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MOVE work, live and prosper in northwestern alberta

Local Features News Events

Opportunities

FAIRVIEW FLYERS

COMPETITIVE HOCKEY, RIGHT AT HOME

GO: MIGHTY PEACE EXPLORE + ENJOY OUR REGION

THROUGH THE EYE OF THE STORM ADDRESSING THE OPIOID CRISIS IN THE PEACE REGION

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Inspiring Women IN BUSINESS

TAKE One NOV | DEC | JAN 18/19


Contents >> NOVEMBER 2018 - FEBRUARY 2019

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VOLUME XX

PUBLISHERS

Jenelle Van Slyke Tormaigh Van Slyke EDITORS

Jenelle Van Slyke Tormaigh Van Slyke ADVERTISING SALES | FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

Tormaigh Van Slyke // hello@moveupmag.com LAYOUT DESIGN

Jenelle Van Slyke Tormaigh Van Slyke AD DESIGN

Aimie Williams Jenelle Van Slyke Tormaigh Van Slyke PHOTOGRAPHY

Ç Competitive hockey, right at home

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p. 26

Jenna Armstrong, Melissa E. Earle, Paul Lavoie Images, That Girl Pearl Photography, Samantha Rose Photography, Hope Regimbald, Drew Rogers, T Parenteau Photography WRITERS

Amber Armstrong, Northern Lakes College Staff, Drew Rogers, Jenelle Van Slyke, Tormaigh Van Slyke, Talena Winters

Inspiring Women IN BUSINESS

Move Up is published by VAULTmedia. No content herein, including designed advertising, can be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. 12,500+ copies are printed and distributed throughout the Mighty Peace Region, Alberta and beyond. Move Up is 100 per cent funded by advertising dollars. Have a great story idea? Please send us your press release for consideration.

moveupmag.com hello@moveupmag.com

Ç 10 Inspiring Women in Business

p. 31

Also >> 19

ICYMI

Coloured in Fun Run, Sisters in Spirit & Summer's End Festival

MOVE UP IS PUBLISHED BY

VAULTmedia MOVE UP IS A PROUD MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANIZATIONS

PREDA

PEACE REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ALLIANCE

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Turning your Life Around Through Education

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Performance is Power

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Go Mighty Peace

Chris Yellowbird seizes his opportunity with NLC

DMI values diversity in the workplace

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY BY TYRELL PARENTEAU

Your guide to culture and events in the Mighty Peace

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YEAR in review

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he Regional Economic Development Initiative for Northwest Alberta (REDI) was formed in 2002 to promote and enhance economic growth amongst its member communities and to promote the region. REDI is geographically located in the far northwest portion of Alberta—within Mackenzie County and the Métis Settlement of Paddle Prairie. The region is home to several progressive and established resource industries such as agriculture, forestry and oil and gas. This has enabled sustained economic diversification. Like the northern lights that dance overhead, the REDI region is vibrant and alive. The region is filled with unique commercial, residential and industrial investment opportunities. This, together with a high regard for family and lifestyle, make the region an amazing place to work and live. 6

ADVE R T I S E M E N T

It is REDI’s mandate to keep this region vibrant and growing, and throughout the past year REDI has worked with its partners to maintain that vibrancy. REDI BUSINESS BOOTCAMP In the past year REDI partnered with Northern Lakes College to deliver the REDI Business Bootcamp, a diverse offering of business programs for small business owners and entrepreneurs. A total of 14 offerings of 11 different courses in the areas of human resources, bookkeeping, marketing & branding and business planning were offered. The courses were offered in High Level, Fort Vermilion and La Crete and ran from January through April 2018. Approximately 90 people participated in the courses from various businesses and organizations throughout the Mackenzie region. HIGH LEVEL CENSUS CORRECTION In 2017, REDI partnered with the Town of High Level to redo their 2016

federal census. In 2015 REDI completed a census for High Level that identified 1,487 residences and 3,823 residents. The federal census, however, only identified 1,163 residences and only 3,159 residents. While the economy had slowed down, something was amiss. The 2017 census identified 1,495 residences and 3,701 residents—an increase of almost 600 people and more than 400 residences. Municipalities rely on census data to access per capita government grants. The result of the 2017 census greatly improved the amount of grant funding the Town receives from the province. TRANSPORTATION Transportation remains a priority for the REDI region. REDI has belonged to the Northern Transportation Advocacy Bureau (NTAB) since its inception and continues to work with them to advocate for northern transportation corridors.

Of great relevance is a proposed rail line that would run from Fort McMurray to Alaska. This multicommodity rail line would help move Mackenzie region commodities via rail to Alaska and Asian pacific markets. It would also open the opportunity for valueadded facilities to be built in the region, increasing employment and investment opportunities. In September of 2017, REDI partnered with NTAB and the Peace Region Economic Development Alliance (PREDA) to host the “North to Alaska Symposium”. More than 150 people attended the conference which included speakers from industry, representatives from Alaska, one of the proposed rail developers and featured Preston Manning as the keynote speaker. HEMP RESEARCH REDI has also been looking into opportunities like hemp. No, not the marijuana kind—industrial hemp. Over the past two years REDI has partnered


with the Mackenzie Applied Research Association (MARA) to complete hemp trials in the La Crete region. We have known for many years the commodities grown in northern Alberta are among the best. With an increasing demand for hemp, REDI invested in MARA on a five-year hemp trial. Additionally, REDI partnered with the other northern alliances to attract potential hemp processors to northern Alberta. Hemp is being used to build everything from car parts to building bricks. And, while it may seem a little “out there,� it is a new reality and REDI wants to be prepared. POTENTIAL SKI HILL AND HISTORICAL SITES Not so far out there is the potential for a ski hill in our region. REDI has partnered with the Mackenzie Ski Hill Society to hire a consultant to prepare the Buffalo Head Ski Area Master Plan. An important aspect of economic viability is the quality of life residents enjoy and a ski hill is pretty enjoyable.

NORTH TO ALASKA SYMPOSIUM

REDI has also partnered with the Mackenzie Frontier Tourism Association to complete brochures and markers for local historical sites. REDI is continuing its work in all these areas and continues to monitor the region for potential opportunities. REDI is planning a spring conference in High Level to highlight new opportunities.

HIGH LEVEL

CENSUS CORRECTION

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Members from the "Through the Eye of the Storm" organizational committee meet with the Alberta Minister of Health Hon. Sarah Hoffman and MLA Debbie Jabbour // Photography submitted

THROUGH THE EYE OF THE STORM Major Initiative Addresses the Opioid Crisis in the Peace Region he “Through the Eye of the Storm” project was created and developed through the Peace Regional Victim Services Society in partnership with Alberta Health Services Addictions and Mental Health, Peace River RCMP, the Peace River Correctional Centre, Kee Tas Now Tribal Council and persons with lived experience.

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The goals of this grant initiative are to: • increase awareness in Peace Regional communities about the effects of the opioid crisis locally • reduce stigma toward people who use opioids and other substances 8

ADVE R T I S E M E N T

• educate and enhance community knowledge about opioids, including the medical use of opioids, risk and impact of opioid use and abuse on individuals, families and communities • provide an increased understanding of the available harm reduction programs and community services available to individuals and families throughout the region and an understanding of how to access services including Addiction and Mental Health service, the Opioid Dependency Program in Grande Prairie, HIV North and other identified support services available throughout the region

We have engaged Dr. Charl Els who is an expert in his field and involved in several aspects of the Opioid Crisis in Canada. Dr. Els will be engaged in the development of the school presentations and he will participate in local information sessions. We will also have real life stories of people directly affected by the Opioid Crisis from the area. This addition should prove to be very impactful and unique to this initiative. We encourage everyone and anyone to attend these sessions as Dr. Els is a very engaging presenter and will be interactive with the audience.


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News 

Photography by Melissa E. Earle

Shareholders Announce Selling DMI to Mercer International Inc.

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s of October 4, 2018, the shareholders of DaishowaMarubeni International Ltd. (“DMI”), Nippon Paper Industries Co. Ltd. and Marubeni Corporation announced they have entered into a share purchase agreement to sell all DMI shares to Mercer International Inc. (“Mercer”). DMI’s assets include the Peace River Pulp Mill in Peace River, Alberta, a 50 per cent ownership of Cariboo Pulp and Paper Mill in Quesnel, British Columbia, and a 50 per cent interest in the Peace River Logging Corporation and associated Limited Partnership, a joint venture with the

Woodland Cree First Nation. DMI President, Mr. Tomoyuki (Steve) Iida, was quoted as saying the following:

to customary closing conditions. Operations will continue as scheduled under DMI’s management until the transaction is closed. ABOUT DMI

“I believe all of DMI’s assets have bright futures. The mills have reliable access to fibre and are well-situated to serve multiple markets. Most importantly, our workforce operating these mills, logging operations and providing corporate administrative services are well experienced and highly skilled,” said Iida. The transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2018, subject

Daishowa-Marubeni International Ltd. is a forest products company first established in Western Canada in 1969 and co-owns and operates two modern kraft pulp mills in British Columbia and Alberta with a total annual production capacity of approximately 648,500 ADMT of premium grade NBSK and NBHK market pulp.

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 News PRSD schools raise $20K for Cancer Photography submitted

awareness to an important cause that impacts many families. At the same time, it promotes the attributes of citizenship, community, compassion, teamwork, leadership, generosity and kindness.

In late September, schools throughout Peace River School Division (PRSD) held school walks, runs and various challenges in honour of the Terry Fox legacy and to raise money for cancer research.

On October 16, PRSD announced that division-wide, $19,971.45 was raised for cancer research. According to the PRSD, school participation in Terry Fox events raises

PRSD extends heartfelt gratitude to students, staff, parents and community members for their outstanding support and generosity.

HFCRD hires Behavioural consultants

Behavioural Consultants Brooke Senacka & Jennifer Laycock

Holy Family Catholic Regional Division (HFCRD) is pleased to welcome Behavioural Consultants Brooke Senack and Jennifer Laycock. These new positions are funded by the 2018/19 Classroom Improvement Fund from Alberta Education. The two will work directly with students, teachers and parents from multiple HFCRD schools to address behaviour concerns. 12

“We are thrilled to welcome Brooke and Jennifer. They have a wealth of experience working with children, and I am confident they will have a profound impact on our students,” said Superintendent Betty Turpin. “We are grateful to Alberta Education for providing funding…so our division could create and financially support these positions.” According to HFCRD, they made their decision to utilize the $314,000 grant based on the results of teacher surveys. Last year, teachers voted to receive new technology and improved furniture. In total, the fund has provided $77 million for classrooms across the province.

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Fairview’s Re-brand & New Logo Unveiled On September 24, Fairview’s Town Council and Administration proudly unveiled their new logo supporting their ongoing re-branding efforts. During the unveiling ceremony, Mayor Gordon MacLeod announced the re-brand is a step forward in communicating Council’s goals for the community. The Town sought outside input for the project by collaborating 55+ community and high school students. “We want to be known as a vibrant, safe, health-conscious community that attracts young professionals. We want to be known as the best place to live and a community of choice in the Peace Country,” said MacLeod. According to MacLeod, there will be a concerted effort to facilitate more health programs and retail opportunities as well as to be more receptive to entrepreneurs. “We want to be known as a forward thinking and innovative community, supporting innovative entrepreneurs with diverse services, modern amenities and recreational/cultural opportunities for the entire family,” said MacLeod. According to MacLeod, the new logo keeps the “heart” concept, and the “The Heart of the Peace” tagline as it continues to reflect Fairview’s geographical position in the region and captures the friendly, welcoming and health-focused attitude of the community.


START UP UP OR OR EXPAND EXPANDYOUR YOURBUSINESS BUSINESS START Are you you ready readyto tostart startyour yournew newbusiness businessininthe theHeart Heartofofthe thePeace? Peace? Are Areyou youaadeveloper developerlooking lookingfor foropportunities? opportunities? Are Fairview’s progressive progressivesupport supportto toour ourcommunity communitycontributes contributestoto the Fairview’s the development of ofbusiness, business,industry, industry,education, education,recreation, recreation,and andhealth health development professionals; making makingus usthe thecommunity communityofofchoice choiceininthe thePeace PeaceCountry. Country. professionals;

INVEST WHERE WHERE INVEST THE HEART HEART IS IS

Contact Contactus ustoday! today!Visit Visitour ouronline onlineavailable available Commercial CommercialListings Listingson onwww.fairview.ca www.fairview.ca

Fairview’s Fairview’s competitive competitivecommercial commercialtax taxrate ratewith withthe theDevelopment Development Incentive Program assists entrepreneurs and businesses Incentive Program assists entrepreneurs and businessestotolocate, locate, start start and andgrow growin inFairview Fairviewwith withthe thepurpose purposeofofstimulating stimulating business/residential expansion and development. business/residential expansion and development.

Commercial Commercial Tax Tax Rate RateComparison Comparison

Fairview, Fairview, Alberta: Alberta: 14.65 14.65

16 rate 16 Peace Peace Country Country Municipalities: Municipalities:16.33 16.33*median *median rate Town of Fairview Town of Fairview www.heartofthepeace.com www.heartofthepeace.com www.fairview.ca www.fairview.ca

Daryl Greenhill, CAO Daryl Greenhill, CAO AB T0H 1L0 10209-109 St Fairview, St Fairview, AB T0H 1L0 Tel.10209-109 780-835-5461 Tel. 780-835-5461 cao@fairview.ca cao@fairview.ca #Li fesBetterUpHere | NOVEMBER 2018 - FEBRUARY 20 1 9 M OV E U P

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Xcetera

Ta

Inc.

P. 780 624 4388 C. 780 625 1854 F. 780 624 2455 Individual Tax Returns Corporate Tax Returns Payroll Bookkeeping GST Filing

Accounts Receivable Accounts Payable WCB Applications Corporate Registry PBA Certified

We can also help you apply for the Disability Tax Credit

julie@taxcetera.ca | www.taxcetera.ca Box 5054 10011 102 Ave. Peace River AB T8S 1R7

www.solar-store.com

Providing renewable energy products and technical support for your energy independence

780-835-3682 | 1-866-835-6277 info@solar-store.com | Box 1243, Fairview, AB

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News ď Ž Photography submitted

SavetheDate

Christmas with Elvis December 8 at the Mile Zero Regional Multiplex in Grimshaw. Tickets are $50 at Beyond 2000. Call 780-332-2012 for more information.

Peace Regional Recreation Centre On schedule As fall wraps up construction on the Peace Regional Recreation Centre is continuing full tilt and on schedule. Throughout the end of summer and early fall construction focused on concrete, putting in floor bases and prepping the second floor. The floor slabs are now 80 percent complete. Additionally, the roofing is complete on

the non-pre-engineered areas. The new ice plant has arrived and is in the ice plant rooms, as has the cooling tower for it. Air handling units have arrived on site and will be installed over the next few months. Looking ahead the entire structure is expected to be completely enclosed in about six weeks. Custom glass is being cut to fill in the windows and doors

Clear Hills County Municipal Development Plan

are on their way. Due to the unexpected good weather, crews are able to begin work on some of the external components such as curbs, gutters and sidewalks. Framing for the interior walls followed by drywall is also excepted to take place later this fall. For more information visit peaceriver.ca/peaceregional-recreation-centre

If you are a resident, employee or business owner in Clear Hills County, go to clearhillscounty. ab.ca and fill out the Municipal Development Plan survey for a chance to win $1,000 for a local not-for-profit group of your choice.

Peace Valley Snow Rider Memberships now being sold The 2018/2019 Alberta Snowmobile Association (ASA)/ Peace Valley Snow Rider memberships are now being sold. They are $80 if purchased before January 1, and $90 afterward. They are being sold by the sled dealerships in Peace River and Hines Creek, and they can be purchased online from ASA.

Your feedback will be valuable in shaping the vision, goals, objectives and policies for the growth and development of the County. Deadline to complete the survey is November 15.

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Northern Sunrise County Proudly Supports Their Honey Producers

DENIS AND TRACY SIMONEAU

SIMONEAU HONEY BUZZINESS 780-618-3640 MIKE AND CORINNA WILLIAMS

MCW APIARIES 780-219-9227 PETER AND PAULINE GUNNING

GUNNING HONEY 780-624-2819

780-624-0013 16

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celebrating 100 years

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amenities that Peace River already has and bring some new ones to town. The facility includes an ice rink, indoor running track, indoor field house, child play space, and Peace River’s Town charter was initially signed on fitness centre. December 1, 1919. At the time the world was still recovering from the first world war, the roaring 20’s were Additionally, the Town of Peace River will also be helping just around the corner and in northwestern Alberta, a to support community groups who wish to put together village had just become a town. A century later a lot has their own centennial-themed event. We will be making changed, socially, culturally, even the hills have moved toolkits available with some event items for groups that are interested. Details on the toolkits will be made but the Town of Peace River is still here. available closer to 2019. Kicking off the year in January will be a proclamation of Peace River’s Centennial. Twelve months later in Celebrations like this will take a community and for those December there will be a resigning of the Town’s charter who are interested in taking part, there will be many and the interring of a time capsule. Additional events volunteer opportunities throughout the year. If you think throughout the year are still being finalized by a citizen- you might be interested, you can contact the committee led committee with support from the Town of Peace by emailing Tanya Bell at tbell@peaceriver.ca. River. As more event details are confirmed they will be Remember to join us in 2019 for this once in a publicly advertised. century event. Conveniently the celebrations will coincide with the opening of the new Peace Regional Recreation Centre in the fall of 2019. This brand-new facility will refresh some oming up in 2019 the Town of Peace River will be celebrating 100 years.

Main Street Peace River, looking south from 99 Ave. circa 1919. Peace Feed & Sale Barn is on the right as is the WH Wilson store, and on the right is the Peace Hotel. Photo Courtesy of Peace River Museum, Archives and Mackenzie Centre 1980.1123.013

Peace Riverites dressed in formal wear pose for a photo before the start of a dance at the opening of the first Legion Hall Great War Veterans Association Hall in 1919. The hall was located near present day 100 St. and 100 Ave. near where Town Hall and Panago are located today. Photo Courtesy of Peace River Museum, Archives and Mackenzie Centre 1972.458.001

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#ICYMI

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

The 2018 Coloured in Fun Run was held on June 17 in Manning and the County of Northern Lights // Photography submitted

Coloured in Fun Run 5k

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he County of Northern Lights, the Town of Manning, Nova Inn, 3G Enterprises and local volunteers all helped to put on the second annual “Coloured in Fun Run 5k” on June 17 (Father’s Day), hosted at the Nova Inn in Manning. The Coloured in Fun Run is just what it sounds like. It’s a fun excuse to be active outside in a non-competitive environment and have coloured powders thrown at you. No need to

worry though. The powder is made of cornstarch and FD&C and/or D&C colours, which is approved for use in foods, cosmetics and/or drugs. So, these products are not considered hazardous or toxic. The Nova Inn offered a discounted rate to anyone staying there the night before. They also offered discounted breakfast for fun runners.

sunglasses, joined one or more of the three 5km heats, ran and got hit with colour every kilometre or so along the route. Sound like fun? Contact the County of Northern Lights to learn more about next year’s Coloured in Fun Run 5k (780-836-3348).

Participants of all ages showed up, signed up, got their T-shirt and #Li fesBetterUpHere | NOVEMBER 2018 - FEBRUARY 20 1 9 M OV E U P

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#ICYMI

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

(L) Peace River Mayor Tom Tarpey signs proclamation declaring October 4, 2018 Sisters in Spirit Day in the Town of Peace River // Photography submitted (R) The Peace River Sisters in Spirit Walk culminates with a vigil in Riverfront Park // Photography by Hope Regimbald

Sisters in Spirit Walk

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n October 4, the Peace River Aboriginal Interagency Committee (PRAIC) hosted their annual Sisters in Spirit Walk, one of many across Canada. This is an important day that brings attention to the issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. The PRAIC believes that by raising awareness, and

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encouraging everyone to take part, they can foster change and bring healing. The following is an excerpt from a joint statement of several national organizations supporting the Sisters in Spirit Walk: “The violence experienced by Aboriginal women and girls in Canada is a national tragedy. The disappearance and murder

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of our Aboriginal sisters is felt nationwide, with countless First Nations, Inuit and Métis families and communities grappling with the loss of a loved one and struggling to find answers. We are speaking out, as individuals and organizations, because we believe this violence should be of urgent concern to everyone in Canada. More than that, this concern must lead to action—action

to ensure that the rights and safety of Aboriginal sisters, daughters, mothers and grandmothers are respected and protected.” The Town of Peace River and Northern Sunrise County signed proclamations officially making October 4, 2018 Sisters in Spirit Day.


#ICYMI

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

(L) The Hula Hoop Circus from Grande Prairie delilghted festival attendees // Photography submitted (R) Fairview's annual Summer's End Festival was held August 27 // Photography submitted

Summer's End Festival

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airview’s Summer’s End Festival, held August 27, was a huge success thanks to the hard work and dedication of many volunteers and support from the community! Each year there is fun for the whole family. This year the Fairview Legion Main Stage Shows were Mary Lambert (children’s performer), the Hula Hoop

Circus, Reptile World, an open jam session with Brent Irvine Second Stage Music, Kurt Furstenwerth, Don Imes, Rob Bell, Ray Hamel, Terry Cameron, Tragically Hick, Vic & the Chicks, Rattlesnake Rodeo and an open mic street dance with entertainment by Thick as Thieves. Some additional festivities included the Peace Classic Wheels Street

Spectacular, a 5/10km walk/run, a by-donation pancake breakfast hosted by Crossroads, a farmers market and beer gardens hosted by Fairview Flyers Activities.

tattoos, sandpainting, face painting, Brilliant Body Art, balloon artist creations, a free photo booth sponsored by the Bear Creek Funeral Home and an outdoor vendor market.

There were free bouncy castles sponsored by Servus Credit Union, the Summer’s End Trade Show, a lumberjack show (log rolling, hercules hoist, axe throwing), glitter

All this, and much, much more.

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 Column à

NORTHERN LAKES COLLEGE

TURNING YOUR LIFE AROUND THROUGH EDUCATION

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he journey to addictions recovery requires the support of trained counsellors with knowledge and skills in the field. Northern Lakes College (NLC) student Chris Yellowbird is from Alexander First Nation, AB, and is not your typical student. Yellowbird’s background story is a recollection of trauma, abuse and misuse that ends with a singular moment that completely turned his life around. “I have an interesting story because I used to be a client at the Footprints Healing Centre in Alexander First Nation. I am about 21 months sober now. After I finished there as a client, an opportunity opened up, and I asked for a job. I started as night staff. I just knew I had to start somewhere; it was a way for me to get my foot in the door,” said Yellowbird.

While working at the healing centre, Yellowbird started looking into accredited training, which was a requirement made by his employer. He researched his educational options and landed on NLC’s Addictions Counselling Diploma program. Today, Yellowbird works as a casual support worker for Footprints while completing the Addictions Counselling Diploma program as a fulltime, home-based student. Yellowbird is able to do his courses online through the blended delivery methods of NLC Anytime, Anywhere and NLC Live Online™. Yellowbird has chosen to use his past as a tool to help others on their journey to recovery. Just a few months ago, Yellowbird had the opportunity to work as a full-time facilitator for four weeks. “That was a great experience for me. I got to use my own

The instructors at Northern Lakes College have a way of keeping you engaged, and witnessing their passion ignites it in yourself. Chris Yellowbird

Northern Lakes College Student

Chris Yellowbird went from a life of addiction to Addictions Councelling with NLC's Addictions Councelling Diploma program ▶

instincts because many of my strengths in this field stem from my own personal experiences, but I was able to combine it with the knowledge I learned from my educational experiences,” said Yellowbird. The program can be taken full-time or part-time, depending on the unique needs of the student. NLC offers a high ratio of student-to-instructor time, affordable tuition and quality programs. Graduates of the Addictions Counselling Diploma program at Northern Lakes College will have the skills to provide counselling to individuals, groups and families. “If you’re getting into the addictions field, always remind yourself of what sparked that passion to be in this field. Don’t be complacent and make sure

you take care of yourself too. The instructors at Northern Lakes College have a way of keeping you engaged, and witnessing their passion ignites it in yourself,” said Yellowbird. Today Yellowbird is a fulltime counsellor and lives on an acreage with his wife and three children. About his future, he says, “To come where I came from, to be a student with NLC today, to feel accepted and to be encouraged in my educational journey is something I am still getting used to. It is a good feeling, and it is a real motivator for me.”

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 Relocation Story Photography submitted

Ç THE PICKLES/DEMPSEY FAMILY ARE FROM THE MARITIMES

THE PICKLES/DEMPSEY FAMILY ARE FROM THE MARITIMES WHERE ARE YOU ORIGINALLY FROM?

We are both from small Acadian French regions. I am originally from Clare, Nova Scotia, and my partner Denise is from Richibucto, New Brunswick. There are lots of Maritimers in the Peace Region, so we feel right at home. The word “sociable” comes to mind. WHERE IN THE PEACE REGION DID YOU MOVE TO?

We moved to the north end of Peace River—handy to the rink, pool and schools. We felt it was more convenient for our two busy boys, and it’s close to the Reddi-Mart to satisfy 24

our late-night cravings.

HOW LONG AGO DID YOU MOVE UP HERE?

We moved to Peace River just over a year ago on August 21, 2017. Wow, already over a year. Time sure flies by. Slow down, Father Time.

WHERE DO YOU WORK?

We were fortunate enough to land two amazing jobs. I work at Northern Lakes College as the Chair of Academic Upgrading, while my partner works at the Peace River Medical Clinic as an Administrative Assistant. They say if you enjoy your

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job enough, you’re not really working. In our case, I guess we are not working.

WHAT’S YOUR STORY? HOW DID YOU END UP RELOCATING TO THE MIGHTY PEACE REGION?

Our story? I’m in the Witness Protection Program—just kidding. Although we are originally from Nova Scotia/New Brunswick, like many Maritimers, we had to uproot our little family to move either north or out west for employment. I did a few stints up north—Yukon, Nunavut, the NWT and northern Saskatchewan— before moving to beautiful, scenic Peace River. No regrets at all.


WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION OF THE PEACE REGION?

Several years ago, we lived in the NWT and my son would sometimes play hockey in Edmonton, so we drove through Peace River. I still recall driving past the airport and seeing the Peace River valley for the first time. It’s so majestic. When you see the rolling hills and the mighty river for the first time, it truly is special. A year later, I still feel the same way about Peace River. WHAT SURPRISED YOU THE MOST ABOUT THE PEACE REGION?

After having lived in Canada’s north for 16 years, I would say what surprised me the most was that Peace River had amenities like Walmart, Canadian Tire, The Brick, Tim Hortons, etc. I’m used to fly in/fly out communities, so it was nice to see roads. For a small town it truly has everything a family requires. Not only the stores, but it is well equipped with services and activities for children and adults.   IN WHAT WAYS HAVE YOU INTEGRATED YOURSELF INTO THE COMMUNITY?

HOW DO YOU ENTERTAIN OUTOF-TOWN GUESTS? WHAT ARE SOME MUST-TRY PEACE REGION EXPERIENCES?

In the year we have been in Peace River, we’ve had numerous visitors/ guests. Some of the activities we’ve participated in are: bowling, playing pool at Sharks, movie theatre, hiking, walking the trails, golfing, Twelve Foot Davis Park, and two must dos in my opinion are the Peace River Cabins and Outdoors and the Dunvegan Provincial Park. HAVE YOU HAD ANY INTERESTING WILDLIFE ENCOUNTERS SINCE YOU’VE BEEN HERE?

Back in Nova Scotia, if you spot a deer, you shoot it and fill your freezer with fresh meat. Here in Peace River, the deer are so habituated. They are everywhere. My first month in Peace River, I woke up to a deer standing on our back deck. I quietly walked outside and fed him some apples and carrots. It was an amazing experience being that close to wildlife. Our youngest son Cooper says he sees Santa’s reindeer everyday. WHAT IS YOUR IDEAL NIGHT OUT/ DATE NIGHT IN THE PEACE REGION?

I feel that we have integrated very Peace River does not have as hopping nicely into the community. My of a night life as say Halifax (put it on partner and I often entertain friends your bucket list); however, you can and co-workers at our house, our still get out and have some fun at the children are very active with school and community sports, I am a member local restaurants or pubs. If you’re not into that scene, you can try bowling, of the Chamber of Commerce, we curling or even skiing. There are many frequent the rink to support the options. As for us, many weekends are Navigators, we volunteer, and we spent traveling throughout Alberta for do our best to attend the many community gatherings and festivities.     our son’s hockey or having friends over for some socializing/drinks and maybe   even some Texas Hold’em. Either way, WHAT WOULD BE YOUR ADVICE TO ANYONE THINKING OF RELOCATING I’m usually all in. HERE?     In the words of comedian Robin Williams, “You’re only given a little spark of madness. You must not lose it.” In other words, don’t hesitate—do it. Peace River really is a friendly, safe, welcoming, multicultural, vibrant community. It’s certainly a great community to raise a family.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN FIVE YEARS?

One can never predict the future, but in five years we hope to still be in Peace River. Our oldest son will be graduating from high school, our youngest in Grade 5, and I hope to be semi-retired doing more of my

passions—traveling, writing books and motivational speaking. On that note, I published two inspiring books called Hug Someone You Love Today, and I operate a motivational speaking business called New Beginnings Consultant. If interested in either service, feel free to reach out to me at 780-617-0878. Until we cross paths again, keep smiling while you still have teeth.

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 Recreation Feature

COMPETITIVE HOCKEY, RIGHT AT HOME BY DREW ROGERS

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f you want to do well in competitive hockey, the pressure is on. Once you reach a certain level, and you want to continue to improve, you’re going to have to make some sacrifices. In rural Alberta, there is often a mentality that you need to relocate to find opportunity—bigger leagues and larger centres equals more opportunity, right? Well, not necessarily. The North West Junior Hockey League (NWJHL) offers players ages 16-21 the opportunity to play at a high level with their competitive peers while staying in the Peace Region. The Fairview Flyers, for example, have done a great job of retaining local talent

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and keeping the benches and bleachers filled every season. Practicing twice a week and traveling for games across the Alberta/BC Peace Region has allowed these players to keep their skills sharp, stay active and keep playing the game they love at a challenging pace. Move Up was able to head to Fairview to take in an earlyseason practice and chat with Coach Lance Wiebe and some players about the season. According to Coach Wiebe, it’s important to get the players fired up at the beginning of the year, especially in a rural community like Fairview. “Some of the teams in larger

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centres are able to practice all summer as the ice is always in at their arenas. We might take a little longer to get things going in the fall, but I certainly think we have the talent to match any of the other teams,” said Coach Wiebe. Once the season has started, many local employers are more understanding of the hockey schedule. “These boys are working in the fields a lot of the time with harvest season when we are trying to get practices started,” said Coach Wiebe. “The reality is that although they love to play hockey, they have real lives that sometimes take priority.” Once all the skates were laced up, and the team hit

the ice for their Monday night practice, the talent was undeniable. They lived up to their name as they flew around the ice honing their skills and syncing with each other’s nuances during drills. With any group of young athletes, motivation and focus are key. “No coach can just instantly motivate their team to perform. It takes time to get the new guys on board with our program. We see them bond more after a few bus trips to away games. It helps them all get to know each other,” said Coach Weibe. “There is no shortage of time on the bus usually playing two games a weekend and often traveling to different towns each day to do so.”


Top: The Fairview Flyers gather around Coach Lance Weibe at hockey proactice // Photography by Drew Rogers Bottom: (L) Members of the Fairview Flyers pitching in to get the ice ready (R) Members of the Fairview Flyers gear up for the Summer's End Festival parade // Photography submitted

The home games in Fairview are important to the team in a whole different way.

Playing at home has worked out really well for Bjorklund.

“The support we get here in Fairview for the team is unparalleled. Without the sponsors and supporters in our community, it would be hard to make this happen. When we have home games, Fairview comes out strong for us,” said Coach Wiebe.

“There isn’t a town in the Peace that comes out as strong to support a hockey team like Fairview does. Anyone who comes here to play will be blown away by the support we get from the local community,” said Bjorklund.

Coming up through the local hockey programs, Spencer Bjorklund always wanted to play for the Flyers.

While not all players are from Fairview, they appreciate being able to play at a challenging level while staying close to home.

“It’s great to be back playing here at this level. I like the fact that I can see these younger kids and show them that they can keep pushing and get here,” said Bjorklund.

Zac Schlachter balances working for the family business while being able to get as much ice time as possible.

“I’ve always loved playing hockey. Playing for the Flyers allows me to keep moving forward with my life and my family while playing competitively at the same time,” said Schlachter. Schlachter says he really enjoys the comradery of the team environment and being able to mentor the younger players. “The times going to away games on the bus are great. That’s quality time with the boys that you can’t replace. We love the support from Fairview. We try to get out into the community and show them we appreciate it,” said Schlachter.

they look forward to dialing things in. Make sure to follow along with all the teams in the NWJHL as the season progresses. It’s a great opportunity to see fast, exciting hockey close to home. North West Junior Hockey League nwjhl.com Fairview Flyers fairviewflyers.com

The momentum is building, and the players are bonding. As the season progresses, #Li fesBetterUpHere | NOVEMBER 2018 - FEBRUARY 20 1 9 M OV E U P

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 Column

Þ AMBER ARMSTRONG | INDIGENOUS AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT FACILITATOR | DMI PRPD

Performance is Power

Pictured L to R: Robin Walter, Alison Quinney, Greta Caron, Lindsay Grundy-Kish, Valerie Differenz, Sarah Stockley and Michelle Sanguin // Photography by Melissa E. Earle

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ur women at DMI Peace River Pulp Division don’t dress up for photo shoots. They come to work dressed with their education, experience and the attitude to get the work done. That is the uniform of our women and our workforce. At DMI PRPD, we focus on diversity. We focus on challenging what we see in our environment and work to improve it. It’s how we manage our forest, never overlooking how each species of tree, plant, animal or insect interact and contribute to the overall landscape. To focus on one

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species means overlooking another. That is a mistake, as the balance of all values need to be secure for growth—in the workplace and in society. We focus on diversity at DMI PRPD because differences in age, culture, gender, education and experience bring balance. It is critical to the success of an organization. Does it make a difference? Only through the experience of someone in a non-traditional role are we able to make that determination. “Being in this industry and having this opportunity might mean more to me than my male

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counterparts. Here I have the chance to be an equal,” said Robin Walter, Fibreline Operator. “I have the chance to earn the same wage for doing the same job as my guys. That doesn’t happen in a lot of places. I am also able to be totally independent. I am so grateful that I am able to take care of myself financially. It’s an amazing feeling.” If a person has the attitude and aptitude to succeed, they should be provided an opportunity. We hold ourselves back, as organizations, when we fail to challenge what we “see” as success. If we label a role as male or female we deny the possibility of

success through the other gender. At DMI PRPD, we understand that roles have requirements—the essential skills and education required to do the job. If the individual applying for the role has the required skills and the right attitude, we have a fit. While the world changes and we evolve and devolve in areas, there are more threats to our environment. During these challenging times, it becomes important to remember that the value of all voices contributing will enable us to move into a future where respect provides the foundation of our collective success.


ADVERTI SE ME N T

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Inspiring Women IN BUSINESS


Treating Body, Mind and Spirit Wendy Wagner, Zen Spa & Hair Studio, Peace River, AB Words By Talena Winters | Photography by T Parenteau Photography

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n the MerriamWebster Dictionary, zen is defined as, “a state of calm attentiveness in which one’s actions are guided by intuition rather than by conscious effort.” It is this aptly-used noun that describes the energy of Zen Spa in Peace River— intuitive calm attentiveness to their client’s needs and well-being. Owner Wendy Wagner strives to create an 32

environment where customers can relax and receive treatments designed to promote whole-body wellness at an affordable price. “We want our clients to feel good and know that we are looking out for their best interests. We do our best to go above and beyond for them,” said Wagner. Wagner, the daughter of the man who began long-standing Peace River

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business Fred’s Heating, always wanted her own business. After studying applied social science and Eastern religions in university, she travelled to India, Thailand, Japan, lived in Korea and became a registered massage therapist and BodyTalk (energy medicine) practitioner. She decided the best way to share the many things she’d experienced and learned was to open a spa. In 2007, the perfect building became

available, and Zen Spa was born. “I wanted to bring in the beauty, magic and more spiritual elements of the East where I had travelled, along with the statues and artwork and so on. I wanted to create the full sensory experience of what a spa should be like in this small house from the 1940s,” said Wagner. “It was just divine timing that this building became available and it was the ambiance and size I was looking for.”


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We specialize in body, mind and spirit at Zen Spa. We value both looking good and feeling good.

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Zen Spa has a small team of professionals who are each passionate about their area of expertise. Wagner does massage therapy—including specialty massages—and BodyTalk, Teresa Boettger (who has been with the spa since it opened) does hair styling, Cindy Michaud does esthetics and they currently have a massage therapist in training who is completing her practicum. They have automatic valueadds in their services, like the therapeutic far infrared amethyst crystal heating mat used for all massage clients. In addition, Zen Spa has teamed up with Wing Dental to provide specialized care Medi-Spa services, which use Botox injections and medical-grade 34

skin care to help clients look their best. “We bring people relief and wellbeing—relief from pain, stress and anxiety, unwanted hair, bad nails and hair and malnourished skin. We have technology that helps with body contouring, stimulating face collagen and skin resurfacing. We offer free consultations to give people personalized advice. We’re a small spa, but we do almost everything,” said Wagner. Wagner encourages a positive, respectful and supportive environment at the spa, and she is looking forward to expanding her team, including providing a place for students from the new EvelineCharles Academy. With more people

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on the team, she could lengthen their hours and provide more benefits to their clients. “We’ll be able to provide more services. What does each individual person bring to the team? I never know until they walk in with their strengths, qualities and specialties,” said Wagner. Practically since Zen Spa opened, Wagner has been hosting a Meditation Monday event (with a drop-in fee of $1, which she donates) as a way of creating and supporting community. “I think it’s a really important space to hold within the community so people can experience the benefits of meditation. We’ve been doing it pretty

much every Monday for 11 years,” said Wagner. The meditation nights fit with Wagner’s overriding philosophy of helping people look after every aspect of themselves. “We specialize in body, mind and spirit at Zen Spa. We value both looking good and feeling good. BodyTalk is about feeling better, hair and esthetics is about looking better. They go together and strengthen each other,” said Wagner.

peaceriverzenspa.com


Goddess on a Mission

Sarah Keates, The Green Goddess, Northern Sunrise County, AB Words By Talena Winters | Photography by Melissa E. Earle

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t’s been said that the body is a temple. This idea is intrinsic to the clean bath and beauty line created by Sarah Keates, aka “The Green Goddess.” She began her business over seven years ago to provide a natural alternative to the toxic-ingredient-laden options on many store shelves, and now has a full line of bath and beauty products for women—because at the Green Goddess, all women are goddesses. “I pride myself on creating truly natural products that are full of truth and integrity, ethically-sourced and cruelty-free,” said Keates. “I do not use synthetic fragrance, artificial colour or anything else funky, nor do I use ingredients that support slave labour

or animal testing. Many ingredients are wildcrafted locally, with recipes that root us back into our folkloric past.” Keates’ journey from cruise ship massage therapist to natural health product guru began in the cosmetics aisle with one simple question—what made her favourite makeup remover blue? After researching the ingredients list and being appalled at what she learned, she decided there had to be a better option. As it turned out, she invented the option herself, and The Green Goddess was born. “I’ve always felt a pull toward alternative and holistic health, but I had no idea I would fall in love with

making my own potions and lotions,” said Keates. “Once I started doing it, there was no turning back. I feel good knowing I might change one more woman’s life.” Her passion extends to educating women to take their health into their own hands. She teaches workshops on how to make the products and works to raise awareness of the “greenwashing” prevalent in many companies’ advertising and packaging. She also has a robust jar-recycling program in an effort to keep her products as eco-conscious as possible. “I want to empower women with an alternative choice. There needs to be a presence in the bath and beauty

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I'm proud to be one of the companies trying to bring change.

industry that says it is unacceptable to poison women and convince them that they are naturally ugly without these products, that beauty ends at a certain age or that animal testing or supporting slave labour in the name of vanity is okay,” said Keates. “As more women demand better, we will see even more people make their own and demand that companies raise the bar. Every movement starts somewhere, and I’m proud to be one of the companies trying to bring change.”

Green Goddess products on the East Coast. Now that Keates has just given birth to her third child, that dedication and flexibility in her team is more important than ever.

When it came time to grow the Green Goddess team, Keates hired local moms. They provide her with office support and make her small-batch products with the same love and care that she does, and she empowers them to support their families on their own schedules. One of these women has now moved out to Nova Scotia and continues to make and distribute

The Green Goddess gives back to the community by supporting the local women’s shelter and contributing to raffles and auctions for local causes. Keates has even raised money to support a friend who had a brain aneurysm. She also donates to the Malala Fund, which works to allow girls around the world to receive an education.

“I am heavily involved in all aspects of my business; I just have help now so that I can spend more time learning, creating and teaching while keeping my products and customer service to the high-quality standard I expect,” said Keates.

“I believe that women are powerful, and they are an underused resource in the world. I want to see that change,” said Keates. With every potion she sells, the Green Goddess is leading the way.

iamthegreengoddess.com

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We try to give our customers more than they expect.

Gateway to Success Barb Kobbert, Gateway Inn, Worsley, AB

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Words By Talena Winters | Photography by Melissa E. Earle

hen thentwenty-fiveyear-old Barb Kobbert, originally from Hines Creek, took the risk of purchasing the 10-room country hotel in Worsley in 1992, she knew she had it in her to make it work. Why? Because within the previous 36 months, she had already done the impossible—survived a house fire that left over 90 38

per cent of her body covered in burns, and then, against the doctor’s odds, recovered full mobility.

young for a license. I finally convinced the Alberta Liquor Control Board and began operating.”

“I was deep in the hole financially, had no husband, no home, no car, not even any clothes, and I was still having wound issues. The nice thing about having nothing is that you have nothing to lose,” said Kobbert. “Bank after bank turned me down and the liquor board felt I was too

Kobbert had spent the previous four years before the accident finding employment in the communities where her logger boyfriend-thenhusband was working. She worked nearly every position available in the hotel in Wonowon, BC. She and her partner also

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invested in some real estate, and it was while renovating one of these homes in August 1989 that she was trapped in a basement that caught fire. When she got out, her life would never be the same. “I had 13 operations and spent 15 months in the University of Alberta burn unit and Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital. I am still the worst surviving burn that they have ever


had,” said Kobbert. “They used an experimental grafting procedure on me where they flew my skin cells to Vancouver, grew more in a lab, and then flew them back and slapped them on me. They’ve never used that [procedure] on anyone else. My doctor always apologizes to me and says if they had known I would walk again they would have done it differently.” According to Kobbert, when she got out her husband had left her and her financial situation was in ruins. Thanks to the support of her parents and brother, Kobbert had a place to stay and a car to get to work, having reacquired an old position at an oilfield company. A self-proclaimed workaholic, she put those assets to good use, and by the following spring had rented her own home and bought a car. The following

year, she bought the hotel in Worsley, the hamlet her mother had grown up in.

ground on a new 21-room hotel, which was completed in 2008.

“I got to use what I learned in all those five-dollar-anhour hotel jobs. The hotel didn’t have any records to go by, so it was a gamble. I lived upstairs for the first year and a half,” said Kobbert.

“I wanted all the things guests suggested for the new hotel, particularly both indoor and outdoor access to the rooms. Almost all of the hotel rooms have a full kitchen. We have a 42man camp on our property offering all-inclusive or room-only rates in both the camp and in-house,” said Kobbert. “We offer catering and host meetings, weddings, funerals, graduations and private Christmas parties in our FireSide lounge. We have even delivered hot lunch for over 100 men an hour [drive] up into the hills. We try to give our customers more than they expect.”

Kobbert’s tenacity soon helped the business grow. She bought into a sports and night club business in Fairview with some partners, and then, because there weren’t enough rooms in the hotel to meet demand, she purchased a camp to add to the Worsley business. When she found that dividing her attention was costing both establishments, she eventually sold the Fairview business. In 2006, after an economic boom in the Worsley area, she broke

In addition to the hotel and camp, the Gateway Inn also features a liquor store, restaurant and lounge.

Twenty-nine years after her life hit rock bottom, Kobbert is a living example of what determination, hard work, resilience and a willingness to take risks can accomplish. Her history and ongoing medical issues have made her more compassionate toward others, and she strongly believes that no matter what we go through, we must keep moving forward. “I feel I’ve created a stable but proactive and innovative company able to adjust to economic changes, the changing needs of my customers and other dynamics. I still enjoy waking up and going to work, and I get great satisfaction from every happy customer,” said Kobbert.

worsleygateway.ca

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I am grateful for the excellent staff and mentors I have had.

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Serving the Community Well Amy Murphy, Amy K. Murphy, Barrister & Solicitor, Peace River, AB Words By Talena Winters | Photography by Melissa E. Earle

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portfolio of clients she has served— everyone from multi-milliondollar industrial clients or farming partnerships to couples drawing up wills or buying their first home.

s a Peace River local, Amy Murphy takes pride in providing ethical, friendly and professional service to her community.

Her law firm officially opened on January 7, 2013, only two and a half weeks after the decision had been made to open it. However, Murphy has practised in Peace River since 2001, being mentored as an associate at Simpson, Thietke & Associates after working as an associate in Calgary for several years. For Murphy, becoming a lawyer was a natural fit. “I used to love to debate on social issues when I was in school. In high school, one of my teachers showed me the University of Alberta calendar and told me if my grades were high enough, I could get into law school without a four-year degree on two years equivalence,” said Murphy. “In 1986, I travelled to Indonesia. When I saw the absolute poverty, I vowed I would ensure I could make a living for myself. I remembered my teacher’s advice and when I got back to Alberta, I did just as he had recommended.” Murphy’s firm offers services in real estate, corporate and commercial law, wills and estate administration, estate litigation, collections, family law and civil litigation. However, they specialize in real estate of all kinds— residential, agricultural, commercial and industrial. “People come to a lawyer when they require guidance and educated advice

Amy Murphy and staff

to protect their legal interests for big, life-changing decisions. Being a general practitioner, I have a depth of experience in several types of law that makes solving multi-faceted problems more efficient,” said Murphy. “If someone comes to me with an estate matter, my knowledge of corporate law and family law bring a multidisciplinary approach to the problem without the necessity of a referral to another lawyer.” She encourages her hardworking team to be client-focused, working with their clients’ goals in mind, so they are represented well and in a cost-effective manner. “My assistants are more specialized in their training and duties. They all have a friendly working relationship, which means they collaborate and share knowledge when required. Our firm is also committed to continuing legal education for both the staff and myself through the Legal Education Society of Alberta,” said Murphy. Murphy takes pride in the diverse

“Running a law firm is a dynamic venture as it is both a business and a profession governed by high ethical standards. I have successfully negotiated with large city firms on purchases and sales of businesses and with counsel for lenders on financings over 10 million dollars. I am grateful for the excellent staff and mentors I have had. I would not have enjoyed the success I have had if not for their efforts and contributions,” said Murphy. Murphy has given back to her hometown in many ways, regularly donating to community fundraising initiatives and serving as a current member of Rotary, past Director of the Chamber of Commerce and past member of the Peace River and District Health Foundation Board. One of her most creative (and heartwarming) contribution was a party she helped organize. “In collaboration with Rotary and Freson Bros. Peace River, last year I hosted an invitation-only Christmas party for eighteen local families. I plan to make it an annual event,” said Murphy. Creating community spirit is service at its finest.

amykmurphy.ca

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Our clients know they are going to be looked after.

Helping People Find a Home Dianne Lavoie, Real Estate Broker, Royal Lepage Valley Realty, Peace River, AB Words By Talena Winters | Photography by Paul Lavoie Images

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fter 34 years working with real estate in the Peace Region, Dianne Lavoie knows all the ins and outs of the business. So, when Lavoie’s life partner, George Leger, purchased the Royal Lepage Valley Realty franchise where she had been working in January 2017, she got her broker designation. She now manages the eight agents affiliated with their office. For her, the job has many benefits. “Real estate is a very people-focused business, and I enjoy working with people. There’s a lot of satisfaction in finding the right house for a family,” said Lavoie. “Working with first-time home buyers is a thrill all its own. Selling a house can be a very personal experience; you need someone to bridge the gap between your personal view of your home and needing to sell the house in a professional manner. That kind of work is very satisfying for me.” When Lavoie began selling real estate in Peace River in 1985, she still had three young children at home. It was an ideal career fit. “You work a lot of evenings and weekends, but Monday morning you can stay home and do laundry or get to parent-teacher interviews. It really worked out well,” said Lavoie. Royal Lepage Valley Realty deals with

all kinds of real estate—residential, agricultural and commercial industrial—and they cover a huge territory. They have one agent who lives and works in Manning, but the rest work out of the Peace River office and provide services from Smoky River in the south up through Northern Sunrise County, Town of Peace River, County of Northern Lights, MD of Peace and all the municipalities in between. With the assistance of their office administrator, Lori Hendrickson, each of the agents at Royal Lepage Valley Realty tend to specialize in certain geographical areas or types of properties, playing to their strengths and enabling them to serve the diverse needs of their clients. Two of the agents also speak French. “Our realtors are professional, trained and experienced, which is the baseline you can expect from any realtor in Alberta. However, I think that friendly, personable service is as important, and that’s something we deliver at Royal Lepage. Our clients know they’re going to be looked after,” said Lavoie. Lavoie is a firm believer in the value of the services she and her agents offer. Whether buying or selling, Lavoie believes having professional help with the process could prevent costly mistakes. With such a huge investment, having an agent could

mean the difference between buying an asset or a lemon. “I got a call from a friend of my son’s because he was purchasing a property in the Yukon. He was so excited about the location of this cabin on the lake that he forgot a lot of the important details, like the fact the well was shared and there was no paperwork stating who was going to pay for any repairs,” said Lavoie. “We sometimes get blinded by ‘This is my dream home,’ but what about the practical issues? The zoning and real property reports? There’s a multitude of things you may not think about as a home buyer.” As an entity, Royal Lepage supports women’s shelters across Canada, and this office works to support the Peace River location through fundraisers and Christmas gifts. In addition, each agent supports community initiatives on their own time. “I think it’s very important to give back to the community where you live and work. I’m Métis, so I spend a lot of time with our Indigenous groups. It’s really where your personal beliefs and interests are,” said Lavoie. What does the future hold for Lavoie? More of the same—providing topnotch professional service to her clients.

RoyalLepageValleyRealty.ca

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Amanda Condrotte (L) and Janessa Allan (R)

Crafting a Beautiful Partnership Amanda Condrotte and Janessa Allan, Raediance Florist & Gift Shop, Grimshaw, AB Words By Talena Winters | Photography by T Parenteau Photography

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riends Amanda Condrotte and Janessa Allan know what it’s like to take risks in business.

A little less than two years ago, in January of 2017, they had each decided it was time to make the career changes they’d been dreaming of. A month later, they were renovating a location in Grimshaw, and by April, Raediance 44

Florist and & Gift Shop had opened its doors. “We both thought someday we would own a business. We took a chance and walked away from everything that was comfortable and normal— good full-time jobs—to try something new not knowing how it was going to go,” said Condrotte. While the two had grown

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up in the neighbouring towns of Dixonville and Grimshaw it was only within the last few years that they got to know each other well. They settled on their current business based on their mutual interests— Condrotte’s love of crafting, Allan’s love of finding and giving the perfect gift, and their shared love of flowers. “Finding that perfect gift for someone was always really

exciting. I love that people can come into our store and do that,” said Allan. “And every girl likes getting flowers,” Condrotte added. In addition to the giftware and flowers, the two of them teach do-it-yourself painting, craft and floral workshops, both in-store and on the road, and they also offer custom furniture repainting.


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We want all of our customers to feel welcome and inspired.

“It’s really exciting to see an old, outdated piece someone may have thrown away get a fresh coat of paint. The transformation is really incredible,” said Allan. So far, the reception to their business has been fantastic. Within a short year-and-ahalf, they have already been able to bring on some parttime help. All three of them are experts in all areas of the store, which allows them to both serve their customers better and express their own creativity in their work. “Everything we do requires some level of creativity, whether it be floral design, painting or restocking the floor,” said Allan. Not only do Condrotte

and Allan have a personal investment in their business—even the name came from their middle names, both of which are Rae—they want their customers to feel that personal touch, too. They make sure to acknowledge customer requests and messages right away, even ones that come in after hours. They’re still trying to find their path, and they’re doing that by listening to and taking care of their customers.

“We want all of our customers to feel welcome and inspired—inspired when they see something and immediately think of someone who would love it or inspired when they see the painted pieces throughout the store and get the courage to do it on their own at home. We love when customers who have maybe had a bad day come in and walk around because they feel comfortable and relaxed when they’re here,” added Allan.

“All the items that you find in our store were carefully chosen by us. They’re things that we feel passionate about and think other people would enjoy,” said Condrotte.

The company gives back to their community in any way they can, often by donating gift baskets to silent auctions and prizes for events. They are big believers in shopping local—if they can’t supply something a customer

wants, they suggest someone else in the area who can. “We feel all the communities around us have shown us so much support that it’s the least we can do to give back,” said Allan. “In the floral and giftware business, we are always meeting new people. We get to hear their stories and share the excitement of special times in their lives, which really makes a personal connection. We’re grateful to have that opportunity,” said Condrotte.

raedianceflorist.ca

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In Harmony with History Diana Strid, Miramichi House, Fairview, AB Words By Talena Winters | Photography by Jenna Armstrong

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in Fairview, and his brother Leagh,” said Strid. “The eldest of his three daughters never married, and when their mother passed away, she moved back to Fairview to care for their father. She was the last one who lived in the house.”

“I bought this beautiful old house from the Loggie family. It was built by Warren Peter Loggie, one of the younger sons of a dynastic East Coast family who came out to settle

Strid had lived down the street for several years and admired the house, but by the time it went up for sale, she was living and working in Grande Prairie teaching music—violin, mandolin, and lieder harp, to name a few of the instruments she plays—and

sk Diana Strid what is it that makes her bed and breakfast at Miramichi House in Fairview special, and she’s happy to tell you—it’s affordable, comfortable, personable, hosts live music on a regular basis and, oh yeah, it’s a big part of the local history.

didn’t think she was quite ready to implement her “semi-retirement plan” of owning a bed and breakfast. Still, she was curious, and a realtor friend of hers obliged. “I walked into the house, and it whispered to me, ‘I’m your B&B.’ I ended up buying it, kind of accidentally, despite not having any plans put together to do anything like that,” said Strid. Since purchasing the house six years ago, Strid has put her extensive

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I walked into the house, and It whispered to me, 'I'm your B&B.'

who would give farmers credit during the Depression, so that really endeared them to a lot of people. The Loggies were decent people, not pretentious or standoffish, just really well-liked. So, the house has that aura about it,” said Strid. Strid carries on that generous spirit by offering house concerts on a regular basis through the Home Routes Circuit. She hosts the events, gives room and board to the musicians for the night (her friend Donna Sellers provides them breakfast) and the income all goes to the musicians. She sees this as a service to her community. “It’s to bring in good music. People are so generous, they bring wine and food, so it’s very much a community effort. It does cost me something, but it’s nothing compared to the value we’re getting,” said Strid.

repertoire of talents toward renovating and restoring the house while still teaching in Grande Prairie. As of this fall, she is finally living and working in Fairview full-time, and the house is transitioning from the longer-term tenants she’s been renting to in the interim to the bed and breakfast of her dreams. “I’ve done a lot of different things, and I had this idea that when I semi-retired, the thing that would incorporate everything I love to do would be a bed and breakfast. I like to renovate, garden, bake, have people 48

over and entertain, make soap, make quilts and those sorts of things. Then, this house came along and pulled it all together,” said Strid. Many of her guests have a connection to the community. One of her regular guests is the granddaughter of the woman who used to be a maid in the house—or the “hired girl,” as the Loggie sisters called her. Now, the guest stays at the Miramichi House when she comes to visit her grandmother, who lives in care. “Somebody told me that W. P. Loggie was one of the few merchants in town

M OVE U P N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 8 - FEBRU A RY 2019 | www.moveupmag.com

Strid loves buying and promoting local—from the fresh-squeezed juices she offers her guests (taken from fruit and berries she’s picked herself ), to produce from the Farmers Market, to the local art on her walls, to the fundraisers she supports. For Strid, living in a small town is the perfect life and she welcomes each and every guest to relax and enjoy it. This new chapter in Miramichi House’s story is creating a wonderful harmony with its past.

fb.com/miramichihouse


Handmade with Love

Heather Pawluski, Northern Touches by Heather, Manning, AB Words By Talena Winters | Photography by Samantha Rose Photography

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hen Heather Pawluski’s grandmother taught her to knit as a child, she never imagined it would one day turn into a thriving business. But, knitting wasn’t the only thing she learned from her grandmother. While working her grandmother’s booth at the Farmers Market, Pawluski was also

steeped in entrepreneurship and community. Now, the mother of two has her own thriving handmade business—making knit and crochet hats, felted wool dryer balls and teaching others the joy of fibre crafting—called Northern Touches by Heather. “I used to help Grandma sell her knitting at the Farmers Market, and when I got out of high school, I would

go with baking. When my daughter was born seven years ago, I started Northern Touches to help support my family by making money on the side with a craft I was doing all the time anyway,” said Pawluski. Pawluski has always loved art and design, so beginning her own handmade business was a natural step. “I always wanted to do

something creative; this is a way to do that and create a business, too,” said Pawluski. Pawluski crochets and knits hats for all ages, most of which are her own design, and she even sells the patterns for some of them. The few garments she didn’t design herself were designed by other Albertans. She’s a big believer in supporting local.

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I love being able to surprise customers with the exact thing they asked for.

“The biggest seller I have is the Moose Toque, and it was designed by a lady out of Fort Assiniboine. I met her through a Facebook group for people who have handmade businesses, and I’ve gotten to know people through Instagram and other online sites,” said Pawluski. Pawluski nurtures those community connections right here in the Peace Region, too. Siobhan Kennedy, the maker behind Autumn Jade Studio jewelry, carries Northern Touches in her storefront in Manning and also rents out space when Pawluski needs it to teach her classes. “I’ve only been teaching knitting classes for a couple

50

months now, and a big part of why I do them is getting out in the community, meeting new people and sparking that interest in someone who doesn’t think they can knit. At a recent arm knitting class, there were a lot of ladies who don’t craft, and they got to go home wearing really cool scarves they’d made. They were so excited,” said Pawluski. Pawluski goes to a great deal of effort finding the perfect fibres for her products. She buys only yarns she has touched to guarantee softness and quality, and she often goes the extra mile to help customers get exactly what they are looking for. If she doesn’t already have the

M OVE U P N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 8 - FEBRU A RY 2019 | www.moveupmag.com

right colour of yarn in her extensive stash, she’ll find it. “I have really awesome customers who come to me with the craziest ideas and just a picture from Pinterest and go ‘Can you make this?’ I love being able to surprise them with the exact thing they asked for. I do whatever I can to help them,” said Pawluski. Pawluski spends most of her year creating stock for Christmas markets, but she also sells her products through her Facebook page and online storefronts on Etsy, Craftsy and Ravelry. Locally, her products are carried by Autumn Jade Studio in Manning, Mint Health + Drugs in Peace River and Hippy Strings in

Sexsmith. She’s hoping to expand that in the future. She also loves to give back to her community in any way she can. “Any time there’s a silent auction, I donate as much as I can. I also do my best to support women in business locally, and handmade businesses especially, and I’ve had some amazing women support me back,” said Pawluski. With Northern Touches, the warmth isn’t just in the product—it’s crafted into the very stitches themselves.

fb.com/northerntouches


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I love being part of something that makes people feel good.

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Look Good, Feel Great Amanda Chomiak, Party Presence, High Level, AB Words By Talena Winters | Photography by That Girl Pearl Photography

she looked. She looked like a million bucks and I felt like a million bucks. That’s her wedding; she’s going to remember how she felt in that dress for the rest of her life,” said Chomiak.

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or Amanda Chomiak, the greatest reward is helping others look and feel good. This passion, plus her own love of clothes, especially dresses, led her to start her personal dress styling business, Party Presence, four years ago. “I did a breast cancer fundraiser fashion show in Edmonton five years ago called Passion for Fashion. We raised over $3,500, which was pretty good for a small-town girl who had never done anything like that before. I was like, ‘Wow, I love this. I want to do more of this,’” said Chomiak. Soon after, she moved home to High Level. She

shopped locally but wasn’t able to find what she was looking for. After a few disappointing online shopping experiences— where what she received was nothing like what she expected—she decided to start her own company. “I wanted to save people the hassle and gamble of online shopping and the effort of driving to the city to find a dress,” said Chomiak. She established relationships with some trusted suppliers and set up a dress room in her home for people looking to buy gowns and accessories right in High Level. Since then, she has also become a Younique Cosmetics representative and a licensed pedicurist,

offering pedicures to clients under the business name Serenity Spaworks. “Incorporating the makeup into my business just made sense. It was becoming a bit of a one-stop-shop. I was helping people pamper themselves, and it was the self-care aspect that encouraged me to become a pedicurist. I love being part of something that makes people feel good,” said Chomiak. Chomiak’s businesses are all about just that. She loves being part of people’s special moments by helping them look and feel their best. “I found my friend’s wedding dress for her, and everyone said how amazing

Chomiak does everything she can to help her clients, even having dresses custommade when necessary. She is looking forward to increasing the offerings of Serenity Spaworks by taking some courses in esthetics and makeup artistry. She also donates gift certificates and gift baskets to charities and fundraisers, and she has organized two other fundraiser fashion shows after the one that got her started—one for an animal rescue and another for a local teen raising money to go to the Miss Teen Canada pageant. “I’ve worked in customer service my whole life, and I know what I like and expect from others, so I try to deliver the same positive experience for my clients. I always do my best to help them find whatever they’re looking for,” said Chomiak. “And, I love helping with causes I believe in. I just want to wake up happy and love what I do—those are my long- and my short-term goals.”

fb.com/partypresence

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 Upcoming Events  Ski the Peace  On The Ice 10

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

N W T

YELLOWKNIFE 632 HAY RIVER 381 HIGH LEVEL 180 MANNING 52 GRIMSHAW

MILE ZERO MACKENZIE HIGHWAY


SKI THE PEACE Whispering Pines in Worsley, AB

Fairview Ski Hill

The Whispering Pines Ski Area is located in beautiful Clear Hills County in Northern Alberta. A community-run ski hill with indoor areas to warm up in at the top and bottom. If downhill isn’t your thing, they offer free cross country ski trails—a great way to see nature. Touted as “Northern Alberta’s best kept secret,” head out and see for yourself.

Another great river valley ski hill! Fairview Ski Hill has 3 tow lifts with a full spectrum of terrain choices. They have made a name for themselves in the area for their snowboard park. If you or a friend loves freestyle riding, this is your hill. skifairview.com 780-835-4725

skiworsley.com 780-685-2594

Misery Mountain Ski Area

Manning Ski Hill

The Misery Mountain Ski Area boasts over 25 runs for all skill levels, a chair lift, daily and seasonal rentals, lessons and ski programs to suit everyone’s needs and more.

Located five miles east of Manning (Hwy 691) and three miles north (Range Road 224), the T-bar lift operates five different runs—entertainment for all levels of ski/snowboarding enthusiasts. The Manning Ski Hill offers affordable winter fun for the whole family. Feel free to bring your own snacks. Note: The Ski Hill will not operate in -25 degrees celsius or colder.

Fb.com/ManningSkiHill 780-836-2655

Bring your friends! Misery loves company! Note: The Ski Hill will not operate in -25 degrees or colder (including wind chill).

miserymountain.com | fb.com/miserymountainskiarea 780-624-4881


UPCOMING EVENTS NOVEMBER | DECEMBER | JANUARY

ONGOING Volunteer of the Month Program ONGOING

Town of Grimshaw The Town of Grimshaw Community Services Department would like to ask all interested residents and/or organizations to recognize a worthy recipient for Grimshaw’s Volunteer of the Month Program. g 780-332-4005 or fcss@grimshaw.ca

Adult Book Club

SECOND MONDAY OF THE MONTH AT 7:30PM (OCTOBER TO MAY )

Fairview Public Library g 780-835-2613

Jack and Jill TUESDAYS FROM 10AM TO 11:30AM

High Level Arena Hall Parent and tot play time.

Seniors Coffee Mornings TUESDAYS AT 10AM

Adult Swimming Lessons and Adult Swim Club

High Level Monthly Market

Peace Regional Pool Cost is $53.85 + GST g 780-624-3720

High Level Town Hall Program Room

Rhyme Time on Momma's Lap

SUNDAYS FROM 10AM TO 8PM

Fairview Public Library For ages 6 months to 2. g 780-835-2613

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Use the Northern Air Walking Track for free! Indoor shoes are required by all users. Sponsored by the Town of Grimshaw. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 01)

TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS

WEDNESDAYS AT 11AM (SEPTEMBER TO MAY )

Café du Coin, St. Isidore g 780-624-8071

TUESDAYS FROM 12PM TO 1PM

Indoor Walking Program

MONDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS FROM 9AM TO 11AM

St. Isidore Cultural Centre Enjoy a free hour of walking and socializing. Bring indoor shoes and a water bottle. g 780-624-8071

Café du Coin, St. Isidore $12 per seniors meal. $8 per take home meal. $15 per adult meal. g 780-624-8071

Youth Drop-In Shinny Hockey TUESDAYS: 3:35PM TO 4:45PM

High Level Arena

Free Youth Fun in the Fieldhouse TUESDAYS FROM 5PM TO 7PM (UNTIL MAY 28, 2019)

Free Walking Program for Seniors

MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS FROM 10:30AM TO 11:30AM (UNTIL APRIL 25, 2019)

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex, Grimshaw Sponsored by the Town of Grimshaw FCSS g 780-332-4005

High Level Arena

NOVEMBER

Art Attack at the Mack

Light Up a Memory

Town of Grimshaw WEDNESDAYS & SATURDAYS: 7PM The Town of Grimshaw will Featuring exercise equipment, pool be hosting a food drive for the tables and card games. Women’s Shelter and wearing g Jeanne D’Arc at 780-624-5645 purple on November 21 to show g Armande at 780-624-8357 support. LAST WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH FROM 6PM TO 8PM

Mackenzie Crossroads Museum & VIC, High Level

Public Skate

THURSDAYS: 3:45PM - 4:45PM FRIDAYS: 3:45PM - 4:45PM SUNDAYS: 5PM - 6PM

High Level Arena

Adult Drop-In Gym Night Spirit of the North Community School, High Level

Afterschool Gym

EVERY SECOND FRIDAY OF THE MONTH FROM 6PM TO 8PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake g 780-629-2476

THURSDAYS FROM 7PM TO 9PM

Teen Night Painting Drop In

TUESDAYS FROM 7PM TO 9PM

Fairview Fine Arts Centre All levels welcome. Free for members. $5 for non-members. g 780-835-2697

Family Violence Prevention Month

St. Isidore Club du Bon Temps (Seniors Drop In Centre)

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex – Northern Air Walking Track Sponsored by the Town of Grimshaw g 780-332-4005 (ext. 01)

MONDAYS & TUESDAYS: 4PM - 5PM

(UNTIL APRIL 14, 2019)

EVERY SUNDAY FROM 4PM TO 5PM

TUESDAYS AT 11AM (SEPTEMBER TO MAY )

Seniors Lunch Program

Are you Interesting in walking?

Adult Drop-In Shinny Hockey

Time for Tots

Fairview Public Library For ages 3 to 5. g 780-835-2613

EVERY THIRD SATURDAY OF THE MONTH FROM 1PM TO 4PM

Location varies, High Level

Free Swim

FIRST SATURDAY OF THE MONTH FROM 3PM TO 5:30PM

Fairview Aquatic Centre

NOVEMBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31

Hosted by the Peace Palliative Care Society Light up the memory of a loved one this year by making a donation of a $10 per name, the names of those remembered will be published in local newspapers during the Christmas season. Lights will be lit in their memory. Donations may be made at select local businesses. g Leslie at 780-332-2332

National Addictions Awareness Week NOVEMBER 26 TO DECEMBER 2

Each November, National Addictions Awareness Week seeks to raise awareness about the impact addictions have on families, communities and individuals.


The Festival of Mini-Trees

NOVEMBER 26 TO DECEMBER 1 (EXTENDED LIBRARY HOURS)

Grimshaw Municipal Library Bidding closes at 3pm on December 1. g 780-332-4553 g grimshawlibrary.ab.ca

Grimshaw Holiday Homes and Christmas Magic Decorating Challenge

SUBMIT YOUR ENTRY BY 4PM ON DECEMBER 14 TO GRIMSHAW COMMUNIT Y SERVICES BY CALLING 780-332-4005 (EXT. 04).

Understanding the Cycle of Abuse with Dr. Sonia

Standard First Aid/CPR Course NOVEMBER 3 + 4

Peace Regional Pool NOVEMBER 1 FROM 1PM TO 2:30PM Cost is $145.40 + GST Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake A free session and light snacks will Fitness Night and Let’s Get be provided. Please pre-register by Healthy Together October 29. g 780-629-2476

NOVEMBER 5 FROM 5PM TO 7PM

Addicts Healing Support and Art Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake A collaboration between KTCMaker Group IRS and Woodland Cree Health. NOVEMBER 1 FROM 5:30PM TO 7PM A fitness routine including Woodland Cree Health Centre stretching, Zumba, walking and with NNADAP Counsellor Joanne more. Learn to make healthy Gibb and Dr. Sonia Sorban salads and energy drinks. Everyone is welcome. Snacks, g 780-629-8963 refreshments and door prizes. g 780-629-2476 g 780-629-2476

Show your Christmas Spirit and Community Pride by entering either the Residential or Business categories. There will prizes for 1st Artisans of the Peace Christmas and 2nd place. Sponsored by the Craft Sale & Farmers Market Town of Grimshaw. NOVEMBER 2 FROM 5PM TO 9PM

Peace River Pool Closed over Christmas DECEMBER 24, 25, 26 & JANUARY 1

Peace River Municipal Library Meet the artists at the opening evening on January 23 from 5:30pm to 7:30pm featuring local visual, musical and vocal talent.

NOVEMBER

Belle Petroleum Centre, Peace River Hosted by Freshly Squeezed Entertainment. Duel DJ party with light show. 18+. $15 in advance or $25 at the door. Costume contest. g bpcentre.ca

Grand Reopening of the Manning Municipal Library DATE TBA

After weeks of construction and renovations, the doors will reopen! fb.com/manningmunicipallibrary

High Level Midnight Madness LAST SATURDAY OF NOVEMBER (TO BE CONFIRMED)

Jukebox Mania NOVEMBER 3 AT 6PM

Flamingo Inn, High Level Fundraising games, door prizes, awards, drink & food specials and more. $40 a ticket. Hosted by the High Level Parent Link Centre. g 780-926-4668

NOVEMBER 7 FROM 4PM TO 6PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake For ages 8 to 12. Hot chocolate and cupcake bar with goodies to decorate your cupcakes. Please pre-register by November 1. g 780629-2476

Lego Club NOVEMBER 8 FROM 3:30PM - 4:30PM

Nampa FCSS

NOVEMBER 8 FROM 4PM TO 6PM

Boys in the Kitchen! Let’s Make Pizza!

NOVEMBER 3 AT 8PM

Cocoa and Cupcakes

Open Gym

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Ages 6-12. g 780-629-2476

NOVEMBER 2 FROM 5PM TO 7PM

JANUARY 23 TO FEBRUARY 20

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Free soup for seniors 55+. Caregivers are welcome. g 780629-2476

g 780-322-3954

Al Adair Rec Centre, Peace River

Neon Jungle Halloween Peace of Art Show “Reflections” After Party

NOVEMBER 7 FROM 12PM TO 1PM

Join us for creative Lego building challenges. Snacks will be provided.

NOVEMBER 3 FROM 10AM TO 4PM

St. Isidore Cultural Centre Boys, grab your Dads and join us in the kitchen and learn how to make pizza. FREE. Limited spots available. Please pre-register by October 27. g 780-624-8071

Elder’s Soup and Bannock

Chili Cook Off Passport to Christmas NOVEMBER 5

Town of Fairview For more info, please contact the Fairview Chamber of Commerce at 780-835-5999.

NOVEMBER 8 FROM 6PM TO 9PM

Fairview Fine Arts Centre Tickets are $30 and include a handmade pottery bowl and a chili dinner. Cast your vote for the best chili. g 780-835-2697

Finding Our Voices

NOVEMBER 6, 13, 20, 27 AND DECEMBER 4 FROM 1PM TO 3PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake A five session peer support group for women. Sessions include self-esteem, self-image, communication, self-compassion, relationships and moving forward. Sessions are free and free childcare will be provided as needed but will require a week’s notice. A certificate will be provided upon completion. Light snacks will be provided. Please pre-register by November 1. g 780-629-2476

Seniors Lunch and Learn NOVEMBER 7 AT 12PM

Nampa Seniors Centre $5 per person. Join us for lunch followed by informative speakers touching on a variety of topics. Call 780-322-3952 to register.

Community Kitchen for Seniors

NOVEMBER 9 FROM 10AM TO 1PM

Fairview Legion Join us! We will cook for you, visit, have lunch together and send you home with delicious food. Funded by the MD of Fairview, Fairview FCSS and the Fairview Rotary.

Fall Family Fun Dance

NOVEMBER 9 FROM 6:30PM TO 9PM

Nampa Complex (Upstairs) Children must be accompanied by an adult. g 780-322-3954


UPCOMING EVENTS CONTINUED... NOVEMBER | DECEMBER | JANUARY

Little Adventurers: Pajama Party

Festival of Trees Wine & Cheese NOVEMBER 15 FROM 7PM TO 9PM

Chateau Nova, Peace River

NOVEMBER 12 FROM 10AM - 11:30AM

Nampa FCSS Join us for themed games, crafts, activities and snacks. Don’t forget to wear your pajamas! For children ages 0-6 (must be accompanied by a parent or guardian). Pre-registration Seniors Coffee Morning required by November 16. g 780- NOVEMBER 14 FROM 10AM - 11AM Farmers Restaurant, Nampa 322-3954 Join us for coffee and conversation. MZRM Field House Youth Time g 780-322-3954

Let’s Taco Bout Stress

NOVEMBER 16 FROM 1PM TO 3PM

Nampa Seniors Centre Join us for an afternoon with Mental Health Promotions Facilitator Ruth Soult and learn about stress reducing techniques with Heart Math. Taco lunch will be served. Cost: FREE. Limited spaces are available. Call 780-3223954 to register.

business and crafts in conjunction with Berwyn Farmers Market. Concession and ATM on-site. GPS Student Parliament will be taking toonie admission at the door with all funds going toward the Christmas in the Community Annual Event. For more information contact Tanya at 780-618-1894.

Family Fun Night NOVEMBER 17

Northwest Health Centre, High Level NOVEMBER 12 FROM 1PM TO 4PM Part of the Festival of Trees Calling all youth! Join us for “No Festival of Trees Comedy Night hosted by the Northwest Health Elder’s Soup and Bannock School Day” Open Court use at the NOVEMBER 14 FROM 12PM TO 1PM NOVEMBER 16 FROM 7PM TO 11PM Foundation. Multiplex Field House for only $2. Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Chateau Nova, Peace River Doors open at 6:30pm. Scottish g 780-332-4005 (ext. 0) Free soup for seniors 55+. Festival of Trees Gala Night Dance Society to perform followed NOVEMBER 17 FROM 5PM TO 1AM Caregivers are welcome. g 780by Comedian Cory Mack. Ticket Public Skating and Shinny 629-2476 Chateau Nova, Peace River includes wings, beer and door Doors open at 5pm. Supper at Hockey prize draws. $35 (online only). 6pm. Live auction at 6:30pm. NOVEMBER 12 Open Gym Dance from 9pm to 1am. A very NOVEMBER 14 FROM 4PM TO 6PM Mile Zero Regional Multiplex festive evening for all. $75 (online Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Skating from 1pm to 2:30pm, only). Hockey from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $2 Ages 6-12. g 780-629-2476

Free Swim NOVEMBER 12 FROM 6:30PM - 8:30PM

Peace Regional Pool Sponsored by Baytex Energy

Bullying Awareness Week

Building Healthy Relationships with Dr. Sonia

NOVEMBER 18 TO 24

Town of Grimshaw

NOVEMBER 15 FROM 1PM - 2:30PM

Cadotte Lake Free session with light snacks provided. Please pre-register by November 13. g 780-629-2476

Minute to Win It Challenge

Extra-Life 24-Hour Charity Gaming Marathon NOVEMBER 17 FROM 6AM TO NOVEMBER 18 AT 6AM

Grimshaw Municipal Library NOVEMBER 15 FROM 3:30PM - 4:30PM Participants can compete in Nampa FCSS gaming tournaments, partake in For kids ages 5 to 12. Join us smaller, non-competitive events or for exciting minute to win it play casually with friends while Cookie Decorating challenging themselves to stay challenges. g 780-322-3954 NOVEMBER 13 awake for the 24-hour period. Nampa FCSS For age 6 to 12. Join us for an Addicts Healing Support and Art Proceeds will benefit the Children’s Miracle Network, specifically the afternoon of cookie decorating. Maker Group Pre-registration is required by Stollery Hospital. NOVEMBER 15 FROM 5:30PM - 7PM November 8. Call 780-322-3954 to g 780-332-4553 Woodland Cree Health Centre register. with NNADAP Counsellor Joanne Tea and Craft Sale Gibb and Dr. Sonia Sorban NOVEMBER 17 FROM 10AM TO 4PM Beading ‘n’ More NOVEMBER 13 & 27 FROM 5PM - 7PM g 780-629-8963 High Level Senior Centre Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake g 780-629-2476 Hosted by the Golden Range Specialty beadwork by TBD/TBC Society 19th Annual Festival of Trees A two-session class. Must preNOVEMBER 15 TO 19 register by November 8. Grimshaw Christmas Market Chateau Nova, Peace River g 780-629-2476 NOVEMBER 17 FROM 10AM TO 4PM Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Over 100 vendors of home-based

Festival of Trees Children’s Event

NOVEMBER 18 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

Chateau Nova, Peace River Free admission for children includes door prizes, glitter facepainting, super heroes, photos with Santa and candy bags.

Seniors Outing: Festival of Trees Silver Bell Tea NOVEMBER 18 FROM 1PM TO 3PM

Ride to the event will leave the “Café du Coin” at 12:15pm. Join us for a great social event. g 780-624-8071

Hands On

NOVEMBER 19 FROM 10AM - 11:30AM

Join Nampa FCSS and Peace Parent Link for an interactive morning of reading, singing, crafts, snacks and more. g 780-322-3954


Little Adventurers

NOVEMBER 19 FROM 1PM - 2:30PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Theme TBD. Fun and adventure for kids. A light snack will be provided. A partnership with Peace Parent Link. Please pre-register by November 15. g 780-629-2476

Healthy Teeth for a Healthy Smile (Fluoride Varnish)

Bowling!

Nampa FCSS No pre-registration required; children must be accompanied by parents or legal guardian. g 780322-3954

Bus will depart the St. Isidore Cultural Centre at 12:30pm and return for 4:30pm. Seniors! Get your bowling shoes on and join us for a fun recreational afternoon. FREE! Limited spots are available. Please pre-register by October 23 by calling 780-624-8071.

NOVEMBER 21 FROM 10AM TO 12PM Smoky Lanes in Girouxville

Lunch and Learn Festival of Trees Silver Bell Tea NOVEMBER 21 FROM 12PM TO 1PM NOVEMBER 19 FROM 1PM TO 3PM

Chateau Nova, Peace River A free event for seniors. Enjoy a warm beverage and dessert while socializing and listening to the delights of the Goodtimers.

NOVEMBER 23 FROM 1:30PM - 3:30PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Lunch and an informational session. 18+. g 780-629-2476

Open Gym

NOVEMBER 21 FROM 4PM TO 6PM

Iron Chef for Youth & Adults NOVEMBER 23 + 24

Spirit of the North Community School, High Level Hosted by the FCSS High Level

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Seniors Outing: Festival of Trees Ages 6-12. g 780-629-2476

Live Music at Miramichi House

Pre-registration is required. Call 780-322-3954 to register.

11120 103 Ave., Fairview Music by Woody Holler. $20. g 780-835--3991

NOVEMBER 19

Open Gym

NOVEMBER 21 FROM 4PM TO 6PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Ages 12-16. g 780-629-2476

NOVEMBER 23 AT 6:30PM

NOVEMBER 22 FROM 3:30PM - 4:30PM

NOVEMBER 19 FROM 5PM TO 7PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake A collaboration between KTCIRS and Woodland Cree Health. A fitness routine including stretching, Zumba, walking and more. Learn to make healthy salads and energy drinks. Everyone is welcome. Snacks, refreshments and door prizes. g 780-629-2476

Human Rights and Inclusivity Workshop

NOVEMBER 20 FROM 9AM TO 11AM

Peace River Municipal Library $10 per person. Light snacks will be provided. Registration deadline is November 16.

NOVEMBER 22 FROM 3:30PM - 5PM

Nampa Seniors Centre Healthy habits start now! This class introduces kids to basic cooking principles and ways they can make yummy snacks that are equally nutritious. Limited spots available. Pre-registration is required by November 16. Call 780-322-3954 to register.

Open Gym

NOVEMBER 22 FROM 4PM TO 6PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Ages 6-12. g 780-629-2476

NOVEMBER 20 FROM 5PM TO 7PM

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Sponsored by Grimshaw Community Services in honour of Bullying Awareness Week g 780-332-4005

Milk and Cookies Club

NOVEMBER 23 FROM 10AM TO 11AM

Nampa Public Library Join us for a story, crafts, milk and cookies. For children ages 0 to 6 (must be accompanied by a parent or guardian). g 780-322-3954

Friedenstal Fall Dance NOVEMBER 24 AT 8PM

Friedenstal Hall Music by Thick as Thieves. Midnight lunch and live auctions. $30. Tickets available at the Jewelry Box and Ed Luck Insurance.

Santa’s Rock and Skate

NOVEMBER 25 FROM 1:30PM - 3PM

Nampa Complex Enjoy holiday music, hot chocolate, cookies and an open skate with Santa. A family event for all ages. g 780-322-3954

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Skating from 1pm to 2:30pm, Hockey from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $2

Light Up the Park

MZRM Field House Youth Time

Riverfront Park Fireworks start at 7:10pm. Celebrate the start of the holiday season with fireworks, hot chocolate, hot dogs, caroling and fun! All are welcome. g 780-624-1000

Calling all youth! Join us for “No School Day” Open Court use at the Multiplex Field House for only $2. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 0)

NOVEMBER 23 FROM 7PM TO 8PM

St. Paul's UCW Tea & Bake Sale

NOVEMBER 24 FROM 2PM TO 4PM

St. Paul's United Church, Fairview

SnowFest

NOVEMBER 24 AT 5PM

Misery Mountain Ski Area, Peace River Fundraiser for the Misery Mountain Ski Area. Ticket includes meal, dessert, live auction, truck raffle and live music by the Brad Lynch Band. Tickets ($60 or $450/ table) can be purchased at Style Ryte Cleaners. Cash bar. 18+.

Free Youth Time in the Fieldhouse

Grimshaw Municipal Library g 780-332-4553 g grimshawlibrary.ab.ca

NOVEMBER 26

Nampa Public Library Ages 5 to 12. Join us for storytime and s’mores. g 780-322-3954

Healthy Kids Cooking Class

NOVEMBER 24

Public Skating and Shinny Hockey

Books and S’mores

Fitness Night and Let’s Get Healthy Together

Grimshaw Festival of Mini-Trees Opening Night Wine & Cheese

High Level Festival of Trees Finale NOVEMBER 24 AT 5:30PM

Northwest Health Centre Hosted by the Northwest Health Foundation

NOVEMBER 26 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

Little Adventurers

NOVEMBER 26 FROM 1PM - 2:30PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Theme TBD. Fun and adventure for kids. A light snack will be provided. g 780-629-2476

Free Swim

NOVEMBER 26 FROM 6:30PM - 8:30PM

Peace Regional Pool Sponsored by First Baptist Church

Family Fun Night NOVEMBER 28

Manning Health Care Centre

Open Gym NOVEMBER 29 FROM 4PM TO 6PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake Ages 6-12. g 780-629-2476


UPCOMING EVENTS CONTINUED... NOVEMBER | DECEMBER | JANUARY

Addicts Healing Support and Art Maker Group

Wooden Snowman Workshop DECEMBER 9 AT 6PM

Farmers Restaurant Cost: $45 per person. Join us for an evening craft workshop. Preregistration is required. Call 780322-3954 to register.

NOVEMBER 29 FROM 5:30PM - 7PM

Woodland Cree Health Centre with NNADAP Counsellor Joanne Gibb and Dr. Sonia Sorban g 780-629-8963 g 780-629-2476

Santa’s Workshop

DECEMBER 10 FROM 6PM TO 8PM

Free Open Court Time

Farmers Restaurant Join us for cookie decorating, hot chocolate, Christmas carols and a visit with Santa. Free to attend. g 780-322-3954

NOVEMBER 29 FROM 7:30PM - 9PM

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Field House In recognition of National Addictions Awareness Week Sponsored by the Town of Grimshaw, County of Northern Lights and the MD of Peace No. 135.

Moonlight Madness NOVEMBER 30

Town of Fairview Fairview will be taken over with the Christmas Spirit along with many deals throughout town. This will be unlike any Moonlight Madness you’ve ever seen! g 780835-5999

Fairview Farmers Market

NOVEMBER 30 FROM 5PM TO 9PM

Homemade goods, baked goods and crafts

Canadian Country Christmas NOVEMBER 30 AT 5:30PM

Belle Petroleum Centre, Peace River Featuring Sean Hogan, Thomas Wade, Adam Gregory and Steve Wilkinson. Includes Christmas dinner buffet. Tickets are $75 (or $40 without dinner). g bpcentre.ca

DECEMBER Dixonville Light Up DATE TBA

Dixonville Outdoor Rink A family friendly evening with snacks, bonfire and fun!

Distracted Driving Presentation DECEMBER 12 AT 5PM

High Level Santa Claus Parade

Youth Handwash Presentation

(TO BE CONFIRMED)

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake In partnership with Alberta Health Services. g 780-629-2476

FIRST SATURDAY OF DECEMBER

High Level Museum Open House DATE TBA FROM 1PM TO 4PM

DECEMBER 4 AT 4PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake In partnership with Alberta Health Services. g 780-629-2476

Mackenzie Crossroads Museum & VIC

Standard First Aid/CPR Course

Children’s Christmas Craft Night

Peace Regional Pool Cost is $145.40 + GST

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex g 780-332-4005 (ext. 04)

Seniors Christmas Social

Moonlight Madness

New Horizon Drop In Centre, Grimshaw Everyone is invited! Enjoy Christmas music and treats. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 04)

Downtown Fairview

DATES TBA

Supper with Santa

DECEMBER 2 FROM 4PM TO 7PM

Marie Reine Cultural Centre Enjoy a community Christmas meal, crafts, games, door prizes and a visit from Santa. A free family event. Pre-registration required. g 780-322-3954

DECEMBER 5 + 6

DECEMBER 5 FROM 1PM TO 3PM

Youth Christmas Wreath Workshop

DECEMBER 7 FROM 6PM TO 8PM

Café du Coin, St. Isidore Limited spots available. PreNampa/Northern Sunrise County registration required by December 4. g 780-624-8071 FCSS and Nampa Public Library

Open House 2018

DECEMBER 3 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

Nampa Public Library Come for fellowship, live entertainment and some light snacks and refreshments! g 780-322-3954

Free Swim

DECEMBER 3 FROM 6:30PM - 8:30PM

Peace Regional Pool Sponsored by Hertz Rental

December Show Opening

DECEMBER 7 FROM 7PM TO 9PM

Fairview Fine Arts Centre Member's Annual Show & Sale g 780-835-2697

Christmas Bazaar

DECEMBER 8 AT 10AM

Florence MacDougall Community School, High Level Hosted by the High Level Parent Link Centre

DECEMBER 14

Storytime with Santa

DECEMBER 15

Grimshaw Municipal Library g 780-332-4553 g grimshawlibrary.ab.ca

Grimshaw Christmas Parade DECEMBER 15 AT 3:30PM

Parade Route will be on Main Street (North to South). Community Christmas Event to follow at the Mile Zero Regional Multiplex. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 04)

Free Swim

DECEMBER 17 FROM 6:30PM - 8:30PM

Peace Regional Pool Sponsored by AUPE

Adult Handwashing Presentation DECEMBER 18 AT 4PM

Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake In partnership with Alberta Health Services. g 780-629-2476


Seniors Christmas Tea and Open House DECEMBER 19 FROM 2PM TO 4PM

Café du Coin Get into the Christmas spirit and join us for an afternoon Christmas social. Snacks and tea will be provided. g 780-624-8071

MZRM Field House Youth Time

DECEMBER 27 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Calling all youth! Join us for “No School Day” Open Court use at the Multiplex Field House for only $2. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 0)

Public Skating and Shinny Hockey DECEMBER 27

JANUARY Babysitter’s Course and Home Alone Course DATES TBA

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex g 780-332-4005 (ext. 04)

MZRM Field House Youth Time JANUARY 2 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

Calling all youth! Join us for “No School Day” Open Court use at the Multiplex Field House for only $2. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 0)

Public Skating and Shinny Hockey JANUARY 2

JANUARY 19 FROM 5PM TO 9PM

Belle Petroleum Centre, Peace River g tedxgrandeprairie.com

JANUARY 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 13

Peace Regional Pool Prerequisites: Bronze Cross and Calling all youth! Join us for “No SFA/CPR Level C. Cost is $280.50+ School Day” Open Court use at the GST Multiplex Field House for only $2. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 0) MZRM Field House Youth Time DECEMBER 28 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

JANUARY 3 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Calling all youth! Join us for “No School Day” Open Court use at the Multiplex Field House for only $2. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 0)

Public Skating and Shinny Hockey JANUARY 3

DECEMBER 28

JANUARY 31

Free Swim

JANUARY 21 FROM 6:30PM - 8:30PM

Peace Regional Pool Sponsored by Health Scientist Association of AB EMS Peace River Local

Tobacco and Cannabis Awareness Presentation

Belle Petroleum Centre, Peace River $35 in advance. Dance starts at 9pm. Live music by Thick as Thieves. g bpcentre.ca

Public Skating and Shinny Hockey JANUARY 4

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex

Skating from 1pm to 2:30pm, Hockey from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $2.

Become a Red Cross Water Safety Instructor JANUARY 31, FEBRUARY 2, 15 & 16

Peace Regional Pool There is some pre-course work that Mamowintowin Hall, Cadotte Lake needs to be completed before the In partnership with Alberta Health course, so register early. Cost is Services. g 780-629-2476 $359.

Please note: Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of these events and listings. Any errors or omissions are strictly unintentional.

JANUARY 4 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

New Year’s Eve

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Skating from 1pm to 2:30pm, Hockey from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $2.

JANUARY 23 FROM 12PM TO 1PM

MZRM Field House Youth Time

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Calling all youth! Join us for “No Skating from 1pm to 2:30pm, School Day” Open Court use at the Hockey from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $2 Multiplex Field House for only $2. g 780-332-4005 (ext. 0) DECEMBER 31 AT 7PM

JANUARY 31 FROM 1PM TO 4PM

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Calling all youth! Join us for “No School Day” Open Court use at the Multiplex Field House for only $2. JANUARY 20 FROM 11:30AM TO 3PM g 780-332-4005 (ext. 0) St. Isidore Skating Rink g 780-624-8071 Public Skating and Shinny Hockey g 780-322-3954

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Skating from 1pm to 2:30pm, Hockey from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $2.

Public Skating and Shinny Hockey

MZRM Field House Youth Time

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Skating from 1pm to 2:30pm, Hockey from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $2 Frosty Family Fun Day

Mile Zero Regional Multiplex Skating from 1pm to 2:30pm, Hockey from 2:30pm to 4:30pm. $2 National Lifeguard Course

MZRM Field House Youth Time

TEDx Peace River

Grimshaw Municipal Library Robbie Burns Night JANUARY 26

Grimshaw Municipal Library Dance performances, the unmistakable sound of the pipes, a wee bit to taste, and of course, a supper featuring haggis. Tickets will be available before Christmas and would make fine gifts. g 780-332-4553 g grimshawlibrary.ab.ca

To have your event or listing included in the next issue, please forward all pertinent information to jenelle@thevaultmag.net (some conditions apply).


ON THE ICE BAYTEX ENERGY CENTRE

THE MILE ZERO REGIONAL MULTIPLEX

9810 73 AVE. PEACE RIVER, AB

4609 50 ST. GRIMSHAW, AB

The Baytex Energy Centre is home to the Peace River Minor Hockey League, the Junior B Navigators, the Peace River Skating Club, The Peace River Speed Skating Association, The Peace River Ringette Association and Recreation Hockey and Old Timers Leagues.

The Mile Zero Regional Multiplex boasts many amenities, one of which is the 85’ by 200’ NHL regulation-size ice rink. The bleachers can accommodate 1,000 and eight dressing rooms are available for arena and fieldhouse groups. The Multiplex also has an outdoor rink located on the north side of the building.

The ice surface is 85’ by 200’ and the season runs from September to March. The arena boasts heated seating for 1,700, a concession area, meeting rooms, a press area and dressing rooms. 780-624-3204 PEACERIVER.CA

HIGH LEVEL SPORTS COMPLEX 10101 105 AVE. HIGH LEVEL, AB

The High Level Sports Complex boasts a regulation-size hockey rink with seating capacity for 1,400. The outdoor rink adjacent to the Sports Complex is 80’ by 200’ and is open during daylight hours from December to March. High Level also has an outdoor skating path at Jubilee Park next to Town Hall. HIGHLEVEL.CA

780-332-4005 GRIMSHAW.CA

MANNING SPORTS CENTRE ARENA 8 AVE SE MANNING, AB

An indoor rink open seasonally from October to March, the Manning Sports Centre Arena is home of the Manning Comets, The Manning Minor Hockey League and the Manning Figure Skating Club. Contact the arena to inquire about ice skating lessons, pickup hockey, ice hockey clinics and more. A snack bar is open during youth hockey games, tournaments and other special events. 780-836-3624

MAINWAY ELECTRICAL & INSTRUMENTATION OUTDOOR SKATING RINK GRIMSHAW, AB

Located on the north side of the Mile Zero Regional Multiplex, the outdoor skating rink is open for use when winter weather conditions allow. The ice surface is perfect for shinny hockey and public and family skating outside while enjoying the fresh, crisp winter air.

WAYNE JOHNSON COMMUNITY ARENA BERWYN, AB

Public skating and ice rentals are available. The Wayne Johnson Community Arena offers skate sharpening, free skates to borrow and a trade-in program for individuals who have outgrown their skates. The arena is volunteerrun. FB: BERWYN ARENA SOCIET Y

DAVE SHAW MEMORIAL COMPLEX 712 6 AVE. HINES CREEK, AB

THE FAIRVIEW FAIRPLEX ARENA 10317 109 ST. FAIRVIEW, AB

The Fairview Fairplex Arena is home to the WJHL Fairview Flyers, Fairview Minor Hockey Teams and the Fairview Silver Blades Skating Program. There is a concession stand and the Fairview Curling Rink is conveniently located next door. 780-835-2723 FAIRVIEW.CA

The Dave Shaw Memorial Complex has a curling rink with four sheets of ice and an arena with an ice rink for skating and hockey. It also has a hall with cooking facilities. 780-494-3690 HINESCREEK.COM


RINKS IN THE PEACE NAMPA AND DISTRICT COMPLEX

PEACE RIVER OUTDOOR RINKS

NAMPA, AB

Weather permitting, municipal boarded rinks operate from December until the end of February. Check the Town of Peace River’s website for more information.

The Nampa Complex boasts two curling rink surfaces as well as an ice hockey rink, which operate from October to March each year. There are four dressing rooms, and inside and outside viewing area and a food booth that is rented out to a contractor during the winter season. The complex also has a hall with an industrial kitchen available for rent. FB: NAMPA AND DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL SOCIET Y

WORSLEY ARENA

MD OF FAIRVIEW OUTDOOR RINK BLUESKY, AB

Outdoor skating rink available when winter conditions allow.

Shaftesbury Estates Rink 92 Street, Shaftesbury Playground Riverside Rink 107 Avenue, Riverside Playground West Peace River Rink 92 Street, Lower West Peace Saddleback Ridge Rink 82 Street, Saddleback Park/Playground

DIXONVILLE OUTDOOR RINK HWY 689 DIXONVILLE, AB

Outdoor skating rink available when winter conditions allow.

WORSLEY, AB

Baytex Energy Centre Outdoor Rink 73 Avenue

NORTH STAR OUTDOOR RINK

Public skating, curling and hockey.

Riverfront Park (no boards)

3RD AVE NORTH STAR, AB

780-685-3921

Spruce Court (no boards)

FAIRVIEW OUTDOOR RINK FAIRVIEW, AB

The Fairview Outdoor Rink is located south of the Fairplex Arena. The rink is perfect for a casual game of shinny or an afternoon skate with the family.

Riverview Outdoor Rink 114 Avenue (no boards) PEACERIVER.CA

CLEARDALE OUTDOOR SKATING RINK CLEARDALE, AB

Outdoor skating rink available when winter conditions allow.

Outdoor skating rink available when winter conditions allow.


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Move Up Magazine Issue 20  

In this issue: 10 Inspiring Women in Business, Fairview Flyers Hockey, REDI: Year in Review, Addressing the Opioid Crisis, GO: Mighty Peace,...

Move Up Magazine Issue 20  

In this issue: 10 Inspiring Women in Business, Fairview Flyers Hockey, REDI: Year in Review, Addressing the Opioid Crisis, GO: Mighty Peace,...

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