifice, learn about their historical and religious origins and traditions, and hear panelists who are members of the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim faiths discuss what their religious monuments represent. The audience will be encouraged to think about what places they consider sacred and how they feel in those sacred places. Does the nostalgia for home ultimately represent a longing for our spiritual home? Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

Western Wall Dome of the Rock Mosque 24

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Haus Music Tuesday, November 8, 7—9pm Athenaeum 401 E. Michigan St. Indy Go: 3 FREE 317-655-2755 / shannon@athfound.org Presented by Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Baroque Orchestra, and the Athenaeum Foundation.

Athenaeum

Enjoy some seriously old Haus Music in one of Indy’s oldest German “houses,” the historic Athenaeum. Compare the sounds between period and modern instruments while listening to Mozart and more! Many time-honored musical selections are anchored in our hearts and our homes, as they have become synonymous with milestone events. (Think: Pachelbel’s Canon in D and Mendelssohn’s Wedding March.) Many of these works represent a rich musical history dating back over nearly four centuries of music making. The program, Haus Music, uses the historic Athenaeum, an old German house, as the setting to explore these enduring works that have been so close to home over the centuries. More than a concert, you will be able to explore how these musical selections sound on both modern and period instruments. The pitch will be different, the timbre will be different, the technique will be different, and the musical interpretation may be different. And while hearing is understanding, we want you to touch these instruments too in our lobby “instrument petting zoo!” Cash bar available and beverages may be taken into the theatre. The concert begins at 7 pm, with the instrument petting zoo available an hour before (6pm) and after the concert in the lobby. An audience Q&A will also follow the performance. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » How does an event like this come about? Spirit & Place is proud of the fact it inspires creativity and encourages a generous spirit of collaboration. Music lover and Athenaeum Foundation president Cassie Stockamp asked her friends at ICO and Indy Baroque, “What do period instruments sound like? How do they sound compared to modern instruments?” Wanting to experience the answer, Cassie offered to host such a concert at the A! From there, this uniquely conversational and educational concert was born.

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

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Homing the Houseless Wednesday, November 9, 6:30—9pm Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation 6501 N. Meridian St. IndyGo: 17, 18, & 28 FREE 317-255-6647 / info@ihcindy.org Presented by Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation with promotional support from the Coalition for Homelessness Intervention and Prevention.

sukkah

Watch the “Road to Eden” and reflect with filmmaker Doug Passon on the connection between homelessness, spirituality, and holiday of Sukkot. “Road to Eden” documents beloved Jewish musician Dan Nichols’ journey through the Deep South to celebrate the Jewish festival of Sukkot and explore its deeper meaning and relevance to modern Jewish life. On the road, he confronts issues of homelessness, immigration, interfaith relations, environmental concerns, Middle East turmoil, and civil rights, reminding us all that we are still trying to reach the “Promised Land” together. The Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation and its partners invite people from all religious backgrounds to view the film and then engage in a Q&A session with filmmaker Doug Passon. Join in on this dialogue about our obligations to secure a home for our neighbors globally and locally. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

Spiritually Meaningful Rooted in the Jewish calendar, but welcoming to all faith traditions, Homing the Houseless explores the meaning of Sukkot and our obligations to “the other” through film, music, and conversation.

Awesomeness

nomination

did you know » What is Sukkot? A joyous celebration, Sukkot is an autumn commemoration of the sheltering the Israelites took in the desert after their exodus from Egypt. Many Jews celebrate by building a Sukkah which is a temporary outdoor shelter meant to symbolize the transience of life and dependence on God.

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My Home, My Earth, My Responsibility Wednesday, November 9, 6:30—8:30pm Unitarian Universalist Church of Indianapolis 615 W. 43rd St. Indy Go: 18 & 28 FREE 317-278-2444 / sacademy@iupui.edu Presented by Senior Academy of IUPUI, Cedar Street Builders, Eagle Creek Park Foundation, Hoosier Environmental Council, Indianapolis Hiking Club, and Unitarian Universalist Church of Indianapolis.

my home, my earth

Through exhibits, conversations, and short multi-media presentations, experts in the fields of architecture, aging, and the environment will explore how our choices can help preserve our common home, Earth, for future generations. Our homes, whether personal residences or the Earth, are interconnected in complex, diverse, fragile, and transient ways. This event explores that intersection by inviting experts from a variety of backgrounds to address the question, “How do we best understand, preserve, and utilize our HOME?” Through a fast-paced, multi-media format utilizing art displays, exhibits, guest presenters, and images this presentation will take participants on a sensory and intellectual journey that begins and ends at “home,” prompting all to consider how to answer the challenge. The reception area containing art, information, and displays, will open at 6:30pm with presentations beginning at 7pm. Each presentation (6 total) will last 7 to 10 minutes, keeping the evening’s energy vibrant and engaged. Presenters will answer audience questions at the end. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know »

The Senior Academy of IUPUI is an independent association of retired faculty and staff who contribute their expertise and experience to the University and community.

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

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Bless this Mess Wednesday, November 9, 7—8:30pm Theater at the Fort 8920 Otis Ave. IndyGo: 4 FREE 317-218-4653 / art4healing@gmail.com Presented by Art of the Soul Studio, Indiana Art Therapy Association, Storytelling Arts of Indiana, and Partnerships for Lawrence.

relationships of the home

The writer’s pen, artist’s brush, and storyteller’s voice bring light to the often dark and difficult relationships of the home. Relationships in our literal and metaphorical homes can be complex, difficult, and messy. Bless this Mess will demonstrate how poetry, storytelling, and art can make sense of the “mess” and bring healing and stability to relationships of the home. First, an art exhibit featuring work by Indiana art therapists using photographs and other media will portray challenging relationships in the home. Once in the auditorium, attendees will hear from poets and storytellers who created new work for this program. Assisted and joined by former Indiana Poet Laureate, Norbert Krapf, and poet/therapist, Liza Hyatt, the audience will hear narratives depicting how difficult, messy, and even traumatic relationships in our homes can be—but also how these truths can be expressed and overcome. Afterwards, audience members will break into small groups to write, tell, or create art about their own experiences or their responses to the event. Poets, storytellers, and art therapists will guide individuals as they engage in their own creative explorations on difficult relationships. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org. This event will contain mature themes and is recommended for adults only.

did you know » After publishing their poetry collections, Catholic Boy Blues and The Mother Poems, Norbert Krapf and Liza Hyatt united to facilitate writing workshops about difficult relationships titled Mining the Dark for Healing Gold. Both have used their own writing—about a boy being wounded by a man he called Father and a girl being wounded by a woman she called Mother—for healing and personal growth. Liza Hyatt approached Art of the Soul Studio to collaborate in creating an event that used writing and other creative arts to address the topic of difficult relationships in the home.

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Herrmann Chaia Hazan and Angela

Homes Before Highways: Communities Under the Exit Ramps Wednesday, November 9, 7—9pm Concord Neighborhood Center 1310 S. Meridian St. IndyGo: 16 FREE 317-278-4548 / suhyatt@iupui.edu Presented by IUPUI Department of Anthropology and Concord Neighborhood Center.

homes before highways

Share stories and see photos of homes and businesses destroyed on Indianapolis’ south and west sides by the interstate construction of the 1960s and ‘70s. Homes have meanings that live on in the memories of those who once inhabited them, long after they have been erased from the landscape. Driving south on Capitol Street, for example, you can suddenly find yourself on an entrance ramp onto I-70. Yet, Capitol was once part of a vibrant neighborhood that is fondly remembered by its former residents. Using personal narratives, archival photos, newspapers, and other documents, Homes before Highways will share the stories of the displacement that resulted from interstate construction and will explore the ways that the idea of home shapes both our understandings of the past and our visions for the future. We will also discuss how the interstates, even while they demolished urban neighborhoods, also made possible the construction of the new homes that came to make up suburban communities. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

Build Community Awesomeness

nomination

Recipients of the Charles Bantz Community Fellowship, Hyatt and Mullins are anthropology professors who have both forged longstanding partnerships with groups such as the Ransom Place Neighborhood Association and the Concord Neighborhood Center. This event builds on many years of research on the ways in which people understand the meanings of their homes and neighborhoods, both in the past and in the present. More than a standalone event, Hyatt and Mullins plan to schedule a “scan-a-thon” following the Spirit & Place Festival to help communities preserve old photos, newspaper clippings, yearbooks, church bulletins and other neighborhood memorabilia.

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

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Signature Event In conjunction with Butler University’s Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series

An Evening with Elizabeth Strout Wednesday, November 9, 7:30—9pm Butler University, Atherton Union, Reilly Room 704 W. Hampton Dr. IndyGo: 18 & 28 FREE 317-274-2455 or festival@iupui.edu Presented by Butler University’s Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series and Spirit & Place.

elizabeth strout

Readings and reflections by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Elizabeth Strout. With her complicated, finely-drawn characters and incisive prose, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Elizabeth Strout uses the quiet rhythms of the everyday and the natural beauty of her northern New England home to illuminate the depth of grief and the breadth of joy in even the most ordinary of lives. Strout won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her 2008 novel Olive Kitteridge. Weaving together thirteen rich, luminous narratives into one masterful novel anchored by the larger-than-life character Olive, Olive Kitteridge offers profound insights in the human condition—its conflicts, its tragedies and joys, and the endurance it requires. Strout’s next book, The Burgess Boys: A Novel, was published in 2013. Set in Brooklyn, the story follows two brothers who are from Strout’s native Maine. In her latest New York Times bestseller, My Name is Lucy Barton (2016), Strout shows how a simple hospital visit becomes a portal to the most tender relationship of all—the one between mother and daughter. Walk-ins welcome as seating allows after ticketholders have been seated. A limited number of metered parking spaces are available next to the Atherton Union. Garage parking can be found at the Sunset Avenue Garage near Clowes Hall (5 minute walk).

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A Place to Call Home: A Workshop Where You Can Help End Homelessness Thursday, November 10, 9am—3pm Indiana Interchurch Center 1100 W. 42nd Street IndyGo: 34 FREE, RSVP by Nov. 7 (Limit 150) 317-472-7638 or jhunt@chipindy.org Presented by Coalition for Homelessness Intervention and Prevention (CHIP), Veterans Homelessness Task Force, Community Education and Public Policy Committee of the Continuum of Care, and IU Public Policy Institute.

home to call e c a l p a

How can Indianapolis end homelessness? Tell us what you think in this unique town hall meeting and workshop to create a community plan. Home means different things to different people. At its core home is about safety, comfort, community, and belonging. We believe that everyone in Indianapolis deserves a home. Unfortunately, 5,000–8,300 individuals experience homelessness in our community annually. The Blueprint 3.0 will be our community’s plan toward the goal of ending homelessness. This dynamic plan weaves together community input, best practices, research, and data to develop practical strategies to end homelessness. We invite you to provide your voice to this process that will help more people experience “home” and make Indianapolis a better place for all of our residents. This day-long workshop is geared for service providers and concerned community members alike. Nationally recognized expert on homelessness Dr. Dennis Culhane of the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice will be the featured speaker. Visit spiritandplace.org for a full schedule, including speaker details. RSVP’s required by Nov. 7, includes continental breakfast and lunch. Guests have the option of RSVPing for the Town Hall session (9am-12pm), Workshop (12—3pm), or both.

did you know » CHIP serves as the background for the Continuum of Care, the coalition that includes housing and service providers, medical, mental health, and substance abuse professionals, and others that interact with the homeless. A few years ago, CHIP led the process to create the Blueprint 2.0—the second iteration Blueprint to End Homelessness. Through the process CHIP realized two things: The community wants to get involved and greater community feedback is needed for a stronger plan. Simply put: The plan won’t work if the community is not engaged. The public has always been invited to provide feedback, but by being a part of the Spirit & Place Festival CHIP is able to bring new voices to the table.

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Leaving Home Thursday, November 10, 6—8pm Indiana Medical History Museum 3045 W. Vermont St. IndyGo: 3 & 8 FREE 317-635-7329 / education@imhm.org Presented by the Indiana Medical History Museum, IUPUI Medical Humanities & Health Studies, and Mental Health America—Greater Indianapolis.

Leaving Home

Exhibit opening and panel discussion on the closure of Indiana’s Central State Hospital in 1994 and the current state of mental health care in Central Indiana. With the decision to close Indiana’s Central State psychiatric hospital in 1994, patients were faced with the prospect of a different future. The exhibit Leaving Home explores how patients achieved new levels of independence as they prepared for life after Central State, drawing its primary content from patient-produced newsletters. The panel discussion will focus on the development of mental health services in Central Indiana in the aftermath of the hospital’s closure, and confront difficult issues such as jails and prisons as “homes” for those suffering from mental illness, and the impact of mental illness on families today. Panel moderators Elizabeth Nelson, PhD and Modupe Labode, PhD will lead the discussion. Confirmed panelists include: Alan Schmetzer (former Director and CEO of Midtown Community Mental Health Center) Ellen Dwyer (historian), and Marianne Halbert (National Alliance on Mental Illness). Doors open at 5pm and the panel discussion begins at 5:30pm. From 6:45 to 8pm, attendees can mix and mingle over snacks, talk with panelists, and view the Leaving Home exhibit. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » At the Indiana Medical History Museum (IMHM), one of the most common questions visitors ask is, “What happened to the patients after Central State closed?” When staff discovered stacks of patient-produced newsletters in their archives, they knew they had to tell this story. Moreover, as society continues to develop policies that affect those suffering with mental illness, the IMHM felt it was important to host a panel discussion at the exhibit opening that would tie the exhibit’s 1990s themes to present-day community concerns.

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Bringing Memories Home: The Transformative Power of Music Thursday, November 10, 5:30—8:30pm Indianapolis Museum of Art, DeBoest Lecture Hall 4000 Michigan Rd. IndyGo: 34 & 38 FREE 317-356-8046 / info@shininglightfilmfest.org Presented by Shining Light Film Festival, Alzheimer’s Association Greater Indiana Chapter, ArtMix: art redefining disability, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Families First, NAMI Indianapolis.

power of music

Film screening and panel discussion of “Alive Inside” which portrays the effects of music on people living with Alzheimer’s disease. Many people consider their bodies to be their home and their minds, thoughts, and memories integral to their identity. What happens when one is no longer able to connect to one’s past and the present is unrecognizable? “Alive Inside” explores how personalized music can trigger the brain and revitalize people who have memory loss. It also provides insight into how existing institutions can become more homelike, and how the current healthcare system might offer alternative therapies for healing beyond prescription medication. This inspirational and joyous film demonstrates how music can restore a sense of going home to one’s self. Audience members are invited to arrive early (5:30pm) for an opportunity to listen to therapeutic music selections so they can personally experience the power of music as documented in the film. (The film begins at 6pm and the IMA Café will be open prior to the screening.) After the screening, a panel featuring a folklore and ethnomusicology professor, geriatric professionals, and a family caregiver will engage the audience in dialogue. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org. (Limit 150)

did you know » “Alive Inside” received the Audience Award at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival because of its illuminating, uplifting, and thought-provoking content.

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

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More Than a Roof: Affordable Homeownership as a Catalyst for Change Thursday, November 10, 5:30—8:30pm Second Presbyterian Church 7700 N. Meridian St. IndyGo: 18 & 28 FREE, RSVP required by Nov. 7 (limit 75) 317-777-6095 or ahochstetler@indyhabitat.org Presented by Greater Indy Habitat for Humanity, Circles Indy, and Second Presbyterian Church.

homeownership

Experience the decisions the working poor must make regarding affordable housing and discover how homeownership is a catalyst for family stability and strength. Have you ever lived in a moldy rental unit because it is the only place you can afford? Have you ever moved regularly to keep rent low? Do you pay more than 50% of your income in housing to ensure a better school for your kids? In Indiana, the average hourly wage necessary to afford a two‐bedroom, Fair Market Rate (FMR) unit is $14.03. More than half of Hoosier renters (52%) cannot afford the FMR, according to an Indiana 211 Partnership Community Report. The need for affordable housing is real and the benefits of homeownership—stability for children, improved health and safety, increased education and job prospects, and asset building—can be life-changing. Attendees to this event will enjoy a simple meal (5:30pm) before participating in a poverty simulation (6:15pm) interwoven with the stories of Habitat families. This unique opportunity will help create better understanding of the economic, social, and community impacts of poverty and affordable homeownership. The event will conclude in a group reflection and conversation led by Jim Morris (CEO of Greater Indy Habitat), Marie Wiese (Circles Indy), and Habitat families eager to share their experiences. RSVP required by Nov. 7 at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » Spirit & Place is excited this year’s Public Conversation will also tackle the issue of affordable housing. Harvard sociologist and MacArthur “Genius” Matthew Desmond’s recent book Evicted: Poverty & Profit in the American City takes the reader into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Read more on page 54.

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Finding my Forever Family Thursday, November 10, 6—9pm Tube Factory artspace 1125 Cruft St. IndyGo: 13, 16, & 22 FREE, RSVP by Nov. 9 at spiritandplace.org 317-872-5650 x 108 / mferris@indyhumane.org Presented by Humane Society of Indianapolis and Big Car.

Pet Art-fueled, full sensory experience where participants “become” a dog or cat and visit stations to understand life at Indy Humane’s shelter.

Adoption

Whether you own animals or love them from afar, IndyHumane invites guests of all ages to step into Big Car’s Tube Factory facility and to gain empathy and understanding for what shelter animals experience on their journey toward finding a forever home. You begin the journey by choosing the profile card of a dog or cat. As you move through the room, you will stop at stations to learn a little bit more about your animal’s story. Each stop is a customized and interactive experience that will incorporate either some form of art (music, video, graphics, acting, paintings) or ask you to use one of your 5 senses (taste, touch, sight, smell, sound) before moving on to learn another step in your animal’s process. Each animal’s story is unique, so a person can choose to go through the stations multiple times, should they find the experience interesting. At the very last station in the experience, you will receive a current update on how the animal has been doing since leaving the shelter. Walk-ins welcome, but RSVPs encouraged by Nov. 9 at spiritandplace.org.

did you know »

IndyHumane offers public tours of its facilities but limits tours to 15 people at a time. “When we learned about the opportunity to participate in the Spirit & Place Festival this year, we thought this would be the perfect venue to take this experience to a whole new level and to reach many more people.”

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

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Rebuilding Home: Moral Injury to Soul Repair Thursday, November 10, 1—2:30pm and 6—7:30pm Athenaeum Auditorium 401 E. Michigan St. IndyGo: 3, 5, 10, 11, 17 & 21 FREE 317-966-7529 / mail@sapphiretheatre.com

Rebuilding home

Presented by The Sapphire Theatre Company, Athenaeum Foundation, Valiant Seed, Heartland Yoga Community, YMCA at the Athenaeum, and Brite Divinity School Soul Repair Center.

Interactive performance designed to foster healthy communication and re-connection for military members, veterans, families, and friends. Serving in the U.S. Armed Forces is honorable and praise-worthy. Unfortunately, many come home with invisible wounds that leave them deeply conflicted by experiences contrary to their moral beliefs. If unresolved, these moral injuries can result in depression and guilt that break down one’s mental health and home-life. Rebuilding a Home is a performance with guided conversations to shine a spotlight on the signs and symptoms of moral injury, to explore communication techniques, and to offer helpful ideas for military families to reconnect—ideas they can use in celebrating together the following day, Veteran’s Day. Rebuilding a Home is an extension of The Sapphire’s award-winning, interactive PICTURE THIS program, delivering impactful learning in an entertaining way since 1984. Audiences will be engaged by live enactments of real-life scenarios with opportunities to talk directly with the characters. The Sapphire is collaborating with veterans and vital community partners to ensure authenticity, relevance, event-day support and on-going resources. Presentation includes stress reduction techniques and trained on-site listeners to assist struggling audience members. Free, limited space childcare from the YMCA. Reservations must be made at mail@sapphiretheatre.com. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » Twenty U.S. veterans commit suicide every day. The inspiration for this ground-breaking production came from Pathways to Hope—the first national conference on Moral Injury, led by Rita Nakashima Brock. Sapphire Theatre Co. is grateful to premiere this program at the Spirit & Place Festival and hopes to continue offering this program free to veterans and families across Indiana, and to take the production to the next national conference on moral injury.

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Writing Home: The Stories of American Veterans in Words, Dance, and Theater Friday, November 11, 10am—11:30am and 1pm—2:30pm Theater at the Fort 8920 Otis Ave. IndyGo: 4

Sunday, November 13, 10am—11:30pm and 1:30—3pm Arthur M. Glick JCC 6701 Hoover Rd. IndyGo: 28 FREE, RSVP by Nov. 11 317-715-9240 / lfreeman@jccindy.org

stories of veterans

Presented by JCC Indianapolis, Dance Kaleidoscope, Indiana Writers Center, Indiana Historical Society, and Jewish Family Services.

Theater, spoken word, and movement performed by Dance Kaleidoscope, veterans, and actors will evoke a sense of wonder, understanding, and appreciation. This multidisciplinary endeavor provides veterans an opportunity to share their feelings and express themselves through written and spoken word and creative movement. An unforgettable experience, Writing Home will tie the past, present, and future together allowing people to ponder and experience “home” in a unique way. Arriving attendees will hear music and be asked to share thoughts about “home” and a veteran they know. Postcards may be used as conversation prompts before a brief museum theater piece brings to life a series of letters between Norman Vandivier, an Indiana naval aviator stationed in the Pacific during WWII, and his parents. Readings will be shared by veterans involved in writing workshops with the Indiana Writers Center. Their words are followed by creative dance interpretations created and performed by Dance Kaleidoscope. A reception will follow.

did you know »

RSVP by Nov. 11 at spiritandplace.org.

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

The JCC, Dance Kaleidoscope, Jewish Family Services, and Indiana Writers Center partnered during last year’s festival to tell the stories of seniors through video and dance. Their prize-winning creation, The Choreography of Dreams, won $20,000 from the Central Indiana Senior Fund, an affiliate of CICF. 37


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Signature Event Side-by-Side RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org for all free occurrences.

Friday, November 11, 12:30—4:30pm and 6:30—9:30pm FREE Exhibit & church tours

“Homeless Jesus”

Friday, November 11, 5—7:30pm*

Artist-led tour, reception, & dinner ($50, RSVP by Nov. 7 at robertsparkumc.org or 635-1636)

Friday, November 11, 7:45—9pm FREE Artist’s talk & Matthew’s Voices: Side-by-Side community choir premiere Saturday, November 12, 12:30—8pm FREE

Exhibit & church tours

Saturday, November 12, 5pm FREE

Family style & family-friendly shared dinner (RSVP requested)

Sunday, November 13, 12:30—4pm FREE Exhibit & church tours

Sunday, November 13, 12:00pm FREE

Shared Soup’s On hot lunch (walk-ins welcome) Roberts Park United Methodist Church 401 N. Delaware St. Indy Go: 2, 5, 10, 17, & 19 *$50: Artist-lead tour, reception, and dinner Supports additional meals served Nov. 12 & 13. RVSP for the dinner at 317-635-1636 or robertsparkumc.org.

Presented by Roberts Park United Methodist Church, Sculpture by Timothy Schmalz Inc., Waltz Books, and members of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.

did you know » Spirit & Place is proud to partner with Roberts Park UMC to include Timothy Schmalz in this year’s Public Conversation on November 13.

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First-ever side-by-side exhibit of sculptor Timothy Schmalz’s “Matthew 25” works partnered with 3-days of side-by-side dinners and fellowship among festival participants, homeless neighbors, community leaders, artists, and congregants. There is nothing like a home cooked meal served around a family table. Yet for thousands in Marion County alone, that is an unimaginable scene. Through its 20-year feeding ministry, Soup’s On, Roberts Park serves more than 11,000 meals a year to the homeless and food-insecure in Indianapolis. In 2015, Roberts Park unveiled the sculpture “Homeless Jesus” by Timothy Schmalz at the intersection of Alabama, Vermont, and Massachusetts Avenue as a means to provoke conversation and bring attention to our homeless neighbors. Roberts Park UMC believes we can work together to build a more dynamic, compassionate, stronger, and loving community by sharing our experiences “side-by-side.” This multi-part festival offering allows several entry points to learn more about homelessness and how faith, art, and community service can intersect to make a difference in people’s lives.

Exhibition

From Nov. 11 through 13, six sculptures by Timothy Schmalz themed on the teachings of Matthew 25 (“I tell you the truth, when you did it to one of the least of these my brothers and sisters, you were doing it to me!”) will be on public display—side-by-side—for the very first time. Free, hours listed above. Walk-ins welcome.

Artist-led Tour, Reception, & Dinner

Nov. 11, 5—7:30pm. You are invited to participate in a reception and meal of thanksgiving with Timothy Schmalz, Mayor Joe Hogsett, and congregants of Roberts Park UMC, including individuals involved with the church’s 20-year-old Soup’s On ministry. Members of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra will provide music as participants share a meal. Dinner guests are invited to the premiere of Matthew’s Voices: Side-by-Side following the dinner (see below). $50 per meal, supports additional shared meals with the homeless during the festival. RSVP by Nov. 7 at robertsparkumc.org or 317-635-1636.

Concert & Artist Talk

Nov. 11, 7:45—9pm. Remarks by Timothy Schmalz, preceded by the premiere of Matthew’s Voices: Side-by-Side, the newly formed community choir comprised of men and women of all walks of life, including our homeless neighbors, under the direction of Roberts Park Choir Director Jason Fishburn. Free, open to the public. RSVP requested at spiritandplace.org.

Shared Meals

Nov. 12, 5pm and Nov. 13, 12pm. RSVPs requested for the Nov. 12 family-style meal at spiritandplace.org. Walk-ins welcome for the Nov. 13 traditional Soup’s On hot lunch.

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Home 2016

Festival of Events

Gary Chilluffo

Blood, Sweat, & Tears: Creating a Place Called Home Friday, November 11, 6:30—8:30pm Indiana Landmarks Center 1201 Central Ave. IndyGo: 5 & 19 FREE, RSVP by Nov. 7 317-639-4534 / sstanis@indianalandmarks.org Presented by Indiana Landmarks, Storytelling Arts of Indiana, and Historic Urban Neighborhoods of Indianapolis.

St.Joseph historic district

It takes blood, sweat, tears, and vision to convert a historic place into a home. Go on the journey with those who have lived it! If you’ve ever lived in an historic neighborhood, turned a run-down building into a home, had desires to restore an historic building, or just ever looked at someone renovating a home and thought, “I could do that!,” this event is for you. Four featured storytellers—Garry Chilluffo (St. Joseph Historic District), David Williams (Indianapolis Westside), John Watson (Bush Stadium/StadiumLofts), and Judy O’Bannon (Corydon, IN barn)—bring their passion, emotion, and humor center stage to demonstrate how places shape us and forge connections to our past. After the featured presenters share their stories, the mic opens to anyone inspired to share a 1 to 3 minute home renovation story. Cash bar and light snacks will be served beginning at 6:30pm with the story sharing beginning at 7pm. RSVP by Nov. 7 at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » In 2009, the empty grandstands of rusting seats at historic Bush Stadium overlooked a field jammed with “Cash for Clunkers” cars. Today, people live in cool, loft-style apartments in the repurposed grandstand, overlooking a restored field that still boasts a pitcher’s mound and home plate.

bush stadium

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Gary Chilluffo

Spirited Chase: Something to Write Home About Saturday, November 12, 9am—3pm WFYI Public Media 1630 N. Meridian St. & 5 Mystery Venues $9 Per Person, RSVP by Nov. 9 317-636-2020 / cweidman@wfyi.org. Presented by WFYI and its community partners.

spirited chase

This on-the-go program offers the chance to visit five mystery locations to learn what “home” means to the people and places of Indianapolis. Spirited Chase is an interactive, on-the-go opportunity to discover new places and faces in Indianapolis. Participants will travel to five “hidden gems” and “gems hidden in plain sight” that each explore what home means to the people of Indianapolis–only, there’s a catch: participants will not know where they are going until they get there. While the locations remain unknown until the day of the event, one thing is for certain, participants will leave the day with a memorable experience to write home about. RSVP by Nov. 9. at 317-636-2020 or wfyi.org/events/spirited-chase.

Fun Awesomeness

nomination

Fun does not equal dumb and serious does not equal boring. A fan favorite for several years, Spirited Chase offers adventure, mystery, and playfulness all while connecting people to important and serious ideas and services in Indianapolis. Well done!

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A Journey Home: Interfaith and Cross Cultural Perspectives Saturday, November 12, 9—10:30am Christian Theological Seminary Shelton Auditorium 1000 W. 42nd St. IndyGo: 34 FREE 317-931-4219 dtctaskforce@desmondtutucenter.org

finding a home

Presented by Desmond Tutu Center for Peace, Reconciliation and Global Justice, The Immigrant and Refugee Service Corps, The Darfur Women Network, and the Center for Citizenship and Community at Butler University.

Learn the history of past immigration to the United States and current concerns from a Muslim, Jewish, and Christian perspective. Currently, immigrants and refugees (“newcomers”) have been at the forefront of both political and social debate in the United States and around the world. When we cultivate our knowledge of migration histories and our awareness of the personal narratives of our neighbors, we can appreciate “home” as a vibrant crossroad, but when we view “home” as a finite resource, we become defensive and fearful. In this session, participants will be transported back in time through a multimedia presentation highlighting historical perspectives of different immigrant communities to the United States to current events and attitudes present in society today. A panel of religious and community leaders from the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim communities will discuss their own community’s struggles as immigrants historically and in the present day, and what their respective faiths say about welcoming the stranger. As an added bonus, the Darfur Women Network will engage the audience in a hands-on experience of soap-making and how they use this skill to empower their community. Featured speakers include Glenn Tebbe (Indiana Catholic Conferences), Rabbi Paula Winning (Bureau of Jewish Education), and Imam Omar Atia (Evansville Islamic Center). Terri Morris Downs of the Immigrant Welcome Center will moderate.

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Wandering to Where We All Live Saturday, November 12, 10am—12pm Holcomb Gardens (Meet at Canal Bridge) 4700 Garden Road IndyGo: 18 & 28 FREE, RSVP by Nov. 11 (limit 50) 317-940-6505 / mtrueblo@butler.edu Presented by Butler University Center for Urban Ecology, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, daVinci Pursuit, and The Town of Rocky Ripple.

explore

Art, science, and curiosity combine in this exploratory walk with local artists, scientists, and community members, which will present a different way of seeing our waterways. Our city is home to more than just people. When we slow down to take a gander at what’s around us—whether for inspiration, study, or just curiosity—we learn more about what our home is to the people, plants, and animals around us. Participants will leave with new skills, increased understanding, and renewed curiosity about the places where they live. The “wandering” will begin at Holcomb Gardens when participants are given materials to collect, document, and ask questions about what they observe before walking to the Center for Urban Ecology farm, nearby woods, Rocky Ripple, and White River. Artists and scientists will discuss plants, animals, and other items of interest along the way. Walking north along the river to the Rocky Ripple town hall, “wanderers” will convene for discussion, coffee, and collective art creation about what we have experienced. Rocky Ripple community members will be present to provide their perspective on the role the waterways play in their daily lives. The walk returns and concludes at Holcomb Gardens. RSVP by Nov.11 at spiritandplace.org. (Limit 50)

did you know » There’s been a lot of focus on Indy’s waterways recently. From “Rivers of the Anthropocene,” a project of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, to the work of Reconnecting to our Waterways (ROW), The daVinci Pursuit, and Big Car on the “Stream Walks” series, many organizations share the goal of bringing together the perspectives of artists and scientists to help us all become curious explorers of our own surroundings. Spirit & Place is thrilled to provide a platform for this important placemaking work!

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There’s No Place Like Home: Love Letters to Planet Earth Saturday, November 12, 1—3:30pm Orchard School 615 W. 64th St. IndyGo: 28 FREE 317-835-9827 / jimpoyser@earthcharterindiana.org Presented by Elders Climate Action, The Orchard School, The Nature Conservancy, and Youth Power Indiana.

no place like home

Youth and elders come together to learn from each other and explore the different ways we share and care for our home, planet earth. Dorothy knew the truth: “There’s no place like home.” Since planet earth is our only home, how we treat it matters. We are more than mere sojourners passing through without consequence. Our choices about the earth affect our lives, our children’s lives, and grandchildren’s lives. Let’s work across generational lines to be the best stewards of the earth we can be! This intergenerational event invites you to learn from today’s youth as well as from the wisdom of elders. Third grade students from The Orchard School as well as other area schools will kick off the gathering by reading love letters to the earth. Older students will then present on climate education topics such as climate recovery. (They’ll also be happy to swap stories on how they have achieved policy victories in IPS!) Afterwards, older attendees will be invited to write their own love and action letters while youth learn about the new Children of Indiana Nature Park. When the two groups recommence, some of the elders will read their love letters to the next generation. This event gives a voice to the young and energizes elders to exercise their power to protect and preserve. United, these generations can teach and learn from each other. Begin with love, and anything is possible. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » The Children of Indiana Nature Park is a signature project of Indiana’s Bicentennial celebration. Young people can download a deed for the Park and “own” a piece of the Indiana landscape to care for in perpetuity (ilovemyland.org).

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Home is Where Your Heart Is Saturday, November 12, 2—4pm 37-Place 2506 E. 25th Street IndyGo: 5 & 21 FREE 317-545-2245 / aster.bekele@fhcenter.org. Presented by Felege Hiywot Center, 37 Place, Edna Martin Christian Center, Community Health Network East, Random Act of Music, and Coalition of Second Generation Ethiopians.

growing commun ities

Inspired place-making event focused on story-sharing, exhibits, music, and more featuring Martindale Brightwood youth, elders, and Ethiopian community. Celebrate and learn about Martindale Brightwood and its stories through a poster exhibit and artifact display created by community youth featuring neighborhood elders. There will be discussions with longtime residents and some of Martindale Brightwood’s newest neighbors—Ethiopian immigrants. Ethiopian storytelling, music, dance, and coffee are all a part of the day! Martindale Brightwood youth have been interviewing the elders of their community. They’ve heard firsthand the precious memories the elders have of their Martindale Brightwood home, especially how it used to be. The elders love sharing stories of their old neighbors, carefree days of playing outside, home cooked meals, and peaceful afternoons with family and friends. They also share painful feelings about changes to the area and the fear they have for grandchildren and other children in Martindale Brightwood. But resiliency is at the core of this community and the youth and elders—as well as immigrant newcomers—see much to be celebrated. Come and join us! Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know »

The Felege Hiywot Center serves urban youth, second generation Ethiopians, and Ethiopian orphans by teaching gardening and environmental preservation. During a recent summer camp for high school students, the youth expressed a desire to get to know the community elders better. Interviews soon commenced! One interviewee, a 98-year-old named Mrs. Jimie, is a life-long Martindale Brightwood resident who has proudly used two gardening tools her entire life: her grandmother’s sickle and watering pail. As the youth discovered, Mrs. Jimie is just one of Martindale Brightwood’s gems.

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Refugees Welcome Saturday, November 12, 2—4pm Northminster Presbyterian Church 1660 Kessler Blvd East Dr. IndyGo: 17, 19, & 26 FREE 317-251-9489 / media@northminster-indy.org

Welcome home

Presented by Northminster Presbyterian Church, Exodus Refugee Immigration, The Polis Center, and Yardbox Films.

Explore the concept of “home” through refugee perspectives with creative placemaking through art, faith, and data. The world is experiencing the worst refugee crisis since WWII. Refugees Welcome will provide an interactive, safe, and creative forum to discuss this timely topic. Learn how refugees develop a sense of home in a new country through “mental maps,” which are personal points-of-view and perceptions of the areas in which they interact. Over time, the mental map expands as the community is explored. Story maps, which combine narrative text, images, and multimedia, will be created to transform data and geography into compelling and meaningful art. A spoken word performance, story-sharing featuring refugee families, and a collaborative art project asking participants to create their own depiction of what “home” means to them will round out the experience. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

did you know » Northminster Presbyterian Church’s relationship with Exodus Refugee goes back four decades and its link to The Polis Center began in 2014 with a Spirit & Place Festival event on gun violence. Its connection to Yardbox Films stems from the interest and support of one of this year’s Selection Committee members, Asa Gauen, when he learned the organizers of Refugees Welcome could use video support. Together, they’ve intentionally designed a space for thoughtful examination on the issue of refugee resettlement.

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Chronicling Hoosier: Tracing Home in Historic Newspapers Saturday, November 12, 2—3:30pm Indiana State Library, Author’s Room 315 W. Ohio St. IndyGo: 5,8, 10, 11, 15, 34, & 50 FREE, RSVP by Nov. 8 (limit 50) 317-274-8230 or klpalmer@iupuiedu Presented by IUPUI University Library and Indiana Historical Bureau.

historic newspapers

What is a “Hoosier?” Learn what digital historic newspapers reveal while exploring community history. Chronicling Hoosier will provide avid Hoosier hunters, burgeoning genealogists, and the just plain curious equal delight in discovering the power of digital historic newspapers. Big data from historic sources transforms into compelling visualizations that provide new insights into our State’s long-fascination with the origin of the word Hoosier. Focusing on newspapers dating back to 1836, tactics will be taught that every Hoosier can use to search free, digital newspapers from the comfort of their own homes, embarking on their own discoveries of self, family, and community. Historian Chandler Lighty will walk participants through Indiana’s own historic newspaper tool, Hoosier State Chronicles, demonstrating how to easily locate specific information but also how to lose one’s self in the depths of their community history, browsing the over 217,000 pages of local Indiana news. Participants will receive a worksheet that allows them to customize a honed search for a particular topic, person, or event. Attendees will leave with a new sense of communal identity through their beloved Hoosier moniker but also a step-by-step plan for beginning individual discovery through historic digital newspapers. RSVP by Nov. 8 at spiritandplace.org. Seating limited to 50.

did you know » IUPUI University Librarians are participating in the NEH Chronicling America Data Challenge, tracing the use of Hoosier over time and across geographies, plotting data on interactive maps and timelines. The discoveries made through this application will be compared to the slew of theories that exist regarding the meaning of Hoosier.

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Festival of Events

Dan Helrigel

Home 2016

The Things They Brought Home: Military Tattoos Saturday, November 12, 3—5pm Indianapolis Art Center 820 E. 67th St. IndyGo: 17 FREE 255-2464 / awalbridge@indplsartcenter.org Presented by Indianapolis Art Center, Veterans in Industries and Arts, and Indiana Writers Center.

tattoos

This interactive art exhibition explores the veteran experience, tattoos, and the concept of the “body as home” through photography, writing, and panel discussion. Military personnel put their bodies—the homes of their spirit and self-identity—at risk for others. Their tattoos can be a form of self-expression that allows the world a glimpse into what they cherish most or will never forget. The Things They Brought Home will amaze visitors with original and striking photographs of tattooed veterans along with their writings or oral histories. The images and stories give visitors a unique look into the experiences of military personnel. The accounts written by veterans and active duty service personnel will encourage visitors to reflect on happy and humorous stories as well as hard and difficult memories. In addition, interactive experiences, such as a photo booth and a response board, will allow visitors to share their own tattoo stories. Tattoo artists will demonstrate tattoo designs and provide historical and contemporary context on the art of tattooing. Veteran service providers will be on hand to share information and a panel discussion at 3:30pm will feature photographers, veterans, and others speaking about their experiences. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs requested at spiritandplace.org.

Most Thought-Provoking The Spirit & Place Selection Committee was impressed with how The Things They Brought Home encourages people to think deeper about the idea of “the body as home.” Also, tattoos live on the fringe of the art scene. Highlighting tattoos challenges perspectives when it comes to not only art, but the role of art in self-identity and expression, especially for veterans.

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Awesomeness

nomination

spiritandplace.org | festival@iupui.edu


Genius Loci: Herman B Wells and the Spirit of Place Sunday, November 13, 1—2pm Harrison Center for the Arts—City Gallery 1505 N. Delaware St. IndyGo: 19 FREE 317-771-4050 / andchris@iupui.edu

herman B Wells

Presented by Dr. Richard Gunderman and the Harrison Center for the Arts.

Deepen and enrich your connection to the Hoosier state by learning about the authentically-Indiana ideas of legendary IU President Herman B Wells. What is “home?” We often think of home as the building that offers us refuge from the world or as the people who call us their own. But what if the essence of home runs deeper than bricks and mortar or a cast of characters? Could it be that the spirit of a place is what makes “home?” Herman B Wells, the legendary president of Indiana University, certainly thought so. Dr. Richard Gunderman, Indiana University, will pair the ideas of Wells with the evocative power of home-themed Indiana artwork created specifically for this event. Join in for a fresh perspective what home means from a Hoosier perspective. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs encouraged due to limited seating at spiritandplace.org.

did you know »

Indiana was home to the 11th President of Indiana University, Herman B Wells. Having spent his entire 97 year life in the Hoosier State, and having visited each of its 92 counties, Wells knew and captured the spirit of home in Indiana through his life, his work in education, and his dedication to know and care for his fellow Hoosiers. Home, it seems, was his driving motivation.

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Erin Kelley

Public Conversation Signature Event

In conjunction with the John D. Barlow Lecture in the Humanities

21st Annual Public Conversation Sunday, November 13, 4—5:30pm Indiana Landmarks Center 1201 Central Ave. IndyGo: 5 & 19 FREE 317-274-2455 / festival@iupui.edu

public conversation

Presented by Spirit & Place, Roberts Park United Methodist Church, Eskenazi Health, Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership, Fair Housing Center of Central Indiana, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs, and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI as part of the John D. Barlow Lecture in the Humanities.

A sociologist, sculptor, community activist, and political scientist reflect on poverty, homelessness, public policy, and the human spirit. What if “home” is an unaffordable place? What if we’re unwelcome in the spaces we try to claim as “home?” How do we make the idea of “home” a reality for those without? For more than 20 years, the Public Conversation has provided a neutral space where audience members can be a “fly on the wall” to a spontaneous and thoughtful dialogue between individuals of differing arts, humanities, and religious backgrounds. This year’s Public Conversation is no different, but examines the nuances of home through a social justice and policy lens to understand the opportunities and challenges we face as a society when it comes to creating just communities. Walk-ins welcome. RSVPs encouraged at spiritandplace.org.

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Presenters » Harvard sociologist and MacArthur Genius Matthew Desmond’s New York Times bestselling book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in an American City paints a vivid and heartbreaking story of life on the edge for America’s poor. Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America’s vast inequality—and to people’s determination and intelligence in the face of hardship. Canadian sculptor Timothy Schmalz’s “Homeless Jesus” piece outside Roberts Park UMC downtown has caused many people to stop and stare over the past several months. Schmalz, a Catholic, describes his work as visual translations of the Gospels. He believes the more powerful—and truthful—the art, the more powerful the questions of the viewer become and the more likely they are too see marginalized people as God sees them. Allison Luthe serves as the Executive Director of the Martin Luther King Community Center (MLK Center) located in Butler-Tarkington. Luthe represents the MLK Center in community collaborations to bring about comprehensive social and economic advancement for families in the area surrounding 38th and Illinois and the mid-north area. In her 15+ year career, she has tackled a wide range of social justice issues working for or volunteering with organizations such as Central Indiana Jobs for Justice, Greater Indianapolis NAACP, Forest Manor Multi-Service Center, and the United Way of Central Indiana. Terri Jett, Associated Professor of Political Science and Special Assistant to the Provost for Diversity and Inclusivity at Butler University, will moderate. Jett is the board president of the ACLU of Indiana and also serves on the Indiana Debate Commission.

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Event Index *21st Annual Public Conversation.................................................................................................................................. 50 A Journey Home: Interfaith and Cross Cultural Perspectives................................................................................... 42 A Place to Call Home: A Workshop Where You Can Help End Homelessness..................................................... 31 *An Evening with Elizabeth Strout.................................................................................................................................. 30 B3Home: Bats, Bees and Birds........................................................................................................................................ 16 Being at Home with Loss, Death, & Dying.................................................................................................................... 22 Bless this Mess.................................................................................................................................................................... 28 *Blood, Sweat & Tears: Creating a Place Called Home............................................................................................... 40 *Bloom Where You’re Planted......................................................................................................................................... 17 Bringing Memories Home: The Transformative Power of Music............................................................................. 33 *Chronicling Hoosier: Tracing Home in Historic Newspapers.................................................................................. 47 Closing in on The Homestretch: Community Engagement on Youth Homelessness.......................................... 20 Do It Again Recycled Art Market: Home is What We Make of It............................................................................. 15 *Finding Home: Indiana at 200........................................................................................................................................ 19 Finding My Forever Family................................................................................................................................................ 35 *From the Ground Up: Developing a People-Centered Approach to Community Development................................................................................................................ 23 Genius Loci: Herman B Wells and the Spirit of Place................................................................................................. 49 Haus Music........................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Home Grown: Building Strong Communities through Food..................................................................................... 18 Home is Where Your Heart is........................................................................................................................................... 45 Homes Before Highways: Neighborhoods Under the Exit Ramps.......................................................................... 29 Homing the Houseless....................................................................................................................................................... 26 I Am Home: Muslim Hoosiers.......................................................................................................................................... 12 Leaving Home...................................................................................................................................................................... 32 *More Than a Roof: Affordable Homeownership as a Catalyst for Change.......................................................... 34 Moving Stories..................................................................................................................................................................... 11 My Home, My Earth, My Responsibility........................................................................................................................ 27 Rebuilding Home: Moral Injury to Soul Repair............................................................................................................. 36 Refugees Welcome............................................................................................................................................................. 46 Riverside Speaks! Past, Present, & Future..................................................................................................................... 13 *Side-by-Side....................................................................................................................................................................... 38 *Slow Saunter Hike / Next Indiana Campfire............................................................................................................... 14 Sounds of Home.................................................................................................................................................................. 21 *Spirited Chase: Something to Write Home About.................................................................................................... 41 *The Dog Ate My Homework (Opening Night Event)................................................................................................ 10 The Houses of Abraham.................................................................................................................................................... 24 The Things They Brought Home: Military Tattoos....................................................................................................... 48 There is No Place Like Home: Love Letters to Planet Earth...................................................................................... 44 *Wandering to Where We All Live.................................................................................................................................. 43 *Writing Home: The Stories of American Veterans in Words, Dance, and Theater............................................. 37 *RSVPs strongly encouraged or required. In some cases, ticket sales apply. See individual event descriptions for details. Walk-ins welcome to most events but RSVP’ing at spiritandplace.org is still encouraged.

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RULE #1:

People don’t read anymore.

Of course, that’s hogwash. People read a lot. They just read differently. They seek information differently and respond differently when they find it. As you might imagine, all of this has a tremendous impact on marketing. It’s terribly challenging—and fun, like a 700-piece jigsaw puzzle of some rococo cathedral. We love this stuff—this figuring out what to say and how best to say it, how to get people’s attention and inspire them to action. Usually, that means breaking a few rules. If that appeals to you, maybe you should read more at our website. welldonemarketing.com


Home 2016

Festival Partners Alzheimer’s Association Greater Indiana Chapter American Friends Service Committee Art of the Soul Studio Arthur M. Glick JCC ArtMix Indiana Arts Council of Indianapolis Arts for Learning Athenaeum Foundation Big Car Boone County Solid Waste Management District Brite Divinity School Soul Repair Center Butler University Center for Urban Ecology Butler University Vivian S. Delbrook Visiting Writers Series Cedar Street Builders Center for Citizenship and Community at Butler University Center for Interfaith Cooperation Central Christian Church, Indianapolis Christian Theological Seminary Christians for Peace and Justice in the Middle East Circles Indy CityWrite Coalition for Homelessness Intervention and Prevention (CHIP) Coalition of Second Generation Ethiopians Community Education and Public Policy Committee of the Continuum of Care Community Health Network East Concord Neighborhood Center Congregation Beth-El Zedeck Dance Kaleidoscope Desmond Tutu Center for Peace, Reconciliation and Global Justice at Butler University

Eagle Creek Park Foundation Ebenezer Baptist Church Edna Martin Christian Center/37 Place Elders Climate Action Eskenazi Health Exodus Refugee Fair Housing Center of Central Indiana Families First Felege Hiywot Center Garfield Park Arts Center Greater Indy Habitat for Humanity Harrison Center for the Arts- City Gallery Heartland Yoga Community Historic Urban Neighborhoods of Indianapolis Homeless Youth Taskforce Hoosier Environmental Council Humane Society of Indianapolis Indiana Art Therapy Association Indiana Forest Alliance Indiana Historical Bureau Indiana Historical Society Indiana Interchurch Center Indiana Landmarks Indiana Medical History Museum Indiana Repertory Theatre Indiana State Library Indiana State Museum Indiana Writers Center Indianapolis Art Center Indianapolis Baroque Orchestra Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation Indianapolis Hiking Club Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership Indianapolis Museum of Art Indianapolis Peace and Justice Center 54

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Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation (IndyGo) Indianapolis Women’s Chorus Indy Food Council IndyGo Transit Ambassadors Insight Development Corp. Islamic Society of North America IU Public Policy Institute IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI IU School of Public & Environmental Affairs at IUPUI IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute IUPUI Department of Anthropology IUPUI Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program IUPUI Senior Academy IUPUI University Library Ivy Tech Community College Jewish Family Services Jewish Voice for Peace—Indiana Kenyetta Dance Company Kheprw Institute KI NuMedia Love Handle Morgan-Monroe State Forest Muslim Alliance of Indiana NAMI Indianapolis Northminster Presbyterian Church Outreach, Inc. Paramount Farm Paramount School of Excellence Partnerships for Lawrence Polis Center Random Act of Music Roberts Park United Methodist Church Scarabys Consulting, LLC Sculpture by Timothy Schmalz, Inc. Second Presbyterian Church

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Shining Light Film Festival Slow Food Indy Social Sketch Indy Southeast Working Class Task Force Spargel Productions Stopover, Inc. Storytelling Arts of Indiana SullivanMunce Cultural Center Sun King Brewery The Darfur Women’s Network The daVinci Pursuit The Immigrant and Refugee Service Corp The Indianapolis Public Library (Central Library) The Nature Conservancy The Orchard School The Sapphire Theatre Company Theater at the Fort Threshold Singers Town of Rocky Ripple TURN Festival Unitarian Universalist Church of Indianapolis University of Indianapolis Valiant Seed Veterans Homelessness Task Force Veterans in Industries and Arts Waltz Books WFYI Public Media Writing Futures at Marian University Youth Power Indiana YMCA at the Athenaeum Zionsville Cultural District Zionsville Nature Center Zionsville Street & Stormwater Department

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Donors MAJOR PARTNERS

PARTNERS

Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation, Inc. Bohlsen Group Indiana Landmarks Lilly Endowment Inc. The Polis Center at IUPUI WFYI Public Media IUPUI

Ronald Caltabiano & John Muggee Sharolyn R. Doane, in memory of Beverly A. Doane Fair Housing Center of Central Indiana David H. Kosene Joanna B. & William Taft

FRIENDS

Pamela J. Bennett Edward R. & Phyllis S. Gabovitch Jane A. Henegar & Matthew R. Gutwein Jon B. Laramore & Janet G. McCabe Takuya & Ingrid M. Sato William Scott David Wantz & Susan Fleck Rosalind Harris Webb Gretchen Wolfram

CHAMPIONS

12 Stars Media Center for Service & Learning at IUPUI The Indianapolis Foundation, a CICF affiliate Robin M. & Carole E. Thomas / Paradox Dental Center

VISIONARY

Christel DeHaan Family Foundation, in honor of the children and families of Christel House Eskenazi Health Ken Honeywell Goldstein Group Financial Advisors LLC IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI Second Presbyterian Church

DONORS

Dona L. Armstrong Sue E. Arnold Judge Sarah Evans Barker & Kenneth R. Barker Sara A. Blackburn Glen A. & Jeanne A. Bohannon Tad & Vicki Bohlsen Joseph E. & Helen-Louise Boling Robin Bousum Elizabeth J. Brandt Lydia A. Brasher Brett & Karissa Hulse Charles L. & Kathleen M. Brinkman Scott M. & Mary C. Brown John J. & Melissa Buechler Steven M. & Deborah H. Bulloff Nancy D. Campbell Judith L. Cebula & Michael Redmond Victor E. Childers Richard A. & Lynn C. Cohee M. L. Coufal David & Shirley Daniell John A. & Donna L. Dearth Elizabeth M. Elliott Katherine J. English

LEADING

David J. & Penny J. Bodenhamer Christian Theological Seminary Gail Thomas Strong & Anthony L. Strong Rhonda Fox Waltz & Kevin L. Waltz

SUSTAINING

Keira A. Amstutz & Shawn P. Mulholland Arthur Jordan Foundation Elizabeth Goodfellow Pamela Blevins Hinkle & C. Eric Hinkle Charles A. & Samantha R. Hyde Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership Leslie J. & Michael P. Kidwell, Jr. E. Kirk McKinney, Jr. Penrod Society

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Joseph Flummerfelt Lewis F. Galloway & Eleanor H. Alexander John & Nadine A. Gantt Jane E. Gosling Susan E. Grayson, in honor of Pam Hinkle & Erin K. Kelley Austin & Christine A. Greene Jacqueline A. Griswold Susan C. Guba Coyene I. Halpern Emily F. Hancock Sara M. & Christopher J. Hausermann William L. Hayes Mary E. Hays Samuel M. & Margaret Hazlett Brian D. & Louise H. Henderson Holly Hendrickson John A. & Judith C. Hill Martha J. Hinkle Gary N. & Heliene M. Houdek Jeffrey L. Hunter & Anne H. Weinheimer Indiana Association of United Ways Stephen J. & Anne M. Jay William D. & Ann L. Jones David E. & Mimi J. Jose The Judith K. Powell Living Trust Sharon Kandris Venetta Keefe Erin K. Kelley & Jeffery A. Zickgraf Kelly Kester Billie B. Kingston Kenneth R. & Sara B. Koehler Norbert & Katherine Krapf Patricia A. Ley Jane E. Malless Margaret M. Maxwell & John L. Krauss Therese A. Maxwell Susan McCormick Mary M. McKee Robert B. & Eleanor S. McNamara Tilden & Cathy L. Mendelson Anne C. Laker & Joseph H. Merrick Edith L. Millikan John E. & Mary Jane Mitchell Janet J. Newland Patricia E. O’Neil Donald & Mary J. Orander Beth Perdue Outland Brian E. & Gail J. Payne Hudnall A. & Diane L. Pfeiffer

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

Loretta M. Qadir Dhyana R. Raynor Kathryn Rietmann N. Clay & Amy J. Robbins C. Diane Roe D. H. Royce Lillian Rucker Mary R. Schilling Robert A. & Rita S. Schilling Roger W. & Barbara D. Schmenner Paul G. & Susan C. Schoon Stacy Schroeder William L. & Laura A. Selm Karen Crawford Simms Jane L. & G. P. Smith, Jr. Ron Sukenick Bonnie H. Swaim David W. Clapp & Nancy Swigonski Tharp-Perrin Gindhart Artists Inc. Joan M. Trendell Randall C. Trowbridge & Alice W. Brown Ellen F. Van DeVoorde Maija A. Vanags Susan Vinicor Mitchell R. Vogel & Claudia Grossmann William M. & Audrey E. Wiebenga Charles H. Williams Marguerite Winslow & Loretta Knapp Bernard Wurger Lynn R. & Kay A. Youngblood Nathan P. & Jennifer Yumibe Tamara S. Zahn & Timothy L. Wade

MATCHING GIFT DONORS Eli Lilly and Company Lilly Endowment Inc. PNC Foundation

SPECIAL THANKS Kheprw Institute NUVO Yelp

This list includes gifts and pledges received October 2015 through August 2016. If your name is not listed as you would like it to be, or if it has been omitted, please accept our apologies and call us at (317) 278-2644.

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Home 2016

Festival Team Steering Committee

Event Selection Committee

Marc McAleavey

Beth Perdue Outland

Carol Baker Ebony Chappel Matt Davis Asa Gauen Heather Hall Uroosa Khan Leah Nahmias Kathi Ridley-Merriweather

Bruce Hetrick

Steering Committee Chair, Principal, Powerful Appeals; Visiting Professor, Journalism and Public Relations Dept., IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

Keira Amstutz

Vicki Bohlsen

Elizabeth Goodfellow

David Hampton

Charlie Hyde

President & CEO, Indiana Humanities

• •

CEO, Bohlsen Group

• •

Major Gift Officer, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

• •

Sr. Pastor Light of the World Christian Church & Deputy Mayor of Neighborhood Engagement

Co-Chair Co-Chair

Spirit & Place Staff

President & CEO, Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site

Pam Blevins Hinkle

Festival Director

pegg kennedy

LaShawnda Crowe Storm

Leslie Kidwell

Erin Kelley

David Kosene

Karen Lynch

Fred Lewis

Shamira Wilson

Cheri O’Neill

Sales Associate, Tucker Realty

Major Gift Officer, American Red Cross President, Kosene and Kosene

Sr. Minister, First Baptist Church of Indianapolis

Community Engagement Director Program Director Intern (Event Logistics) Intern (Community Engagement)

President & CEO, Ball State University Foundation

Beth Perdue Outland

Sr. Norma Rocklage

Vice President, Community Engagement & Strategic Innovation, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra

Executive Director, Education Formation Outreach, Marian University

Robin Thoman

Gail Thomas Strong

Paradox Dental Care

Vice President, Community Engagement, WFYI Public Media

Sally Zweig

Attorney at Law, Katz & Korin, PC

58

spiritandplace.org | festival@iupui.edu


Thanks to Polis Center Support Staff •

David J. Bodenhamer

Neil Devadsan

Allegra East

Robert Ferrell

Lou Ann Glidden

Melissa Gona

Gloria Harmsen Hastings

John Hayes

Debra Hollon

Gautham Kumar Bavandla

Executive Director

Lead Systems Engineer

Communications & Marketing Manager

Programmer

Business Manager

Financial Assistant GIS Analyst GIS Analyst

Research Programmer/Research Associatte

Administrative Assistant

Learn Mo re

about spirit & Place What’s with that name “Spirit & Place” anyway? What else goes on besides the festival? Discover why Spirit & Place is an award-winning organization, how it makes a meaningful and measurable difference, and how you can get involved. Join Director

Pam Blevins Hinkle second Wednesday of every month (except November)

RSVP to pbhinkle@iupui.edu or by calling Pam at 317-278-2644.

9 am or 5:30 pm for a one-hour talk and tour.

#SPindy | 317-274-2455

59


SEPTEMBER 20 - OCTOBER 15

exploring our story

TICKETS STARTING AT $25 BUY NOW! IRTLIVE.COM | 317.635.5252

2016

Open Enrollment November 3-10

Enrolling 9th graders only at Riverside

Open House November 3

5:30-8:30 p.m Herron High School 110 E. 16th St. Featuring information on both schools Register online at

herronhighschool.org


s val i t s e F e c a l P & Spirit Theme 2017

NOV 2017

Taken literally or otherwise, POWER is a complex reality.

POWER can be disquieting, discomforting, and oppressive.

POWER is a fundamental concept that shapes our world. From an “Almighty Power” to the “Power Rangers,” we integrate not only the word, but the use of power into our personal, spiritual, and community lives.

Power can also be illuminating, inspiring, and hopeful.

Using the arts, humanities, and religion as vehicles to explore the meaning of POWER, Spirit & Place invites you to share your thoughts on POWER by following us on social media. Sign up for our enews and blog posts to dig even deeper.

Learn more at spiritandplace.org

Guidelines available in January 2017 Apply by April 21, 2017


spirit & PLACE Since 1996 » ea-makers 330,000 people | 6,000 id

9 0 0 + c o m m u n i t y o r g a n i z at i o n s | 1 , 0 4 0 p r o g r a m s

Ignite Creativity

INspire Place-making

Human creativity is the engine of all systems.

places represent our shared cultural, environmental, economic, and social capital

Develops talent

Sparks public innovation

Drives experimentation and risk-taking

+

Strengthens civic identity

Revitalizes place-based assets

Supports and sustains values of place-making

+ Spark Connections spirit & Place is the “and”...

»

vibrant & engaged communities Spirit & Place strengthens civitas (bonds of community)

Brings us together across boundaries of differences

Creates public conversation, reflection and experience •

Links people, ideas and organizations

Empowers civic and creative voices

Promotes free exchange of ideas •

Practices civility

Each year, Spirit & Place brings together 19,000 Central Indiana citizens through public events and partnerships that ignite creativity, inspire place-making, and spark connections in order to build more vibrant and civically engaged communities. #SPindy | 317-274-2455

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p: 317-274-2455 f: 317-278-1830 festival@iupui.edu spiritandplace.org #SPIndy

Spirit & Place Event Guide 2016  
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