Page 1


Catskill Regional Medical Center

inj

Designatedd Strokee Center In recognition of expertise in treating stroke, Catskill Regional Medical Center’s Harris Campus has been named a designated Stroke Center as determined by the New York State Department of Health. Our specialized Stroke physicians, nurses and technicians use advanced medicine, techniques and technology to Team of highly trained trai treat stroke quickly and effectively. Having emergency access to stroke care services within the first three hours of symptoms appearing is critical in minimizing brain damage.

Harris Campus

Grover M. Hermann Hospital

crmcny.org


2015-2016 SCott WoodS Editor

Cindy Monahan-herbert Monahan Graphic Design Studio Art Director and Production

Cindy herbert Kathy herbert Advertising

doMiniCK Capuzzi Cindy herbert SCott WoodS Photography

MiChelle Gadoury Kathy herbert eriC nyStroM Mary tonJeS dan younG Distribution

The Jeffersonville Journal is produced with 100% windpower and vegi-inks This publication is sponsored by the

JefferSonville area ChaMber of CoMMerCe p.o. box 463 Jeffersonville, ny 12748 845-482-5688

Jeffersonvilleny.com

facebook.com/Jeffersonvilleny The Jeffersonville Journal is published by the Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 463, Jeffersonville, NY 12748. No part of this publication can be reproduced without the written permission of the Chamber. The information in this publication is carefully compiled to ensure maximum accuracy. The Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce cannot, and does not, guarantee the correctness of all the information furnished it or the complete absence of errors and omissions. Thus, no responsibility for these shall be assumed.

2015-2016 | FEATURE | ARTICLES

photo by dominick Capuzzi

contents Welcome 2

WCM’s Summer Chamber Music Festival 3

Jeffersonville Transportation Company: From Cutters to Motor Coaches 6-8 Slow Down, You Move Too Fast 11-12

WJFF Radio: Best Little Station Near Dam Site 15-16 We Are Making a Music Scene 24 The Flowing Maples 32-33

Hot Bed * Cold Frame * Cool Project 38

Join in on the Action at Bethel Woods 40-41 Remembering Trees 53-54

What’s Cooking in the Kitchens?! 55-57

The Sullivan County Adult Care Center: Caring Roots That Run Deep 58-59

HELPFUL | INFORMATION

Events Calendar 18-23

Cultural Calendar & Museums 26-31 Business Directory 42-49 Cultural Guide 60-61

Helpful Information 62-63 Area Map 64

COVER

Cover photo by Dominick Capuzzi

Dominick and Maryann Capuzzi owners of High Road Farm Youngsville .... moved to NY after being weekenders for many years .... I always loved the country .... spending many summers with my family in East Durham N.Y. on a little farm owned by my fathers friend .... as a restaurateur I was always working .... as financial advisor too much stress .... in 2005 Maryann and I decided to make the move .... my wife is an avid horse women .... so we started construction of our barn the same year to stable our own horses and create a little business to keep me busy …. the constant exposure to beautiful sunrises and lush landscapes turned into a passion for digital photography .... even as a kid I had a brownie instamatic .... I love to shoot pics of our horses and send them to their owners .... so many beautiful and interesting things to photograph here in Sullivan country .... the barn shot was a cold winters morning after a light snow fall, coming down the mountain from a walk with my dogs.


Welcome to the country! Imagine a place where streams run pure, cascading down enchanted mountains and through pristine valleys. Bird song, not traffic noise fills the air, a place where winter’s chill energizes the spirit and summer evenings are a warm blanket for the soul. This little slice of paradise is a world unto itself. A world at peace. A sanctuary. We, who are lucky enough to visit here, or even better call it home, are proud of our secret little place. We know how lucky we are. We gather in the park with neighbors to share Music Under the Sun and together we are charmed by tractor parades and Jamborees. Strolling through the farmer’s markets we actually meet the person who grows our food, harvests our honey and knits our scarves. She is a friend, not a corporation. For most it is a place to imagine. We are the lucky ones who call it home.

Scott Woods,editor 2 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

photo by terri Ward


JULY 11-26

WCM’s SUMMER CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

M

John Corigliano Composer

Photo by Henry Fair

usic in the Barn opens the 2015 Weekend of Chamber Music (WCM) season on Saturday, June 20 at a lovely country home in Bethel, NY. Hosted by a long-time patron and founding member of the WCM Board, this intimate, engaging evening begins with wine and mingling on the lawn, adds a concert of solos, duos, trios and quartets in a charming old barn, and is followed by dinner al fresco on the terrace with the musicians. Guests always enjoy strolling the grounds to view the lake and gardens, and the deliciously prepared, gourmet buffet supper with dessert and coffee disappears as quickly as do the reservations for this popular annual benefit. Acclaimed for its world-class concerts, superb artists and up-close audience involvement, the 22nd WCM Summer Chamber Music Festival from July 11 to 26 expands this year to 10 events over two weeks. Home base for the popular Summer Festival is the idyllic Eddie Adams Farm in Jeffersonville, but several events also travel to Honesdale, North Branch, Callicoon, Loch Sheldrake and Bethel this summer. Jam-packed with concerts indoors and out; social gatherings; imaginative talks and plenty of close connection between audience, musicians and music, the annual Summer Festival also showcases a celebrated composer-in-residence and offers a Chamber Music Immersion Fellowship opportunity for pre-professional musicians. Centered around the work of a contemporary composer each year, Summer Festival 2015 presents the iconic John Corigliano as its third composer-in-residence. Among Corigliano's accolades are the Pulitzer Prize, the Grawemeyer Award, five Grammy Awards and one Academy Award “Oscar” for The Red Violin, and an Oscar nomination for Altered States. His works have been performed and recorded by many of the most prominent orchestras, soloists, and chamber musicians in the world. The acclaimed Corigliano Quartet is named after him, and two of its members, Melia Watras and Michael Jinsoo Lim, have performed with WCM in recent years. Festival 2015 begins with a program of Bach, Ravel, Fauré and improvisation on Saturday, July 11 at the Cooperage in Honesdale,

Nurit Pacht violinist

PA. An outdoor Concert on the Lawn in Jeffersonville at 3pm Sunday, July 12 at the Jeffersonville Presbyterian Church brings back the WCM Wind Quintet, with music by Bob Dylan arranged by Waggoner, Vaughan Williams, Rosetti, Ibert and more. Morning shoppers at Callicoon Farmers’ Market will enjoy a free, short preview at 11 am of the afternoon program. The first week continues with improv, discussion and film clips at the Old North Branch Inn Thursday July 16; a pre-concert talk and music by Beethoven, Corigliano and Honegger at the Adams Barn Saturday July 18, and, after a long hiatus, WCM returns to SUNY Sullivan for an afternoon concert Sunday, July 19. Dubbed Persistence of Vision this year for the connection to film that audiences will enjoy through John Corigliano’s appearance, talks and music, the Festival’s 2nd week continues Thursday July 23 with MusicTalks! in Bethel, where the composer joins artistic co-director Andrew Waggoner and the WCM musicians in discussion and performance of his film music. Corigliano will be on hand for the Friday July 24 free open rehearsal and the Saturday July 25 Gala Finale at the Adams Barn, in Jeffersonville. This concert offers a preconcert talk, music by Corigliano, Fauré, Kreisler, Popper and Schubert, with a Gala Meet-the-Artists reception after on the barn porch. The Festival returns to the Cooperage on Sunday July 26 for its final program of selections from Fauré, Corigliano, Schubert and more. Typical of its history in the Catskills, WCM’s innovative concert programs, superb musicians and delightfully unique concert settings are all in a “weekend’s” work for this outstanding ensemble. At its core remains a flexible company, a roster of globe-trotting musicians - masters of their instruments - who have earned national and international recognition. They are a group of colleagues and friends whose sheer delight in playing together and in sharing their excitement with audiences creates an exhilarating and inspiring atmosphere. Always eagerly anticipated, the annual WCM Festival is a summer season must for residents and visitors alike! To join our email list or get more information, visit WCMconcerts.org or call 845-887-5803.

INFORMATION:

845-887–5803 | WCMconcerts.org | info@WCMconcerts.org

Weekend of Chamber Music is a 501(c )3 non-profit, sponsored in part by public funding from the New York State Council on the Arts, a State agency.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 3


4 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 5


Written by Michael duttweiler

Jeffersonville Transportation Company

From Cutters to Motor Coaches

esidents of Center Street and Jefferson Avenue in Jeffersonville from the 1920s through the 1970s likely viewed the Jeffersonville Transportation Company as a noisy and dusty neighbor congesting otherwise quiet streets. Today’s visitors to the Western Sullivan Public Library on Center Street would be hard pressed to see it as a garage crammed to the rafters with tools, trucks, buses, and groceries. For me, Jeffersonville Transportation was our family business started by my grandfather Frederick H. Duttweiler and continued by my father, Russell E. Duttweiler. Its history spans periods of dramatic change in the transportation industry and the economy of Jeffersonville and Sullivan County -- from horse-drawn cutters to luxury motor coaches roaming the continent. Fred Duttweiler’s family was part of the influx of Swiss settlers to Jeffersonville in the 1840s and 1850s with Fred’s father, Jacob, arriving in 1853. That is a story in itself involving a land swindle and forced relocation to land at the corner of Swiss Hill and Goebel Roads. They were farmers and stone masons, among whose projects were the beautiful stone arched bridges of the area. In 1909 at the age of 27, Duttweiler assumed his first official role in the transportation business by becoming a rural mail carrier moving mail to and from the Liberty Ontario &Western Rail Road station to Jeffersonville using a team of black horses and a four-seat surrey. It’s likely that this initial transportation venture was largely a matter of being in the right place at the right time. Becoming a mail carrier, while perhaps an individual risk, hardly was novel; there were dozens of mail carriers across the state.  The steps Duttweiler took beyond this initial modest venture had much to do with the unique times, especially the integral role of rail transportation in rural development and the growing vacation lodging trade in Sullivan County. The Duttweiler family, like many others in the area, had added guest lodging to their farm operations building a sizeable boarding house on Swiss Hill. Between the transportation needs of his family’s guests and seeing the thousands of tourists coming and going from the Liberty O&W train depot, Duttweiler saw a new business opportunity. His first big step was in 1911, the purchase of a Model T bus to carry passengers between Jeffersonville and Liberty. By his third year in business, Duttweiler had married Helen Eggler, also a descendent of early Swiss settlers, bought a home on “The Island” in the village, expanded passenger transportation between Jeffersonville and Liberty, and added local freight hauling to his venture. That first Model-T bus was just the start.  Multiple other vehicles soon joined the Duttweiler taxi fleet first

R

6 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


operating initially on an on-request basis followed by regularly scheduled routes. His new service was appreciated. The Jeffersonville correspondent to the Liberty Register reported in December 1915: “We cannot help making comment on the efficient automobile service rendered our people here, as well as other points along the line from Jeffersonville to Liberty, by Frederick H. Duttweiler of this place. Fred still makes two trips daily to Liberty with his auto and gives us quick and excellent service. Liberty, as well the O. and W. R.R., receive much patronage from here, through Mr. Duttweiler’s courtesies. Fred shoveled his own track so as to make it passable for auto service and we wish to make known to him through the columns of this valuable paper our appreciation of his efforts and service.” Today it’s hard to envision that the small Village of Jeffersonville with a population of less than 500 could provide enough demand to support viable taxi and bus services but it did. According to the Catskill Institute, the list of nearby lodging options in the early 1920s included venues like: boarding houses run by the Arndt, Von Bergen, Hess, Wahl, Welch, Mall, Sohl, and Likel families and larger venues such as the Franklin House, Hotel Jefferson, the Mansion House, Smith's Maple Grove, Sunnyside Farm, Muldavinville Bungalows, and Tonnison’s White House. Nearby Kenoza Lake had 26 establishments. There were 25 establishments in the Youngsville community and 11 in White Sulphur Springs both on the route to Liberty. Liberty had 54 listings and neighboring Ferndale had more than 90. The need was there. In the 1920s, Duttweiler added multiple taxis,  larger buses, and additional daily runs to and from Liberty. Early motorized transportation was a hazardous venture with unskilled drivers, poor roads and maintenance, and ill-designed equipment. The local papers describe many mishaps including several involving Duttweiler and his vehicles. There were numerous fender benders, and buses and taxis routinely broke down or were stuck in the mud or snow. That first Model T caught fire and burned to the frame near Liberty as Fred and his passengers tossed on dirt in vain. Despite these early travails, the Duttweiler family became fully committed to the transportation business by incorporating

Above: Fred Duttweiler with a load of U.S. Mail on the road between Jeffersonville and Liberty in 1912.

Top right: Fred Duttweiler, oil can in hand, moving a local family with chain-drive truck before 1920.

Bottom right: Transferring loads of groceries on Center Street in front of Duttweiler garage in 1935. The left building is now the Village Hall and the building on its right is the Sullivan West Public Library.

the Jeffersonville Transportation Company in 1919. This truly was a family affair; incorporators along with Duttweiler included Almeda and Annie Eggler, Helen Eggler Duttweiler's sisters, and August Neuberger who was Fred’s brother-in-law. The incorporation value of $3,000 had to be the bulk of the assets of these families representing a significant leap of faith in this new venture. By 1920, the Jeffersonville Transportation Company was off to a dynamic start with combined taxi, bus service, and freight transport. Multiple vehicles  fanned out from the hamlet of Jeffersonville. 1924 was a landmark year for the Duttweiler family and business. A new Duttweiler home was purchased on the corner of Center Street and Jefferson Avenue (later to become my childhood home). As the fleet grew, so did the need for covered space for servicing vehicles and for storage of goods in transit. That same year, land was purchased across the street from the new house and the Jeffersonville Transportation Company garage was erected. That structure today is the Western Sullivan Public Library building. Many taxi, bus, and truck transportation firms surfaced in the 1920s. The railroads fought back through legal, regulatory, and political channels but eventually lost the battle. Truck and bus operators came under increasing regulation by the Interstate Commerce Commission and New York Public Service Commission requiring competition for specified routes and roles. Duttweiler scored a major coup when in 1929 he obtained rights to provide daily service between Jeffersonville and New York City. By 1929, the Jeffersonville Transportation Company  fleet consisted of eight buses and taxis plus several trucks. In the 1930s, passenger transportation preferences shifted dramatically toward passenger cars despite the economic burdens

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 7


Top Left: Motor coaches in front of the Duttweiler home on Center Street in 1935.

Bottom Left: Frederick H. Duttweiler

Top Right: Trucks and buses off Jefferson Avenue behind the Duttweiler garage in the 1960s.

of the Great Depression. In addition, some larger hotels started providing direct charter services to their facilities. Seeing the handwriting on the wall, Duttweiler began focusing his bus operations on touring, first providing area tours to tourist destinations like Ashokan Dam. By the mid-1930s, he had affiliated with Yelloway Lines and began chartering tours across the country including holding long-term contracts with Major Bowes Talent Shows and the Maganini Chamber Orchestra. As local schools were centralized, it was a natural step for Duttweiler to add pupil transportation to the mix. Starting with runs to feeder schools like the Faubel District before the consolidated new school was built in 1938, for the next 45 years thousands of Jeffersonville students would travel Duttweiler buses. Daily bus transportation from Jeffersonville to New York eventually was dropped but the Liberty to New York route continued until the rights were allowed to lapse during WWII. Freight operations continued to evolve and became focused on transporting groceries to hotels and camps in Western Sullivan County and northeastern Pennsylvania. By 1940, as he approached 60 years old, Fred Duttweiler had built a profitable transportation business. WWII and the economic boom that followed would reshape the business once again, leading to the final chapter for the firm. At 67, and one suspects with a lot of urging from spouse Helen, Fred began the formal transition of the business to his son Russell making him full partner in 1949. Fred remained an active partner in decision making but his involvement in daily operations was limited. By this time, the large long-distance motor coaches were long gone leaving only limited school transportation as the remaining passenger transport. The distribution of groceries and supplies flourished, supplemented by the occasional moving job. The old fire house next to the Duttweiler garage was purchased

8 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

and attached to the main garage providing additional freight and vehicle storage. The business was in good shape with clear focus, a solid fleet, and quality facilities. It was time to for Fred to move on. The final transfer of the Jeffersonville Transportation Company to Russell Duttweiler was completed in 1953. The company existed for another 28 years but continued to evolve under Russell Duttweiler’s leadership. The grocery distribution industry changed dramatically when food wholesalers developed fleets of their own leading to the phase out of grocery hauling in 1965. There remained a role in supporting Sullivan County tourism by distributing milk and milk products from the Crowley milk plant in Binghamton to Western Catskill distributors. In the 1960s, before the precipitous decline of the “Borscht Belt” tourism industry, there were four daily runs of tractor-trailers from Binghamton to Sullivan and Ulster Counties throughout the summer season. The remaining two routes were sold off in 1970. With consolidation of the Jeffersonville Youngsville Central School, pupil transportation had become the central part of the business. As Russell in turn decided it was time to retire, all remaining bus routes were sold off in 1981, dissolving the Jeffersonville Transportation Company twelve years after the death of its founder Frederick H. Duttweiler. The last vestiges of the Jeffersonville Transportation Company are well disguised today. In addition to the library, the appended firehouse and freight building served for a while as the home of the Jeffersonville ambulance corps. It now is the Village of Jeffersonville office including the Russell E. Duttweiler Community Hall, so designated to recognize his years as village trustee and mayor. At first it was  hard for me to accept that the Jeffersonville Transportation Company was no more. The business and the family members I miss daily are interwoven in my memory. It’s nice to know that some of what they built remains to serve Jeffersonville yet today.

Michael Duttweiler was raised in Jeffersonville, and lived there through his undergraduate college years. He graduated from J.Y.C.S. and is married to Linda Redington Duttweiler, also from Jeffersonville. A career-long adult educator with Cornell Cooperative Extension, he has long-standing interest in local history of the Catskill Mountains and other regions of New York. He is a three-time graduate of Cornell University holding degrees in natural resources and a doctorate in education. Now retired, he lives with his family in Ithaca, New York. References Catskill Institute (undated) Hotels and Bungalows. http://catskills.brown.edu/hotelsbungalows.shtml

Duttweiler, Michael W. (2014) From Cutters to Motor Coaches: Pioneering Commercial Transportation in the Catskills. Fast Pencil Publishing Company, Campbell, CA.


Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 9


10 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


Slow Down, You Move Too Fast By Anne Hart

My step is always a little lighter when I hear that catchy song from Simon and Garfunkel. Slow is in the news these days with the ascendance of the Slow Movement, described in Carl Honore’s 2004 book “In Praise of Slowness”, as “a movement that places a new value on the benefit of taking more time to achieve outcomes or meet our needs.” Slow Food places an emphasis on protecting regional food traditions and the preserving biodiversity. Slow Money has a principle of “connecting investors to the places where they live”. Both urge and support an emphasis on local food and a local economy. And many of us have listened and become more concerned about how and where our food is grown and the impact that has on our health and environment. Many of us have also come to realize that it’s also important to purchase products grown right here at home, in the region or in the good old US of A. Should we be concerned about our flowers as well? The answer is “Oh, yes.” It’s time to take your flowers into the slow lane and bring them back home. There’s nothing better than a sun ripened, just picked vegetable either grown yourself or bought from a local farmer. Flowers are no different. Did you know that over 80% of the flowers you see at the grocery store, your local florist or online come from South and Central America, Mexico, the Netherlands and Africa? Did you know that there aren’t any labelling rules that apply to imported flowers? Were they sustainably grown? What chemicals were used? Where were they grown? Were the growers’ employees paid a living wage? There is no way of knowing. American and locally grown flowers are labelled, by origin and whether or not they are certified organic, and sometimes with the name and location of the flower farm. The Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers (ASCFG) lists growers all over America on their website (ascfg.org) and you can find out everything you want to know about the flowers grown by their members. Certified American Grown is a

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 11


new campaign begun by flower growers all over the US. The hidden costs of shipping flowers thousands of miles are numerous. Once cut, they are doused with preservatives and sometimes with chemicals to kill any living bugs, boxed, put on a truck, then on a plane, then on another truck to a wholesaler, and another to the florist or grocery store, arriving a week or so later without getting one drink of water. American and locally grown flowers don’t travel as far, don’t have as many middlemen, and arrive much sooner after they are cut. And all those wages paid to the growers and the transporters are wages paid to Americans. Ever wonder why those roses you picked up don’t have any scent or smell like something under your sink? They are bred for uniformity so that they all look the same, will fit nicely into a box, and can take the rough and tumble of long distance travel. Most of the time that breeding is at the expense of the scent flowers have, which is to my mind like the flavor of a locally grown vegetable. It’s what makes them the real deal. It’s also at the expense of variety. The subtler, more fragile and more interesting flowers aren’t part of the mix. Last winter I found a rose for a customer that was grown in California. It was a deep and luscious red with a chartreuse center. It was frilly. It was fresh, unusual, and American. Last week I spoke with a grower in Oregon about some flowers a bride wants that won’t be available here at the time of the wedding. They virtually walked me through the fields talking about what would be available when. That’s what I do with customers who come to my garden in person.

12 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

American and, even more so, locally grown flowers have all of the characteristics that make flowers so special. They smell better. They’re fresher. They last longer. They are more unusual. We know where they come from. In this country we’ve come to take for granted that we can have what we want when we want it, whether it’s an imported tomato in the deep of winter, a movie on demand or a bouquet of flowers. Have we lost anything with this convenience? As Debra Prinzing, florist, gardener and author of “The 50 Mile Bouquet: Seasonal, Local and Sustainable Flowers” puts it, “ Like harvesting salad greens and herbs from your window box or kitchen garden before running to the supermarket, slow flowers is decorating your home with flowers, foliage and branches you grow yourself.” She goes on to say “It’s a way to practice the art of living in the moment and observing nature’s transition from one season to the next.” “Slow down, you move to fast, you got to make the morning last……”

Anne Hart is the proprietress of Domesticities and the Cutting Garden in Youngsville, where you can obtain fresh, unusual flowers when they bloom if you don’t happen to have some in your own garden. The only truck they travel on is yours. She has a long list of local growers and florists to share with you once you decide to take your flowers to the slow lane.


Western Sullivan Wellness

Massage Therapy & Reflexology (845) 482-5031

Offered by Lucette Ostergren, LMT

5310 State Route 52 Jeffersonville

Bill & Elaine (845) 482-3345 Cell: 845-707-1424

KORWAN’S GARDEN CENTER 148 Eggler Road, Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Fruit Trees Trees Shrubs

Rhododendron - Azalea Holly - Pieris Wood Carvings Crafts - Carved Signs

In 1842, 110 Swiss immigrants settled near the present day Presbyterian Church of Jeffersonville and named their settlement the Winkelried Society after the Swiss patriot, Arnold Von Winkelried.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 13


Thony Landscaping Complete DESIGNING & PLANTING Service

RICHARD THONY Jeffersonville, NY

845.482.4184

ALL TYPES OF DRY STONE WORK

Youngsville Garage, Inc.

CoMplete autoMotive repair SinCe 1925

NYS Inspection • Computer Diagnostic Service A/C Service • Transmission Service 24-Hour Towing • Foreign & Domestic

NAPA AUTOCARE CENTER

Scott Gaebel • p: (845) 482-5151 • f: (845) 482-9310 4015 route 52, youngsville, ny 12791

14 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


by lucette barker

Best Little Station by Dam Site What is the likelihood that a small rural community nestled in the Catskill Mountains could manage to get a public radio station up and running and keep it on the air for 25 years?

On the surface the demographics of family owned farms and a resort community that had seen better days would not suggest it. But a group of individuals with commitment, perseverance and dedicated labor managed to succeed.

The story begins with two individuals, Malcolm Brown and Anne Larsen. Malcolm, a retired philosophy professor, had become an activist interested in green, renewable energy and Anne, a librarian, was possessed with a strong belief in books and education to broaden one’s understanding of other peoples and the world. The couple purchased the old generating site next to the Dam by Lake Jefferson in 1985. Their intent was to restore the site to its original 1920’s era purpose –to generate electricity. Lake Jefferson and its dam were created for the purpose of generating electricity. Malcolm summarizes: “The dam was designed by a Jeffersonville group led by Dr. Cameron Gain, for the Clarke Water and Power Company, but was only partially completed. In 1927, the company Lake Jefferson Inc. completed construction. The dam created the lake, but the original hydroelectric project was abandoned in favor of a generation using coal.” After renewed efforts by Malcolm and Anne, which included getting state and federal permits, and considerable new construction, Jeffersonville Hydroelectric Company began producing power in spring of 1986. The energy produced was enough to generate electricity for 20-25 homes. Rather than just sell all this energy back to NYSEG, Malcolm and Anne wanted to put this energy to a more creative use.

The Seed of an Idea is Planted

In 1987, Malcolm Brown and Anne Larsen were entertaining old family friends, Joe Mazur, a mathematics professor from Vermont with his wife and two daughters. As they were sitting on the deck of the half-finished house above Jeff Hydro the visiting family requested Malcolm to tune in to National Public Radio’s (NPR’s) weekly broadcast of “A Prairie Home Companion” as was this family’s tradition. Malcolm responded “We can’t get that here. There are only two radio stations, one is rock and one is country-western.” For residents of Sullivan County the paucity of any kind of radio, TV and now cell phone signals is something we all have to live with. However, as Joe and his family were parting after the weekend Joe said to Malcolm and Anne (referring to a public radio station) “Why don’t you build one? Don’t you know that that’s how these things start?” Well . . . no . . . Malcolm and Anne did not know, at least at that moment.

However, several weeks later, each of them independently, on the same day and unbeknownst to the other, called NPR to inquire about starting a public radio station. They were given a long list—“So you want to start a Public Radio Station. This is what you need to do” These are things you will want to do like outreach to community – make sure there’s a desire in the community, gather some statistical analysis, obtain the equipment plus many other of tasks listed in a step by step fashion with the final note “Are you sure you really want to do this or should you see your mental health expert?”

The Germination of the Seed

What followed was an ad in the Sullivan County Democrat: “Dear Reader, would you be interested in joining other people and starting up a public radio station and if you do would you come to a public meeting at the Lake Jeff Hotel.” There was a great deal of interest. Eighty to one hundred people showed up for the meeting. During that meeting committees were formed to take on the many facets of actually making this dream come to life. Malcolm and Anne took care of many of the administrative tasks including a trip to Washington, D.C., to visit the FCC and Corporation for Public Broadcasting, applying for grants, getting the engineering

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 15


done and the needed licenses, and obtaining the lease for the radio tower from the County. From that initial meeting grew a core of dedicated volunteers. It took 3 years to complete the station. There were fundraisers. There were many meetings. There were countless chores and errands. Malcolm was always on the site supervising. On the weekends David Dann, Bert Echt, Kevin Gref and Chuck Hein along with other volunteers would show up faithfully to donate their carpentry skills to the building. Mark Keoppen and Annie Hat showed up, tools in hand. There were other artists like Jack Hardy, Angela Page and Judith Pearce all contributed their talents. Bogner Seitel and Ellenville Lumber offered their support by giving them fabulous deals on the purchase of supplies. Lou Grupp, owner of Lake Jefferson and the Hotel offered his support. Elaine Giguere, Director of the Delaware Valley Arts Alliance (DVAA) looked at this radio station not as a rival but as a boost to her leadership efforts to organize the arts community. She became a strong supporter and help to WJFF. The co-owner of radio station WVOS, Chris Coffin threw his support behind this growing station. A cadre of prominent Jeffersonville residents, Kathleen Tonges, Ebbie Weiss, Adelaide Schadt, Ellie Brey, Glenn Wooddell and Winnie Mullally were mainstays of support in the early days.

Sonja Hedlund and WJFF Founder Malcolm Brown.

A Station Comes to Life

On February 12, 1990, at 6:00 a.m. in the morning, there was a little crackling on the air then came the now familiar voice of Glenn Wooddell. All the previous three years of labor had come to fruition and the station was born. One can only imagine the excitement at that moment as the community of volunteers all tuned in to their radios. The commitment of the previous three years and the willingness to “soldier on” has continued for 25 years now. The station has grown to 1500 members and 100 volunteers. There have been a total of 5000 members when numbers are calculated over the past 10 years. In the early years the station was on the air from 6:00 a.m. to midnight, but in the late 90’s it expanded to a 24 hour broadcasting station. The programming is filled with nationally produced programs from NPR, Pacifica and Public Radio International (PRI) as well as locally produced programs. That is the beauty of the station. It is truly a community radio. It is difficult if not impossible to have a voice on commercial stations however WJFF is one station where individuals do have a voice. The naming of the radio station WJFF Radio was intentionally named to place it in the local community. The other moniker of WJFF is Radio Catskill places the radio station in the larger surrounding area. Indeed excerpted from its Mission Statement . . . “It aims to involve the community in preserving and transmitting the community’s cultural heritage and artistic expressions in addition to those of the global community and to promote understanding among people of diverse social and cultural backgrounds.” This little station tucked away in the Catskills has served its mission “to make available to its community a broad range of ideas and ideals useful to a full and enlightened life” for the past 25 years. We look forward to the next 25.

WJFF, Radio Catskill, is a hydro-powered volunteer-driven public radio station based in Jeffersonville, NY and with a satellite studio in Honesdale, PA. Its contingent of more than 100 volunteers provide listeners with a mix of both locally and nationally produced programming on the air at 90.5 FM and streamed live and archived at www.wjffradio.org

16 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Local band, Crackers performing.

Amanda Halloran performs.


A true Adirondack store in the heart of the Catskills, one of a kind rustic furniture and decor...

www.TheRusticCottage.com

4938 Route 52, Jeffersonville, NY • 482-4123

The school, overlooking the Village, was modeled after the Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg, Virginia, and was constructed at a total cost of $417,500.

Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg, VA

School in Jeffersonville

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 17


Calendar of Events

June

5-27 • Farming with Kids, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 a.m. - Children do farm chores (activities vary): milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horses, etc. $6.00/person. Children under 3 free. Minimum of 5 people. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center, NY. 845-482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com

6 • Summer Kick-off Party & Membership/Summer Program Sign-up at Delaware Community Center Kick off the summer with fun and enjoy all the great activities you and your children can participate in at the DYC. Sign up for Membership, Summer Program, and Swim Lessons. For info: summer@delawareyouthcenter.org. www.delawareyouthcenter.org

38 Eagle Dr. , Swan Lake. 1 p.m. Info: 482-4061.

13 • Chicken BBQ, United Reformed Church, Youngsville. 4-7 p.m.

13 • Trout Festival & Parade The 11th Annual Trout Parade will roll down Main Street at 1 p.m. with bands, floats, antique cars, musical performances, puppeteers, dancers and a whole lot of fun. Downtown, Main Street, Livingston Manor. Info: 439-4227. 13 • Chicken BBQ, North Branch firehouse, take-out only, 4-6 p.m.

14 • A Flag Day Celebration In honor of our Flag, join Boy Scout Troop 106 for raising and salute to Old Glory. Backyard Park, Jeffersonville. 876 Swiss Hill Road North. For time and more info: villageofjeff@gmail.com 14 • Firemen’s Pancake Breakfast Come to the pancake breakfast at the Callicoon firehouse. 7 a.m-11 a.m., then join us for the tractor parade, chicken BBQ and afternoon events!

14 • Callicoon’s Antique Tractor Parade Parade honoring the heritage of farming and agriculture in western Sullivan County. Farming families spanning several generations show their tractors, both old and new. A chicken BBQ will be held after the parade. 12 Noon, Main Street, Callicoon. For info: liaison@delawareyouthcenter.org.

Farmers’ Markets

7 • Annual Cowboy Challenge Sullivan County Horse Council will sponsor its annual Cowboy Challenge 2nd of the 4th SCHC part series hosted at Bridle Hill Farm (www.bridlehillfarm.com) Open series with divisions for all levels of horse and rider. For more info and forms please go to (www.schc-ny.org). Questions please contact Eunice at (845) 866-6140, eunice@hvc.rr.com

7 • Jeffersonville Lion’s Club Golf Tournament. Swan Lake Golf & Country Club.

Callicoon - Sundays Now through - Nov. 8, 11-2 p.m.

Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive Indoor Market - Nov. -April at Delaware Youth Center

Liberty - Fridays Now through Sept. 4, 3-6 p.m.

Darbee Lane Municipal Parking Lot

Roscoe - Sundays Now through - Columbus Day 10-2 p.m., Niforatos Field

18 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

17-19 • Upper Delaware River Paddle Pedal, Paddle down the Delaware River by day and pedal at night under a full moon. This weekend long event has options for every level bicyclist. Enjoy the beauty of the Upper Delaware River Valley from the roads and from the water. Narrowsburg, NY. For detailed description, visit www.paddlepedal.com

Jeffersonville Outdoor Market

Saturdays thru Sept. 5th 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Farmers, Vendors, Flea & Craft Marketeers all selling their wares throughout the summer. For info/vendor space, call Michelle at Heirloom Marketplace (845) 482-2169

21 • Pancake Breakfast White Lake Fire Department

21 • A Lotta Ricotta Saturday 10:30-12:30 p.m. Meet the goats. Try milking one. Make whole milk ricotta cheese. Learn ways to serve it. Sample local artisan cheese. $40.00. Reservations required. Private classes on request. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center. Info: 482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com

22-Sept. 4 • Bridle Hill Farm Summer Day Camp, equestrian facility offers horseback riding and trail rides for all ages and levels. The Summer Day Camp is a popular activity; every day, Monday through Friday (9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon;) drop in and pay as you go $40 (or $30 with prepaid riding package.) Each session includes riding, and horse educational activities. Spend time with lots of others. The farm has


an indoor and outdoor riding so come rain or shine. Open daily YR sunrise to sunset by appointment. Info: 482-3993. www.bridlehillfarm.com

24 - August 26 • Callicoon Center Band Concerts, 81st year performing for the community. Every Wednesday night 8 p.m. at the Callicoon Center Band Stand. Bring a blanket or lawn chair, rain or shine. Though the concerts are free, a "cigar box" is passed at intermission for those who wish to make a donation of choice for the band. Refreshments are available at the Country Store and the Fire House- provided by the Ladies Auxillary. 28 • 5K Running for the Bulls Run/Walk Help raise money to spay and neuter the Pit Bulls of Sullivan County! On River Road in Callicoon, meeting in front of post office. $20 donation preferred but any amount is appreciated. 9 a.m. To sign-up, email stefanie.johnson@gmail.com or call (617) 459-6099. Sponsored by Ridgeback Sports and Sullivan SPCA.

28 • Motorcycle/Antique Car Poker Run Sign-up begins at 9 a.m. Jeffersonville Firehouse. Info: 482-4289.

Music Under the Sun Saturdays from July 4 - Sept. 5 • 1-3 p.m. In the Backyard Park Jeffersonville

Bring a picnic basket and blanket! 876 Swiss Hill Road North Info: villageofjeff@gmail.com

Thru Aug. 15 • Registration for Little Stars Family Daycare & Preschool, Call for info: 845-594-4282. Youngsville.

July

2-4 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-3 p.m.

Photo by Scott Woods

3-25 • Farming with Kids, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 a.m. - Children do farm chores (activities vary): milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horses, etc. $6.00/person. Children under 3 free. Minimum of 5 people. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center, NY. 845-482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com 4 • Narrowsburg Fire Department Parade 2 p.m. Info: 252-3328. www.narrowsburgfd.com

River Run in Callicoon

19 • Pancake Breakfast 7 a.m.-12 Noon, Jeffersonville Fire Dept. at firehouse.

24-25 • Community Wide Yard Sale Village of Jeffersonville. 10 a.m.-4:00 p.m. For more info: villageofjeff@gmail.com

25 • Chicken Barbecue & Bake Sale Kenoza Lake Fire Department at firehouse. 4:30-7:00 p.m.

4 • Bake Sale Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church. 9 a.m. until sold out.

11 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-3 p.m.

11 • Founders Day Street Fair Specials at local shops, street vendors, live music, children’s activities, art shows and more! 3rd St., Wurtsboro, NY. Info: 845-283-3361 12 • Lake Huntington Field Day & BBQ Lake Huntington Fire Dept. at firehouse.

17-18 • Giant Old Time Bazaar Games of all kinds, including Spindle, Over & Under, Coin Toss, Ring Toss, Big Six Wheel, Dart Wheel, Pokerino, Penny Pitch and the ever popular, Ballette. This wonderful family event also has a Children’s Corner with ten games just for kids. Music and food. Purchase pies and other baked goods. Home made items for sale, and door prizes. 6-10 p.m. at St. Francis Church, Rte 52, in Youngsville. Info: 482-4292 or 482-4360. (Raindate July 19) 18 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-3 p.m.

18 • A Lotta Ricotta Saturday 10:30-12:30 p.m. Meet the goast. Try milking one. Make whole milk ricotta cheese. Learn ways to serve it. Sample local artisan cheese. $40.00. Reservations required. Private classes on request. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center. Info: 482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com 19 • The River Run 5K/10K 5K and 10K Race down River Road in Callicoon, flat course along the scenic Delaware River. 8 a.m. Info: 887-5155. Registration form online at www.delawareyouthcenter.org.

25 • Callicoon Country Fair Town-wide event with art, music, food, and fun! Vendors offer antiques, art, crafts, food, locally made artisan goods, flea market items, jewelry and more. Wander along the historic streets, view the architecture, and admire the beautiful Delaware River. 11-5 p.m. Info: 887-3076 or 887-9017. 25 • Community Yard Sale at the Delaware Youth Center. Rent space, sell your stuff! For info call 887-5634. 25 • Old Time Fair & BBQ Held RAIN or SHINE, at the Grahamsville

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 19


26 • Riverfest, a music, art and environmental festival featuring artists & artisans, a kids korner, live poster auction, live music and great food. Downtown Narrowsburg. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. 26 • Pancake Breakfast, Youngsville Fire Department at firehouse, 7-12 Noon.

31 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-3 p.m.

31 • Blue Moon Festival This Village wide event in Jeffersonville will start off with a Bonfire and Drum Circle in the Backyard Park, followed by a Howl @ the Moon Contest, Music on the Main Events Stage at 8 p.m. and Blue Moon Specials at Mullally's Pub and at area businesses. Events start at 6 p.m. For more info: villageofjeff@gmail.com. 31, Aug 1-2 • Sullivan County Democrat Two-Man Better Ball Golf Tournament, Villa Roma Country Club. Reservations Required. Info: 887-5200.

Photos by Cindy Herbert

Fairgrounds on St. Rt. 55, this year’s Time and the Valleys Museum Old Time Fair includes old fashioned activities such as corn shucking and lady’s skillet throwing. Demonstrations. Pie auction and music. Plenty of free parking and admission is FREE, with only a nominal fee for some games and food. enjoy the delicious Chicken Barbecue. Grahamsville Fairgrounds, Rte. 55, Grahamsville, NY. 10-5 p.m. Info: 985-7700.

August

(7/31) 1-29 • Farming with Kids, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 a.m. - Children do farm chores (activities vary): milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horses, etc. Activities vary. $6.00/person. Children under 3 free): Minimum of 5 people. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center, NY. 845-482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com 1 • 87th SCVFA Sullivan County Firemens Association Parade, Liberty

1 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-3 p.m.

1 • Horse Show/Lions Club Charity Show 9 a.m., all day, Bridle Hill Farm, Jeffersonville, NY. Open show with English and Western classes for all levels of horse and rider. Tri-Valley Horseman Association of New York (www.trivalleyhorse.com) point classes are offered. Spectators are welcome. Info: 482-3330 or 482-5568. 2 • Pancake Breakfast Callicoon Center Fire Dept. at firehouse.

7 • Old Time Fiddlers Come out and enjoy some great fiddlers! Jeffersonville Firehouse, 6:30 p.m.

8 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-1 p.m.

9 • Return to Your Senses Taste, Touch, Sight, Sound and Smell Women – just for you! Get in touch with your inner self through a series of special guests and speakers who will educate and inspire you, get you moving and make you think!! Located at the Backyard Park in Jeffersonville. 876 Swiss Hill Road North. For time and more info villageofjeff@gmail.com. Photo by Dan Young/Bridle Hill Farm

10 • Sullivan Renaissance Awards Ceremony held at Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel. 6 p.m. Info: 295-2445. 14, 15, 16 • 136th Little World’s Fair Grahamsville Fairgrounds, sponsored by Neversink Agricultural Society. Rides, games, entertainment, exhibits, food. Fireworks on

20 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Saturday night. Fri-Sat, 9-11p.m.; Sun. 10-7 p.m. Info: 985-2500. www.grahamsvillefair.com 16 • Bagel Festival Street Fair, 9-4pm. Broadway, Monticello. Info: 845-665-9230. www.thebagelfestival.org/event/schedule/

16 • A Lotta Ricotta Saturday 10:30-12:30 p.m. Meet the goast. Try milking one. Make whole milk ricotta cheese. Learn ways to serve it. Sample local artisan cheese. $40.00. Reservations required. Private classes on request. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center. Info: 482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com 22 • Rummage Sale - Bag Day Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-1 p.m.

29 • Rummage Sale - Super Bag Day Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-1 p.m.

29 • Annual Hortonville Parade & Field Day, Hortonville Fire Department’s annual parade and field day starts at Noon on Main Street, Hortonville, followed by games and food (including chicken barbeque) at the firemen’s field. Fun for all ages. 30-Sept. 27 • Harvest Festival at Bethel Woods Sundays through September, 11-4 p.m. Farmers Market, Diverse Craft Village, Festival Foods, Live Music, Children's Area with art activities and community performances, Corn and Hay Mazes, Arts, Pony Ride and more! Admission is FREE and Parking is $2.00. No pets allowed on grounds. Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 295-2446.

September 2 • Pancake Breakfast Callicoon Center Fire Dept. at firehouse.

6 • Rosehaven Alpaca Festival, Harvest Festival at Bethel Woods, 11-4 p.m. Bethel Woods, Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 295-2446.

10-June 2016 • Bridle Hill Farm After School, equestrian facility offers horseback riding and trail rides for all ages and levels. The After School Riding Educational Programs


Photos by Cindy Herbert

every Thursday weekly (SWCS bus drop off point) except no program when school is not in session. Begins September through June, Two (2) hours after school once per week, every Thursday @ 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.; Cost $20 per child (pay as you go each week.) Discounts available for a prepaid $300 riding package fee reduced to $15 per student. Includes a group riding lesson, feeding, grooming, tacking,  barn activity, and  cleanup. The farm has an indoor and outdoor riding so come rain, snow or shine. Open daily YR sunrise to sunset by appointment; call (845) 482-3993 or www.bridlehillfarm.com  12 • Live Well, Be Well Festival at Bethel Woods, A day of peace, yoga and wellness. 10 a.m. 200 Hurd Rd., Bethel, NY. Info: 800745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

12 • Chicken BBQ, United Reformed Church, Youngsville.

12 • Chicken BBQ, benefit for Hortonville Presbyterian Church. Pre-orders only: $9. Pick-up between 4-5:30 p.m. at Hortonville firehouse. Info: 887-4214. 12 • Pancake Breakfast, 7-12 Noon. Presbyterian Church, Jeffersonville.

12 • 22nd Annual VonSteuben Day Parade & German Festival, Parade 12 Noon. Entertainment, vendors & ethnic food and children’s activities following at Firemen's Field, Yulan.

12 • Tractor Parade, Duck Race & Jamboree, Come to Jeffersonville for a great day filled with fun activities for the whole family! Festival starts off with the 5th annual Tractor Parade at 12:30 p.m. on Main Street. Watch area Farmers drive their Tractor's down Main St, ranging from old to new! Join in the Festivities! Followed by the Annual Duck Race at 2 p.m. at Mill Pond and ends at The Schadt Memorial Bridge (footbridge near Gazebo on Main Street). 3,400 ducks have raced in prior years! Race benefits community improvements and spondored by JEMS. Info: 482-4600 19 • Driver’s Safety Class, Delaware Youth Center offers the NTSI (National Traffic Safety Institute) six-hour New York State Driver Safety Course. 9:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 8 Creamery Road, Callicoon New York 12723. Info: 845887-4120. www.delawareyouthcenter.org

Event Gallery for ALL AGES. It features chili sampling and voting for a $2 donation to benefit participating organizations. Tickets to the Craft Beer sampling NOT required for admission to the Chili Cook-off. 200 Hurd Rd., Bethel, NY. Info: 800-745-3000.

27 • Pancake Breakfast, 7-12 Noon. North Branch Fire Department at firehouse.

27-28 • National Alpaca Farm Days Visit our area alpaca farms and learn all about alpacas. Imagine! Alpacas will have their farm open to visitors on Sat. and Sun. from 10-4 p.m., located at 132 E. Hill Road, Jeffersonville, 845-231-3315.

10 • Callicoon Art Walk, showcasing the growing art, music and retail community in the picturesque hamlet of Callicoon on the Delaware. www.facebook.com/callicoonartwalk

October

10 • Roast Beef Dinner, Kenoza Lake Fire Dept. at firehouse. 4:30-7:30 p.m.

2-17 • Farming with Kids, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 a.m. - Children do farm chores (activities vary): milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horses, etc. $6.00/person. Children under 3 free. Minimum of 5 people. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center, NY. 845-482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com

3 • 5th Annual Wine Festival, 11-4 p.m., The Annual Wine Festival at Bethel Woods features specialty foods, hand-crafted products, live music, and sampling from a variety of the region's finest wineries. Tasting Fee with wine glass. Designated Driver discount. 200 Hurd Rd., Bethel, NY. Info: 800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org 3 • Penny Social, Doors open 6:00 p.m. Calling 8 p.m., benefit of St. Francis RC Church, Youngsville firehouse.

10 • Craft Beer Festival & Annual Chili Cook-off, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts continues to brew up fun with the Bethel Woods Craft Beer Festival and Chili Cook-Off, an outdoor beer, food and music festival designed to stimulate and educate your palate through local food and unbelievable New York beer. Craft beers from over 20 breweries will be available for sampling against a backdrop of live music at the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival. The spacious Market Sheds at Bethel Woods will also be the place for local food favorites for sale by a selection of vendors. General Admission Sampling Pass ticket includes a commemorative glass and unlimited sampling. Only a limited number of tickets will be sold. Everyone MUST BE 21+ years of age to purchase tickets and valid ID is required for admission.The traditional Chili Day in October Chili Cook-off starts at 12:00 p.m. inside the

See Oktoberfest ad on page 59 10, 11 • Jeffersonville’s Founders Day Oktoberfest, A Columbus Day Weekend event. Parade, Great Pumpkin Race, Hot Dog/Brats Eating Contest, Art contest, Bed Races, Tug of War, Archery Contest, Ghost Stories at Stone Arch Bridge, Live Music, German/Swiss Fare, AND MORE! For schedule of events: www.jeffersonvilleny.com/oktoberfest and find us on facebook. 11 • A Little Bit of Everything at Apple Pond Farm, 11-3 p.m. - Feeding animals, milking goats, grooming horses, gardening and more. Grooming horses, milking, picking in the garden. $6.00/$4.00. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center, NY. 845-482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com 17 • Roast Beef Dinner 4:30 p.m.- 8:30 p.m Jeffersonville Fire Dept. at firehouse. Info: 482-4289.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 21


Photo courtesy of JEMS - Annual Duck Race

18 • Chicken BBQ Take-out Callicoon Center Fire Dept. at firehouse.

24 • Delaware Youth Center’s Halloween Extravaganza... Children’s Costume Parade and Party: The Delaware Youth Center sponsors a children's costume parade down Main Street. Line up 12:45 pm behind the Delaware Free Library and parade begins at 1 p.m. Games and treats at the youth center following the parade.

Halloween Dance: Adult costume party; Live band, prizes for best costumes 8 -11 p.m. Bring your own refreshments. All are welcome. For information call 8875155. Delaware Youth Center, Callicoon. www.delawareyouthcenter.org.

31 • 89th Annual Roast Beef Dinner 4:30-9 p.m., Youngsville Fire Dept. at firehouse.

31 • Trunk or Treat in the Backyard Park 3 p.m. -6 p.m. Located at the Backyard Park in Jeffersonville. 876 Swiss Hill Road North. For more info villageofjeff@gmail.com. villageofjeff@gmail.com.

31 • Halloween Parade & Costume Judging, Jeffersonville Lions Club Annual Halloween Party & Parade 6:30 p.m. Line-up 6 p.m. on Center Street near Library. March to firehouse, costume judging and refreshments. Info: 482-3330 or 482-4661.

November

1 • Pancake Breakfast, White Lake Fire Department, at firehouse.

3 • Election Day Soup & Chili Sale Kenoza Lake Methodist Church at Kenoza Lake firehouse. 11 a.m. until sold out.

3 • Election Day Soup & Bread Kiwanis Club at Delaware Youth Center, Callicoon.

14 • Ham & Turkey Raffle, Callicoon Center Fire Dept. 15 • Pancake Breakfast, Hortonville Volunteer Fire Co., at firehouse. 7-12 Noon.

27-28 • Holiday Craft Fair Unique assortment of merchandise for holiday

shopping. Delaware Community Center, Callicoon, 9-4 p.m. Info: 887-5634. www.delawareyouthcenter.org.

27 • Annual James Dworetsky Memorial Holiday Parade, 7p.m., Main Street, Jeffersonville. After parade visit with Santa at Jeffersonville firehouse. To enter a float or participate, call 482-4151.

28 • Santa Visits Jeffersonville! Santa and his Elves will be visiting in the lobby of Jeff Bank in Jeffersonville from 12:30-3:30 p.m. Come for a visit and have your photo taken with Santa! There will be cookies, hot chocolate and a Christmas craft. Sponsored by Jeff Bank and Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce. Suggested donation $4.00 with proceeds donated to the local food bank. Photos uploaded online for easy ordering. For more info: 482-5688.

Photo by Dominick Capuzzi

2016

January TBA • Annual Ice Carnival, Professional figure skating exhibition, snow sculpture contest. Sponsored by Livingston Manor Rotary at Rotary Park. Info: 439-5793. January TBA • Annual Eaglefest Narrowsburg. Live bird demonstrations, observation, guest lectures, films, poster auction, eagle art. 9:30-4:30 p.m. Info: 252-6509. www.dveaglealliance.org February TBA • Pancake Breakfast 7-12 Noon, Youngsville Fire Dept. at firehouse.

28 • Christmas Bazaar Kenoza Lake Methodist Church at Kenoza Lake firehouse. 10-4 p.m.

28-29 • Handmade for the Holidays Featuring great homemade gifts from over 30 of your favorite local producers. 11-4 p.m. at Duke’s Pottery, 855 Cty. Rd. 93, Roscoe. Info: 607-498-5207

December

5 • Christmas in Callicoon, Children's Christmas Party from 1-3 p.m. at the Delaware Community Center. Arts and crafts projects for holiday giving, cupcake decorating, photos with Santa for a nominal fee. Info: 887-5155. www.delawareyouthcenter.org. 5-6 & 12-13 • Handmade for the Holidays. Featuring great homemade gifts from over 30 of your favorite local producers. 11-4 p.m. at Duke’s Pottery, 855 Cty. Rd. 93, Roscoe. Info: 607-498-5207

12 • Dickens on the Delaware, visit Callicoon from 12-7pm as it transforms itself back in time to the Victorian era. Enjoy holiday specials, Victorian costumes, caroling, vendors, music, photos, performances, Santa, and more. For information call 845-887-9017. Find us on facebook!

22 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

March TBA • St. Patrick’s Day Parade Parade starts at 1 p.m., Main Street, Jeffersonville. Sponsored by the Jeffersonville Fire Department. To participate or enter a float in parade, call 482-4289. March 19 • Easter Egg Hunt 11 a.m. Delaware Youth Center. Info: 887-5155.

March 20 • Kiwanis Palm Sunday Pancake Breakfast, Benefit the youth of the community held at Delaware Community Center. 7-12 Noon. April TBA • Roast Beef Dinner Callicoon Center Fire Dept. at firehouse.

April TBA • Annual Talent Show Hortonville Presbyterian Church, Hortonville, 7:30 p.m. Info: 887-4346.


April 3 • 15th Annual Chicken BBQ Take-out, Jeffersonville Fire Dept. 1-4 p.m. until gone. Info: 482-4289.

April 23 • Jeffersonville’s 5K Sap Run Scenic course around Lake Jeff. Race starts at 9 a.m. Course is USATF certified. Register online and view all race details at www.JeffersonvilleNY.com/5ksaprun Find us on Facebook!

April 23 • Jeffersonville’s Maple Syrup Festival, Celebrating all things maple! 11-5 p.m. Local maple syrup products, live music, crafts and specialty foods and much more! For more info and to particpate: info@jeffersonvilleny.com. Facebook.com/JeffersonvilleMapleSyrupFestival or jeffersonvilleny.com/maplesyrupfestival April 23 • Boy Scout Chicken BBQ First Presbyterian Church, Jeffersonville.

April 23 • Annual Roast Beef Dinner, North Branch Fire Dept., 4-9 p.m. at firehouse.

May TBA • Pancake & French Toast Breakfast, Kenoza Lake Fire Dept. at firehouse, 7-11:00 a.m.

May TBA • Penny Social, St. Francis Church at Youngsville firehouse, 6 p.m.

May 7 • 26th Annual Kite Festival, SUNY Sullivan, 10-4 p.m. Professional and Amateur Kite Flyers, Live Music, Food, Craft Vendors and more. Info: 434-5750, ext. 4377.

May 8 • Mother’s Day Pancake Breakfast, Hortonville Volunteer Fire Co., at firehouse. 7-12 Noon.

May 30 • Annual Fremont Memorial Day Parade, the second longest running parade in New York State. The Parade begins at 10 a.m. at the Fremont Post Office and proceeds to the ball fields.

X

Please visit our COMMUNITY CALENDAR for more events and updates: JeffersonvilleNYevents.com

Western Sullivan Public Library Callicoon • Jeffersonville • Narrowsburg

Offers a wide variety of programs for all ages at all three branches. Visit w splo nline.o rg perio dically!

Film Lovers, Unite!: A new group

Story Time

for movie buffs that will be one Friday night a month at the Narrowsburg Branch 845-252-3360 for more information.

Story Time at all three branches. Wednesdays at Narrowsburg, 10:30 a.m.; Thursdays at Callicoon, 10:30 a.m.; Tuesdays at Jeffersonville, 10:30 a.m.

Public Computer Center:

Free Computer Support. Every Tuesday from 1-6pm at the Jeffersonville Branch of the Western Sullivan Public Library. Every Wednesday from 1-4pm at the Delaware Free Branch of the Western Sullivan Public Library in Callicoon. Every Saturday from 10am-1pm at the Tusten-Cochecton Branch of the Western Sullivan Public Library in Narrowsburg.

Book Sales

July 25 • 9-4pm Annual Callicoon Country Fair Book Sale, Main Street, Callicoon. August TBA • 9-3pm Annual Firehouse Book Sale at Jeffersonville Firehouse.

Holiday Book Sale TBA, Jeffersonville Library.

Career Counseling Services:

Pages & Pints:

Meets at the Callicoon Brewery on the last Thursday or second to last at 7:00pm. Call the Delaware Free Branch in Callicoon, 845-887-4040 for dates.

Book Groups

Narrowsburg: meets the 3rd Friday of each month, 4pm. 845-252-3360 (Narrowsburg) for more information.

Knitting & Crocheting Groups -

A ll levels

Jeffersonville Branch - meets the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of each month, 6:30 p.m. Tusten-Cochecton Branch - meets every Monday, 6 .p.m.

Delaware Free Branch - meets last Tuesday of the month, 6:30 .p.m.

Genealogy Group: Meets every

second Tuesday of the month at 6:00pm at the Delaware Free Branch in Callicoon. Call 845-887-4040 for more information.

Career counseling, assistance with resume writing, and interview and job search skills training is available at the Western Sullivan Public Library. Contact Cindy Menges at cmenges@rcls.org or at 845-887-4040.

Business Group: Meets every

Wednesday at the Delaware Free Branch of the Western Sullivan Public Library in Callicoon on alternate weeks from 10:15am-12pm or from 5-7pm. Check the website for specific times each week. Meet with like-minded professionals and learn how to take advantage of technology to more effectively manage and market your business or organization. Explore social media, design custom letterhead, build eMail blasts, learn photo editing, and more. Registration required. Programs without 5 people pre-registered may be cancelled.

Teen Tech Time. Meets on Thursday at the Delaware Free Branch of the Western Sullivan Public Library in Callicoon starting in June or July.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 23


We are Making a Music Scene

A

By Elizabeth Bernitt

few years back I had the pleasure of spending summer days in the shade atop a ladder helping to create the Main Events Stage. I was some how roped into painting. Me paint?...not my forte but this painting job, well a monkey could do. (No offense to any monkeys.) Why would I allow myself to get roped into something that I enjoy as much as I enjoy oral surgery. Only one thing could get me to do such a dreaded task. Music. The promise that just off the streets I strolled daily, here in the town I love so much would be filled with sweet music. I worked, hopeful, envisioning the dream, a place that I could go during my wonderful Catskill summers to listen and move in time to music. Very nice, in theory, and then it was done and painted. An event or two happened but nothing took root. Nothing grew, to me it felt like the day the music died. I got on with the day to day and refocused my attention on the jobs I love, being a mom and wife. Last summer my friend, Lucette, told me that the property owner of the Main Events Stage had offered JEMS the use the stage for events. Perhaps a new wind would breathe life (and music) to the stage. I was

- Saturday June 6 JEMS Teen Jam, 3PM – Featuring “Breach the Barrier” - Saturday, June 13 2PM - Sara Hulse Band opening John Gain, CD Release of “Just Another Man” - Saturday, June 20 Jazz & Blues Concert - 4PM Featuring Thurman Barker • Noah Barker Matt Hoffman • Noelle Tannen - Saturday, July 11 Yesah – aka Noah Barker presents an evening of “Music & Art” - 8PM - Friday, July 31 “Blue Moon Event” Blues Band - 8PM - Saturday, August 8 Yesah – aka Noah Barker presents an evening of “Music & Art” - 8PM - Saturday, September 12 Jeff Jamboree - Music to be announced

24 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

L to R-Members of Oh Sweet Catastrophe and members of Without Walls John Muzuruk, Kayla Mathews, Kayla Ann Gagliardo, Reece Maopolski, McKinley Bernitt, A.J. Lumalcuri and Bryce Maopolski.

skeptic but I sat back and watched. The events were happening and people were talking. In late August, my daughter’s friend, Kayla Ann came up with the idea of using the old stage on Halloween night. Kayla Ann suggested that their band, Oh Sweet Catastrophe, could perform in costume. That got my wheels turning. Having attended a few talent shows at both Sullivan West Elementary as well as Sullivan West High School, I knew a number of students that liked to perform music and might also be interested in Trick or Treating. We pulled together an hour and a half event. Despite a damp and chilly evening, people of all ages showed up. The audience ignored the sprinkling rain and performers hands were frozen yet everyone enjoyed themselves and there was a true feeling of unity in the crowd. The dream had come true! Fortunately we had reached out to all the right people. Parents volunteered their insightful knowledge and much needed equipment. It was a great night for all who attended. From that evening, a music scene for teens was inspired and has since taken root. Thrilling to see but more thrilling to hear. I will no longer look at that stage with skepticism. The JEMS, The Village of Jeffersonville and The Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce have a goal, they want everyone to come out and enjoy the stage. There are even plans to improve the venue and make it the best this simple and inviting space can be. Everyone is thankful to all who are putting their energies into the Main Events Stage. The Summer Saturday schedule has booked up and Jeffersonville is going to rock! You will be able to enjoy jazz, chamber music, a play, heavy metal, country tunes or The JEMS Teen JAM. It is wonderful that music will be filling our village. Our stage will be put to good use and the little town that could will be very proud. Music needs all of us, the players and the audience. It can move us forward as a community. The Main Events Stage has become a great place to get the rock rolling! We did it!


Cultural Calendar JUNE

Through June 28 Exhibition: “Material Being,” works by Ed Smith and Joni Wehrli, sponsored and presented by Catskill Art Society, CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Info: 436-4227. June 5, 6, 7 (Friday, Saturday & Sunday) Theatre: Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman,” a Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop production, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Rivoli Theatre, 5243 Main Street, So. Fallsburg, NY. Info: scdw.net.

June 7 (Sunday) Concert: “A Forest of Sound,” the Sullivan County Community Chorus 38th annual spring concert, featuring the choral music of Dan Forrest along with violin solos, four-hand piano accompaniments and a chamber orchestra, Immaculate Conception Church, 6317 Route 42, Woodbourne, NY. June 12 – July 4 Exhibit: Ionnis Glykokokalos Paintings, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Alliance Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Fri., June 12, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

June 13 NACL Theatre: The Weather Project at The Trout Parade. An outdoor theatre performance about climate change that brings together song, dance, stilt-walking, and acting by members of NACL and the community. The Weather Project tours the county this summer and is produced in collaboration with Catskill Art Society and Catskill Mountainkeeper. 3 p.m. Info: 845-557-0694.

June 13 (Saturday) Concert: No Good Sister, honky-tonk, western swing trio, 8 p.m., Harmony Presents, 8 Silk Mill Drive, Hawley, PA. Admission: $20 ($15 advance). Info: 588-8077. June 14 (Sunday) Theatre: Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman,” a Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop production, 2 p.m., Rivoli Theatre, 5243 Main Street, So. Fallsburg, NY. Info: scdw.net.

June12 – July 4 Exhibit: “drawing BIG: The Immediacy of Touch,” works by Judy Glantzman, Esther Podemski, John Tomlinson, Liza Phillips, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, June 12, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

June 12, 13 (Friday & Saturday) Theatre: Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman,” a Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop production, 8 p.m., Rivoli Theatre, 5243 Main Street, So. Fallsburg, NY. Info: scdw.net.

NACL’s The Weather Project

26 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

June 16 – 28 Musical Theatre: “Damn Yankees,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, Tuesdays through Saturdays 8 p.m., plus matinées on Wednesdays 2 p.m. and Sundays 3 p.m., Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Info: 794-1194 or FBplayhouse.org.

June 19 (Friday) Concert: Loudon Wainwright III, a Grammy Award- winning American songwriter, folk singer, humorist, and actor, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, 8 p.m., Tusten Theatre, 210 Bridge Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Admission: $30. Info: 252-7272.


June 19 (Friday) Concert: Bryan Adams, 30th Anniversary tour of “Reckless,”, Pavilion, 8 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. June 19, 20 (Friday & Saturday) Robert Lyons and Kristin Marting Idiot—based on The Idiot by Dostoevsky, the multi-disciplinary performance features Kristin Marting’s gestural choreography, Robert Lyons’ original text, and innovative video art to invoke a complex brain-scan of Prince Myshkin’s “truly beautiful soul” as he faces a fearful, corrupt society. 7:30pm. NACL Theatre, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake, NY 12743 Info: 845-557-0694. Tickets online at www.nacl.org June 25 - Aug 22 Shrek The Musical (every Thursday and Saturday, 11am)- Shrek the Musical - “Based on the Oscar-winning DreamWorks Animation film, Shrek The Musical is a TONY Award-winning fairy tale adventure featuring all new songs from Jeanine Tesori (Thoroughly Modern Millie, Caroline or Change) and a sidesplitting book by David Lindsay-Abaire. Shrek brings all the beloved characters you know from the film to life on stage, and proves there's more to the story than meets the ears." Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Info: 794-1194 or FBplayhouse.org.

June 26 (Friday) Concert: Train presents “Picasso at the Wheel Summer Tour,” with special guests The Fray & Matt Nathanson. Pavilion, 7 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. June 27 (Saturday) Concert: Mormon Tabernacle Choir with the Orchestra at Temple Square, sponsored and presented by Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 7:30 p.m., Pavilion, Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: bethelwoodscenter.org.

June 28 (Sunday) Talk: “O & W Railroad’s Effect on Tourism in Sullivan County,“ presented by O&W Historical Society and sponsored by Time in the Valleys Museum, 2 p.m., Daniel Pierce Library Community Room, 328 Main Street, Grahamsville, NY. Free. Info: 985-7700. June 30 – July 12 Musical Theatre: “Young Frankenstein,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, Tuesdays through Saturdays 8 p.m., plus matinées on Wednesdays 2 p.m. and Sundays 3 p.m., Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Info: 794-1194 or FBplayhouse.org.

Human Lard Dog and the Band of Shy performing in Callicoon Creek Park.

JULY

July 3 (Friday) Concert: Kid Rock with special guest Foreigner, Pavilion, 6:45 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. July 4 – August 2 Exhibit: CAS Summer Members’ Show, sponsored and presented by Catskill Art Society, CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Info: 436-4227.

July 4 (Saturday) NACL Theatre: NACL Theatre The Weather Project at Liberty 4th of July Celebration. An outdoor theatre performance about climate change that brings together song, dance, stilt-walking, and acting by members of NACL and the community. The Weather Project tours the county in collaboration with Liberty Chamber of Commerce, Sullivan Renaissance, and Liberty School. 1 p.m. Info: 845-557-0694.

July 10 – August 1 Exhibit: Joan Giordano mixed media, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Alliance Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, July 10, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

July 10 – August 1 Exhibition: “Synthesis,” a group exhibition of textiles by Fiber Revolution, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, July 10, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

July 10, 11, 12 (Friday, Saturday & Sunday) Theatre: “Godspell,” a Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop production, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Rivoli Theatre, 5243 Main Street, So. Fallsburg, NY. Info: scdw.net. July 10-12 Exhibit: “Art in Bloom,” art and floral arrangements, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Krause Recital Hall, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, July 10, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. July 11 (Saturday) Concert: Def Leppard with Styx and Tesla, sponsored and presented by Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 7 p.m., Pavilion, Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: BethelWoodsCenter.org,

July 11 (Saturday) The Slipper Room Mr. Choade’s Brilliant Surprise--- book now for the a return engagement of the Lower East Side’s, The Slipper Room in an intelligent, funny, and visually stimulating nouveau burlesque and variety show. Adults only, please! 7:30pm Door, 8:30pm Show. NACL Theatre, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake, NY 12743. Info: 845-557-0694. Tickets online at www.nacl.org

July 12 (Sunday) WCM Summer Music Festival: Concert on the Lawn, Presbyterian Church, Jeffersonville. 3:00 pm, The Festival wind quintet performs Beethoven, Dylan (arranged by Waggoner), Ibert and Rosetti and Vaughan Williams at the outdoor concert on the church lawn. Performing are flutist Judith Pearce, oboist Matt Sullivan, clarinetist Pascal Archer, French hornist Adam Schommer and bassoonist Gina

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 27


July 14 – 26 Musical Theatre: “Oliver!,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, Tuesdays through Saturdays 8 p.m., plus matinées on Wednesdays 2 p.m. and Sundays 3 p.m., Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Info: 794-1194 or FBplayhouse.org.

July 16 (Thursday) WCM Summer Music Festival: MusicTalks! The Old North Branch Inn, North Branch, NY. 7:30 pm. Our Persistence of Vision theme takes shape in a fun evening of improv, film clips and chat about John Corigliano’s movie music and more. Performing and discussing are Andrew Waggoner, violin and Caroline Stinson, cello. A cash bar and refreshments will be for sale. Tickets are $25, free for students 18 and under.Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 845782-7015. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 17 (Friday) Concert: Neil Young & Promise of the Real, Pavilion, 8 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. July 17, 18, 19 (Friday, Saturday & Sunday) Theatre: “Godspell,” a Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop production, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Rivoli Theatre, 5243 Main Street, So. Fallsburg, NY. Info: scdw.net

July 18 (Saturday) WCM Summer Music Festival: Barn Concert - Eddie Adams Barn, Jeffersonville, NY. 8:00 pm. Artistic Codirector Andrew Waggoner introduces The Festival’s first Main Event concert with a pre-concert talk at 7pm. At 8pm, the program presents Beethoven’s String Trio, opus 3; John Corigliano’s Voyage for flute and quintet as well as his String Quartet, and Honegger’s Sonatina for violin and cello. Performing are Judith Pearce, flute; Harumi Rhodes, Sunghae Anna Lim, violins; Tawnya Popoff, viola; Caroline Stinson, cello and Andrew Trombley, double bass. Refreshments will be available at intermission. Tickets are $30, free for students 18 and under. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 845-7827015. www.WCMconcerts.org.

July 19 (Sunday) WCM Summer Music Festival: SUNY Afternoon Concert, SUNY Sullivan, Loch Sheldrake, NY. 3:00 pm. After a long hiatus, WCM is pleased to return to the stage at the SUNY Sullivan concert hall for an afternoon program of Beethoven’s String Trio, and music by Gordon Jacob and Bach. Performing are violinist Sunghae Anna Lim, violist Tawnya Popoff and cellist Caroline Stinson. Tickets are $20, free for students 18 and under.

28 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 845-782-7015. www.WCMconcerts.org.

July 23 (Thursday) WCM Summer Music Festival: MusicTalks! Catskill Distilling Company, Bethel, NY. 7:30 pm. WCM is pleased to present an evening of live music and conversation with Composer-in-Residence, John Corigliano, moderated by Artistic Co-director and violinist Andrew Waggoner. The music for this program includes Corigliano’s Snapshot for String Quartet, and film music from his scores for “The Red Violin” and “Altered States;” Fantasy on Bach for solo cello, and more. Also appearing are violinist Nurit Pacht, violist Lois Martin and cellist Caroline Stinson. Hosted by Stacy Cohen proprietor of the Dancing Cat, beverages and light refreshments will be for sale. Tickets are $25, free for students 18 and under. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 845782-7015. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 24 (Friday) WCM Summer Music Festival: Open Rehearsal-Eddie Adams Barn, Jeffersonville, NY. 7:00 pm. The 2015 Festival Immersion Program interns will present their work. Festival musicians rehearse for Saturday’s Gala concert, including the Fauré Piano Trio; Mr. Tambourine Man with composer John Corigliano in the house, and audience questions are encouraged. Admission is free; donations are always welcome. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 845-782-7015. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 24 (Friday) Concert: Brad Paisley w/ Justin Moore and Mickey Guyton, the M&M Auto group Country Megaticket series, 7 p.m., Pavilion, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: BethelWoodsCenter.org, Megaticket.com or 1-800-745-3000.

July 25 (Saturday) WCM Summer Music Festival: Gala Concert-Eddie Adams Barn, Jeffersonville, NY. 7:00 pm. Composer-inResidence John Corigliano and Artistic Co-director Andrew Waggoner introduce the evening’s music in a pre-concert talk at 7 pm. The second Main Event program offers the Fauré Piano Trio, Corigliano’s Mr. Tambourine Man for soprano and piano; and solos, duos and songs by Kreisler, Fauré, Popper and Schubert. Performing are soprano Lindsay Kesselman with her husband, Christopher James Lees, piano; Nurit Pacht, violin; Caroline Stinson, cello and Tannis Gibson, piano. There will be short intermission, and a Gala Meetthe-Artists’ Reception follows the concert. Tickets are $35, free for students 18 and under. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 845-782-7015. www.WCMconcerts.org.

July 25 (Saturday) Concert: Tony Bennett and Lady GaGa with full orchestra, featuring songs from their Grammy-nominated album “Cheek to Cheek,” sponsored and presented by Bethel Woods

Center for the Arts, 8 p.m., Pavilion, Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: bethelwoodscenter.org.

July 26 (Sunday) WCM Summer Music Festival: Closing Concert - The Cooperage Honesdale, PA. 3:00 pm. Selections of Festival music by Fauré, Corigliano, Kreisler, Fauré, and more are on tap for the final concert of the 22nd season. Performing are soprano Lindsay Kesselman with her husband, Christopher James Lees on piano; Nurit Pacht, violin; Caroline Stinson, cello and Tannis Gibson, piano. Admission is a suggested donation of $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Call the Cooperage at 570-253-2020 for tickets. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 845-7827015. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 26 (Sunday) Riverfest: Music, art and envrionmental festival celebrating the Upper Delaware River and the ecology that supports it, featuring live music, art displays, Kids Korner, great food, an art auction and more, sponsored by Catskill Regional Medical Center and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Info: 252-7576 July 28 – August 9 Musical Theatre: “ The Music Man,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, Tuesdays through Saturdays 8 p.m., plus matinées on Wednesdays 2 p.m. and Sundays 3 p.m., Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Info: 794-1194 or FBplayhouse.org.

photo by tom bushey

Cuffari. Admission is a suggested donation of $20 at the concert; free for students 18 and under. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 845-782-7015. www.WCMconcerts.org.

Eddie Adams Barn


AUGUST

August 13 (Thursday) Sunset Concert Series - Shandelee Music Festival: "Evening of Chamber Music," featuring HERMITAGE PIANO TRIO: Misha Keylin, violin; Sergey Antonov, cello; IIya Kazantsev, piano "Three of Russia's most spectacular young soloists, turned in a performance of such power and sweeping passion that it left you nearly out of breath." The Washington Post. Join us for these unforgettable performances presented in a beautiful intimate setting, followed by specialty dessert receptions. 8 p.m. Info: 845-439-3277. www.shandlee.org

August 2 (Friday) Concert: Peter Catera with Hudson Valley Philharmonic,” Pavilion, 7 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. August 7, 8, 9 (Friday, Saturday & Sunday) Theatre: “Fiddler on the Roof,” a Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop production, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Rivoli Theatre, 5243 Main Street, So. Fallsburg, NY. Info: scdw.net.

August 14 (Friday) Concert: Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Marshall Tucker Band, classic southern rock, sponsored and presented by Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 7:30 p.m., Pavilion, Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: Ticketmaster or 1.800.745.3000.

August 7 – 29 Exhibit: James Gann Paintings, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, August 7, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

photo by tom bushey

August 7 -29 Exhibit: “Clownz: Comic Horror,” sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, August 7, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.August 7

Weekend of Chamber Music’s Gibson & Waggoner.

(Friday) Florida Georgia Line w/ Thomas Rhett and Frankie Ballard, the M&M Auto group Country Megaticket series, 7 p.m., Pavilion, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: BethelWoodsCenter.org, Megaticket.com or 1-800-745-3000.

August 11-23 Musical Theatre: “42nd Street,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, Tuesdays through Saturdays 8 p.m., plus matinées on Wednesdays 2 p.m. and Sundays 3 p.m., Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Info: 794-1194 or FBplayhouse.org.

August 14, 15, 16 (Friday, Saturday & Sunday) Theatre: “Fiddler on the Roof,” a Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop production, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Rivoli Theatre, 5243 Main Street, So. Fallsburg, NY. Info: scdw.net.

August 15 (Saturday) Sunset Concert Series - Shandelee Music Festival: "Young Artist Concert," featuring LLEWELLYN SANCHEZ- WERNER, solo piano 2014 Gilmore Young Artist Award Recipient - An honor awarded every two years singling out the most promising American pianists of the new generation. The National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts awarded him the only Young Arts gold medal for music in 2015. Llewellyn received the Atlantic Council’s 2014 Young Global Citizen Award, along with fellow recipients Robert De Niro, Prime Ministers Shimon Peres and Lee Kuan Yew, and Presidents Enrique Pena Nieto and Petro Poroshenko. Join us for these unforgettable performances presented in a beautiful intimate setting, followed by specialty dessert receptions. 8 p.m. Info: 845-439-3277. www.shandlee.org

August 15, 16 (Saturday & Sunday) MB Adaptors HEADSHOT!---based physical theatre company, MB Adaptor’s American and Catalan ensemble play a group of actors that find themselves at a surrealistic audition where the challenge of winning takes precedence over anything else—this is an audition you won’t want to miss. Aug. 15 at 7:30pm. Aug. 16 at 3:00 p.m. NACL Theatre, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake, NY 12743 Info: 845-557-0694. Tickets online at www.nacl.org August 20 (Thursday) Sunset Concert Series - Shandelee Music Festival: "Evening of Chamber Music" featuring ADRIENN KANTOR, flute and

ERIKA ALLEN, piano. Join us for these unforgettable performances presented in a beautiful intimate setting, followed by specialty dessert receptions. 8 p.m. Info: 845-439-3277. www.shandlee.org August 21, 22, 23 (Friday, Saturday & Sunday) Theatre: “Fiddler on the Roof,” a Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop production, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Rivoli Theatre, 5243 Main Street, So. Fallsburg, NY. Info: scdw.net.

August 22 (Saturday) Sunset Concert Series - Shandelee Music Festival: "Evening of Chamber Music" featuring DMITRI BERLINSKY, violin and Friends. The youngest winner in the history of the Paganini International Violin Competition in Genoa, Italy. This victory led to his performance on Nicolo Paganini's own Guarneri del Gesú instrument, a privilege shared by only a handful of artists in history. Subsequent triumphs at the Montreal International Violin Competition (Grand Prize), the International Tchaikovsky Competition and the Queen Elizabeth Competition in Brussels, led to appearances with major orchestras in Europe, Russia, the Far East, North and South America. Join us for these unforgettable performances presented in a beautiful intimate setting, followed by specialty dessert receptions. 8 p.m. Info: 845-439-3277. www.shandlee.org August 23 (Sunday) Concert: Zac Brown Band,” Pavilion, 7 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

August 24 (Monday) Sunset Concert Series - Shandelee Music Festival: "Evening of Chamber Music" 8 p.m. featuring The resident graduate string quartet of The Juilliard School AEOLUS QUARTET: Nicholas Tavani, violin; Rachel Shapiro, violin; Gregory Luce, viola; Alan Richardson, cello Join us for these unforgettable performances presented in a beautiful intimate setting, followed by specialty dessert receptions. 8 p.m. Info: 845-439-3277. www.shandlee.org

August 25-30 Musical Theatre: “The Fantasticks,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, Tuesdays through Saturdays 8 p.m., plus matinées on Wednesdays 2 p.m. and Sundays 3 p.m., Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Info: 794-1194 or FBplayhouse.org.

August 29 (Saturday) Concert: Christine Ebersole,” Event Gallery, 8 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 29


August 29 – September 13 Exhibit: CAS Student and Teacher Art Show, sponsored and presented by Catskill Art Society, CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Info: 436-4227. August 29 (Saturday) The Assembly 33 Demon Teeth--- an engaging drama that closely follows the aging process of a family over the years, eclectically incorporating Japanese Kabuki theatre technique in a moving performance by the innovative, Assembly from New York City. 7:30 p.m. NACL Theatre, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake, NY 12743 Info: 845-557-0694. Tickets online at www.nacl.org

August 30 (Sunday) Concert: Rascal Flatts w/ Scotty McCreery & Raelynn, the M&M Auto group Country Megaticket series, 7 p.m., Pavilion, Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: BethelWoodsCenter.org, Megaticket.com or 1-800-745-3000.

SEPTEMBER

September 1 (Tuesday) Concert: Chicago and Earth, Wind & Fire,” Pavilion, 7:30 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

September 1 – 6 Theatre: “Driving Miss Daisy,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, Tuesdays through Saturdays 8 p.m., plus matinées on Wednesdays 2 p.m. and Sundays 3 p.m., Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Info: 794-1194 or FBplayhouse.org. September 4 – October 3 Exhibit: Linda Sokolowski Mixed Media, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, September 4, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

September 4 – October 3 Exhibit: “Displaced Landscape,” group show curated by Theresa Hackett, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 2527576. Opening reception: Friday, September 4, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. September 6 (Sunday) Concert: “Vanhalen,” Pavilion, 7:30 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

September 11, 12 (Friday & Saturday) Scott Adkins The Kioskers—written by Scott

30 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Adkins while in a Pata-playwrights’ residency at NACL Theatre in 2011, two city dwellers seek escape from the drudgery of urban living into a surreal countryside that mixes toy theater, shadow puppetry, and projected stop animation. 7:30 p.m. NACL Theatre, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake, NY 12743. Info: 845-557-0694. Tickets online at www.nacl.org September 12 (Saturday) Concert: “Vic Dibitetto, the Italian Hurricane,” Event Stage, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

September 18 – 20 Film: Big Eddy Film Festival, featuring documentaries, features, animation and more, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Tusten Theatre, 210 Bridge Street, Narrowsburgh, NY. Info: bigeddyfilmfest.com. September 19 – October 18 Exhibition: “Hand-Me-Downs,” works by Kathryn Kosto, Frank Mullaney and Jake Seo, sponsored and presented by Catskill Art Society, CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Info: 436-4227.

September 19 (Saturday) Concert: “An Evening with Jackson Browne,” Pavilion, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

September 25, 26 (Friday & Saturday) Kevin Augustine’s Lone Wolf Tribe The God Projekt-- alone in a barren paradise, God the Father struggles with dementia as he tries to manage his divine office. Winner of the 2014 Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding Performance Art Production this raucous and darkly humorous investigation into the consequences of cosmic actions features Catskill-style comedy, bloody puppetry and a tour-de-force performance by Brooklyn puppeteer Kevin Augustine as the “Man Upstairs.” 7:30 p.m. NACL Theatre, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake, NY 12743. Info: 845-557-0694. Tickets online at www.nacl.org

OCTOBER

October 4 (Sunday) Concert: “The Princeton Nassoons,” Event Gallery, 3:00 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

October 9 – 31 Exhibit: Dana Duke Photography, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4

p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, October 9, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

October 10, 11 (Saturday & Sunday) Pontine Theatre The House of Seven Gables-- an original adaptation by Portsmouth, NH’s Pontine Theatre of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The House of the Seven Gables,” the story follows several generations of the ill-fated Pyncheon family in Salem, Massachusetts, bowed under a curse dating from the famous witch trials, and trapped in the once magnificent, but now decrepit, House of the Seven Gables. Sat. 7:30pm. Sun. 3:00pm. NACL Theatre, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake, NY 12743. Info: 845-5570694. Tickets online at www.nacl.org October 17 (Saturday) Concert: “Karen Mason,” Event Gallery, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. October 17 (Saturday) Anniversary Celebration: Delaware Valley Arts Alliance 40th Anniversary Celebration with honorees, entertainment, a celebration dinner and silent auction. Details TBA.

October 18 (Sunday) Concert: “Eileen Moon, cello, Kristina Wajsa, piano, Victor Villena, Bandoneon,” Event Gallery, 2:00 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. October 23, 24 (Friday & Saturday) Nightjar Apothecary Darwinii: The Comeuppance of Man—created by NACL’s Brett Keyser and playwright Glen Berger, this solo performance features Keyser in the role of Cristóbal, an Argentine man accused of stealing original Charles Darwin manuscripts from rare book libraries because he’s convinced he’s the great-great-great-great bastard grandson of the father of Natural Selection. 7:30pm. NACL Theatre, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake, NY 12743. Info: 845-557-0694. Tickets online at www.nacl.org October 24 – November 22 Exhibit: “Logarithmic Scale,” works by John Dinkey, Joel Edwards and Elise Freda, sponsored and presented by Catskill Art Society, CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor,NY. Info: 436-4227. October 24 (Saturday) Concert: “Blues at Bethel Woods” Event Gallery, 6:30 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org.

NOVEMBER

November 8 Concert: Honor Finnegan sponsored and presented by RiverFolk Concerts Info: 252-6783.


November 7 (Saturday) Concert: “Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes,” Event Gallery, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. November 14 (Saturday) Concert: “The Ultimate Bradstan Reunion,” Event Gallery, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. November 14 – December 23 Exhibit/Sale: Valley Artists Holiday Sale, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Signature Gifts shop and Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. plus seasonal extended hours. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Sat., November 21, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

November 21 – December 23 Exhibit/Sale: “Art in Sixes,” mixed media small works show, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Alliance Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Saturday, November 21, 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. November 22 (Sunday) Concert: “Laura Frautschi, violin and John Novacek, piano,” Event Gallery, 2:00 p.m. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: www.BethelWoodsCenter.org. November 28 – December 31 Exhibit: CAS Winter Members Show, sponsored and presented by Catskill Art Society, CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor,NY. Info: 436-4227.

Museums

Catskill Fly Fishing Center & Museum Museum and education center on 53 acres bordering the Willowemoc River dedicated to preserving America's fly fishing heritage; teaching its future generations of fly fishers; and protecting its fly fishing environment. 1031 Old Route 17, Livingston Manor, NY 845-439-4810, catskillflyfishing.org flyfish@catskill.net

D&H Canal Museum at Lock 50 Interpretive Center within the 45 acre linear park which includes approximately 3 1/2 miles of historic D&H Canal towpath trail. Remains of the original locks, drydock & waste weirs are visible from the towpath. Seasonal 16 Bova Road, Phillipsport, NY 845-807-0261

Fort Delaware Museum of Colonial History Costumed interpreters discuss and demonstrate the life styles of the first European settlers in the Upper Delaware River Valley during the Revolutionary War period and their place in local and Early American history. Seasonal. 6615 State Route 97, Narrowsburg, NY 845-252-6660 May-Sept 845-807-0261 fortdelaware@hotmail.com

Liberty Museum & Arts Center A renovated historical building housing collections and presenting art and history exhibits. The museum also hosts classes, lectures, cultural events & children's programs, and will be the new home of Liberty Free Theatre. 46 South Main Street, Liberty, NY 845-292-2394, libertymuseum.com LMACinfo@libertymuseum.com

Museum at Bethel Woods: An Interpretation of the 1969 Woodstock Music & Arts Fair Located at the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival, the museum explores the unique experience of Woodstock, its significance as a culminating event of a decade of radical cultural transformation and the legacies of the 60's, through interactive exhibits, displays, and a collection of artifacts. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY 1-866-781-2922 bethelwoodscenter.org info@bethelwoodscenter.org

Roscoe O&W Railway Museum The museum contains O&W artifacts and memorabilia, other “railroadiana,”and local history displays showing the impact of the

Fort Delaware Museum of Colonial History

O&W on community life, hunting, fishing, farming, tourism and local industries. Seasonal: May – October 7 Railroad Avenue, Roscoe, NY 607-498-4346 roscoeowrailwaymuseum@yahoo.com

Sullivan County Museum & Historical Society Home to the Sullivan County Historical Society, the Cook Society and the Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop, the museum offers permanent and changing historical exhibits and maintains archives, census records, and family histories. 265 Main Street P.O. Box 247, Hurleyville, NY 845- 434-8044 sullivancountyhistory.org schs@sullivancountyhistory.org

Ten Mile River Scout Museum Dedicated to preserving the history and artifacts of Ten Mile River Scout Camps, the largest Boy Scout Council camp in the U.S., through an extensive memorabilia display and video collection. 1481 County Road 26, Narrowsburg, NY 845-252-2000/212-242-1100 tmrmuseum.org questions@tmrmuseum.org Time and the Valleys Museum A living and interactive resource that preserves the past and educates the present and insures the uniqueness of the Rondout and Neversink watersheds. 332 Main Street, Grahamsville, NY 845-985-7700 timeandthevalleysmuseum.org info@timeandthevalleysmuseum.org.

Town of Lumberland Museum Room Lumberland Town Hall, 1054 Proctor Road, Glen Spey, NY 856-8600 ext 222 townoflumberland.org/govt/museum.php gsmuseum@townoflumberland.org Displays memorabilia, photographs and artifacts representing every hamlet in the Town of Lumberland, and details the history of the D&H Canal in Pond Eddy.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 31


T

The Maples Flow

he Diehl Homestead Farm located in Callicoon was established in 1842. Here is where Adam and Annette Diehl along with Adam’s dad, Pete produce Maple syrup. As soon as he could walk, Adam began helping his dad and grandfather in the sap house. His passion for producing maple syrup runs as strong as the sap in the maple trees. The Diehls first started producing maple syrup in the 1950s using hand turned drills to tap the maple trees. They would use galvanized (metal) taps and sap buckets to catch the sap. The buckets were fitted with a lid to keep rain and foreign objects out. 2015, was the first year they did not use the buckets for the snow was so deep in the woods it made it almost impossible to walk let alone carry the necessary equipment. You may have noticed in your travels long lines of blue tubing in the woods. Just like the branches of the maples, sap flows through these tubes. The tubes connect to larger tubing that runs downhill and dispenses into stainless steel tanks, each tank can holds 500 gallons of sap. Freezing nights and warm days are what make the sap run, that’s why late February through March is the best time to produce maple syrup. Starch is stored in the tree’s roots in

32 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Article by Cindy Herbert

the winter, the starch then turns to sugar and the warmer temperatures during the day makes the sap run up the tree and out the taps. When the maples start to bud, the sap season is over as it changes the flavor to a unpleasant “buddy” flavor. The flavor of the syrup is also affected by soil type, genetics of the trees and weather conditions during the maple season. The very deep snow this winter did not help. The snow took longer to melt in the woods not allowing the sap to run easily up from the roots, making this season less productive. The Diehls tap 2800 maples. Many with two taps in each but they will not tap a tree more than twice. The taps are only inserted an inch into the tree trunk. New taps are drilled each year allowing the old holes to heal. A maple needs to be at least 10”-17” in diameter to tap. There are seven species of maples found in NY State. The sugar maple has the highest level of sugar. Red and black maples can be tapped as well but the sap is not as sweet and therefore the sap to syrup ratio becomes much thinner. Healthy maples have been known to produce sap for well over 100 years and provide syrup for generations of farm families. When the lines are gravity fed they produce one quart of syrup per

tap. If the lines have a vacuum system attached they can yield a half gallon per tap. Approximately one third of their taps are gravity fed. There is an adapter to each tube which will prevent sap to draw back into the tree. If this were to happen it could introduce bacteria into the tree. At the end of the season each tap is taken out of the tree but the lines are flushed out and remain in the woods. After the sap is gathered it is then cooked in an evaporator. The Diehls operate a wood fired evaporator. To boil off the water. The heat is intense and the fire needs to be continuously fed to keep the heat a constant temperature of between 219 and 221 degrees. It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. As sap moves through the evaporator the sugar concentration increases from appoximately 2% to 66%. Today some syrup producers use reverse osmosis, state of the art equipment that removes half of the water from the sap. Sap travels through canisters with membranes that separate the water and Top left: A young Pete with his dad, Art in 1954, tapping a maple tree.

Top Right: The Diehls sell their maple syrup in many different containers, look for their gold label on the containers when shopping locally.


Top left: Taps are inserted approximately an inch into the tree. This photo shows the process of gathering maple syrup that the Diehls used to use. Bottom left: The Diehls produce not only maple syrup but also maple sugar, maple cream and candy.

Right: The Diehls cut thier own wood to use in the evaporator.

sap. This process cuts the time of the evaporating process. When the syrup reaches the finishing pan it is then checked with a hydrometer which has two scales. The Brix scale indicates the percentage of sugar in the maple syrup and the Baume scale measures how dense the maple syrup is in relation to the density of water. The last step is to filter the syrup while it is still hot. The filter press pushes the hot syrup through the interior of a series of plates and passes through filters that remove dirt and sugar sand, making the syrup perfectly clear. Now the maple syrup is ready to bottle and produce other maple products such as maple cream, maple sugar and candy. I'm sure you are now inspired to take up this hobby. If you have one or a few maples on your property and some

pots to boil sap on your stove top this would be a fun and educational winter activity for the family. Just remember how much sap it takes to make a single gallon of syrup. I for one am happy to pay  the price for local syrup. Now that you see what goes into it, I'm sure you agree; pure maple syrup is liquid gold! Want to learn more? Visit a Maple Syrup Producer near you! Visit two producers in Callicoon (Call first): Diehls Maple Syrup www.dielhlsmaplesyrup.com Sara’s Sugar Shack at facebook.com/ssugarshack

New York Maple Syrup is classified by color and taste.

Grade A Golden Color & Delicate Taste Grade A Amber Color & Rich Taste Grade A Dark Color & Robust Taste

Grade A Very Dark Color & Strong Taste

Maple syrup has 50 calories per tablespoon and is fat free.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 33


34 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


S.V. Shah, M.D. TEL. 845-482-5039

riChard h. StaGl Stone Cutter

PATIO STONE • WALL STONE • VENEER • COPING • STAIR TREAD KENOZA LAKE, NY 12750

Diplomat American Board of Internal Medicine 9 Terrace Avenue Jeffersonville, NY 12748

Tel: 845-482-4171 Hours: 9 AM - 12:30 PM Call for additional hours

Keller Glass Specialty, inc. “ We M a k e G l a s s S p e c i a l ” low rates • free estimates

• STORE FRONTS/SOLARIUMS • ALL PRIME WINDOWS • STORM & SCREEN • PLEXIGLASS/WG • MIRRORS • AUTO GLASS

5036 RT. 52 JEFFERSONVILLE, NY 12748

• SANDBLAST ART & DESIGN • THERMOPANE/TEMPERED • TABLE TOPS • TUB & SHOWER ENCLOSURES • SKYLIGHTS • INS. CLAIMS SERVICED

RICK KELLER (845) 482-5792/Fax 482-4535

Knack, Pavloff & Company, LLP Certified Public Accountants

14 Sturgis Road Monticello, NY 12701 (845) 794-2200 Fax (845) 794-2273

3 Hatfield Lane, Suite 2C Goshen, NY 10924 (845) 360-5354 Fax (845) 360-5352

We Look Forward To Hearing From You

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 35


Breeder of Quality American British White Park John Gempler 129 Swiss Hill Road N. Jeffersonville, NY 12748

Home: (845) 482-5227

www.g-swhitepark.com

KENNETH C. KLEIN COUNSELOR AT LAW

JEFFERSONVILLE OFFICE 4880 State Route 52 (Main Street) P.O. Box 600 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 (845) 482-5000

36 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

LIBERTY OFFICE 2 School Street P.O. Box 670 Liberty, NY 12754 (845) 295-0100


MIKE GORR

RON GORR

Excavating • Bulldozing • Ditch Digging • Trucking Septic Systems • Foundations & Pads • Driveways www.gorrexcavating.com • www.facebook.com/RHGorr

14 Hortonville Main Street Callicoon, NY 12723

phone: (845) 887-4757 fax: (845) 887-5620 rgorr@hvc.rr.com

Valentine Schmitt ran a brewery in Jeffersonville. In 1897 and 1898, a total of bills from hotels and saloons in town showed that 3000 kegs of beer were consumed in a village with a population of 500.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 37


I

Article & Illustration by Scott Woods

Hot Bed * Cold Frame * Cool Project

f you are up for an amazing endeavor consider building a thermal cold frame. Building it is not really as difficult as you might think, it costs next to nothing and the rewards are brilliant. It will stretch out your growing seasons on both ends and you will be working in the garden when others are just staring out the window at the snow. You can start seedlings in the spring; grow salad crops in March and kale and herbs into early winter. Why are we sitting around reading magazines… Let’s get to work! First you need to find an old discarded window. The size of the window will dictate the size of your growing bed and the size of the pit you will be digging so keep that in mind when you are searching garage sales and scouring curbsides on garbage night. Thermal windows are prized but single pane glass can work fine too. Once you have a good clean window in hand, select a site on your property with a south facing slant. Place the window on the ground and use a small stick to trace the window’s shape in the dirt. Move the window to a safe spot and start digging. The diameter of the pit needs to be smaller than the actual window by a few inches on each side. You will need to dig this rectangular pit to a depth of about two and a half feet. Take your time, you can do it. Once it’s dug scrape it out clean and shape it as nicely as you can. Place the window over the open pit to be sure that it extends over the edges and doesn’t fall in. Take the window away again and spread a few inches of loose gravel across the bottom of the pit. This will help with drainage. You don’t have to be fussy about the gravel; you probably excavated enough rocks and stones when you were digging the hole. Now you will need to purchase several bales of straw. My drawing shows a window that works with six bales but every window is different. Straw is preferred over hay because the hollow stalks of straw act as excellent insulators and straw doesn’t contain weed seeds, hay does. Secure the window on top of the hay bales so that it completely covers the opening and everything is snug and tight. You may find it necessary to place bricks at the window corners to anchor it against the wind. Your little hot house is ready for the planting stage. Choosing the right time to plant is critical. Realistically you are not going to have too much luck growing anything in December or January. The sun is just too low in the sky and Catskill days are just too short and cold. But, once we enter the ever lengthening days of February and March your hot bed can be kicked into action. Make friends with the dairy farmer or horse wrangler down the road and see if you can negotiate for a wheelbarrow load of fresh poop. In this case it has to be fresh. The action of the fresh manure decomposing will actually generate the heat that will warm your hot house and enable you to germinate seeds and

38 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

grow plants when there is still snow falling. Mix some loose straw in with the manure to insure air packing it all down in a layer at least 18 inches thick covering the gravel and raising the height of the pit. Finally spread out an eight inch layer of nice potting soil, water it down and sew your seeds directly. Nights and cloudy days keep the window down and snug. You will see droplets of condensation that will drip down and water your tiny seedlings. As days become warm and sunny raise the window up to vent out the heat. A simple stick stabbed into the hay bale will do the trick. Be watchful, as early spring days can turn cold and cloudy in an instant. If you want to be fancy there are thermostatically controlled apertures that will raise and lower the window mechanically. Lettuce is a cool weather crop. You will have no problem growing your own fresh salads. Peas are   also a cool weather crop, as well a cabbage and broccoli. If you want to add a burst of color, snapdragons, pansies and petunias are cold tolerate flowers. By late spring early summer you can disassemble the cold frame. Store the window away for next season, spread the hay on your strawberry plants and use the now composted manure in your garden beds. The pit will be ready to be used again as the foundation of your new cold frame to grow kale in the fall. 


WELSH CABIN with WiFi

Specializing in Burgers, Steaks & Wings Monday Wednesday Thursday Friday 3:00 pm to close

845-482-3802

Saturday Sunday 12 Noon to close

495 Hessinger-Lare Road, Jeffersonville, NY 12748

Serving Every Day Except Tuesday- Closed

REAL ESTATE • BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS ESTATES & WILLS

MARTIN S. MILLER Attorney at Law

SM

Real Estate Inc. Upper Delaware Country Properties P.O. Box 335 21 Lower Main St. • Callicoon, NY 12723

Office: (845) 887-5640 tom@fredarealty.com

www.fredarealty.com

Representing clients in Sullivan, Delaware, Orange and Ulster Counties since 1975.

(845) 482-4200 • (845) 794-4440 Jeffersonville - Monticello marty@martinsmillerlaw.com

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 39


Join in on the action at

40 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Bethel Woods!

Whether taking our teen show on the road or inviting whole families into programs, Bethel Woods wants to find a place for all to join in on the action! Our community is our greatest resource so we’ve been thinking of as many ways as we can to spend more time together. This Spring we launched a new version of Saturdays at the Woods (SAW), which involved running five simultaneous programs and welcoming in local teaching artists as facilitators: one for caregivers and their 0-3 year olds, one each for 4-6 year olds, 7-9 year olds and 10-13 year olds, and a final one for just parents with kids in the 4-13 year old classes. It’s certainly grown our SAW family, and the work that has been produced is simply amazing! We look forward to celebrating the culmination of this session on May 16, and to starting a new series come the fall – keep an eye out for registration towards the end of the summer! Also having its first showing this spring, but returning in the Fall is E3: Engage. Experience. Explore., an expansion of the former World Stage Series, created to give participants the opportunity to engage, experience, and explore the arts through exposure to high quality performing groups. E3 brings a visiting performing arts group in to reside on site with us for a period of time, during which we collaborate on programming in schools, for schools in our Event Gallery, and family programming! This spring we promoted language arts skills in elementary students. Fall 2015 E3 will focus on the enriching and engaging relationship between math and performing arts for middle schools, and we’ll be working with high schools in Spring 2016! Previously called Summer Stages, PLAY: Peace. Love. Arts. You., is an exciting new twist on how we engage our young people in the performing arts. As we strive to inspire, educate, and empower through our programs, PLAY will be driven by the thoughts and ideas of the youth involved. From exploring questions such as “How can


At Bethel Woods, we seek to inspire, educate, and empower individuals through the arts and humanities. We believe that arts are critical to the strength of a community, and our programs are designed to give audiences of all ages and backgrounds opportunities to explore history and the arts. Whether you are a teacher looking to expand your students’ classroom experiences in ways that support your Common Core goals or a parent seeking new avenues to expose and engage your children, there is an array of opportunities at Bethel Woods Center for the Arts to discover, enrich, and expand your love of the arts! See our website for more details or for contact information to be in touch www.bethelwoodscenter.org!

5

Here are a few upcoming events at

BETHEL WOODS for KIDS

JUN 28 - AUGUST 1 , 2015 P.L.A.Y: THEATRE At the Conservatory at Bethel Woods

AUG 9 - 23 , 2015 P.L.A.Y: MUSIC At the Conservatory at Bethel Woods

2015 Flicks Series: Moonlit Movie Mondays at the Terrace Stage

MON, JUL 13, 2015 - 8:30 PM THE GOONIES

MON, AUG 3, 2015 - 8:30 PM THE WIZARD OF OZ

MON, SEP 14, 2015 - 8:30 PM E.T. THE EXTRATERRESTRIAL July 18 (Saturday)

Concert: The KIDZ BOP Kids “Make Some Noise” T our 4 p.m., Pavilion

Check their website for more events.

www.bethelwoodscenter.org/arts-education

5

world peace start with you,” to working collaboratively to write original songs, PLAY draws its content from the visionary minds of our youth. PLAY: Theater has us welcoming in specialists in devised theater to partner with local artist and educators to guide our participating youth in the writing and staging of their very own original theatrical work. All participants will collaborate together as playwrights, actors, directors, set designers and more! Running through the month of July, there are 2, 3 and 4 week options depending on the childs age. PLAY: Music will give melody to the lyrics of participants’ perspectives. Whether first chair in one’s school orchestra or a star shower singer or simply excited to pick up an instrument for the first time, this collaborative music making experience will take youth through the complete process of song writing, from the music to the lyrics, and performing, from playing and singing to staging and lighting. A complete original production will be presented at the culminating event. We welcome 9-15 year olds for this two week program in August. Please see our website for further details, including scholarship and transportation support options, open houses, program dates and culminating performances – at which we look forward to seeing you all! Amongst this, all our teens are keeping quite busy with Project Identity, our programming exclusively designed for the youth in our region aged 14-18. PI: Photography, an intensive internship during which artistic, technical and professional skills will be learned, is well under way – look for an announcement about our culminating gallery exhibit and come celebrate the creativity and dedication of our future! We’ll also be taking PI on the road, with PI: Sessions. A space for creating, critiquing and collaborating will morph into a coffeehouse style sharing opportunity on the 2nd Saturday of each month beginning in June. Look for us everywhere from the Rock Hill firehouse to the Delaware Valley Youth Center! And that’s not all! We’re serious about families, and so have really ramped up our film series, renamed “Flicks,” to offer more chances to gather in front of a screen, whether indoors for our Halloween and Holiday Market family programming and our first time ever “Night at the Museum,” (that’s right – we’re really sleeping over in the museum!), or at our first time ever outdoor movies on our Terrace Stage with cult favorites like The Wizard of Oz and Goonies. The Pavilion Stage welcomes KIDZ BOP this July 18, and we’re excited to have local youth bands as their opening acts – family friendly all around! And never forget what an everyday family experience our museum can be! Many of our local libraries have a museum pass that can be checked out like a book so be sure to ask at yours!

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 41


SHOPPING

Catskill Country Ceramics

Greenware, bisque, gifts, lessons and supplies, Mia Bella Candles and jewelry making supplies.

4852 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3651 catskilcntry@aol.com See ad page 50

Domesticities & The Cutting Garden

Antiques, home, garden and gift. Flowers - Cut your own flowers.

Global Home

Furniture, vintage & antique finds, home decor, flooring, wallpaper, fabric, art, gifts, fragrance, jewelry, toys, books, interior consultation and decoration services.

4929 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3652 www.globalhomeny.com www.facebook.com/globalhomeny info@globalhomeny.com

the store where you will find the Thrift Shop at Heirloom Marketplace filled with gently used housewares, furnishings and tools at bargain prices.

92 Bayer Road Callicoon Center, NY 12724 Phone: (845) 482-2046 (845) 807-3747 www.earthgirlpottery.com www.facebook.com/EarthgirlPottery earthgirlpottery@gmail.com See ad page 14

Peck’s Market, Inc.

Fun & functional handmade pottery

4917 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-2169 www.auctionzip.com/cgibin/auctionlist.cgi?vuid=74344 heirloommarketplace@twc.com www.facebook.com/HeirloomMarketplace See ad page 13 Supermarket and deli

4897 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3800 www.pecksmarket.com csmith@pecksmarket.com See ad page 17

Rosehaven Boutique

Offering a large assortment of quality merchandise, all in natural alpaca fiber. Along with ethnic alpaca clothing from Peru, Rosehaven’s own products include alpaca socks and gloves, natural dyed yarn, and many hand knit products from talented western Sullivan County knitters.

Heirloom Marketplace

A true Adirondack store in the heart of the Catskills, one of a kind rustic furniture and decor.

4938 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Heirloom Marketplace Phone: (845) 482-4123 Heirloom Marketplace is a combination of Like us on Facebook! auction house, antique emporium and thrift shop. www.therusticcottage.com A treasure trove of fine, funky, collectable and info@therusticcottage.com vintage items, the store is filled with exciting discoveries of every kind. Check out the back of See ad page 17

4055 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-3333 www.thecuttinggarden.org www.pinterest.com/domesticities www.facebook.com/domesticities cuttinggarden@hotmail.com See ad page 31 Earthgirl Pottery

The Rustic Cottage

The Rustic Cottage

2027 State Route 17B Bethel, NY 12720 Phone: (845) 887-6801 Cell: (914) 953-2506 www.rosehavenalpacas.com www.facebook.com/RosehavenAlpacas info@rosehavenalpacas.com See ad page 4

42 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

The Red Door Consignment Shoppe

Ladies & men’s consignment clothes & accessories, casual wear to gowns, junior to plus sizes.

4910 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 866-1807 www.facebook.com/TheRedDoor ConsignmentShoppe reddoorshoppe@hotmail.com See ad page 13 The Trash Queen Store

From the practical to sublimely unique, extraordinary vintage, antique, eclectic furniture, lighting, decorative collectables, glassware, jewelry and more! Dramatically expanded store that now carries vintage and gently used designer clothing, a children's section, AND, by popular demand, Kathy's Famous Amazing Yard Sale, now indoors.

21 Lower Main Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 866-3867 www.facebook.com/trashqueenstore trashqueenstore@aol.com See ad page 57

The Red Door Consignment Shoppe


PLACES to EAT Angelina’s on the Hill

Pizzeria and Italian Restaurant

23 Crestwood Drive Lake Huntington, NY 12752 Phone: (845) 932-5042 www.facebook.com/Angelinasonthehill BoLoon City

Chinese Food: Szechuan, Hunan, Mandarin and Cantonese

4908 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3312/3359 See ad page 52 CJ’s Sub Shop & Deli

Subs, sandwiches, paninis, burgers, daily specials, party platters, jumbo subs and more.

4054 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone/Fax: (845) 482-3211 Just Desserts!

Ice Cream Stand

Mullally’s Restaurant & Pub 4919 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5992 www.mullallyspub.com www.facebook.com/mullallypub

Mullally's Pub and Liquor Store 4919 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5992 www.mullallyspub.com www.facebook.com/mullallypub

Mullally’s Pub, Just Desserts! Ice Cream Stand and Liquor Store

Natural Valley Kitchen

Healthy Food, Cafe/Market

4889 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4500 www.naturalvalleykitchen.com www.facebook.com/naturalvalleykitchen www.twitter.com/nvk2014 www.pinterest.com/NaturalValley/ naturalvalleykitchen@gmail.com See ad page 57

Welsh Cabin Restaurant and Bar

Steaks, wings and pub food all fresh with special specials all the time.

495 Hessinger-Lare Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-3802 Like us on Facebook! mwelsh24@netzero.com See ad page 39 Samba Cafe

Cuisine is ingredient-driven, farm fresh and infused with latin flavors, celebrating simple, rustic, comfort foods. Open for lunch & dinner.

4893 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5900 www.sambacafeandinn.com www.facebook.com/SambaCafe.Inn sambacafeandinn@hotmail.com See ad page 37

Natural Valley Kitchen

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 43


PLACES to Stay

Stone Wall Acres Bed & Breakfast

Enjoy your stay in our large and private carriage house accommodations furnished with 19th century antiques.

142 Eagin Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4930 Cell: (845) 701-2271 www.stonewallacresbandb.com www.facebook.com/StoneWallAcresBed Breakfast glennspielmann@hotmail.com See ad page 14

Jeffersonian Bed & Breakfast

Historic house built by the town doctor in 1922 with 5 guestrooms. Easy walking distance to shops and restaurants.

4858 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5947 www.jeffersonianbandb.com See ad page 34

Stone Wall Acres Bed & Breakfast

The Jeffersonian Bed & Breakfast

Samba Inn

Located in the center of Village. Walk to shops and restaurants. Guest rooms are nicely furnished with kitchenette's, A/C, TV and WiFi (in Cafe)

4893 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5900 www.sambacafeandinn.com www.facebook.com/SambaCafe.Inn sambacafeandinn@hotmail.com See ad page 37

44 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Samba Inn

Photo by Cindy Herbert


Alpacas in Harmony

Award winning alpacas with great genetics for sale, Farmstore

Farm & Garden

483 County Route 114 Cochecton, NY 12726 Phone: 631-804-9418 info@alpacasinharmony.com www.alpacasinharmony.com See ad page 52

Apple Pond Farm & Renewable Energy Educational Center

80 Hahn Road Callicoon Center NY 12724 Phone/Fax: (845) 482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com www.facebook.com/ApplePondFarm See ad page 36 Brey's Egg Farm

Poultry Farm, Farm Fresh Eggs, Compost and Top Soil

607 Swiss Hill Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5464 www.breyseggfarm.com breyseggs@gmail.com See ad page 52 Bridle Hill Farm

Riding Academy, Boarding, Stables, Lessons, Trail Riding

190 Hemmer Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3993 www.bridlehillfarm.com www.facebook.com/bridle.farm young@bridlehillfarm.com See ad page 54

Domesticities & The Cutting Garden

Antiques, home, garden and gift. Flowers - Cut your own flowers.

4055 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-3333 www.thecuttinggarden.org www.pinterest.com/domesticities www.facebook.com/domesticities cuttinggarden@hotmail.com See ad page 31 Earthgirl Flowers

Flower Arrangements from Earthgirl's Gardens for Weddings, Events & Parties

92 Bayer Road Callicoon Center , NY 12724 Phone: (845) 482-2046 Cell: (845) 807-3747 www.earthgirlflowers.com

Earthgirl Flowers cont’d www.facebook.com/EarthgirlFlowers earthgirlpottery@gmail.com See ad page 14 High Road Farm

State of the Art Equine Facility, Boarding, Lessons for Trails

8 Eagin Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4706 www.highroadhorsefarm.com Like us on Facebook! info@highroadhorsefarm.com See ad page 14 Imagine! Alpacas

Alpaca Farm & Farmstore

132 E. Hill Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 231-3315 www.imaginealpacas.com Like us on Facebook! info@imaginealpacas.com See ad page 34

Korwan's Garden Center

Trees & Shrubs, Restorations, Crafts, Wood Carver, Carved Signs

148 Eggler Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3345 Cell: (845) 707-1424 billfm79@yahoo.com See ad page 13

Oak Ridge Farm, Inc.

Photo by Cindy Herbert

Farm Tours, Renewable Energy

Boarding, Lessons, Therapeutic Riding, Trail Riding for Boarders

222 Hessinger-Lare Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4686 www.oakridgefarminc.com patwelj@netzero.net See ad page 50 Rosehaven Alpacas

Breeding and Sales, Alpaca Fabric, Alpaca Products

540 County Route 164 Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 887-6801 Cell: 914-953-2506 www.rosehavenalpacas.com www.facebook.com/RosehavenAlpacas info@rosehavenalpacas.com See ad page 4 Tonjes Dairy and Cheese Farm

Dairy Farm & Cheeses– Mozzarella, Cultured Buttermilk, Ricotta, Fromage Blanc and Yogurt

188 Tonjes Road Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 482-5971 Like us on Facebook! tonjesfarmdairy@gmail.com See ad page 52

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 45


HOME IMPROVEMENT

Contractors, Building Supplies, Lawn & Garden Equipment, Landscaping, Maintenance Services, Swimming Pools & Spas

Contractors

Brett Erdman Contracting

Contractor, Carpentry, Concrete

P.O. Box 17 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5128 bretterdmancontracting@yahoo.com See ad page 34

Superior Plumbing & Heating Plumbing, Heating System Installation, Burner Service and Repair, Wet Core Drilling 15 Gempler Lane Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Ph./Fax: (845) 482-5622 superiorpandh@yahoo.com See ad page 39

Glass

Keller Glass Specialty, Inc. Glass Specialist for Home, Auto, Table Tops, Mirrors, Plexiglass, Thermopane/ Tempered, Sandblast Art and Design. 5036 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5792 See ad page 35

Mullally’s Sales & Rentals

46 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Hardware/Lumber/ Home Improvement Kohler Lumber

Lumber & Building Material, Pressure Treated & Cedar Products, Paints, Mason, Plumbing, Electrical, Varnishes, Owens Corning & BP Roofing, Carpet, Cabinetry, Owens Corning Blown-in Insulation, Floorcovering.

5023 & 5117 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5290 See ad page 39

H. Pfanstiel Hardware Co., Inc.

Decorative Door, Cabinet and Bath Hardware Manufacturer

5007 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4445 (800) 806-6096 www.pfanstieldecorativehardware.com hph845@aol.com

Lawn & Garden Equipment Rental

Mullally’s Sales & Rentals John Deere, Stihl, Rental Equipment 4510 State Route 52 P.O. Box 633, Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5222 www.mullallytractor.com Like us on Facebook!

Maintenance Services Trash Queen Enterprises, Inc.

Trash/Junk Removal, Recycling, Clean-outs, Property Management

P.O. Box 4 North Branch, NY 12766 Phone: (845) 866-DUMP (3867) kathy@trashq.com

Swimming Pools & Spas Clear-Rite Pools & Spas, Inc.

Installation & Service, Residential and Commercial Pools, Custom Designed & Lap Pools, Weekly Maintenance

214 Hemmer Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4646 Fax: (845) 482-9051 www.clearritepools.com clearritepools@hvc.rr.com See ad page 5


SERVICES

Accountant

Knack, Pavloff & Company, LLP 14 Sturgis Road Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 794-2200 Fax: (845) 794-2273 www.knackpavloff.com dknack@knackpavloff.com See ad page 35

Advertising

Cindy Monahan Graphic Design Studio

Graphic Design, Websites, Logos, Advertising, Brochures, Postcards, etc.

P.O. Box 151, Hortonville, NY 12745 Phone: (845) 887-6472 cmdesign@hvc.rr.com

Attorneys

Kenneth C. Klein 4880 Main Street (State Route 52) P.O. Box 600 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5000 Phone: (845) 482-5002 See ad page 36

Law Offices of William H. Chellis, P.C. P.O. Box 624 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3405 Fax: (845) 482-4106 www.chellislaw.com whchellis@chellislaw.com See ad page 12

Martin S. Miller, Esq. 10 St. John Street Monticello, NY 12701 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 794-4440 Phone: (845) 482-4200 Fax: (845) 482-1009 marty@martinsmillerlaw.com See ad page 39

Archery

Professional and Business

Bold Archery Design

Traditional Archery, Handmade arrows, Private lessons besides our Woodland Skills Course, Leather work for archery gear, sheaths, custom holsters & neck pouches.

26 Hubert Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-2173 www.boldarcherydesign.com www.facebook.com/BoldArcheryDesign www.etsy.com/shop/BoldArcheryDesign boldarcherydesign@gmail.com

Artists, Music & Performing Arts

Anne T. Maus Stained Glass Studio Custom Stained Glass

172 Villa Roma Road Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 482-5699 www.annemausstainedglass.com annemaus@earthlink.net Earthgirl Pottery

Handmade Gifts to Give or Keep

92 Bayer Road Callicoon Center, NY 12724 Phone: (845) 482-2046 (845) 807-3747 OPEN STUDIO www.earthgirlpottery.com www.facebook.com/EarthgirlPottery earthgirlpottery@gmail.com See ad page 14 The Janice Center

Art Classes, Instrumental Music, Instruction, Music Together, Dance

5296 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3324 www.janicecenter.com Like us on Facebook! thejanicecenter@aol.com

Weekend of Chamber Music, Inc. Chamber Music P.O. Box 304 Lake Huntington, NY 12752 Phone: (845) 932-8527 Phone: (718) 638-8962 www.WCMConcerts.org www.facebook.com/WCMconcerts info@WCMConcerts.org See ad inside back cover

The Eddie Adams Workshop Photo Journalist Workshop Jeff- North Branch Road P.O. Box 488 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4112 www.eddieadamsworkshop.com www.facebook.com/EddieAdamsWorkshop See ad page 4

Automotives

Dick's Auto Sales, Inc.

23-1/2 Hour Towing, Used Car & Truck Sales, Full Repair & Service, NYS Inspection Station, Scorpion Sprayed on Truck Bed Liners

5065 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4460 See ad page 9

Justus Tire & Alignment 4926 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4815 www.justusauto.com See ad page 35

Lake Huntington Automotive Services

Automotive and Small Engines

244 Nearing Road Lake Huntington, NY 12752 Phone: (845) 932-8267 lakehuntingtonautomotive@gmail.com See ad page 37

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 47


Shakelton Auto & Truck Parts 4547 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5211 See ad page 50 Siggy’s Auto Body, Inc. 5013 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3080 See ad page 39

Banks

Catskill Hudson Bank 9 Lower Main Street Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (888) 209-2265 www.chbny.com ktheadore@chbny.com See ad page 9

The First National Bank of Jeffersonville 4866 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4000 www.jeffbank.com jaustin@jeffbank.com www.facebook.com/jeffersonvillebank See ad page 5

Day Care

Little Stars Family Day Care & Preschool 12 Pammer Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 594-4282 starlight@hvc.rr.com www.mylittlestars.org www.facebook.com/LittleStarsFDC See ad page 35

Funeral Services

Stewart-Murphy Funeral Home, Inc. 5068 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4280 or (845) 887-4900

Hair Salons/Barber Jim’s Barber Shop

Serving the Jeffersonville area for over 48 years.

4886 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4421 Mane Street Styles

Hair Salon– Schwarzkopf Color, K-Pak waves and perms, Sulfate-free products, Rusk, Pin curls, Roller sets, as well as large variety of Iron work, Distributor of Melaleuca Products.

431 Bayer Road North Branch, NY 12766 Phone: (845) 482-3042 bethbrealtor@yahoo.com See ad page 17

Health and Fitness The Janice Center

Zumba, Kidnastics and Karate

5296 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3324 www.janicecenter.com Like us on Facebook! thejanicecenter@aol.com

Jefferson Pharmacy

Pharmacy, Greeting Cards, Maybelline Products

4892 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5720 jeffpharm@yahoo.com See ad page 52 S.V. Shah M.D.

Physician, Medical Practice

9 Terrace Avenue Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4171 See ad page 35 Paint Parties at the Janice Center

48 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Western Sullivan Wellness

Massage Therapy and Reflexology

5310 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5031 See ad page 13

Insurance Companies

Callicoon Co-operative Insurance Company 15 Chapel Street Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5522 info@callicoonco-op.com See ad page 10

Mike Preis, Inc. 4898 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5510

39 Lower Main Street Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 887-4210 www.mikepreis.com www.facebook.com/mikepreisinsurance insure@mikepreis.com See ad page 5

Media Radio & Newspapers WJFF Radio Catskill

Educational Programming, News, Music, Public Affairs. Open House 2-4 p.m, 1st Saturday of Each Month. Nation's Only Hydropowered Radio Station.

4765 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4141 www.wjffradio.org www.facebook.com/WJFFRadio adam@wjffradio.org See ad page 17 Sullivan County Democrat Newspaper/Publisher

5 Lower Main Street Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 887-5200 www.scdemocratonline.com www.facebook.com/scdemocrat publisher@sc-democrat.com See ad page 52


The River Reporter 93 Erie Avenue Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-3298 www.riverreporter.com www.facebook.com/theriverreporter editor@riverreporter.com See ad page 51

Nursery School/Preschool Little Stars Family Day Care & Preschool 12 Pammer Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 594-4282 starlight@hvc.rr.com www.mylittlestars.org www.facebook.com/LittleStarsFDC See ad page 35 Playful Learners Nursery School Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 423-8410 katieherbert6@yahoo.com Stepping Tones Pre-school 5296 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3324 www.janicecenter.com thejanicecenter@aol.com

Pet Grooming/Sitters Fore Paws Grooming

Dogs and Cats, Bath & Brush, Full Groom, Trims, Nails, Teeth, Glands

State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 423-8028 See ad page 50 Domestic Pet Care

In home pet sitting, dog walking, cat visits & small herd horse care available.

Kristen & Criss - Sullivan County, N.Y. Phone: 201-362-0113 abpetcare@yahoo.com

Real Estate

American Heritage Real Estate 4886 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5565 www.americanheritagerealestate.com See ad page 36

Catskill Sales Associates, Inc. 4920 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3200 www.catskillsales.com Like us on Facebook! warren@catskillsales.com See ad page 14

Century 21 Country Realty Beth Bernitt Kathy McCormack Ass. Brokers Lic. in NY, PA 30 Forestburg Road Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 791-5280 bethbrealtor@yahoo.com kathlyn.mccormack@gmail.com www.century21countryrealty.com info@century21countryrealty.com

Century 21 Country Realty Ellie Hyde 30 Forestburg Road Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 791-5280 Fax: (845) 791-5283 www.century21countryrealty.com Like us on Facebook! info@century21countryrealty.com See ad page 35

Sewing & Design Studio

Custom Garments & Embroidery, Alterations, Repairs & Home Decor.

Peg Geisel’s Sewing & Design Studio 541 Jeff-North Branch Road North Branch, NY 12766 Phone: (845) 707-2968 peg-geisel@hotmail.com See ad page 36

Storage Units

Jeff Self Storage 5352 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 798-1280 jeffstorage@yahoo.com

Spray Tanning Service Mobile Spray Tanning Service

Fun with No Sun Spray Tanning Service 7 Jeane Street Liberty, NY 12754 Phone: (845) 701-2514 funwithnosun@gmail.com www.facebook.com/FunWithNoSun

Weddings

Earthgirl Flowers

Flower Arrangements for Weddings, Events & Parties

92 Bayer Road Callicoon Center , NY 12724 Phone: (845) 482-2046 (845) 807-3747 www.earthgirlflowers.com www.facebook.com/EarthgirlFlowers earthgirlpottery@gmail.com See ad page 14 Eddie Adams Barn

Wedding, Event & Party Venue

Jeff-North Branch Road P.O. Box 488 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4112 www.eddieadamsbarn.com

Veterinarians/ Animal Hospitals

Dr. Richard Scwalb, DVM Dr. Moria L. Norris, DVM Jeffersonville Animal Hospital 89 Schoolhouse Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5500 www.jeffersonvilleanimalhospitalny.com www.facebook.com/jeffersonville animalhospital See ad page 13

Dr. Joseph Nebzydoski, V.M.D. Youngsville Veterinary Clinic 4130 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-3330

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 49


JEFF SANITATION INC.

– Residential Garbage Service – Rubbish Removal • Dumpsters Available • Recycling 10, 20, 30, 40 Yard Rolloffs Available

(845) 482-0926

State Route 52, P.O. Box 387, Jeffersonville, NY 12748

50 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


Fosterdale Equipment Corp. LLOYD BRUCHER Pres./Sales

ROGER BRUCHER V. Pres/Service

IAN BLUMENTHAL Sales Manager

(845) 932-8611 feq@hvc.rr.com 3137 Route 17B Cochecton, NY 12726

Charles F. Langhorn settled in Jeffersonville in 1846 after being advised by his doctor to do so because the hemlock trees had medicinal benefits and would help his heart condition. He built the first hotel. He was an avid admirer of the Declaration of Independence and named his hotel the Jefferson House. It is believed that this is how Jeffersonville got its name.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 51


52 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


By Mariano Vidal

Remembering Trees nurtured from the moisture and nutrients drawn from the soil. If the nutrients were to be contaminated as in the days of acid factories, the trees would not thrive or even die. Kilmer turned to prayer and faith when his daughter Rose was stricken with infantile paralysis. “…I think her tiny feet know beautiful paths. You understand this and it gives me a selfish pleasure…”

A tree that looks at God all day, And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

I think that I shall never see A poem lovely as a tree.

These are the first lines of a lovely poem titled Trees, written by Joyce Kilmer in 1913. I am sure many of our readers are familiar with it. And, no, Joyce Kilmer was not a girl as my nephew once thought. Joyce was a common name for a boy in those days. Kilmer was born in New Brunswick, NJ, but lived for a long time in forested and pristine Mahwah, just over the border from NY. It was there, while looking through his bedroom window and down a wooded hill, where the poet became inspired enough to jot down the verses of the famous little poem. Mahwah is a stone’s throw away from Callicoon and as such, we are fortunate to have many of the same tree species that inspired young Kilmer. These species include both deciduous and evergreens such as beech, birch, maple, ash, cherry, firs, pines, etc. Hemlocks still abound, but not as prolific as they once were before they were harvested wantonly by the tanneries that sprouted all over the region in the 18th century. Not only were the hemlocks in great peril, but the rivers were poisoned with the tannery outflows. Later, the forests in our environs were again attacked by acid factories. These did not discriminate, however, as they consumed any type of tree available - including oak and chestnut - to make ethanol, antifreeze and wood alcohol. Yes, one was both able start the car engine and drive to the nearest local speakeasy serving “bathtub gin”. The last of the acid factories closed around 1950 in Livingston Manor. The next pair of lines of the poem read:

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest Against the earth's sweet flowing breast;

Here, Kilmer presents the imagery of a suckling infant, akin to a seedling, drawing nourishment directly from Mother Earth’s bosom. Similarly, trees are

The tree is no longer a new-born, but an adolescent extending its arms to the heavens in prayer, as if asking for a respite from environmental abuse.

A tree that may in summer wear A nest of robins in her hair;

This is my favorite stanza, as the tree allegorically becomes a pretty woman wearing a hat consisting of a robin’s nest.

Upon whose bosom snow has lain; Who intimately lives with rain.

In these lines, the girl becomes exposed to the harsh winter, but stoically and without complaint. She is at peace with the burden of living an unprotected and solitary life without regret, but aware that her burden will eventually replenish her when spring arrives and blossoms bloom before the leaf.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 53


Poems are made by fools like me, But only God can make a tree.

Here, Kilmer is self-effacing in his description of what he is able to create, this simple little poem, which he probably thought at the time would amount to nothing, even more so in comparison to a living thing such as a tree. Some things are forgotten, while others die. Sometimes, what is both forgotten and dead, may not be necessarily the same thing. Trees was set to music by in 1922 and recorded by many, from the likes of Perry Como, Paul Robeson, Nelson Eddy and even Alfalfa (“I never took a lesson”). But my favorite interpretation is that of Richard Tauber, the Austrian born Jewish tenor who escaped from Hitler’s Germany to a successful career in England. You may not be able to understand every word due to his heavy accent, but who cares. Ogden Nash composed a parody:

I think that I shall never see A billboard lovely as a tree. Indeed, unless the billboards fall, I'll never see a tree at all.

Shortly before his deployment to Europe during WWI, daughter Rose died, and twelve days later a son was born. Sergeant Joyce Kilmer was killed when he was struck in the head by an enemy bullet in the final days of the Great War. He was 31 years old. He is long dead, but not forgotten. So the next time you look through a window at a wooded hill, whether the trees are festooned in their best blossomy attire, full of verdant greenery, glorious autumnal glows or snowbound encrusted white, remember his pretty little poem. Mariano Vidal is an architect and a classical vocalist. He lives in Youngsville with his wife Susie and their cat, Tarzan.

54 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


Ron Badach Callicoon Kitchen | By Elizabeth Bernitt • Natural Valley Kitchen | By Scott Woods

What’s Cooking in the Kitchens? way of living. Ron whipped up a Black Bean burger that day. The Show’s hostesses devoured his Black Bean Burger and that won him bragging rights for that episode.

Once the show aired Ron had the good fortune of some very positive feedback. Vineyards called to ask if he could suggest some vegetarian meals and wines that might pair well with them.

Basil is the one thing Ron grows as much as possible...pesto finds its way into many things he makes. For most everything else, he uses local farmers markets.

Callicoon Kitchen: Ron Badach Elizabeth, Emma, Madeline and Ava live in a lovely Arts and Crafts home overlooking a beautiful pasture. In the kitchen is where the magic happens. You see, the man of the house, father and hunky husband (according to ABC’s THE CHEW) Ron Badach. A vegetarian for 20 years he has a gift tempting his family with his culinary creations which helps to keep them healthy.

Ron was, at a young age, enamored with PBS and their early cooking shows. He found watching people cook to be very relaxing and he still feels that way today. As a young man Badach managed a top New Jersey restaurant and was inspired. The restaurant served luscious dishes created by the Swiss Chef/Owner, who is today regarded as one of the top chefs in the United States. Working in this environment inspired Ron, he began to try his hand in the kitchen playing with recipes, incorporating things he had seen and heard then adding his own ideas and taste. Much joy was found in the kitchen sharing all he created.

As life happens, along came beautiful wife Elizabeth, blessed with twin daughters, the purchase of this warm welcoming house in the country and their third daughter completed this home. All while working as a financial advisor and playing in the kitchen every chance he could. Ron inspires and tempts all those around him who feel privileged to share his amazing creations.

Ron was invited to share his culinary creations in a fun little challenge on a daytime television show called The Chew. Ron as a vegetarian eats well balanced meals and sticks to a fitness routine as part of his healthy lifestyle. The audience of The Chew seemed to appreciate the visual results that Ron achieves with his

Ron took this as a catalyst to put his recipes out there. He decided with the youth obesity situation in our country, his healthful way of cooking could help. If he shared his passion people would see that eating healthy isn’t that difficult. He created Ron Badach Callicoon Kitchen on Youtube and Facebook. You can look him up and you too can see how relaxing it is to watch someone cook. You too can be inspired and you can have a healthful way of living. If you would like to see Ron in action, he will be doing a live demo at the Barryville Farmers Market on July 4th. Here are two recipes Ron is sharing with us... enjoy!

Asian Peanut Sesame Noodles

1/2 cup "natural peanut butter" 1/4 cup soy sauce 1/3 cup warm water 2 Tbsp chopped ginger 1 Clove chopped garlic 2 Tbsp Rice wine vinegar 1 1/2 Tbsp Toasted Sesame oil cont’d. over

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 55


2 Tsp honey 1 tsp crushed red pepper flakes Juice of 1 lime Zest of 1 lime Combine all in a food processor..if mixture is too thick ..thin with water Cook drain and cool 1/2 pound Japanese Soba Noodles (or 1/2 lb linguine). Toss with peanut sauce..Top with sliced scallions and toasted Sesame seeds and chopped cashews.. Delish!!!

Vegetarian Miso Soup Natural Valley Kitchen: Soraia Haberli

4 cups vegetable stock 4 cups water 1 block..extra firm tofu..drained and cubed 1/4 cup miso paste 1 handful chopped shiitake mushroom 1 bunch thinly sliced scallion..use both white and green 1 handful thin sliced baby spinach ..(or kale) Bring the stock and water to a simmer...add tofu, shiitake scallion and spinach..let simmer for 5-7 minutes..remove from heat..in a separate bowl..add a ladle of stock into the miso paste and dissolve completely ..pour back into soup to taste..add more if desired. Tips..do not combine boiling soup to miso..make sure it is removed from the heat before mixing. This one is all 3 of my

daughters favorite.. they help me make it!!..

56 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Chef Soraia Haberli has a passion for the garden fresh, organic ingredients that go into her healthy recipes at Natural Valley Kitchens on Main Street in the heart of Jeffersonville. Natural Valley Kitchens commitment to using fresh produce from local farmers creates healthy meals for their customers and a healthy economy for our local community.

"When I came to this Country, I had no idea that cooking was going to be my passion and my future career," Soraia said. "I got a job as an assistant to this wonderful family in Manhattan and learned a lot about food with my boss who is an excellent cook. Being in the kitchen helping her with dinner parties and being

Quinoa is the one food Soraia loves to use in her dishes. It is high protein, high fiber, high in calcium, phosphorous, vitamin B and E quality and packed with amino acids, variety of antioxidant phytonutrients and many minerals. exposed to the wonderful ethnic dishes she prepared made me fall in love with cooking." After two great years with them Soraia pursued a career in the food industry. "I told myself, if this is what you want you should go to school and get a good education in the field." With so many great schools in New York the hard part was choosing the right one. Cooking healthy was Soraia's first priority, natural ingredients and gourmet was a plus. "I chose Natural Gourmet Cookery School and got my certification as a Chef and have been a private Chef in Manhattan NY, Greenwich Connecticut and Aspen Colorado."


Soraia is an expert in nutritional Cuisine and has a real talent for preparing exotic dishes from around the world. “I am originally from Brazil,” Soraia smiles. “We were second home owners from 2006 to 2014. When my husband retired in July 2014 we decided to become full time Sullivan County Residents. Both of us are in the food business, I am certified Chef and my husband certified restaurant manager, we combined our expertise and Created Natural Valley Kitchen.”

You can also visit Natural Valley Kitchen at the Farmers Market in Rock Hill on Saturdays, Roscoe on Sundays, Delhi on Wednesdays and the Harvest Festival at Bethel Woods 5 Sundays in September. Soraia was happy to share the following recipe with us.

Thai Quinoa Salad with fresh Cilantro Vinaigrette

For the Salad 1 cup quinoa, rinsed (or pre-washed) 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 red bell pepper, cut into bite-sized strips 1 carrot, peeled and grated 1 English cucumber, seeded and diced 2 scallions, white and green parts, finely sliced

TheArtofScottWoods.com

For the Vinaigrette freshly squeezed lime juice, from 2 limes 2-1 teaspoons Asian fish sauce 1- tablespoon vegetable oil 1/2- teaspoon sesame oil 1/4 cup fresh minced cilantro Instructions Add quinoa, salt and 1-2/3 cups water to a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to low, cover, and cook for 15 minutes, until the water is absorbed and the quinoa is cooked. Transfer to a serving bowl and let cool in the refrigerator. Combine fish sauce, lime juice, sesame oil, vegetable oil, and cilantro in a medium bowl. Once the quinoa is cool, add the red bell peppers, carrots, cucumbers, scallions, and vinaigrette. Toss and refrigerate. Serve cold.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 57


The Sullivan County Adult Care Center:

Photo courtesy of John Conway

Caring Roots That Run Deep....

Sullivan County has a long and proud history of caring for its residents.

A new chapter in that history began with the acquisition of the former Workman’s Circle Sanatorium in Liberty NY in the 1950s. The building underwent a $403,000. renovation, and was reopened in May of 1957 as The Sullivan County Home and Infirmary. The home initially welcomed 42 residents, with the ability to accommodate up to 70 residents. At the time of the opening, the State agreed to reimburse the home $5.86 per day for the care of each of its residents. The “new” County Home and Infirmary was warmly received by the community who saw the benefit of having a county facility dedicated to caring for the needs of its elderly and chronically ill. The facility became an integral part of the community, and for many years was referred to simply as “The Infirmary.” Times and names have certainly changed, but the commitment to caring remains the same. In 1988, after decades at the original location, construction began on a new building, located across the road from the original "Infirmary,” by the edge of Sunset Lake. At the completion of construction, the new facility was equipped to house 160 residents in bright, colorful rooms many with lake views. On May 5, 1992 it was officially re-named The Sullivan County Adult Care Center. Included in the plans for the new building was an area to accommodate an adult day care program. This program would offer activities Monday through Friday for adults with physical or mental limitations. The program would allow participants to spend the day at the facility, and return to their homes at night. This was the first Medical Model of its kind in Sullivan County. The program's founder, Joe Heilman dedicated the services to include individual medical care such as blood pressure monitoring, medication management, and physical and occupational therapies for each registrant. The program activities are tailored to include group meal preparation, current events discussions, arts and crafts, and gardening. Mr. Heilman and staff welcomed their first registrants on June 3, 1992. The program is currently known as The Adult Day Health Services Program. Although Mr. Heilman has since retired, The Adult Day Health Services Program continues to accommodate up to 17 participants on a daily basis. The facility’s Family Council was established in the late 1980s, and its members are volunteers, who act as strong advocates for the residents of the facility. They are supported by membership dues, donations, memorial contributions and fund raisers. These funds help to purchase items that enhance the quality of life for the residents. Wooden patio furniture, pianos, and a large screen

58 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


TV are a few of the welcome additions. To date, the Council continues holding monthly meetings providing moral support to families and addressing the non-medical needs of residents. In 2012, thanks to the efforts of county legislators and employees, a $1.1 million dollar HEAL grant was secured for renovations to the Adult Care Center. Responding to the needs of the county’s residents, a short term rehabilitation unit was designed, as well as a memory care unit. In May 2014, a ribbon cutting was held to unveil a beautifully remodeled lobby and the new units: The Memory Care Unit is dedicated to the needs of residents with dementia. With the assistance of the Alzheimer’s Association, the employees on the unit received specialized training to handle the needs of residents who suffer cognitive loss. The secure unit has a cheerful dining area, an enclosed patio, and a “quiet room” for visits with loved ones. This unit is another “first of its kind” in Sullivan County. The Short-Term Rehabilitation Unit assists patients transitioning from hospital to home. Whether recovering from surgery or serious illness, patients receive skilled nursing care, as well as physical, occupational and speech therapies and in spacious private and semi-private rooms, many with views of the lake. Comprehensive case management is offered to assist with planning a safe and successful discharge to home. The Adult Care Center also continues to provide traditional long-term skilled nursing care. The present-day facility is now equipped to handle residents needing IV therapy and also provides short-term respite care which provides planned short-term and time limited breaks for caregivers. Activities are an integral part of life at the facility. Frequently performers from the community are invited in to entertain residents. Regular parties and holiday celebrations are the norm. Pet visits are also a common and much-anticipated activity.

A warm and welcoming environment greets visitors to the newly remodeled lobby.

In the future the Adult Care Center anticipates the installation of a solar farm, which will provide most, if not all, of the electricity needed by the facility. Not only will the facility be powered by clean energy, but the county will realize a significant cost savings. Family Council extends an invitation to visit the Sullivan County Adult Care Center, the Adult Day Health Services Program or the Family Council by contacting the facility at (845) 292-8640, extension 2117.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 59


Cultural Arts Guide ARTS INFORMATION

Delaware Valley Arts Alliance P.O. Box 170 - 37 Main Street Narrowsburg, New York 845-252-7576 artsalliancesite.org info@artsalliancesite.org Arts Council that provides information and services for artists and the general public including publication of a cultural calendar, grants, Artsletter in print and on the web. Year-round

THEATRES

Callicoon Theater 30 Upper Main Street, Callicoon, NY 845-887-4460 callicoontheater.com calltheater@pronetisp.net Screenings of current popular films, and Cine-Art series of award-winning alternative and foreign films.

NACL Theatre Operated by North American Cultural Laboratory 110 Highland Lake Rd, Highland Lake, NY 845-557-0694 nacl.org - nacl@nacl.org Devoted to presenting multi-disciplinary and multi-media original theatre performances, music, dance and special events. Rivoli Theatre Operated by Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop 5243 Main Street, South Fallsburg, NY 845-436-5336 scdw.net - scdwemail@aol.com Hosts quality, award-winning live community theatre produced by Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop, and film screenings throughout the year.

Seelig Theatre at Sullivan County Community College 112 College Road, Loch Sheldrake, NY 845-434-5750 ext. 4377 sullivan.suny.edu hegeland@sunysullivan.edu Campus events, gallery exhibits, holiday & family shows, summer series, lectures, music, dance, theater, and the Metropolitan Opera live in HD. Tusten Theatre Managed by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance 210 Bridge Street, Narrowsburg, NY 845-252-7272 artsalliancesite.org - info@artsalliancesite.org Hosts live jazz, classical, traditional and new music concerts, theatre, opera

productions, and film. Home of Delaware Valley Opera and Delaware Valley Chamber Orchestra.

GALLERIES

Alliance Gallery & Loft Gallery Operated by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance Delaware Arts Center 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY 845-252-7576 artsalliancesite.org - info@artsalliancesite.org Year-round exhibitions of works by contemporary professional artists in all media; artists talks; demonstrations; and special events.

CAS Arts Center Operated by the Catskill Art Society 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY 845-436-4227 catskillartsociety.org info@catskillartsociety.org Year-round exhibitions of works by contemporary professional artists in all media. The gallery also hosts classes, readings, films, performances, and special events. Georgia Chambers Studio & Art Gallery A. Dorrer Drive, Callicoon, NY 845-887-4886 artful3000@yahoo.com Etchings, watercolors and paintings from the artist's studio.

The Drawing Room Gallery at DeBruce Country Inn 982 DeBruce Road, DeBruce, NY 845-439-3900 debrucecountryinn.com Contemporary works of art in small format including paintings, sculpture, prints and photography. Old Stone House 282 Hasbrouck Road, Woodbourne, NY 845-436-7720 theoldstonehouseofhasbrouck.org An historic art gallery and community center that presents exhibits, classes and community events.

River Gallery the Art of Living 8 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY 845-252-3238 rivergalleryny.com - info@rivergalleryny.com Changing exhibitions of works by professional contemporary artists.

Rolling River Gallery 25 Cooley Road, Parksville, NY 845-747-4123

60 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

rollingriver.net - info@rollingriver.net Changing exhibitions of works by locally and internationally known artists, photographers & children's book illustrators.

The Stray Cat Gallery Operated by The Catskill Distilling Company & The Dancing Cat Saloon 2032 Rt. 17 B, Bethel NY 845-423-8850 straycatgallery.com nancy@straycatgallery.com Showcasing the formidable talents of Tri State Area artists with revolving group shows in all media. On display are permanent sculptural installations. Selected residential artists are at work on site. The Left Bank Art is Liberty, Inc. 59 North Main Street, Liberty, NY 845-857-8208 Featuring six decades of artwork by Ron Lusker

WAA Gallery Operated by Wurtsboro Art Alliance 73 Sullivan Street, Wurtsboro, NY 845-888-4440 info@waagallery.org A non-profit community arts group founded in 2006 to encourage and promote art and artists from the region. Wurtsboro Art Alliance hosts year-round exhibitions in all media of student, amateur and professional art. Wulff Gallery Operated by Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum 1031 Old Route 17, Livingston Manor, NY catskillflyfishing.org - flyfish@catskill.net

MUSEUMS see page 31

PERFORMING ARTS

CULTURAL SERIES & PRESENTERS PLACES TO SEE AND HEAR THE ARTS Bethel Woods Center for the Arts 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY 1-866-781-2922 bethelwoodscenter.org info@bethelwoodscenter.org A not-for-profit cultural organization committed to inspiring expression, creativity and innovation through the arts. Offering multiple stages featuring a diverse selection of popular artists and culturally-rich performances, an awardwinning museum, and educational and community program.


Parksville USA 6 Main Street, Parksville, NY 845-747-4247 parksvilleusa.com - mistermichele@owly.com Presents a variety of concerts from Latin jazz to vocal and string quartets to opera during their season from April-October with a holiday concert in December. Shandelee Music Festival 442 J. Young Road, Livingston Manor, NY 845-439-3277 shandelee.org - shanfest@aol.com Produces a sunset concert series each summer.

Sullivan County Community College 112 College Road Loch Sheldrake, NY 845-434-5750 sullivan.suny.edu Seelig Theatre. Campus events, gallery exhibits, holiday & family shows, summer series,lectures, music, dance, theater & children's theater.

Town of Lumberland Cultural Series 1054 Proctor Road, Glen Spey, NY 845-856-8600 townoflumberland.org/govt/culteralseries.php. Presents regional and local artists in a variety of fine cultural programs including concerts, exhibitions and arts-related workshops.

PERFORMING ARTS ORGANIZATIONS

Groups that Produce Music/Theatre/Opera

Big Sky Productions 80 M. Gilles Road, Grahamsville, NY 845-985-7783 bigsky1952@aol.com A community-based theatre company specializing in benefits for non-profit organizations with readings, one-act and full-length plays, and murder mystery dinner theatre performances.

Delaware Valley Opera P.O. Box 446 - 37 Main Street Narrowsburg, NY 845-252-3136 delawarevalleyopera.org Non-profit professional opera company that produces and presents fully staged operas and recitals throughout the region, and offers opera workshops for adults and children. Delaware Valley Chamber Orchestra c/o P.O. Box 170, Narrowsburg, NY 845-252-7576 dvcomusic@gmail.com Live performances by area musicians of work by local composers primarily in the fall at the Tusten Theatre.

Callicoon Center Band P.O. Box 216, Youngsville, NY 845-439-4635 The Callicoon Center Band presents free weekly concerts in their bandstand each Wednesday evening in the summer. Bring a blanket or chair for your listening enjoyment!   

Forestburgh Theatre Arts Center Forestburgh Playhouse 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY 845-794-1194 fbplayhouse.org Professional summer theatre presenting Broadway musicals, plays, and children's theatre, with dining, cocktails, and cabaret in the adjoining Tavern.

Liberty Free Theatre P.O. Box 337, Kauneonga Lake, NY 845-798-1527 libertyfreetheatre.org libertyfree1@verizon.net Presenting first class productions of plays, music, poetry, and fiction that stimulate community dialogue while they entertain the public. Weekend of Chamber Music P.O. Box 304, Lake Huntington, NY 845-932-8527 weekendofchambermusic.com info@wcmconcerts.org Performances of world class chamber music during the Summer Festival in Jeffersonville and environs, as well as Arts Education partnerships and projects.

Sullivan County Community Chorus 845-794-7869 Sullivancountycommunitychorus@yahoo.com. Open to all voice parts, the chorus presents two concerts per year, in winter and spring. Program offerings range from masterworks with orchestral accompaniment to popular and Broadway music. Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop PO Box 353, Monticello, NY 845-436-5336 scdw.net - scdwemail@aol.com Producers of quality, award-winning live community theatre in the Rivoli Theatre (See Theatres) in So. Fallsburg.

North American Cultural Laboratory (NACL) 110 Highland Lake Road Highland Lake, NY 845-557-0694 nacl.org A professional theatre company that presents its own multi-disciplinary and original performances as well as the work of national and international contemporary theatre groups that are on the cutting edge of new theatre.

CLASSES, TRAINING & RETREATS

photo by dominick Capuzzi

Nesin Cultural Arts Eugene D. Nesin Theatre 22 St. John Street, Monticello, New York 845-794-6013 nesinculturalarts.org - nesin@verizon.net Strives to provide comprehensive lifelong learning opportunities to students and the community through integrated arts based partnerships and programming.

Janice Center 5286 State Route 52, Jeffersonville, NY 845-482-3324 janicecenter.com - ken@janicecenter.com Classes in music, dance, arts for adults and children.

Margolis Brown Adaptors P.O. Box 6, Barryville, NY 845-468-0152 margolisbrownadaptors.org Under the artistic direction of Kari Margolis and Tony Brown, The Margolis Brown ADAPTORS encompasses a professional performing ensemble and a full-time training and research center.

NACL (see performing arts organizations) Nesin Cultural Arts (see Performing Arts Presenters)

Shandelee Music Festival (see Performing Arts Presenters)

HISTORICAL Societies/Groups

Basket Historical Society of the Upper Delaware River Rt. 97, Long Eddy, NY 12760 Phone: (845) 887-6703 Collecting and preserving historical facts and legends of the Upper Delaware Valley. Cochecton Preservation Society, Inc. 377 New Turnpike Road P.O. Box 242, Cochecton, NY 12726 Phone: (845) 932-8487 Maintains historic railroad station. Frederick A. Cook Society 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Fax: (845) 434-8056 Commemorates and advances the work of the polar explorer.

Shandelee Music Festival J. Young Road, Livingston Manor, NY 845-439-3277 shandelee.org - shanfest@aol.com Master classes and opportunities for students to perform in recitals and informal concerts. Sunset Concert Series presents internationally acclaimed classical artists.

Sullivan County Historical Society Sullivan County Museum 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Fax: (845) 434-8056 Historical and contemporary displays, exhibits and events, archives and genealogy assistance.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 61


Helpful Information COMMUNICATIONS, EDUCATION, EMERGENCIES, MUNICIPALITIES, ORGANIZATIONS, LIBRARIES, TRANSPORTATION, POST OFFICES, UTILITIES, CHURCHES, RECYCLING

Communications

• NEWSPAPERS: Catskill Shopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .292-0500 river reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252-7414 Sullivan County democrat . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5200 times herald record . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-295-2181 • RADIO: WJff-fM, 90.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4141

Open House, 1:30-3:30 p.m., 1st Saturday of month. Nation’s only hydro-powered radio station. www.wjffradio.org

Wdnb 102.1 fM thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . .292-7535 WJuX-fM 99.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .888-861-6100 Wpdh-fM, 101.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .471-1500 WSul-fM, 98.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794-9898 WvoS-aM, 1240; WvoS-fM, 95.9 . . . . . .794-9898 Wzad fM 97.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .471-1500

• TELEVISION: Cable 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .692-6781 time Warner Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-431-8878

Education

Sullivan County Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .292-0082 adult education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .791-4070 alternate education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4760 vocational (voteC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295-4152 Sullivan County Community College . . . . . .434-5750

Sullivan West Central School District: Administrative Office Numbers: elementary - Jeffersonville Campus . . . . . .482-4610 high School - lake huntington Campus . . . 932-8401

Emergency Numbers

Emergency Fire/Ambulance: all fire and ambulance calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .911 Emergency Police: local police, call Sheriff’s department . . . .794-7100 new york State police (liberty) . . . . . . . . . .292-6600

Catskill Regional Medical Center: harris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794-3300 Callicoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5530

Crystal Run Urgent Care rockhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .796-5444

Other: animal Shelter (S.C. S.p.C.a) . . . . . . . . . . .796-3120 domestic violence hotline . . . . . . . . . .800-942-6906

62 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016

Safe passage (domestic violence program) . .292-5700 poison Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-222-1222 Suicide Crisis Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . .647-2443

Municipal Offices

town of bethel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .583-4350 town of Cochecton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .932-8360 town of fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-6605 recycling Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794-4466 Sullivan County Government Center . . . . . .794-3000

• Village of Jeffersonville

17 Center Street p.o. box 555, Jeffersonville, ny 12748 phone: 482-4275 • fax: 482-5298

Office Hours: Monday-friday, 8-noon & 1-4 p.m.

Mayor, William thony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482-4275 village Clerk/treasurer/fiscal officer Colleen freitas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4275 Sole assessor, bonnie hubert . . . . . . . . . . .482-5390 village historian, Maureen Schlott . . . . . . . .482-4984 building/Multiple res. inspector & Code enforcement officer, Kevin zieres . . .482-5390 planning board Chairman fred fries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482-4299 (after 7 p.m.) zoning board of appeals, Kris rasmussen . . .482-9066

• Town of Callicoon

TOWN HALL 19 legion Street, p.o. box 687, Jeffersonville, ny 12748 phone: 482-5390 • fax: 482-5030 www.townofcallicoon.org Town Board Meeting 2nd Monday monthly, 7:30 p.m.

Town Planning Board 2nd thursday monthly, 7:30 p.m.

Zoning Board Appeals 3rd thursday monthly, 8:00 p.m.

• Town of Delaware

Justice Court tuesday evenings, 7:00 p.m.

Nutrition Site every Wednesday & fridaylunch $2.00 per person over 60.

104 Main Street, p.o. box 129, hortonville, ny 12745 phone: 887-5250 • fax: 887-5228 www.townofdelaware-ny.us


all meetings held in the town hall Town Board Second Wednesday of each month, 7:00 p.m. Planning Board third Wednesday of each month, 7:30 p.m.

Zoning Board fourth thursday of each month, 7:30 p.m. Justice Court Monday evenings, 7:30 p.m.

Organizations

Community Garden Club, president . . .845-513-5263 3rd Tuesday of each month - New members welcome

Jeffersonville area Chamber of Commerce (JaCC) president . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .932-8538 JeMS (Jeffersonville enhances More of Sullivan) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.jeffersonvillejems.org lion’s Club, president . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-3330 blood drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .436-4416

Western Sullivan Public Libraries

delaware free library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-4040 Jeffersonville library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4350 tusten-Cochecton library . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252-3360 for programs and events for each branch visit the library website at www.WSplonline.org

Public Transportation

• Air: Monticello airport, inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794-6888 Stewart international airport . . . . . . . . . . . .564-7200 Sullivan County international airport . . . . . .583-6600 • Bus: Shortline bus System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 794-5500 • Train: aMtraK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-872-7245 Metro-north Commuter railroad . . . . .800-638-7646

U.S. Post Offices and Zip Codes

bethel 12720 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .583-5005 Callicoon 12723 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-4470 Callicoon Center 12724 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4287 Cochecton 12726 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .932-8319 fremont Center 12736 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5808 hankins 12741 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-4411 hortonville 12745 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5329 Jeffersonville 12748 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-275-8777 Kenoza lake 12750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..482-5234 lake huntington 12752 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .932-8318 livingston Manor 12758 . . . . . . . . . . . .800-275-8777 long eddy 12760 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5260 north branch 12766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-3910 obernburg 12767 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-5599 youngsville 12791 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4295

Utilities

verizon telephone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-621-9900 new york State electric and Gas (nySeG): Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-572-1111 Customer electric outage . . . . . . . . . . .800-572-1131

Solid Waste/Recycling Centers

Sullivan County division of Solid Waste: .845-807-0290 Transfer Stations: ferndale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .845-292-3670 rockland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .845-439-3654 Western Sullivan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .845-932-8845 Transfer Stations (Town Residents only): bethel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .845-292-4505

Church & Synagogue Information

Kenoza lake assembly of God Church . . . . .482-9856 Church on the rock (pentecostal) . . . . . . . . .482-5870 Congregation ahavath Sholom Synagogue -po box 183, Jeffersonville, ny 12748 Grace lutheran Church, north branch . . . . .482-5218 presbyterian Church of Jeffersonville . . . . . .482-5549 St. francis roman Catholic Church Youngsville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4640 St. George roman Catholic Church Jeffersonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4640 St. paul’s Mission united reform Church Youngsville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-5760 united reform Church, Youngsville . . . . . . . .482-4553 united Methodist Church, Jeffersonville . . . . .482-5561 united Methodist Church, Kenoza Lake . . . . .482-5561 Word of life, Youngsville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-3338

Children/Youth Organizations

Cyo (Catholic youth organization) . . . . . . . . . .482-4186 Girl Scouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5394 boy Scouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-5136 4-h Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-5729 Junior JeMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-3053 presbyterian Church youth Group . . . . . . . .482-5047 Jeffersonville lion’s - leo Club . . . . . . . . . . .482-4591

Senior Citizen Events

Jeffersonville - 2nd thursday each month, 12 noon. town hall, legion ave., Jeffersonville, 482-9953.

Senior Citizens meet 1st, 3rd & 4thtuesday at 12 noon. delaware Community Center, 570-224-6381.

Thrift Shops

iou Main Street thrift Shop Wed.-Sat., 10-3 p.m. (bag day on Wednesdays) Main Street, Callicoon, ny 12723 St. paul’s Mission thrift Store Wed & Sat., 10-3 p.m. St. rt. 52. 4042 State route 52, youngsville, ny 12791

the ark thrift Shop thurs.,11-2 p.m. & Sat., 11-3 p.m. 4907 Main Street (St. rt. 52), Jeffersonville, ny 12748

All area codes are (845) unless otherwise listed.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016 63


64 Jeffersonville Journal • 2015-2016


BethelWoodsCenter oodsCenter.or .org $GVJGN9QQFU%GPVGTHQTVJG#TVUKUCPQVHQTRTQÆ’VEWNVWTCNQTICPK\CVKQPVJCVKPURKTGUGFWECVGUCPFGORQYGTUKPFKXKFWCNUVJTQWIJVJGCTVUCPFJWOCPKVKGU )GPGTCNUWRRQTVHQT6JG/WUGWOCV$GVJGN9QQFUKURTQXKFGFD[C ITCPVHTQOVJG9KNNKCOCPF'NCKPG-CRNCP2TKXCVG(QWPFCVKQP

5WRRQTVRTQXKFGFD[


Jeffersonville Journal 2015-2016  

Celebrating Country Life in Western Sullivan County. There is plenty to keep you busy in our beautiful little corner of the Catskills

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you