Page 1

PORTFOLIO

Annalee Barnett


Reflection 1 This final semester of Newsnot having the drive to finish paper, I have learned nothing anything. However, I believe new about production. Evthis will change when I have erything I used this semester, my career because I will be I learned in my previous five working towards a personal semesters. However, although goal that I actually want to I learned nothing new, I will achieve. always be able to take my three years of journalism into Teamwork my future. After leaving high Personally, I do not like to school, I plan work with people. I on majoring in “When you’re do better when I am Digital Journal- dedicated to on my own. However, ism at Southeastif needed, I can pull your page, you ern University. out a personality and I will take the fellow editors, work well with my skills I learned in teammates. To work your writers, this Newspaper together as a team, it class and use it in and the news- is important to let evmy future career eryone have a voice. paper, it pays as a foreign corYou will never know respondent. Per- off. ” if you have missed sonally, the skill an amazing idea I can improve if you refuse to let upon most within production, someone talk and share. This is procrastination. The longer year, I think we were wrong I procrastinated, the worse in silencing certain opinions my page looked. and sticking to what we have always known. There is nothDeadlines ing wrong with doing things I have dealt with deadlines a little different and trying the same I have every year. something new. They are my enemy. I never meet them and I am never Journalism Ethics done when they come rolling Concerning ethics, it never in. I evelive this is mostly due pays off to lie or plagiarize to me having Senioritis and a piece of work. Whatever

you cheat on will always, no matter what, catch up with you in the end. It is important not only for the public that you write for and your own conscience that every article written is done so honorably. Dedication Personally, I feel that I have been very dedicated this semester. When you’re dedicated to your page, you fellow editors, your writers, and the newspaper, it pays off. Self-reflection In this final semester of Newspaper, I have faced several problems and hardships. These arose from my writers and their quality of work. This hardship has taught me that communication is key and that being patient always pays off. I believe that my greatest weakness is my inability to finish anything on time. In the future, I need to cut procrastination out of my lifestyle. To do this, I will set a schedule that keeps everything throughout the day moving so that there is no possibility for me to procrastinate.


Reflection 2 Out of the twelve pages that I edited this semester, page 25 from the May issue was my favorite. There are several reasons I like this page. To begin, both stories on the page are exciting and interesting. Articles One is very applicable to the school due to the fact that it is about the vandalized track. The next story is interesting as well because it speaks of the danger of bull riding. I am proud of the photo that I got for this page and I think that when people look at it, it will make them want to read the article. I also liked that I pulled the tan color from the steer and used it in my kicker and subheads. At first, I was not sure if I was going to

be able to get a bull riding photo, due to schedule problems and the fact that I could not get into the bull riding club without an adult over the age of 21. However, I was able to take the photo the day before production day and fill the giant hole on my page. I was never worried that the vandalism article would get done due to the fact that the writer has always been very reliable. Spread I am proud that I am able to succesfully put together a page that is asthetically appealing without the help of my advisors. I feel that I have come very far as an editor and as a journalism student. Thank you to everyone who has put in time to help me.

SPORTS

THE CACTUS SHADOWS PRESS

MAY 18, 2018 ■ 13

Absolute bull

Professional bull riders face being gored, gouged, and trampled to ride a bull for eight seconds. By ANNALEE BARNETT g sports editor

Two thousand pounds of muscle and flesh bucks wildly as a terrified human clings to the monster’s back. Only eight more seconds remain until the man receives glory, fame, and thousands of dollars.

BULL RIDING IN ARIZONA “Bull riding is one of those sports meant solely for athletes that have a death wish. It’s a true adrenaline junky kind of thing,” said Jocelyn Adams, a junior. Adams competes in local bull riding events as an amateur. Some of the more popular places to see bull riding include Buffalo Chip Saloon and Road Runner Bar. These places allow anyone over 18 years of age to participate, even first timers. Bull riding in Arizona is one of the most popular sporting events in the state. The surplus of western themed towns and barns allows for bull riding to continue to grow in popularity. “I think since Arizona was a settler and frontier town with a bunch of cowboys, western events like bull riding are ingrained in our culture as a state,” said Sierra Fluegel, a senior.

PROFESSIONAL BULL RIDING In March of 2018, the Professional Bull Riding organization came to Phoenix, Arizona. The Gila River Arena was filled

to the brim with thousands of excited fans ready to see some high action bull riding. Professionals travel around the country to compete in events, similar to a tour. The professionals who travel and compete at the events do not have a sports contract like a football player would. In order for a professional to make a substantial amount of money, they must compete and win. “Being a pro bull rider is tough. I mean, it’s their job and they don’t make much if they don’t win. They’re mostly just doing it for the insane adrenaline rush,” said Adams.

INJURIES Not only do professional bull riders not earn as much as other pro athletes, they also have to spend thousands on medical bills. The average professional will have four to five serious surgeries in their lifetime. Bull riding is also credited with the most deaths out of any other professional sport. This is mostly due to injuries in the areas of the head, shoulder, and knee. However, many professional bull riders ignore the fact that they are ever injured. “They don’t care, they just want to be able to get back on the bull the next day,” said Rich Blyn, in a separate interview. Blyn is a Professional Bull rider athletic trainer.

AT BUFFALO CHIP Bar and

Saloon, an amateur bull rider takes a swing at the bull named Noodles. The man had a successful ride and even stayed on Noodles past the designated eight seconds required to qualify.4ANNALEE BARNETT

Administration plans to repair vandalized track

After several unknown people vandalized the school’s track with suggestive graffiti, efforts to remove the spray paint have not been entirely effective. New plans are being made to remove the provocative graffiti.

H

By FAITH HASHER g opinion editor

EARTS pounding, sweat dripping, the track athletes are out on the field putting 100 percent effort in, just so some kids can vandalize the track. The track athletes began their season at the start of February to find out that the weekend before someone had drawn provocative images with spray paint of the field. Throughout the season, there were three home meets where other schools came and saw the embarrassing graphics.

“This summer we plan to finish removing sport itself has to take money out of their all of the spray paint before the football seabudget to replace or fix whatever is broken. son begins,” said Steve Bebee, “It is kind of rude how principal. someone would just ruin Since this vandalism happroperty that people use pened right before the track to train on,” said Grace season, the school had to wait Tipton, a freshman and until after the season to bring track athlete. equipment on the field so they The track team is the did not impede the athletes largest team on campus training. and all of the athletes pracMost people do not know tice or compete six days a that all sports are self-funded week. so when someone ruins the The school is involving equipment or property, the Steve Bebee, principal. the insurance company

This summer we plan to finish removing all of the spray paint before the football season begins.”

because there is a possibility that part of the turf is going to have to be replaced. No matter what, there is a deductible with the insurance which is costing the school. “The people who vandalized the track obviously have no respect for sports or the athletes competing,” said Adam Voeller, a senior and track athlete. Voeller is a sprinter on the track team, who ran the first leg of the 4x1 that broke the school record and got third in state this year. From now on, the track will have newer and more cameras around the stadium as well as more locks so people cannot break in.


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THE CACTUS SHADOWS PRESS

MAY 18, 2018 ■ 13

Absolute bull

Professional bull riders face being gored, gouged, and trampled to ride a bull for eight seconds. By ANNALEE BARNETT g sports editor

Two thousand pounds of muscle and flesh bucks wildly as a terrified human clings to the monster’s back. Only eight more seconds remain until the man receives glory, fame, and thousands of dollars.

BULL RIDING IN ARIZONA “Bull riding is one of those sports meant solely for athletes that have a death wish. It’s a true adrenaline junky kind of thing,” said Jocelyn Adams, a junior. Adams competes in local bull riding events as an amateur. Some of the more popular places to see bull riding include Buffalo Chip Saloon and Road Runner Bar. These places allow anyone over 18 years of age to participate, even first timers. Bull riding in Arizona is one of the most popular sporting events in the state. The surplus of western themed towns and barns allows for bull riding to continue to grow in popularity. “I think since Arizona was a settler and frontier town with a bunch of cowboys, western events like bull riding are ingrained in our culture as a state,” said Sierra Fluegel, a senior.

PROFESSIONAL BULL RIDING In March of 2018, the Professional Bull Riding organization came to Phoenix, Arizona. The Gila River Arena was filled

to the brim with thousands of excited fans ready to see some high action bull riding. Professionals travel around the country to compete in events, similar to a tour. The professionals who travel and compete at the events do not have a sports contract like a football player would. In order for a professional to make a substantial amount of money, they must compete and win. “Being a pro bull rider is tough. I mean, it’s their job and they don’t make much if they don’t win. They’re mostly just doing it for the insane adrenaline rush,” said Adams.

INJURIES Not only do professional bull riders not earn as much as other pro athletes, they also have to spend thousands on medical bills. The average professional will have four to five serious surgeries in their lifetime. Bull riding is also credited with the most deaths out of any other professional sport. This is mostly due to injuries in the areas of the head, shoulder, and knee. However, many professional bull riders ignore the fact that they are ever injured. “They don’t care, they just want to be able to get back on the bull the next day,” said Rich Blyn, in a separate interview. Blyn is a Professional Bull rider athletic trainer.

AT BUFFALO CHIP Bar and Saloon, an amateur bull rider takes a swing at the bull named Noodles. The man had a successful ride and even stayed on Noodles past the designated eight seconds required to qualify.4ANNALEE BARNETT

Administration plans to repair vandalized track

After several unknown people vandalized the school’s track with suggestive graffiti, efforts to remove the spray paint have not been entirely effective. New plans are being made to remove the provocative graffiti.

H

By FAITH HASHER g opinion editor

EARTS pounding, sweat dripping, the track athletes are out on the field putting 100 percent effort in, just so some kids can vandalize the track. The track athletes began their season at the start of February to find out that the weekend before someone had drawn provocative images with spray paint of the field. Throughout the season, there were three home meets where other schools came and saw the embarrassing graphics.

“This summer we plan to finish removing sport itself has to take money out of their all of the spray paint before the football seabudget to replace or fix whatever is broken. son begins,” said Steve Bebee, “It is kind of rude how principal. someone would just ruin Since this vandalism happroperty that people use pened right before the track to train on,” said Grace season, the school had to wait Tipton, a freshman and until after the season to bring track athlete. equipment on the field so they The track team is the did not impede the athletes largest team on campus training. and all of the athletes pracMost people do not know tice or compete six days a that all sports are self-funded week. so when someone ruins the The school is involving equipment or property, the Steve Bebee, principal. the insurance company

This summer we plan to finish removing all of the spray paint before the football season begins.”

because there is a possibility that part of the turf is going to have to be replaced. No matter what, there is a deductible with the insurance which is costing the school. “The people who vandalized the track obviously have no respect for sports or the athletes competing,” said Adam Voeller, a senior and track athlete. Voeller is a sprinter on the track team, who ran the first leg of the 4x1 that broke the school record and got third in state this year. From now on, the track will have newer and more cameras around the stadium as well as more locks so people cannot break in.


MaySpreadSports 14 ■ MAY 18, 2018

SPORTS

Playing for keeps

“I’m glad because I get to keep playing football. It’ll be a lot of fun.”

Stuent athletes secure scholarships and continue competing at... Taylor Markland Northwest Nazarene University- Volleyball Caitlin Bickle - Baylor University- Basketball

MASON RUSSO, FOOTBALL

Elizabeth Raby - South Mountain Community College- Softball

THE CACTUS SHADOWS PRESS

“I’m excited because its going to be a good school with a good education.”

TYLER WILLIAMS, BASEBALL

Venessa Gutierrez - South Mountain Community College- Softball Kendall Bennett - San Diego State University- Swim Tyler Williams - University of Colorado - Colorado SpringsBaseball Zane Arrendle - Paradise Valley Community CollegeBaseball Courtney Chatburn Minot State University (South Dakota)- Softball Katie Deininger - University of Houston - Dive Mason Russo - Concordia College- Football Nathan Cassara - Northwest Nazarene University- Baseball Cruz Hamilton - Ventura College- Baseball

“I’m happy because I get to play baseball in college, I’m excited to see what happens.” ZANE ARRENDALE, BASEBALL

“I’m excited to go to South Mountain Community College for a two year softball scholarship.” ELIZABETH RABY, SOFTBALL

4ANNALEE BARNETT


MaySpreadSports THE CACTUS SHADOWS PRESS SPORTS

MAY 18, 2018 ■ 15

Marchica hurdles competition

I

By GRIFFIN GOLDSTEIN i staff writer

T isn’t very often Cactus Shadows gets to have a state champion, but this year, one individual managed to stay on the top the entire season. This track season, Michael Marchica’s talent and hard work paid off when he won the AIA Division II State title for the 300 meter hurdles.

300 METER HURDLES

Not only does he run the 300 meter hurdles, but also the 110 hurdles and the 4x400 relay. This year, in the state meet, he placed an impressive 6th in the preliminaries and 7th overall in the finals for the 110s with a time of 14.94 seconds. He has also covered 400 meters, just a hair off of a quarter-mile, in just 50 seconds in a relay split. “The improvement Michael has made this year compared to previous years is incredible. We’ve been focusing a lot on block starts and form to really bring down his times as low as possible,” said Steven Dodd, the hurdling coach.

The 300 meter hurdles has a reputation for being one of the hardest events in the sport. It is nearly a quartermile long, all-out sprint, with STATE CHAMPIONS eight 36 inch tall hurdles on Marchica is not the only star the way to the finish line. hurdler on the track team, but is This event requires a lot of Michael Marchica, senior speed-endurance and good track athlete. actually followed close behind by Logan Hasher, a sophomore. form to get over the hurdles The two know each other very as fast and efficiently as poswell and feed off of each other sible. to perform at their best. They have been train“It’s exciting to me that I am able to compete ing together for two full seasons now. at this level and I can’t wait to see what I’ll do in “We do a lot of the same workouts together. It the future,” said Marchica. helps a lot to have someone to push off of,” said Marchica closed his senior season with a Hasher. gold medal at state and a personal record of Now that the 2018 season is over, Marchica 38.86 seconds, only 0.08 seconds off the school will be focusing on staying in shape and trainrecord, which he ran in the state finals. To give ing for his next season in college. He has been an idea as to how fast that is, the Arizona State discussing scholarships with the coach at record for that event is 36.24, making him only Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. a couple seconds off.

“It’s exciting to me that I am able to compete at this level.”

IN THE CLEAR, Michael Marchica leads the pack in the 110 hurdles race at a home meet. Steven Dodd, hurdles coach, awarded Marchica the Most Valuable Player award for the 2017-2018 season. 4 KAYLEIGH RHEA

PAINT BALLIN’ OUT

Katelyn Reinhart discusses the schematics and intrigue of paint ball. ASIDE FROM THE STEADY inhale and exhale of a group, a loading room is silent. People stand inches away from each other, nerves building and guns pointed. For most people, getting shot is an event from a nightmare. However, getting shot is a typical occurrence for paint ballers.

THE RULES OF THE GAME A sport for the adrenaline junkie, paint ball caters to all kinds of people. From nervous beginners to experienced players with thousands of dollars poured into their equipment, the games are split into teams at random. There are two rules in paint ball that must be obeyed in order to win: be quick and avoid getting shot. “I think everyone starts off a bit nervous, and there’s a really big adrenaline rush to it. It’s the kind of thing where you get better the more you do it,” said Colin Dooley, a senior and paint baller.

A TEAM SPORT Known for it’s team building attributes, paint ball has built up a sense of community among players. From entry

level players to near-experts, participants gather before a match until the alarm rings for the round to begin. This time allows players of all kinds to connect before and during the match. “Everyone who does paint ball is super friendly and up for anything, so you know that you’ll make friends when you go. It’s almost like it’s a requirement to play the games,” said Robert Griffiths, a senior.

GETTING INTO THE GAME As people get more into the sport, it is not uncommon to see players with extremely expensive gear mixed into the rounds. Equipment can run anywhere from twenty to thousands of dollars, with some electing to spend money on thicker gear, rapid-fire paint ball guns, and elaborate masks. However, the equipment used does not always dictate the skill of the player. “You can absolutely pour your wallet into gear for paint ball, but you don’t necessarily need to in order to get good. There is an incentive when you buy some nicer stuff because you bond

with other paint ballers over gear, and having some nice stuff inspires you to play more,” said Dooley. While many students have gotten involved, paint ball has left a unmistakable splatter in family life. For many parents, paint ball has proved to be a well-received bonding experience. “I used to take my boys and their friends, and it was a blast to get everyone out there. It was an experience you can’t get anywhere else,” said Roger Gannon, a Cave Creek parent. With people of all ages and experiences, paint ball is a sport that offers something for everyone, from expensive gear to paint splatters.

AT HIS HOME, Colin Dooley practices his paint ball skills. Dooley is an avid paint ball player and often goes out to play with friends at places like Splatter Ranch on Scottsdale and Jomax road. 4KATELYN REINHART


May-Photo & ArticleSports

SPORTS

THE CACTUS SHADOWS PRESS

MAY 18, 2018 ■ 13

Absolute bull

Professional bull riders face being gored, gouged, and trampled to ride a bull for eight seconds. By ANNALEE BARNETT g sports editor

Two thousand pounds of muscle and flesh bucks wildly as a terrified human clings to the monster’s back. Only eight more seconds remain until the man receives glory, fame, and thousands of dollars.

BULL RIDING IN ARIZONA “Bull riding is one of those sports meant solely for athletes that have a death wish. It’s a true adrenaline junky kind of thing,” said Jocelyn Adams, a junior. Adams competes in local bull riding events as an amateur. Some of the more popular places to see bull riding include Buffalo Chip Saloon and Road Runner Bar. These places allow anyone over 18 years of age to participate, even first timers. Bull riding in Arizona is one of the most popular sporting events in the state. The surplus of western themed towns and barns allows for bull riding to continue to grow in popularity. “I think since Arizona was a settler and frontier town with a bunch of cowboys, western events like bull riding are ingrained in our culture as a state,” said Sierra Fluegel, a senior.

PROFESSIONAL BULL RIDING In March of 2018, the Professional Bull Riding organization came to Phoenix, Arizona. The Gila River Arena was filled

to the brim with thousands of excited fans ready to see some high action bull riding. Professionals travel around the country to compete in events, similar to a tour. The professionals who travel and compete at the events do not have a sports contract like a football player would. In order for a professional to make a substantial amount of money, they must compete and win. “Being a pro bull rider is tough. I mean, it’s their job and they don’t make much if they don’t win. They’re mostly just doing it for the insane adrenaline rush,” said Adams.

INJURIES Not only do professional bull riders not earn as much as other pro athletes, they also have to spend thousands on medical bills. The average professional will have four to five serious surgeries in their lifetime. Bull riding is also credited with the most deaths out of any other professional sport. This is mostly due to injuries in the areas of the head, shoulder, and knee. However, many professional bull riders ignore the fact that they are ever injured. “They don’t care, they just want to be able to get back on the bull the next day,” said Rich Blyn, in a separate interview. Blyn is a Professional Bull rider athletic trainer.

AT BUFFALO CHIP Bar and

Saloon, an amateur bull rider takes a swing at the bull named Noodles. The man had a successful ride and even stayed on Noodles past the designated eight seconds required to qualify.4ANNALEE BARNETT

Administration plans to repair vandalized track

After several unknown people vandalized the school’s track with suggestive graffiti, efforts to remove the spray paint have not been entirely effective. New plans are being made to remove the provocative graffiti. By FAITH HASHER g opinion editor

EARTS pounding, sweat dripping, the track athletes are

“This summer we plan to finish removing all of the spray paint before the football season begins,” said Steve Bebee, principal. Since this vandalism hap-

sport itself has to take money out of their budget to replace or fix whatever is broken. “It is kind of rude how someone would just ruin property that people use

This summer we

because there is a possibility that part of the turf is going to have to be replaced. No matter what, there is a deductible with the insurance which is costing the school. “The people who vandalized the track


MayArticleNews

Annalee's Portfolio 2018  
Annalee's Portfolio 2018  
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