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Maddie Howard 2017-2018 2nd Semester Portfolio

Yosemite National Park


Self Reflection Self Evaluation

Grand Canyon National Park


This semester, regarding leadership and teamwork, seemed to be a lot better than last semester. I feel like the editors and the staffers got to know each other more and everyone was easier to work with because of that. I also feel like I worked pretty well with everyone this semester. Just like I said last semester, I would like to try to be a more hands on leader and not be afraid to say what I need to get done. I will use my improved leadership skills in the future to get things for my page done early and more efficiently and take these skills into the next chapter of my life. Regarding actual production skills, even for a second year editor, I still find myself using Adamson’s help. I definitely feel like I have evolved in my designing skills in the second semester. Deadlines are what makes our paper good and ready to go by the time it is ready to be passed out to the student body. I feel like I have not been the best with getting everything done on time. Senioritis definitely hit me hard this semester. Even though that was an issue, I was still able to get my work done in time, even though a lot of that was at the last minute. Journalism ethics have the ability to tell us right from wrong. In a newspaper, especially, it is very important not to plagiarize. If someone plagiarized their article, there is a chance that the newspaper could

Kenai Fjords National Park

get shut down. I feel like I was a good asset to the staff this year. I feel like I really only put the effort into my pages and not really paying a lot of attention to the other pages. I wish I did help out a lot more since this was my last semester of newspaper. Some problems that I faced was not getting some stories for my page done on time. This put me in a situation where I would have to come up with something or use an article from another issue that was not used yet. I have learned to become prepared for someone not getting their stuff done by thinking of different ways to get my page organized. My greatest weakness, regarding publications, would be trying to remembering all of the different tricks and tips of InDesign. To overcome this weakness, I will probably write some of the tips down in order to remember them. Overall, this semester has been really good and an exciting learning experience. Newspaper has definitely been one of the coolest experiences I have ever been through. I have learned so many useful things that I will take with me to my next chapter in my life. I am so happy to have worked on the CsPress and to have met some really awesome people in the process. I definitely cherish the memories and the lessons that I have learned over the last three years.


The most significant work that I created this year was my milkshake review in the May issue of the paper. This was the most enjoyable because I was able to go around to three different milkshake places and ice cream is my favorite dessert. I was able to discover different places that I would have never even think to visit. I have been to Shake Shack before and that place never disappoints. I was able to go to a really cool, old place called MacAlpines. I was really shocked about how good that place was because it was just a hole in the wall place that I would have never thought about going to. It was a very easy piece to complete because I love ice cream and I was so excited about this story. I also got pretty good pictures for this story as well. Shake Shack and Churn were not the best photographed. Shake Shack was definitely better looking than the Churn milkshake, but MacAlpines was the best photographed for sure. It was just a good looking milkshake. Overall, this has probably been my most favorite article that I have written this year. SUMMER Milkshake SMOOTHIE Madness BOWL RECIPES

I

food stuff

F you want to go back in time

With summer just around the corner, smoothies are an option to help cool off. By straw or spoon, these smoothies are a great refreshment. They are quick and easy to make and do not call for a lot of ingredients.

Mixed Berry Bowl

4GRACE HAYCRAFT ½ cup apple juice ½ cup almond milk ½ cup frozen blueberries ½ cup frozen strawberries ½ cup frozen açaí berry

Strawberry Lemonade

to an early 1950s theme diner, MacAlpines is the place to visit. Located in Central Phoenix, along 7th Street, MacAlpines has been charming the community since 1929. At first, it just looks like a small place that would not even take notice to, but when you walk in, there is a ton of old vintage furniture and knick-knacks that will take you back in time. They have classic diner food including, cheese burgers, hot dogs, and salads. What MacAlpines is known for, however, is their milkshakes and sodas with ice cream. They have over a hundred flavor combinations that you can choose from including, chocolate, peppermint, birthday cake, banana, and vanilla. They even offer some unique flavors that include, dill pickle, licorice, nectar, and hogsmeade. To add to the old fashion feel, they make their milkshakes in the old fashion Hamilton Beach milkshake machines. They also use the classic brand of ice cream called Thrifty’s. This milkshake was the perfect consistency of creamy and smooth. The chocolate flavor was so well distributed with the taste of peppermint flavor. The milkshake was topped with, easily determined, homemade whipped cream, a cherry, and a peppermint candy. Overall, MacAlpines was definitely the best milkshake I have ever encounterd.

4GRACE HAYCRAFT 3 cups frozen strawberries 1 cup lemonade ½ cup vanilla, plain, or strawberry yogurt

Sweet Banana Bowl

4MADDIE HOWARD

CHOCOLATE ATTACK! Maddie Howard orders two chocolate pepermint milkshakes at MacAlpines. These shakes are topped with homemade whip cream. peppermint candies, and a cherry. Customers will pay no more than $6 for a shake.

4MADDIE HOWARD

Shake Shack Shake Shack is a go to place for someone craving a top notch buger and milkshake. They have three locations around Phoenix and even more all over the country. Shake Shack originally started as just a hot dog cart located in New York. They are a pretty modern style restaurant, so when you walk in, everything is clean cut and very organized. The milkshakes that they offer are chocolate, vanilla, black and white, peanut butter, caramel, strawberry, and coffee. You can also get any of these milkshakes in a malted form. The milkshake that is my personal favorite is the black and white milkshake. This milkshake is handspun and consists of a mix of chocolate and vanilla ice cream. It was very tasty and pretty rich, so typically only a few bites would satisfy one’s chcolate and vanilla craving. Shake Shack is always a fantastic place to get a quality milkshake to go with your burger and fries.

Churn

2 frozen bananas (chopped) ¾ cup yogurt ¾ cup almond milk 1 tablespoon peanut butter

4GRACE HAYCRAFT

4MADDIE HOWARD Grace Haycraft

10

trending now editor

Churn is another ice cream parlor located in Phoenix along Central Avenue. When you first walk into Churn, you feel like you are in a candy wonderland. It has candy on one side of the store that covers the wall from head to toe. On the other side of the store is where you order the ice cream. They also offer baked goods such as cookies. I was actually able to see them make the cookies and they are enormous sized cookies. They offer a wide selection of ice cream flavors, but not as many as MacAlpines. They do not have any specialty milkshake flavors, you just choose your ice cream flavor and they make your shake. I chose just a classic strawberry shake. It was not the best milkshake I have had, but it was not the worst. It was just an average milkshake. The flavor was definitely delicious and the texture was creamy, but it does not compare to MacAlpines or Shake Shack.

Maddie Howard creeker editor

MAY 2018 intrigue


Most Significant Work

Sequoia National Park


Tear Sheets: Stories Tear Sheets: Stories

Great Smokey Mountains National Park


September Stories


October Stories


November Stories


December Stories


Februray Stories travel

ing to nect

d hike in the hidden red rock trails of Sedona exes. a. According to Sedona Red Rocks Tours, a spots in Sedona that are aligned with the ley l places around the world. hrough places like the Pyramids, Stonehenge, dered to be sacred healing places,” said Gallery in Sedona. ortexes. These trees have a spiral trunk, which rgy. DNA, tornadoes, so when you go to a vortex, ming from the on or energy,”

discusses hought to be to healing, laces where ” editate in the g vibrations, all dependent vortex. ese vortexes which increases id Altman. pen in Sedona hose interke the time to

“Sedona vortexes are thought to be swirling centers of energy that are conducive to healing, meditation, and self-exploration. These are places where the earth seems especially alive with energy.”

me clear my m Brechner, a

rs will notice hese stores, hikers can learn more about

ter meditation would be to compare it to me... it isn’t a cardio-like workout yet it had or. meditating. It generally depends on the perch type of stone has specific qualities that meditation.

MEDITATING deep in one of the Sedona

vortexes, Heather Lambesis takes in the scenery and gets in touch with spiritual vibrations. Locals and spiritual enthusiasts say that one can feel the vortex in their body when meditating inside of one. 4 ZOIE LAMBESIS

Kicks on Travelers from all over have been getting their kicks on Route 66 for many decades. Known for its wild west roots, there are many stops along the way in Arizona’s portion. Coming to life on Nov. 11, 1926, Route 66 has been serving settlers and tourists of America for over 90 years, starting in Chicago, Illinois and ending in Los Angeles, California. “Route 66 seems like a window into how things used to be and people like it because it is nostalgic,” said Avalon McLeod, a senior. Along the way, there are many different historical hotels and shops that can be seen just along Route 66. “When I was in Flagstaff one time, I actually stayed in a hotel by Route 66 called Little America, it was really cool,” said Kaitlyn Walker, a senior. During the Great Depression, many families wanted to escape their lives back east and start a better one on the west coast. The major reason for this was because of the Dust Bowl. According to National 66, a website preserving the historic route, people began to see Route 66 as a “road of opportunity”. “This road gave people the opportunity to see the country and since the automobile was now able to function over long distances, families were able to go on vacations across the country,” said Geoff Johnson, a history teacher. In Arizona, Route 66 runs through the northern part of the state. It runs through major cities including Flagstaff, Kingman, Winslow, and Holbrook. “When I’m up in Flagstaff, I don’t like to take the highway around. I like to go through, because there are still some of those old motels that are still operating and it just gives the feeling of what things used to be like,” said Johnson In Winslow, one of the hotels that is found along Route 66 is the Wingwam Village Motel. This motel is a significant choice because you are sleeping in a concrete tepee. Another stop that can be made along the way in Arizona’s portion of Route 66 is the famous Meteor Crater. This crater is about a mile long, 550 feet deep, and around 50,000 years old. Stopping at the Meteor Crater, tourists a able to take a tour around the rim of the crater. Route 66 also goes right through the town of Flagstaff. Route 66 runs right through the heat of Flagstaff so this means there are plenty of stops to make along the way. One interesting restaurant is called the Galaxy Diner. This restaurant offers classic meal combinations including burgers, fries, and shakes and it gives their customers a 1950’wws diner experience. Tourists can also go to the Museum of Northern Arizona and The Arboretum at Flagstaff. As people travel along Route 66, they will find that it takes them back in time and gives them a feel of what that time was like.

Maddie Howard Creeker Editor

9


March Stories In 1922, a woman by the name of Anna Hopkins suspected that her husband, the chief engineer for the local mining company, was involved in an affair with a teacher in town. Having become fed up with these rumors, Hopkins acted on her rage and reportedly threw carbolic acid in the face of the teacher. This can cause major corrosive injury, as proven by the teacher, who is reported to have died in the Connor Hotel. The teacher is said to haunt Room 1 and 2 and people are reporting seeing a strange figure on occasion and the radio being turned on, even when unplugged. “I really just think that Jerome is a huge tourist trap,” said Ethan Penington, a sophomore. Jerome, being a mining town in the late 19 and early 20 century, was almost devoid of female presence, apart from the prostitutes who worked in brothels and on the streets of the town. One popular spot for these scandalous acts was known as “Husband’s Alley” located just off of what was Main Street. Many women were reported to have been killed in that area and are still seen to this day by travellers. “Nothing has ever happened to me personally, but I know people who have had paranormal experiences, so I definitely believe in ghosts,” said Gina Mure, a Cave Creek local. According to visitors, the most haunted place in town is the Jerome Grand Hotel which was not always what it is today. Being built in 1926 under the name “United Verde Hospital,” this building saw a lot of gruesome injuries and deaths, seeing as it was a hospital in a mining settlement before medicine was extremely advanced.

XANDRA SQUIER looks around at the vintage buildings in Jerome. Jerome is known for its supernatural atmosphere and haunted buildings, such as the one pictured. Many people explore Jerome’s surroundings looking too see paranormal things. 4SEAN GANNON People that spend the night often report hearing someone trying to open their door or keys jingling, sounds that would regularly be heard in a hospital, and even say that they have seen items moving or figures throughout the hotel. Claude Harvey, the old hospital maintenance worker, fell to his death in the elevator shaft in 1935. The outline of his body remains on the floor below the elevator and some staff say that they have heard or seen Harvey still cleaning the floors of the once-hospital, now-hotel.

Jerome is not only popular to tourists but to ghost hunting shows as well. Hit programs like Ghost Adventures and Ghost Hunters have tried their luck at Jerome hotel.

Sean Gannon tech editor

SAVE MONEY, STAY LOCAL

Figuring out where to go for spring break can be difficult for many, however, Arizona offers several cheap places to visit, so traveling will not put a damper on the bank account. “People should stay in Arizona for vacations because staycations are relatively cheap, and since we’re in high school, some of us may move away later in life and regret not exploring more of our state,” said Mackenzie Moller, a senior. Arizona offers many different opportunities to enjoy the outdoors and learn to appreciate the desert that many call home. Some activities that some people can do during a staycation include hiking, mountain biking, tubing, and fishing. A little closer to home in Cave Creek, people are able to have a lake day at Bartlett Lake or Lake Pleasant. Camping is also available at these lakes.

“My favorite lake is Bartlett Lake because it is close, it has some rocks and canyons, and you can get out of the wind down there. It’s also really beautiful,” said avid fisher and math teacher Russell DelGrosso. There are also different towns in Arizona that offer an out of town feel when people visit because of the different climates and terrain that are found there. Some of those towns include Prescott, Sedona, and Flagstaff. Prescott and Flagstaff both have a forest feel to them which can be great for someone wishing to escape the desert scene in Phoenix. Sedona has a different feel with the red rocks mixed with forest. Sedona is also a place where people can discover spiritual objects, including vortexes.

“Flagstaff is probably my favorite place to get away to because it is such a cute town and I love how it kind of makes you feel like you aren’t in Arizona, so it’s like you’re in a different state,” said Kaitlyn Walker, a senior. If one wants to feel like they are out of the state, there are many resorts that offer an escape from the desert with restaurants and pools. Some of these include the JW Marriott Desert Ridge, The Scottsdale Princess and The Westin at Kierland. Prices vary at different times of the year, but these resorts can offer a relaxing night away from home.

are many

Maddie Howard Creeker Editor

“People should stay in Arizona for vacations because staycations are relatively cheap and, since we’re in high school, some of us may move away later in life and regret not exploring more of our state.” Mackenzie Moller, a senior. intrigue MARCH 2018

W GRACE HAYCRAFT-MCKEE 9


April Stories 14 ■ APRIL 13, 2018

SPORTS

THE CACTUS SHADOWS PRESS

Paddle oar drift

Maddie Howard explains the history of kayaking and how it has evolved in today’s culture.

F

OR many decades, kayaking

was a way of life for the first people who lived in the United States, but now it has transformed into a fun hobby and even a lifestyle. “My favorite part about kayaking is how peaceful it is, it is just you, another person and the nature around you,” said Jeffery Walker, an economic teacher. According to kayakin.tripod.com, the firsdt kayak sprang up from the Inuit people who were native to the artic terrain. They designed the first kayak out of wood and different kinds of fur, including seal skin. For the early inahbitants of the world, kayaking was used as a way to survive. These people would use it to get from place to place and to hunt for food. According to sea-quest-kayak.com, in 1845 a man named John Macgregor created a decked canoe that he based off some of the first kayaks that the natives used. His canoe was known as the “Rob Roy”. In the modern days, kayaks are made out of different bases including plastic and fiberglass. Another kind of kayak that is availiable is one that is inflatable. These kayaks can make the sport more enjoyable because it is an easy and light way to go about the lake and convienient to pack up when done. “My kayaks are made out of plastic and they are pretty easy to carry around and get around the lake, but I feel like having an inflatiable kayak would be so much easier to get around,”

said Holland Loberg, a junior and avid kayaker. In Arizona, there is a variety of spots that locals and tourists can explore via kayak. “I went to Lake Powell when I went kayaking, the lake was absolutely beautiful and it is just such a fun a peacful time to enjoy nature, said Julia Kovachi, a senior. In Prescott, Arizona, there is a lake called Watson Lake. It is a man-made lake that is surrounded by large boulders. With a set up like this, there are different hidden places that are accessable to kayakers. People are able to go through tight canyon like formations with their kayakas to explore a more in depth beauty the lake has to offer. A closer spot to enjoy kayaking near Cave Creek is Bartlett Lake. This lake is also a manmade lake that is in a canyon setting surrounded by the Tonto National Forest. Bartlett is known to be a little crowded with boaters, but it is a popular spot to kayak along the mountains and even get some fishing in. Another spot located in the Phoenix valley is the Salt River. The Salt River is a steady flowing river that makes it easy for kayakers to enjoy. The river may have some fast flowing rapids that could take the kayaker by surprise if not prepared. However, this lake does allow a kayaker to pull off to the side to enjoy a picnic under the shade of a Mesquite tree. If one is lucky, while flowing along the river, there may be some wild horses taking a drink off to the side.

ON THE VERDE RIVER, Sierra Flue-

gel, a senior, paddles down a portion of the river in her kayak.

4ANNALEE BARNETT

Animal advocates call for the end of husky races A FAMOUS AND ICONIC ALASKAN TRADITION,

The Iditarod, is coming to a crashing halt due to accusations of animal abuse within the organization. The Iditarod also known as the Last Great Race on Earth began in 1973. Mushers and their dogs race from Anchorage to Nome Alaska, every March against many other highly competitive teams.

HOW IT WORKS Teams consist of 16 dogs with one musher. Most teams complete the race in eight to 11 days with musher Dallas Seavey holding the record at eight days, 11 hours, 20 minutes, and 16 seconds. Conditions during the Iditarod are always

that in actuality overheating during a sled race is of bigger concern then being too cold. Although many believe in this theory, many animal advocates disagree and do not support the race nor its ethics.

CONTROVERSY Another issue with the Iditarod is the rumors and accusations of animal abuse that have recently come into the limelight. According to PETA (People for Ethical Treatment of Animals), more than 20 dogs have died since 2004 strictly from participating in the race. “I think it's awful that they are treating

“I think it’s awful that they are treating the dogs

should be disqualified. One bad case should not ruin it for everyone,” said Russell Delgrosso, Alaskan salmon fisherman.

According to the Washington Post, the Iditarod started drug testing dogs in 1994 and has a clean record up until last year. Record holder Seavey, had four dogs with tramadol and opioid pain reliever found in their system.

THE END OF THE IDITAROD

After the accusations of doping and mistreatment, many animal advocates are calling for the end of the Iditarod. In fact, they have been requesting the race stop since the early 1970s because of the cruel treatment and neglect the dogs endure.


May Stories SUMMER SMOOTHIE BOWL RECIPES With summer just around the corner, smoothies are an option to help cool off. By straw or spoon, these smoothies are a great refreshment. They are quick and easy to make and do not call for a lot of ingredients.

Mixed Berry Bowl

4GRACE HAYCRAFT ½ cup apple juice ½ cup almond milk ½ cup frozen blueberries ½ cup frozen strawberries ½ cup frozen açaí berry

Strawberry Lemonade

I

food stuff

F you want to go back in time

to an early 1950s theme diner, MacAlpines is the place to visit. Located in Central Phoenix, along 7th Street, MacAlpines has been charming the community since 1929. At first, it just looks like a small place that would not even take notice to, but when you walk in, there is a ton of old vintage furniture and knick-knacks that will take you back in time. They have classic diner food including, cheese burgers, hot dogs, and salads. What MacAlpines is known for, however, is their milkshakes and sodas with ice cream. They have over a hundred flavor combinations that you can choose from including, chocolate, peppermint, birthday cake, banana, and vanilla. They even offer some unique flavors that include, dill pickle, licorice, nectar, and hogsmeade. To add to the old fashion feel, they make their milkshakes in the old fashion Hamilton Beach milkshake machines. They also use the classic brand of ice cream called Thrifty’s. This milkshake was the perfect consistency of creamy and smooth. The chocolate flavor was so well distributed with the taste of peppermint flavor. The milkshake was topped with, easily determined, homemade whipped cream, a cherry, and a peppermint candy. Overall, MacAlpines was definitely the best milkshake I have ever encounterd.

4GRACE HAYCRAFT 3 cups frozen strawberries 1 cup lemonade ½ cup vanilla, plain, or strawberry yogurt

Sweet Banana Bowl

4MADDIE HOWARD

Milkshake Madness

CHOCOLATE ATTACK! Maddie Howard orders two chocolate pepermint milkshakes at MacAlpines. These shakes are topped with homemade whip cream. peppermint candies, and a cherry. Customers will pay no more than $6 for a shake.

4MADDIE HOWARD

Shake Shack Shake Shack is a go to place for someone craving a top notch buger and milkshake. They have three locations around Phoenix and even more all over the country. Shake Shack originally started as just a hot dog cart located in New York. They are a pretty modern style restaurant, so when you walk in, everything is clean cut and very organized. The milkshakes that they offer are chocolate, vanilla, black and white, peanut butter, caramel, strawberry, and coffee. You can also get any of these milkshakes in a malted form. The milkshake that is my personal favorite is the black and white milkshake. This milkshake is handspun and consists of a mix of chocolate and vanilla ice cream. It was very tasty and pretty rich, so typically only a few bites would satisfy one’s chcolate and vanilla craving. Shake Shack is always a fantastic place to get a quality milkshake to go with your burger and fries.

Churn

2 frozen bananas (chopped) ¾ cup yogurt ¾ cup almond milk 1 tablespoon peanut butter

4GRACE HAYCRAFT

4MADDIE HOWARD Grace Haycraft

10

trending now editor

Churn is another ice cream parlor located in Phoenix along Central Avenue. When you first walk into Churn, you feel like you are in a candy wonderland. It has candy on one side of the store that covers the wall from head to toe. On the other side of the store is where you order the ice cream. They also offer baked goods such as cookies. I was actually able to see them make the cookies and they are enormous sized cookies. They offer a wide selection of ice cream flavors, but not as many as MacAlpines. They do not have any specialty milkshake flavors, you just choose your ice cream flavor and they make your shake. I chose just a classic strawberry shake. It was not the best milkshake I have had, but it was not the worst. It was just an average milkshake. The flavor was definitely delicious and the texture was creamy, but it does not compare to MacAlpines or Shake Shack.

Maddie Howard creeker editor

MAY 2018 intrigue


Tear Sheets: Spreads

Badlands National Park


September Spread


October Spread


November Spread


December Spread


Februray Spread creeker

the Creek screams for ice cream

A

TINY ice cream parlor in the

center of Cave Creek, right next to El Encanto, is one of a kind, and definitely gives Dairy Queen a run for their money in the dessert business. The City Creamery, a new ice cream shop in Cave Creek, delivers a friendly and welcoming environment all while serving up some of the best ice cream in town. When entering the creamery, one is instantly drawn to the churns on the right side of the entrance, where they produce small batches of ice cream to serve customers. These churns look like three-feettall wooden barrels with PVC pipe coming from the top. Each day, they have a slightly different set of flavors available depending on which kinds of ice cream they have been making, usually ranging between 10-15 different flavors. Opposite of the churns is a map of the United States where people are able to put small stickers indicating where they came from. Service was immediate as I was greeted as soon as I stepped foot through the door. The employees are clean cut, well mannered, and very friendly. They all seem like they genuinely like coming to work. I was able to sample a few different flavors when I visited so I began with the one on the menu that intrigued me the most: Jalapeno. At first, I was very concerned

that this concept of ice and spice would not pan out well, but I was delighted to be proven wrong. Beginning with the bland taste of vanilla, I was not too impressed, but about five seconds into letting the ice cream settle into my taste buds, I was hit with an overwhelming heat while it was treated by the vanilla. Overall, the Jalapeno ice cream is a fantastic, original idea. Originating in Virginia City, Montana, a town with a population of 198 as of 2016, the small creamery is focused less on quantity and more on quality. Everyday, the company produces minute batches of natural, handmade ice cream with no added preservatives. Now, the company has grown to have three locations in Virginia City, West Yellowstone, and Cave Creek. All of these towns have a relatively small population, with Cave Creek and Carefree having a combined population of about 9,200 people giving this location the potential to make more money while still maintaining the “small town” vibe. For those seeking something a little more tame, I would recommend the cookie dough ice cream. Made with chunks of real cookie dough, this ice cream delivers the pure sweet taste that everyone looks for in ice cream.

Sean Gannon tech editor

FLAVOR OVERLOAD, this ice cream shop is

home to many different flavors including classic Chocolate, Vanilla, Butter Pecan, and Mint Chip. The City Creamery is also home to unique flavors such as Licorice, Maple Nut, Wedded Bliss, Huckleberry Honey and Lavender, and Candied Jalapeno.

4 SEAN GANNON

WHERE TO GO FOR GAMEDAY

4

HAROLD’S

BUFFALO CHIP

This bar and restaurant is a great place for all the Chicago Bears fans in town. A bell is rung every time their team makes a touchdown.

For all the Packers fans out there, The Buffalo Chip hosts cheese curd competitions, and sells season seat reservation

ROADHOUSE With over 16 large flat screen TV’s, and a tailgate tent, Harolds is great place for Steelers fans to watch their big game.

UMAJA PEIRCE FEBRUARY 2018 intrigue


creeker

FOCUSED , Grossi teaches one of his pupils how to play the guitar. He wants other people to learn and appreciate the art of music as a whole.

rank Grossi, born and raised in Colorado, learned to play guitar as a teen after tradgedy struck, and he was no longer able to play sports. “...Children, they need an identity in life and it’s [music] not for everyone, but most people need something to identify with,” said Grossi. Although music is his passion currently, this was not always the case. “I used to be a football player when I was a kid. I played a lot of sports… football, baseball, basketball, all sorts of sports. At age 12 I broke my hip playing football, and people don’t realize those sorts of things happen to people, and they lose their identity. So I asked my parents if I could take guitar lessons because I couldn’t play sports anymore, and I needed something,” said Grossi. Grossi played in a band in high school and continued doing so until his mid-twenties. It was then that he made the decision he was not going to be famous, and decided to keep guitar in his life as a recreational activity. He worked several jobs, including some in the Frank Grossi, who was construction field, until a injured at age 12 friend offered him a guitar teaching job. When Grossi took it, he was surprised to learn how much he enjoyed teaching. “Music has a big part in a lot of peoples lives that isn’t fame. It’s for the expression,” said

“So I asked my parents if I could take guitar lessons because I couldn’t play sports anymore, and I needed something.”

Grossi. Students of Grossi have gone on to become professional guitarists and use his teachings to build their career. Spending several years teaching in Colorado Springs, Grossi and his wife moved to Arizona in 1998 and he started working a full time job while teaching guitar part time. Big Rock Music officially started in 2004 and became Grossi’s full time job. He added two piano instructors for two years but in 2011, after his wife passed away, he returned to teaching solely guitar. “My mother knew Frank somehow, that’s why I took guitar and piano from his wife. He was my first teacher,” said Ryder Jones, a junior. Big Rock Music Guitar Lessons moved into the Spanish Villa and is now additionally selling guitars and making small repairs. He now sells acoustic, electric, and bass as well as banjos, mandolins, and ukuleles. With 15 years of teaching experience, Grossi helps students from all different backgrounds ages 5 and up. “I started taking lessons with him at the age of 4, and I did so because when I was little I always wanted to play the guitar, and for my birthday my dad bought me an electric Fender and signed me up for lessons with him. Frank was my first teacher, and I still go to lessons with him here and there when I can,” said Annikka Fremel, a junior. Grossi believes that music is therapeutic for people, and that art as a whole is necessary in our schools and society. Along with wanting to contribute to keeping art in people's lives, he also hopes to aid in prolonging the guitar as an iconic instrument.

Getting in tune with Frank Grossi

PATIENCE, Grossi is teaching his pupil the ways of the guitar,

Maja Peirce staff writer

intrigue FEBRUARY 2018

4MAJA PEIRCE

including the different notes, frets, and which strings are which. Tuning is one of the first steps to learning the instrument.

4MAJA PEIRCE

5


March Spread creeker

Exploring with Extreme Arizona

VROOM VROOM, avid dirt bike rider,

Sean Gannon, rips through the Tonto National Forest on his Suzuki RM125. Extreme Arizona offers dirt bike rentals all week long. Bikes can be rented for a day, half-day, or multiple. 4ETHAN PENINGTON

From roaring four-wheelers to speedy jet skis, Extreme Arizona offers a wide variety of all-terrain vehicles to satiate an extremist’s need for adventure. “Extreme Arizona brings in a lot of tourists and a lot of money into the town of Cave Creek,” said Janet Olson, an employee. The company offers daily rentals and guided tours in the Sonoran Desert as well as the Bradshaw mountains. The tours are led by experienced, local guides, who are familiar with the surrounding area. “Our customer service is probably first and foremost. All of our vehicles are street legal and we have them serviced every four hours for safety,” said Olson. Not only is Extreme Arizona located in the middle of a vast desert filled with trails, it is also only half an hour away from both Bartlett Lake and Lake Pleasant. There are also wave runners and water related motor vehicles available for those wanting to take a trip to the lake. On April 15, brand new jet ski models will be available to rent. For those who prefer land vehicles,

ATV, dirt bike, and Polaris RZR rentals are available for inquiring guests. Customers without the ability to tow are offered services and trailers upon request. “It's good because it gets people out to explore the desert and a lot of people go out to do it with their families. I think it’s a great business,” said Nicole Vian, a senior. Vian is a dirt biker herself and has even competed in dirt biking events. Any skill level is welcome to come on the guided tours. From highly experienced, to completely new, it is encouraged to try out the high energy activity. “I’ve only ever gone four wheeling once or twice, but when I did go, I had so much fun. Going on a guided tour sounds like a lot of fun as well as a good way to gain experience,” said Sierra Fluegel, a senior. The tours offer a wide variety of desert wildlife and nature. Spring is one of the most recommended seasons. The longer tours are much more challenging, however, they offer a special experience.

Annalee Barnett sports editor

UNCOVERING TONTO Tonto Bar and Grill expertly blends both Old Western and Native American traditions in its menu and ambiance, and in doing so has preserved the authenticity of the richly unique history behind the restaurant and its location. “I had no idea there was so much history behind it, but now that I do it makes going there different,” said Sheree Bolkovatz, a junior. The restaurant has been open for over 20 years, but the land it sits on has stories that date all the way back to the 1800s, when it was inhabited by the Tonto Apache tribe. At this time, General George Stoneman’s troops were making their way down from military camps in Prescott and Camp Verde. The Tonto Apaches were skilled at keeping intruders at bay, but were pushed out by Stoneman’s soldiers. While the original mission was to improve upon and expand a supply wagon road, the troops found the land to be ideal for a stopover camp. Slowly, with help from the “gold boom” in the Bradshaw mountains attracting more people, it evolved into a new community for miners and ranchers to move into. In the 1940s, the main allure began to be recapturing the Old West and its cowboy-and-Indian past. Also due in part to the popularization of dude ranches at this time, the Howard

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Ranch was taken over and renamed to Rancho Mañana. It quickly became the most famed dude ranch in the state. Tonto Bar and Grill became what it is today with it’s opening in 1994. Since then, sharing it’s history and preserving as much as possible has been one of the main traits that sets it apart. “Its history adds more culture,” said Arielle Stanley, an employee. “It’s always fun to talk to customers about it when they ask.” The menu is built based upon blending Native American ingredients and Southwestern style dishes. According to their website, their mission is to honor Arizona’s heritage and indigenous traditions by incorporating different aspects of the culture. “We have been going to Tonto since we moved here fifteen years ago,” said Elizabeth Lincoln, dance teacher. “It’s a great place to take visitors to experience the West.” Not only can you learn about the rich history of the property, often times weddings are held on its golf course.

Annie Sogaard staff writer

SCRUMPTIOUS, this Tonto Burger has bacon, crisp onions, lettuce, tomato, and

cheese. At Tonto Bar and Grill, they offer customers the ability create their own burger that curates to everyone’s tastes buds. 4TONTO BAR AND GRILL MARCH 2018 intrigue


creeker

M Lemon Aid Get to know the man who serves lemonade for a good cause

ix, pour, repeat. Creating something sweet from something sour, dubbed the “lemonade man” by students, Gregory Lousignont sells sweet drinks after school hours. “I see him all the time and he always waves. I haven’t stopped there, but I always make a point to wave back. You really have to be ready for it, sometimes you’re driving by and almost pass him before you can get the wave back,” said Jeremy Valentini, a senior. Lousignont has no set price for his product, instead, he goes entirely off of donations that he then gives to charity. “There’s a number of different charities. The Phoenix Children’s Hospital is one, St. Jude’s, breast cancer research, Lymphoma Leukemia Society. There’s a few more in there, but I kind of pick and choose. The last one I did was Time’s Up,” said Lousignont, as he cut a lemon into a wedge. Donation to charity is a big priority for Lousignont, but human connection is another. He has many locations for his stand, and meets all kinds of people during his sales. While all of these social experiences may be nerve-wracking for some, Lousignont revels in it. “It fills a void with people that was put in by a lot of technology, and that kind of personal interaction with people over something as simple as lemonade really surprised me. I was actually really nervous when I started doing this but the reaction has been so positive that I got a lot more comfortable,” said Lousignont. After a student suggested the location by school campus, Lousignont’s lemonade stand gained popularity with parents and students. He both maintains repeat customers and greets new people each day. “I stopped by last semester and gave $2 for a cup. We talked for 10 minutes about how he wanted to expand his business with the stands, and he was a really cool guy,” said Tyler Fleming, a senior. As the lemonade stand gained popularity, Lousignont made a reputation for himself among students, with both his personality and his product.

Katelyn Reinhart spotlight editor

MAKING A DIFFERENCE, Gregory Lousignont has found a hobby in selling lemonade around the town of Cave Creek. However, Lousignont does not sell his lemonade for his own profit, he takes the money from lemonade sales and donates it to charity. He would also like to expand his stands to more spots around town.

4KATELYN REINHART

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April Spread

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ROM designer handbags, to work clothes, to clothing for teens and children, Gold Mine Thrift Shop has a wide range of finds, relying only on donated items. Located in the center of Cave Creek, the Gold Mine has been a collection point for many relief products. The shop rarely ever throws anything away, keeping most everything for anyone who might need it. They also raise funds for over 27 charities and try to help anyone they possibly can in need. Roots of the beloved thrift store trace back to the Good Shepherd of the Hills parish in 1947, where the store was originally housed. The church first started as a mission outpost, but it was the only one in town at the time, later turning into so much more. Turning 70 years old this year, the stores’ revenue grew to $150,000 per year. “Seeing all the different kinds of people and items that came through the store, you’ve seen everything if you have worked at a thrift store,” Preston Woolsey, a former employee. The thrift shop is filled with dedicated employees and has high reviews online, with many say-

creeker

ing how much they love the store, how great the environment is, and how happy they were when they left. “I’ve only been to it once, but it was such a cool place. They had so much stuff to look at and I really liked it a lot. At first I walked in thinking I wasn’t going to find anything worth finding but I found so much,” said Jordan Bean, a junior. Accepting donations of all kinds, the shop is filled with all types of clothing, household items, art, bedding, books, cookware, electronics, hats, games and puzzles. “Going into the store is kind of a bargain and almost like a treasure hunt. You go in thinking you won’t get anything, and eventually you come out with a lot more things than you bargained for,” said Bean. Many buyers are attracted to the store for its inexpensive prices. “It’s such a cool place to go if you don’t want to blow a bunch of money, there are so many things you can find and it just gives off a bunch of good vibes. All the volunteers who work there are always so nice, kind and willing to help with anything. They always have positive attitudes,” said Madison Monoscalo, a junior. The Gold Mine is open from 9 to 3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday.

Makenna French staff writer

Getting to know the center of the Creek In the heart of Cave Creek stands Black Mountain, a frequent hiking spot known for its steepness. “The hike has been around for decades. My aunt and mom used to hike it when they were my age,” said Jessica Kotowski, a senior and avid hiker. Black Mountain is home to many cacti, wildlife, and dirt, which is a mixture of slate, granite, and shale rock, to be exact. “My favorite part about hiking Black Mountain is it combines my love of exercise with my love of nature,” said Patrick Riley, owner of Black Mountain Adventures, a trail guiding service. Black Mountain is a steep hike, as the highest elevation point is 3,403 feet. The total elevation gain to the top is about 1,118 feet. According to the hiking app AllTrails, to get to the summit, it takes about 2.3 miles and it is an out and back style of a trail. The entire hike up to the peak is uphill mixed with some flat strait forward paths. The trail to the summit is also rated as difficult on AllTrails because of the rocky trail and steep climb to the top. “Make sure you stay on the trail. It’s easy to get lost, I have before. Try to get to the top if you can, I promise the view is worth it,” said Olivia Cristante, a junior. The view at the peak creates a panoramic view of Cave Creek showing all the mountain ranges and familiar buildings. At the top, there is an American Flag that symbolizes accomplishment for many because of how steep the hike is. Beneath the flag is a handmade sign that writes, “Dedicated to those men and women from our community who honorably served and continue to serve in the Armed Forces of the United States. They serve and continue to protect what our veterans fought and died for...our American way of life.”

Grace Haycraft-McKee trending now editor

Digging up fashion at Goldmine Thrift Shop

Makenna French

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staff writer

4OLIVIA STICKEL

4JIM ROBESON MARCH 2018 intrigue


creeker

A bully good time

CAPTURING THE MOMENT The best spots to take preprom pictures.

Live music. Line dancing. Bull riding. All this and more can be found at Outlaws bar and grill located on Cave Creek road.

WATCH OUT, no only is Outlaws

home to good food and a good time, they also have big steers kept in the back. These steers, used for bullriding, can be seen not only from the restaurant, but also driving along Cave Creek Road.

4ANNALEE BARNETT

”I love Outlaws. They offer so many different events for everyone, not to mention that the food is really good too,” said Nicole Vian, a senior. This family restaurant is open seven days a week for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. A wide variety of food is offered to customers, such as burgers, tacos, salads, wraps, and the popular barbecue. The restaurant is also a member of UberEats, an business that delivers whatever food is ordered. It has branched off of the Uber company. “Outlaws is one of the best places in Cave Creek in my opinion. It’s the ultimate package, good food, good service, and cool events,” said Griffin Spellicy, a senior. Being a western themed bar, Outlaws is one of several in the town of Cave Creek. However it offers a unique set of events that allow it to stand out. “I love all of the western bars in Cave Creek, but there’s something special about Outlaws. Maybe its the atmosphere, maybe its the fun events. I’m not sure. But whatever Outlaws is doing, is working,” said Vian. At Outlaws, every day of the week is packed with different events for customers to enjoy. These include bull riding, barrel racing, team roping, line dancing, a mechanical bull, and much more. Another popular event is the motor racing event. Vehicles such as motorcycles, go carts, and even lawn mowers are encouraged to partake in the weekly race. “I think the motor races are one of my favorite events, just because you see such a variety of different vehicles. It’s hilarious when you see a lawn mower come in first over everything,” said Doug Hunt, a common customer. The bar has both an indoor and outdoor setting with lively music and sparking lights strung up. Behind the building, a customer can sit beside the large enclosure filled with horses, cattle, and cows.

Prom is just around the corner and many students are scrambling to take good pictures. Location and lighting is a big part of taking a picture, and students want to make sure they are great enough to last a lifetime. There are many places around Cave Creek to take prom pictures, some of the most popular places include Tonto Bar and Grill and Rancho Manana because they are close by and people love their landscapes. “I really want to go to Rancho Manana or someplace with a really open and scenic background,” said Olivia Rose, a junior. There is more to taking good prom pictures than just the location. It is also about how the photo is taken and making sure all the details are perfect. “To get the best pictures, get them done around sunset time, and make sure to pay a lot of attention to where everyone is placed in big group photos,” said Sayge Bolli, a professional photographer. Wether or not students want to take pictures is up to them. Some do not like it because of the hassle of getting everyone together at a time and place, but many students do think that the pictures are worth the planning, because they are memories that some keep forever. “I want to take prom pictures because it's a good way to remember the night, not only how you looked, but also it will help you temper the memories from that night later on,” said Casey Davis, a senior. This May, many juniors and seniors will be running around town to take good photos.

Annalee Barnett sports editor

Avianna Hoppes staff writer

intrigue MARCH 2018

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May Spread creeker

Breakfast wagon

SITTING DOWN, Olivia Stickel, a senior, checks out the Wagon

Wheel for the first time. The restaurant not only sells an array of beverages, but also foods. Some of there breakfast dishes include,the He-Person consisting of eggs, bacon, sausage, and pancakes. Another dish is called the Omeletwich, which includes a choice bacon or ham on a croissant with American cheese. 4SARA

The Wagon Wheel Coffee shop is a small breakfast place located in Cave Creek. This diner is open every day from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wagon Wheel is a throwback to the classic old diners, but do note that they only take cash. “Its a cute place to eat, it is small and cozy. I love the feel of the place,” said Olivia Graeber, a sophomore. It is a casual restaurant, with meals costing about $10-20. “I love going to the restaurant because their food is really good and I like that it is local,” said Michelle Satran, a freshman. Since Wagon Wheel has been open, it has served as a popular breakfast place for many people. This is also a popular spot for locals and even students around Cave Creek. “The Wagon Wheel used to be the hangout for Cactus Shadows students. They had a back room and it would be filled every morning before school,” said Elissa Ericson, dance teacher.

Avianna Hoppes staff writer

WINDOM

CAN’T STAND THE HEAT

Carefree Kiwanis rewards scholars

Local businesses slow down over the summer.

Hands absentmindedly reach into a mailbox, know, everyone was so excited,” said James shuffling for the smooth texture of paper but Flannagan, a senior who will receive $1,500 expecting very little. A student pulls out the from Kiwanis each semester for two years. typical prize: a few magazines, advertisements, These scholarships vary in longevity and a small parcel. However, one envelope catches amount, with some being a one-time offer and their eye. As the school year comes to a close, others extending through semesters. Each Kiwanis has sent out their scholarships. application was reviewed by the Kiwanis Club From Arts and Humanities to Foreign of Carefree, who awarded the scholarships to Language, Kiwanis offered scholarships of the students. $2,250 and more to students who applied and “I have the best job in Kiwanis: giving out were selected by the club. the money,” said Steve Beginning with sending in Morse, a member of the the application and ending Kiwanis funds committee. with receiving the scholarSeveral students applied, ship, these students have and students of all kinds taken part in the scholwere granted the scholararship process in order ships, from artists to mathto receive their reward. maticians. Among the appliWith essays and intercants was Rachel Curnutt, views, many students have valedictorian, who received a applied for the scholarship scholarship. opportunity. “The application process James Flannagan, a senior “I had been told by a was pretty easy and I’m family friend that I would really glad I got the scholbe a good candidate for arship. I felt pretty accomthe application, so I applied and didn’t really plished with this year overall, and it was a good expect much. I went in for the interview and way to end the year,” said Curnutt. a few weeks later, I got a letter in the mail. I Selected students received their scholarship was actually out with friends getting yogurt at a luncheon on May 16. at the time and my mom called me to let me

“I was actually out with friends getting yogurt at the time and my mom called me to let me know, everyone was so excited,”

Katelyn Reinhart spotlight editor

intrigue MARCH 2018

The restaurant does not accept credit cards, they do not cater, and they do not have wifi services. Those factors may be a downside to people, however, there are some who enjoy the old feel of the restaurant and this may even enhance the experience of the diner. “Some people may not like how old it is, but I love it. It's got a great atmosphere and the food is really good too,” said Graeber. The Wagon Wheel may look like a small building on the side of the road, but it has much to offer in terms of food. The restaurant is best known for its biscuits and gravy, as well as its omelets. They also offer specialty pancakes and french toast that are large in portions. “Their menu never changes, so that way I can always order my favorite breakfast every time I go there,” said Satran. If one wants a quiet peaceful breakfast or brunch, as it is secluded from the heart of downtown Cave Creek, and there is no live music.

When school gets out and the weather heats Larry Grimes, manager at The Creek Patio Grill. up, more and more people leave Cave Creek. Since businesses in Arizona, and especially This means that small businesses have to find in Cave Creek, seem to thrive in the winter ways to cope with the slower times. months, most of them have to find some way Lorna Cooper, a senior who works at Big to cope throughout the summer when business Earl's, said that they get very slow when all the slows. winter visitors leave. “We have to deal with the slow of the sum“So many peomer by not having as high of ple leave because payroll and trying to spend less of how hot it is, money. We have to cut hours and at Big Earl's it and we go with less workers is 90 percent outeveryday so we can still make side seating,” said a profit,” said Grimes. Cooper. People who are employed Snowbird seaby small businesses in Cave son in Arizona Creek also seem to make less is typically Oct. money over the summer. This or Nov. through can happen by their hours getLarry Grimes, a manager at The Creek Patio Grill. April or May. ting cut so the company can According to an spend less on payroll or they ASU study, there can make less tips because of are approximately the limited amount of people. 300,000-400,000 people who travel and live “In the summertime, tips are about half in Arizona through the winter months. This as much and I spend most of my time sitting accounts for a large about of revenue in restauaround at work waiting for customers, while rants, grocery stores, and sporting events. in the wintertime, I'm always running around “I think that we do get slower over the sumdoing stuff,” said Nicole Vian, a senior who mer, mostly during the week with the weekworks at The Village Coffee and Creperie. ends still being pretty busy. To my understandBig companies and corporations do not hurt ing, there are a lot of people who live in the as much as the small businesses in the summer, area in the wintertime and then go somewhere being the small places take a much bigger hit. else for the summer because it is so hot,” said Emma Russello

“...there are a lot of people who live in the area in the wintertime and then go somewhere else for the summer because it is so hot.”

travel editor

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Maddie Howard 2017-2018 Portfolio 2nd Semester  
Maddie Howard 2017-2018 Portfolio 2nd Semester  
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