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2013-2014


2013-2014 | FEATURE | ARTICLES 2013-2014

CREDITS Editor

SCOTT WOODS Art Director and Production

CINDY MONAHAN-HERBERT Monahan Graphic Design Studio Staff/Sales

ANNE HART CINDY HERBERT KATHY HERBERT KRISTEN FISCHER Photography

DOMINICK CAPUZZI CINDY HERBERT SCOTT WOODS Distribution Staff

KRISTEN FISCHER KATHY HERBERT ERIC NYSTROM JOE TINARI MARY TONJES DAN YOUNG KRISTIN YOUNG Printer

CAYUGA PRESS Produced with 100% wind power and vegi-inks This publication is sponsored by the

JEFFERSONVILLE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE P.O. Box 463 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 845-482-5688

JeffersonvilleNY.com

Welcome to Jeffersonville 2 20th Anniversary of WCM’s SUMMER FESTIVAL in the Catskills 3 Mountain Lions in the Mist 5-6 You Can Go Home Again 8-10 Flowers, Fishing & Opera 14-15 Whatever Happened to Falls Mill? 32-34 Jeff Bank– The Inception 36-38 The Balash Farm on Wahl Road 40-41 Sullivan County’s Secret Sauce 50-51 Garlic– Good, and Good for You! 54-55 A look into what ‘Shopping Local’ really means 56-57

HELPFUL | INFORMATION Events Calendar 18-24 Cultural Calendar & Museums 27-31 Business Directory 42-49 Cultural Guide 60-61 Helpful Information 62-63 Area Map 64

COVER Cover photo by local artist Scott Woods. Visit www.TheArtofScottWoods.com

facebook.com/JeffersonvilleNY The Jeffersonville Journal is published by the Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 463, Jeffersonville, NY 12748. This is the twentieth edition and 15,000 copies were printed May, 2013. No part of this publication can be reproduced without the written permission of the Chamber. The information in this publication is carefully compiled to ensure maximum accuracy. The Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce cannot, and does not, guarantee the correctness of all the information furnished it or the complete absence of errors and omissions. Thus, no responsibility for these shall be assumed.

JACC Serves: Callicoon Center, Fosterdale, Jeffersonville, Kenoza Lake, Youngsville and parts of the Towns of Bethel, Callicoon and Delaware.

Photo by Scott Woods

contents


Welcome to Jeffersonville and the Surrounding Areas High above the town, moisture builds to clouds, rain falls on the trees and trickles down the hillside. It forms a tiny brook that nourishes meadow flowers on its way to join a stream. The stream becomes a creek that meanders through the valley. It tumbles into a waterfall that generates power for a radio station broadcasting, “…sunny days ahead.” The gurgling water echoes past a printer toiling at his letterpress, then winds along the main street where a banker approves a new mortgage for an old farm. The water becomes gentle as it flows beneath the foot bridge and past the shady gazebo where adolescents scheme. Behind the shops and markets the creek drifts now unseen by neighbors running errands and catching up on news, past the firehouse it flows, past a pub, a bakery and the church on the hill. Now it rambles near a shop filled with imported antiques and not far off an auto mechanic tinkers with tires, brakes and ghosts. From the arches of an old stone bridge a young woman gazes down to her reflection and makes a wish. Her secret dreams carried away in the swirling currents through forest, field and pasture. The fly fishing here is good. There will be trout for dinner.  Among the slippery rocks, children search for crayfish and magical adventures. Cows wade out to drink. A local farmer lets the waters quench his growing crops. What he does not use evaporates away. High above the town, moisture builds to clouds, rain falls on the trees and trickles down the hillside.

Scott Woods, editor 2 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014


Transformations: JULY 14-27

20th Anniversary of WCM’s

SUMMER FESTIVAL

in the Catskills

John Harbison

Judith Pearce Caroline Stinson & Andre w Waggoner

H

ailed as “world-class” and with “some of the finest music we are likely to hear anywhere in the world,” Weekend of Chamber Music (WCM) launches its third decade in the Catskills this summer, and to celebrate, several exciting new initiatives are afoot! With Transformations as an entirely fitting title for its milestone Summer Music Festival, WCM offers audiences more than just the ‘usual’ fare of superb musicians, innovative programs, and delightfully unique concert settings in July of 2013. A very special tribute concert celebrates WCM’s founder, flutist Judith Pearce, who has passed the ‘Artistic Direction’ baton to two acclaimed artists, composer Andrew Waggoner and his wife, cellist Caroline Stinson. At the core of WCM remains a flexible company of superb musicians led by Stinson and Waggoner, who add a reputation for cutting edge performances in modern classical improvisation to the programs. Transformations is the first Festival under their direction, and from July 14 to 27, concerts indoors and out; social soirées; imaginative talks; plenty of intimate contact between audience, musicians and music, and the inauguration of an annual Composer-in-Residence are all part of this exclusive, not-to-be-missed celebration. WCM’s globe-trotting musicians, masters of their instruments all, have earned national and international recognition, and they are a group of colleagues and friends whose sheer delight in playing together creates an exhilarating and inspiring atmosphere for audiences.

WCM’s 20th Festival opens on July 14 with a concert on the back lawn of the Presbyterian Church in Jeffersonville, and a host of beloved tunes arranged for winds. Week one continues with MusicTalks! on Thursday July 18 at the Old North Branch Inn, and “Transprovisations” is the fare, with improv in various styles plus a mixed media performance, discussions and demonstrations. Saturday Night July 20 moves to the Eddie Adams Barn in Jeffersonville, with music by Beethoven, Bach and Harbison, and Judith Pearce performs Nicholas Maw’s “Night Thoughts” on solo flute for this very special tribute evening. Kicking off the second week on Sunday July 21 is “Market Music,” is a free sample of chamber music at the farmer’s market in Callicoon. Next, composer-in-residence John Harbison joins WCM in an up close and personal MusicTalks! on Thursday July 25 at the Catskill Distilling Company. There’s a free open rehearsal on Friday July 26 at the Eddie Adams Farm, and the Gala Grand Finale concert and artists’ reception July 27 brings music by Reger, Mozart, Bach, and the world premiere of a Harbison Violin Sonata to the WCM stage at the Adams Barn.

INFORMATION: WCMconcerts.org/845-887–5803 after Memorial Day. info@WCMconcerts.org Weekend of Chamber Music is a 501(c )3 non-profit, sponsored in part by public funding from the New York State Council on the Arts, a State agency.

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By Scott Woods

Mountain Lions in the Mist The Northwest has Sasquatch, Scotland has the Loch Ness Monster and here in Sullivan County we have The Mountain Lion. Or do we…? “Absolutely. I saw it with my own eyes. I know what a mountain lion looks like and what I saw was a mountain lion,” swears Mariano Vidal of Callicoon. “And I am not a man who makes things up.” “Absolutely not. There are no mountain lions in the Catskill Mountains.” declares Lt. Deming Lindsley of the Department of Environmental Conservation “I’ve been hearing this for 40 years. We’ve gotten reports from almost every town in Sullivan, Ulster, Oswego, Greene, Schoharie, Orange and Dutchess Counties and we’ve never been able to confirm a single sighting.” Whether or not these large cats roam beside us is up to who you ask. It’s a local debate with passionate convictions on both sides. They are here. They are not. But why wouldn’t they be? Breeding populations of mountain lion coexist with humans in areas much more urban than our little neck of the woods. Lions are frequent visitors to the suburbs of cities like Los Angeles, Denver and even St. Louis. Their favored prey is deer. We certainly have enough deer. Some would say too many. But the mountain lions’ disappearance is one of the reasons that whitetail deer have over populated parts of the Northeast. Also known as puma, catamount or cougar, mountain lions require a vast home range of 30 square miles. They average about 130 pounds but big males can weigh over 200 pounds. They are 5 to 9 feet long from nose to tip of tail. It is their long tail and larger size that clearly distinguishes them from much smaller bobcats which are plentiful in the Catskills. Historically mountain lions did once thrive in our hills and

valleys. That is fact. Cougars ranged from Canada to the tip of South America and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Unfortunately for them, they were prized by hunters and loathed by ranchers and farmers. Many states, including New York, placed lucrative bounties on their heads. The mountain lion east of the Rockies was trapped and hunted into oblivion. They are for the most part solitary creatures that prefer to hunt at night or dusk. With intense stealth they stalk then ambush their prey. Elusive and shy, cougar are seldom seen by humans even in areas where they are known to be. Unable to “roar,” their eerie calls mimic a woman’s scream or a wailing baby. Have mountain lions ever attacked humans? Indeed they have. Though extremely rare (more people are killed each year by lightening and snake bite) there are documented cases of mountain lion attacks on people. In April of 1994, 40-year old Barbara Schoener, was attacked as she jogged along a path in Auburn State Recreation Area 40 miles northeast of Sacramento, California. Her body was found the next day buried under leaves and branches, an instinctual act by the mountain lion in an effort to hide his quarry from hungry animals including other mountain lions. An autopsy showed that Miss Schoener was mauled once and somehow managed to escape but the mountain lion persisted and she was ultimately killed. The sad truth is mountain lions have a lot more to fear from humans than we do from them. Like the American bison, the passenger pigeon and the lynx, the once prevalent cougar has disappeared from over-hunting and human encroachment. New York State’s last documented mountain lion was killed in 1894. But don’t tell that to Mike Barber of Jeffersonville’s Rustic Cottage. “It was at dusk along Route 52 about a half mile outside of Lake Huntington. I have great far vision. My wife, Colleen

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saw it too. It ran low to the ground across the road in front of our car.” he exclaims, “I thought, Oh crap, we just saw a mountain lion!” Perhaps eye witnesses like Mike are just seeing large bobcats. But even the largest bobcat only weighs about thirty five pounds. “A bobcat has a short bobbed tail.” says Barber, “This had a great swoop tail.” Lt. Lindsley relates the story of an exasperated man who called in to report that he was driving near the Monticello Raceway and he had just hit a “black panther”. In the morning, an agent investigating the scene discovered a dead fisher. Fishers are large mammals related to mink and wolverine. Though fishers do populate our forests it is a rare treat to ever see one. “It was night and in the fleeting car lights I’m sure this fellow thought he saw what he thought he saw.” says Lindsley, “Fishers do have big fluffy tails. But come on, a large fisher is maybe fifteen pounds. A mountain lion is one hundred fifteen.” Mike Barber huffs, “Don’t ask the DEC. They’ll tell you they don’t exist.” There is a widely popular conspiracy theory that the DEC is quietly reintroducing the mountain lion in a secret effort to control the state’s deer population. Lt. Lindsley scoffs at the idea. “How would we do that? WHY would we do that?” There is one truly documented case of a mountain lion recently crossing through our area. In June of 2011 a male cougar was struck and killed by a car in Milford, Connecticut. Collected DNA proved that the cat’s genetics matched a known mountain lion population in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The half starved lion had travelled 1500 miles, possibly in search of a mate. It would have had to pass through New York State on its lovelorn journey. Could this mountain lion be a pioneer in a resurgence of wild mountain lions to the Catskills? Many naturalists believe they could make a comeback if humans would only allow them to do so. Moose have begun to repopulate parts of the Adirondacks, bald eagles have returned in healthy numbers to our area and coyote and wild turkey have surged back from rarely seen to commonplace. We often forget that we live among some of world’s most unspoiled countryside. Many of our communities border vast tracks of back country. Catskill Park encompasses over 700,000 acres of wilderness. Is it enough wild to support a population of lions? Lt. Lindsley smirks, “I had an uncle, an avid woodsman who went to his grave cursing me because he was convinced he had once seen a lion. Where is the proof? Where is the scat, the photograph, the tracks in the snow? Where is the mountain lion? Show me the proof. People want to believe there is something out there.”

Our editor, Scott Woods is a passionate naturalist, avid gardener and writer. He lives on on a small farm with his partner Albert and their dog Echo.

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YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN By Lynne Freda

I

I had just moved back to the Callicoon area after living happily in Florida for 26 years. Family matters made that choice for me. In Florida, I'd had a good job, loads of friends, a nice house and familiarity of the area, after living there so long. But the familiarity was nothing compared to what I felt at that moment when I passed the same person at the same time in the same place... I thought "Oh wow-- is this how it's going to be from now on?" It made me think long and hard about living here. It had taken me a year to decide whether or not to make the move back, but after drawing up countless pros and cons lists, I knew I had to come back here. My Dad had passed, and my Mom needed me. But as I looked in the rear view mirror on I-75 heading north, I realized this cold truth: besides my co-workers and close friends, no one really knew I had left. I had lived in Florida for 26 years, and I didn't make an impression on the public at large. Tampa was just too big a place for that. Now, after moving back and having to reintroduce myself to people who looked vaguely as I remember them, I wasn't sure if that familiarity was breeding contempt. After a few more weeks of relearning who local folks were, and hearing tales of our younger years, or having them ask about my Mom's health, or comment on my Dad's passing, (a recent event at that time), I realized this was a good thing-a great thing! People cared about me and my family! I wasn't an anonymous stranger to them. Where I lived in Florida, if you smiled at people and said hello, as I do here, I was often met with silence, or a downcast look so they

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article Photos by Dominick Capuzzi

t hit me as I was walking into Peck's Market  to get something for lunch. The person I just passed and smiled at was the same one I saw yesterday at the same time.. and in nearly the same location. When it happened the third day in a row, he joked, "We gotta stop meeting like this!" And we both laughed it off. But it hit me hard... while I smiled and made small talk, it was like the movie "Groundhog Day" where Bill Murray's character was stuck repeating the same day over and over again.

wouldn't have to make eye contact. They wouldn't know if I lived or died, and they wouldn't care. I wasn't a part of their lives or their routine. But not here in Sullivan County-- people genuinely care about other people. If I didn't go into Peck's for a few days, someone noticed and asked how I was. If I didn’t get our mail from the box for a couple days, my carrier brought it down to the house to check on our welfare. When I got a flat tire early on, three different people stopped to help and offer a ride if needed. That would never have happened in Florida, despite all my years of living there. It's simply too big and too busy for other folks to get involved. Now that I have been back for 8 years, I realize the comfort that comes from that small-town familiarity. People care about others... or maybe they just want to talk about someone else for some gossip relief. Doesn't matter-- people have hearts and souls here. I'm not the only person who moved away and then came back. Once I started reacquainting myself with people, I found some interesting life stories of local folks who grew up here, moved away, and decided to come back. For instance, Jeanne Sager, who writes a column for the Sullivan County Democrat. Jeanne has deep roots in the area. Her Grandfather started Eschenberg Mowers in Hortonville, which has serviced generations of local residents' lawn care needs, and her grandmother's family helped found White Sulphur Springs. Jeanne grew up in the area and graduated from NYU, where she met her husband, Jonathan. He was from Virginia, and they moved to the Tidewater area after they got married. Even though Jeanne enjoyed her job at a newspaper there, her "aha moment" came after the events of September 11, 2001. The couple had just spent a nice visit with family, and left to go back to Virginia the day before the attacks. But as that terrible autumn day unfolded, rumors swirled that other things were happening. Her hometown and her family were just two hours north of the fallen


Trade Center. Phone lines were overwhelmed, so Jeanne couldn't find out for certain if everyone was all right. She recounted the impotence she felt living away from family and friends. "Even though I knew Sullivan County was far enough away from New York City that everyone was likely OK, I was struck by a sense that I was so far away and so helpless."

more time with the baby, as grandparents do. Around the same time, Karl's own grandmother passed away, leaving the family farm in Bethel empty. "No one wanted to see the farm go out of the family," Karl said, "so my father offered it to us if we would come back home." He and his wife had always had that plan in the back of their minds, and that conversation "sealed the deal."

That pretty much made up Jeanne's mind, and as she struggled

So Karl and his wife Kathleen packed up and moved into the old

with the pros and cons of moving back, fortuitously, the Sullivan County Democrat (where she had interned in high school and college) called her and asked her if she would be interested in a job. Be it divine intervention or fate, Jeanne jumped at the chance. Though their blood had been thinned by southern living, the Sagers decided to move north.  Jonathan found a job locally, and besides the Democrat column, Jeanne writes a nationallyrecognized blog called "Inside Out Motherhood." They've since had a daughter, and they're very happy to be raising her in the area where Jeanne grew up. "My daughter plays with the children of my childhood friends, she took swimming lessons in the same pool where I learned to swim, and  I'm able to give her a sense of history and family."

farmhouse in Bethel. They are in the process of renovating it to accommodate their growing family... the Bresslers recently welcomed twins, a boy and a girl, to their brood.

Other people who've moved away and then come to our area share similar feelings about the pull of family ties. Karl Bressler, a local attorney, was a standout student and track star in the 1990's at Livingston Manor High School. College took him away, but after getting a degree and teaching high school history, he wasn't sure if that was the path he wanted to follow. Friends invited him to live with them in Virginia, and he changed his career, attending law school there. But talk about a night which changed his life: one night Karl was out with friends, and ran into his old girlfriend from Livingston Manor! She was pursuing her Master's at William and Mary. After getting over their shock at running into each other in Virginia, they got back together, and married a few years later. After their son was born, the visits back home were just too short. Both sets of grandparents lived in the Manor, and they desired

They're so happy they moved back, and Karl can’t wait to repeat his youthful experiences with his family. “We are looking forward to seeing our children running in the fields and playing in the woods like we did when we were kids." That's not to say they don't miss things here that they took for granted in Virginia, like a Starbucks less than a mile from their home in Williamsburg, or any type of restaurant or shop within a 10-minute drive, and good friends they made during their time away. But the Bresslers are back in Sullivan County for the long haul, and for them, Virginia is only a day's drive away. It's a common theme among local folks who move away: their kids don't get to know their grandparents, aunts and uncles, or cousins very well, and they want that to change. They want their kids to experience what they did growing up. For attorney Bill Chellis, a local man who had lived away for about 15 years, family is everything. He grew up here, graduated from Delaware Valley in Callicoon, then went on to SUNY, Villanova for his law degree, and a seminary in Pittsburgh. With a law degree and pastoral degree, Bill and his wife Katrina moved to Syracuse, then Rochester. He practiced law and was a full-time pastor, but remembered speaking of the importance of putting down roots with his congregation. "I often waxed on about the cultural cancer of mobility and the loss of place in modern life," recounted Bill. "The funny part was that I did it 5 hours or so from my actual homeland!" Later, when he

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 9


practiced law full-time, the Chellises realized it was time to "stop being hypocrites" as he put it, and "practice what they preached." That feeling really hit home for the Chellises a couple summers ago. They let their young daughter stay with the grandparents in Jeffersonville while Mom and Dad were back in Rochester.  But she got hurt on that vacation, and Bill and his wife were 5 hours away upstate. Bill said being so far away made him realize "every moment in life is truly precious." It made him re-think how far they lived from their family, and Bill turned pensive. "I was also worried that my children were growing up and calling somewhere home other than Jeffersonville. The sense of my kids being 'from' somewhere different than my wife and I struck us as problematic." So they moved back home, bought a home in Jeffersonville, opened his law practice with the help of his wife, and they are now raising their three children here. As they travel through different areas of Western Sullivan County, they share family history with their kids. Katrina's grandparents once owned the Lake Jeff Hotel. Bill's maternal grandparents owned the J.M. Schmidt store in North Branch, and his paternal grandparents had a farm on Swiss Hill. For me, every day when I go into work at the real estate firm founded by my dad more than 40 years ago, and which carries his name to this day, I always think about family. It helps that I work with my two brothers and my sister-in-law. But I know Dad would be happy and proud that I've come back here, as well as my older brother Joe, who with his wife Elise, moved back here themselves in the 1990's, after living and working in New Hampshire for several years. Again, the importance of family called. I enjoy seeing familiar faces and being able to identify someone by the car they drive, the dog they walk, or the hat they wear. It's a nice feeling to be greeted by a friend or acquaintance at a local restaurant or pancake breakfast, rather than just being considered another customer. My daughter marvels at the amount of people I know and the ease of our casual conversations, where we ask about each other's jobs and families, with real care and concern. I hope she picks that up and carries it with her into her future, wherever she lands. But, wherever that may be, I hope she'll always realize, despite what author Thomas Wolfe declared, "You CAN go home again."

Lynne Freda is a real estate agent at Matthew J. Freda Real Estate in Callicoon, N.Y., a family-owned and run local business. You can reach her at lynne@fredarealty.com she also worked in television news in Tampa, FL as a producer and executive producer for 26 years.

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Town Callicoon Town of of Callicoon DIRECTORY

Town Supervisor Town Clerk/Tax Collector Councilman Councilman Councilman Councilman Justice Justice Justice Clerk Highway Superintendent Attorney Sole Assessor Health Officer Registrar Dog Control Officer Historian Building Department Bookkeeper Planning Board 7pm) Plan/Zone Secretary Zoning Board Youngsville Water Supt. Town Barn Town Hall Town Fax

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Thomas Bose Janet Brahm Charles Schadt Scott Gaebel David Kuebler Howard Fuchs Edward McKenna James Hubert Kim Klein Kristofer Scullion Marvin Newberg Bonnie Hubert Dr. David Schwalb Janet Brahm William Romney Maureen Schlott Kevin Zieres (3-4pm) Joe Anne Baker Fred Fries

482-5390 ext. 311 482-5390 ext. 300 482-3205 482-5245 482-5772 482-4652 482-5131 482-4414 482-5390 ext. 301 482-5505 794-8415 482-5390 ext. 302 292-6630 482-5390 ext. 300 482-3707 482-4984 482-5390 ext. 308 482-5390 ext. 303 482-4299 (after

Sharon Erdman Kris Rasmussen Kevin Klein

932-8220 482-9066 482-3869 482-5505 482-5390 482-5030

AREA CODE (845)


Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 13


By Mariano Vidal

Flowers, Fishing and Opera

Yogi Berra once said,

You can see a lot just by observing. I don’t fish as much anymore, but when I did, I would try to be attentive to the fauna and flora that would coexist in the same realm as the wily trout. I would watch an osprey fly overhead, a mink in search of lunch or a flower in bloom. At the beginning, I always carried with me to the stream Art Flick’s Streamside Guide to Naturals and their Imitations, which is signed by the author along with the inscription, “I am glad you didn’t let anyone outbid you. Little by little, however, I started to empty my vest pockets and rely more on instinct, experience and yes, observation. In addition, I was not terribly concerned if I didn’t catch fish. One of the things I first noticed was that certain flowers bloomed when particular Mayflies hatched. This event, called phenology among scientific circles (to which I don’t belong), occurs when environmental conditions are ideal for two or more organisms. This phenomenon is nothing new, as several books have been written on the subject. One article, authored by a Charles Robertson and dating back to 1895 is titled, The Philosophy of Flower Seasons and the Phaenological Relations of the Entomophilous Flora and the Anthophilous Insect Fauna. I have never read it, never will, and just looked it up on the internet. However, please note that you will be tested at the end of this article and will be heavily penalized if you score low. There is also an illustrated pretty little book titled Trout Flies and Flowers, authored by Ivan Mahoney, who gives much credit to my friend, master angler and keen observer, Ed Lundquist. Crocus and daffodils first appear in synch with the early Quill Gordon Mayfly. You may also see the appropriately named trout lily here and there. Also edible ramps and fiddlehead ferns sprout. If you know where I can find a patch of these, please let me know. Blue Quills, who seem to prefer rainy days, soon follow. Hendricksons abound when the ragged forsythias start to show, although this may happen a bit earlier downstream, since this mechanism is also combined with altitude (and

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attitude). At this time, the shad are upstream on the Delaware and guess where the Shadbush gets its name? Trilliums, which like wet, shady spots, go hand-in-hand with the March Brown, an ephemerella which appears to be on steroids. Bigger still is the Green Drake, who is intertwined with rhododendrons irises and lilacs. Light Cahills abound throughout the summer along with lilies daisies. The tiny Tricos materialize in August along with black-eyed susans. Fish terrestrials, such as ants, beetles and crickets when cosmos and dahlias appear. If you don’t agree, or have experienced different concurrences, don’t write to the editor, as he wouldn’t have a clue and because there can be a marked difference in river and exact microclimate location. This is only my own general guide. So now, instead of having my cherished Art Flick book with me, or dialing the fishing hot-line, I check my wife’s garden before I struggle into my waders. Just like fishing and flowers, opera has been an important part of my life.


Preferring the solitude of smaller pools off the beaten path, I have been known to belt out an operatic aria or two at dusk. On one occasion, what I thought was a blue heron perched on a rock, started to wade towards the riverbank while reeling in. So much for my keen power of observation. The poor fellow probably thought that I suffered from an uncontrollable and incurable medical condition and wanted to get away post haste, creating a small wake. Flowers and fishing also play an abundant role in opera. In Georges Bizet‘s the Pearl Fishers, and appropriately so, Nadir, the tenor lead happens to be a fisherman. Also by Bizet, is Carmen, and this time the leading tenor, Don Jose, who at the beginning of the opera enters the stage as a gallant army officer is later reduced to a blabbering idiot by the captivatingly sultry Andalusian gypsy. In the 2nd Act he delivers “La fleur que tu m’avais jetee”, also known as the Flower Song:

The flower that you tossed at me, I kept while in prison. Withered and dry, It retained its fragrant aroma. I am not sure what type flower Carmen tossed Don Jose, but it may have been toxic. Unfortunately for Bizet, Carmen was a fiasco when it debuted and had to wait 10 years before it was considered a hit. Unfortunately, (again) he was already dead by the time. Leo Delibes opera Lakme, is set in 19th century British India. It contains the famous Flower Duet, and if you watch a lot of T.V., you probably have heard it as background music to an old airline commercial. The soprano dies honorably, committing suicide by eating the poisonous datura, also known as the very toxic angel’s trumpet. Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata is based on a play titled, The Lady of the Camelias, written by Alexander Dumas, fils (as in “junior”). Traviata literally means a fallen woman, as in the petals of a flower, or someone who has been deflowered, as is the case of the leading lady, Violetta, who conveniently happens to be a courtesan who favors camelias. Then there is Madame Butterfly (as in bush), Puccini also has the tenor, Pinkerton, deliver the short flowery aria, Addio Fiotito Asil (“Goodbye to this flowery refuge”) while the cherry blossoms are in bloom. The soprano then commits hara-kiri and probably with good reason. So between flowers, fishing and opera, you can see a lot just by observing.

Mariano Vidal is a registered architect. As a lyric tenor, he has performed at Carnegie Hall's Weill Recital, Town Hall and at the NJPAC. He is a member of The Lyric Quartet, who will perform throughout the year at the Parksville Music Festival. When not flyfishing, he enjoys helping his wife Susie around the garden.

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KENNETH C. KLEIN COUNSELOR AT LAW

TEL. 845-482-5039

RICHARD H. STAGL STONE CUTTER PATIO STONE • WALL STONE • VENEER • COPING • STAIR TREAD KENOZA LAKE, NY 12750

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JEFFERSONVILLE OFFICE 4880 State Route 52 (Main Street) P.O. Box 600 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 (845) 482-5000 LIBERTY OFFICE 2 School Street P.O. Box 670 Liberty, NY 12754 (845) 295-0100


June 1 • Summer Youth Program at Delaware Community Center Sign up for our fun-filled summer activities at the Youth Center, from 9-12 noon. Arts/Crafts & Environmental Program runs from July 1 – August 8, 2013 (6 weeks). Summer PEP/Sports Program runs from June 24 – August 16, 2013 (8 weeks). Swim lesson sign-up. Info: 887-5155. www.delawareyouthcenter.org 1-29: Farming with Kids – Fridays & Saturdays, 10 – 11:15 am - Children do farm chores (activities vary): milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horses, etc. Adults: $5.00. Children (age 4 and older): $4.00. Minimum of 5 people. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center NY 845-482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com 8 • Chicken BBQ, United Reformed Church, Youngsville.

Sullivan County Farmers’ Markets Jeffersonville - Thursdays July 4 - August 30, 3-6 p.m.

Parking lot of St. George’s Church

Callicoon - Sundays May 5 - Nov. 24, 11-2 p.m.

Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive

Liberty - Fridays June 7 - Oct. 11, 3-6 p.m.

Sullivan County Visitors Ass. parking lot, 100 Sullivan Avenue.

Kauneonga Lake - Fridays July 5 - Aug. 30, 3-6 p.m.

Firefighter’s Pavilion, 3594 Route 55 Cornell Cooperative Extension of Sullivan County, 292-6180, ext. 115 www.sullivancountyfarmersmarkets.org

8 • Trout Festival & Parade The 10th Annual Trout Parade will roll down Main Street at 1 p.m. with bands, floats, antique cars, musical performances, puppeteers, dancers and a whole lot of fun. 11 a.m. Festival begins. DOWNTOWN, Main Street, Livingston Manor. Info: 439-4227. 9 • Firemen’s Pancake Breakfast Come to the pancake breakfast at the Callicoon firehouse. 7 a.m-11 a.m., then join us for the tractor parade, chicken BBQ and afternoon events! 9 • Antique Tractor Parade, Parade honoring the heritage of farming and agriculture in western Sullivan County. Farming families spanning several generations show their tractors, both old and new. A chicken BBQ will be held after the parade. 12 Noon, Main Street, Callicoon. Info: 887-4444 or 570-224-4235. 9 • Jeffersonville Lion’s Club Golf Tournament. Swan Lake Golf & Country Club. 38 Eagle Dr. , Swan Lake. 1 p.m. Info: 482-4061. 15 • Chicken BBQ, North Branch firehouse, take-out only, 4-6 p.m. 17-Sept. 6 • Bridle Hill Summer Day Camp, A popular activity for all ages; drop in for one morning or an afternoon session, it is a-la-carte and includes a riding lesson and many educational horse activities with lots of other campers. The farm includes both indoor and outdoor riding arenas so come rain or shine.  Summer camp dates: Camp begins on  June 17, 2013 through September 6, 2013. Day times: Monday through Friday each week: AM Session: 9:00-12:00 p.m. and PM Session: 2:00-5:00 p.m. (3 hour sessions) Cost discount for pre purchase of five (5) days for nonconsecutive use package: AM session: $40 (per session) and PM session: $40 (per session). Info: 482-3993. 22-23 • Upper Delaware River Pedal Paddle, Paddle down the Delaware River by day and pedal at night under a full moon. This weekend long event has options for every level

18 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Photo by Dawn J. Benko

bicyclist.  Enjoy the beauty of the Upper Delaware River Valley from the roads and from the water. Eat farm fresh meals and roast marshmallows at a campfire. Narrowsburg, NY. For detailed description, visit www.paddlepedal.com 22 • Day to be Gay Festival A day of music, entertainment, food, drink and shopping. Celebrating the GLBT Community of the Catskills. 11-5 p.m. Hills Country Inn, Callicoon Center, NY. Info: 583-3141 23 • A Lotta Ricotta Saturday 10:30-12:30 p.m. Make whole milk ricotta cheese. Learn ways to serve it. Sample local artisan cheese. $40.00. Reservations required. Proceeds to benefit the Sullivan County Farm network. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center. Info: 482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com 26 - August 28 • Callicoon Center Band Concerts, Every Wednesday night 8 p.m. at the Callicoon Center Band Stand. Bring a blanket or lawn chair, rain or shine. Though the concerts are free, a "cigar box" is passed at intermission for those who wish to make a donation of choice for the band. Refreshments are available at the Country Store and the Fire House- provided by the Ladies Auxillary. 30 • Motorcycle/Antique Car Poker Run Sign-up begins at 9 a.m. Jeffersonville Firehouse. Info: 482-4289.


July 1 • Delaware Community Center Pool opens and swimming lessons begin. Info: 887-5155. www.delawareyouthcenter.org. 4 • Narrowsburg Fire Department Parade & Chicken BBQ Info: 252-3328. www.narrowsburgfd.com 5-27: Farming with Kids – Fridays & Saturdays, 10-11:15am - Children do some farm chores (activities vary): milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horses, etc. Adults: $5.00. Children (age 4 and older): $4.00. Minimum of 5 people. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center NY. Info: 845482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com 5-6 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-3 p.m. 6 • Bake Sale Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church. 9 a.m. until sold out. 6 • Independence Day Parade & Festival Parade line-up will be at the Roscoe Central School Parking Lot at 10 a.m. Parade begins at 11 a.m. All are welcome to participate. All marchers are welcome and encouraged to march. Craft show, 10-4 p.m. All sorts of wares. Fun for the entire family! The Roscoe Fire Department will be selling their delicious barbecue chicken. Info: 607-498-5347 6 • Unveiling of Memorial Window in honor of Francis Curey, WWII awarded Medal of Honor. Sullivan County Historical Society, 265 Main St., Hurleyville, NY. Info: 845-434-8044 6 • Founders Day Street Fair Specials at local shops, street vendors, live

Photo by Dominick Capuzzi

music, children’s activities, art shows and more! 3rd St., Wurtsboro, NY. Info: 845-283-3361 7 • Chicken Barbecue Hortonville Fire Department, take out only. 13 • Callicoon Creek Park “Under the Moon in Callicoon” Concert Series Are you ready for a night in the Park? For a starlight picnic? Bring a friend. Tuck in with a blanket. Get comfy in a lawn chair. There's nothing quite like a concert under a River Basin sky. Featuring Elizabeth Rose & Brewster Smith and Doug Rogers & Hoy Polloy, 8 p.m., Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive, Callicoon. Info: callicooncreekpark.blogspot.com 19-20 • Giant Old Time Bazaar Games of all kinds, including Spindle, Over & Under, Coin Toss, Ring Toss, Big Six Wheel, Dart Wheel, Pokerino, Penny Pitch and the ever popular, Ballette. This wonderful family event also has a Children’s Corner with ten games just for kids. Music and food. Purchase pies and other baked goods. Home made items for sale, and door prizes. 6-10 p.m. at St. Francis Church, Rte 52, in Youngsville. Info: 482-4292 or 482-4360. (Raindate July 21) 20 • Horse Show/Lions Club Charity Show, 9 a.m., all day, Stone Wall Farms, Jeffersonville, NY. Info: 482-3330. 21 • The River Run 5K Race down River Road in Callicoon, flat course along the scenic Delaware River. 8 a.m. Info: 887-5155. www.delawareyouthcenter.org.

21 • A Lotta Ricotta Saturday 10-12:30 p.m. Make whole milk ricotta cheese. Learn ways to serve it. Sample local artisan cheese. 10:30-12:30 p.m. $40.00. Reservations required. Proceeds to benefit the Sullivan County Farm network. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center. Info: 482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com 21 • Pancake Breakfast 7 a.m.-12 Noon, Jeffersonville Fire Dept. at firehouse. 27 • Callicoon Creek Park “Under the Moon in Callicoon” Concert Series Are you ready for a night in the Park? For a starlight picnic? Bring a friend. Tuck in with a blanket. Get comfy in a lawn chair. There's nothing quite like a concert under a River Basin sky. Featuring Janet Burgan Barbecue Bob and the Spareribs, 8 p.m., Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive, Callicoon. Info: callicooncreekpark.blogspot.com 27-28 • Civil War Encampment The 25th Annual Civil War Encampment and Battle Reenactment will be held at Walnut Mountain Park (off Route 55 West) in the town of Liberty, New York. Come view the daily routines of the Civil War soldiers from both the Union and Confederate standpoints. Watch full scale battles unfold as if on a huge outdoor theater screen. Re-enactors will entertain you with scenarios. All this will be performed in a very authentic 19th century atmosphere. You also may visit sulter row where the re-enactors purchase their equipment. There is an on-site concession for food and drink. Bring light lawn chairs to view bat-

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 19


tles. Gates are open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, and from 9 a.m. to the conclusion of the battle on Sunday. 5 and under are free; Adults: $10; Seniors: $8; Groups of 8 or more: $8 per person. www.143rdnewyorkvolunteers.org 27 • Chicken Barbecue & Bake Sale Kenoza Lake Fire Department at firehouse. 4:30-6:30 p.m. 27 • Callicoon Street Fair Vendors line the main streets of Callicoon with merchandise from A-Z. Food, music, and entertainment complete the days' activities. Wander along the historic streets, view the architecture, and admire the beautiful Delaware River. 9-4 p.m. Info: 887-5640. 27 • Old Time Fair & BBQ Od fashioned activities such as horseshoe pitching, corn shucking and lady’s skillet throwing, children’s old fashioned games, ice cream making demonstration and tasting, Chestnut Creek ball race, pie auction, local history exhibits, spinning and quilting demonstrations. Plenty of free parking and admission is FREE, with only a nominal fee for some games and food. Grahamsville Fairgrounds, Rte. 55, Grahamsville, NY. Info: 985-7700. 28 • Riverfest, a music, art and environmental festival featuring artists & artisans, a kids korner, live poster auction, live music and great food. Downtown Narrowsburg. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Info: 252-7576. 28 • Pancake Breakfast, Youngsville Fire Department at firehouse, 7-12 Noon. 28 • Family Fun Day, Family Day is designed for families with children ages 5-12, but older and younger siblings, as well as parents, grandparents, and other family members, will find something to do. We encourage families to make a day of it by bringing a picnic lunch and enjoying the beautiful Bethel Woods environment. Have fun with your family at Family Day!11-3 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org 28 • Solar Sundays 1-3 pm - Introduction to renewable energy and tour of on-site systems (wind turbine, solar

20 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Photo by Jeremy Frank

electric, solar thermal) with full financial information included. Reservations. $20.00/person. Minimum 4 people. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center NY 845-4824764. www.applepondfarm.com

August 1, 2, 3, 4 • MazFest Music Festival 2013 Roscoe’s Fireman’s Field, 297 Gulf Road, Roscoe, NY. For more info www.mazmyth.com August 2-31 • Farming with Kids Fridays and Saturdays 10 a.m. Kids do some real farm chores! Milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horse, etc. Activities vary. $5.00 adults, $4.00 children over 3. Minimum of 5 people. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road. Callicoon Center. No reservations needed. Info: 482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com 2 • Old Time Fiddlers Jeffersonville Firehouse, 6:30 p.m. 2-3 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-3 p.m. 3 • Jeffersonville Fire Department’s 125th Anniversary Celebration Bag Pipes and regional fire depts. will participate in parade with their antique trucks and


Photo by Jeremy Frank

equipment. Parade line-up at Noon on Willy Avenue, parade starts at 1 p.m and ends in field at Dick’s Auto Sales in Kohlertown. Beer tent, food vendors, D.J. and huge inflatables for the kids. Info: 845-866-0889

Woods, Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 295-2446. September 1- Rosehaven Alpaca Festival September 8 - Sullivan County Heritage Faire. Revolution to Revolution – the 1760’s to the 1960’s. September 15 - World Celebration Festival September 22 - Earth Day in Autumn and the Live Well, Be Well Event Sept. 29 - Rustic for the Home Exploration of Crafts with a Focus on the Home

4 • Pancake Breakfast Callicoon Center Fire Dept. at firehouse. 9, 10, 11 • Sullivan County Democrat Men’s Golf Tournament, Villa Roma Country Club. Reservations Required. Info: 887-5200. 10 • Callicoon Creek Park “Under the Moon in Callicoon” Concert Series Are you ready for a night in the Park? For a starlight picnic? Bring a friend. Tuck in with a blanket. Get comfy in a lawn chair. There's nothing quite like a concert under a River Basin sky. Featuring Little Sparrow and Gone Fishin' Band, 8 p.m., Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive, Callicoon. Info: callicooncreekpark.blogspot.com 10, 17, 24, 31 • Rummage Sale Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-1 p.m. 11 • For the Love of Horses 1-3pm - Featuring draft, carriage and riding horses. Demonstrations of pulling logs, driving to carriage. $8.00/person. Minimum of 8 people. Reservations preferred. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center NY 845-4824764 www.applepondfarm.com 12 • Sullivan Renaissance Awards Ceremony held at SUNY Sullivan, 112 College Road, Loch Sheldrake. 6 p.m. Info: 295-2445. 16, 17, 18 • 134th Little World’s Fair Grahamsville Fairgrounds, sponsored by Neversink Agricultural Society. Rides, games, entertainment, exhibits, food. Fireworks on Saturday night. Fri-Sat, 9-11p.m.; Sun. 10-7 p.m. Info: 985-2500. www.grahamsvillefair.com 17-18 • Bagel Festival Saturday will feature a parade, celebs, digintaries, the making of the worlds longest bagel chain, the worlds largest tye dye peace sign bagel, bagel and food vendors, music, and more. Sunday will include Bagels and Brunch on Broadway. Local farmers and their

produce/food will be brought together with celebrity chefs to create a brunch type dish. Saturday, 10-5 p.m. Free; Sunday, 10 -2 p.m. Tickets will be available on site for brunch. Broadway, Monticello. Info: 845-665-9230 24 • JACC Town Wide Yard Sale & Flea Market in Jeffersonville & Youngsville A fun day of hunting for bargains & unique items throughout both communities & villages! 9-3 p.m. For vendor space or to have your yard sale listed, contact The Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce at 845-482-5688 Follow us on Facebook @ facebook.com/JACC Yardsale

Farmers Market, Diverse Craft Village, Festival Foods, Live Music, Children's Area with art activities and community performances , Corn and Hay Mazes, Arts, Pony Ride and more! Admission is FREE and Parking is $2.00. No pets allowed on grounds.

24 • Annual Community Yard Sale at the Delaware Youth Center. Rent a space, sell your stuff! For information call 887-5634.

7-28 • Farming with Kids Saturdays, 10-11:15am - Children do some farm chores (activities vary): milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horses, etc. Adults: $5.00. Children (age 4 and older): $4.00. Minimum of 5 people. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center NY 845-482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com

7 • Bag Day Benefit Kenoza Lake United Methodist Church at church. 9-1 p.m.

24 • Annual Hortonville Parade & Field Day, Hortonville Fire Department’s annual parade and field day starts at Noon on Main Street, Hortonville, followed by games and food (including chicken barbeque) at the firemen’s field. Fun for all ages. 24 • Callicoon Creek Park “Under the Moon in Callicoon” Concert Series Are you ready for a night in the Park? For a starlight picnic? Bring a friend. Tuck in with a blanket. Get comfy in a lawn chair. There's nothing quite like a concert under a River Basin sky. Featuring Black Onion and Whiskey Bent, 8 p.m., Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive, Callicoon. Info: callicooncreekpark.blogspot.com

September 1-29 • Harvest Festival at Bethel Woods Sundays through September, 11-4 p.m. Bethel

8 • Grover Hermann Benefit Pancake Breakfast, 7-12 Noon. Hortonville firehouse. 10 • Jeff Lions Rabies Clinic, Jeff Firehouse, 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Info: 482-3330. 10-June 17, 2014 • Bridle Hill Farm After School, Riding Educational Program, Five (5) week session after school program (SWCS bus drop off point – “Money” bus with driver Ms. Roseta Rosa) Begins September 10th, 2013 through June 17th, 2014, Two (2) hours after school once per week (except no program when school is not in session.) Every Tuesday @ 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM; Total cost $90 per child ($18 per student for two hours once per week.) Includes riding, horse care, feeding,

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 21


grooming basics, hoof health, tacking, blanketing, barn activities, and cleanup. Info: 482-3993.

Photo by Dominick Capuzzi

14 • Pancake Breakfast, 7-12 Noon. Presbyterian Church, Jeffersonville.

October

14 • 22nd Annual VonSteuben Day Parade & German Festival, Parade 12 Noon. Entertainment, vendors & ethnic food and children’s activities following at Firemen's Field, Yulan.

5-19: Farming with Kids – Saturdays, 10-11:15am - Children do some farm chores (activities vary): milking goats, feeding chickens, gathering eggs, grooming horses, etc. Adults: $5.00. Children (age 4 and older): $4.00. Minimum of 5 people. No reservations needed. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center, NY. Info:845-482-4764. www.applepondfarm.com

14 • Tractor Parade & Duck Race Come down to Jeffersonville for a great day filled with fun activities for the whole family! Festival starts off with the 3rd annual Tractor Parade at 11 a.m. on Main Street. Watch area Farmers drive their Tractor's down Main St, ranging from old to new! Join in the Festivities! Followed by the Annual Duck Race at 1 p.m. at Mill Pond and ends at The Schadt Memorial Bridge (footbridge near Gazebo on Main Street). 3,400 ducks have raced in prior years! Race benefits community improvements and spondored by JEMS. Info: 482-3731 15 • 84th SCVFA Sullivan County Firemens Association Parade Rock Hill, 2 p.m. 21 • Chicken BBQ, United Reformed Church, Youngsville. 21 • A Lotta Ricotta 1-3pm - Make whole milk ricotta cheese. Learn ways to serve it. Sample local artisanal cheeses. $40.00 Reservations required. Proceeds to benefit the Sullivan County Farm Network. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center NY 845-482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com 28-29 • National Alpaca Farm Days Visit our area alpaca farms and learn all about alpacas. Imagine! Alpacas will have their farm open to visitors on Sat. and Sun. from 10-4 p.m., located at 132 E. Hill Road, Jeffersonville, 845-231-3315, Nature’s Reserve Alpacas will have their farm open on Saturday from 2-4 p.m., located at 408 River Road, Callicoon, 845-887-2012. 29 • Pancake Breakfast, 7-12 Noon. North Branch Fire Department at firehouse.

5 • 3rd Annual Wine Festival, 11-4 p.m., More than 20 regional wineries will gather once again at Bethel Woods Center for the Arts. The Wine Festival will feature tastings from wineries in the Hudson Valley and Finger Lakes region, all of which will be available for sale. $15.00 Tasting Fee with wine glass $5.00 GA / Designated Driver. 200 Hurd Rd., Bethel, NY. Info: 800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org 5 • Penny Social, Doors open 6:00 p.m. Calling 8 p.m., benefit of St. Francis RC Church, Youngsville firehouse. 12 • Craft Beer Festival & Annual Chili Cook-off, An outdoor beer, food and music festival designed to stimulate and educate your palate through local food and unbelievable New York beer. Craft beers from over 25 breweries will be available for sampling against a backdrop of live music and the site of the 1969 Woodstock festival. The spacious Market Sheds at Bethel Woods will also be the place for local food favorites for sale by a selection of vendors. Shop for merchandise from your favorite brewery and related products from carefully selected vendors. A $40 per person ticket includes a commemorative glass and unlimited sampling. Tickets, if available, will be $45 at the gate. Only a limited number of tickets will be sold. Admission also includes a sampling glass, tasting notebook, LIVE MUSIC from national and regional bands and guest speakers featuring brewing techniques and cooking with beer. A VIP Sampling Pass is available for $75 per person and includes the above, plus one hour early access to the breweries, reserved

22 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Photo by Iain Kennedy

14 • Chicken BBQ, benefit for Hortonville Presbyterian Church. Pre-orders only: $9. Pick-up between 4-5:30 p.m. at Hortonville firehouse. Info: 887-4214.

seating in front of the Festival Stage, souvenir shirt and laminate , and admission to The Museum at Bethel Woods. A $15 designated driver ticket is available and includes Museum admission. You must be 21+ years of age to purchase sampling tickets and valid ID is required for admission. Event staff reserves the right to refuse service to anyone at anytime. The traditional Chili Day in October Chili Cook-off will take place inside the Event Gallery and will feature sampling and voting for a $2 donation to benefit participating organizations. Tickets to the Craft Beer Festival not required for admission to the Chili Cook-off. 200 Hurd Rd., Bethel, NY. Info: 800-745-3000 12-13 • TroutOberFest, A 2-day fly fishing event featuring fly tyers, instructional classes, presentations, new products, special deals and more. A great chance to meet other fly anglers, share stories, and hit the river for some fall fishing. 52 Stewart Ave., Roscoe, NY. Info: 607-4985194. 12 • Roast Beef Dinner, Kenoza Lake Fire Dept. at firehouse. 4:00-7:30 p.m. 13 • A Little Bit of Everything at Apple Pond Farm, 10am-1pm - Feeding animals, milking goats, grooming horses, gardening...and more. $5.00/person, all ages. Proceeds to benefit the Sullivan County Farm Network. Apple Pond Farm, 80 Hahn Road, Callicoon Center NY 845-482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com 19 • Roast Beef Dinner 4:30 p.m.- 8:30 p.m Jeffersonville Fire Dept. at firehouse. Info: 482-4289. 19 • Dog Costume Parade and Anniversary Party at Towne Gift Shoppe


Western Sullivan Public Library Offers a wide variety of programs for all ages at all three branches. Visit wsplonline.org periodically!

Join us for our 3rd year anniversary celebration. Prizes for 3 categories. Refreshments, sales and fun. Parade line-up 1 p.m. Parade starts at 1:15. Info: 482-4182. 20 • Chicken BBQ Take-out Callicoon Center Fire Dept. at firehouse. 26 • Delaware Youth Center’s Halloween Extravaganza... Children’s Costume Parade and Party: The Delaware Youth Center sponsors a children's costume parade down Main Street. Line up 12:45 pm behind the Delaware Free Library and parade begins at 1 p.m. Games and treats at the youth center following the parade. Halloween Dance: Adult costume party; Live band, prizes for best costumes 8 p.m. -12 midnight. Bring your own refreshments. For information call 887-5155. All are welcome. For information call 887-5155. Delaware Youth Center, Callicoon. www.delawareyouthcenter.org. 26 • 87th Annual Roast Beef Dinner 4:30-9 p.m., Youngsville Fire Dept. at firehouse. 31 • Halloween Parade & Costume Judging, Jeffersonville Lions Club Annual Halloween Party & Parade. Line-up 6 p.m. on Center Street near Library. March to firehouse, costume judging and refreshments. Info: 482-3330 or 482-4661.

29-Dec. 24 • Deck the Halls in Jeffersonville, come to town to find unique gifts for a great price at our local shops. For each purchase you make at participating shops, you will be entered to win a gift certificate to the shop of your choice or gift basket. Info: 482-5688. 30-Dec. 1 • Handmade for the Holidays Quality Craft Fair, 11-4 p.m. at Duke’s Pottery, 855 Cty. Rd. 93, Roscoe. Info: 607-498-5207

December

Summer Reading Program

July 8 through August 8 at all three branches. Visit our website for registration and updates, www.wsplonline.org.

Story Time

Story Time at all three branches--starting this Fall (and Spring 2014). Mondays at Narrowsburg, 1:00-200 p.m.; Thursdays at Callicoon, 10:00-11:00 a.m.; Thursdays at Jeffersonville, 1:00-2:00 p.m.

Book Sales

7 • Christmas in Callicoon, Children's Christmas Party from 1-3 p.m. at the Delaware Community Center. Arts and crafts projects for holiday giving, cupcake decorating, photos with Santa for a nominal fee. Info: 887-5155. www.delawareyouthcenter.org.

July 27 • 9-4pm Annual Callicoon Street Fair Book Sale, Main Street, Callicoon. August 9, 10, 11 • 9-3pm Annual Firehouse Book Sale at Jeffersonville Firehouse.

7-8 • Handmade for the Holidays Quality Craft Fair, 11-4 p.m. at Duke’s Pottery, 855 Cty. Rd. 93, Roscoe. Info: 607-498-5207.

Holiday Book Sale TBA, Jeffersonville Library.

14 • Santa Visits Jeffersonville Santa and his Elves will be visiting in the lobby of Jeff Bank in Jeffersonville from 12:30-3:30 p.m. Come for a visit and have your photo taken with Santa! There will be cookies, hot chocolate and Christmas coloring pages to take home or give to Santa. Sponsored by Jeff Bank and Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce. Suggested donation $3.00 with proceeds donated to the local food bank. For more info: 482-5688.

November

14-15 • Handmade for the Holidays Quality Craft Fair, 11-4 p.m. at Duke’s Pottery, 855 Cty. Rd. 93, Roscoe. Info: 607-498-5207

5 • Election Day Soup & Chili Sale, Kenoza Lake Methodist Church at Kenoza Lake firehouse. 11 a.m. until sold out.

2014 Calendar

First Fridays: Contemporary Author Series 1st Friday of each month through December 2013. And April through December 2014. Open mic 7:30 p.m., visiting author 8 p.m. at Tusten-Cochecton Branch, Narrowsburg.

Book Discussion Group

Narrowsburg branch--meets the 3rd Friday of each month, 4:00 p.m.

Chess for Fun

Every Friday at the Narrowsburg branch, 6:00 p.m.

Knitwitz Knitting Group

Jeffersonville branch - meets the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of each month, 6:30 p.m.

10 • Pancake Breakfast, Hortonville Volunteer Fire Co., at firehouse. 7-12 Noon.

January TBA • Annual Ice Carnival, Professional figure skating exhibition, snow sculpture contest. Sponsored by Livingston Manor Rotary at Rotary Park. Info: 439-5793.

29-30 • Holiday Craft Fair Unique assortment of merchandise for holiday shopping. Delaware Community Center, Callicoon, 9-4 p.m. Info: 887-5634. www.delawareyouthcenter.org.

January • Indoor Winter Farmers’ Market, held every other Sunday at the Delaware Youth Center, Callicoon, NY. 11-2 p.m. Info: 292-6180, ext. 115 www.sullivancountyfarmersmarkets.org

Public Computer Center

29 • Annual James Dworetsky Memorial Holiday Parade, 7p.m., Main Street, Jeffersonville. After parade visit with Santa at Jeffersonville firehouse. To enter a float or participate, call 482-4151.

January TBA • Annual Eaglefest Narrowsburg. Live bird demonstrations, observation, guest lectures, films, poster auction, eagle art. 9:30-4:30 p.m. Info: 252-6509. www.dveaglealliance.org

Wednesdays in Callicoon: Class 10 a.m. -12 p.m. Support 1-4 p.m.

9 • Ham & Turkey Raffle, Callicoon Center Fire Dept.

Pumpkin Decorating

October, TBA • All three branches Mondays in Narrowsburg: Support 1-4 p.m. Class 4-6 p.m. Tuesdays in Jeffersonville: Support 1-6 p.m.

Fridays in Jeffersonville: Support 1-3 p.m. Class 5-7 p.m.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 23


Specializing in Burgers, Steaks & Wings

WELSH CABIN

Monday Wednesday Thursday Friday 3:00 pm to close

Saturday Sunday 12 Noon to close

845-482-3802

495 Hessinger-Lare Road, Jeffersonville, NY 12748

Serving Every Day Except Tuesday- Closed February 9 • Pancake Breakfast 7-12 Noon, Youngsville Fire Dept. at firehouse. February 14-March 15 • Annual Global Home Floor Model Sale, 4929 Main St., Jeffersonville, NY. Info: (845) 482-3652. www.globalhomeny.com March 15 • St. Patrick’s Day Parade Parade starts at 1 p.m., Main Street, Jeffersonville. Sponsored by the Jeffersonville Fire Department. To participate or enter a float in parade, call 482-4289. April TBA • Roast Beef Dinner Callicoon Center Fire Dept. at firehouse. April 12 • Easter Egg Hunt 11 a.m. Delaware Youth Center. Info: 887-5155. April 13 • Kiwanis Palm Sunday Pancake Breakfast Benefit the youth of the community held at Delaware Community Center. 7-12 Noon. April TBA • Annual Talent Show Hortonville Presbyterian Church, Hortonville, 7:30 p.m. Info: 887-4346. April TBA • 13th Annual Chicken BBQ Take-out Jeffersonville Fire Dept. 1-4 p.m. until gone. Info: 482-4289. April 1 • Opening Day of Trout Season at Catskill Fly Fishing Center & Museum Open house, Guest fly tier, lunch and demonstrations. Info: 439-4810. April 1 • Trout Season, Opens countywide, 794-3000, Ext. 6681. April 26 • Annual Roast Beef Dinner, North Branch Fire Dept., 4-9 p.m. at firehouse. May TBA • Foodstock - Fine Food and Wine Festival. You'll shop and taste samples of food, wine and specialty products from over 50 vendors! Held in Tennis Building at Villa Roma, 11-3 p.m. Info: 845482-4141. May 3 • Penny Social, St. Francis Church at Youngsville firehouse, 6 p.m. May 4 • Pancake & French Toast Breakfast, Kenoza Lake Fire Dept. at firehouse, 7-11:00 a.m. May 11 • Mother’s Day Pancake Breakfast, Hortonville Volunteer Fire Co., at firehouse. 7-12 Noon. May 26 • Annual Fremont Memorial Day Parade, the second longest running parade in New York State. The Parade begins at 10 a.m. at the Fremont Post Office and proceeds to the ball fields.

J. Josef Stuehlerʼs Musical Institute in Jeffersonville, NY

24 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014


Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 25


REAL ESTATE • BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS ESTATES & WILLS

MARTIN S. MILLER Attorney at Law Representing clients in Sullivan, Delaware, Orange and Ulster Counties since 1975.

(845) 482-4200 • (845) 794-4440 Jeffersonville - Monticello martin.s.miller@verizon.net

26 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014


June 1 (Saturday) Concert: David Driver “On the Twentieth Century,” reinventing some of the best songs of the last century, with special guest Blythe Gurda, sponsored and presented by DVAA, 8 p.m., Tusten Theatre, 210 Bridge Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Admission: 252-7272. www.ArtsAllianceSite.org June 1 - June 9 Special Exhibit: Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Livingston Manor Trout Parade. CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Gallery Hours: Thurs.Sat. & Mon. , 11-6 p.m. Sun. 11-3 p.m. Info: 845-436-4227 June 8 (Saturday) Concert: Christine Lavin, sponsored and presented by RiverFolk Concerts, 8 p.m., The Cooperage, 1030 Main Street, Honesdale, PA. Raffle to benefit Delaware Valley Arts Alliance. Admission: 252-6783. www.ArtsAllianceSite.org June 9 (Sunday) Concert: Sullivan County Community Chorus presents “L’Chaim,” a spring concert under the baton of Kevin J. Giroux, Immaculate Conception Church, Woodbourne, NY. Info: Lucille Horton, 794-7869. June 11 - 16 (Tuesday - Sunday) Theatre: Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, 8 p.m. (2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Wednesday and 3 p.m. Sunday), Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Box office: 794-1194. June 14 - July 6 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: “Perhaps in a Dream, Joe Statuto photography, sponsored and presented by DVAA, Alliance Gallery, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10-4 p.m. Free. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, June 14, 7-9 p.m. www.ArtsAllianceSite.org June 14 - July 6 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: Matt Pozorski, sculpture and drawing, sponsored and presented by DVAA, Loft Gallery, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10-4 p.m. (and seasonally, Sundays,11-3 p.m.). Free. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, June 14, 7-9 p.m. www.ArtsAllianceSite.org June 15 (Saturday) Celtic Woman Pavilion Stage, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-7453000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org June 15 (Saturday) The Subtle Body, NACL Theater, 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY, 7:30 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org June 15 – July 14 CAS Summer Members Show Opening Reception 6-8 p.m. CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Gallery Hours: Thurs.- Sat. & Mon., 11-6 p.m. Sun. 11-3 p.m. Info: 845-436-4227

June 15 (Saturday) Craft Show: Audubon Craft Festival 10-5 p.m., Livingston Manor, NY. Info: 439-4325 or www.sullivanaudubon.org. June 18 - 30 (Tuesday - Sunday) Theatre: “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, 8 p.m. (2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Wednesday and 3 p.m. Sunday), Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Box office: 794-1194. June 20 (Thursday) Hot Tuna with special guest Jill Sobule Event Gallery, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-7453000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org June 21 (Friday) Gay Pride Dance, 7-11 p.m., Catskill Distilling Co., 2037 Route 17B, Bethel, NY.

Cultural Events Calendar

June 22 (Saturday) Festival: Day to Be Gay Festival, Noon to 5 p.m., Hills Country Inn, 6 Hills Resort Rd, Callicoon Center, NY. June 22 (Saturday) Joan Baez & Indigo Girls Pavilion Stage, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-7453000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org June 23 (Sunday) Wormholes, 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY, 4:00 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org June 29 (Saturday) HEART and Jason Bonham's LED ZEPPELIN Experience Pavilion Stage, 7:30 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

JULY July 2 (Tuesday) Dave Matthews Band with special guest Fitz and the Tantrums Pavilion Stage, 7:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-7453000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 2 - 14 (Tuesday - Sunday) Theatre: Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5,” a Forestburgh Playhouse production, 8 p.m. (2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Wednesday and 3 p.m. Sunday), Forestburgh Playhouse, 39 Forestburgh Road, Forestburgh, NY. Box office: 794-1194. July 6 (raindate, July 7) (Saturday) Artwalk/chalkwalk: featuring local artists and craftspeople, 10-4 p.m., from WaterWheel Junction on Main Street to theLivingston Manor library. Maps will be available of artist/craft vendor positions. For additional information call 439-4325 or visit www.livingstonmanor.org. July 7 (Sunday) Counselor-in-Training Program A Performing Arts Community Service Opportunity for Teens Grades 11 and 12 8:30 a.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road,

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CONCERTS. RECITALS. THEATER. EXHIBITS. MUSIC & ARTS. FESTIVALS. MUSEUMS. Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 27


Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 12 - August 3 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: “Amusing the Muse,” Richard Gubernick drawings, sponsored and presented by DVAA, Alliance Gallery, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10-4 p.m. Sundays from 11-3 p.m. Free. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, July 12, 7-9 p.m. www.ArtsAllianceSite.org July 12 - August 3 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: Edward Evans & Joyce Pommer paintings, sponsored and presented by DVAA, Loft Gallery, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10-4 p.m., Sundays, 11-3 p.m. Free. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, July 12, 7-9 p.m. www.ArtsAllianceSite.org July 12 - 14 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: “Art in Bloom,” a group show of art with interpretive floral arrangements by local garden clubs and master gardeners, sponsored and presented by DVAA, Krause Recital Hall, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday Saturday, 10-4 p.m. Free. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, July 12, 7-9 p.m. www.ArtsAllianceSite.org July 12 (Friday) Big Time Rush & Victoria Justice with special guest Olivia Sutherland Pavilion Stage, 7:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-7453000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 13 (Saturday) Concert: Bob Malone, sponsored and presented by RiverFolk Concerts, 8 p.m., The Cooperage, 1030 Main Street, Honesdale, PA. Info: 252-6783. July 13 (Saturday) Callicoon Creek Park “Under the Moon in Callicoon” Concert Series Are you ready for a night in the Park? For a starlight picnic? Bring a friend. Tuck in with a blanket. Get comfy in a lawn chair. There's nothing quite like a concert under a River Basin sky. Featuring Elizabeth Rose & Brewster Smith and Doug Rogers & Hoy Polloy, 8 p.m., Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive, Callicoon. Info: callicooncreekpark.blogspot.com July 14 (Sunday) Opening Day on the Lawn offers Bach Chorale Preludes, a Borodin String Quartet, and a host of familiar, beloved tunes all arranged for winds. Judith Pearce, flute; Matt Sullivan, oboe; Pavel Vinnitsky, clarinet; Adam Schommer, French horn; Gina Cuffari, bassoon. Presbyterian Church, Route 52, Jeffersonville, NY. 3 p.m. Weekend of Chamber Music,Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 887-5803. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 18 (Thursday) MusicTalks! with Transprovisations means improvisation in various styles and mixed

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media performance art, plus discussion and demonstration of how improv invigorates the composition and the performance of written music. Andrew Waggoner, composer/violin; Caroline Stinson, cello; Matt Sullivan, oboe and Ken Cro-Ken, painter. Olde North Branch Inn, North Branch, NY. 7:30 p.m. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 887-5803. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 19 (Friday) Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons Pavilion Stage, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-7453000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 20 (Saturday) Celebrate 20 with WCM! Saturday Night in the Barn pays tribute to flutist and WCM founder Judith Pearce. Music includes a Martinu Trio, Beethoven’s Piano Sonata Op. 109, Maw’s “Night Thoughts” for solo flute, Bach Chorale Preludes and Harbison’s Songs America Loves to Sing. Judith Pearce, flute; Pavel Vinnitsky, clarinet; Anna Lim, violin; Caroline Stinson, cello; Tannis Gibson, piano; Andrew Waggoner, violin. Eddie Adams Barn, North Branch Road, Jeffersonville, NY. Preconcert talk 7 p.m.; concert 8 p.m. Refreshments follow. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 887-5803. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 20 (Saturday) Natalie Merchant with The Hudson Valley Philharmonic Randall Craig Fleischer, conductor Pavilion Stage, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-7453000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 20 – August 25 Third Exhibition, Large Paintings and Small Watercolor/Collages of Lisa Samalin and Found Objects and Image Staining of Charles Wilkin, Artist Talk 3 p.m., Opening Reception 4-6 p.m. CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Gallery Hours: Thurs.- Sat. & Mon., 11-6 p.m. Sun. 11-3 p.m. Info: 845-436-4227 July 20 (Saturday) NACL Theatre, The Slipper Room Presents: Mr. Choade’s Wild Ride, doors open at 8 p.m. 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY. Info: 557-0694 www.nacl.org July 21 (Sunday) Market Music, event features free samples of chamber music at a relaxed, outdoor farmer’s market. Andrew Waggoner, violin; Caroline Stinson, cello and special guests. Callicoon Farmers' Market, Callicoon, NY. 11am. Free, donations are welcome.Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 887-5803. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 22 (Monday) Youth Opera Experience, An Opera Workshop for Youth in Grades 2-6 9:00 a.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

July 24 (Wednesday) Allen Yueh, solo piano Presented in Collaboration with Shandelee Music Festival, Event Gallery, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000 or 439-3277. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 25 (Thursday) EAGLES, Pavilion Stage, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 26 (Friday) At Work & Play Behind the Notes gives audiences an up close sneak peek at the Grand Finale concert July 27, with interactive open rehearsal and discussion by the artists, plus audience Q&A with composer-in-residence John Harbison and WCM artists. Eddie Adams Barn, North Branch Road, Jeffersonville, NY. 7:00 p.m. Free, donations welcome. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 887-5803. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 26 (Friday) Tim McGraw with Brantley Gilbert, Love and Theft, Pavilion Stage, 7:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 27 (Saturday) Callicoon Creek Park “Under the Moon in Callicoon” Concert Series Are you ready for a night in the Park? For a starlight picnic? Bring a friend. Tuck in with a blanket. Get comfy in a lawn chair. There's nothing quite like a concert under a River Basin sky. Featuring Janet Burgan Barbecue Bob and the Spareribs, 8 p.m., Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive, Callicoon. Info: callicooncreekpark.blogspot.com July 27 (Saturday) Grand Finale Concert and Reception, with music that includes the world-premiere of a new violin and piano piece by John Harbison; Bach’s Cantata Sinfonia; Haydn’s Londoner Trios; a Reger Chaconne; a Mozart Reconstruction; Stravinsky’s Serenade in A and Harbison’s Piano Quintet. Judith Pearce, flute; Nurit Pacht, violin; Andrew Waggoner, violin; Rose Mary Harbison, violin; Daniel Panner, viola; Caroline Stinson, cello; Tannis Gibson, piano and John Harbison, composer. Eddie Adams Barn, North Branch Road, Jeffersonville, NY. Pre-concert talk 7 p.m.; concert 8 p.m. Gala Artists’ Reception follows. Admission $30, students 18 & under free. Weekend of Chamber Music, Info: 887-5803. www.WCMconcerts.org. July 27 (Saturday) Bad Company and Lynyrd Skynyrd 40th Anniversary XL Tour Pavilion Stage, 7:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 27 (Saturday) Fair: Time and the Valleys Museum Old Time Fair and BBQ, featuring old fashioned games and activities for children and adults, sponsored and presented by Time and the


July 28 (Sunday) Festival: Riverfest, a music, art and environmental festival featuring high quality crafts, live music, demonstrations, information about the environment, children’s art space and an auction of original art posters created by over 60 artists, sponsored and presented by DVAA, Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Info: 252-7576. July 28 (Sunday) Family Fun Day, Family Day is designed for families with children ages 5-12, but older and younger siblings, as well as parents, grandparents, and other family members, will find something to do. We encourage families to make a day of it by bringing a picnic lunch and enjoying the beautiful Bethel Woods environment. Have fun with your family at Family Day!11-3 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org July 28 (Sunday) NACL Theatre, My Machine is Powered by Clocks, 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY, 4:00 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org July 28 (Sunday) Claudia Hu, piano, Helen Shen, piano, Doris Lee, piano. Presented in Collaboration with Shandelee Music Festival, Event Gallery, 3:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

AUGUST August 1 (Thursday) "An Evening of Chamber Music" Jupiter Symphony Chamber Players; William Wolfram, piano; Xiao-Dong Wang, violin; Lisa Shihoten, violin; Dov Scheindlin, violin; Bronwyn Banerdt, cello; Vadim Lando, clarinet. Sunset Concert Pavilion SMF Festival Grounds, 7:30 p.m. Doors Open 8:00 p.m. Concert. Info: 845-439-3277. www.shandelee.org August 3 (Saturday) Alexander Kobrin, solo piano Sunset Concert Pavilion - SMF Festival Grounds, 7:30 p.m. Doors Open 8:00 p.m. Concert. Info: 845439-3277. www.shandelee.org August 6 (Tuesday) "An Evening of Chamber Music" The Attacca Quartet; Irina Nuzova, piano; Luke Fleming, viola; Amy Schroeder, violin Keiko Tokunaga, violin; Andrew Yee, cello. Sunset Concert Pavilion - SMF Festival

MUSEUMS The Museum at Bethel Woods The Story of the Sixties and Woodstock. Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of Woodstock, 19692009. Plan to spend at least two hours to enjoy the captivating multimedia experience that combines film and interactive displays, text panels and artifacts to explore the unique experience of the Woodstock festival and the 1960s, a time of cultural transformation. Open daily through September 2: 10-7 p.m. Call for other hours after Labor Day thru December 31. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY 12720. Info: 1-866-781-2922. www.bethelwoodscenter.org. Sullivan County Museum & Sullivan County Historical Society The Museum, Historical Society exhibits and archives are located in the historic 1912 Hurleyville School House. This is the premier spot in the county to not only learn about the fascinating history of the area but explore your own personal history. The Society maintains both permanent and changing exhibits of historical interest. In addition to newspapers and census records on microfilm, the archives contain marriage and death records, newspaper clippings, family histories, obituaries, maps and much more. Also housed in or associated with the Museum are the Frederick A. Cook Society exhibit and archives and the Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop. The museum is open YR, Tues-Sat 10-4:30 p.m. & Sun 1-4:30 p.m. The Historical Society archives are open YR, Wed 10-4 p.m. or by appointment. 265 Main St., Hurleyville, NY. Tel: 434-8044. www.sullivancountyhistory.org

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Valleys Museum, 1-5 p.m., Grahamsville Fairgrounds, Route 55, Grahamsville, NY. Admission: Free. Info: 985-7700.

Delaware Arts Center Located in the historic Arlington Hotel, the center hosts year round exhibits of contemporary art, readings by local authors, recitals digital media, and special events. It is also the headquarters for Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, the arts council for Sullivan County. Open JanDec (closed Dec 24-Jan 15); Tues-Fri 9-5 p.m. & Sat 104 p.m. 37 Main St., Narrowsburg, NY. Tel: 252-7576. Fort Delaware Museum of Colonial History A living history museum depicting frontier life of a stockade settlement. A tour of the settlement includes cabin life, blacksmith, candle making, cooking, a cannon demo and other daily life activities of early settlers. Also available on site are a picnic pavilion, restrooms, and a gift shop. Open Memorial Day Weekend-Labor Day; Fri., Sat. & Mon. 10-5 p.m.; Sun. noon-5 p.m. 6615 State Rte. 97, Narrowsburg, NY. Tel: (April-September) 252-6660 or (September-April) 807-0261. Liberty Museum & Arts Center A renovated historic building housing collections and exhibits of items of historical interest. Art classes, lectures, cultural & children’s programs. Opening Hours: Thurs.-Sat. 12-4 p.m. 46 South Main Street, Liberty. Info: 292-2394. www.libertymuseum.com

Ten Mile River Scout Museum Museum dedicated to preserving the history and artifacts of the Ten Mile River Scout Camps, the largest Boy Scout council camp in the U.S. Extensive memorabilia display includes patches and neckerchiefs, variety of scout uniforms, maps, literature, camp and staff photos. Video collection includes narrated color slide shows, camp documentaries, home movies, interviews with former campers and staffers. Mini-theater seats 15-20. Local history exhibits and library on history of NYC scouting Catskill Fly Fishing Center and scout camps. Open July-Aug., call for hours. By & Museum Museum, gift shop and education appointment rest of year. 1481 County Road 26, center on 53 acres bordering the Narrowsburg, NY. Tel: 252-3775. www.tmrmuseum.org Willowemoc River. Committed to Roscoe O&W Railway Museum preserving the past, protecting the The museum complex consists of the museum building, a present, and promoting the future of refurbished caboose with original train order signal, and fly fishing. Birthplace of American fly the Watchman's Shanties. View railroad, scale model fishing. Open YR daily Apr.-Oct. 10-4 railroad, and local history exhibits as well as rotating p.m. and Nov.-March Tuesday-Friday exhibits and events. Open weekends Memorial Day10-1 p.m. and Saturdays 10-4 p.m. Columbus Day weekends, 11-3 p.m. 7 Railroad Ave., 1031 Old Rt. 17, Livingston Manor, Roscoe, NY. Tel: 607-498-4346. www.nyow.org NY. Tel: 439-4810. Catskill Art Society The Catskill Arts Center cultivates public interest and participation in the arts through exhibitions, classes and events. Open YR; Thurs.-Sat. & Mon. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun. 11-3 p.m. 48 Main St., Livingston Manor, NY. Tel: 436-4227. www.catskillartsociety.org

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Grounds, 7:30 p.m. Doors Open 8:00 p.m. Concert. Info: 845-439-3277 www.shandelee.org August 8 (Thursday) "An Evening of Chamber Music" Aiman Mussakhajayeva, violin; Cullan Bryant, piano. Sunset Concert Pavilion - SMF Festival Grounds, 7:30 p.m. Doors Open 8:00 p.m. Concert. Info: 845-439-3277. www.shandelee.org August 8 (Thursday) George Thorogood & The Destroyers and Buddy Guy with special guest The James Hunter Six. Pavilion Stage, 7:30 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org August 9 - 31 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: “Half Hidden,” Carol Radsprecher paintings, sponsored and presented by DVAA Alliance Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. and Sundays from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, August 9, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. August 9 - 31 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: “Le Déjeuner sur L’herbe,” Evelyne Morisot paintings, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, Loft Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, August 9, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. August 10 (Saturday) Concert: Brother Sun, sponsored and presented by RiverFolk Concerts, 8 p.m., The Cooperage, 1030 Main Street, Honesdale, PA. Info: 252-6783.

August 15 (Thursday) International Young Artists of Shandelee, solo pianists, Sunset Concert Pavilion - SMF Festival Grounds. 7:30 p.m. Doors Open 8:00 p.m. - Concert. Info: 845-439-3277 www.shandelee.org August 15 (Thursday) Cheech & Chong: Live In Concert! "Up In Smoke Tour" with special guests WAR, Tower of Power. Pavilion Stage, 7:30 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org August 16 (Friday) Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer, Chris Thile with guest vocalist Aoife O'Donovan, Pavilion Stage, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org August 17 (Saturday) International Young Artists of Shandelee, solo pianists Sunset Concert Pavilion - SMF Festival Grounds. 2:30 p.m. Doors Open 3:00 p.m. - Concert. Info: 845-439-3277 www.shandelee.org August 17 (Saturday) ZAC BROWN BAND with special guest Levi Lowery Pavilion Stage, 7:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org August 18 (Sunday) NACL Theatre, The Pigeoning 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY, 4 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org

August 10 (Saturday) Julien Quentin, solo piano Sunset Concert Pavilion - SMF Festival Grounds, 7:30 p.m. Doors Open 8:00 p.m. Concert. Info: 845-439-3277 www.shandelee.org

August 20 (Tuesday) John Mayer with special guest Phillip Phillips, Pavilion Stage, 7:30 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

August 10 (Saturday) Callicoon Creek Park “Under the Moon in Callicoon” Concert Series, Are you ready for a night in the Park? For a starlight picnic? Bring a friend. Tuck in with a blanket. Get comfy in a lawn chair. There's nothing quite like a concert under a River Basin sky. Featuring Little Sparrow and Gone Fishin' Band, 8 p.m., Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive, Callicoon. Info: callicooncreekpark.blogspot.com

August 23 (Friday) Luke Bryan with Thompson Square, Florida Georgia Line, Pavilion Stage, 7:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

August 10 (Saturday) NACL Theatre, The Weather Project Kickoff Event, 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY, 1-10 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org August 11 (Sunday) Blake Shelton with Easton Corbin, Jana Kramer, Pavilion Stage, 7:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

August 24 (Saturday) Callicoon Creek Park “Under the Moon in Callicoon” Concert Series Are you ready for a night in the Park? For a starlight picnic? Bring a friend. Tuck in with a blanket. Get comfy in a lawn chair. There's nothing quite like a concert under a River Basin sky. Featuring Black Onion and Whiskey Bent, 8 p.m., Callicoon Creek Park, Audley Dorrer Drive, Callicoon. Info: callicooncreekpark.blogspot.com August 24 (Saturday) NACL Theatre, Black Wizard/Blue Wizard 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY, 7:30 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org

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August 31 – October 6 Fourth Exhibition: Ghosts of the Catskills, Group Show, Guest Curated by Andrea Brown and Elizabeth Ennis, Artist Talk 3 p.m., Opening Reception 4-6 p.m. CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Gallery Hours: Thurs.- Sat. & Mon., 11-6 p.m. Sun. 11-3 p.m. Info: 436-4227

SEPTEMBER September 6 - 28 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: “Color,” Jane Blake paintings on silk, & Carolyn Duke raku pottery, sponsored and presented by DVAA, Alliance Gallery, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10-4 p.m. Free. Info: 2527576. Opening reception: Friday, September 6, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. September 8 (Sunday) NACL Theatre, Same River, 110 Highland Lake Rd., Highland Lake NY, 4 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org September 14 (Saturday) The Complete & Condensed Stage Directions of Eugene 0’Neill, Vol. 2, 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY, 7:30 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org September 20 - 22 (Friday - Sunday) Film: The Big Eddy Film Festival, sponsored and presented by DVAA and Catskill Film Commission, 3 days of features, documentaries and shorts, Tusten Theatre, 210 Bridge Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Info: 252-7576. September 21 (Saturday) Concert: Claudia Nygaard, sponsored and presented by RiverFolk Concerts, 8 p.m., The Cooperage, 1030 Main Street, Honesdale, PA. Info: 252-6783. September 28 (Saturday) NACL Theatre, Insomnia: The Waking of Herselves, 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake NY, 7:30 p.m. Info: 557-0694. www.nacl.org September 29 (Sunday) Glenn Dicterow Farewell Concert 2013 Chamber Music Series, Event Gallery, 3:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

OCTOBER October 4 - November 2 (Friday - Saturday) Exhibit: “The Delaware River and the Universe,” Kathe Blackbird Frantz paintings, sponsored and presented by DVAA, Alliance Gallery, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Gallery hours: Tuesday Saturday, 10-4 p.m. Free. Info: 252-7576. Opening reception: Friday, October 4, 7-9 p.m. October 5 (Saturday) Concert: “Jim Gaudet and The Railroad Boys,” bluegrass band, sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance, 8 p.m., Tusten Theatre, 210 Bridge Street, Narrowsburg, NY. Tickets/info: 252-7272 or www.ArtsAllianceSite.org.


October 6 (Sunday) Jeremy Denk, piano – 2013 Chamber Music Series. Event Gallery, 3:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-7453000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org October 9 (Wednesday) Colin Hay, Event Gallery, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org October 11 (Friday) Vanilla Fudge, Event Gallery, 8:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org October 12 (Saturday) Concert: Music of Our Time, a Delaware Valley Chamber Orchestra project featuring new works by Kevin Vertrees, Tusten Theatre, Narrowsburg, NY. Info: dvcomusic.com October 12 – November 17 Fifth Exhibition Drawings and Paintings of Ellen Cibula and William Landau’s Metal Work featuring Oil and Wax on Metal on Birch or Painted Panels, Artist Talk 3 p.m., Opening Reception 4-6 p.m. CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Gallery Hours: Thurs.- Sat. & Mon., 11-6 p.m. Sun. 11-3 p.m. Info: 436-4227

Reception 2-4 p.m. CAS Arts Center, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY. Gallery Hours: Thurs.- Sat. & Mon. , 11-6 p.m. Sun. 11-3 p.m. Info: 845-436-4227 November 24 (Sunday) Arlo Guthrie, Event Gallery, 8:00 p.m., Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org

DECEMBER December 8 (Sunday) "Lincoln Center Family" Holiday Concert 2013 Chamber Music Series, Event Gallery, 3:00 p.m. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel, NY. Info: 1-800-745-3000. www.bethelwoodscenter.org December 8 (Sunday) Concert: Gathering Time, sponsored and presented by RiverFolk Concerts, 3 p.m., The Cooperage, 1030 Main Street, Honesdale, PA. Info: 252-6783

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Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 31


by Cindy HErbert endless and upon one of the huge flat stones was an old stone pit where the settlers used to boil sap to make Maple syrup. These massive rocks here were covered with moss and with a little more observance noticed the moss grew on all the trees that surrounded

As a young girl, my grandfather would take my brother, Paul and I to a place called

Falls Mill. We would park along 17B, (which was before the new guard rails make it impossible to pull over anywhere) near a path that was overgrown and not clearly recognizable unless you knew where to look. This path led us to a beautiful spot along the Callicoon Creek. Once we made our way down we loved to climb on the huge rocks and quietly listen as the water trickled by. Way before the 1970s, it was a hotspot where many locals came to wade and sunbathe on the huge rocks. Little did I know that years later I would learn that Falls Mill was once a settlement and that I would embark on a mission to find out...

Whatever happened to...

Falls Mill? Falls Mill is located in the Town of Delaware. Only a hint of its existence appears on my GPS and as I drive by only two old foundations are visible. I had come across an advertisement in Child’s Gazateer and Business Directory of Sullivan County, NY for 1872-1873 of an E.R. Lawrence that ran a sawmill there. I found no other information until I had a conversation last summer with Daniel Diehl, a young, hard working dairy farmer who knew about Falls Mill. Partly because the old road ended at his family’s home on Hubbard Road. A section of the turnpike is named for the Hubbard family. The road was called the Old Beechwood Turnpike and along it are traces of old foundations of homes that were part of the Falls Mill settlement. I needed to know more so I joined Daniel for a hike on his family property. The Old Beechwoods Turnpike was lined on both sides with beautiful stone walls. A map from 1850 shows that it came came out on Gabel Road, however, it actually went farther up to the Beechwoods near Tower Road. Along this road were many farms. As Daniel and I walked along the old road, it was clear how beautiful this old horse and carriage road had been, lined with high stone walls on both sides and the two old farmsteads he showed me along the way were divided by stone walls which seem to this day to be very well kept. It was amazing to see two laid up stone wells that are well over 150 years old and still in impeccable condition. One would only need to put a hand pump back in to have fresh water. According to the map, these two farms were once owned by Mrs. Naman and S. Cochrare. We went off the turnpike, crossing one of the stone fenced lots. We walked to a place called, “Pigeon Rock,” a rock that seemed

32 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Top Left: Where the mill dam was once located on the Callicoon Creek. Top right: The old stone pit used to boil sap. Middle: Old foundation of the mill office owned by Edwin R. Lawrence. Bottom: One of the old wells. Right page, top: The Falls Mill House. Right page, middle: An advertisement from Child’s Gazetteer and Business Directory of Sullivan County for 1872-1873. Right page, bottom: The Old Beechwood Turnpike as it looks today.


the rocks. Falls Mill was Division No. 61 of the Hardenburg Patent and contained about 3,300 acres. In 1750, Joseph Griswold living in NYC, an Englishman and wealthy distiller from London purchased this lot from John Wenham. By 1861, most of this lot was neither sold nor cultivated and was owned by Joseph Griswold’s grand daughter, Madame Berthemy of France. The original purchase price was $500. Over the years the Griswold family paid a total of $2,500,000 in taxes and interest. This brought the land value to $800 per acre. This amount was six times as much as the assessed value of all the real and personal property of the town. A fine example of the result of land monopoly. There were many landowners, most of them were farmers but several had more than one trade. Many of the names are still part of our community today. You may have friends and neighbors or recognize road names like Gabel, Krantz, Layman, Long, Peters, Layton, Keegan, Hicks, McGar, Huth, VonBergen, Wormuth, Anson, Segar, Knox, Quinn, Fisk, Moulthrop, Sweney and Fischer. Edwin R. Lawrence was one of the largest landowners with 475 acres. Mr. Lawrence wore multiple hats. Not only was he a farmer but also ran a sawmill which was capable of wood turning, scroll sawing, sawing and planing. Industry records from 18501880 show he made wagons, sleighs and furniture. An old county landowners map shows his mill on the Callicoon Creek. The creek actually powered the mill. He also supplied bark to Gardner’s papermill in Hortonville. He had a shop that offered general merchandise such as dry goods, boots, shoes and groceries. In The Callicoon Echo, dated 1888, Lawrence placed an

advertisement for “Falls Mill Cider Mill” offering fine quality of cider for sale. Mr. Lawrence, like many small hamlet merchants of the day, also acted as postmaster. He was appointed postmaster on July 23,1869, only a few months after the Town of Delaware was established, breaking away from the Town of Cochecton on March 1, 1869. It was in Charles Fischer’s home in Falls Mill that the first Delaware town meeting took place. In 1892, Edwin’s yearly earnings as postmaster was $39.12. The Old Beechwoods Turnpike crossed over the Callicoon Creek and connected to New Turnpike Road. In winter or early spring, before the trees leaf out you can still find a hint of the old foundation. Around this area is where the mill office, general store and post office were located. Further up on the Old Beechwoods Turnpike, perched on the hill was a grand boarding house called “Falls Mill House.” It stood at a high point that offered sweeping views of the distant falls yet it was close enough that guests could hear the running of the falls below. The boarding house was three stories and had a mansard style roof and a two story porch. In the Erie Railroad “Summer Homes” tourist booklet dated 1888, it reads, “Falls Mill House– E. R. Lawrence, Proprietor– P.O. address, Falls Mill, Sullivan County, N.Y. – 4.5 miles; will meet guests at train, free one way. 16 rooms; adults, $4 to $7; children, $3 to $4; servants, $3 to $5; $.50 to $1.50 per day; discount for season. On the east branch of Callicoon Creek; best trout fishing and hunting; large farm attached; large pond near hotel; boats free. A stage line would also go to Falls Mill daily except for Sundays at a charge of 50¢. The stage line would leave after arrival of train 1 from New York and connect with train 30 for New York. Falls Mill School was in School District #9 and John

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 33


A county landowners map showing Falls MIll around 1875.

Rieber was trustee. The Callicoon Historian wrote, “The schools at North Branch, Jeffersonville, Hortonville, Kenoza Lake, Falls Mill and Cochecton are on a par with the best schools in the county.” Prior to the Beechwood School being built, a young girl named Pauline Kautz went to school in Falls Mill in the 1870s. The only time she wore shoes was when she had to walk to school. Her journey everyday was quite the hike, especially on the way home, an incline the entire way. When the Lower Beechwood school was built Falls Mill school closed. In 1892 Delaware township had collected a total of $4,678.68 for support of the school in Callicoon Depot and vicinity. But why does a settlement like Falls Mill suddenly vanish? I have three theories; 1) Edwin Lawrence owned most of the businesses, he died around 1895 and his son and daughter’s sold and moved away. 2) The mill closed, like so many other mills, after all the hemlock was exhausted. 3) Falls Mill was hard to build up due to the steep incline on both sides of the Callicoon Creek.

What do you think happened? A special thank you to: The Sullivan County Historical Society, Franck Dumas, Daniel Diehl and family. Many facts in my article came from James Eldridge Quinlan’s, “History of Sullivan County” and Child’s Gazetteer and Business Directory of Sullivan County, NY for 1872-1873. Falls Mill is all on private property, please respect and not trespass.

Cindy lives a few miles from Falls Mill with her family and loves local history.

34 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014


Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 35


“The comptroller of the currency has granted the application for the organizing of the First National Bank of Jeffersonville. The directors and officers of the bank have not yet been selected, but in all probability the president will be Val Scheidell, who is the moving spirit in this enterprise as he is and has been in all other important projects in this community. Plans are being completed for the new two story concrete bank building which is to grace the northeast corner of East Main Street and Maple Avenue.” When the first directors and officers were chosen on September 8, Valentine Scheidell, businessman, entrepreneur, and longtime supervisor of the town of Callicoon, was indeed chosen as bank president, while William B. Vorhees of Roscoe was selected vice president and Charles Schmidt cashier. Other directors included: William F. Heinle of Cochecton Center; Grover M. Hermann of Callicoon; George DeLap of Kenoza Lake; and Otto W. Meyer, Henry U. Krenrich, and Robert B. McGinn, of Jeffersonville. These men served until the first annual meeting of stockholders was held the following January. No. 10456, Treasury Department, Office of Controller of the Currency Washington, D.C., Oct. 28, 1913 Whereas, by satisfactory evidence presented to the undersigned, it has been made to appear that “The First National Bank of Jeffersonville” in the village of Jeffersonville, in the county of Sullivan and the state of New York, has complied with all the provisions of the statutes of the United States required to

Jeff Bank– The Inception T

he year is 1913. Woodrow Wilson becomes be complied with before an association shall be authorized to commence the the 28th president of the United States. The business of banking, 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is Now, therefore, I, Thomas P. Kane, Acting Controller of the Currency, do ratified, authorizing the federal income tax. And a hereby certify that “The First National Bank of Jeffersonville” in the village redesigned Grand Central Station reopens in of Jeffersonville, in the county of Sullivan, and the state of New York, New York City, as the largest train station is authorized to commence the business of banking as provided in in the world. It is a pivotal year in Section 5169 of the revised statutes of the United States. Sullivan County, as well. It is the peak In testimony whereof, witness my hand and seal of office this year for passenger travel on the 28th day of October, 1913– T.P. Kane, Acting Controller of the Ontario & Western Railway, which Currency feeds the county’s major resorts. The decline in travel in The paper also reported: subsequent years would signal the “The first depositor was George DeLap of Kenoza Lake. As end of what had been nearly a George engineered the construction of the fine bank building, quarter of a century of prosperous it is but natural that he would wish to be the first tourism in the area. And a disastrous depositor…The finishing touches were put on the interior walls Valentine Scheidell fire strikes the village of Liberty on of the bank building this week. The exterior will be finished up First President of June 13th—Friday the 13th-with a wash when warmer weather permits. Joseph Rapp, Jeff Bank destroying nearly half of the village’s marble cutter, on Tuesday finished the job of carving the name of business district. the bank in raised letters across the front of the building.” Meanwhile, the small community of Jeffersonville, home to about 500 people, is When the new bank’s stockholders held their first Annual Meeting on poised to get electrical service for the first time. And January 13, 1914, a new, expanded slate of directors was elected, and in The First National Bank of Jeffersonville receives addition to the original nine, Jeffersonville physician Dr. J. Cameron Gain, John its charter and unveils plans for a newly construct- Townsend, one time Neversink Supervisor Dr. W.H.H. Hoar of Grahamsville, ed, state- of- the-art, fireproof building on the corner Judge George H. Smith of Woodbourne, and Michael E. Galligan of of East Main Street and Maple Avenue. Forestburgh were chosen. The Record editorialized that the group “represented The saga of The First National Bank of every section of the county, which augurs well for the prestige and prospects of Jeffersonville began when five local businessmen - the new bank.” Louis P. Faubel, Henry U. Krenrich, Otto W. Meyer, and Charles and Fred Schmidt - applied for a charter to establish a local bank. At that time, most JEFF BANK’S FIRST PRESIDENT people in the community who utilized banking Respected Jeffersonville businessman and politician Valentine Scheidell services did so either in Callicoon or in Liberty. On August 28, 1913, Jeffersonville’s weekly was the man chosen as the first president of the First National Bank of newspaper, the Sullivan County Record, ran a story Jeffersonville. Scheidell was born in Jeffersonville on September 26, 1869, and on its front page announcing that the petition for the grew up in the community where his grandfather, Frederick, had been one of the earliest settlers, operating a grist mill beginning in the 1840s. His father, bank had been granted.

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36 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014


also named Frederick, was longtime town of Callicoon Supervisor. Valentine Scheidell was involved in a number of business ventures over the years, including serving as the vice president of the unsuccessful Warrior Gold Mining Company of Liberty. In 1904, the company purchased 311 acres of land on the western slope of the Shawangunk Mountains near Ellenville which they believed contained a large amount of ore made up of considerable percentages of gold, copper, zinc, and lead. Not enough ore was ever found to make the mine commercially viable. Scheidell, a Democrat, succeeded his father as Supervisor of the town of Callicoon beginning in 1898, becoming the Sullivan County Board of Supervisors youngest member, and later served as the Chairman of the Board. After many years in office, he declined his party’s nomination to run again in 1913, citing as his principal reason the fact that “the duties imposed upon him as supervisor had so multiplied that he found no time to devote to his private interests.” In addition to his role in establishing the community’s new bank, he was in the creamery business with his uncle Charles Scheidell, and had purchased a number of failed creamery operations in the region in 1912, opening an office in Jeffersonville to run them. The Livingston Manor Times reported in its April 4, 1912 edition that "at the sale of the creameries of the Dairy Products Company which took place in Monticello Tuesday, Valentine Scheidell of Jeffersonville purchased the bulk of the creameries offered. Those properties included the Jeffersonville, Youngsville, Kenoza Lake, Callicoon and North Branch creameries. Last week in New York, Mr. Scheidell purchased the Galilee and Lookout, Pa., creameries.” Valentine Scheidell died in 1935; he was 66.

Annual Coaching Day in Jeffersonville drew crowds of locals and visitors.

The first ad for The First National Bank of Jeffersonville.

– John Conway and Debra Conway/History Prose/Barryville, NY.

SULLIVAN COUNTY BANKING HISTORY When the First National Bank of Jeffersonville was officially chartered in October of 1913, there were already a number of banks operating in Sullivan County. A few, such as the National Union Bank in Monticello, founded in 1850, and the Sullivan County National Bank in Liberty, established in 1893, dated back to the 19th Century, but most had been established less than a decade before. Sullivan County had been enjoying a period of unparalleled prosperity since around 1890, as the railroads had helped establish the region as a tourist destination. During this time, hundreds of small hotels and thousands of farmhouses had begun entertaining summer visitors from the New York metropolitan area. Many hotels and farmhouses, often with a financial incentive from the railroad, built additional rooms to accommodate even more guests. With all the ensuing economic activity, the need for hometown banks increased. By the end of the 1920s, many of the small communities in the county, such as Livingston Manor, Roscoe, Callicoon, South Fallsburg and Woodridge, had established their own banks, while Monticello and Liberty were each home to more than one. The local banking world was a fairly stable one, even through the decline of the resort industry in the 1920s, the Great Depression of the 1930s and the World War of the 1940s. Nationwide prosperity following the end of World War II brought new growth to the region, which saw an even more booming resort industry take shape. This also boosted the profitability of the local banks. By 1953, the county was home to 538 hotels, 1,000 rooming houses, and 50,000 bungalows, and with an estimated two to three million vacationers each summer,

The nicely colored photo of Jeff Bank with the walking bridge crossing the Callicoon Creek.

The original Remington & Sherman Co. safe still exists within the Jeffersonville Jeff Bank building. The building was built around the safe.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 37


the resort industry was reportedly responsible for adding more than $150 million a year to the local economy. It was reported that one of the county’s largest hotels handled so much money each week that it had to spread its banking business among four different local banks. In 1962, the region’s economy was still a vibrant one with no end to the prosperity in sight, and there were at least eleven small community banks operating in Sullivan County. Throughout the early 1960s, however, things began to change, as some of the smaller community banks were absorbed by larger counterparts. The Livingston Manor Bank was one of the first to go, being acquired by Sullivan County National Bank of Liberty in 1962. They also acquired the First National Bank and Trust Co. of Roscoe. First National bank of Callicoon acquired First National Bank of Narrowsburg and changed their name to United National Bank in 1964. Liberty National Bank acquired South Fallsburg National Bank. Other local banks merged with much larger operations from out of the region. Sullivan County Trust Company in Monticello, for example, took over a Port Jervis bank in 1964 and become known as Intercounty Trust, and then merged with the much larger and rapidly growing County Trust of White Plains in 1966. County Trust was already one of the 55 largest banks in the country, and had 52 branches in Westchester, Putnam, and Rockland Counties by the time it moved into Sullivan County. The merger meant that the Monticello bank would thereafter operate under the larger bank’s name and charter. This was a fairly typical scenario, and since these types of mergers usually meant that a local bank’s senior management would be headquartered in some distant city, approval of the mergers often included the provision that a “local advisory board” be established in the community to keep the bank’s out-of-town management apprised of local conditions and to “preserve the community bank atmosphere.” Despite such advisory boards, however, the newly configured banks were community banks only in the sense that they operated a facility within the community. Rarely in such cases did loan or mortgage approval rest solely in local hands, for example. Connections between bankers and customers, many established over decades, were broken and, in some instances, the days of a customer doing business with a banker who was also a neighbor were ended. Sullivan County was changing, too. Hundreds of hotels and thousands of bungalows vanished in little more than a decade, and the resorts that continued to operate were struggling to survive. The 1970s and ‘80s were difficult for the county economically. By the end of the 1980s, even the oldest of Sullivan County’s local banking institutions, National Union Bank in Monticello and Sullivan County National Bank in Liberty, were gone, having been taken over by Key Bank and Norstar Bank, respectively. As the 21st Century arrived, all but one of the eleven community banks that had been in operation in 1962 had vanished. Only the First National Bank of Jeffersonville remained.

Callicoon, Narrowsburg, Livingston Manor, and Liberty, which had lost their own local banks in the years before. In keeping up with the times, the bank installed a Burroughs computer in the new Operations Center in 1984. From that seed has grown Internet banking, online bill paying, telephone banking as well as a network of ATMs. Customers take advantage of the ability to access accounts, transfer funds and pay bills at their own convenience, twenty-four hours a day. By the end of 2012, the decision to convert the bank from a national to a New York State charter was completed. The trademark name of Jeff Bank, which had been in use since 2008, now became the bank’s legal name. By offering residents convenient and secure banking, by making customer satisfaction the ultimate goal, and by forging special relationships with its customers—its neighbors—Jeff Bank has become a trusted Sullivan County tradition, a tradition that is now one hundred years old.

JEFF BANK – The Survivor The First National Bank of Jeffersonville had continued to concentrate on maintaining its independence while growing beyond the village of Jeffersonville. The bank opened its first branch in Eldred in 1967, and eventually expanded throughout the county, establishing a total of twelve branches from Callicoon to Bloomingburg. In doing so, Jeff Bank brought community banking back to many of the communities, such as

38 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

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Written by Sonia Owchariw

The Balash Farm on Wahl Road Anna, Mary, Ewa and Mae…those were the Greats. Yes, these women were the “matriarchs” of my mother’s history or “her-story.” They were the great-grandmothers who endured so much by leaving behind their beloved homelands of The Czech Republic and the Ukraine in the early 1900’s. They left behind children, sisters and brothers

Top: Great-Grandfather Billie and wife, Mary. Above: Great-Grandmother Ewa holds Uncle Andy with my mother, Carolyn, and her mother, Mae Balash in the back. Nero, the dog.

40 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

in order to make a life in the United States. Once settled in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, these women sent for their family; they sponsored them. The women: Anna Sloboda, Mary Mader and Ewa Kit were pioneers and came with no men. They were strong and courageous in a foreign country that wasn’t too kind to immigrants especially women. Indeed, they are warriors in the pages of my family genealogy and examples of feminism and strength. Anna Sloboda lived in Yabalonova, Slovakia with her daughter, Mary and her seven other children including my Great-Uncle Frank Sloboda. Anna came to America with Mary, however, left Frank behind until she could send for him. Tough decisions were made. Frank ended up in an orphanage until he was 18 years old. He joined his mother and sister later in America. Anna and Mary moved to the East Village where most European immigrants settled. Making a life, Anna and Mary had a restaurant. Eventually, Mary married William Balash and had a son named Joseph. Leaving the East Village, Anna, Mary and William bought a 40-acre dairy farm on Wahl Road in Jeffersonville, New York. The farm on Wahl Road had a barn, a house, cows, chickens, corn fields and Apple Orchard trees. It was a plentiful farm with cascading hills, a stream, trees and memories that filtered down to many generations especially my mother, Carolyn. When I was a young girl in New Jersey, my parents drove to Sullivan County for camping. It was during these trips while driving on Route 17 West heading toward Ellenville, New York, that my mother would say, “these are my mountains.” I was always impressed that she could claim those mountains. With her Brooklynborn demeanor, you knew not to challenge her. If she said those “hills” belonged to her, you let it be. However, when she spoke those words, I could tell the love she had for the mountains. She enjoyed sharing her stories about the farm, family and the animals. Finally, one day, she took us to the farm on Wahl Road. During the 1930’s, the farm was worked by Anna, Mary, Wendall and Frank. Visiting from Brooklyn, my mother loved going to the farm. She described Anna as one “tough” woman. One day when my mom was about six years old, she rummaged through Great-Grandmother’s Anna jewelry box and found a pearl necklace. My mother adorned with the trinket, walked down the stairs elegantly feeling like a princess. My mom was amused with her finding. However, when Anna saw her, she wasn’t too kind and said, roughly “stay out of my jewelry.” Then there was the time, when my mother gathered the chicken eggs from the coop. Again, she was just being helpful, but Anna was a prideful woman and wanted to manage all the work on the farm. There was a dog named Nero on the farm. He would sit on the front porch with the family as they watched the sunset. The Wahl Road farm stayed in the family for two decades with harsh winters and bountiful Apple Orchard trees. Grandpa Billie


was a “moonshiner,” and he liked his Apple Orchard trees. He made whiskey from those apples; it was probably the main reason why he purchased the farm. Uncle Frank drove his jalopy truck down the winding roads of Jeffersonville where he sold the milk and eggs. My mother enjoyed sitting in the back of the truck and a bumpy ride it was. The farm was filled with many relatives from New York City and Brooklyn. There was Great-grandmother Ewa with her siblings, Anastasia and Harry. Ewa’s daughter Mae reveled in the fields with her children Carolyn and Andrew. Cousins were abundant by the likes of Julia, Helen, Patty and Harry. It was a bustling farm. The farm was sold in the 1950’s, Anna Sloboda and Grandpa Billie are buried in Calvary Cemetery in Youngsville. Grandpa Billie’s funeral was in Jeffersonville at St. George Roman Catholic Church. My Great-Grandmother Mary returned to Upper East Side in New York City. My mother was saddened by the selling of the farm that she held so dearly. Driving to the farm decades later, she relived those moments. It wasn’t until 2004 that I befriended the new owners and first visited the old farm. I was always looking for family memorabilia or an heirloom on the farm. I drove the same way my mother did when I was a child. I know the exact spot on Route 17 West where my mother said, “my mountains.” Once in Jeffersonville I passed by St. George Roman Catholic where my mom went to church, and the bowling alley where my GreatUncle Frank rented a room after the farm was sold. Driving up the hilly roads I imagined Uncle Frank’s chattering truck with the milk bottles. I was surrounded by family memories. On Wahl Road there’s a creek that my mom and her brother Andrew swam in. These visions were clear because of my mother’s storytelling. Once on the farm I looked around hoping to capture a glimpse of the family past. This past May, the owner gave me a wooden-framed picture with a woman’s picture. Her dark hair pulled back in a bun. She wore flowered earrings and a flowered pin on her high-collared black dress. Was it Anna? I didn’t recognize it as my Great-Great Grandmother, Anna. But, when I looked closer, I saw my GreatUncle Frank’s resemblance. I started crying, because how special for me to have this gift. The owner held onto the picture for two years waiting to give it to me. My connection to the farm was sealed. I still drive through Jeffersonville recalling the Balash farm. Much is to be said about “moonshining” Grandpa Billie and the picture of Anna. I say their names aloud to let them resonate once again. Remembering the “greats” is a way of keeping them alive in my heart; they are not forgotten. Jeffersonville is special because it is going home. Over half a century family memories still thrive on Wahl Road.

Sonia Owchariw is a news reporter in the Tri-State area since 1998. Sullivan County has been a second home and a fond memory since she was a child. Her hobbies are piano, singing, writing and camping.

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4055 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-3333 www.thecuttinggarden.org Like us on Facebook! cuttinggarden@hotmail.com See ad page 55 Earthgirl Pottery & Vintage Closet Fun & functional handmade pottery Vintage clothing & jewelry

92 Bayer Road Callicoon Center, NY 12724 Phone: (845) 482-4976 www.earthgirlpottery.com www.facebook.com/EarthgirlPottery earthgirlpottery@gmail.com See ad page 10

A true Adirondack store in the heart of the Catskills, one of a kind rustic furniture and decor.

4938 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4123 Like us on Facebook! www.therusticcottage.com info@therusticcottage.com See ad page 57

Beautiful flowers for all occasions and mylar balloons

4889 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4700 www.thenchantedflorist.com Like us on Facebook! thenchantedflorist@gmail.com See ad page 52

Women’s Fashions - clothes, jewelry, bags, shoes, gowns for proms, weddings and special events. Petite, misses and plus sizes.

The Rustic Cottage

Furniture, vintage & antique finds, home decor, flooring, wallpaper, fabric, art, gifts, fragrance, jewelry, toys, books, interior consultation and decoration services.

4929 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3652 www.globalhomeny.com Like us on Facebook! info@globalhomeny.com See ad page 6 Peck's Market, Inc. Supermarket and deli

4897 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3800 www.pecksmarket.com csmith@pecksmarket.com See ad page 35 The Other Store Gifts for all occasions and all seasons (including Precious Moments). School Supplies, Balloons, Gift Wrap, Cards and Webkinz for the Children. -

4882 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville NY 12748 Phone/Fax: (845) 482-9876 Like us on Facebook!

42 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

The Red Door Consignment Shoppe Ladies consignment clothes & accessories, casual wear to gowns, junior to plus sizes.

4910 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 866-1807 Like us on Facebook! reddoorshoppe@hotmail.com See ad page 4 The Towne Gift Shoppe Unique & affordable gifts, home decor, locally handcrafted pieces, books, toys, souvenirs, pet items and more!

9 Sheri Lane (off State Route 52) Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4182 www.townegiftshoppe.com www.facebook.com/townegift jeffgiftshop@yahoo.com See ad page 57 The Trash Queen Store From the practical to sublimely unique, extraordinary vintage, antique, eclectic furniture, lighting, decorative collectables, glassware, jewelry and more!

21 Lower Main Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 866-3867 www.facebook.com/trashqueenstore trashqueenstore@aol.com See ad page 39


PLACES to EAT BoLoon City Chinese Food: Szechuan, Hunan, Mandarin and Cantonese

4908 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3312/3359 See ad page 26 Creekside Deli & Cafe Homemade soups & salads, paninis, subs, wraps, hot sandwiches and breakfast.

4889 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone/Fax: (845) 482-4500 www.creeksidedeli.com www.facebook.com/creeksidedeli michael@creeksidedeli.com CJ’s Sub Shop & Deli Subs, sandwiches, paninis, burgers, daily specials, party platters, jumbo subs and more.

4054 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone/Fax: (845) 482-3211 Hotel Clair Taproom & Liquor Store

Mullally's Pub and Liquor Store 4919 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5992 www.mullallyspub.com www.facebook.com/mullallypub See ad page 25

Full bar and kitchen. Open 7 days.

4053 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-3843 www.facebook.com/clair.youngsville Just Desserts! Mullally’s Restaurant & Pub 4919 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5992 www.mullallyspub.com www.facebook.com/mullallypub See ad page 25 Lanza's Country Inn Restaurant & Pub Offering clean, comfortable surroundings, friendly service and real good food.

839 Shandelee Road Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Phone: (845) 439-5070 www.lanzascountryinn.com dickl400@aol.com See ad page 41

American, Mediterranean and Turkish

4896 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4242 Welsh Cabin Restaurant and Bar Steaks, wings and pub food all fresh with special specials all the time.

495 Hessinger-Lare Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-3802 Like us on Facebook! mwelsh24@netzero.com See ad page 24

Photo by Beth Bernitt

Ice Cream Stand

Ted's Restaurant

Samba Cafe Cuisine is ingredient-driven, farm fresh and infused with latin flavors, celebrating simple, rustic, comfort foods. Open for lunch & dinner.

4893 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5900 www.sambacafeandinn.com Like us on Facebook! sambacafeandinn@hotmail.com See ad page 4

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 43


PLACES to Stay Samba Inn Located in the center of Village. Walk to shops and restaurants. Guest rooms are nicely furnished with kitchenette's, A/C, TV and WiFi (in Cafe)

Fosterdale Motor Lodge Featuring large clean rooms with your choice of three different units. Less than 5 minutes to Bethel Woods. A Certified Green Facility & Wildlife Habitat.

1166 C.R. 114 Fosterdale, NY 12726 Phone: (845) 932-8538 www.fmlodge.com www.facebook.com/fmlodge info@fmlodge.com See ad page 39

Lanza's Country Inn Restaurant & Pub

4893 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5900 www.sambacafeandinn.com Like us on Facebook! sambacafeandinn@hotmail.com See ad page 4

Offering comfortable rooms with antique furnishings. Full served breakfasts in our greenhouse dining area and convenience to all our area has to offer.

839 Shandelee Road Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Phone: (845) 439-5070 www.lanzascountryinn.com dickl400@aol.com See ad page 41 The Old North Branch Inn Beautifully restored Inn with guestrooms designed to anticipate your every need, each with a spacious private bath.

869 North Branch-Hortonville Road North Branch, NY 12766 Phone: (845) 482-5925 www.theoldnorthbranchinn.com Like us on Facebook! See ad page 38

Jeffersonian Bed & Breakfast Historic house built by the town doctor in 1922 with 5 guestrooms. Easy walking distance to shops and restaurants.

4858 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5947 www.jeffersonianbandb.com

44 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Stone Wall Acres Bed & Breakfast Enjoy your stay in our large and private carriage house accommodations furnished with 19th century antiques.

142 Eagin Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4390 Cell: (845) 701-2791 www.stonewallacresbandb.com stonewallacres@fcc.net See ad page 35


Farm & Garden

Apple Pond Farm & Renewable Energy Educational Center Farm Tours, Renewable Energy

80 Hahn Road Callicoon Center NY 12724 Phone/Fax: (845) 482-4764 www.applepondfarm.com www.facebook.com/ApplePondFarm See ad page 52

Korwan's Garden Center

Rosehaven Alpacas

Trees & Shrubs, Restorations, Crafts, Wood Carver, Carved Signs

Breeding and Sales, Alpaca Fabric, Country Store with Alpaca Products

148 Eggler Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3345 billfm79@yahoo.com See ad page 41

540 County Route 164 Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 887-6801 Cell: 914-953-2506 info@rosehavenalpacas.com www.rosehavenalpacas.com See ad page 12

Poultry Farm, Farm Fresh Eggs, Compost and Top Soil

607 Swiss Hill Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5464 www.breyseggfarm.com breyseggs@gmail.com See ad page 59 Bridle Hill Farm Riding Academy, Boarding, Stables, Lessons, Trail Riding

190 Hemmer Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3993 www.bridlehillfarm.com www.facebook.com/bridle.farm young@bridlehillfarm.com See ad page 25

Photo by Dominick Capuzzi

Brey's Egg Farm

Tonjes Dairy and Cheese Farm Dairy Farm & Cheeses– Mozzarella, Cultured Buttermilk, Ricotta, Fromage Blanc and Yogurt

188 Tonjes Road Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 482-5971 tonjesfarmdairy@gmail.com See ad page 15

Nature’s Reserve Alpacas Breeding & Sales, Heirloom Quality Fiber, Farmstore carrying yarn, fabric, felting, roving, rugs, scarves, Socks, Hats, Sweaters. Open by appointment only.

Earthgirl Flowers

408 River Road Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 887-2012 www.naturesreservealpacas.com www.facebook.com/Naturesreservealpacas natures@hvc.rr.com See ad page 10

Flower Arrangements from Earthgirl's Gardens for Weddings, Events & Parties

Oak Ridge Farm, Inc.

92 Bayer Road Callicoon Center , NY 12724 Phone: (845) 482-4976 www.earthgirlflowers.com www.facebook.com/EarthgirlFlowers earthgirlpottery@gmail.com See ad page 10

Boarding, Lessons, Therapeutic Riding, Trail Riding for Boarders

Vita's Farm & Garden Market

222 Hessinger-Lare Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4686 www.oakridgefarminc.com patwelj@netzero.net See ad page 55

4789 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5776 Like us on Facebook! veejeff1@aol.com

Local Produce, Potted Plants, Crafts and Gifts

High Road Farm State of the Art Equine Facility, Boarding, Lessons for Trails

8 Eagin Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4706 www.highroadhorsefarm.com Like us on Facebook! info@highroadhorsefarm.com See ad page 34 Imagine! Alpacas Alpaca Farm & Farmstore

132 E. Hill Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 231-3315 www.imaginealpacas.com Like us on Facebook! info@imaginealpacas.com See ad page 57

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 45


HOME IMPROVEMENT

Contractors, Building Supplies, Lawn & Garden Equipment, Landscaping, Maintenance Services, Swimming Pools & Spas

Contractors Durant Electric All your electrical and plumbing needs in one call.

36 Swiss Hill Road N. Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-2066 Fax: (845) 482-2277 Like us on Facebook! durantelectric@twcmetrobiz.com www.abcdurantelectric.com TLC Construction General Contractor 77 Old Danzer Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4476 See ad page 59 R.J. Electric & Plumbing General Contracting, Electric, Plumbing, Carpentry, Roofing, Tiles, Septic Repair & Installation, Heating, Winterization, Generators

P.O. Box 333 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-5496 Cell: (845) 665-1598 rjelectricandplumbing@yahoo.com See ad page 41

Superior Plumbing & Heating Plumbing, Heating System Installation, Burner Service and Repair, Wet Core Drilling 15 Gempler Lane Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Ph./Fax: (845) 482-5622 superiorpandh@yahoo.com See ad page 16

Mullally’s Sales & Rentals John Deere, Stihl, Rental Equipment 4510 State Route 52 P.O. Box 633, Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5222 www.mullallytractor.com Like us on Facebook!

Glass

Landscape by Design

Keller Glass Specialty, Inc. Glass Specialist for Home, Auto, Table Tops, Mirrors, Plexiglass, Thermopane/ Tempered, Sandblast Art and Design. 5036 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5792 See ad page 58

Snow Removal, Landscaping, Firewood, Trucking

Brian Freidenstine Hessinger-Lare Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4521 See ad page 17

Locksmith The Spare Key

Hardware/Lumber/ Home Improvement Kohler Lumber Lumber & Building Material, Pressure Treated & Cedar Products, Paints, Mason, Plumbing, Electrical, Varnishes, Owens Corning & BP Roofing, Carpet, Cabinetry, Owens Corning Blown-in Insulation, Floorcovering.

5023 & 5117 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5290 See ad page 25

Lawn & Garden Equipment Rental Mowers and More, Inc. Lawn and Garden Equipment, Sales and Service 3960 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-5800 mowersandmore@hvc.rr.com

46 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Landscaping

All Types of Keying. 24 Hour Service.

3019 State Route 17B Fosterdale, NY 12726 Phone: (845) 932-8212 www.sparekeyny.com sparekey1@hotmail.com See ad page 31

Maintenance Services Trash Queen Enterprises, Inc. Trash/Junk Removal, Recycling, Clean-outs, Property Management

P.O. Box 4 North Branch, NY 12766 Phone: (845) 866-DUMP (3867) kathy@trashq.com

Swimming Pools & Spas Clear-Rite Pools & Spas, Inc. Installation & Service, Residential and Commercial Pools, Custom Designed & Lap Pools, Weekly Maintenance

214 Hemmer Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4646 Fax: (845) 482-9051 www.clearritepools.com clearritepools@hvc.rr.com See ad page 17


SERVICES

Professional and Business

Accountant Knack, Pavloff & Company, LLP 14 Sturgis Road Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 794-2200 Fax: (845) 794-2273 www.knackpavloff.com dknack@knackpavloff.com See ad page 53

Advertising Cindy Monahan Graphic Design Studio Graphic Design, Websites, Logos, Advertising, Brochures, Postcards, etc.

P.O. Box 151, Hortonville, NY 12745 Phone: (845) 887-6472 cmdesign@hvc.rr.com Echo Letterpress Invitations for All Occasions, Graphic Design, Stationery

4849 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4900 www.echoletterpress.com Like us on Facebook! info@echoletterpress.com

Attorneys Kenneth C. Klein 4880 Main Street (State Route 52) P.O. Box 600 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5000 Phone: (845) 482-5002 See ad page 16 Law Offices of William H. Chellis P.O. Box 624 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3405 Fax: (845) 482-4106 www.chellislaw.com whchellis@chellislaw.com See ad page 7 Martin S. Miller, Esq. 10 St. John Street - Suite 101 Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 794-4440 Fax: (845) 482-1009 martin.s.miller@verizon.net See ad page 26

Artists, Music & Performing Arts Anne T. Maus Stained Glass Studio Custom Stained Glass

172 Villa Roma Road Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 482-5699 annemaus@earthlink.net Earthgirl Pottery Handmade Gifts to Give or Keep

92 Bayer Road Callicoon Center, NY 12724 Phone: (845) 482-4976 OPEN STUDIO www.earthgirlpottery.com www.facebook.com/EarthgirlPottery earthgirlpottery@gmail.com See ad page 10

Automotives Dick's Auto Sales, Inc. 23-1/2 Hour Towing, Used Car & Truck Sales, Full Repair & Service, NYS Inspection Station, Scorpion Sprayed on Truck Bed Liners

5065 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4460 See ad page 4 Fosterdale Auto Sales/Rent-a-Car 1166 C.R. 114, Fosterdale, NY 12726 Phone: (845) 932-8538 www.fmlodge.com www.17bcars.com www.facebook.com/fmlodge info@fmlodge.com See ad page 39

The Janice Center Art Classes, Instrumental Music, Instruction, Music Together, Dance

5296 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3324 www.janicecenter.com Like us on Facebook! thejanicecenter@aol.com See ad page 16 Weekend of Chamber Music, Inc. Chamber Music P.O. Box 304 Lake Huntington, NY 12752 Phone: (845) 932-8527 Phone: (718) 638-8962 www.WCMConcerts.org www.facebook.com/WCMconcerts info@WCMConcerts.org See ad inside back cover The Eddie Adams Workshop Photo Journalist Workshop Jeff- North Branch Road P.O. Box 488 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4112 www.eddieadamsworkshop.com Like us on Facebook! See ad page 12

Justus Tire & Alignment 4926 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4815 www.justusauto.com See ad page 24 Shakelton Auto & Truck Parts 4547 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5211 See ad page 31

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 47


Siggy’s Auto Body, Inc. 5013 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3080 See ad page 25

Banks Catskill Hudson Bank 4054 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (866) 514-3657 www.chbny.com ephillips@chbny.com See ad page 16 The First National Bank of Jeffersonville 4866 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4000 www.jeffbank.com rowens@jeffbank.com See ad inside front cover

Day Care/Preschool Little Stars Family Day Care & Preschool 12 Pammer Road Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-4181 littlestarsfdc@earthlink.net www.littlestarsfdc.org See ad page 53

Flags The Spare Key All Types of Flags

3019 State Route 17B Fosterdale, NY 12726 Phone: (845) 932-8212 www.sparekeyny.com sparekey1@hotmail.com See ad page 31

Funeral Services Stewart-Murphy Funeral Home, Inc. 5068 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4280 or (845) 887-4900

Hair Salons/Barber Shop Jim’s Barber Shop Serving the Jeffersonville area for over 47 years.

4886 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4421 "L" Magnifique Salon Full Service Salon– Color, Hi-lites, Perms, Pedicures, Manicures, Facial Waxing, Spray Tanning, Thermafuse and Sexy Products

4895 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3888 Like us on Facebook! See ad page 25 Mane Street Styles Hair Salon– Schwarzkopf Color, Color 10, Joico & Tressa Perms, Trendy Feather & Tinsel Crimped Hair Extensions, Sulfate-free Products, Rusk, Distributor of Melaleuca Products, Off-site Reiki

431 Bayer Road North Branch, NY 12766 Phone: (845) 482-3042 bethbrealtor@yahoo.com See ad page 53

Health and Fitness Catskill Mountain Massage CranioSacral Therapy, Lymph Drainage Therapy, Swedish/Medical Massage, MyoFascial Release, Zero Balancing, Acupressure, Shamanic Healing, PTSD Therapy, Visceral Manipulation, Mongolian Massage, Aroma Therapy and Lymphedema Therapist.

Cynthia Crisp, LMT, LLCC 4700 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5521 Cell: 917-797-9834 www.catskillmountainspirit.com info@catskillmountainspirit.com See ad page 53 The Janice Center

Jefferson Pharmacy Pharmacy, Greeting Cards, Maybelline Products

4892 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5720 jeffpharm@yahoo.com See ad page 59 S.V. Shah M.D. Physician, Medical Practice

9 Terrace Avenue Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4171 See ad page 39 Western Sullivan Wellness Massage Therapy, Acupunture and Reflexology. Nutrition, Medicinal Herbs, Massage and Birthing Workshops

5135 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5031 See ad page 58

Insurance Companies Callicoon Co-operative Insurance Company 15 Chapel Street Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5522 info@callicoonco-op.com See ad page 13 Crossroads Agency, Inc. 5013 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3100 www.crossroadsagencyinc.com pro.insure@crossroadsagencyinc.com See ad page 26 Mike Preis, Inc. 4898 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5510 www.mikepreis.com insure@mikepreis.com See ad page 15

Zumba, Kidnastics and Karate

5296 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3324 www.janicecenter.com Like us on Facebook! thejanicecenter@aol.com See ad page 16

48 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Laundromat Jeff Laundromat Jumbo Washer & Dryers, Energy Efficient Machines, Television, Candy/Soda, Security Cameras for your safety.

4869 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 See ad page 52


Media Radio & Newspapers WJFF Radio Catskill Educational Programming, News, Music, Public Affairs. Open House 2-4 p.m, 1st Saturday of Each Month. Nation's Only Hydropowered Radio Station.

4765 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4141 www.wjffradio.org www.facebook.com/WJFFRadio wjff@wjffradio.org See ad page 39 Sullivan County Democrat Newspaper and Printer

5 Lower Main Street Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 887-5200 www.sc-democrat.com Like us on Facebook! publisher@sc-democrat.com See ad page 59 The River Reporter 93 Erie Avenue Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-3298 www.riverreporter.com Like us on Facebook! editor@riverreporter.com See ad page 53

Real Estate American Heritage Real Estate 4886 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5565 www.americanheritagerealestate.com See ad page 26 Catskill Sales Associates, Inc. 4920 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-3200 www.catskillsales.com Like us on Facebook! warren@catskillsales.com See ad page 52 Century 21 Country Realty 30 Forestburg Road Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 791-5280 Fax: (845) 791-5283 www.century21countryrealty.com info@century21countryrealty.com See ad page 39

Klimchok Real Estate Beth Bernitt Kathy McCormack Ass. Brokers Lic. in NY, PA 36 Lower Main, Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 482-5475 or (845) 887-4444 www.klimchok.com bethbrealtor@yahoo.com kathlyn.mccormack@gmail.com

Storage Units Jeff Self Storage 5352 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 798-1280 jeffstorage@yahoo.com

United States Postal Service U.S.P.S. Jeffersonville Post Office 12748 P.O. Box 9998 4915 Main Street (State Route 52) Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4265 Karen.A.Davis2@usps.gov www.usps.com

The Enchanted Florist Beautiful Flowers for All Occasions and Mylar Balloons

4889 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4700 www.thenchantedflorist.com Like us on Facebook! thenchantedflorist@gmail.com See ad page 52

Veterinarians/ Animal Hospitals Dr. Richard Scwalb, DVM Dr. Moria L. Norris, DVM Jeffersonville Animal Hospital 89 Schoolhouse Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5500 See ad page 6 Dr. Joseph Nebzydoski, V.M.D. Youngsville Veterinary Clinic 4130 State Route 52 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-3330 www.youngsville.myvetonline.com

Weddings

Pet Grooming/Kennel

Fosterdale Motor Lodge

C&M Kennel & Grooming

Tent Rentals for All Ocassions

1166 C.R. 114 Fosterdale, NY 12726 Phone: (845) 932-8538 Fax: (845) 932-7937 www.fmlodge.com info@fmlodge.com www.facebook.com/fmlodge See ad page 39 Earthgirl Flowers Flower Arrangements for Weddings, Events & Parties

92 Bayer Road Callicoon Center , NY 12724 Phone: (845) 482-4976 www.earthgirlflowers.com www.facebook.com/EarthgirlFlowers earthgirlpottery@gmail.com See ad page 10

Dogs and Cats

5296 State Route 52 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-5995 See ad page 26 Domestic Pet Care Offering loving, professional dog sitting in your home.

Kristen & Criss - Sullivan County, N.Y. Phone: 201-362-0113 abpetcare@yahoo.com

Pet Care Items The Towne Gift Shoppe Pet Items– Toys, Treats

9 Sheri Lane (off State Route 52) Youngsville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4182 www.townegiftshoppe.com www.facebook.com/townegift jeffgiftshop@yahoo.com See ad page 57

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 49


Sullivan County’s Secret Sauce By Sean Welsh and Ginny Davis resources, thus increasing chicken consumption. Barbeque schools became a popular program put on by Cornell Cooperative Extension offices across New York. Dr. Baker traveled to the counties to guide these events. Locally, Earle Wilde, a new Sullivan County Cornell Extension Agent with a similar respect and interest for the poultry industry, was hired around the same time. Teaming with Dr. Baker, Earle would lead Cornell Cooperative Extension of Sullivan County Chicken Barbeque Schools on an annual basis until he retired from the Extension and he even led them for several years after that. Local fire departments such as the Jeffersonville Volunteer Fire Department and area church organizations became the biggest audiences for the annual Barbeque Schools. The fire companies came each year to learn how to improve their barbeque event operations. “Students” were taught all the principals of You know summer is getting closer in Western Sullivan County when that barbequing, including pit construction, uniquely delicious smoky scent of chicken barbeque first drifts past your nose. It signals recipes, and the importance of cooking the to your brain that “good cooking” is taking place nearby. The unmistakably pleasant chicken properly without burning. “Earle aroma is as much a part of our community’s summer as fireworks or outdoor evening Wilde become a master at chicken band concerts. These barbeques are so popular that it seems like the whole town turns barbeques and was notorious for keeping out. Everyone enjoys a delicious meal not to mention supporting a good cause like a his crews on target.” recalled Dr. Skoda. The art of perfect local Boy Scout troop, a community church, or a town fire mass production of department. They also enjoy dining with their neighbors over a You know summer is a classic taste was meal where there is an unspoken guarantee that you won’t go and partichome hungry. getting closer in Western covered ipants left with the What most locals might not know is Sullivan County’s knowledge not connection with this upstate New York culinary tradition. From Sullivan County when only of how to the “secret recipe” used to create the sauce that bathes and that uniquely delicious make the chicken seasons the chickens throughout the barbequing to determining from beginning to the proper height that the grill needs to be from the charcoal coals smoky scent of end product but for the poultry to cook properly. The whole cooking process is also of how to attributed to the County’s Cornell Cooperative Extension chicken barbeque first prepare a barbeque program that operates with a mission to teach and train. chicken dinner of The Extension has a long service record of delivering drifts past your nose. their own. Everyone educational programs to our communities by using research, left the Barbeque knowledge and best practices developed by Cornell University. In the 1950s, Sullivan County residents were introduced to special training on how to School a valuable piece of information. successfully operate chicken barbeque events. Taught by Extension educators, this The recipe for the “Cornell secret sauce.” training and education formed what would become our local model for hosting a Many believe that the secret sauce recipe is successful large-scale chicken barbeque event. Incredibly, the model introduced here what makes the chicken so tasty. The barbeque dinner hosted by the over 60 years ago lives on in the food preparation practices of our local chicken barbeque Kenoza Lake Fire Department (KLFD) in events to this day. Historically, poultry producers represented a large part of the Sullivan County late July features chicken cooked with the agricultural industry. According to retired Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan special Cornell Cooperative Extension County Executive Director Jerry Skoda, “Dr. Robert C. Baker was the Cornell Father of sauce recipe. The design of KLFD’s large Broiler Production and Barbeque Chicken.” Doctor Baker bounced around throughout barbeque pit and the racks used to cook the the land grant system until he ended up as a poultry specialist in the State of Delaware, chickens are modeled after Dr. Baker’s where the concept of broilers (3-5 lbs. birds in weight compared to the traditional 6-12 Cornell Cooperative Extension barbeque lbs. roaster birds) was developed. This new bird was a quicker-to-produce, young, and plans. Considered to be Kenoza Lake’s tasty chicken that increased the income of producers, leading to more efficient use of biggest event of the summer, the chicken

50 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014


barbeque typically attracts more than 500 diners and the proceeds from this meal help support the annual operations of the fire department. The meat is basted several times during the cooking process with the special sauce. Wallpaper paste brushes are used to cover the chickens with the special mixture, consisting of cooking oil, cider vinegar, poultry seasoning, eggs, and salt and pepper. Once cooked, the chicken is removed from the special grilling racks, transferred to covered milk cans for hot food storage and then transported to the fire house to meet the hungry diners. Side dishes are served along with the chicken to fill out the firemen’s dinner menu. Popular menu items include sweet corn, macaroni salad, coleslaw, rolls and Swann’s ice cream. Each diner also receives a special hand cleanser towelette to help with the pre- and post-meal clean-up. For many years, Catherine Royce made the salads for these dinners. Her salad recipes are still in use today. Catherine served as a 4-H leader for many years in Kenoza Lake and very likely attended one of the Barbeque School classes offered by Cooperative Extension. Gladys Slater was another community volunteer who organized many different elements of kitchen operations. A large group of volunteers help the firemen put on the dinner because of the event’s size and the work involved in producing one of the area’s best tasting chicken barbeques. This barbeque, along with others held in our local neighboring communities, attract local residents, summer visitors, campaigning politicians and an occasional celebrity. On August 17, 1969, some very wet and dirty hippies attended the Kenoza Lake Fire Department’s Chicken Barbeque. They were in the area to attend the Woodstock Rock Festival and came to that dinner on a Sunday afternoon seeking a meal. Because the rock concert drew unexpectedly large crowds food was in such short supply. The hippies arrived at the firemen’s meal very hungry. It’s safe to say they would have left the Kenoza Lake event most satisfied. Cornell Cooperative Extension perpetuates the chicken barbeque dinner tradition begun by Earle Wilde and Dr. Baker now led by Jerry Skoda and Joe Walsh. Each fall, educator staff members, along with a large corps of volunteers, prepare a chicken feast known as the Cornell Chicken Barbeque and Annual Meeting. Folks numbering in the hundreds who represent the membership constituency of the Extension in our county attend this special chicken dinner. This event ushers in the newly elected Board of Directors and begins a new year of Extension work. The Annual Meeting has been held in Jeffersonville for close to 100 years. In 2014, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Sullivan County will celebrate its centennial. What a special milestone and achievement this will represent to a state organization that has served our local communities so well by offering wonderful educational and training programs such as the Barbeque Schools. For more information about Cornell Cooperative Extension and Dr. Robert Baker’s cooking method for barbequing chicken and hosting a chicken barbeque, consider consulting these resources: Dr. Robert C. Baker’s Barbequed Chicken and Other Meats (Information Bulletin 862). http://www.ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/1813/2652/2/bbq.pdf Sullivan County Cooperative Extension Website: http://blogs.cce.cornell.edu/sullivan/ The Land Grant Mission of Cornell University: http://landgrant.cornell.edu/ Cornell University Cooperative Extension Website http://www.cce.cornell.edu/Pages/Default.aspx

Recipe for...

l l e n r o C ’s r e k Dr. Ba e p i c e R e c u a S BBQ

(enough for 10 halves):

1 cup cooking oil 1 pint cider vinegar 3 tablespoons salt 1 tablespoon poultry seasoning 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 egg Beat the egg, then add the oil and beat again. Add other ingredients and stir. The recipe can be varied to suit individual tastes. Use broiler halves, ideally one pound each. Place them over the barbeque after the flame is gone from the lit charcoal. Turn the halves every 5-10 minutes, using turners or a long handled fork. Baste the chicken with the sauce using a fiber brush at each turning. The basting should be light at first and heavy near the end of the cooking period. Cooking time is about an hour based on the size of the broiler and the amount of heat from the charcoal. Test to see if the chicken wing pulls easily away from the body. There should be no red color visible in the joint.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 51


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52 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014


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Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 53


Garlic – Good, and Good for You!

G

arlic is a member of the allium family whose reputable cousins include onions, shallots, leeks and chives. Native to Asia, it has been used for medicinal and culinary purposes for thousands of years. Ancient civilizations including the Chinese and Romans considered garlic a cure-all for a long list of conditions, including digestion, low energy and respiratory problems. During World Wars I & II, garlic was used to prevent gangrene in wounded soldiers. The chemical compounds in garlic include antibiotic, antioxidant and antifungal properties. It also has antitumor and antimicrobial effects. Garlic is high in Vitamin C and B6 and contains minerals including potassium, calcium and magnesium. When cooked, garlic has a deep sweet flavor, but peer-reviewed studies have shown that garlic loses many of its medicinal properties when heated. Garlic is versatile, and adds flavor and richness to just about any dish. Raw garlic, chopped very finely, has the strongest flavor and when used in uncooked dishes such as salsa and gazpacho, it has just the right amount of punch to balance the acidity in those dishes. Unpeeled garlic cloves, tossed in olive oil, salt and pepper, roasted and then slipped out of their skins, makes a deep mellow paste that can be added to a number of dishes. Garlic burns easily and needs less cooking time than onions or other alliums. Garlic is easy to grow, and there are a number of varieties available which are superior to the variety usually found in grocery stores. If you don’t have a garden, these great varieties can also be found at our local farmers markets or at stores carrying locally grown produce. I recently attended a lively and informative workshop on garlic presented by Ed Fraser of Fraser’s Garlic Farm in Churchville, NY and Crystal Stewart of CCE’s Capital District Vegetable and Small Fruit Program. The workshop covered tips on growing, harvesting, storing and marketing garlic and I’m pleased to share some the highlights along with my own observations.

54 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Fraser recommended Porcelain, Rocambole and Artichoke type garlics for our region. Porcelain types include “Music” (one of my favorites), “German Porcelain”, “Polish Hardneck” and “Georgia Crystal.” They are hard-necked garlics which have five to six large, easy to peel cloves. They are usually strong tasting garlics that can be stored for eight to ten months in the right conditions. Their scape patterns are random. (Stay tuned for more on scapes.) Rocambole types include “Carpathian”, “Spanish Roja”, “Amish” and “Ukrainian Red.” They are also hardnecked garlics with eight to nine large

ed. In the fall you should use less nitrogen and optimize the phosphorous and potassium in the soil to promote good root development. Good roots make bigger garlic. Add a lot of nitrogen in the spring, first in late February or early March, with two to three side dressings of fish emulsion ending no later than the last week in April. Before planting, separate the cloves from the bulb. Plant the cloves 1 ½”-2” deep. Hardnecks should have their root tips planted down. Spacing should be no less than 4” apart to allow for good air circulation

“Without garlic I simply would not care to live.” Louis Diat (1885-1958) Ritz Carlton Chef, Culinary Writer and purported inventor of vichyssoise. cloves. Their scapes form one to three coils during development before straightening out. The cloves on hard-neck garlics grow around a woody stem and are generally stronger than soft neck garlics. Artichoke type garlics are soft necked garlics which usually have three to five clove layers with 12-20 cloves per bulb. They have yellow-green leaves and horizontal leaf architecture. These garlics can be braided and their thick wrappers make them store well. Their flavor is usually milder. “Ozark”, “Red Toch” and “Susanville” are recommended varieties. When buying garlic to plant, look for bulbs which are firm and have a good appearance and has been tested for disease. If the cloves are small, have brown spots or are soft, do not plant them. Garlic is planted in the fall for good root development. Garlic likes a neutral soil with a PH about 6.8. If you haven’t had your soil tested lately, you can have an in-depth test done through Cornell Cooperative Extension. You should pick a sunny spot which drains well. The addition of compost and organic matter to the soil is recommend-

when the plants emerge. Fraser hills the soil 6-8” over the cloves and doesn’t mulch. He says that the weight of the soil prevents the cloves from heaving and that mulch can hold too much moisture in the soil, inviting disease. Stewart thinks that mulch is a good insulator and should be used. Try a little of each method and see which brings you better garlic! The heavier your soil, the shallower you should plant so that the bulb will not use too much energy pushing through the clay. He sells to a farmer in Pennsylvania with heavy clay soil who mulches with compost, chopped leaves and rotted hay, removing some of it in spring to keep the soil from becoming too moist. Garlic doesn’t like competition from weeds. Weeding begins before planting and continues until harvest. Depending on the size of your garlic plot, you should hand weed, hill small weeds and cultivate. While weeding, you should scout for weak or diseased plants. When you find them, pull them up and discard them. The fun begins with hardnecks when the scapes begin to emerge from the center of the top leaves around the end of May. Scapes are leafless flower stalks which


grow from the root. They are edible and have a mild garlic flavor. Scapes should be removed from the plant when it is starting its first curl by snapping it off where it comes out of the leaves. This helps to divert energy to the bulb. Scapes should be refrigerated right away. Scape pesto is delicious, and finely chopped scapes are a great addition to stir fries or as a substitute for onions. Softnecks mature earlier than hardnecks, usually sometime around the end of June. Their leaves will begin to fall over and lie on the ground. Hardnecks follow and are usually ready in the first two weeks of July. It’s harder to tell if they are ready, and the best way is to pull one up, cut a cross section of a head and see if there is space between the cloves and the outer “paper” or wrapper skin. If there is no space, it is ready. Gently pull each bulb out to avoid pulling off the “paper”. Garlic bruises easily so handling should be done very carefully. If it isn’t too hot and isn’t going to rain, you can leave the garlic out to begin to cure for a few days. (Extreme heat liquefies the garlic.) Carefully shake off the dirt after it’s dried. Before taking into storage for drying, trim the hardneck roots to ¼” and the stems to six inches. For softnecks, cut the leaves to within one inch of the head. The best places to dry garlic are in shaded hoop houses or old wood barns. The key to optimum drying is to keep the temperature around 100 degrees and make sure there is lots of air circulation. We cure our garlic in an old chicken coop with no windows, which is good for air circulation, but not for drying if it’s rainy. To wash, or not to wash, that is the question. If you want to wash your garlic before drying, curing and storing, wait a few days before washing. Spray gently with a hose to avoid removing the outer skins. A recent study done on post-harvest handling done by Cornell Cooperative Extension found that washed cloves became more discolored during the drying and curing process. The discoloration could be removed by removing a few skins, but this is time consuming and may have an adverse effect on storage life. Diseases, particularly Aspergillus and Embellisia was slightly higher in washed garlic. Storage should be in a dry, cool area. Once garlic has been cooled to below 45 degrees, you should store it as close to freezing as possible at a level of 65% humidity. One way to store it is in paper bags in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. Home grown garlic, stored properly, will provide eating pleasure all winter long. For more information on postharvest handling, storage and disease, visit http://cdvsfp.cce.cornell.edu/crop.php?id=14.

Thony Landscaping

RICHARD THONY Jeffersonville, NY

Complete DESIGNING & PLANTING Service

845.482.4184

For more about Fraser Garlic Farm, visit www.frasergarlic.com/default.asp

ALL TYPES OF DRY STONE WORK Anne Hart is co-owner of Domesticities and The Cutting Garden in Youngsville, NY. She forgot to plant her garlic last fall and is relying on local farmers for this year’s supply. In 1853, Sullivan County was manufacturing $3,000,000 worth of leather a year. There were at least 24 tanneries in the county.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 55


A look into what

’ l a c o L g n ‘Shoppi really means

Have you noticed the term “Shop Local” popping up in ads on the radio and even in the news lately? This growing trend is not just a catchphrase but it is something that is very important to do. You will even see this quote on the JACC (Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce) website, “ Think Local First Find everything you need, right here at home.” (www.jeffersonvilleny.com) Several stores have always carried or have recently expanded their “Locally Made” sections. We interviewed local shop owners Kristen and Criss of The Towne Gift Shoppe in Youngsville to find out what shop local means for them. JACC – What type of a store is The Towne Gift Shoppe? TGS – The Towne Gift Shoppe is a locally owned variety gift store with a selection of items for everyone in the family. We carry affordably priced items for babies and work our way up through toddlers, young children, teens, women, men and even your dog or cat! Toys, games and puzzles for all ages, jewelry, books, candles, kitchenware, frames, novelty items and some items related to hobbies like fishing or hunting. JACC – Definitely sounds like you can find a lot of different items in your shop. So what does “Shop Local” mean as a business owner? TGS – To “Shop Local” means to keep our small towns and communities alive and thriving. It means helping our local economy, providing that extra added personal touch to someone’s shopping experience. But ultimately it comes down to keeping the money you work hard for in your community, town or county. By keeping the dollars you spend close to home you are helping the economy where it matters most. You may pay a little more at a smaller local shop, but you save time, which is very valuable, you can save gas but more importantly you are helping your community, your neighbor and even yourself by shopping local and spending maybe that extra $1 - $5. JACC – So in other words, by shopping in your own hometown or even your neighboring towns within your county is shopping local. Not only will it keep businesses like yours open but because the money stays in the county, programs within the county, as well as county jobs which are supported by tax dollars will continue to thrive and won’t need to be continually cut each year. TGS – Correct, it is important for people to realize that by spending money within their community and not outside their community it not only supports that particular business but it also helps support the rest of the community through county programs, school programs, jobs and so on. Every year at budget time there is always talk of how the budget needs to be cut and generally this means certain programs won’t get the necessary funds and possibility of job loss. It’s not that shopping elsewhere should be avoided all together but people should be aware that money made in the county but spent elsewhere is money the county will never see again. Stores and services cannot stay in business if no one patronizes them, and consequently the community as a whole also begins to suffer. JACC – What has The Towne Gift Shoppe done to help support Sullivan County’s ‘Shop Local’ movement?

56 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

TGS – We have incorporated over 30 different community member’s items into our store so you can shop other vendors all under one roof, similar to going to a craft show or a farmer’s market. It is closer to double that number if you count the specific variety of the items that are locally made right here in the Catskill region. JACC – Aside from your selection of new affordably priced merchandise what types of local items do you carry? TGS – We carry pottery, soaps, hand painted items, hand sewn items, wood working, dog treats, foods, jewelry, photographs, aromatherapy products, soy candles, books, Top: Flowers at Vita’s Farm & Garden Market. Middle: Beautiful Adirondack furinishings at The Rustic Cottage. Below: Samba’s Brazilian Cheese Bread.


greeting cards are the items that spring to mind, but I am sure we are forgetting an item or two. JACC – Why did you decide to carry these? TGS – Whether you call them artists, crafters, entrepreneurs, business owners, etc we all want the same thing and that is do what we love and get paid to do it. Many of these artists can only go to craft or vendor shows in the warmer months, which leaves 4 or 5 months they are unable to sell their wares. We provide an extra outlet for these individuals to sell their items year round in our store. Also by carrying local items we ensure that the item is made in the USA which many of our customers appreciate. JACC – So it sounds like it’s a win/win. People can shop a wide variety of merchandise and find some otherwise hard to find or seasonal vendor products in your store. And not only does this allow your business to remain open; it is helping another individual with their business AND also helping your community as a whole. So it sounds more like it’s a win/win/win. TGS – We love the community that we now call home and would like for it to continue to thrive. Shopping local may sometimes mean you might spend slightly more than if you were to drive an extra 10-15 or even 20 miles out of the way or order something online, but the payoff comes by keeping your neighbors employed, keeping the music program or art program in the school, saving that extra patrolman’s job. Basically that little bit extra keeps your community alive. That’s what ‘Shop Local’ means for us. The Towne Gift Shoppe can be found on Route 52 diagonally across from The Cutting Garden or on facebook at www.facebook.com/townegift. Give them a call for their current days and hours at 845-482-4182. Open Year Round with off-street parking and handicap accessible. Take a look at these other shops and stores carrying local items and we all Thank YOU for ‘Shopping Local’.

A list of JACC business members that produce or carry locally made products: Pecks Markets Samba Brazilian Cheese Bread Imagine! Alpacas Rosehaven Alpacas Nature’s Reserve Alpacas Earthgirl Pottery Domesticities & The Cutting Garden Tonjes Dairy & Cheese Farm Anne T. Maus Stained Glass Bridgewater Mercantile The Red Door Consignment Shoppe Creekside Deli Vita’s Farm & Garden Market The Clothes Line Brey’s Egg Farm The Rustic Cottage

A true Adirondack store in the heart of the Catskills, one of a kind rustic furniture and decor...

www.TheRusticCottage.com

4938 Route 52, Jeffersonville, NY • 482-4123 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 57


Western Sullivan Wellness (formerly Western Sullivan Massage)

Massage Therapy, Acupuncture Offered by & Reflexology Workshops on

Nutrition, Medicinal Herbs, Massage, Birthing Classes

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58 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Lucette Ostergren, LMT Sandra Owen Kelly, LAC

New location at 5135 State Route 52, Jeffersonville


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Tom Maus (845) 482-4476 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 59


Cultural

Arts Guide Arts Council

Galleries

Delaware Valley Arts Alliance

Catskill Arts Society 48 Main Street Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Phone: (845) 436-4227 www.catskillartsociety.org Exhibits, classes, workshops and a variety of special programs.

For schedule of events see page 27-31 37 Main Street - P.O. Box 170 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7576 Fax: (845) 252-6515 www.artsalliancesite.org info@artsalliancesite.org Provides facilities, small grants and technical assistance to artists and art groups in the Sullivan County area. Initiates and sustains cultural programs for the public, such as DIGit Media Festival, Riverfest, year-round gallery exhibitions, a film program, and a literary series. The local funding agent for the New York State Council on the Arts.

Crafts Calico Geese of Quilting Guild 69 Ferndale-Loomis Road Liberty, NY 12754 Phone: (845) 292-5250 Fosters, preserves, teaches and promotes the art of quiltmaking.

Dance Happy Footers 24 Shamfield Heights Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4494 1st and 3rd Fridays. Square, Line and Round dancing. Triad Dance Ensemble P.O. Box 136, Yulan, NY 12792 Phone: (845) 557-6340 Modern dance company, performing an eclectic mix of choreography. Summer only.

Educational Cobalt Studio Royce Rd., P.O. Box 79 White Lake, NY 12786 Phone/Fax: (845) 583-7025 www.fcc.net/cobaltstudios Professional scenic artist school. Fully-operational scenic painting shop, school workshops, specializes in backdrops for theaters. Sullivan County Community College Seelig Theater 112 College Road Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759 Phone: (845) 434-5750, ext. 4303 Presenter of performing arts events, lectures, symposia.

DeHoyos Gallery Sullivan County Community College 1000 Leroy Road Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759 Phone: (845) 434-5750 ext. 4255 www.sullivan.suny.edu Rotating exhibitions by contemporary artists.

Elise Freda’s “Three Moons”, oil on paper, 27.5 x 40.5 Sullivan County Historical Society Sullivan County Museum 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Fax: (845) 434-8056 Historical and contemporary displays, exhibits and events, archives and genealogy assistance.

Delaware Arts Center Gallery 37 Main Street - P.O. Box 170 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7576 Fax: (845) 252-6515 www.artsalliancesite.org Juried exhibitions by contemporary artists. All media.

Libraries

Nutshell Arts Center 6692 Route 52 - P.O. Box 86 Lake Huntington, NY 12752 Phone: (845) 932-8708 www.nutshellarts.com Seasonal art exhibitions; painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media.

Liberty Public North Main Street Liberty, NY 12754 Phone: (845) 292-6070

Historical Societies/Groups Basket Historical Society of the Upper Delaware River Long Eddy, NY 12760 Phone: (845) 887-5417 Local society; publishes newsletter. Cochecton Preservation Society, Inc. 377 New Turnpike Road Cochecton, NY 12726 Phone: (845) 932-8487 Fax: (845) 932-9844 Maintains historic railroad station. Frederick A. Cook Society 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Fax: (845) 434-8056 Commemorates and advances the work of the polar explorer.

60 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Hermann Memorial Library Sullivan County Community College 1000 Leroy Road - P.O. Box 497 Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759 Phone: (845) 434-5750, ext. 4223 www.sullivan.suny.edu

Livingston Manor Free Main Street Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Phone: (845) 439-5440 Roscoe Free Maple Street & Highland Ave. Roscoe, NY 12776 Phone: (607) 498-5574

Western Sullivan Public Library www.WSPLonline.org Delaware Free Branch Main Street - P.O. Box 245 Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 887-4040 Fax: (845) 887-8957 Jeffersonville Public Branch 19 Center Street - P.O. Box 737 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4350 Fax: (845) 482-3092 Tusten-Cochecton Branch 198 Bridge Street - P.O. Box 129 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-3360 Fax: (845) 252-3331

Literary Groups Upper Delaware Writers Collective 1258 County Road 26 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7506 Workshops in poetry and short fiction.

Museums Catskill Fly Fishing Center & Museum 5447 Old Route 17 - P.O. Box 1295 Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Phone: (845) 439-4810 Fax: (845) 439-3387 www.cffcm.net Museum features the sport of fly fishing. Library and video room, gift shop and visitors’ center. The fifty acre site borders Willowemoc Creek, a great place for walks and picnicking. Educational programs and workshops. Fort Delaware Museum of Colonial History Rt. 97, Narrowsburg, NY 12764 P.O. Box 5012 Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 252-6660 (845) 794-3000, ext. 5002 Reconstruction of an original stockade (1755-1785.) Contains three log dwellings, an armory, gun platform, meeting house, blacksmith shop and animal pens. Demonstrations of fort activities and special weekend activities. The Museum at Bethel Woods 200 Hurd Road Bethel, NY 12720 Phone: 866-781-2922 www.bethelwoodscenter.org Interactive exhibits consisting of audio/visual experiences, informative displays amd a collection of artifacts. Special exhibit gallery. Sullivan County Museum & Cultural Center 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Fax: (845) 434-8056


Cultural

Arts Guide Arts Council

Galleries

Delaware Valley Arts Alliance

Catskill Arts Society 48 Main Street Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Phone: (845) 436-4227 www.catskillartsociety.org Exhibits, classes, workshops and a variety of special programs.

For schedule of events see page 27-31 37 Main Street - P.O. Box 170 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7576 Fax: (845) 252-6515 www.artsalliancesite.org info@artsalliancesite.org Provides facilities, small grants and technical assistance to artists and art groups in the Sullivan County area. Initiates and sustains cultural programs for the public, such as DIGit Media Festival, Riverfest, year-round gallery exhibitions, a film program, and a literary series. The local funding agent for the New York State Council on the Arts.

Crafts Calico Geese of Quilting Guild 69 Ferndale-Loomis Road Liberty, NY 12754 Phone: (845) 292-5250 Fosters, preserves, teaches and promotes the art of quiltmaking.

Dance Happy Footers 24 Shamfield Heights Road Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4494 1st and 3rd Fridays. Square, Line and Round dancing. Triad Dance Ensemble P.O. Box 136, Yulan, NY 12792 Phone: (845) 557-6340 Modern dance company, performing an eclectic mix of choreography. Summer only.

Educational Cobalt Studio Royce Rd., P.O. Box 79 White Lake, NY 12786 Phone/Fax: (845) 583-7025 www.fcc.net/cobaltstudios Professional scenic artist school. Fully-operational scenic painting shop, school workshops, specializes in backdrops for theaters. Sullivan County Community College Seelig Theater 112 College Road Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759 Phone: (845) 434-5750, ext. 4303 Presenter of performing arts events, lectures, symposia.

DeHoyos Gallery Sullivan County Community College 1000 Leroy Road Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759 Phone: (845) 434-5750 ext. 4255 www.sullivan.suny.edu Rotating exhibitions by contemporary artists.

Elise Freda’s “Three Moons”, oil on paper, 27.5 x 40.5 Sullivan County Historical Society Sullivan County Museum 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Fax: (845) 434-8056 Historical and contemporary displays, exhibits and events, archives and genealogy assistance.

Delaware Arts Center Gallery 37 Main Street - P.O. Box 170 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7576 Fax: (845) 252-6515 www.artsalliancesite.org Juried exhibitions by contemporary artists. All media.

Libraries

Nutshell Arts Center 6692 Route 52 - P.O. Box 86 Lake Huntington, NY 12752 Phone: (845) 932-8708 www.nutshellarts.com Seasonal art exhibitions; painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media.

Liberty Public North Main Street Liberty, NY 12754 Phone: (845) 292-6070

Historical Societies/Groups Basket Historical Society of the Upper Delaware River Long Eddy, NY 12760 Phone: (845) 887-5417 Local society; publishes newsletter. Cochecton Preservation Society, Inc. 377 New Turnpike Road Cochecton, NY 12726 Phone: (845) 932-8487 Fax: (845) 932-9844 Maintains historic railroad station. Frederick A. Cook Society 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Fax: (845) 434-8056 Commemorates and advances the work of the polar explorer.

60 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Hermann Memorial Library Sullivan County Community College 1000 Leroy Road - P.O. Box 497 Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759 Phone: (845) 434-5750, ext. 4223 www.sullivan.suny.edu

Livingston Manor Free Main Street Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Phone: (845) 439-5440 Roscoe Free Maple Street & Highland Ave. Roscoe, NY 12776 Phone: (607) 498-5574

Western Sullivan Public Library www.WSPLonline.org Delaware Free Branch Main Street - P.O. Box 245 Callicoon, NY 12723 Phone: (845) 887-4040 Fax: (845) 887-8957 Jeffersonville Public Branch 19 Center Street - P.O. Box 737 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4350 Fax: (845) 482-3092 Tusten-Cochecton Branch 198 Bridge Street - P.O. Box 129 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-3360 Fax: (845) 252-3331

Literary Groups Upper Delaware Writers Collective 1258 County Road 26 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7506 Workshops in poetry and short fiction.

Museums Catskill Fly Fishing Center & Museum 5447 Old Route 17 - P.O. Box 1295 Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Phone: (845) 439-4810 Fax: (845) 439-3387 www.cffcm.net Museum features the sport of fly fishing. Library and video room, gift shop and visitors’ center. The fifty acre site borders Willowemoc Creek, a great place for walks and picnicking. Educational programs and workshops. Fort Delaware Museum of Colonial History Rt. 97, Narrowsburg, NY 12764 P.O. Box 5012 Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 252-6660 (845) 794-3000, ext. 5002 Reconstruction of an original stockade (1755-1785.) Contains three log dwellings, an armory, gun platform, meeting house, blacksmith shop and animal pens. Demonstrations of fort activities and special weekend activities. The Museum at Bethel Woods 200 Hurd Road Bethel, NY 12720 Phone: 866-781-2922 www.bethelwoodscenter.org Interactive exhibits consisting of audio/visual experiences, informative displays amd a collection of artifacts. Special exhibit gallery. Sullivan County Museum & Cultural Center 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Fax: (845) 434-8056


Exhibits artifacts, maps and globes, and shows a video detailing the daring and boundary-breaking polar explorations of Frederick A. Cook. Liberty Museum & Arts Center 46 South Main Street Liberty, NY 12754 Phone: (845) 292-2394 www.libertymuseum.com Exhibits of area artists and local history, presents a variety of quality cultural events and workshops. Roscoe O&W Railway Museum Railroad Avenue, Roscoe, NY 12776 Phone: (607) 498-5500/4346 www.nyow.org/museum.html A refurbished caboose houses historical displays about the impact of the railroad on life in the area. Sullivan County Museum, Art & Cultural Center 265 Main Street - P.O. Box 247 Hurleyville, NY 12747-0247 Phone: (845) 434-8044 Permanent and changing historical and contemporary displays and exhibits, archival and genealogy assistance, art gallery and classes.

Music Organizations Callicoon Center Band Main Street Callicoon Center, NY 12724 c/o Karen Carey, Secretary P.O. Box 216 Youngsville, NY 12791 Phone: (845) 482-5732 Free outdoor public concerts. Featuring music of the town band era. Wednesdays, 8 p.m. at the Band Stand, Callicoon Center. Beginning June 26. Delaware Valley Chamber Orchestra Narrowsburg, NY 12764. dvcomusic@gmail.com Presenting “Music of Our Time.” Performing as the orchestra for Delaware Valley Opera at the Tusten Theatre, Narrowsburg, NY. The Ensemble performs concerts, art openings, receptions, weddings and dinners. Delaware Valley Opera P.O. Box 188 Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone/Fax: (845) 252-3136 www.dv-opera.org Regional opera company. Performances in the Tusten Theatre, Narrowsburg, NY. Shandelee Music Festival, Inc. J. Young Road, Shandelee P.O. Box 1264 Livingston Manor, NY 12758 Sept-July Phone: (212)-288-4152 August: Shandelee Location Phone: (845) 439-3277 Exceptional pianists for three weeks in August. Master classes and informal performances. Open to the public. Sunset Concert Series takes place outdoors in the Festival Pavilion. Concerts followed by a catered dessert reception. Reservations only.

Sullivan County Community Chorus, Sullivan County Community College, Seelig Theatre 1000 Leroy Road Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759 Phone: (845) 794-7869 All singers welcome. Weekend of Chamber Music P.O. Box 304 Lake Huntington, NY 12752 Phone/Fax: (845) 932-8527 Phone/Fax: (718) 638-8962 www.wcmconcerts.org Summer Chamber Music Festival features some of America’s finest chamber musicians. Performances in July and early August. Spring and Fall concerts in other venues. Extensive program of concerts and workshops in schools. For more info, see article on page 3.

Performing Spaces

Community-based theatrical production company. Catskill Festival of New Theatre NaCL Theatre 110 Highland Lake Rd. Highland Lake, NY 12743 Box Office: (845) 557-0694 www.nacl.org A unique and eclectic international theatre festival in the upstate NY town of Highland Lake. Produced by NaCl founders, Brad Krumholz and Tannis Kowalchuk and features the most daring artists of today from the USA, Canada, and abroad. Features performances that are experimental and multi-disciplinary including circus, puppetry, acrobatics, visual outdoor spectacle, stilt walkers, music, new plays, and contemporary performance that defines our culture, our art, and our life. Festival admission is on a sliding scale PAY-WHATYOU-CAN. NaCl Catskills in Highland Lake, NY (1 mile from Eldred)

Tusten Theater 198 Bridge Street Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7576 www.artsalliancesite.org info@artsalliancesite.org

Margolis Brown Ensemble Theatre 4204 SR 97 Barryville, NY 12719 Phone: (845) 557-0941 www.margolisbrown.org Experimental theatre with a distinctly physical emphasis. Oasis Theatre Company 16 Wild Cat Mountain Road Claryville, NY 12725 Phone: (845) 985-0390 Text-focused productions which shed new light on old perceptions. Periwinkle National Theatre 19 Clinton Avenue Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 794-1666 Fax: (845) 794-0304 www.TE2000.com/periwinkle A non-profit professional touring company brings plays with social themes, relevant to the lives of children and youth, to student audiences in schools, civic centers and theaters.

Producing DIGit Media Festival 198 Bridge Street Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Contact: DVAA, P.O. Box 170, Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7576. A film and media program. Riverfest Main Street, Narrowsburg, NY 12764 Phone: (845) 252-7234 Music, art and environmental festival. Held on Sunday, July 28. Sullivan Performing Arts, Inc. Sullivan County Community College Seelig Theatre, 1000 Leroy Road Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759 Phone: (845) 436-9916 Fax: (845) 434-4806 Drama, music and dance, and entertainment for children and families.

Public Radio WJFF FM 90.5 – Radio Catskill 4765 St. Rt. 52 - P.O. Box 546 Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: (845) 482-4141 Fax: (845) 482-9533 www.wjffradio.org Educational radio, programming, format; news, music, public affairs. Open house 1:30-3:30 p.m., 1st Saturday of month. Nation’s only fully hydropowered radio station.

Theatre

Companies/Groups Big Sky Productions 80 M. Gilles Road Grahamsville, NY 12740 Phone: (845) 985-7783 Bigsky1952@aol.com

Elise Freda’s “Mountain Line”, encaustic on handmade paper, 10”x10” Forestburgh Playhouse 39 Forestburgh Road Forestburgh, NY 12777 Phone/Fax: (845) 794-2005 Box office: (845) 794-1194 www.fbplayhouse.com Summer theatre musicals, comedy and drama, with or without dinner or after-show cabaret. Children’s musicals. The Forestburgh Playhouse presents five cabaret shows. Call for schedule. Liberty Free Theatre 109 South Main Street Liberty, NY 12754 Phone: (845) 292-3788 Seasonal, intimate, free theatre concerned with social issues.

SEPIA Theatrix P.O. Box 897 Kauneonga Lake, NY 12749 Phone: (845) 583-5706 Involved in choreography, acting and directing. Promotion of artistic works from the intercultural community. Sullivan County Dramatic Workshop Rivoli Theater, Main Street South Fallsburg, NY 12799 P.O. Box 353, Monticello, NY 12701 Phone: (845) 794-5034 Open to all interested in acting or backstage work. Three major productions a year.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 61


Helpful Information COMMUNICATIONS, EDUCATION, EMERGENCIES, MUNICIPALITIES, ORGANIZATIONS, LIBRARIES, TRANSPORTATION, POST OFFICES, UTILITIES, CHURCHES, RECYCLING

Communications • NEWSPAPERS: Catskill Shopper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .292-0500 River Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252-7414 Sullivan County Democrat . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5200 Times Herald Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-295-2181

Safe Passage (Domestic Violence Program) . .292-5700 Poison Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-222-1222 Suicide Crisis Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . .647-2443

Municipal Offices Town of Bethel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .583-4350 Town of Cochecton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .932-8360 Town of Fremont . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-6605 Recycling Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794-4466 Sullivan County Government Center . . . . . .794-3000

• RADIO: WJFF-FM, 90.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4141

Open House, 1:30-3:30 p.m., 1st Saturday of month. Nation’s only hydro-powered radio station. www.wjffradio.org

WDNB 102.1 FM Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . .292-7535 WJUX-FM 99.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .888-861-6100 WPDH-FM, 101.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .471-1500 WSUL-FM, 98.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794-9898 WVOS-AM, 1240; WVOS-FM, 95.9 . . . . . .794-9898 WZAD FM 97.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .471-1500 • TELEVISION: Cable 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .692-6781 Time Warner Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-431-8878

Education Sullivan County Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .292-0082 Adult Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .791-4070 Alternate Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4760 Vocational (VOTEC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295-4152

Village of Jeffersonville

17 Center Street P.O. Box 555, Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: 482-4275 • Fax: 482-5298 Office Hours: Monday-Friday, 8-Noon & 1-4 p.m. Mayor, William Thony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482-4275 Village Clerk/Treasurer/Fiscal Officer Colleen Freitas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4275 Sole Assessor, Bonnie Hubert . . . . . . . . . . .482-5390 Village Historian, Maureen Schlott . . . . . . . .482-4984 Building/Multiple Res. Inspector & Code Enforcement Officer, Kevin Zieres . . .482-5390 Planning Board Chairman Fred Fries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482-4299 (after 7 p.m.) Zoning Board of Appeals, Kris Rasmussen . . .482-9066

Town of Callicoon

Sullivan County Community College . . . . . .434-5750

Sullivan West Central School District: Administrative Office Numbers: Elementary - Jeffersonville Campus . . . . . .482-4610 High School - Lake Huntington Campus . . . 932-8401

TOWN HALL 19 Legion Street, P.O. Box 687, Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Phone: 482-5390 • Fax: 482-5030 www.townofcallicoon.org

Emergency Numbers Emergency Fire/Ambulance: All fire and ambulance calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .911 Emergency Police: Local Police, call Sheriff’s Department . . . .794-7100 New York State Police (Liberty) . . . . . . . . . .292-6600

Other: Animal Shelter (S.C. S.P.C.A) . . . . . . . . . . .796-3120 Domestic Violence Hotline . . . . . . . . . .800-942-6906

62 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014

Justice Court Tuesday evenings, 7:00 p.m.

Town Planning Board 2nd Thursday monthly, 7:30 p.m.

Nutrition Site Every Wednesday & FridayLunch $2.00 per person over 60.

Zoning Board Appeals 3rd Thursday monthly, 8:00 p.m.

Catskill Regional Medical Center: Harris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794-3300 Callicoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5530 Crystal Run Urgent Care Rockhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .796-5444

Town Board Meeting 2nd Monday monthly, 7:30 p.m.

Town of Delaware

104 Main Street, P.O. Box 129, Hortonville, NY 12745 Phone: 887-5250 • Fax: 887-5228 www.townofdelaware-ny.us


Solid Waste/Recycling Centers

All meetings held in the Town Hall Town Board Second Wednesday of each month, 7:00 p.m.

Zoning Board Fourth Thursday of each month, 7:30 p.m.

Planning Board Third Wednesday of each month, 7:30 p.m.

Justice Court Monday Evenings, 7:30 p.m.

Organizations Community Garden Club, President . . .845-513-5263 3rd Tuesday of each month - New members welcome

Jeffersonville Area Chamber of Commerce (JACC) President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .932-8538 JEMS (Jeffersonville Enhances More of Sullivan) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.jeffersonvillejems.org Lion’s Club, President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-3330 Blood Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .436-4416

Western Sullivan Public Libraries Delaware Free Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-4040 Jeffersonville Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4350 Tusten-Cochecton Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252-3360 For programs and events for each branch visit the library website at www.WSPLonline.org

Public Transportation • Air: Monticello Airport, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .794-6888 Stewart International Airport . . . . . . . . . . . .564-7200 Sullivan County International Airport . . . . . .583-6600 • Bus: Shortline Bus System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 794-5500 • Train: AMTRAK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-872-7245 Metro-North Commuter Railroad . . . . .800-638-7646

U.S. Post Offices and Zip Codes Bethel 12720 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .583-5005 Callicoon 12723 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-4470 Callicoon Center 12724 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4287 Cochecton 12726 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .932-8319 Fremont Center 12736 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5808 Hankins 12741 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-4411 Hortonville 12745 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5329 Jeffersonville 12748 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-275-8777 Kenoza Lake 12750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..482-5234 Lake Huntington 12752 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .932-8318 Livingston Manor 12758 . . . . . . . . . . . .800-275-8777 Long Eddy 12760 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5260 North Branch 12766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-3910 Obernburg 12767 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-5599 Youngsville 12791 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4295

Utilities Verizon Telephone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-621-9900 New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG): Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-572-1111 Customer Electric Outage . . . . . . . . . . .800-572-1131

Sullivan County Division of Solid Waste: .845-807-0290 Transfer Stations: Ferndale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .845-292-3670 Rockland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .845-439-3654 Western Sullivan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .845-932-8845 Transfer Stations (Town Residents only): Bethel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .845-292-4505

Church & Synagogue Information Kenoza Lake Assembly of God Church . . . . .482-9856 Church on the Rock (Pentecostal) . . . . . . . . .482-5870 Congregation Ahavath Sholom Synagogue -PO Box 183, Jeffersonville, NY 12748 Grace Lutheran Church, North Branch . . . . .482-5218 Presbyterian Church of Jeffersonville . . . . . .482-5549 St. Francis Roman Catholic Church Youngsville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4640 St. George Roman Catholic Church Jeffersonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-4640 St. Paul’s Mission United Reform Church Youngsville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-5760 United Reform Church, Youngsville . . . . . . . .482-4553 United Methodist Church, Jeffersonville . . . . .482-5561 United Methodist Church, Kenoza Lake . . . . .482-5561 Word of Life, Youngsville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-3338

Children/Youth Organizations CYO (Catholic Youth Organization) . . . . . . . . . .482-4186 Girl Scouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .887-5394 Boy Scouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-5136 4-H Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-5729 Junior JEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .482-3053 Presbyterian Church Youth Group . . . . . . . .482-5047 Jeffersonville Lion’s - Leo Club . . . . . . . . . . .482-4591

Senior Citizen Events Jeffersonville - 2nd Thursday each month, 12 noon. Town Hall, Legion Ave., Jeffersonville, 482-9953. Senior Citizens meet 1st, 3rd & 4thTuesday at 12 noon. Delaware Community Center, 570-224-6381.

Thrift Shops IOU Main Street Thrift Shop Wed.-Sat., 10-3 p.m. (Bag Day on Wednesdays) Main Street, Callicoon, NY 12723 St. Paul’s Mission Thrift Store Wed & Sat., 10-3 p.m. St. Rt. 52. 4042 State Route 52, Youngsville, NY 12791 The Ark Thrift Shop Thurs.,11-2 p.m. & Sat., 11-3 p.m. 4907 Main Street (St. Rt. 52), Jeffersonville, NY 12748 All area codes are (845) unless otherwise listed.

Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014 63


64 Jeffersonville Journal • 2013-2014


Jeffersonville Journal  

Annual publication includes interesting articles, local events, cultural events and business listing in and around Jeffersonville, NY.

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