Page 1

James D. Julia, Inc. presents Extraordinary Firearms Auction October 31, November 1 & 2, 2017 (Catalog 1 of 2)


Lot 1590 Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Lots 1235 & 1236 Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Lots 1158 & 1159 (top to bottom) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


James D. Julia, Inc. Presents: Extraordinary Firearms Auction & Sporting & Collector Firearms Auction October 31, November 1 & 2, 2017 Extraordinary Firearms Auction Tuesday, October 31st at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, November 1st at 10:00 a.m.–NFA Class 3/Military Sporting & Collector Firearms Auction Wednesday, November 1st directly after Extraordinary NFA Class 3/Military Thursday, November 2nd at 10:00 a.m. Preview Saturday, October 28th, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday, October 29th, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday, October 30th, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, October 31st, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, November 1st, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Thursday, November 2nd, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. There will also be preview during each auction session Special preview can be arranged by appointment

Front cover: Lots 1403, 1448 & 1605 (top to bottom) 203 Skowhegan Road Fairfield, Maine USA 04937 P: (207) 453-7125 F: (207) 453-2502 firearms@jamesdjulia.com www.jamesdjulia.com Contacts: Tony Wilcox, Jeremy Hatch, Wes Dillon, Josh Loewensteiner, J.R. LaRue, John Keene or Mal MacGregor Directions: Exit 133 off I-95, 1 mile North on US Route 201 Catalogs: $40 each or both for $75 Catalog 1: Extraordinary Firearms Auction, Session 1 & part of Session 2 Catalog 2: Sporting & Collector Firearms Auction, part of Session 2 & Session 3 All catalogs are shipped U.S. Priority Mail. If you wish to have Fed Ex Next Day add $17; Fed Ex 2nd Day add $14. Outside North America, add $75 for shipping Prices realized are included and will be mailed approximately 2-3 weeks after the auction Auctioneer: James D. Julia | ME License: AR83/MA License: 1406/NH License: 2511 3

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Part of a remarkable offering of early martial flintlock pistols Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

4


Administration, Staff & Experts Administration & Staff:

Boston Office:

President & Auctioneer James D. Julia Vice President Sandy Julia Executive Assistant to the President Nancy Turcotte-Noonan Chief Executive Officer Mark Ford Executive Assistant to the CEO Sharon Bemis Marketing Director Scott Wentzell Operations Manager Gabe Wiegand Controller, Human Resources Tim Dean Accountant Callie Soule Credit and Collections Melanie DiFloures Firearms Sales Representatives Tony Wilcox, Jeremy Hatch Firearms Senior Consultant & Sales Representative Wes Dillon Firearms Administrative Manager Tara Schmitt BATF Compliance/Inventory Manager & Class 3 Specialist John Keene Firearms Administrative Assistants Chelsea Semple, Nell Inman Fine Art, Asian & Antiques Department Head Bill Gage Fine Art, Asian & Antiques Assistant Department Head Tony Greist Fine Art, Asian & Antiques Administrative Manager Megan Noyes Rare Lamps, Glass & Fine Jewelry Department Head Mike Fredericks Rare Lamps, Glass & Fine Jewelry Administrative Manager Julie Killam Graphic Design Lisa Oakes, Lisa Warren Information Technology & Web Development Jeremy Mahns Photography Jack Stepp, Tracy Grover, Katie Luce Shipping Scott Greeley, Chad Roger Operations Support Staff Tom Weston, Dave Labbe, Jim Weigel, Joe Noyes, Ugo Liberti Administrative Support Staff Deb Duplisea Receptionist Jessica Spaulding

Department Head-Fine Art, Asian & Antiques Bill Gage Marketing and Business Development Coordinator for the Boston Area Rebekah Kaufman Fine Art Specialist Allyson Lee Asian Art Specialist Joshua Chamberlain

Expert Departments:

Chief Firearms Consultant and Cataloger J.R. LaRue Firearms & Military Consultants & Catalogers Gerald AlFares (military swords, Japanese swords & armor) Leonardo Antaris, MD (European military pistols) Wes Dillon (Sporting Arms) Ron Gabel (Kentucky rifles) Bruce Kauffman (20th C. military) Master Sergeant John Keene (Class 3) Josh Loewensteiner (Sporting Arms) Malcolm MacGregor (Sporting Arms) Doug McChristian (Indian Wars material) Tom Power (American Firearms) George Ruben (Antique & Military European small arms) Dave Sanders (Winchesters, Colts, Sporting Arms) Peter Schmidt (Colonial & Pre-Civil War firearms) John Sexton (Cannons, Civil War & Confederate material) Bill Shea (Nazi military accessories) Brad Simpson (German Military Pistols) Randy Trawnik (Imperial German Headgear) John Wall (Mauser and Mannlicher Bolt Rifles) W. Darrin Weaver (Imperial military) Tony Wilcox (Colts, Winchesters and 19th & 20th century military) Courtney Wilson (Civil War specialist) Charles Woolley (20th C. aviation & military-particularly WWI) Indian Art Objects John Bower Antiques & Fine Art (Furniture, Paintings, Folk Art & Accessories) James D. Julia, Bill Gage, Tony Greist, Don Heller Asian Art & Artifacts Tony Greist, Anthony Wu, Joshua Chamberlain Fine Art Allyson Lee, Bill Gage Books Charles Robinson Glass Dudley Browne Paperweights Debbie Tarsitano

James D. Julia, Inc. Offices 203 Skowhegan Road, Fairfield, Maine 04937 P: (207) 453-7125 | F: (207) 453-2502 Office Hours: Monday–Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Telephone answering system after hours The 1790 House 827 Main Street, Woburn, Massachusetts 01801 P: (781) 460-6800 | F: (781) 935-3868 Office Hours: Monday–Friday, please call ahead Telephone answering system after hours 5

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Thomas J. Bouwkamp Engineer/ Physician and Caretaker of Fine American Arms Born and raised in Michigan Tom developed a passion for firearms and the shooting sports at an early age. In the 1960s pheasants were still abundant in southern Michigan farmlands providing ample opportunities for young hunters to roam local cornfields and woodlots. In college, he earned an engineering degree and met his beautiful wife Barbara, then worked as a metallurgical engineer for the International Nickel Company. A career path change led to medical school and ultimately a thirty-year practice as a primary care physician in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Now retired, it’s a place he still calls home. With disposable income now available, he began collecting antique Winchesters in the 1980s through local contacts, noted dealers, and regional gun shows. Tom’s collection grew in size and stature to the point where he began to travel to prestigious national collector’s shows to display his treasures. His noteworthy collection has received several awards for content and creativity. Dr. Bouwkamp’s prestigious Parker shotgun collection began with a routine house call to a 90-year-old gentleman whose overgrown farm was a haven for game and a covert Tom hunted regularly. After tending to his ailment, the gent showed his appreciation by giving Tom an old shotgun, a classic Parker double. Unfortunately, it had been destroyed in a house fire. Though beyond repair, it sparked a desire to discover what a genuine Parker should look like and handle in the field. With that, Tom set out on his new quest for Parker shotguns. The goal—to research and acquire as many quality examples of the Parker grades and gauges as possible. Research came from the classic references by Johnson & Baer, and The Parker Story along with PGCA membership. High quality acquisitions were hard to come by in U.P. Michigan with much time and effort spent prospecting by word of mouth, scouring gun shows, prominent dealers and auction. Many good Winchesters were converted into funds for the Old Reliable. Dr. Thomas J. Bouwkamp’s Winchesters and Parkers offered at Julia’s Fall 2017 auction are a testament to his passion, and we at Julia’s are very proud to present them!

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

6


Warren H. Buxton (1935–2016) Cowboy, Electrical Engineer and Walther Researcher Extraordinaire

Warren H. Buxton was an extraordinary man of boundless energy  and enthusiasm. Although he was best known for his groundbreaking books on the P38, Warren also wrote Russell M. Catron and His Pistols, and, at the time of his death, had nearly completed an encyclopedic reference on the Walther Olympia. In the planning stage was another project, for he had photocopied virtually all of Walther’s postwar P38 records for yet another book!   Those are serious accomplishments for a fellow who grew  up in a remote section of Wyoming, specifically on the Ucross ranch, a place most people would describe as “a hundred miles from nowhere.” Spending his youth as a bona fide cowboy, Warren’s first experience with the real world came through his enlistment with the military.  After high school he signed up with the Air Force where he trained as an electronics technician and flew in an RB-47 reconnaissance bomber. Four years later, after his tour of duty, Warren returned to Wyoming ranching. But only briefly. The first hard winter, in which some of the daily highs hit -50F, prompted Warren to do “something else.”   So Warren went back to school, starting with Trinidad State Jr. College and finishing at University of New Mexico where he graduated with a degree in Electrical Engineering. His first job was with the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico where he worked with “Q” clearance, one of the highest levels of security with access to “special intelligence.” Just what he did still remains a mystery, even to his closest friends. As Warren was inclined to say, with a chuckle and a sly smile, “If I told you, I’d have to kill you.”    It was during his tenure at Los Alamos that Warren became interested in P38s. According to David Witkowski, long term OGCA member and close friend, Warren spotted his first “good” P38 at a Columbus show while traveling with Ernie Lang, another OGCA member and a founder of the National Automatic Pistol Collectors Association (NAPCA). Of course, the gun was priced “outrageously” and Warren didn’t get it, but  the P38’s mystique coupled with Warren’s unbridled curiosity set up a chain of investigation that Warren pursued for the rest of his life and expressed through his books.

After retiring from Los Alamos, Warren took a brief respite from German guns to write a short work on the Catron pistols that briefly explored Kimballs, the High Standard T3 and the Colt T4. It made no difference that the Catron’s production was limited or that most gun aficionados had never heard of the company. Warren got interested and he wanted the information “out there.” The Catron book was published in 2004. At about the same time, Warren’s interest returned to Walther. He was fascinated by the Olympias and learned all he could about their development and production. Some OGCA members may remember his displays: “The Beginning of a Walther Legend” (2005-2009); “The Walther Olympia” (2009, 2012); and “A Few Rare Walther Automatic Pistols” (2015). In his last showing, Warren’s Walther AP #10 with stock was awarded the Thomas L. Kyser Best Single Gun award. Joking aside, Warren’s book on the Olympias and its competitors will have the same monumental and lasting effect as his P38 anthology. Fortunately for the collector’s community, a number of contributors have volunteered to complete his effort that needs only a fine tuning before being published by Simpson, Ltd. We have all heard the phrase “I could never have accomplished that task had I not been standing on the shoulders of giants.” Warren was one of those giants. As anyone interested in firearms history and mechanical developments would attest, his name was synonymous with integrity and meticulous research. Yet reputation aside, there was so much more to the man as his intellect, knowledge, and passion for discovery invariably made an indelible impression. It will be a long, long time until anyone comes close to filling his shoes. Warren, rest in peace.

As all writers know, finishing the first publication is the hardest. You have to build your knowledge base while achieving peer credibility and hope that the book will be critically acclaimed. To state that The P38 Pistol Vol I: Walther Pistols, published in 1978, met that milestone would be an understatement. It was a first class text whose presentation included a level of detailing that was previously unknown. The book sold out quickly, bringing Warren incredible notoriety. Now an accomplished author, doors opened magically, as collectors from around the world rushed to contribute and seek acknowledgment. The P38 Pistol Vol II: Contract Pistols was published in 1984 and The P38 Pistol Vol III: Postwar Distribution in 1990. All three were reprinted in 1999.

excerpts of a letter written by Leonardo M. Antaris, MD

7

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Dr. Zack Catterton Zack was born and grew up in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and, from an early age, was immersed in stories of the “War between the States� and about how his great-great grandfather, manager of the great Hotel at White Sulfur Springs, had been a friend of Robert E. Lee when the famous general was a repeated guest there. After graduating from the University of Virginia, he received his M.D. from the Medical College of Virginia in 1971. He went on to complete a pediatric residency at Charity Hospital, Tulane Division, in New Orleans, and fellowship in Neonatology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. Zack met his loving wife, Jane, as a medical student who went on to become a general pediatrician. They have a grown daughter and son with children of their own. In the early 1990s genealogy research led Zack to the identification of over fifteen ancestors who fought in the Army of Northern Virginia, including several in the Stonewall Brigade. This prompted a twenty-five-year passion for collecting the highest quality Confederate arms, especially Confederate handguns. Many of these handguns have extensive collection histories and provenance. Zack has delighted in researching and owning these rare and historical firearms. After thirty-five years of caring for the sickest of newborns initially in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Medical College of Georgia and later in the NICU of the University of TennesseeChattanooga, Zack retired from practice in 2012. Jane also retired from pediatrics that same year. They reside in Signal Mountain, Tennessee, a small town outside of Chattanooga. Both Zack and Jane are enjoying travel and being with their children and grandchildren.

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

8


Russell G. Grinnell (1938–2016) Russell was a firearms and Randall knife enthusiast since the mid1950s. He collected the nicest or most unusual that he could afford while rearing our family, two sons, Scott & Russell, and a daughter, Elizabeth, each now have to start their own firearms collection. We went to gun shows and enjoyed them as a family. I learned a lot about firearms along the way. My grandson Rusty has a nice rifle and two already earmarked for my great-grandchildren, Gavin and Warner! In the middle 1990s Russell had to sell his first collection to help pay for a liver transplant, which is when we became fans and friends of the James D. Julia Auction Company. After the transplant surgery it was apparent he was going to recover and Russell almost immediately began collecting again. This time, it was L.C. Smith shotguns, and again, we called upon Julia’s to help us disperse them when Russell’s heart began giving him problems a few years ago. In true collector fashion, as we were selling, Russell continued buying always searching for the best, extra nice, and unusual pieces. He loved to research what he could glean about each gun he purchased and put together very good notes on each gun and knife. Amazingly, the last three guns Russell purchased arrived the afternoon before he passed. I brought the guns in the house and laid them on his chair where he always sat and he said he would catalog them in the morning. Russell had a wonderful and full life and we met so many good people and made so many friends in the gun trade. Russell researched so many guns that I also became friends with the ladies at the Cody Museum. I too valued these friendships because they kept Russell alive and wanting to live. Together, we shared 59 years, but didn’t quite make our 59th wedding anniversary. I certainly miss the conversations Russell and I shared about the firearms and the research he did on their histories. But now, it is time to share these guns with someone else who will appreciate the history and condition just as Russell did. —Joyce Grinnell

9

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Laurence “Larry” Ross Kelley (1937–2010) Laurence (“Larry”) Ross Kelley was born in Bristol, VA in 1937. In his trade he was a chemist and he became an avid shotgun collector in his retirement. He received his first shotgun from his father at the age of 11 years. He thoroughly enjoyed duck hunting as a favorite pastime. He loved teaching his grandson, John Ross Sullivan, the skill of shooting along with care and respect of guns. Larry was a member of the Back Woods Quail Club in Rhems, SC and enjoyed shooting there very much. He died in 2010 leaving a collection of shotguns that brought him much joy. His main collection was comprised of mostly fine A.H. Fox shotguns and he also collected a small number of English Best quality guns and high grade Browning Semi-Auto rifles, all of which are being offered in Poulin’s and Julia’s Fall 2017 Auctions.

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

10


Morris L. Racker (1929-2016) Morris was born in 1929 in Waverly, Iowa, to Leonard and Elinore (née Rone) Racker. After graduating from Waverly High School in 1947, Morris attended University of Iowa, where he majored in Art and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Following college graduation in 1951, Morris enlisted in the Army and entered basic training in Breckenridge, Kentucky, followed by additional training in Fort Holabird, Maryland. From there, Morris was assigned to the Central Intelligence Corps (CIC) in Germany, where he served from 1952-1954. After his service, Morris remained in Dusseldorf, Germany as an investigator in the Refugee Investigations Division, a civilian division within the CIC. It was during this time that Morris met his future wife, Helga, who worked as a translator with the British Consulate in Dusseldorf. After marrying in 1957 in Locarno, Switzerland, Morris and Helga moved back to Iowa in order for Morris to pursue his master’s degree. Morris graduated with distinction with a Master of Fine Arts degree from University of Iowa in 1959. His career began as a graphic package designer with John Morrell & Co. in Ottumwa, Iowa. In 1961 Morris and Helga moved to Chicago where they raised their family and resided there for the rest of their lives. With his wife Helga’s success as an entrepreneur, Morris and Helga enjoyed international travel, visiting Europe, South America, and Asia and traveling throughout the United States. They were lifelong antique collectors, and picked up many interesting items over the years. In time, Morris developed a keen interest in Civil War militaria, and began his exemplary collection of Civil War firearms, particularly rare and unique Confederate items, an interest he continued to pursue throughout the rest of his life. Morris welcomed interaction with people from all walks of life, as long as they were good listeners and open to the next joke (usually his). Shortly after celebrating 59 years of marriage in April of 2016, Helga passed away. Morris followed a few months later, passing away in October of 2016. James Julia Auctions is extremely happy to be offering the Morris Racker Collection of such diversity, rarity and high condition.

11

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


John Robert Roughton, Jr. John Robert Roughton, Jr., (Bob), born June 28, 1938, in Norfolk, VA, took an interest in firearms at age 12, when given his first rifle, a single shot 22. He fondly remembers target practicing using tin cans while visiting his grandparent’s farm. He graduated from VPI in 1960 and proceeded into the US Army as a 2nd Lieutenant. His interest in firearms was increased during his service years and he started collecting thereafter. His first notable purchase was a Civil War percussion musket. By then married to his wife, Sylvia, he left the army with a rank of Captain. He spent the next 40 years in the family business of Roughton Pontiac Corp., all the while adding to his collection. For a while he collected Colts but later added Winchesters, Civil War Carbines, Flintlock Military Muskets, Remingtons, Smith & Wessons and Military Knives. Valuable Flintlock Muskets made by Springfield, Virginia Manufactory and Harpers Ferry enhanced his collection. Of special interest were two Harpers Ferry pistols, the last pair made.

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

12


Arlen Saunders A longtime firearms enthusiast and collector, Arlen has spent over 60 years building his collection. His passion for fine firearms run the gambit from primitive flintlocks to bespoke European shotguns. He was an early member of The National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association and spent many years in the early 50s and 60s at shoots around Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee and especially Friendship, Indiana. While he bought and sold many flintlock and percussion rifles, he loved to build them and share his knowledge with others. He developed friendships with many of the craftsmen who fashioned primitive weapon components such as Bill Large, the barrel maker. Arlen was also a devoted American shotgun collector with items including L.C. Smith, Winchester, Remington, Parker Bros, and A.H. Fox. This led him to be a member of the Parker Gun Collectors Association as well as a member of the Ohio Gun Collectors Association. As a trained engineer, he enjoyed design as well as the aesthetics of a well-made firearm. This led him to specialize in German Drilling Rifles late in his collecting years. He joined the German Gun Collectors association and has traveled to many European countries with the group over the years including, Britain, Scotland, Italy, Switzerland, German and Austria. Touring facilities where fine, bespoke guns are built and engraved was a joy for him to view. He also enjoyed shooting on some of the European estates of the countries he was touring. Good food, good friends and beautiful scenery were in abundance on those trips. He has enjoyed collecting and traveling to find new firearms to add to his collection, but now feels that it’s time to find new homes for his items and is pleased that they will be going to enthusiasts that will appreciate them as much as he does.

13

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Dana J. Tauber (1947-2017) Dana James Tauber was born November 18, 1947 in Morristown, New Jersey. The eldest of three boys, Dana was an enthusiastic influence on his brothers and friends, often leading their adventures. Summers were spent cobbling together go carts from whatever parts they could salvage and building RC track cars to race at a local hobby store. Dana also enjoyed the outdoors and spent a good deal of time fishing at his grandmother’s house. As he got older his passion for hunting grew, and like his father his game of choice was pheasants. Dana attended Rutgers University, graduating in 1969 with a major in Botany. When he started dating Maria Pilar Cobo in 1970, he knew he wanted to spend the rest of his life with her, and they were soon married on September 3, 1972. Dana was an ambitious, hard worker and in 1977 he opened his business, Crystal Science Corporation, where he manufactured YIG spheres used in microwave frequency tuning. His oldest daughter Erica was born in 1980, Jessica in 1981, and son Brian in 1985. By this time Crystal Science was flourishing and Dana began to expand his knowledge and passion for the collecting of antique shotguns. Initially he was mainly focused on fine Syracuse Lefever Guns. His Lefever guns were featured on numerous occasions in The Double Gun Journal as well as Bob Elliot’s book Lefever: Guns of Lasting Fame. After some time Dana had established likely the finest Lefever collection in the world, but over time his interest shifted to exceptional A. H. Fox guns of Philadelphia and so he sold most of his Lefevers in the late 2000s. While he grew his collection of Foxes, Dana also developed a passion for many other things including Mazda RX-7s, Andrew Wyeth paintings, and he also enjoyed smoking the occasional fine cigar. Above all Dana was a wonderful husband and loving father, and cherished his family more than anything. In September 2016 he was diagnosed with a glioblastoma, and after a six month battle, Dana passed away on March 27, 2017. He will always be remembered for his kind, generous, and caring spirit. —Brian Tauber

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

14


Tim Zissler Tim Zissler is a retired machinist from Minneapolis. In the 1980s he caught the gun collecting bug and began to assemble a modest but highly conditioned set of Winchester lever action rifles. In the picture to the right, Tim (on the right) is seen at a Winchester Collectors Association show in July of 1995 at Cody, WY along with Ethyl Saign, Charlie Foster and Warren Webster. Tim became fast friends with Ray and Ethyl and spent many Sunday afternoons talking guns and enjoying Ray and Ethyl’s fine cooking. The form, fit and function of the Winchester levers automatically appealed to Tim’s machinist’s instincts. The collection spans the full range of levers from the 1866 to the 1894. All of Tim’s guns are the best that he could find and afford. They are characterized by having unturned screws and high conditioned original finish. His particular passion became the Model 1873 and are offered here to the discriminating collector. Tim is truly a caretaker whose concern is that the collection be acquired by individuals who will treasure the pieces just as he did and maintain them in their pristine condition for years to come. Tim and his wife Connie now live in Wyoming within easy commute to the Buffalo Bill Firearms Museum where they continue to enjoy quality Winchesters and country music.

15

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Lots 1009 & 1010 (top to bottom) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

16


Session 1: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 Session 1

Commencing at approximately 10:00 a.m. Please Read Conditions of Sale Before Bidding Lots 1000-1759

1000. RARE JENNINGS BREECHLOADING SINGLE SHOT RIFLE. SN 102. Cal 54. Standard rifle with 26” rnd smooth bore bbl, ramrod tube under the bbl containing a brass & hickory cleaning rod that is probably a replacement. It has pin front sight on a dovetail and fixed rear sight on the frame over the chamber area. Left side of frame has the Robbins & Lawrence markings along with “C.P. DICKSON AGENT / NEW YORK / PATENTED 1849”. Receiver & rear end of the bbl are nicely engraved in foliate arabesque patterns. Hammer shank & buttplate tang are engraved to match. Breech cover & pellet priming receptacle are present. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut buttstock that has straight grip & crescent buttplate with an engraved 2-1/4” by 3/4” nickel silver oval inlaid in the left side. According to Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms there were probably less than 1,000 of these rare rifles produced in 2 varieties 1848-1851. The first model was a repeater and the model described here was a factory conversion or one built at the factory from Jennings Repeater parts. This rifle used the “Rocket Ball” cartridge which was grossly underpowered and unsuitable for either military or sporting use which led to the demise of this design, but propelled the Chief Engineer, B. Tyler Henry into prominence. He later invented the Volcanic line of arms which evolved into the Model 1860 Henry Rifle, which then became the Winchester dynasty. Many of the existing Jennings rifles were converted to muzzle loader. Very few are found today in orig configuration. CONDITION: Fair to good. No orig finish remains with the metal an overall cleaned gray patina with areas of pitting over the bbl. Receiver is lightly pitted around the breech opening and nipple areas with the remainder a gray/brown patina. Buttplate & trigger guard are matching patina. Trigger guard has welded repairs. Stock has a repaired chip at the toe and another in right side of top tang with a gouge in the left wrist and shows a hand worn patina. Hammer is not solid at full cock, otherwise mechanics are a little loose but functional. Bore is moderately pitted. 52355-1 (8,000-12,000)

17

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1001.

SUPERB UNTOUCHED VOLCANIC REPEATING ARMS COMPANY NAVY SIZE PISTOL WITH 8” BARREL NEAR NEW. SN 324. Cal. 41. 8” bbl. Blue finish with gun metal receiver. Case colored hammer. Blue lever. 2-pc varnished walnut grips. Bbl has 3-line address reading “The Volcanic Arms Co. Patent New Haven Conn. Feb. 14. 1854”. Rear face of loading collar shows assembly no. “95”. Assembly no. “95” is also stamped on front face of bbl under collar. “598” is stamped on front face of magazine follower. SN appears on left side of grip strap at bottom under grip, on right side of lever by hinge, inside of each sideplate, on side of each toggle, on left side of elevator, right side of firing pin, and at top of each grip on inside. CONDITION: A wonderfully preserved, unfired example of a Volcanic Arms Company Navy Pistol with an 8” bbl, seldom if ever seen in this condition. Bbl has fabulous blue finish. Bbl address is sharp. Assembly nos. are sharp. Bore appears unfired. Magazine follower retains nearly all of blue finish. Gun metal receiver is a much desired deep rich mustard-brown patina. Rear-sight retains nearly all of the fire-blue finish. Rear of firing pin shows nearly all of fire-blue finish. Elevator shows nearly all of fire-blue finish, with some staining, on both sides of firing pin and at bottom of surface. Hammer shows nearly all of muted case coloring with a few slight scratches on left side. Trigger retains most all of its case color finish. Lever retains nearly all of its dark-blue finish with slight flaking. Hammer screw shows a considerable amount of blue on head. Lever screw is very slightly marred. Elevator and lever spring screws show traces of blue. Trigger spring shows all of its fire-blue. Grips retain nearly all of piano varnish finish with some light handling marks and slight high point wear at bottom of each grip. A Volcanic Arms Company Navy Pistol in a remarkable state of preservation with an estimated production of only 1,500 made. This gives the advanced collector a once in a life time opportunity to add possibly the best specimen extant to his collection. Almost impossible to improve upon. 51096-1 (30,000-50,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

18


Session 1 1002.

SUPERB AND RARE VOLCANIC REPEATING ARMS COMPANY LEVER ACTION NAVY PISTOL WITH 6” BARREL. SN 662. Cal. 41. 6” bbl. Blue finish with gun metal receiver, case color hammer, blue lever. Bbl shows 3-line address that reads “The Volcanic Repeating Arms Co. Patent New Haven Conn Feb. 14. 1854”. Rear face of loading collar shows assembly no. “47”. Front face of bbl also shows assembly no. “47”. SN is stamped on left inside of grip frame, on inside of sideplates, on side of each toggle, on left side of elevator, left side of firing pin, and at top inside of each grip. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbl shows almost all orig blue, very slight fading near address. Front face of collar near “T”-latch shows some light aging as does muzzle of bbl. Bore is slightly pitted toward muzzle with some evidence of being fired. Bbl shows some light high point wear with a sharp mark. Receiver is a deep rich mustard-brown patina and minuscule handling marks. Right sideplate is very slightly battered at top edge. Ejector port shows a few small dents. Hammer face is slightly battered. Rear-sight retains most all fire-blue. Elevator has traces of fire-blue around bolt. Bottom of elevator also shows generous traces of fire-blue finish. Hammer retains nearly all the case color on left side. Right side is somewhat dull and lightly scratched. Checkering is sharp. Hammer screw is slightly marred. Lever retains half of its bright blue finish with balance turning a smooth silver-gray patina. Trigger shows traces of case color. Trigger spring retains nearly all of fire-blue finish. Grips retain nearly all of piano varnish finish with only some slight scratch marks and a little high point wear on bottom of each grip. An opportunity for the advanced collector to obtain an outstanding example of an extremely rare Volcanic Repeating Arms Company Navy size lever action pistol in a condition that would be difficult to improve upon. 51096-4 (30,000-50,000)

19

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1003.

EXTREMELY RARE IRON FRAME HENRY MODEL 1860 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 131. 44 RF HENRY. Rare Henry rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl that has integral magazine and 1st type German silver front sight blade with rounded top. Top flat of bbl has the small 2-line Henry patent date & address with an open dovetail near the receiver. Receiver, side plates and buttplate are of the rare iron variety with a 2nd sight dovetail in top flat of receiver. This receiver dovetail contains an orig, 1st type 1000-yard Henry ladder sight. Mounted with very nicely figured, uncheckered, slab sawed American walnut buttstock with varnish finish and early features of a perch belly stock and iron buttplate with rounded heel and large trap containing an orig 4-pc hickory & iron cleaning rod. Cleaning rod recess in the stock has a beveled area at the bottom of the hole which is distinctive only to the iron frame variety of the Model 1860 Henry rifle. Brass frame versions of the rifle are not known to have this bevel. SN was observed in the usual place on top flat of bbl between rear sight dovetail and frame, left side of lower tang under the wood, inside top tang channel of buttstock and inside top tang of buttplate. All 5 stock & buttplate screws are matching numbered to the rifle. The tang wood screws are also distinctive to the iron frame variety of this model with beveled heads. The rnd portion of the bbl, under the loading sleeve is marked with the assembly “151” which number is also found on rear face of loading sleeve. According to The Henry Rifle, Quick, there were probably less than 200 of the iron frame variety produced within the first 400 rifles. As of the publication of the reference book, there were only 90 of them known and this rifle is listed in a chart on page 54. Apparently there is some controversy as to whether the iron frame Henry was produced at a separate facility or simultaneously with the brass frame version in the same plant. The aforementioned chart on pages 54 & 55 of the reference publication lists 16 known duplicate serial numbers which leads one to speculate however one wishes to speculate. Mr. Quick states that there are no known Martially marked iron frame Henry’s. He also reports that the iron frame Henry may have been an effort to gain a Navy contract which, if true, apparently never

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

20


Session 1

Reverse

materialized. No matter, there are few surviving iron frame Henry’s and extremely few of those show any orig finish. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine retain a smooth, even, plummy blue/brown patina with some scattered light surface rust. Receiver & side plates retain about 60-70% matching patina showing light wear and a few nicks & scratches. Lever, hammer & buttplate are also with the same patina. Wood is sound with numerous small nicks & scratches and retains about 90% of an old restored varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, strong bright bore with good shine and a few scattered spots of pitting. Cleaning rod is fine. 52328-51 JRL (75,000-125,000)

21

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1004.

CIVIL WAR ERA HENRY MODEL 1860 LEVER ACTION RIFLE INSCRIBED TO CIVIL WAR CONFEDERATE COL DUDLEY W JONES 9th TEXAS CAVALRY. SN 1763. Cal. .44 RF Henry. Standard Henry rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl that has integral magazine, nickel silver front sight, an iron filler in rear dovetail & with a fixed rear sight in top flat of receiver dovetail. Left sideplate is engraved in period script “D.W. JONES” with small engraved flourishes above & below. Mounted with an uncheckered, straight grain American walnut buttstock with straight grip and crescent buttplate that has round heel & large trap with corresponding large hole in the stock to accommodate a 4-pc hickory wiping rod that would have been included with rifle from the factory (cleaning rod not present). SN is found on top flat of bbl at the receiver, left side of lower CDV of Col. Dudley W. Jones tang under the wood, in top tang of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. All of the tang & buttplate screws are matching numbered to this rifle. Right side of buttstock has a filled sling swivel base recess and right side of bbl & magazine tube is mounted with a sling loop & ring. Round portion of bbl, under loading sleeve, is marked with the assembly number “565”, which number is also found on rear face of loading sleeve. Bbl has the 2-line Henry address in small font. Rifle has several early features including sharp radius on top rear of receiver, small loop lever, slight perch belly stock & round heel on the buttplate. Follower tab is of the larger, later size, however the receiver does not have the relief cut usually found with the larger size tab. Magazine spring is a little rusty and short, but appears to be orig style. Accompanied by a large packet of information detailing the very brief life and Civil War service of Col. Dudley William Jones. Col. Jones was born in 1840 in Lamar County, TX, the grandson of one of the first settlers of Lamar County who arrived there in 1836. Shortly after his birth, Col. Jones’ family moved to Mt. Pleasant, TX where he received his education from his mother and common schools of the area then attended Maury Institute at Coffeeville. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he returned to Mt. Pleasant and enlisted as a private in the Titus Grays, Company I of Col. William Simm’s 9th Texas Cavalry. The regimental adjutant, named Bell was accused of abolitionism & bigamy and was subsequently hanged by the men of the regiment who then elected Jones First Lieutenant and Adjutant, effective Oct 14, 1861. During the first year of the war, the 9th Texas Cavalry served with Gen. Ben McCulloch’s army of the West Arkansas, Missouri and Indian Territory

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

22


Session 1

Reverse

where they participated in several small fights. After the Battle of Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge) in March 1862, the regiment was transferred to Mississippi. During the reorganization, Jones was elected Colonel and the regiment became part of Lawrence Sullivan Ross’ famed brigade. For the remainder of the war, Jones remained in command of the 9th Texas Cavalry, participating in innumerable major and minor battles & skirmishes with records showing that the regiment participated in over 30 fights. In the final weeks of the war, Jones commanded Ross’ brigade under the famous and daring Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Cavalry Corps. After the war, Col. Jones traveled for about a year before returning to his father’s farm in 1866. That same year, he was elected to the Constitutional Convention of 1866 and was President of the Texas Club. In 1867, he moved to Houston and began the practice of law and was also the editor of the city’s first daily newspaper, The Ku Klux Vidette. Also included in this packet of information are numerous correspondences about the 9th Texas Cavalry, copies of Col. Jones’ muster rolls, reimbursement slips & other records pertaining to his Confederate service. Col. Jones died of yellow fever in Houston in 1868 and was reportedly buried in an unmarked grave. There are numerous Henry rifles inscribed and/or presented to Union soldiers of the Civil War, but very few are known with history documented to Civil War Confederate soldier. CONDITION: Very good to fine, all matching, as noted above. Bbl & magazine tube are a smooth blue/grey patina with scattered light surface spotting. Receiver and sideplates show moderate sharp edge wear with light nicks & scratches and retains a medium mustard patina. Buttplate has matching patina. Receiver has a deep scratch bottom front. Lever & hammer are a dark patina. Stock is sound with the aforementioned filled recess on the right side, with nicks & dings and shows heavy wear with a fine hand worn patina. Mechanics are a little balky but are functional. Strong dark bore showing heavy wear with fine pitting. 52172-1 JR (30,000-50,000)

23

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1005.

FINE HOGGSON ENGRAVED HENRY MODEL 1860 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 12181. Cal. 44RF Henry. Beautiful late Henry rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl that has integral magazine tube, late style, square back nickel silver front sight and 900 yard Henry ladder rear sight with slide stop screw. Top flat of the bbl has the later large font 2-line Henry’s Patent date and the New Haven Arms Co address. Mounted with very nicely figured, uncheckered American walnut that has the finish of presentation quality Henry’s and the later Winchester Model 1866 rifles (most unusual on a Henry rifle). Left side of buttstock has a factory sling swivel with corresponding sling loop in the left gullet of the bbl. Receiver is silver plated and engraved by Samuel Hoggson with his trademark deer leaping a rail fence on the left sideplate surrounded by foliate arabesque patterns that have pearled background. Right side of the receiver and sideplate, both front side panels, rear edges of the receiver, top 3 flats of the receiver and buttplate tang are engraved to match. SN on the bbl was partially obliterated when the bbl was refinished, with only the last 4 digits visible. Full SN was observed on the left side of lower tang, under the wood, inside top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Bottom tang also has the assembly number “68” which is also found on the side of the magazine follower. Left side of top tang is marked with the letter “F”. Rnd section of the bbl, under the rotating sleeve is marked with the assembly number “125” with matching number on rear face of loading sleeve. Rifle has late features including a sloping radius on top rear of receiver, large magazine follower tab with milled rebated area for the tab in bottom front of frame, the late style front sight and pointed heel on the buttplate. Almost certainly this rifle belonged to someone who held it in great regard and cared for it to the best of their ability. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl and magazine retain 50-60% thinning, very old style restored blue with a wear spot from a sling near the front sling loop. Chamber area of the side flats have small wrench mark on each side. Receiver retains 88-90% strong orig silver, lightly oxidized showing very light edge wear, exposing the brass. Buttplate retains about 75% strong orig silver showing wear on the heel and toe. Hammer retains strong case colors and the lever is a light silver/brown patina. Stock is sound with a few light scratches and retains most of its fine varnish finish that resembles the later presentation Winchester Model 1866 rifles. Mechanics are crisp. Strong bore with sharp rifling and moderate pitting. 52219-1 JRL (35,000-45,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

24


Session 1 1006.

RARE TYPE-1 MARTIALLY MARKED HENRY MODEL 1860 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 3558. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Usual configuration with 24-1/4” oct bbl that has integral mag tube and late-style German silver front sight with square rear edge and a 900 yd. Henry ladder rear sight without slide retaining screw. Mounted with uncheckered, nicely figured, straight-grain American walnut buttstock that has a factory sling swivel on the left side over the distinctive “Henry Bump” and a corresponding staple and ring on the left side of the bbl. Buttplate is 1st style with rounded heel and large trap. The two buttplate screws have beveled heads and are matching numbered to the rifle. SN is found in the usual places on the top flat of the bbl between the frame and rear sight, left side of the lower tang under the wood, inside top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Rnd portion of the bbl under loading sleeve is marked with the assembly number “942” with matching number on rear face of loading sleeve. Right flat of bbl, at the receiver, is stamped with the inspector initials “C.G.C.” (Charles G. Chapman) over a small “H” (B. Tyler Henry) inspector initial with a corresponding “H” on the front side of frame. Left bbl flat at frame also has a small “C” with an adjacent “H” on the receiver. Left side of the buttplate heel is also marked with a small “H” and corresponding “H” on the left heel of the wood. Right side of wrist bears the small “CGC” cartouche. Inspector initials on left side of bbl, receiver, buttplate and stock are the first encountered by this cataloger, but appear to be authentic. Accompanied by a 5-pg letter from renowned Winchester historian and author, George Madis, wherein he notes most of the above information and authenticates this rifle. The federal government purchased a total of 1,731 Henry rifles during the Civil War, of which about 1,100 were the Type 1 series, primarily found in the 3xxx serial range mostly from orders placed in 1863. Type 2 martial Henry’s are those from orders of 1864 & 1865, in the 7xxx to 9xxx serial range. From research of the Federal archives it appears that this rifle may have been issued to the 1st DC Cavalry then recalled and late in the war issued to the 3rd Regiment of Veteran Volunteers. This unit was intended to become a regiment of “shock” troops, however, due to their late entry into the war, were used primarily for picket and guard duty protecting the Capitol and saw very limited action. As part of their enlistment, with honorable service, upon completion of their term of service, they were permitted to retain their issue arms and accoutrements. Apparently, most of these troops availed themselves of this benefit and these fine Henry rifles became hunting and home protection rifles with many of them going west during the great westward expansion of Manifest Destiny. Few of these rifles survive today and rarely with any original finish. It is rare to find a visible cartouche on the stock. PROVENANCE: Barnes Family Collection. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl and mag tube retain an artificially aged pleasing brown patina over very fine pinprick pitting. Receiver and side plates have crisp edges and a wonderful dark mustard patina. Lever and hammer are a natural dark patina. Stock has a couple of hairlines back of top tang otherwise wood is sound with a few light nicks and scratches, a couple of minor grain checks near the right toe and retains a slightly enhanced hand-worn patina. The “Henry Bump” is prominent. Mechanics are fine, strong bore with moderate pitting. Sling is not antique. Cleaning rod is fine. 5252717 (35,000-45,000)

25

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1007.

RARE HENRY 1860 1st MODEL LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 428. Cal 44 RF HENRY. Standard Henry rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl that has integral magazine, early style rounded German silver front sight, no provision for a rear sight on the bbl with a dovetail in top flat of receiver containing a 1st type 1,000 yard Henry ladder rear sight without slide retaining screw. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock and 1st type buttplate with round heel and large trap to accommodate the accompanying 4-pc hickory & steel wiping rod. The 2 buttplate screws and 3 tang screws are all matching numbered to this rifle. Serial number was observed on top bbl flat at the receiver, left side of the lower tang under the wood, inside top tang channel of buttstock and inside buttplate tang. Round portion of the bbl, under the loading sleeve is marked with the assembly # 20 with matching assembly number on rear face of loading sleeve. It should be noted that although the sideplate coloration is different from the receiver & buttplate this is not an unusual occurrence with Henry rifles. This cataloger has noted several such occurrence and one is even pictured with non-matching colors on page 50 of The Henry Rifle, Quick. In actuality the coloration of the receiver & sideplates on that rifle, SN 346 very closely matches the coloration on this rifle. Accompanied by a 3-page and another 2-page letter from Kurt Saxon authenticating this rifle and its original hickory cleaning rod, and stating most of the above information. Kurt is listed in the acknowledgments section as a contributing resource on page 14 of Les Quick’s Henry book. This rifle exhibits all the early features of a Henry rifle including the rounded front sight, small font address, 1,000 yard ladder rear sight, sharp radius at rear of receiver, small magazine follower tab with no rebate for the tab, slight perchbelly stock and buttplate with round heel & large trap with corresponding large hole in the wood. These early rifles produced at the very start of the Civil War almost undoubtedly saw hard service throughout the war and later on the American frontier. Rarely are they found today in orig configuration with any orig finish. This Henry is the gun that inspired the cover theme magazine article for the Fall 2012 The Winchester Collector, “What’s in a Number” and the article titled, “The Cube Root of ‘8’ Equals ‘2’, Why Numbers are Important to Gun Nuts,” which dealt with the Firearms fraternity’s fascination with firearms SN’s. On page 16 is the associated cover article discussing this serial number 428 and also showing a picture of the serial number and top of the barrel and receiver of this Henry on page 17. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine retain a dark brown patina with some thinning on the magazine tube about mid-point with possibly some old touch-up. Receiver & sideplates show light to moderate wear with receiver retaining a mottled dark mustard patina and the sideplates a smooth dark bronze patina. Buttplate is a matching mottled patina. Stock is sound with light nicks, dings & scratches and retains most finish. Mechanics are crisp, strong bright bore with good shine and scattered light pitting. 52330-1 (27,50035,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

26


Session 1 1008.

SCARCE FIRST TYPE MARTIAL HENRY MODEL 1860 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 3063. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Standard Henry rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, integral magazine tube and early 1st type German silver front sight blade with rnd top and 2nd type 900 yard Henry ladder rear sight without slide stop screw. Right forward side of frame has the inspector initials “HH” and correspondingly on the right bbl flat at the receiver the inspector, “CGC”. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut buttstock with straight grip and early style brass buttplate with rnd heel and large trap for the accompanying 4-pc hickory & steel cleaning rod. Right side of buttstock is amateur inlaid with a 5-point brass star secured with a single nail through the center. Right wrist of buttstock shows the outline of a cartouche visible under strong light. Right heel of buttplate is marked with a tiny “C” inspector mark with corresponding “C” adjacent on the wood. SN was observed in the usual place on top flat of bbl between rear sight & frame and on left side of the lower tang under the wood as well as in the top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. The 2 buttplate screws are matching numbered to the rifle. The 3 receiver screws, although unnumbered are orig Henry style screws and probably orig to this rifle. Left top front side of receiver has a small plugged hole which likely was installed for ease of access to change the extractor which was a weak point on the Henry rifle. The lever latch tab is too short to engage the lever latch on the lower tang indicating that the lever is from another rifle, probably an 1866 or 1873. Given the overall condition, along with the “Texas star” in the buttstock, the argument can be made that this probably was a Confederate captured rifle during the Civil War and saw extensive hard service thereafter, both during the war and on the American frontier. There were a total of 1,731 Henry rifles purchased by the US Military, of which only about 800 were the Type-1 as found here, the majority of which were used to arm the 3rd Regiment Veteran Volunteers. This unit was initially intended to act as “shock troops”, but were primarily used for guard and picket duty around Washington, D.C. They did have a few small engagements just toward the end of the war and then were absorbed into the 2nd Maine Cavalry until the war was over. These veteran volunteers, as part of their enlistment agreement with honorable service were allowed to retain their arms and accoutrements at their expiration of service. Apparently the majority of those soldiers took advantage of this provision and took their Henry rifles home with them where they usually saw very hard service on the American frontier, some of which were so harshly used that they are unidentifiable as Martial issued. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Fair, all matching. Bbl & magazine retain a crusty brown patina under a coating of old varnish with heavy pitting on both sides. Receiver & side plates show numerous nicks & dings with light scratches and retains a dark brown brass patina. Lever & hammer are also dark patina with moderate to heavy rust on the lever. Stock is sound showing a “Henry bump” on the left side with numerous light nicks & scratches and retains a very old, dark restored finish. Mechanics are balky on closing, otherwise they are fine. Strong bore with moderate to heavy pitting and a couple of rings about mid-point. Cleaning rod is extremely fine. 52328-52 JRL (15,000-25,000) 27

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1009.

EXTREMELY RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE ENGRAVED IN HIGH RELIEF BY JOHN ULRICH AND DISPLAYED AT THE 1876 PHILADELPHIA WORLD EXPOSITION. SN 104468. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Extraordinarily beautiful example of the engraver’s art, this rifle has 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, Rocky Mountain front sight and 900 yd. Henry ladder rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered, nicely figured, about 3X shell grain buttstock and flame grain forearm with straight stock and crescent buttplate. Right side of buttstock is inlaid with small German silver bowtie-shaped plaque. Bottom of stock and forend cap have factory sling swivels. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked “V / XXXX”. Top tang channel of buttstock is marked with spurious matching SN and inside toe of buttplate with orig matching SN. Trigger is of the narrow, pointed-toe style often found on special 1866 rifles. Receiver, forend cap and buttplate are gold washed. The rifle is incredibly engraved with absolutely full coverage. Relief engraving art by John Ulrich featuring a total of seven panels all surrounded by intricate, intertwined foliate arabesque patterns that have extremely fine pearled backgrounds. Left sideplate is engraved with the large deep relief round vignette of a bugling bull elk set in an extremely detailed forest scene. Forward of that panel is the small round vignette of a flying waterfowl over a marsh scene. On the left rear side is the small vignette of a running fox in a field scene. Left front flat is engraved with the large vignette of a deep relief regal bull elk in a detailed

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

28


Session 1

Reverse

forest scene. Right sideplate is also engraved with the large round vignette in deep relief depicting a bull elk in a detailed forest scene. The right front side flat has the large vignette of a deep relief engraved skulking mountain lion and the right rear of the frame has the small vignette of a squirrel on a limb surrounded by foliate patterns. Remainder of receiver, sideplates, top and bottom tangs are covered in semi-relief foliate arabesque patterns with various small open accent panels. Forend cap and buttplate tang are engraved to match. This rifle was manufactured in about 1872 and was believed to have been part of the factory sample collection which was exhibited at the 1876 Philadelphia World Exposition. This rifle is very similar to SN 104463, which is pictured, both sides on pg. 146 of Winchester Engraving, Wilson with much of the same themes and the panels and nearly identical engraving patterns. PROVENANCE: Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Very good. Bbl and magazine tube retain a smooth blue brown patina with stronger blue in sheltered areas. Bbl has a few spots of blood pitting toward the muzzle. Receiver has been polished a long time ago, which removed some of the shading in the background of the larger vignettes. Edges of receiver and sideplates show light to moderate wear and overall shows traces of orig gold wash. Buttplate and forend cap are a medium to dark mustard patina which matches the patina of the receiver. Hammer retains strong case colors, bright in sheltered areas. Lever is a brown patina with fine pitting. The replacement buttstock has a repaired chip in the toe with some light wood filler and a few grain checks on right side. Otherwise wood is sound and retains an old refinish. Mechanics are fine. Bright shiny bore. 52170-29 (100,000150,000)

29

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1010.

EXTRAORDINARY JOHN ULRICH ENGRAVED AND SIGNED WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN EXHIBITED AT THE 1876 PHILADELPHIA CENTENNIAL WORLD EXPOSITION. SN 103671. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Spectacular gold washed ‘66 rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, thinned half nickel front sight and 900-yd Henry ladder rear sight. Mounted with outstanding 2-3X, uncheckered American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap containing an orig 4-pc brass & iron cleaning rod. Buttplate toe screw is a replacement and the hole is stripped. Bottom of stock and forend cap have factory sling swivels. Trigger is of the thin pointed toe style found on numerous special order rifles. Left side of lower tang is marked “XXX”. The top tang channel of buttstock retains no vestige of the number that might have been there, having been obliterated during numerous removal and re-installation of the buttstock. Buttplate tang has the entire matching SN inside the toe. There is little doubt, however, that this buttstock is probably orig to this rifle or certainly of the period. This rifle is incredibly engraved in semi-relief by master engraved John Ulrich and signed microscopically on the bottom tang “J.Ulrich”. Engraving consists of full coverage, very tight foliate arabesque patterns on the receiver with the large scalloped border vignette of a standing bull elk in a forest scene on the left sideplate and a smaller round vignette in semi-relief of a walking bull elk in a meadow scene on the left front flat. The hammer screw hole is surrounded by a large flower blossom with a small scroll on the sideplate having another very detailed smaller flower blossom. Right sideplate has the scallop bordered semi-relief vignette of a bugling bull elk in an extremely detailed forest scene with the smaller round vignette of a walking bull elk in a meadow scene on the right front flat. Right side hammer screw hole is engraved with mirror image to the left side, of a flower blossom. Two small scrolls above the loading gate opening terminate in detailed flower blossoms. All of the foliate arabesque patterns have very fine pearled background. Full coverage engraving extends over the entire top and bottom of receiver along with top tang. Bottom tang is engraved to match. Bottom of carrier is engraved with foliate

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

30


Session 1

Reverse

arabesque patterns on front and rear edges with tiny diamond and dot patterns in the center. Similar, slightly larger diamond and dot patterns are engraved between the timing screws. Top edges of ejection port are engraved in feather patterns. Forend cap also has full coverage foliate arabesque and floral patterns. Buttplate tang is lightly engraved to match. This rifle was produced in about 1872 and was probably intended as part of the Winchester Exhibition Collection. It, along with other similarly engraved rifles and carbines was part of the Winchester Exhibit at the 1876 Philadelphia World Exposition. Although this rifle is not pictured in the Winchester Engraving books by Wilson, pg. 144 of The Book of Winchester Engraving pictures rifle no. 109651 which is nearly identically engraved in semi-relief with nearly identical vignettes and coverage. The caption for that rifle also states that it was believed to have been displayed at the 1876 Philadelphia Expo. Most certainly it is of exhibition quality and was probably sold after the 1876 Philadelphia display. CONDITION: About good. No orig finish remains with the bbl a smooth dark brown patina, the remains of an old refinish with scattered fine pitting. The bbl address was mostly obliterated during the refinish process. Magazine tube is also a smooth dark brown patina. Receiver, sideplates, forend cap and buttplate show light to moderate edge wear with very light wear on the engraving, just touching the high points and overall retains an even dark mustard patina with traces of orig gold in the engraving. Hammer retains silvered case colors and the lever in a dark brown patina. Wood is sound with numerous nicks, scratches and dings, a bruise on the right wrist and a couple more on the forearm and overall retains about 85% orig piano varnish finish. Mechanics are fine. Strong sharp bore with good shine and scattered pitting. Cleaning rod is fine. 52573-1 (75,000-125,000)

31

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1011.

WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE ELABORATELY ENGRAVED BY CONRAD ULRICH WITH DELUXE WOOD. SN 46038. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Spectacular Conrad Ulrich engraved ‘66 rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, German silver Rocky Mountain front sight and replacement full buckhorn, Kentucky rifle style rear sight with fine “V” notch. Mounted with very highly figured, about 4-X uncheckered American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap. Bottom of stock and forend cap have factory sling swivels. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with a “G” and “VXXX”. Left side of top tang is marked “20”. Top tang channel of buttstock has the entire matching SN and inside toe of buttplate has last four digits of matching SN. Receiver, forend cap and buttplate tang are elaborately engraved by Conrad F. Ulrich with full coverage on both sides of receiver. Left side has the rectangular vignette of a hunter and his dog with a buck deer in the background all set in a forest scene. Left front side flat is engraved with a walking bear set in a forest scene. Right sideplate has the round vignette depicting a hunter holding his firearm with a bird dog on point in the foreground all set in a detailed forest scene. Right front side flat depicts a buck deer standing in a meadow nibbling leaves off a tree. Both sides of receiver and sideplates are completely surrounded by very detailed and nicely shaded foliate arabesque patterns that have a very fine pearled background and Mr. Ulrich’s typical scalloped borders. One scroll on the left side terminates in a flower blossom with another on the right side and a small scroll at the right rear that terminates in a dog’s head. Top of receiver is deeply engraved in foliate and geometric patterns with fine zig-zag borders and very fine pearled background. Top and bottom tangs are engraved to match. Bottom of receiver and bottom of carrier are likewise engraved. Forend cap is also engraved to match with matching scalloped border. Buttplate tang is engraved in similar pattern to that found on top of receiver ring. Altogether, an incredibly beautiful example of the engraver’s art. This rifle, is pictured, both sides, and identified by SN on pg. 107 of Winchester Engraving, Wilson, with credit to the Ivan B. Hart collection. This rifle is similarly engraved to several

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

32


Session 1

Reverse

other 1866 rifles and carbines engraved and signed by Conrad Ulrich, although none of them are fitted with such a highly figured stock and forearm. PROVENANCE: Ivan B. Hart collection; Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Good, all matching. No orig finish remains, with the bbl and magazine tube a smooth artificially aged grey brown patina with a few spots of light rust over the forearm area around the rear sight. Receiver and sideplates show moderate to heavy wear with the engraving still mostly sharp and clear. Lever and hammer are matching patina to the bbl. Forearm has three grain checks and there is a hairline back to top tang in the buttstock, otherwise wood is sound with a few light nicks and bruises and retains a smooth dark refinish. Mechanics are fine. Worn dark bore with moderate to heavy pitting. 52170-28 (65,000-95,000)

33

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1012.

EXTRAORDINARILY RARE L.D. NIMSCHKE ENGRAVED WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 DELUXE SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 118353. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Extraordinary ‘66 carbine with 20” bbl, full magazine, integral front sight/bbl band and 2-postition flip rear sight graduated 100,300 & 500 yds. Left side of receiver has a staple and ring. Mounted with uncheckered, extraordinary, 3-4X center crotch, flame grain American walnut with straight stock and rifle buttplate with trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked “XXV”. Unusually, the full SN is found in the top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. This carbine is one of the most elaborately Nimschke engraved arms to come to market in recent history. The engraving consists of nearly full coverage on the sides and top of receiver & sideplates with fabulous, sweeping, intertwined foliate arabesque patterns that have fine pearled background. Above the lever screw on each sideplate is engraved with a large shell or fan pattern reminiscent of nearly identical patterns observed on Nimschke engraved handguns. One of the large scrolls on the left sideplate incorporates a mythical dog’s head also reminiscent of similar engravings on Nimschke engraved handguns. Top of receiver ring is engraved in Mr. Nimschke’s trademark flower blossom which is usually found on bottom of carrier. Balance of top of receiver is engraved with matching foliate arabesque patterns which extend around the hammer slot and onto the top tang. Buttplate tang is engraved to match. A most unusual and elaborate feature, attesting to the extensive degree of engraving, is the matching engraving patterns on sides of the hammer, sides of the lever, forearm band and front sight band, features almost never seen on engraved arms of that era. Given the extensive and elaborate engraving found on this carbine along with the very highly figured wood, it can almost certainly be surmised that it was intended as an exhibition piece or for presentation to a head

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

34


of state or someone of equal importance or high rank. The fact that it shows moderate to heavy wear testifies to its having been used by whomever was the recipient. This exact carbine, identified by SN, is pictured both sides on pg. 51 of The Book of Winchester Engraving, Wilson and identically on pg. 60 of Mr. Wilson’s book, Winchester Engraving. Both book entries are credited to the Paul Sorrell collection. PROVENANCE: Paul Sorrell collection; Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Good. Only traces of orig silver plating remain in the most sheltered areas, visible near the forearm band, around the rear sight and on the top and bottom tangs under the wood. Traces of oxidized silver can also be seen on the bottom tang and around the trigger slot, along with other traces on the loading gate. The gun metal receiver sideplates and buttplate show moderate to heavy edge wear with moderate wear to the engraving, which is still sharp and clear. Bbl and magazine tube are a dark brown patina with an area of rust on bbl and a ding in the magazine tube. Forearm band and front band are brown patina, as are the lever and hammer with pitting on the lever. Stock has a repaired crack through the wrist that is only faintly visible, otherwise wood is sound and retains an old restored finish. Mechanics are fine. Dark bore with sharp rifling and moderate to heavy pitting. 52170-32 (65,000-95,000)

35

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1013.

EXTRAORDINARY AND WELL KNOWN WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE INTRICATELY AND WONDERFULLY PANEL SCENE ENGRAVED BY MASTER ENGRAVER CONRAD ULRICH AND SIGNED IN NUMEROUS PLACES. SN 79868. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Wonderful gold washed ‘66 rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight and 900 yd. ladder rear sight. Top flat of bbl, forward of rear seat has the 2-line Winchester and King’s address and patent dates. Mounted with very nicely figured, uncheckered, flame grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap containing a 4-pc brass and iron cleaning rod. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked “OXX”. Left side of upper tang is marked three times with the microscopic rectangular signature stamp of master engraver Conrad F. Ulrich with another signature just behind the trigger slot. Reportedly there are other signature stamps on front face of receiver under the forearm. Forearm was not removed to determine this fact. Top tang channel of buttstock is marked with four digits of SN “6098” or “6088” and inside toe of buttplate is marked with four digits of SN “4855” indicating that the buttstock and buttplate are replacements. Bottom of buttstock and forend cap have factory sling swivels. This rifle is one of Mr. Ulrich’s most detailed and intricately engraved pieces of work known. The receiver is fully engraved on sides with the left sideplate having the large vignette morbidly depicting a crocodile devouring a native child with the child’s mother and father staring on helplessly, all set in a detailed savanna scene. This vignette is surrounded by scalloped borders. The area that is part of the rear edge of left side panel and left rear flat have a saddled horse and a gentleman carrying a bucket incorporated within the intricate foliate arabesque patterns. The area of the forward edge of left side panel and receiver has the very detailed figure of a gentleman holding a rifle with his dog incorporated within the foliate arabesque patterns. The left front side flat has the scalloped bordered vignette of a buck and doe deer feeding in a very detailed forest scene. The right sideplate depicts the scalloped border vignette of two hounds and a deceased buck deer in the foreground with a hunter holding a rifle in the background, all set in a detailed forest scene. The

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

36


Session 1

Reverse

area at the back edge of the sideplate and rear side flat have the very highly detailed figures of charging bull buffalo and a standing grizzly bear incorporated within the foliate arabesque patterns. The flat above loading gate opening has a skulking mountain lion incorporated within the foliate arabesque patterns and the right front side flat is engraved with the scallop bordered vignette of a recumbent doe and standing buck deer in a very detailed field scene. The very intricate foliate arabesque patterns are in semi-relief with extremely fine pearled background. Matching foliate arabesque patterns extend over top side flats and top edges of side plates and top & bottom tangs. Front edge of the receiver is engraved with deep, sharply pointed scallop patterns with matching patterns on the forend cap. Buttplate tang is engraved by another hand with a light foliate arabesque flourish. Bottom of receiver and bottom of carrier are lightly engraved with foliate arabesque patterns. This rifle is pictured, both sides, on pg. 99 of The Book of Winchester Engraving and on pg. 111 of Winchester Engraving, both by Wilson. This rile was produced in about 1871, and is similarly engraved to several others of that immediate era which were known to have been part of the Winchester Exhibition Collection which was displayed at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. Given the elaborate and extraordinarily detailed engraving there can be little doubt that this rifle was an exhibition piece very likely intended to influence buyers from the African and Asian continents where crocodiles are prevalent. The fact that this rifle shows hard and heavy use supports the idea that after the 1876 Expo, it was sold to someone on one of those continents where it became a hunting rifle. CONDITION: Fair to good. Bbl and magazine tube are a dark mottled brown patina with a few scattered spots of light surface rust. Bbl address is completely legible. Receiver and forend cap retain traces of orig gold wash with the balance of the gun metal receiver, forend cap & buttplate a dark mustard patina. Front raised edge of receiver, at the forearm is lightly battered. Hammer retains traces of case colors and the lever is a blued patina. Engraving, while showing light surface wear is mostly sharp and clear with a few light nicks and scratches, mostly on right side of receiver. Buttplate is battered on the face with a dark mustard patina. Buttstock has a repaired crack in the toe corresponding with the bottom buttplate screw hole and retains an old restored finish. Forearm has a repaired full length crack in the left bbl channel with restored finish in that area and overall retains traces of orig finish showing moderate to heavy wear. Right sideplate lever and sideplate screw holes have been bushed with steel bushings. Mechanics need attention, lever will not fully extend to chamber a round. Worn dark bore with heavy pitting. Cleaning rod is fine. 52573-2 JRL (45,000-70,000)

37

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1014.

EXTRAORDINARILY RARE L.D. NIMSCHKE ENGRAVED WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION MUSKET. SN 72133. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Rare engraved musket with 27” rnd bbl, 7/8 magazine, square base front sight/ bayonet lug and 900-yd Henry-type ladder rear sight that is probably orig to this musket. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with 2/3 length forearm, 3 bands and straight stock that has musket/carbine buttplate with trap, containing a 4-pc brass and iron cleaning rod. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number 2393 with matching number in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Bottom of stock and middle forearm band have factory sling loops. The receiver and sideplates are beautifully engraved by master engraver L.D. Nimschke with nearly full coverage on the sides consisting of elaborate, sweeping, intertwined foliate arabesque patterns that have a fine pearled background. Two of the scrolls on the left side terminate in feather patterns with a panel in the center of left sideplate engraved “M.R.” and empty panel in the front side flat. Right side is equally beautifully engraved with more tight patterns having a sweeping ribbon in the center through which a foliate arabesque pattern emerges from an engraved rectangle. Right front side flat is a mirror image of the left. The transition flats from sideplates to front side panels are unusually engraved in foliate and floral patterns. Bottom of the carrier is engraved in a geometric pattern with multiple borders and there is Mr. Nimschke’s flower blossom between the timing screws. Bottom tang is engraved in a geometric pattern behind trigger slot surrounding Mr. Nimschke’s “LDN” initial signature. Top of receiver is engraved in foliate & floral and geometric patterns. Sides of top and bottom tangs, under the wood and in other sheltered areas show orig gold wash. Given the elaborate engraving, which is unusual to find on a musket, it seems likely that this musket would have been intended as a presentation to some governmental authority to solicit a contract or as a presentation. The fact that this musket shows moderate to heavy use would indicate that is may not have remained in the U.S. but was probably shipped into the Middle East or South America. This musket is pictured, both sides, on pg. 50 of The Book of Winchester Engraving and on pg. 59 of Winchester Engraving, both by Wilson with credit to the James D. Stewart collection. PROVENANCE: The James D. Steward collection; Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Good, all matching. Bbl, magazine tube and bands retain most of a fine professionally restored finish. Receiver and sideplates retain about 30-40% orig gold wash, stronger on left side. Lever and hammer are a mottled grey/brown patina. Wood is sound with usual nicks, dings and scratches showing heavy wear and an old refinish. Mechanics are fine. Strong sharp bore with good shine and spots of heavy pitting. Cleaning rod has replacement slotted tip and one damaged female thread section, otherwise is fine. 5217031 (30,00050,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

38


Session 1 1015.

RARE ENGRAVED WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 36078. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Fine ‘66 with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, thinned half-nickel front sight and Henry-style 900 yard ladder rear sight. Receiver is beautifully engraved, probably by one of the Ulrichs with full coverage on sides of beautiful foliate arabesque patterns with very fine pearled background. Both sides have large blank panels with wonderful edges & shading and Ulrich’s alternating triangle borders. Top of receiver, top tang, bottom tang, forend cap & buttplate tang are engraved to match and have matching borders around most areas. Mounted with very highly figured, uncheckered, shell grain Claro walnut with straight stock and crescent brass buttplate. Forend cap has an orig sling loop and buttstock has a corresponding orig loop that is centered 5-1/4” from toe. While no exact matches could be found for these patterns, serial numbers 36068 & 35969, pictured on p. 71 of Winchester Engraving, Wilson, are very similar, especially 35969, which has a similar flower around hammer screw. Left side of lower tang is stamped “S” and “XX”. Examination of top tang channel in buttstock disclosed no serial number markings and the number inside toe of buttplate is “6189”, indicating the buttstock is probably a period of use replacement. Inside the buttplate and upper & lower tangs, under the wood show silver-plating. Buttplate has a trap containing a 4-pc iron & brass wiping rod. It appears that this rifle was silver plated originally as there are traces of silver on tangs & inside of receiver. Carrier retains strong silver on inside. According to Mr. Wilson, these simple patterns and large open panels suggests that the company may have been considering having engraved rifles in stock for custom inscriptions. CONDITION: Fine to very fine. Bbl retains about 85% thin orig blue, stronger around front sight with a few scattered spots of fine pitting. Magazine tube retains about 90% stronger orig blue with some fine surface rust. Receiver with very lightly rounded edges and is a medium mustard patina with silver only as noted above. Wood is sound with minor nicks & scratches and forearm retaining about 60% orig piano varnish with balance a dark, hand-worn patina. Buttstock retains about 80% brilliant restored piano varnish finish with light nicks & scratches and some flaking on right side of wrist with oil stain around wrist and a couple of small chips around tangs. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore with a very few scattered spots of light surface erosion. Cleaning rod is fine. 52392-1 (27,500-35,000)

39

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1016.

RARE L.D. NIMSCHKE ENGRAVED WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE INSCRIBED WITH INITIALS “HWC” PURPORTED TO HAVE BELONGED TO OREGON U.S. SENATOR HENRY W CORBETT. SN 28860. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Spectacular Nimschke engraved ‘66 rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, German silver, knife blade front sight and 900 yd. Henry ladder rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate with trap. Bottom of buttstock and forend cap have factory sling swivels. Top tang channel and buttstock is marked with last four digits of matching SN, which are also found inside toe of buttplate. Receiver is beautifully engraved by master engraver L.D. Nimschke with about 70% coverage on the receiver and flourishes on forend cap and buttplate tang. Receiver engraving consists of the fabulous vignette of a screaming eagle’s head on left sideplate and the patriotic vignette of a shield and stars overlaid by a wide ribbon engraved with the initials “H.W.C”. Both vignettes are surrounded by Mr. Nimschke’s sweeping foliate arabesque patterns that have fine pearled background. Both front side flats are identically engraved to match. Top of receiver is engraved in foliate and floral patterns with geometric patterns on top flat. Top tang, behind hammer slot is also engraved with foliate and floral pattern. Bottom of the carrier is engraved with Mr. Nimschke’s trademark flower blossom and there is a foliate pattern between the timing screws that has four stars in the center. Bottom tang, behind trigger slot is engraved with a geometric and stars pattern. Forend cap and buttplate tang are engraved to match with foliate arabesque patterns. According to consignor, this rifle had been presented to Oregon U.S. Senator, Henry W. Corbett (1827-1903). Senator Corbett was born in Massachusetts and eventually wound up in Oregon, where he was elected to the United States Senate and served 1867-1873. This rifle was produced in about 1869 during his term in office and undoubtedly was a presentation from a benefactor seeking an appointment or favor from the Senator. Accompanied by a 2-pg. letter from renowned researcher and author, George Madis, wherein he substantiates most of the technical information above. Another Model 1866 with identical engraving is pictured on pg. 121 of The Winchester Book, 1985 edition. PROVENANCE: Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Good. No orig finish remains, with the bbl and magazine tube being mostly a grey/brown patina. Bbl address is faint but mostly legible. Receiver and sideplates show moderate to heavy edge wear with light to moderate wear on the engraving, which is still completely clear and overall retain a fine medium mustard patina. Forend cap and buttplate are matching patina. Wood is sound with light handling and storage nicks and scratches and retains most of an old refinish. Mechanics are fine. Dark bore with good rifling and moderate to heavy pitting. 52170-30 (20,000-30,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

40


Session 1 1017.

SCARCE ENGRAVED WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 105521. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Fine ‘66 rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, altered Rocky Mountain front sight with German silver blade and replacement Kentucky rifle style fixed rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock that has crescent buttplate with trap containing an orig 4-pc brass & iron cleaning rod. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with an “X”, a “P” and an “F”. Last four digits of matching SN are found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Bottom of stock and forend cap have factory-style sling swivels that may have been added. Receiver, forend cap and buttplate tang are beautifully engraved in period New York style, probably from the L. D. Nimschke shop. Engraving consists of nearly full coverage, extremely well executed foliate arabesque patterns with fine pearled background on both sides. Each sideplate exhibits an empty rnd panel with dash and dot border. The transition on the left side is engraved with diamonds and the right side with diamond and dot patterns. Receiver ring over the top is engraved in a large “X” pattern with diamond and dot background. Diamond patterns are also engraved on top edges of receiver overlapping the sideplates. Foliate arabesque patterns extend over the top of the receiver, by the hammer slot and onto the top tang. Bottom of carrier is engraved in diamond and dot patterns with matching foliate arabesque patterns between the timing screws. Just below that engraved pattern is a stamped small rectangle which encloses the initials “JPE”, possibly those of the engraver which are unknown to this cataloger. Matching foliate arabesque patterns are engraved on each side of the nosecap and buttplate tang. This rifle was produced in about 1872 at a time when the West was still very wild with marauding Indians and other dangers and any repeating firearm was in great demand. Almost certainly this rifle would have been in the possession of a wealthy individual or as a presentation to an important person. The fact that it shows extensive use attests to the fact that it saw hard frontier service. PROVENANCE: Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Fair to good. No orig finish remains with all of the steel parts a cleaned grey/brown metal patina. The brass receiver, forend cap and buttplate retain a medium mustard patina showing moderate to heavy wear on the engraving with worn edges. Left front raised area of the receiver has a series of small dings. Stock has a hairline back of top tang, otherwise wood is sound with an old restored finish. Mechanics are fine. Worn dark bore with sharp rifling. Cleaning rod is fine. 52170-33 (20,000-30,000)

41

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1018.

EXTREMELY RARE POSSIBLY ONE OF A KIND WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 SADDLE RING CARBINE IN CALIBER 44 RUSSIAN. SN 22531. Cal. 44 Russian. Standard carbine with 20” bbl, full magazine, front sight integral with the front band and 2-leaf 2-position rear sight, graduated 100-300-500 yards. Magazine tube is correct type with threaded plug in the muzzle end. Bbl address is in 2-lines “HENRY’S PATENT - OCT. 16 1860 / KING’S PATENT MARCH 29. 1866”. Chamber area of the bbl, between rear sight and frame reads “44 RUSS.”. Mounted with uncheckered, nicely figured, slab sawed American walnut with straight stock and rifle buttplate with trap. Receiver, side plates & buttplate are made of “gun metal” (bronze or brass). Buttstock has early feature of a perch belly. SN was noted on the bottom tang between trigger & hammer spring tension screw. Top tang channel of buttstock is marked “X22531” and inside toe of buttplate is marked “2531”. This carbine is chambered in 44 Russian and a chamber cast confirms the dimensions of a 44 Russian cartridge case. The casting shows that the bbl chamber has a rim diameter of .520”, a base diameter of .460” and an overall case length of .960” which conform to the dimensions of the 44 Russian case. A 44 Russian cartridge functions through the actions and chambers without binding. A 44 American cartridge will not chamber or eject through the ejection port. The bolt & bolt face are blued as has been observed on other, later center fire 1866 bolts. Accompanied by a 2-page letter over the signature of well known Winchester collector and authority, the late Lewis E. Yearout, wherein he states that after having examined this carbine that he finds it completely orig and authentic. He justifies the finding with the information that this serial numbered receiver would have been produced around 1869-1870 and that the development of the 44 Russian cartridge by Smith & Wesson was around 1870, which is substantiated in several books on cartridges. Smith & Wesson developed the 44 Russian cartridge to facilitate a contract with the Russian government for their large frame No. 3 revolvers. It stands to reason that this information would have come to the attention of Winchester who would have wanted to pursue a contract with the Russians for rifles & carbines of the same caliber. In the same year of 1870 Winchester filled a contract with the Turkish Ottoman Empire for 15,000 1866 muskets & 5000 1866 carbines. With that success Winchester would have been eager to follow up with a Russian contract for a companion rifle, musket or carbine to the Smith & Wesson No. 3 revolver. Such a contract apparently never materialized, probably something the Russians would live to regret because in 1877, at the Battle of Plevna, the Turks decimated the Russian Army using their 1866 muskets & carbines. The likelihood is that this carbine is one produced as a sample or test piece for the Russians. It is also possible that this carbine was intended as an ammunition test bed for the development of the 44 Russian cartridge. Regardless this is a very special and most unusual 1866 carbine. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching. Bbl, magazine tube, bbl bands, rear sight, bolt, trigger & lever lock along with the loading gate retain about 99% plus bright, high polish blue. Receiver, side plates & buttplate have sharp edges with a beautiful medium mustard patina with no evidence of having been cleaned or filed. Screws also retain bright blue. Lever & hammer retain most of their strong, bright case colors. Wood is sound with a few light handling & storage marks and retains virtually all of its fine oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore, shows little if any use. 52467-1 JRL (15,000-25,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

42


Session 1 1019.

FINE WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 118709. Cal. 44 RF HENRY. Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4� oct bbl, full magazine, Rocky Mountain front sight with slightly altered nickel-silver blade and musket style rear sight graduated to 900 yards with exposed tension flat spring. Top flat of the bbl is marked with the 2-line Winchester & King’s patent address. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock & crescent brass buttplate that has a trap containing an orig 4-pc brass & iron cleaning rod. Last 4-digits of matching SN are found in top tang channel of buttstock & inside toe of buttplate. Bottom of stock & forend cap have factory style sling swivels. This rifle is produced in about 1874 when the west was still very wild and any repeating firearm was in great demand on the American frontier. Firearms of that era usually saw very hard and continuous service under extremes of weather and harsh conditions often with little or no maintenance. The Model 1866 was extremely popular and remained in service well into the 1880s in the U.S. and even longer in South & Central America. Very few are found today in orig configuration with orig finish. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbl retains 60-70% thinning orig blue with the balance a light patina showing a few minor nicks & dings. Magazine tube is mostly a blue/gray patina. Receiver & side plates have nice sharp edges with only a few minor nicks & scratches and shows a wonderful, even, smooth dark mustard patina. Side plates fit extremely well and show no evidence of battering. Buttplate & forend cap are of equal condition and patina. Hammer retains case colors on the right side and rear edge, faded elsewhere. Lever shows traces of case colors, being mostly a brown patina. Forearm has a small gouge and the wood overall shows a few light nicks & scratches and retains most of a restored finish. Mechanics are crisp, strong sharp bore with good shine and a few scattered spots of pitting. Cleaning rod is fine. 52665-1 JRL (10,000-15,000)

43

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1020.

FINE LATE WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE W/ FACTORY LETTER. SN 156697. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4� rnd bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight and 1873-style, short, semi-buckhorn rear sight with checkered edges. Receiver and sideplates are gun metal (brass or bronze) and the forend cap & buttplate are steel. Top tang has installed a Model 62A, lollipop tang sight with its orig locator pin. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with assembly no. 4624. Top tang channel of buttstock has spurious matching number and inside toe of buttplate is marked 2448. Accompanied by a Winchester factory letter confirming gun as round barreled rifle and shipped with 49 other arms on June 17, 1882 to order 33283. At this juncture, rimfire arms were rapidly waning in demand, although they were still popular in South and Central America. Few of these rifles survive today with high orig finish, usually having been exposed to heavy wear in saddle scabbards and wagon boxes under all sorts of inclement weather, often with little or no maintenance. CONDITION: Fine, numbered as noted above. Bbl and magazine tube retain 95-97% strong orig blue with some minor surface etching. Receiver shows light sharp edge wear with flush fitting sideplates showing no appreciable damage, only a few minor nicks and overall retains a wonderful dark mustard patina. Loading gate retains 30-40% orig fire blue. Hammer retains about 60-70% strong case colors, turned silver on the spur. Lever retains traces of case colors, being mostly a silver/brown patina. Forend cap is a plummy blue patina. Buttplate shows about 70% case colors, strong and bright in sheltered areas with a mottled silver/brown patina elsewhere. Buttstock has a gouge on each side of the comb with light nicks and dings elsewhere and retains most of its original finish. Forearm has a few light nicks and scratches along with some light gouges and also retains most of its finish. Mechanics are crisp. Bright shiny bore shows only light use. Tang sight retains about 88-90% bright orig blue. 52609-5 (11,000-16,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

44


Session 1 1021.

FINE EARLY WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 24226. Cal. 44 RF HENRY. Standard carbine with 20” barrel, full magazine, front sight integral with front band and 2-position, 2-leaf flip rear sight graduated 100, 200 & 500 yards. Barrel address has the Winchester and King’s patent dates and address. The receiver side plates and buttplate are gun metal (bronze or brass). Left side of receiver has a staple and ring. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock and rifle crescent buttplate with trap. Top tang channel of buttstock is marked with the last 4 digits of matching SN which are also found inside toe of buttplate. Left side of buttstock has a hand scratched name that is indecipherable. This is one of the earliest “Winchester” marked ‘66s just after they changed the barrel address from the earlier Henry marking. These early ‘66 carbines were in great demand on the western frontier by just about anyone who made their living on a horse. This encompassed all the cowboys, outlaws and lawmen as well as ordinary citizens. These carbines usually saw extreme hard service under very adverse conditions and are almost never found in orig configuration with high orig finish. PROVENANCE: Ray Saign; The collection of Tim Zissler. CONDITION: Fine plus, all matching. Barrel retains blue in sheltered areas, being mostly a smooth blue/brown patina. Magazine tube retains about 60% strong original blue with an area of what appears to be blood pitting just below the front band. Front band retains 20-25% bright orig blue. Forearm band is a blue/gray patina. Receiver, side plates and buttplate retain sharp edges showing only light wear with a few very light scratches and all retain a wonderful medium to dark mustard patina. Buttplate has a ding in the point of the heel. Loading gate retains about 60% thinning fire blue and the trigger about 75% blue turning plum. Lever and hammer have mostly turned to silver and dark patina. Wood is sound with a few minor scratches and retains most of an old refinish. Hammer will not catch at full cock when operated by the lever but will catch when retracted manually (a cursory inspection of the interior of the action disclosed that a simple cleaning would probably fix this problem). Otherwise mechanics are crisp. Strong bore with sharp rifling and some shine with moderate pitting. 52463-4 JRL (15,000-25,000)

45

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1022.

FINE LATE WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 157400. Cal. .44 RF HENRY. Standard carbine with 20” bbl, full mag, barleycorn front sight and an orig reverse mounted carbine ladder rear sight marked 1873 on the standing leaf. Receiver, side plates and buttplate are gun metal (bronze, brass) and receiver has a staple and ring in the left side. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock & brass carbine buttplate with trap. Left side of bottom tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “C 854”. Top tang channel of buttstock has the matching 3 digit SN along with a series of other numbers. Inside toe of buttplate is marked “634”. Although it appears that this buttplate may not be orig to this buttstock, it does fit perfectly with only a slight wood shrinkage near the toe and gives the appearance of being in place for the life of the carbine. This carbine was produced in about 1882 at a time when the west was very wild with marauding Indians, outlaws & other natural dangers associated with that era. Any repeating firearm was in great demand during the 1880s and especially carbines such as this that were easily handled from the back of a horse. They usually saw extreme hard service under adverse conditions and are rarely found today in orig configuration or with orig finish. Many of these late carbines, after the center fire cartridge had come into being with the popularity with the 1873 Winchester, were sold into south and central America where the .44 RF was still very popular. Most of those arms that have been returned to the U.S. are in near relic condition. PROVENANCE: The collection of Tim Zissler. CONDITION: About fine. Numbers matching as noted above. Bbl and mag tube retain about 40% orig blue turning plummy with the balance a mottled silver/ brown patina. Bbl bands retain about 40-50% thin orig blue. Receiver, side plates & buttplate retain sharp edges and show a wonderful medium to dark mustard patina. Lever and hammer are mostly dark patina. Stock has a few nicks and dings, otherwise wood is sound showing about 50% orig finish on the buttstock with the balance of the stock and forearm a hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine. Strong sharp bore with good shine & scattered pitting. 52463-19 JRL (12,500-17,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

46


Session 1 1023.

FINE EARLY WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH HENRY MARKED BARREL. SN 20390. Cal. 44 RF Henry. Standard Grade rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, globe front sight with post and a reproduction 1st model 1000 yd Henry ladder rear sight. Top flat of bbl is marked with 2-line Henry’s patent and King’s patent address. Receiver is “gun metal” (bronze or brass). Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and rifle crescent buttplate. Bottom of buttstock and forend cap have factory sling swivels. SN was observed on bottom of lower tang between the trigger and hammer spring tension screw. Last 4 digits of matching serial number are also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Top tang does not have the second wood screw nor is it drilled and tapped for tang sight. These features were not standard and early ‘66s can be found with or without these screws. Receiver on this rifle is 2nd type with sloping radius on the top rear. Magazine tube is orig type with threaded plug. These early 66 rifles were in great demand on the American frontier and usually saw extreme hard service with frontiersmen of all walks of life and on both sides of the law. They are rarely found in orig configuration and high orig finish. CONDITION: Good, all matching. Bbl and magazine tube retain most of a smooth, clean artificially aged blue brown patina showing sharp edge wear and a cleaned spot over the address area. Receiver and side plates show evidence of having been draw filed a very long time ago and now have a fine mustard patina. Side plates show no nicks or dings on top or bottom edges and fit extremely well. Buttplate is matching patina with some stock finish overruns. Forearm has a few light nicks and scratches and the buttstock a series of heavier scratches on both sides, otherwise wood is sound and retains most of an old refinish. Mechanics are crisp. Strong sharp bore with good shine and scattered pitting. 52506-16 (10,00012,500)

47

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1024. LATE WINCHESTER MODEL 1866 SADDLE RING CARBINE. NSN. Cal. 44 RF HENRY. Standard grade carbine with 20-1/4” round bbl, full magazine with musket front and forearm bands with an after-market sling swivel threaded hole in the bottom. Front sight is a replacement & is integral with the front band. It has a scarce 3rd type Henry 900-yd ladder rear sight. Mounted with replacement, uncheckered American walnut with strait stock and carbine butt plate with trap. Lower tang is without serial number with only a partial “4” visible. Butt stock and butt plate are unnumbered. Bbl has Winchester and Kings patent names and address. Receiver and side plates are after market engraved, probably in South America with light patterns of flower blossoms and double borders. Left side plate is engraved “MODEL 1873”. Bottom of the bbl about 4-5/8” from the muzzle has a screw slot cutout and the magazine tube has a screw slot cut out 8-5/8” from the muzzle end. It appears that the bbl magazine tube and front band have been recycled from a Winchester musket. CONDITION: Fair to good. No orig finish remains with the bbl and magazine tube a smooth plummy blue restored patina with scattered fine surface rust. Wood is sound and retains most all of its fine custom finish. Receiver and side plates were cleaned and polished a long time ago and are now a medium mustard patina. Lever and hammer are brown metal patina. Mechanics are fine, strong bore with good shine and moderate pitting. 51935-5 JRL (3,500-5,000)

1025. ENGRAVED WINCHESTER THIRD MODEL 1866 OCTAGON BARREL RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 127525. Cal. 44 RF. 24” oct bbl. Full magazine. Blue finish with gun metal receiver. Figured forestock. Straight grain buttstock. Bbl shows 2-line Winchester address rolled in front of rear-sight. Front sight is steel knife blade type. Rear-sight is ladder type. Receiver is engraved overall with scroll and geometric patterns. There is a blank presentation panel on left side and an oval panel on right side, with initials “LFD” engraved. Forward part of receiver on right side has a running deer in high relief. Left side of forward part of receiver shows a grizzly bear in high relief. SN is stamped behind trigger with a “P” proof under lever. Upper tang is stamped “.22.4.2677.” with a cross. Lower tang has a spurious “XXXX” mark. Buttstock shows no markings. Inside toe of buttplate is stamped “2457”. Letter from Cody Firearms Museum indicating that this was shipped on December 1, 1875. CONDITION: Very good, as totally refinished after engraving. Bbl shows a mottled blue-brown refinish. Bbl address is re-rolled. Rear-sight is a modern replacement, as is the front-sight. Bore is dark with traces of rifling. Forend has large gap at receiver. Receiver has sharp engraving over a re-polished re-patinated finish. Engraving is nicely accomplished. Tang markings are spurious as noted. SN is sharp. Hammer and lever show a silver-gray patina with some roughness. Buttstock is a modern replacement with varnish finish overall and some light scratches and dents. Buttstock is undersized at wrist and around buttplate. Buttplate has a rough patinated finish with considerable roughness. Engraving is sharp. Forend cap is a patinated finish with sharp engraving. An attractive engraved Winchester 1866 rifle. 52154-5 (3,500-4,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

48


Session 1 Lots 1026, 1027 & 1028 49

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1026.

*EXTRAORDINARILY RARE AND PROBABLY THE HIGHEST CONDITION 1st TYPE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 1 OF 1000 LEVER ACTION RIFLES WITH NUMERIC 1 OF 1000 DESIGNATION ACCOMPANIED BY ITS ORIGINAL UNIVERSAL STUDIOS PRIZE ’94 CARBINE WITH FACTORY LETTER. 1) WINCHESTER 1873 1 of 1000. SN 6594. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Certainly one of the best known and one of the highest condition Model 1 of 1000 Winchester rifles extant. This rifle has absolutely documented history from 1935 to the present day having been purchased from the Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Co. in Boston by renowned old-time collector, the late Fred F.P. Mills who kept it until his death in 1962. The rifle passed through a number of equally renowned collections, all listed below under provenance. This rifle has 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, gold washed Beach’s combination front sight, early style, short semibuckhorn rear sight with V-notch & checkered edges & a thick base sporting tang sight with 4” staff and early style thumb screw with fine knurled edge. Top flat of the bbl has the 2-line Winchester & King’s address & patents forward of the rear sight and “1 of 1,000” engraved over the chamber area. Receiver is first type with mortised dust cover rails containing a 2nd type dust cover with impressed checkered thumbprint. Receiver also has single set trigger. Mounted with extraordinary, highly figured, flame grain, about 3-4X American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and black insert serpentine grip buttstock with smooth steel shotgun buttplate. Left side of the lower tang,

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

50


Session 1

Reverse

under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “394” & “XXX”. Matching assembly no. is also found inside top tang channel of buttstock. Bottom of the stock & forend cap are fitted with factory sling swivels. Inside each sideplate is numbered “594”, obviously an assembler’s mistake. The left side of the lever, inside the action is numbered “5561” also apparently an assembly or serial number. At the time of manufacture of this rifle, 1875, very few pistol grip 1873 arms were being produced. Since they required a special curved lever to accommodate the pistol grip stock they were apparently numbered to an order. This rifle was featured as item # 688 in the Jackson Arms catalog #22 of 1965 and is pictured on the back cover. This rifle

51

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

was one of the first twenty 1 of 1000 rifles identified to Universal Studios in 1950 when they were doing publicity for their upcoming Jimmy Stewart movie Winchester ’73 and awarded each of those first 20 rifle owners with a new Winchester Model ’94 carbine. The carbine that was awarded to Mr. Mills at that time, serial # 1674643 accompanies this rifle. Very few of those modern ’94 carbines remain with their original 1 of 1000 rifles today, possibly only 2 or 3. This rifle has been the subject of articles in various publications over the years and is accompanied by a large volume of provenance and correspondence including several letters from renowned historian, author and dealer, the late Eric Vaule to the current consignor. Also accompanying is a copy of a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle with oct bbl, set trigger, XXX checkered stock, Peep & Beach sights, sling & swivel, case hardened, One of One Thousand, received in the warehouse July 30, 1875 and shipped the same day to order no. 3745. Additionally accompanied by a 3-page letter from renowned author, researcher and historian, the late R.L. Wilson who details some of the above information and discusses where this rifle will appear in his forthcoming publications. Also accompanying is a copy of a letter from Steve Hannagan to Olin Industries discussing Model 1 of 1000 rifles and stating that out of a total production of 720,610 Model 1873 arms there were only 135 produced as 1 of 1000. Additionally accompanying is a hand written note over the signature of renowned collector, the late Eldon J. Owens of Claremont, NH, wherein he states that he purchased both of these rifles, identified by SN, from the Fred Mills estate. Further accompanied by old black & white photos of Mr. Mills and another gentlemen holding this rifle. Finally accompanied by a 6-1/2 page, on legal sized paper listing of the Frederick P.L. Mills Firearms collection, this rifle is item # 68 on that list. This rifle is pictured in color on pages 31-32 of The Story of Winchester 1 of 1000 and 1 of 100 Rifles, Lewis. A deluxe slip-cover copy of this publication accompanies this rifle. It is also mentioned on page 65 of Winchester the Golden Age of Gunmaking and the Winchester 1 of 1000, Wilson. This is one of the more important and best documented 1 of 1000 rifles to come to market in recent history and certainly one of the most high conditioned rifles. PROVENANCE: Iver Johnson Sporting Goods - 1935; Fred P. L. Mills - 1935-1962; Eldon Owens - 1962; Jackson Arms - 1965; Bobby C. Burns - 1965-1993; Paul Sorrell & Mike Clark - 1993; David Bichrist - 1993; Leon Budginas- 1993; Jack Lewis, Jr. - 1996; Leigh Evans; Eric Vaule - 2003; Bert Jolicoeur - 2004. CONDITION: Very fine, numbers as noted above. Bbl retains about 80% strong orig blue with the balance a medium brown patina, all toward the muzzle. Magazine tube retains about the same amount of blue, also turned brown at the muzzle end. Both magazine tube & bbl have a few small scattered spots of pitting. Receiver, side plates & dust cover retain about 80% orig case colors, strong & bright in sheltered areas faded elsewhere, turned silver over the receiver ring & bottom front edge. Hammer retains strong case colors, turned gray on the spur. Lever retains case colors in sheltered areas, mostly turned gray/brown. Forend cap retains most of its orig case colors, moderately to heavily faded. Buttplate is a cleaned metal patina with fine pitting. Wood is

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

52


Session 1

prize carbine

reverse

sound with a few light handling & storage nicks & scratches and retains most of a fine old restored finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore with a few scattered spots of pitting. Tang sight is mostly a blue/brown patina. 2) WINCHESTER 94. SN 1674643. Original Universal Studios prize ’94 carbine. CONDITION: Carbine is extremely fine, appears to be unfired retaining virtually all of its orig factory finish with a few minor scratches on the wood and a couple more on the receiver. Sight hood is missing. 52651-1, 52651-4 JRL (250,000-400,000)

53

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1027.

VERY RARE AND WELL DOCUMENTED WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 ONE OF ONE THOUSAND LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 30783. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Fine One of One Thousand rifle with rare 26” oct bbl, full magazine, gold-washed Beach’s combination front sight and short, semi-buckhorn rear sight with fine V-notch and hand serrated edges. Receiver is 1st type with mortised dust cover rails and 2nd type dust cover with impressed, checkered thumb-print. Receiver also has single set trigger. Mounted with uncheckered, very highly figured American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “732” & “XX”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Bbl is engraved in 4th style which consists of fine foliate arabesque patterns with pearled background over the chamber area and around the muzzle. Top flat of bbl, over the chamber area is engraved in script “One of One Thousand”. Muzzle & chamber ends of the bbl have inlaid silver bands. This was the 18th rifle identified and documented by Universal Studios in 1950 when they were doing a publicity campaign advertising the forthcoming Jimmy Stewart movie Winchester ‘73. This rifle is pictured in color with an extensive write-up on pages 72 & 73 of The Story of the Winchester 1 of 1000 and 1 of 100 rifles, Lewis. The write up presents the information regarding the discovery of this rifle in 1950 at which time it was owned by Cmdr. T.R. Jordan, USN. The write-up also discloses that the author had located extensive correspondence between Cmdr. Jordan and Steve Hannagan Associates, who was the publicity firm for Universal Studios during the One of One Thousand search. All the information regarding One of One Thousand rifles uncovered during that 1950 search was compiled by Steve Hannagan into a hardbound book which was later published. The write-up also shows provenance to well known dealer/collector Leroy Merz with credit, at that time to the Dr. Edmund Lewis collection. This rifle, identified by serial number in the listing on page 26 of the reference publication shows that it had a 26” oct bbl, with case hardened receiver, XX wood, set trigger and sporting leaf sight. It was received in the warehouse July 24, 1878 and shipped Aug. 2, 1878 to order no. 12415. Pages 146 and 147 of the reference publication discusses the origin of the Hannagan report and the impact

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

54


Session 1

Reverse

that it had on the collecting of the One of One Thousand rifles. Accompanied by a copy of a notarized letter dated 30 June 1950 from Cmdr. Jordan to Universal Pictures describing his One of One Thousand rifle. He states that he bought it from a friend 3 years before. The friend reportedly had acquired it in a trade. Also accompanying are 4 pieces of correspondence between Mr. W.F. Mitchell, wherein he is advising Winchester that he had purchased this rifle and was soliciting information regarding the Model One of One Thousand. A handwritten note on one of the letters, dated June 5, 1968, states, “Purchased May 29, 1968 from Hank Vogel, Detroit, MI”. Additionally accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle with case hardened receiver, 26” oct bbl, set trigger, XX stock, sporting leaf sight & “1 of 1000”, received in the warehouse July 24, 1878 and shipped August 2, 1878 to order #12475. Also accompanied by a copy of the ledger page for this rifle. Also accompanied by a copy of the catalog page from “ARMSFLASH” dated June 3, 1958, the catalog of the renowned dealer, F. Theodore Dexter of Burbank, CA. wherein he is advertising this rifle for sale. Further accompanied by a copy of page 1 of a Leroy Merz catalog advertising this rifle for sale. Finally accompanying is the March/April 1982 issue of Man at Arms magazine which contains a 4-page article by well known historian, researcher & author, R.L. Wilson publicizing his forthcoming book Winchester The Golden Age of American Gunmaking and the Winchester 1 of 1000. Page 4 of that article lists 50 known 1 of 1000 Model 1873 rifles. Page 93 of Mr. Wilson’s book has 3 black & white photos, reprinted from the Hannagan report, with a write-up detailing some of the above information with credit to the William F. Mitchell collection. While little is known about the early provenance, prior to 1950, from that point forward it is rock solid. This rifle is extremely unusual with a deluxe, highly figured wood that is not checkered, but ordered that way. PROVENANCE: Cmdr. T.R. Jordan, USN; F. Theodore Dexter - 1958; Hank Vogel collection - 1968; William F. Mitchell collection - 1968; Leroy Merz; Collection of Dr. Edmund Lewis. CONDITION: About good, all matching. Traces of orig finish remain on the metal, overall retaining a clean gray metal patina, with a few very minor nicks on the bbl. All of the appended metal parts are matching patina to the receiver, bbl & magazine tube. Stock has a hairline by the top tang with a replaced sliver in the forearm, otherwise wood is sound and retains a fine old restored finish. Mechanics are fine, sharp strong bore with fine pitting. 52079-2 (75,000-125,000)

55

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1028.

VERY RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 ONE OF ONE THOUSAND LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 31266. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Fine one of one thousand with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, gold-washed Beach’s combination front sight and early style, short, semi-buckhorn rear sight with fine V-notch. Receiver is 2nd type with attached dust cover rail and 3rd type dust cover with impressed checkered thumb-print. Receiver has single set trigger. Mounted with very nicely figured American walnut with early style checkered forearm and straight stock with crescent buttplate that has a trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “137” and “XX”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. This rifle is beautifully engraved in 1 of 1000 fourth-style with fine foliate arabesque patterns over the top 3 flats of the bbl over the chamber area and around the front sight at the muzzle. Light flourishes of matching engraving are on the side flats over the chamber area and extend completely around the exposed flats of the muzzle. Chamber end & muzzle ends of the bbl are inlaid with platinum bands. Top flat of the bbl, over the chamber is engraved “One of One Thousand”. Accompanied by a copy of a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle with 24” oct bbl, set trigger, checkered stock, case hardened and 1 of 1000, received in warehouse Nov. 14, 1878 and shipped Nov. 20, 1878 with 5 other arms to order #13488. This rifle is listed by serial number on page 26 of The Story of the Winchester 1 of 1000 and 1 of 100 Rifles, Lewis. This rifle was the first number of 6 consecutively numbered 1 of 1000 rifles received in the warehouse Nov. 14, 1878 and shipped Nov. 20, 1878 to order no. 13488. This listing shows that it had an oct bbl, case hardened receiver with checkered stock and set trigger. Apparently it was not available to the author for photography at the time of publication. Three rifles of that shipment are pictured on pages 93 & 94 of Winchester the Golden Age of American Gunmaking and the Winchester 1 of 1000, Wilson. Captions of some of those photographs provide the same information about the shipment of 6 consecutive numbered Winchester 1 of 1000 rifles. While the Winchester Model 1873 was produced in large numbers, approximately 720,000, only 132 are recorded as being 1 of 1000. Of that number only a small percentage is known making this one of the more rare collectible American firearms in the world today. CONDITION: About good, all matching, lower tang having been period repaired and renumbered. Traces of orig finish remain in the most sheltered areas with the metal, overall, showing a smooth, even plum brown patina with a couple of minor nicks on the bbl. Receiver & sideplates show sharp edges indicating light use and handling. Forearm has a couple of repaired areas by the bbl channel on each side and a longitudinal hairline down the bottom, otherwise the wood is sound and overall retains a fine old restored finish with a few nicks, scratches & dings. Checkering shows moderate to heavy wear. Edges of the stock around the top & bottom tangs were reduced during the restoration process. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore with a few small spots of fine pitting. 52692-1 JRL (30,000-50,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

56


EXTREMELY RARE EDITOR’S PROOF COPY OF THE INITIAL PRINTING OF THE HANNAGAN REPORT ON THE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 ONE OF ONE THOUSAND RIFLES. Hardback book measures 11-3/8” tall by 8-3/4” wide. The first six books prior to production were apparently produced by renowned old time collector John R. Woods. This beautiful book is bound in red oil cloth with gold embossed spine “1 / OF / 1000” at the top and “MODEL / 1873” below. They fly leaf is hand-stamped in red “PROOF COPY” near the top and “Initial Printing” below. The book consists of several hundred pages of reports, photographs and copies of notarized statements from more than 20 owners of One of One Thousand rifles. The first page in the book is a copy of a letter from Steve Hannagan dated 1950 and titled “ONE OF ONE THOUSAND” / MODEL 1873 / Winchester’s / First / HighAccuracy / RIFLE”. The body of this letter states “An account of how this great, and all but forgotten variety of the Model 1873 Winchester has now sky-rocketed to a fame far greater than it ever enjoyed at its prime, became the most famous rifle of 1950 and the most prized and valuable item among the nation’s gun collectors”. This book is the compilation of the Universal Pictures Company search for authentic One of One Thousand Rifles to promote their movie “Winchester 73” starring Jimmy Stewart which came out in 1950. The book reports that the background story for the movie originated in 1945 when a Mr. Stuart N. Lake wrote a letter to Winchester’s Edwin Pugsley proposing a motion picture story that he planned to write around a Winchester rifle One of One Thousand. In the letter he gave the background of the rifle in the story as having originated in 1876 in Dodge City, KS where it was the first prize in a shooting contest on the 4th of July. The rifle was subsequently stolen and passed through a number of hands until 1884 when it was recovered by the original winner of the rifle. The movie followed Mr. Lake’s story very closely down to where the hero owner of the rifle thwarted a bank robbery by a gang in Dodge City. The gang allegedly included the outlaw who had stolen the rifle originally. The book also contains the advertising and efforts of Universal Studios to identify and authenticate these rare rifles, to the point of offering a new Winchester Model 94 to the first 20 owners of authentic, documented One of One Thousand Rifles. In total the studio was able to document 23 authentic Model 1873 One of One Thousand Rifles and 6 Model 1876 One of One Thousand Rifles. Almost certainly this publication had a basis in the research for the writing of the books Winchester 1 of 1000, Wilson and the story of the Winchester 1 of 1000 and 1 and 100 Rifles, Lewis. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, pristine and new with only one small ink stain inside the front cover. Cover is bright and clean and completely intact. A rare opportunity to own an extraordinarily rare book which is likely to never surface again in this lifetime. 52177-1 JRL (5,5007,500)

1030.

LOT OF TWO BOXES EARLY WINCHESTER 44 WCF AMMUNITION. Two beautiful 3rd type boxes that are nearly identical with green and black top labels and brown complete wrap bands. The labels are identical to the 1st variation of this label with the addition of a headstamp on the line drawing of the cartridge in the center. The brown paper bands wrapping the boxes picture an 1873 saddle ring carbine with rifle sight and front band. One end of the label has the identical line drawing of a cartridge as found on the top label. The other end of the band is marked “WINCHESTER / 44 CALIBER C.F. /MODEL 1873.”. These labels probably appeared in the 1890’s until about 1902. Few of these such early boxes survive today, intact with ammunition. CONDITION: Again, virtually identical. Both boxes are sealed in plastic and the ammunition was not examined. Both labels show very light wear with very little soil. One box appears to be sealed while the other is opened. One box has light foxing around the carbine side. 52651-2 JRL (1,500-2,500)

57

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1029.


Session 1 1031.

RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 SPECIAL ORDER DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTERS. SN 107940. Cal. 38 WCF (38-40). Exceptional special order, deluxe 1873 with 24-1/4” oct to rnd bbl, button magazine, half nickel front sight and early style, short semi-buckhorn rear sight with checkered edges. Top flat of bbl has the usual 2-line Winchester & King’s address & patent dates. Receiver, side plates, forend cap & buttplate are color case hardened. Receiver is small frame type with stepped receiver ring and integral dust cover rail containing a 3rd type dust cover. Carrier is marked “38 CAL.” Mounted with very nicely figured, about 2X shell grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm & black Fleur-de-lis insert, serpentine grip buttstock with crescent buttplate that has a trap. This is an early ‘73 in 38 caliber which had been introduced in this model rifle in 1879, with this rifle having been produced in 1883. Left side of the lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “4567”, “XX” and an “R”. Matching assembly number is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Top tang channel of buttstock also has the stamped no. “38” and heel of buttstock, under the buttplate is marked “R H”. Accompanied by a 2 Cody Firearms Museum letters which report identical information that this is a rifle in caliber 38, with 1/2 oct bbl, plain trigger, checkered pistol grip stock with rifle butt, 1/2 magazine and case hardened, received in the warehouse March 31, 1883 and shipped April 7, 1883 to order no. 3283. Also accompanied by a copy of the entry on the ledger page for this rifle. PROVENANCE: Vince Sepulveda Collection. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl retains about 85-90% strong orig blue showing light edge wear and some minor toning to plum under strong light. Receiver & side plates retain about 80% orig case colors, brilliant in sheltered areas, strong on the side plates and fading to silver on top & bottom edges. Loading gate retains about 95-96% strong orig fire blue. Hammer retains brilliant case colors, moderately faded on spar. Trigger retains most all of its orig case colors, faded on front edge. Lever retains strong case colors on the sides, fading to silver on outer faces. Forend cap & magazine cap retain most of their orig case colors, moderately faded. Buttplate retains faded case colors on the tang with the face turned silver. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches with the forearm showing wear at the carry point, otherwise the wood retains most of its orig varnish with the checkering showing light diamond point wear. Mechanics are fine, strong bright bore. 52598-3 JRL (20,000-30,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

58


Session 1 1032.

*RARE SEMI-DELUXE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 SMALL BORE LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 555264. Rare semi-deluxe cal.22 short with 24-3/8” oct bbl, full magazine, orig 2nd type inside tube, ivory bead Lyman hunting front sight and flat top semi-buckhorn rear sight. Top flat of bbl has standard Winchester & King address and patent date. Receiver is 3rd type with integral dust cover rail and 3rd type dust cover. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with capped pistol grip buttstock and Winchester embossed hard rubber shotgun buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood, is marked with the assembly number “11372” which number is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. There was a total 720,610 Model 1873 rifles and carbines in 5 different calibers which includes 19,552 rifles produced in 22 rimfire, both 22 short and long, with short being the predominant quantity. These rifles were only produced during the period 1884 to 1904 and were the first repeating 22 rifle made in the United States. They were offered in both 24” and 26” bbls with very few of the 26” models produced. This rifle was manufactured in 1900 near the end of production. Extremely few were produced as “special order” such as found here. These small bore rifles were generally considered to have been garden guns or for use by ladies and young boys. They usually saw extreme hard service with little maintenance and are rarely found today with high original finish or bright bores. The corrosive ammo of those days and lack of small bore cleaning equipment generally resulted in badly eroded bores. This scarce and desirable rifle is accompanied by a Winchester Factory letter from the Buffalo Bill Historical center. The letter further documents the configuration as follows: Rifle Cal. .22 Short, Octagon Barrel, plain trigger with plain pistol gripped stock, lyman hunter front and flat-top rear, shotgun butt with rubber butt plate. Shipped December 15 1900. The reverse side of the factory letter has a copy of the original ledger sheet. A very fine example of a very rare variation of the 1973 Winchester. PROVENANCE: Vince Sepulveda Collection. With Buffalo Bill Historical Center Factory letter and copy of Ledger sheet. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain 96-97% strong orig blue with scattered rust pitting on the top right flat in the area between the sights. Magazine tube has scattered areas of pin-prick pitting on the right side. Receiver retains about 90% strong orig blue with candy striping and fine sharp edge wear. Right side plate retains over 90% orig blue and the left side plate retain over 50% orig blue. Dust cover retains 15-20% original blue. Hammer retains strong, bright case colors and the lever faded case colors on the sides turned silver on outer faces. Top tang roll marking is a thin strike but mostly legible. Wood is sound with light nicks & scratches and a couple of small gouges and retains 95-97% strong orig factory finish with some light oil staining at the receiver and around the top tang. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. Inside magazine tube retains traces of orig blue with bright blue on the spring clip on the bottom. 52329-1 (12,500-17,500) C&R; ESA

59

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1033.

RARE SPECIAL ORDER PRESENTATION WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 41559. Cal. .44WCF (44-40). Fine special order rifle with 24-1/4” oct to rnd bbl, butt on mag, half nickel front sight and early style semibuck horn rear sight with checkered edges. Receiver is 2nd type with attached dust cover rail and 3rd type dust cover. Mounted with a higher end grade of 1X uncheckered American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate with trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly # “543” and “XX”. Buttstock has the assembly # “1554” in top tang channel and inside toe of buttplate, which makes sense given the rifle letters with 1X wood, not “XX.” “1-X” guns that letter that way are extremely rare. Receiver and sideplates are color case hardened with the left side plate inscribed “Presented to / Dr. E. C. Richardson / by / Wm. W. Converse / Jan. 19th 1880”. This inscription has all the characteristics of other inscriptions engraved by renowned Winchester engraver John Ulrich. This gun is the subject of two separate Winchester articles. Accompanied by a four page article by G. Scott Soles, which appeared in the Summer Edition 2008 of The Winchester Collector magazine, which details information about this rifle with several photographs and in particular reports information about Mr. Converse. He was born in Ware, Mass. in 1834 and in 1878 was working at Winchester with a very high salary and position, being paid more than Oliver Winchester’s son, W. W. Winchester. After the deaths of Oliver and W. W. Winchester in 1880 records disclose that Mr. Converse sat on the Winchester Board of Directors, later became Treasurer, then Secretary, and finally President of the company, which appointment took place in March 1881. Additional information is about the possible relationship with Dr. Richardson is theorized, in that he was a physician and may have been the doctor treating the two Winchester men who were both deathly ill and soon both passed away, at which time Converse became President of WRACo. This article also shows the listing for this rifle in the orig Winchester ledger and identifies it in cal. 44 with half oct bbl, plain trigger, “X stock”, casehardened, received in the warehouse Jan. 17 1880 and shipped the same day to order # 18827. This rifle is pictured and described on pg. 190 of The Winchester Book , Madis, 1985 edition. It is also listed on pg. 460 of Winchester’s New Model of 1873, Gordon, wherein Mr. Gordon states there were only 59 inscribed models 1873 known at the time of publication. A second 5-page article by Mr. Soles was published in the Summer Edition 2015 of The Winchester Collector, This article updates significant details Converse not previously reported in any of the popular Winchester publications, but more importantly on Dr. Richardson. It was learned that he was a graduate of Harvard Medical School, and had, upon graduation moved to Ware, Mass. to practice medicine. Dr. Richardson served throughout the Civil War as a surgeon and presumably resumed practice at war’s end. Little else was reported regarding Dr. Richardson but it seems likely that such an elaborate gift would have stemmed from a close relationship, probably relating to the illness of both Winchester men. PROVENANCE: Paul Sorrell; Scott Soles Collection. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl retains 95-96% strong orig blue with light sharp edge wear and thinning around the muzzle with a few spots on the top and bottom of the round section. Receiver and side plate retains most of their orig case colors, strong & bright in sheltered areas, moderately faded and turning silver elsewhere. Hammer retains lightly to moderately faded case colors and the lever stronger case colors in sheltered areas, turning silver on outer faces. Upper and lower tang are mostly grey patina. Forend cap retains most of its orig, moderately faded case colors. Wood is sound with the buttstock having a few light nicks and scratches. Forearm is sound and retains about 50% orig oil finish with the rear 1/2 showing a hand-worn patina. Mechanics are crisp. Bright shiny bore. 52330-2 (17,500-25,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

60


Session 1 1034.

WONDERFUL SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 211641. Cal. .44 WCF (44-40). Standard grade carbine with 20” barrel, special order button magazine, barleycorn front sight and 1873 marked carbine ladder rear sight. Chamber area of barrel, between rear sight and receiver is marked “44 CAL”. Bottom front of the receiver is marked in extremely tiny letters & numbers “J.R / 12831” which is the inventory number applied by James Rosier, Winchester’s dealer in Melbourne, Australia. No indication the meaning of these markings. Left side of receiver has a staple & ring. Mounted with nicely figured, uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight grip and carbine buttplate with trap that contains an original 3-piece brass & steel cleaning rod. This carbine was produced about 1886 at a time that arms such as found here were everyday working tools and were exposed to the extremes of weather and wear most often in a saddle scabbard or wagon box, frequently with little or no maintenance. Firearms of that era are rarely found today with high original finish. PROVENANCE: The collection of Tim Zissler. CONDITION: Very fine. Barrel retains 98-99% strong, bright, original blue with the barrel band showing about 95% strong blue. Receiver and sideplates retain about 88-90% crisp original blue showing sharp edge wear and flaking on the right front flat and left side plate. Bottom front of the receiver, at the carry point is a blue/gray patina. Lever and hammer show strong, very bright case colors, lightly to moderately faded to outer faces of lever. Lever latch & trigger show most of their original case colors, moderately faded (a most unusual bonus to find these items with case colors). Buttplate retains virtually all its original case colors turned a little dark. Wood is sound with a few minor handling and storage nicks & dings and retains most all of its bright original finish. Mechanics are crisp. Very bright shiny bore. 52463-5 JRL (12,500-17,500)

61

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1035.

*FINE HIGH CONDITION WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY WORKSHEET. SN 719589. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, blued standard front sight with screw and semi-buckhorn rear sight. Receiver is 3rd type and unusually has the small bore “step” at the top front of the receiver ring. This is probably a parts clean up rifle assembled out of remaining, unused parts. Although the Winchester records at the Cody Firearms Museum indicate that the SN was applied in 1917, it appears that this rifle was actually assembled in 1923 when the final clean up of 1873 parts remaining at the factory were assembled into arms. That year there were 18,260 rifles & carbines assembled. Bbl has the late, small letter, 2-line address & patent dates on top left flat with caliber marking on top left flat at the chamber area. Bbl & receiver are marked with the “WP” proof mark. Mounted with nicely figured, uncheckered, slab sawed American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate with trap. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum worksheet which has only the following information: Shipped Sept 25, 1925 to order number 148-18, charged to T.N. Boyd & Son. Also accompanied by 2 boxes of caliber 44 ammunition: 1). Early 2-pc box with green & black label and buff colored paper band that has the line drawing of a cartridge on one end and “WINCHESTER .44 CALIBER, C.F. MODEL 1873” on the other. One side of the band also has the line drawing of a Model 1873 carbine. 2). Full box of Remington/UMC 44-40 smokeless ammo in a rnd corner box with brown & black label having a cartridge on top. Ends of the paper band are marked “.44 WINCHESTER / SOFT POINT / SMOKELESS” and one side of the band pictures a Remington Model 14-1/2 pump action rifle. Box is open and filled with mixed head stamp ammunition. CONDITION: Rifle is extremely fine. Overall retains 98-99% crisp orig blue on bbl & magazine tube with fine spots of pinprick rust. Receiver & side plates retain about 97-98% crisp orig blue with tiny spots of flaked blue that is turned to patina. Lever, hammer & trigger retain most of their orig blue with some light surface rust & flaking. Buttplate retains 93-95% orig blue, turning a little plum, showing wear on heel & toe. Wood is sound with a few small nicks in the forearm finish and overall retains virtually all of its orig factory finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Appears to be new & unfired retaining virtually all of the orig finish on the bolt face. Box 1 ammunition is sealed & wrapped in plastic with a couple of minor chips in the label and some light soil. There is also a small ding in the bottom. Ammunition Box 2 has top label intact with the band showing minor losses, overall is a dark brown patina with light soil. Ammunition is moderately oxidized. 52527-13 JRL (12,500-15,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

62


Session 1 1036.

RARE FACTORY ENGRAVED AND NICKEL PLATED WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 202440. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Unusual 1873 rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, combination front sight and semi-buckhorn rear sight. Mounted with very nicely figured, uncheckered American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate with trap. Receiver is third type with integral dust cover rail and third type dust cover. Left side of lower tang, under the wood, is without assembly number, top tang channel of buttstock is not numbered and inside toe of buttplate has the number “00”. Inside edges of buttplate have the name “BOB D.” in electric pencil. Receiver is engraved by L.D. Nimschke in what is probably no. 10 pattern which consists of the small round vignette of a standing bull elk surrounded by foliate arabesque patterns, one scroll of which terminates in Mr. Nimschke’s trademark flower blossom. Balance of the receiver has light scrolls with line borders. Right side is engraved in matching foliate arabesque patterns also including a large flower blossom. Engraving extends over top of receiver and dust cover, both sides of forend cap and buttplate tang. Bottom of receiver and carrier are engraved in mirror image arabesque patterns with the carrier also engraved “44 CAL”. These engraving patterns are identical to those pictured on pgs. 143 & 147 of the 1985 edition of The Winchester Book, Madis. All the metal surfaces were originally nickel finish. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle with oct bbl, plain trigger, $2 engraving, nickel finish and received in the warehouse March 13, 1886 and shipped March 17, 1886. Of the many Model 1873 rifles & carbines produced very few were engraved and extremely few had special plating. Ordinarily, when a Winchester arm was special ordered engraved it was also fitted with deluxe checkered wood. Likelihood is this rifle probably was ordered and used by a trick shot artist or as a special presentation. CONDITION: Very good. Bbl and magazine tube retain 95-96% orig nickel with some very fine pinprick spots on top flats of bbl. Receiver and sideplates retain traces of orig nickel, being mostly a gray patina. Hammer retains most of its orig nickel, and lever traces of nickel. Buttplate is a cleaned gray metal patina with scattered surface rust. Forearm has a tiny hairline in the top front edge and the buttstock a gouge on the bottom right edge, otherwise wood is sound and retains most of a fine restored varnish finish. Mechanics are fine. Strong bore with good shine, pitted in the grooves. 52246-1 (12,000-15,000)

63

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1037.

RARE WINCHESTER EARLY FIRST MODEL 1873 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 543. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, altered Rocky Mountain front sight with the blade made from a coin or piece of silverware. Rear sight is early short style with V-notch and checkered edges mounted backwards in the rear sight dovetail. Receiver is 1st type with mortised dust cover rails containing a 1st type dust cover with raised, checkered oval thumb print. Receiver has set trigger. Mounted with uncheckered slab sawed American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate with trap. Left side of lower tang is marked with the assembly number “244” with matching number in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter that identifies this firearm as a rifle with 24” oct bbl, set trigger, received in warehouse March 16, 1974 (sic should read 1874), shipped March 27, 1874. The Winchester ‘73 is arguably the gun that won the west along with the Colt Single Action Army revolver in the same caliber. This rifle, having been produced in 1878 was delivered at a time when the west was still wild with marauding hostile Indians, outlaws and other dangers on the American frontier. These rifles usually saw very hard service under adverse conditions in harsh weather, usually with little or no maintenance. They were the working mans tools and are rarely found today with high orig finish. This rifle is among the earliest ‘73s produced by Winchester with the “new” bbls. The first 500 or so Model ‘73 arms were produced with either left over 1866 bbls or were manufactured with the same rate of twist as the Model 1866. Winchester almost immediately began receiving complaints about the lack of accuracy with their new rifles. They discovered that the “new” center fire 44 cartridges with higher velocity and heavier bullets required a different rate of twist. Once that was accomplished, accuracy improved greatly. CONDITION: Very good, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain a lightly cleaned and artificially aged silver/brown patina with a few scattered tiny nicks. Receiver & side plates show about 25% orig blue, mostly on the frame with some artificial aging on the surface. Lever & hammer are silvered case colors. Forend cap is a mostly blue/brown patina and buttplate is a silver/gray patina. Wood is sound with nicks, dings and a few bruises and retains most of an old refinish. Mechanics are crisp, strong bore with sharp rifling and moderate pitting. 52506-19 JRL (10,000-15,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

64


Session 1 1038.

RARE WINCHESTER FIRST MODEL FIRST TYPE 1873 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 589. Cal. 44 WCF (4440). Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4” rnd bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight and early style short rear sight with V-notch and checkered edges. Receiver is 1st type with mortised 1st type dust cover that has raised checkered thumb print. Mounted with very highly figured, slab sawed, uncheckered American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate that has a trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “1” and an “R”. Matching number “1” is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum worksheet which identifies this firearm as a rifle with 24” bbl, received in the warehouse March 18, 1874 and shipped May 14, 1874 to order #1381. This worksheet also has the unusual notation “ASSM # R I - FRAME - WOOD - BUTTPLATE”. The Winchester ‘73 is arguably the gun that won the west along with the Colt Single Action Army revolver in the same caliber. This rifle, having been produced in 1878 was delivered at a time when the west was still wild with marauding hostile Indians, outlaws and other dangers on the American frontier. These rifles usually saw very hard service under adverse conditions in harsh weather, usually with little or no maintenance. They were the working mans tools and are rarely found today with high orig finish. CONDITION: Good, all matching. Bbl retains traces of orig blue around the front sight area, otherwise is a cleaned, light, gray patina. Magazine tube, possibly an old replacement retains 50-60% orig blue. Magazine plug is cross threaded in the muzzle end. Receiver retains about 60-65% thinned orig blue mixed with light patina. Right side plate retains 40-50% thin orig blue and the left side plate traces of blue under artificial aging. Lever & hammer are a dark patina as is the buttplate. Stock has a crack back of the top tang with a few nicks & dings, otherwise wood is sound with an old refinish. Top tang screw has been dressed. Mechanics are fine, strong sharp bore with good shine and scattered pitting. 5250620 (12,500-15,500)

65

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1039.

SCARCE FIRST MODEL SECOND TYPE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 29166. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Special order case color hardened rifle with 24-1/4 oct bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight and early style short semi-buckhorn, rear sight with checkered edges. Receiver is 1st type with mortised dust cover rails and 2nd type dust cover with impressed thumb print. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate with trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “337” with matching assembly number in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a rifle with oct bbl, case hardened receiver, received in warehouse June 7, 1878 and shipped Sept. 12, 1878 to order # 13041. The Winchester ‘73 is arguably the gun that won the west along with the Colt Single Action Army revolver in the same caliber. This rifle, having been produced in 1878 was delivered at a time when the west was still wild with marauding hostile Indians, outlaws and other dangers on the American frontier. These rifles usually saw very hard service under adverse conditions in harsh weather, usually with little or no maintenance. They were the working mans tools and are rarely found today with high orig finish, especially case colors. Case colors are readily faded with exposure to the ultraviolet rays of sunshine and fade quickly to gray patina. Finding one of these early Winchesters with a high percentage of case colors is extremely rare. CONDITION: Fine, all matching. Bbl retains about 75-80% orig blue mixed with light surface etching and medium brown patina. Magazine tube retains blue in sheltered areas with the balance a plummy blue/brown patina with a couple of small scrapes. Receiver & side plates retain about 50% orig case colors, strong & bright in sheltered areas, mostly on left side. Right side is moderately to heavily faded and turning gray. Lever & hammer retain strong case colors on the sides turned silver on outer faces of lever and top edge of hammer. Forend cap retains about 25% strong case colors. Buttplate is a dark gray patina. Stock has a couple of hairlines in the wrist with light nicks & scratches over all the wood, which retains an added light finish. Mechanics are crisp, strong bright bore with good shine and some scattered pitting. 52464-1 JRL (10,00015,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

66


Session 1 1040.

RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH COLOR CASE HARDENED FRAME AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 200482. Cal. .38 WCF (38-40). Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4” octagon barrel, full magazine, blued Rocky Mountain front sight & semi-buckhorn rear sight. Top flat of barrel has the Winchester & King’s patent dates and address with caliber marking over the chamber area. Receiver is small frame, 3rd type with integral dust cover rail containing a 3rd type dust cover. Top front of receiver has a step used only on those rifles and carbines of calibers smaller than .44. Mounted with very nicely figured, slab sawed, uncheckered American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which lists this firearm as a rifle in .38 caliber with octagon barrel, plain trigger and color case hardened, received in the warehouse June 1, 1886 and shipped the same day with 19 other 1873s to order number 6836. Standard grade rifles were the working man’s tool and usually saw hard and continuous service under adverse conditions often with little or no maintenance and are rarely found today in original configuration or with high original finish, especially color case hardened examples. Case colors rapidly fade when exposed to the ultraviolet rays of sunshine. This rifle has a heavy coating of factory applied shellac over all the color case hardened parts which has preserved the colors. This cataloger cleaned a small area on the bottom of the receiver which exposed brilliant colors. PROVENANCE: The collection of Tim Zissler. CONDITION: Extremely fine. Barrel and magazine tube retain about 98% strong original blue with only faint sharp edge wear and a couple of very tiny scratches on the barrel. Receiver & side plates retain virtually all of their brilliant case colors under the aforementioned coating of shellac, showing light wear on the bottom front at the carry point. Lever and hammer retain brilliant case colors on the sides with the outer faces of lever showing wear on the loop. Forend cap retains about all of its original case colors, lightly to moderately faded. Buttplate retains virtually all of its original case colors moderately faded on the tang, strong and bright on the face. Stock has a couple of small bruises with another on the forearm and a few light scratches in the finish. Overall the wood retains nearly all of its piano varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp. Bright shiny bore with a few spots of fine pitting. A scarce rifle which would be difficult to improve. 52463-9 JRL (10,000-15,000)

67

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1041.

RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 DELUXE SMALL BORE LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 186240. Cal. 22 SHORT. Rare small bore 1873 rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, Sporting front sight & semi-buckhorn rear sight. Receiver is 3rd type, small bore with stepped receiver ring & integral dust cover rail with 3rd type dust cover. Mounted with 2-3X flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and fleur-de-lis insert, serpentine grip buttstock that has smooth steel shotgun buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “573” “XX”, “22” and an “S”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside the buttplate. Extractor is 1-pc style and the bottom of the carrier is marked “22 CAL. SHORT”. The Model 1873 was produced in fairly large numbers (720,610) of which only 19,552 were chambered in caliber 22, both long & short cartridges in the period 1884-1904. This small bore rifle was produced with both 24” & 26” bbls, standard & deluxe with very few having been ordered at the extra expense of deluxe features. These small bore rifles were usually considered to be boy’s or ladies’ small game and plinking rifles and usually saw very hard service often with little or no maintenance. Given that the small diameter bore, and the lack of commensurate sized cleaning equipment along with the highly corrosive ammunition of that day, very few survive today with any orig finish and with a strong orig bore. Accompanied by a letter from the buffalo Bill historical center and derived from the original company records indicating that this Winchester Model 1873 was shipped August 11 1885 cal, 22 with octagon barrel. Was returned November 28 by Jason Kerr & Kerr and changed to .22 Long ,Octagon Barrel Plain trigger , Plain Wood Pistol grip checkered stock shotgun butt and casehardened. CONDITION: Good to very good, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube are mostly a dark plummy blue patina showing sharp edge wear with a couple small dings on the bbl. Receiver, sideplates & dust cover are a mottled silver/brown patina. Lever & hammer are matching dark patina with the lever showing fine pitting. Stock has a couple of small grain checks, otherwise wood is sound showing moderate diamond point wear on the checkering that may have been freshened and overall retains a fine restored oil finish. Mechanics are fine, worn dark bore with moderate to heavy pitting. Inner magazine tube is orig and in fine condition. 52679-2 JRL (8,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

68


Session 1 1042.

RARE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER FIRST MODEL 1873 SECOND TYPE LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH EXTRA HEAVY BARREL AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 31282. Cal 44 WCF (44-40). Standard grade rifle with rare special order 28” extra heavy oct bbl that measures almost 1” across the flats at the muzzle. It has full magazine with sporting front sight and early style short semi-buckhorn rear sight with checkered edges. Receiver is 1st type with 2nd type mortised dust cover that has impressed, checkered oval thumb print. Mounted with straight grain uncheckered American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate with trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “593” with matching number in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a rifle, with heavy 28” oct bbl, and set trigger. Received in the warehouse Nov. 5, 1878 and shipped 3 days later to order #13091. The Winchester ‘73 is arguably the gun that won the west along with the Colt Single Action Army revolver in the same caliber. This rifle, having been produced in 1878 was delivered at a time when the west was still wild with marauding hostile Indians, outlaws and other dangers on the American frontier. These rifles usually saw very hard service under adverse conditions in harsh weather, usually with little or no maintenance. They were the working mans tools and are rarely found today with high orig finish. Extra length bbls are in and of themselves quite rare as are heavy bbls in the Model 1873 and finding an extra length heavy bbl rifle that letters is an extreme rarity. CONDITION: Fair to good, all matching. No orig finish remains with the metal a light gray cleaned metal patina with a ding on left side of receiver and numerous small nicks around the ejection port. Forearm has a crack at the left side of bbl channel and another on the right side, otherwise wood is sound and retains most of an old restored finish. Dust cover sticks when fully retracted, otherwise mechanics are fine, strong sharp bore, dark with moderate pitting. Dust cover may be a replacement. 52506-22 JRL (8,000-15,000)

69

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1043.

SCARCE WINCHESTER FIRST MODEL 1873 SECOND TYPE LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 15222. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4” oct bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight and 1873 marked rifle ladder rear sight. Receiver is first type with mortised dust cover rails containing a second type dust cover with impressed thumb print. Receiver has single set trigger. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate with trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “406” with matching number in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Bottom of the stock & forend cap have factory sling swivels. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a rifle with oct bbl, set trigger, sporting leaf sight, swivels, received in warehouse May 24, 1876 and shipped the same day to order #5640. The Winchester ‘73 is arguably the gun that won the west along with the Colt Single Action Army revolver in the same caliber. This rifle, having been produced in 1878 was delivered at a time when the west was still wild with marauding hostile Indians, outlaws and other dangers on the American frontier. These rifles usually saw very hard service under adverse conditions in harsh weather, usually with little or no maintenance. They were the working mans tools and are rarely found today with high orig finish. CONDITION: Very good, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain a smooth, artificially aged plummy brown patina with only sharp edge wear. Receiver & side plates retain traces of strong blue in sheltered areas with the balance an artificially aged plummy blue/brown patina. Dust cover retains about 95% strong orig blue. Lever & hammer are a light artificially aged patina. Wood is sound and retains most of an old refinish. Mechanics are crisp, strong sharp bore with fine pitting and a few spots of moderate pitting. 52506-1 JRL (6,500-9,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

70


Session 1 1044.

RARE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER FIRST MODEL 1873 SECOND TYPE LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH 28” BARREL WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 19631. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Standard grade rifle with rare 28” rnd bbl, full magazine, altered half nickel front sight and short style semi-buckhorn rear sight with checkered edges. Receiver is 1st type with mortised dust cover rails containing a second type dust cover with impressed checkered oval thumb print. Top tang is marked 1873. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “2268” with matching number in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a rifle, with 28” bbl and plain trigger, received in the warehouse Aug. 21, 1877 and shipped May 8, 1878 to order #1178. Standard bbl length for the Model 1873 rifle was 24” with shorter or longer lengths available on special order in 2” increments to 36”. Very few were produced in the longer increments and of those most were in the smaller calibers. The Winchester ‘73 is arguably the gun that won the west along with the Colt Single Action Army revolver in the same caliber. This rifle, having been produced in 1878 was delivered at a time when the west was still wild with marauding hostile Indians, outlaws and other dangers on the American frontier. These rifles usually saw very hard service under adverse conditions in harsh weather, usually with little or no maintenance. They were the working mans tools and are rarely found today with high orig finish. CONDITION: Good to very good, all matching. Bbl retains traces of orig blue, mostly in the sheltered area between bbl & magazine tube with the balance a blue/gray patina. Magazine tube also retains traces of orig blue in the sheltered areas being mostly a blue/brown patina on the radius. Receiver retains 25-30% orig blue with the loss areas mostly flaked to a light patina, but shows wear around the front carry point and on the side plates. Lever & hammer retain faded case colors, turned silver on outer faces. Buttplate is a mottled silver/gray patina. Wood is sound with nicks & scratches and a couple of gouges on the buttstock and overall retains about 75-80% orig finish on the buttstock and about 40-50% on the forearm with the balance hand worn patina. Dust cover does not fully retract on lever opening, otherwise mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore. 525069 JRL (6,000-10,000)

71

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1045.

EARLY 2nd MODEL 1873 WINCHESTER LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 41726. Cal. .44 WCF (44-40). Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4� oct bbl, full mag, half nickle front sight, early style short semi-buckhorn rear sight with checkered edges and a thick base tang sight with spiral knurled barrel and fine checkered thumb screw. Receiver is 2nd type with attached dust cover rail and a 3rd type dust cover with a single-set trigger. Mounted with extra finish, uncheckered American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate with trap. This rifle was produced about 1880 when the west was still very wild with marauding Indians, outlaws and other natural dangers abounding. In that era any repeating firearm was in great demand but most especially the model 1873 Winchester. These arms most often saw hard & continuous serves under extreme circumstances usually from the back of a horse or in a wagon box. They are rarely found today in high orig finish & configuration as found here. PROVENANCE: The collection of Tim Zissler. CONDITION: Extremely fine, one of the finest 2nd model 1873 rifles extant today. Bbl retains 97-98% strong orig blue with only light sharp edge wear. Mag tube retains about 99% crisp orig blue, and the forend cap about 97-98% bright orig blue. Receiver and side plates retain about 95-96% strong orig blue with sharp edge wear some minor thinning around the bottom edge and a small patch of surface rust just forward of the lever slot. Lever & hammer retain brilliant case colors turned a little dark on outer face of loop. Buttplate retains virtually all of its orig case colors, brilliant on the tang, bright on the face showing wear only on the heel and toe. Wood is sound with a small scrape on the buttstock and overall retains a lightly waxed finish. Mechanics are crisp. brilliant shiny bore, shows little evidence of ever having been loaded or fired, retaining nearly all its orig blue on the bolt face. 5246318 JRL (6,000-9,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

72


1047. FINE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 288426. Cal. 38 WCF (38-40). Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4� oct bbl, full magazine, altered half nickel front sight, semi-buckhorn rear sight and Lyman combination tang sight. Receiver is small caliber, 3rd type with step in the top front and integral dust cover rail with 3rd type dust cover. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate with trap, containing a 4-pc brass & iron cleaning rod. This rifle was produced in about 1889 when a rifle such as this was an everyday working mans tool. They most often saw hard service under extreme circumstances usually with little or no maintenance and are rarely found today with high orig finish. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbl & magazine tube retain 95-96% strong orig blue with sharp edge wear and some thinning over the chamber area at the carry point. Receiver & side plates retain 70-75% glossy orig blue with sharp edge wear, turning silver over the top & bottom edges and thinning on the right front flat at the carry point. Both sides of receiver have some light candy-striping. Hammer retains strong case colors, turned silver on spur. Lever retains faded case colors on the sides, turned silver on outer faces. Forend cap & buttplate are gray patina. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches with the buttstock showing about 65-70% orig finish, and the forearm a hand worn patina. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. Cleaning rod is a dark brown patina. 52404-9 JRL (5,000-7,000) 73

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1046. EXTREMELY RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 SMOOTHBORE LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 295916. Cal. 32 WCF (32-20). Standard grade rifle with 24-1/4� oct bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight and semi-buckhorn rear sight. Receiver is small frame, 3rd type with stepped receiver ring and integral dust cover rail & 3rd type dust cover. Mounted with a replacement, highly figured, custom pistol grip buttstock that has a rosewood grip cap & crescent buttplate without trap. Forearm is orig and shows very nice figure. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle in caliber 32 smoothbore, with oct bbl and plain trigger, received in the warehouse May 14, 1889 and shipped the next day. Order number not indicated. The lower tang was apparently for a straight stock rifle and was bent just above the lever latch to accommodate the custom pistol grip stock. This rifle was produced in about 1889 and in all probability was ordered by a trick-shot artist or wild-west showman. There is a remote possibility that it may have been ordered as a garden pest gun. The vast majority of smoothbore Winchesters examined by this cataloger have been in caliber 44 which leaves one to believe the small bore center fire smooth bore rifles are quite rare. CONDITION: Fair to good. Traces of orig finish remain in most sheltered areas with the bbl & magazine tube an artificially aged plummy brown patina over scattered pitting. Forend cap is matching patina. Receiver retains traces of orig blue in the most sheltered areas being mostly a smooth, even, plummy blue/brown patina. Hammer retains silvered case colors and the lever an artificially aged brown patina. Forearm has a crack on each side of the bbl channel at the forend cap, otherwise wood is sound and overall retains a fine custom restored finish. Barrel slightly loose in the frame. Mechanics are fine, bright bore with good shine and scattered pitting. 52692-2 JRL (5,000-8,000)


Session 1

1048. RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 TRAPPER SADDLE RING CARBINE WITH 17” BARREL WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 92704. Cal. 44 WCF (4440). Very early standard grade 3rd Model 1873 carbine with 17” bbl, full magazine, standard pedestal front sight with brass blade and 2-position 1866-style rear sight. Receiver is small frame type with stepped front ring and integral dust cover rail with 3rd type dust cover. Left side of receiver has a staple and ring. Mounted with replacement uncheckered, strait grain American walnut butt stock that has carbine butt plate with trap. Forearm is 7-7/8” long and appears to be orig to this carbine. Bbl address was nearly obliterated during a restoration process. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this carbine with 17” bbl, received in warehouse June 6, 1882 and shipped June 20, 1882 to order no. 32434. The majority of the production of these short barrelled carbines were shipped to Central and South America where they saw extensive hard service under very extreme conditions, usually with little or no maintenance and are rarely found today in orig configuration or high orig finish. CONDITION: Fair, no orig finish remains being an overall cleaned and artificially aged metal patina. Bbl shows pitting by the forearm channel with other scattered spots elsewhere. Forearm has a long crack emanating from a deep gouge near the receiver and is missing a sliver from each front top edge and overall retains a dark hand-worn patina. The replacement butt stock has several dings and light gouges and shows an old oil finish. Butt plate tang appears to have been repaired with file marks showing. Mechanics are a little balky otherwise they are functional. Worn dark bore with visible rifling. 51935-4 JRL (4,500-7,500)

1049. WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 380822. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Standard grade carbine with 20” bbl, full magazine, barleycorn front sight & 1873 marked carbine ladder rear sight. Top of the bbl, between the rear sight and forearm band, is marked with the 2-line Winchester & King’s patent address and also has caliber marking over the chamber area. Left side of the bbl & adjacent on the receiver has small British proofs. Left side of receiver is mounted with a staple & ring. Receiver is 3rd type with integral dust cover rail containing a 3rd type dust cover. Mounted with uncheckered, slab-sawed American walnut with straight stock that has carbine buttplate with trap. This rifle is produced about 1891 when business was still being conducted from the back of a horse, buggy or wagon and carbines were the most popular long arm on the American frontier. Those rifles & carbines were usually in use on a daily basis in extremes of weather & wear and are rarely found today in orig configuration with any orig finish. CONDITION: Good to very good. Bbl retains about 80-85% orig finish, turning a little plummy with a ding & light pitting around the muzzle. Magazine tube is mostly a blue/brown patina with scattered surface discoloration. Receiver & sideplates retain about 60-70% thin orig blue, turned plummy brown over the top & bottom edges. Hammer retains faded case colors, turned brown on the spur. Lever retains traces of case colors in sheltered areas, turned blue/brown elsewhere. Buttplate is a mottled silver/brown patina. Wood has a few scattered dings with a gouge on the forearm and a couple small gouges on the wrist and left side of the buttstock with another in the comb and overall contains a lightly added finish. Mechanics are fine, strong sharp bore with good shine and scattered light pitting. 52665-2 (6,000-8,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

74


1051. EARLY FIRST MODEL WINCHESTER 1873 LEVER ACTION SADDLE RING CARBINE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 3458. Cal. 44 WCF. 20” bbl. Full mag with front sight integral with magazine band. Non adjustable folding leaf rear sight with 300 yard portion of front leaf removed. Early style action without stepped front ring. Mortised thumb print dust cover with two screws above cover and saddle ring on left side. Walnut forearm and straight grip stock with steel carbine buttplate. Cody Firearms Museum letter confirms type as carbine, further listing date received and shipped from warehouse as April 10, 1875, order no. 2979. CONDITION: Fair condition rifle with functional mechanics. Dark pitted bore has worn rifling. Metal shows cleaned gray appearance with scattered spots of pitting, surface corrosion and series of dents at bottom of lifter. Top of bbl has polished spot behind rear sight and has weak markings. Wood has age darkened, heavily weathered appearance. Forearm shows warpage and chips along bbl channel with full length glued crack across right side extending to tip. Stock has crack along left side of wrist with plug type repairs. 51935-7 DS (2,500-3,500)

75

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1050. WINCHESTER MODEL 1873 SADDLE RING CARBINE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 375193. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Standard carbine with 20” bbl, full magazine, barleycorn front sight & 1873 marked carbine ladder rear sight. Top of bbl has the Winchester & King’s patent 2-line address with caliber marking over the chamber area. Receiver is 3rd type with integral dust cover rail and 3rd type dust cover. Left side of receiver has a staple & ring. Bottom front edge of receiver has vise marks on each side. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock & carbine buttplate with trap containing a 3-pc brass & iron cleaning rod. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this carbine in caliber 44, received in the warehouse February 25, 1891 and shipped next day to order no. 1173. This carbine was produced at a time when business and ordinary work were conducted from the back of a horse or wagon box and carrying a firearm as an everyday working tool was a way of life. Firearms of that era usually saw very hard frontier service under harsh weather conditions often with little or no maintenance. CONDITION: Very good. Bbl retains strong blue in sheltered areas with about 90% finish, overall turning plummy brown over the top. There are a series of small nicks by the forearm band from someone removing the band. Magazine tube retains strong blue in the sheltered areas, being mostly a blue/gray patina with areas of fine surface rust. Receiver retains 30-35% orig blue in sheltered areas, stronger on left side with the loss areas showing wear & flaking, turning brown over the top & bottom edges. Buttplate retains about 50-60% orig case colors, strong & bright on the tang. Stock has light nicks, dings & scratches and a hairline in the forearm, otherwise the wood is sound and retains a hand worn patina. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore with some very fine orange peel pitting. Cleaning rod is fine. 52601-2 JRL (4,000-6,500)


Session 1 1052.

EXTREMELY RARE WINCHESTER DELUXE SPECIAL ORDER FACTORY ENGRAVED MODEL 1876 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 24685. Cal. 50-95 Express. Fabulous deluxe ‘76 rifle with 26” rnd bbl with full matted top, button magazine, express front sight & early style, short semi-buckhorn rear sight with platinum line & V-notch. Receiver is 2nd type, color case hardened with attached dust cover rail and 3rd type dust cover marked on the top “WINCHESTER EXPRESS / .50 CAL. 95 GRS.”. Bottom of the carrier is marked “50-95”. Mounted with 2-3 X shell grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm & fleur-de-lis insert, serpentine grip buttstock that has full checkered hard rubber buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “410”, “XXX” & an “S”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. Rifle has what was probably $2.00 or $2.50 engraving which consists of fine foliate arabesque patterns on each side & rear edge of the hammer, each side of the forend cap and each side of the lever. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a rifle in Express caliber with 26” matted rnd bbl, plain trigger, half magazine, checkered stock with shotgun butt & rubber buttplate, case hardened and “Engraved and etc”. Received in warehouse Sept. 9, 1882 and shipped Sept. 12, 1882 to order #34086. It was shipped again Oct. 8, 1895 to order #21424. There is no record of it having been returned, leaving one to

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

76


Session 1

Reverse

speculate that this may have been an exhibition rifle. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching. Bbl retains 96-98% strong orig blue with a couple of minor scratches & rubs and slight muzzle end wear. Matting is crisp & clean. Receiver retains about 95% orig case colors, brilliant in sheltered areas, lightly faded elsewhere and turned silver on bottom front edge at the carry point. Hammer retains virtually all of its bright case colors and the lever shows case colors turned dark which matches the forend cap. Dust cover retains about 88-90% bright orig blue with the loss areas flaked, not worn to a light patina. Stock has a couple small gouges with light nicks & scratches, wood is sound and retains about 98% crisp, orig piano varnish finish with the checkering showing only light diamond point wear. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore with a few scattered spots of fine pitting. Altogether an extremely rare ‘76 with high orig condition. 52466-1 JRL (40,000-65,000)

77

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1053.

EXTREMELY RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 OPEN TOP RIFLE WITH 3-DIGIT SERIAL NUMBER AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 590. Cal. 45-75. 28” rnd bbl, full magazine, full blue finish. Straight grain American walnut stocks with crescent buttplate. Bbl shows 2-line Winchester address rolled in front of rear sight. Standard sights for this model. Receiver is of the rare open top variety. Upper tang is marked “MODEL 1876” without finials. SN is hand engraved on the lower tang behind the lever latch. Elevator is unmarked. Lever is of the 2nd Type with a pin inserted in the lever to depress the trigger block. Steel buttplate is of the 1st Type with a thick toe. There is a 5-pc steel cleaning rod in the butt compartment. Accompanying this rifle is a Cody Firearms Museum letter confirming features and showing shipment on November 24, 1877 to Order Number 10535. Winchester 76’s with these early features are extremely rare and desirable to collectors and are seldom found in very good condition. CONDITION: Fine for this model. Bbl shows a smooth mottled plum/brown patina overall with a generous amount of blue in protected areas and very little roughness or erosion. Bbl marking is sharp and clear. Sights are very good. Rear sight shows considerable blue finish. Magazine tube is also a smooth mottled blue/brown patina with traces of blue in protected areas and some very slight roughness at the mid-point in front of the forend. Bore is frosty with some stains and strong rifling. Receiver retains 50-60% of the bright blue finish with the balance drifting into a pleasing plum/brown especially at the carry point. Bright blue is evident in protected areas, especially under the lever and around the hammer. There is a small dent on the right sideplate behind the loading gate. Tang markings are sharp. SN engraving is unmolested. Hammer is a deep plum/brown patina with a generous traces of case color showing on both sides. Stocks are very good, full sized and show handling marks overall commensurate with the age of the rifle. Forend has some slight dents on left side. Stocks show a very light coat of varnish that was applied many years ago. Buttplate is a mottled silver/grey patina with some erosion at the heel and toe. Buttplate screws show considerable blue. Forend cap shows generous traces of orig blue with some staining and slight roughness. Mechanics are crisp. This is an opportunity for an advanced Winchester collector to obtain an extremely rare Winchester open top Model 1876 rifle in far above average condition for this model. These rifles are rarely seen in the condition that is exhibited by this very fine example. 52303-2 TEP (20,000-30,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

78


Session 1 1054.

SCARCE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 63035. Cal. 45-75. Beautiful special order ‘76 with 27-7/8” heavyweight oct bbl that measures 15/16” across the flats, full magazine, German silver Rocky Mountain front sight, no rear seat for a bbl sight & a “76” marked thin base Vernier tang sight with 3” staff. Receiver is 3rd type with integral dust cover rail & 3rd type dust cover. Receiver also has single-set trigger and is color case hardened. Top flat of bbl has the standard 2-line Winchester & King’s patent markings with caliber marking over the chamber area. Carrier is caliber marked. Mounted with 2-3X uncheckered American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate that has a trap. Left side of lower tang is marked with the assembly no. “677” & “XXX”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. This rifle is most unusual with its uncheckered deluxe wood, that was obviously special ordered. The heavyweight bbl is also a very unusual feature on the Model 1876. Given the 28” bbl and full magazine which when fully loaded would have been extremely heavy with the weight balanced toward the muzzle. A most unusual rifle. This rifle was produced in about 1888, well after the introduction of the more successful Model 1886 which chambered more powerful cartridges and was a departure from the toggle link system utilized in the 1876. By the time this rifle was produced the 1876 was near its end of production with only about another 835 arms produced over the next 10 years. CONDITION: Fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain about 98% strong blue, beginning to thin with purple overtones. Receiver & sideplates retain about 20-25% orig case colors, strong in the most sheltered areas, turning mottled silver elsewhere. Hammer retains strong case colors, turned silver on the spur. Lever retains strong case colors on the sides, turned to silver/ gray on the outer faces. Buttplate & forend cap are gray patina. Stock has a chip in the top left edge at the wrist, otherwise wood is sound with the buttstock showing light nicks & scratches and retains about 95% orig piano varnish finish. Forearm retains about 75% orig piano varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. Shows very little use. 52665-3 JRL (15,000-25,000)

79

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1055.

FINE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 “BIG 50” LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 20409. Cal. 50-95. Standard grade rifle with 26” rnd bbl, full magazine, slightly altered half nickel front sight and 1873-style, short, semi-buckhorn rear sight with checkered edges. Top of bbl, forward of rear sight has the 2-line Winchester and King’s 2-line address with chamber area marked “50-CAL.”. Receiver is 2nd type with attached dust cover rail containing a 3rd type dust cover which is marked “WINCHESTER EXPRESS / 50 CAL. 95 GRS”. Bottom of carrier is marked “50-95”. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap containing an orig 5-pc brass & iron cleaning rod. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with assembly no. 394 with matching assembly number in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Bottom of stock and forend cap have factory sling swivels. This rifle was produced about 1881 at a time when the West was still wild with marauding Indians and carrying a rifle was an everyday working tool. These big 50 rifles were very effective hunting arms, especially for the larger wild game of North America, Canada and Alaska, up to and including the great bears of Alaska and the Arctic. Many of these rifles in the big 50 cal. were also used extensively in Africa against the big game over there. Standard grade rifles, such as found here were a working man’s tool and usually saw hard and continuous service. CONDITION: Fine to very fine, all matching. Bbl and magazine tube retain 95-97% strong orig blue with a nick on the bbl and magazine tube and a couple of spots of surface discoloration. Receiver and sideplates retain 80-85% orig blue with most of the losses on the sideplates and bottom front edges, which have turned to a light patina. Remainder of receiver shows very bright blue in sheltered areas. Hammer retains brilliant case colors, lightly faded on right side. Lever retains strong but faded case colors on left side and in protected areas, being a brown patina elsewhere. Forend cap retains about 85% orig blue and buttplate about 60%. Stock has a long bruise at the left heel with the wood overall showing light scratches and retains most of its orig finish. Mechanics are crisp. Brilliant shiny bore, shows very little use. 52609-1 (14,000-21,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

80


Session 1 1056.

FINE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH CONNECTION TO MONTANA TERRITORY WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 27959. Cal.45-75. Standard Grade 3rd model rifle with 28” oct bbl, full magazine, altered Rocky Mountain front sight with replacement blade and 1876 marked rifle ladder rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a rifle with oct bbl and plain trigger received in the warehouse Sept 28, 1882 and shipped March 24, 1883 with 9 other Model 1876 arms to order no. 3268. Also accompanied by a Montana Territorial Warrant (invoice) made out to R.B. Molesworth in the amount of $8 for “killing one bear”. Additionally accompanied by a letter of research dated May 12, 2006 over the signature of Waddy Colvert, Firearms Researcher of Cody, WY, addressed to Mr. John Hawk of Cody, WY. The letter states that Mr. Colvert’s research disclosed that R.B. Molesworth (1806-1890) was Sir Robert B. Molesworth who had been knighted by Queen Victoria and had been a judge in Montana Territory 1856-1886. Cosigner states that this is the rifle Judge Molesworth used to kill the bear for which he was paid the princely sum of $8.00. Standard Grade rifles were the working man’s tools of that era and most often saw hard service under extreme adverse conditions usually in a saddle scabbard or a wagon box frequently with little or no maintenance. Rifles of that era are rarely found today with high orig finish or in fact any orig finish. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbl and magazine do retain about 90% orig blue turning slightly plum color with only sharp edge wear. Receiver and side plates retain 60-65% thin orig blue with the balance blue/grey patina, turned silver on the bottom front at the carry point. Hammer retains about 70% faded case colors and the lever traces of case colors being mostly a silver grey patina. Wood is sound with a few nicks and scratches and a couple of dings with the buttstock showing about 40% orig finish and the balance of the wood a hand worn patina. Mechanics are crisp. Bright shiny bore. 52506-5 JRL (12,000-16,000)

81

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1057.

RARE FIRST MODEL OPEN TOP WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 1831. Cal. 45-75. Standard grade carbine with 22” bbl, full magazine, barleycorn front sight & 1866-style 2-position flip rear sight graduated 100, 300 & 500 yards. Receiver is 1st type open top without dust cover and left side has a stud & ring. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with full length forearm that has steel nose-cap and single band with straight stock and carbine/musket buttplate without trap. Extractor is original with low rounded top. There are nearly 64,000 Model ‘76 rifles, carbines & muskets produced 1876-1998. Probably fewer than 3,000 were shipped in open top configuration and of those very few were carbines making this a very rare ‘76. When the ‘76 model was introduced at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition it was the first big bore repeating firearm available to the American market. Those early rifles & carbines were in great demand for the great westward expansion of Manifest Destiny. They usually saw hard and continuous service on the American frontier and, of the few 1st type carbines known today extremely few are found with high orig finish. CONDITION: Fine. Bbl retains strong blue in sheltered areas being a blue/brown patina over the top and around the muzzle. Receiver & sideplates retain about 60% orig blue, strong in sheltered areas fading to plummy brown elsewhere. Wood is sound with usual handling and use nicks & scratches and shows a pleasing hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, very bright shiny bore with a few scattered spots of pitting. These Open Top Saddle Ring Carbines are rare and highly sought after by collectors. 52609-6 (10,000-15,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

82


Session 1 1058.

EXTREMELY RARE ATLANTIC AND PACIFIC RAILROAD MARKED SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 63131. Cal. 45-60. Standard grade carbine with 22” rnd bbl, full magazine, barleycorn front sight and carbine ladder rear sight graduated to 900 yds. Top of bbl has standard 2-line Winchester & King’s address and patent dates roll marking forward of the rear sight and cal. marking over chamber area. Left side of bbl, below the middle band is marked “A&P 7”. This marking is believed to be for the famed “Atlantic and Pacific” Railroad which was incorporated in 1866 and remains to this day under the BNSF Railway. Receiver has a stud & ring in the left side. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with full length forearm that has metal cap and one band with straight stock and carbine/musket buttplate without trap. This carbine was produced in about 1888 near the end of production of the Model 1876. There were only a few hundred more 1876 marked arms produced before production of this model completely ceased in 1898. These carbines were in great demand on the American frontier where they usually saw hard and continuous service, often under harsh & extreme circumstances, frequently with little or no maintenance. Carbines were especially desirable for ease of handling from a horse,or railcar, and as such were a daily use working tool. This is an extremely rare gun with a most interesting railroad connection which could be further researched. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbl retains 93-95% orig blue turning slightly plum with one area of light, cleaned surface rust. Receiver and sideplates retain about 80-85% orig blue, strong in sheltered areas, turning plum elsewhere, showing sharp edge wear and candy striping to both front side flats. Bottom front of receiver has turned brown and has a deep scratch which continues back toward the lever. Hammer retains bright case colors, turned silver on the spur. Lever retains traces of case colors in the most sheltered areas, being a mottled silver/brown patina elsewhere. Buttplate shows traces of silvered case colors, being mostly a mottled brown patina. Wood is sound with a scratch above the band retaining spring in the forearm and a couple of small gouges on comb of buttstock with normal light handling and storage nicks and scratches. Wood retains nearly all of its original finish with some finish added for preservation. Mechanics are crisp. Bright shiny bore. 52609-3 (7,000-11,000)

83

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1059.

RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 SADDLE RING CARBINE SOLD TO THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT WITH FACTORY LETTER AND MARKED “GOVERNORS GUARD” ON THE COMB. SN 44472. Cal. 45-75. Standard Grade carbine with 22” rnd bbl barleycorn front sight & 1,000 meter Spanish rear sight, graduated 1 to 5 on left side of base and 2 to 10 on the standing leaf. Receiver is 3rd type with integral dust cover rail & 3rd type dust cover. Receiver has a stud and ring in the left side. Mounted with nicely figured, uncheckered American walnut with straight stock & carbine buttplate without trap and full length forearm that has a special blued steel nose-cap with one band secured by a spring keeper. Buttplate is without trap, however the buttstock has the cleaning rod recess under the buttplate and it contains as small piece of paper with handwritten name and address “Leland B. Griswold, 239 N.Pinerst St., Milwaukee, WIS, Jan 4, 1944, Winchester 1876 carbine #44472.”. Comb of the buttstock just forward of the buttplate tang has very worn, barely visible letters stamped into the wood that are only visible under strong light in the right circumstance. The letters appear to be “GOV GA 31”. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a carbine, received in the warehouse April 8, 1885 and shipped the same day with 399 other arms to order no. 19819. There is a notation in the letter “Please see the attached research regarding Royal Canadian Mounted Police carbines.” That information is attached and contains a brief history of the Governor General’s Body Guard which was a militia unit organized under the Militia Act of 1793 that mandated that all healthy male citizens ages 16-60 yrs were required to serve. After the British Army completely left Canada in 1870, the Canadian Govt raised a small regular force and reorganized the militia cavalry into regiments. It was apparently during this time that the Canadian govt ordered the model 1876 carbine to arm the North West Mounted Police as well as the militia cavalry units. This carbine was part of a 399 gun shipment ordered on April 3, 1885. These carbines saw hard frontier service especially during the Riel Rebellion & later patrolling the Canada/U.S. borders and remained in service until 1914. Few of these carbines survive today in orig configuration with orig finish. After their lengthy service with the Canadian Militia they were sold as surplus. Also accompanied by an orig 3-piece brass & steel cleaning rod. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl retains 96-97% strong restored blue. Receiver and sideplates retain about 80-85% thinning orig blue with sharp edge wear, turning silver brown around the carry point on the bottom front. Hammer retains strong case colors turned dark on top edge. Lever retains what appears to be about 70% of a blue finish. Wood is sound with common use nicks, dings and scratches & shows most of a lightly restored finish. Mechanics are crisp. Worn, dark bore with moderate pitting. Cleaning rod is fine. 52506-7 (15,000-25,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

84


Session 1 1060.

SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 OPEN TOP SADDLE RING CARBINE WITH ENGLISH PROOFS AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 2838. Cal. 45-75. Standard Grade carbine with 22” rnd bbl that has Metford style rifling, barleycorn front sight and 1866 style 2-position flip rear sight graduated 100, 300 & 500 yds. Bbl has standard Winchester and King’s patent roll marking with British proofs on the top left over the chamber area and a corresponding proof mark on the receiver ring. Receiver is 1st type, open top without provision for a dust cover. Left side of frame has a stud & ring. Left sideplate is hand engraved “LONDON ARMOURY / JAS. KERR & CO. / 54, KING WILLIAM ST. E.C.”. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with full length forearm that has special blued steel nose cap and one bbl band secured with a spring keeper. Buttstock has a straight grip with carbine buttplate without trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. 1563 with matching assembly no. inside toe of buttplate. Top tang channel of buttstock has matching SN “2838” to this carbine. Very few 1876 carbines were produced in the open top configuration and many of those were later returned to the factory to have a rail and dust cover added. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a carbine, received in the warehouse March 19, 1878 and shipped July 10, 1878 to order no. l2311 with four other 1876 arms (probably also carbines). Additionally accompanied by copies of pages of the Winchester ledger book which lists this carbine along with the SN’s of those other four 1876 arms, which are 2836, 2837, 2839 & 2840. CONDITION: Very good, all matching as noted above. Bbl retains about 50% orig blue mixed with fine surface etching. Receiver and side plates also retain about 50% thin orig blue with most of the losses from flaking, showing light sharp edge wear, turning plummy brown over the top and bottom edges. Bbl legend and side plate engraving are sharp and clear. Hammer retains strong case colors, turned dark on top edge. Lever retains dark case colors on the sides turned dark on outer faces. Wood is sound with a few light nicks and scratches and retains most of an old lightly added finish. Mechanics are crisp. Bright shiny bore. 52506-3 JRL (10,000-12,000)

85

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1061.

SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 NORTH WEST MOUNTED POLICE ISSUED SADDLE RING CARBINE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 44181. Cal. 45-75. Standard carbine with 22” rnd bbl, barleycorn front sight and what is probably a replacement civilian ladder carbine/musket rear sight. Bbl has standard Winchester & King’s patent 2-line address with the area over the chamber marked “CAL. / 45-75”. Receiver is 3rd type with integral dust cover rail containing a 3rd type dust cover and has is a stud & ring in the left side. Carrier is marked “45-75”. Mounted with nicely figured, uncheckered American walnut with full length forearm that has special blued steel nosecap and a single band secured with a spring keeper. Buttstock has a straight grip with carbine buttplate without trap. Right side of buttstock is marked with a Northwest Mounted Police “N.W.M.P. Cartouche” in a half circle. Bottom of stock, below the lower tang has the faint stamping “APP 139” which stands for Alberta Provincial Police. In 1916 the N.W.M.P. loaned the Edmunton Reserve Militia 710 Winchester carbines for training purposes. In January 1919 the Alberta Provincial Police purchased these carbines to arm their police and militia. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a carbine, received in the warehouse March 28, 1885 & shipped the same day to order no. 19589. Also accompanying are copies of research records which shows that order no. 19589 was for 150 carbines which included this serial number. Additionally accompanying is a copy of page 123 “taken out of Lewis Yearout book on 1876 NWMP” which is a listing of 115 carbines by SN which were reported on an inventory of Model 1876’s assigned to H-Division of the N.W.M.P. This division was assigned to Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory during the gold-rush period. The list of 1876 carbines shown on p. 186 of Arms & Accoutrements of the Mounted Police, Clancher, lists this carbine by SN as having been part of a shipment of 150 Winchester carbines shipped from New Haven to Winnipeg on March 28, 1885. After the British Army completely left Canada in 1870, the Canadian Govt raised a small regular force and reorganized the militia cavalry into regiments. It was apparently during this period that the Canadian govt ordered the model 1876 carbine to arm the North West Mounted Police as well as the militia cavalry units. These carbines saw hard frontier service, especially during the Riel Rebellion and as part of the forces assigned to the Yukon Territory during the gold-rush and later patrolling the Canada/U.S. borders & remained in service until 1914. Few of these carbines survive today in orig configuration with orig finish. After their lengthy service with the Canadian Militia they were sold as surplus. Accompanied by an orig 3-piece brass & steel cleaning rod. CONDITION: Good. Bbl retains blue in the most sheltered areas being mostly a silver gray patina with a few nicks and dings. Receiver and sideplates retain about 20-25% thin orig blue in sheltered areas with the left sideplate showing artificial aging. Bottom and top edges of receiver are a blue gray patina. Hammer retains faded case colors, stronger on left side and rear edge. Lever retains traces of case colors, being mostly a mottled silver brown patina. Forearm has two or three gouges about midpoint otherwise wood is sound with a cleaned, hand-worn patina. Mechanics are fine. Strong sharp bore with some shine & very fine pitting. Cleaning rod is fine. 52506-6 JRL (8,500-15,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

86


Session 1 1062.

BEAUTIFUL SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 13457. Cal. .45-60. Standard grade rifle with 28” rnd bbl, special order button mag, half nickel front sight and 1876 marked sporting leaf ladder rear sight. Bbl has usual 2-line Winchester & King’s address with caliber marking over the chamber area. Receiver is 2nd type with attached dust cover rail and 3rd type dust cover. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock & smooth steel shotgun buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “35” and “S”. Top tang channel of buttstock has matching assembly number which is also found inside toe of buttplate. Buttstock does not have the cleaning rod recess under the buttplate. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a rifle in caliber 45-60 with rnd bbl, plain trigger, 1/2 mag and shotgun butt, received in the warehouse January 18, 1881 and shipped 3 days later to order number 23811 1/2. Firearms of this era were an everyday working tool and usually saw extensive hard service under very adverse conditions often with little maintenance and are rarely found today in orig configuration or high orig finish. PROVENANCE: The collection of Tim Zissler. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl retains about 98% crisp orig blue with a couple of tiny nicks and 3 or 4 small scratches. Receiver retains about 95% glossy orig blue with some light candy striping on both sides, a few scratches on right side plate and a series of light surface mars on left side plate. Lever & hammer retain strong case colors, turned dark on top edge of hammer and moderately faded on outer faces of lever. Buttplate retains 60-70% thin orig blue. Wood is sound with 3 or 4 small bruises on the buttstock and overall retains a lightly waxed finish. Mechanics are crisp. Very bright shiny bore. 52463-8 JRL (10,000-15,000)

87

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1063.

SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 10912. Cal. 45-60. This 1880 produced ‘76 rifle has 28” oct bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight with screw and rifle ladder rear sight that appears to be a reproduction. Top flat of bbl has standard 2-line address & patent information with caliber marking over the chamber area. Receiver is 2nd type with attached dust cover rail and 3rd type dust cover. Top tang is mounted with an orig 76 marked, thin base vernier tang sight with 3” staff. The tang, under the sight, has an extra hole apparently for a sight with shorter base. Mounted with 2-3X American walnut with early style checkered forearm and fleur-de-lis insert grip with crescent buttplate that has trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “985” and “XX”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. This rifle was produced at a time when the west was still very wild with frequent encounters with hostile Indians. Firearms of that day most often saw hard service under extreme adverse conditions and are rarely found today with high orig finish. Given that the cost of this deluxe rifle would have likely precluded the common cowboy or farmer from such a purchase, it is likely that it belonged to a wealthier person or someone in law enforcement. CONDITION: Very good. Bbl retains about 85% blue with scattered spots of surface rust and faint sharp edge wear. Magazine tube retains about 80% blue with a few scrapes in the finish and scattered spots of surface rust. Receiver retains faded case colors in sheltered areas, having mostly turned to silver patina. Lever & hammer also retain faded case colors. Wood is sound with numerous small nicks & scratches and retains most of a fine factory finish.A small amount of additional finish has been added to wood and appears to be period.Checkering shows moderate to heavy wear. Mechanics are fine, worn dark bore with visible rifling and 2 rings toward the muzzle that do not show on the outside. Tang sight appears to be new old stock. 52324-2 (13,500-15,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

88


Session 1 1064.

RARE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 WITH EXTRA HEAVY BARREL WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 52836. Cal. 40-60. Standard Grade rifle with special order 26” extra heavy oct bbl with full magazine, altered Rocky Mountain front sight and a later replacement Winchester semi-buck horn rear sight. Muzzle of the bbl measures 1” across the flats. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter that lists this firearm as a rifle in cal 40-60 with 26” extra heavy oct bbl and set trigger, received in the warehouse July 2, 1886 and shipped July 8, 1886 to order no. 6937. This rifle was probably ordered by a western big game hunter who anticipated doing lots of continuous shooting. The extra heavy bbl provided muzzle stability and reduced recoil while dissipating the heat of repeated firing without warping & losing accuracy. Firearms of the 1880’s era usually saw hard and continuous service in generally inclement weather in harsh circumstances, often with little or no maintenance and are rarely found today in orig configuration with any orig finish. CONDITION: Good. Bbbl and magazine tube show no orig finish remaining being an overall cleaned gray metal patina with a few minor nicks and scatters spots of surface rust. Receiver shows traces of orig blue around the side plates and in the most sheltered areas with the balance a cleaned metal patina and light surface pitting. Lever and hammer show traces of silvered case colors. Forearm has a repaired splinter in the right bbl channel otherwise wood is sound with a fine, recently restored finish. Mechanics are crisp. Strong bore wit good rifling and moderate pitting. A very rare rifle that saw hard frontier service. 52506-8 JRL (6,000-10,000)

89

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1065.

SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 1876 SPECIAL ORDER BIG 50 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 26416. Cal. 50-95 Express. Standard Grade rifle with 21-3/4” rnd bbl (standard length for this caliber was 26”), full magazine, half nickel front sight and 1876 marked sporting leaf rear sight. Receiver is 3rd type with milled dust cover rail containing a 3rd type dust cover that is marked “WINCHESTER EXPRESS / .50 CAL. 95 GRS.”. Cal marking “50-CAL” is over the chamber area of the bbl and bottom of carrier is marked “50-95”. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate that has a trap. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “1505” with matching assembly no. in top tang channel of butt stock and inside toe buttplate. Given that the front sight is centered at 1” from the muzzle and the magazine band is centered at 3-3/4” from the muzzle indicates, almost certainly that the bbl was cut at the factory and the sight and magazine band relocated to factory standards. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this firearm as a rifle in Express cal with rnd bbl and plain trigger received in the warehouse September 11, 1882 and shipped December 4, 1882 to order no. 1352. Given the lengthy time this rifle remained in the warehouse one could speculate that it was during that time the bbl and magazine were reduced in length. This rifle was produced in 1882 at a time when the West was still wild with marauding hostile Indians and numerous outlaws to contend with, and subsistence hunting was a way of life. This rifle would have been ideally suited for about anything. The large express caliber was certainly capable of taking any North American big game and would have been a very effective self defense arm. CONDITION: Very good to fine, all matching, bbl cut as noted. Bbl and magazine retain 92-94% thin orig Winchester type blue turning a little plum. Receiver retains strong blue around the side plates with the balance a blue brown patina. Side plates have been cleaned and artificially aged. Hammer retains moderately faded case colors and the lever dark case colors on the sideturn brown on outerfaces. Buttplate is a gray patina. Stock has a couple of small bruises otherwise wood is sound and retains about all of a lightly restored finish. Mechanics are crisp. Strong bright bore with good shine and scattered pitting. 52506-4 JRL (6,000-10,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

90


Session 1 1066.

RARE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 BIG 50 DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 109314. Cal. 50 EX (50-110). Fine deluxe ‘86 Big Bore with 26” oct bbl, button magazine, half nickel front sight with screw & semibuckhorn rear sight. Top flat of bbl has the later type 2-line Winchester address with “50 EX.” caliber marking over the chamber area. Receiver, lever, hammer & forend cap are professionally restored case colors. Mounted with very highly figured 2-3X, center crotch, flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and capped pistol grip stock that has smooth steel shotgun buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “1049”, “XX” & an “S”, with matching assembly no. in top tang channel of buttstock & inside toe of buttplate. Bottom of buttstock & forend cap are mounted with factory sling eyes. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum Records Office worksheet which identifies this rifle in caliber 50-110 with oct bbl, plain trigger, checkered pistol grip stock with shotgun butt, oil finish, half magazine, received in warehouse May 9 1896 and shipped same day to order #16287.This rifle was produced in 1896 and was likely a prized hunting rifle. The 50 Express cartridge was certainly capable of taking any North American big game including the major bears of Alaska and the Arctic. They were very popular in the North woods, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada & Alaska and usually saw very hard service. PROVENANCE: Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Research document confirming the rifle’s configuration and being shipped on May 9, 1896 on order #16287. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Overall retains about 95% crisp finish with bright Winchester blue & case colors, except for the buttplate which is cleaned gray metal patina. Wood retains virtually all of its fine oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, very bright shiny bore. 52665-4 (20,000-25,000)

91

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1067.

SCARCE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 80554. Cal. 40-82. Fine special order ‘86 with 26” oct to rnd bbl, 2/3 (5-shot) magazine, altered sporting front sight and V-notch flat top rear sight that is probably an old replacement. Receiver is color case hardened. Mounted with very highly figured, center crotch, flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and black insert serpentine grip buttstock that has Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “815”, “XXX” & “R B”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. This rifle was produced in about 1893 and was probably the prized hunting rifle of a wealthy person or as a special presentation, possibly someone in law enforcement. Firearms of that era usually saw extensive hard service under adverse conditions often with little maintenance and are rarely found today with high orig finish. CONDITION: Fine to very fine. Bbl & magazine tube retain 96-97% strong orig blue with only light sharp edge wear and some minor freckling on the octagonal area over the forearm. Receiver retains about 75-80% orig case colors, stronger on left side and in sheltered areas, fading elsewhere, having turned silver on the bottom with some spots of what appears to be blood pitting. Hammer retains strong case colors, turned dark on the spur. Lever retains bright case colors on the sides, turned silver on outer faces. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and retains most of its bright, orig piano varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52665-5 JRL (17,500-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

92


1069. SCARCE SPECIAL ORDER DELUXE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 99579. Cal. 45-90. Fine deluxe ‘86 with 26” oct to rnd bbl, 2/3 magazine, Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight & a replacement semi-buckhorn rear sight that has fine pitting. Receiver is color case hardened. Mounted with very highly figured, center crotch, flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm & black insert serpentine grip buttstock that has Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “565”, “XXX”. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle in caliber 45-90 with 1/2 oct bbl, 1/2 magazine, 5 cartridges, plain trigger and checkered pistol grip stock with shotgun butt, rubber butt, received in the warehouse April 24, 1895 and shipped the same day to order no. 10735. The Model 1886, especially in this caliber was extremely popular in the North woods of America, the Rocky Mountains, Canada & Alaska. It was capable of taking the largest wild game, including moose, elk, grizzly bears & brown bears. Very often these rifles were hard used and rarely show orig finish. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain 97-98% strong orig blue with only sharp edge wear and a couple small nicks. Receiver retains about 30-40% smoky case colors, stronger back of loading gate with the balance turned silver. Hammer retains faded case colors, turned silver on the spur. Lever & forend cap retain traces of case colors. Bottom tang shows bright case colors. Wood has light handling & storage, nicks & scratches with a gouge on the comb and overall retains most of the orig varnish on the buttstock and about 80% on the forearm showing wear at the carry point. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52601-1 JRL (12,500-17,500) ESA

93

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1068. FINE DELUXE 1886 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 70258. Cal. 38-56. Beautiful deluxe ‘86 with 26” oct bbl, full magazine, Lyman sporting front sight with bead missing and semi-buckhorn rear sight. Top flat of bbl has standard 2-line Winchester address with caliber marking over the chamber area. Top tang is marked “MODEL 1886”. Mounted with very nicely figured, center crotch, flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and black insert, serpentine grip buttstock and crescent buttplate without trap. Left side of lower tang is marked with the assembly no. “355” & “XX”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock & inside toe of buttplate. Bottom of forearm, at the receiver has the hand carved date “1893”. This rifle was produced in the 1892-1893 period and was probably someones prized hunting rifle. Firearms of that era most often saw hard service, frequently under harsh conditions, sometimes with little or no maintenance. CONDITION: Fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain about 95% strong orig blue, showing only sharp edge wear, a couple of small scratches & dings with some minor thinning on bottom of magazine tube. Receiver retains about 70% orig case colors, strong & bright in sheltered areas, fading elsewhere and turned silver on the belly. Belly of the receiver still shows most of the “2nd coat lines”. Top & bottom tangs retain strong case colors. Hammer retains bright case colors, turned silver on the spur. Lever retains lightly to moderately faded case colors, brilliant in sheltered areas, turning silver on outer faces. Buttplate & forend cap have mostly turned silver with smoky colors showing through. Wood is sound with some heat pimpling on the right side of buttstock with a few light nicks & scratches and retains most of its strong, orig piano varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, very bright shiny bore. 52404-8 JRL (15,000-20,000)


Session 1

1070. RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 BIG 50 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 88081. Cal. 50-100-450. Standard grade rifle with 26” oct bbl, full magazine, silver-bead sporting front sight and platinum line 3-leaf Express rear sight. Receiver is color case hardened and has close-coupled, double-set triggers. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate. This rifle was produced in about 1894 long after the major buffalo herds had ceased to exist. These big 50 rifles were sought after as hunting arms, especially in the north woods, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada & Alaska for North America’s big game, up to and including the great bears of Alaska & the Arctic. They were also favored by hunters for African big game. This rifle is somewhat unusual with its crescent buttplate. Most of the big 50 rifles were fitted with shotgun butts because of the massive recoil. Shooting a big 50 with crescent buttplate has been related to a religious experience, frequently compelling the shooter to take the Lord’s name in vain. This rifle is a recent “attic find”. CONDITION: About fine. This rifle was virtually a new gun when it went into storage. Currently it shows about 99% of its orig factory blue on the bbl & magazine tube with areas of fine blood pitting about mid-point. Receiver retains brilliant case colors on the sides, lightly faded on the top edge and heavily faded on the bottom with 1 of the “2nd lacquer lines” still visible. Receiver also has a few spots of pitting. Hammer retains about 95% bright case colors and the lever about 40% bright case colors with the balance turned brown. Buttplate shows about 70-75% bright case colors with a spot of rust on the heel. Stock has a couple of tiny hairline grain checks, otherwise wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and retains about 98% orig finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. May be completely unfired having heavy factory type grease inside the receiver and shows no evidence on the loading gate of ever having been loaded. 52621-1 (12,500-17,500)

1071. SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 150674. Cal. 40-65. Standard grade carbine with 22” bbl, full magazine, square base front sight & 2000 yard carbine ladder rear sight. Top of the bbl has the standard late 2-line address with caliber marking and the “WP” proof over the chamber area. Receiver ring also has the “WP” proof. Left side of receiver has a stud & ring. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and carbine buttplate. This carbine was built in about 1911 and was very likely someone’s hunting rifle, although the western frontier was still not completely settled and carbines such as this most often were carried in a saddle scabbard or wagon box working the open range. They most often were exposed to harsh elements frequently with little or no maintenance. CONDITION: Fine. Bbl & magazine tube retain most of their original blued finish. Receiver retains about 95-97% bright orig blue, showing sharp edge wear and a few light scratches. Hammer retains about 60% orig blue and the lever about 90%. Forearm band shows about 60% orig blue and the buttplate about 85-90%. Wood is sound and retains virtually all of its original finish, perhaps with some finish added for preservation. Mechanics are crisp, very bright shiny bore with a few scattered spots of pin-prick pitting. 52609-2 (10,000-15,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

94


1073. *VERY RARE WINCHESTER DELUXE EXTRA LIGHTWEIGHT LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 129131. Cal. 45-70. Very rare rifle with 22” extra light tapered rnd bbl, full magazine, ramp mounted Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight and flat top rear sight. Mounted with about 2-X American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and capped pistol grip stock that has Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly number “238”, “XX” and an “R”. Matching assembly number is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle in Cal. 45-70, extra light 22” rnd bbl, plain trigger, checkered pistol grip stock with rubber shotgun buttplate & oil finish, Winchester high velocity sights and full magazine, received in the warehouse March 30, 1905 and shipped the next day to order # 5930. These lightweight rifles were extremely popular as hunting arms, especially in the North Woods, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and Alaska and in the 45-70 caliber is certainly capable of taking any North American big game up to and including the great bears of Alaska and the Arctic. This rifle was obviously someone’s prized hunting gun. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Fine to very fine, all matching. Bbl and magazine tube retain about 95% strong orig blue with several spots of blood pitting on left side of magazine tube toward muzzle end and on the front sight. Receiver retains 93-95% glossy orig blue with a series of small scratches on both sides and sharp edge wear. Hammer retains most of its orig case colors, fading on the spur. Lever retains bright case colors on the sides, faded to silver on the outer faces. Buttstock has a hairline back of top tang, otherwise wood is sound with usual light nicks, dings and scratches and retains most of its orig oil finish. Mechanics are crisp. Very bright shiny bore. 52404-3 (9,000-12,000) C&R; ESA 95

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1072. RARE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH 30” BARREL. SN 60689. Cal. 45-90. Standard grade rifle with 30” oct bbl, full magazine, replacement front sight with screw & brass blade and replacement semi-buckhorn rear sight. Receiver and attached metal parts are color case hardened. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate. This rifle was produced in about 1891 when business was still being conducted from the back of a horse or wagon and firearms of that era were daily use working tools and are rarely found today with orig finish. This rifle with its extra length special order bbl, was undoubtedly a prized hunting rifle. CONDITION: Good, overall retains a completely restored finish with about 99% blue on the bbl & magazine tube. Receiver, lever, hammer, forend cap & buttplate retain a restored color case hardened finish. Wood has a few minor nicks & scratches and shows an amateur-style restored finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52665-11 JRL (10,000-12,000)


Session 1

1074. *WINCHESTER 1886 DELUXE LIGHT WEIGHT LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 128970. Cal. 45-70. 22� tapered rnd bbl. Lyman pedestal mounted bead front sight with Winchester flat top V notch elevator adjustable sporting rear sight. Half length mag. Blue finish with case colored hammer and lever. Forearm and pistol grip stock are XX grade fancy black walnut with style H factory checkering, hard rubber grip cap and hard rubber shotgun style buttplate. Inside lower tang is marked with assembly No. 210 followed by XX stock grade. Top tang stock channel is marked with matching 210. Accompanied by Cody Firearms Museum record check confirming configuration and further stating shipped 8/15/1904, order no. 224457. PROVENANCE: Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Very good orig condition with fine mechanics. Bright bore with strong rifling. 85-90% orig blue with spots of light pitting along top and lower edges of receiver. Hammer and lever have bright case colors on sides. Orig wood finish shows scattered scratches and marks with small spots of wear. 52170-35 DS (8,000-12,000) C&R

1075. FINE SPECIAL ORDERED CASE COLORED WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 48030. Cal. 45-70. Standard grade rifle with scarce special order 28� oct bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight and 1886 marked ladder rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight grip and crescent buttplate. This rifle was produced about 1890 in an era where business was still being conducted from the back of a horse or wagon and a rifle was a daily working tool. Standard grade rifles were affordable by the average working man and usually were exposed daily to extreme harsh conditions, often with little maintenance and are rarely found today with high orig finish. CONDITION: Good. Bbl retains 90-92% strong orig blue showing sharp edge and muzzle end wear with a few minor nicks & scratches. Magazine tube retains 88-90% blue turning a little plum on the outer radius. Receiver retains about 60% fading case colors, a little stronger in sheltered areas, having turned silver over the top & bottom edges. Hammer retains strong case colors on the sides, turned silver on the spur. Lever retains strong case colors in the most sheltered areas, being mostly faded to silver. Stock has a grain check in the right side which aligns with the recess under the buttplate. Forearm has a ding on the right side bbl channel with a few nicks & scratches elsewhere on the wood with the buttstock retaining about 80% orig finish and the forearm a hand worn patina. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52665-13 JRL (7,500-8,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

96


1077. *SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 EXTRA LIGHTWEIGHT TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 149159. Cal. 4570. Standard grade rifle with 22” rapid taper extra lightweight bbl, half magazine, takedown with low pedestal mounted Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight and flat top rear sight. Left side of bbl, by the rear sight is marked “NICKEL STEEL” and the caliber marking is on left side over the chamber area. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock and Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. These lightweight big bore rifles were extremely popular in the North woods, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada & Alaska as big game rifles capable of taking the largest North American big game. This rifle was produced about 1910 and undoubtedly was someones prized hunting rifle. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Fine. Bbl retains about 95-96% strong orig blue with some chemical spotting just forward of the rear sight. Magazine tube & cap retain about 98% orig blue. Takedown extension retains about 80% strong orig blue with the balance flaked to a light patina. Receiver retains 50-60% strong orig blue with the loss areas a light patina. Lever & hammer retain most of their orig, faded case colors. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and retains most of its orig factory finish. Mechanics are crisp, very bright shiny bore. Shows very little use. 52404-6 JRL (7,000-10,000) C&R; ESA

97

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1076. SCARCE FIRST YEAR OF PRODUCTION WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 1991. Cal 40-82. Standard grade rifle with 26” rnd bbl, full magazine, ivory bead sporting front sight & sesmi-buckhorn rear sight that has been filed flat. Receiver is color case hardened. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which verifies this rifle in caliber 40-82, with round bbl and plain trigger, received in warehouse Dec. 6, 1886 and shipped Jan. 14, 1887 to order #14623. This rifle was produced in 1886 when Big Bore repeating rifles were in great demand on the American frontier, both as hunting arms & self defense weapons. They were very popular also with law enforcement & outlaws. These early guns usually saw very hard service and are rarely found today with high orig finish. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbl retains 85-88% orig blue turning a little dull & thin on the upper half with one area of fine surface etching. Magazine tube retains about 95% orig blue. Receiver retains about 70-75% orig case colors, strong & bright on the sides, faded to silver on top & bottom. Hammer retains strong case colors, turned brown on the spur. Lever retains traces of case colors, being mostly a mottled silver/brown patina. Buttplate & forend cap retain smoky case colors turning silver. Stock has a deep scratch on left side of comb with a series of small scratches & bruises on left side of wrist and other light nicks & scratches. Buttstock retains about 85-88% strong orig finish and the forearm about 25% showing wear over the carry point. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore with some fine pitting in the grooves. 52498-1 (7,000-9,000) ESA


Session 1

1078. *WINCHESTER 1886 LIGHTWEIGHT DELUXE TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 126847. Cal. 45-70. 22” tapered rnd bbl. Pedestal mounted Lyman No. 4 ivory bead hunting front sight with filler and rear dovetail. Blued action with case colored hammer and lever is factory equipped with Lyman No. 38 “Climbin Lyman” receiver sight. Half length mag with takedown lever. Forearm and pistol grip stock of oil finished XX black walnut. Stock features include style H factory checkering, hard rubber grip cap, and hard rubber shotgun buttplate. Inside lower tang is marked “633XXR”. Top tang channel of stock is marked “20”. Cody Firearms Museum record check confirms configuration of rifle including Lyman sight, with a ship date of 12/11/1902. PROVENANCE: Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very good orig condition retaining over 80% orig blue showing light scratches and small dents on receiver. Sides of hammer and lever show some fading case colors. Unsanded wood shows light wear with scattered handling marks. Mechanics are fine. Bore is bright. 52170-34 DS (5,000-8,000) C&R; ESA

1079. SCARCE DELUXE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 SADDLE RING CARBINE RESTORED BY TURNBULL RESTORATIONS. SN 63645. Cal 50 EX (50-110). Beautiful, deluxe ‘86 carbine with 22” bbl, full magazine, square base front sight and platinum line 3-leaf Express rear sight. Bbl has 2-line Winchester name & address with caliber marking over the chamber area. Top tang is marked “MODEL 1886”. Receiver, lever, hammer & buttplate are beautifully color case hardened with fine Winchester style colors. Mounted with replacement, about 3X flame & shell grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and black insert, serpentine grip buttstock with carbine buttplate. Buttstock is without the cleaning rod recess under the buttplate as is normally found even on those buttstocks that have buttplates without trap. Stock & buttplate screws are also color case hardened. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “427” & “XXX”. Matching assembly no. is also found inside top tang channel of buttstock & inside toe of buttplate. Lower tang appears to have a welded repair through the SN area with a SN having been pantograph reapplied. Altogether a fine restored carbine. CONDITION: Fine, bbl retains about 99% custom Turnbull blue & the magazine tube 97-98% custom blue turning a little plum. Receiver retains most of its fine Winchester-style case colors, brilliant on the sides, faded on top & bottom edges. Lever & hammer retain most of their bright custom case colors, a little faded on the trigger loop. Top and bottom tang & buttplate retain brilliant case colors. Wood is sound with a series of small scratches on right side of buttstock, showing a little wear on the forearm at the receiver and some dulling on the wrist, otherwise retains virtually all of its fine custom finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52404-5 JRL (7,000-8,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

98


1081. *FINE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 DELUXE TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH SLING AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 145579. Cal. 33 WCF. Beautiful deluxe rifle with 24” tapered rnd bbl, half magazine, takedown with pedestal mounted Lyman ivory bead front sight and slightly altered semi-buckhorn rear sight. Mounted with about 2X, center crotch, flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm & capped pistol grip stock that has Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. Bottom of the stock & forend cap have factory sling eyes with orig hooks and an orig Winchester double roller buckle leather sling. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “775” & “XX”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle in caliber 33 with rnd bbl, plain trigger, half magazine, shotgun butt with rubber buttplate, sling & swivel, received in warehouse August 22, 1911 and shipped same day to order # 320608. This rifle was produced in 1911 and would most like have been a prized hunting rifle. This powerful caliber was very popular in the North woods, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada & Alaska and was certainly capable of taking the largest North American big game up to and including the great bears of Alaska and the Arctic. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl retains 96-97% strong orig blue with one small area of light surface rust. Magazine tube & takedown cap retain about 96-98% strong orig blue. The takedown extension retains about 90-92% orig blue and the receiver about 88-90% strong, glossy orig blue with sharp edge wear and a small cleaned area on the top right edge. Right front side of the receiver has a series of light scratches, probably from the sling buckle. There is also a small dent in the front edge of the loading gate opening. Hammer retains bright case colors, turned gray on the spur. Lever retains strong case colors on the sides and in sheltered areas, turned silver/brown on the outer faces. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and retains about 96-97% strong orig piano varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52404-1 JRL (6,500-7,500) C&R; ESA

99

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1080. EARLY WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 19596. Cal. 40-82. Standard grade rifle with 26” oct bbl, full magazine, slightly altered half nickel front sight & semi-buckhorn rear sight. Top flat of bbl has the standard 2-line Winchester name & address with caliber marking over the chamber area. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate. Receiver is color case hardened. This rifle was produced in about 1888 when the west was still very wild, with hostile Indians, marauding outlaws and other dangers associated with that era. That was a time when a rifle was a daily use tool and they usually saw hard service often with little or no maintenance. Color case hardened examples of these rifles rarely retain any orig colors. Exposure to the ultraviolet rays of sunlight rapidly faded the colors, turning them silver.With factory letter indicating shipped August 22, 1888 rifle, cal, 40/82 Octagon BBl with plain trigger. CONDITION: Fine to very fine. Bbl retains 95-96% strong orig blue with only faint sharp edge wear and a few scattered pin-pricks of surface rust. Magazine tube retains about 50-60% orig blue with the balance turned to a plummy blue/brown. Receiver retains 60-65% orig case colors, strong & bright in sheltered areas, mostly on the right side, with the left side, fading toward the front. Receiver ring shows faded case colors, and the bottom of the receiver has turned silver. Hammer retains bright case colors, turned silver on spur. Lever retains bright case colors on the sides, turning to silver/brown on the outer faces. Forend cap retains faded case colors, and the buttplate is a mottled silver/ brown. Wood has a few minor nicks & scratches with a dark stain on left side of forearm, otherwise wood is sound and retains about 90% bright orig finish. Mechanics are crisp, very bright shiny bore. 52665-10 (6,500-8,500)


Session 1

1082. *SCARCE END OF PRODUCTION WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LIGHTWEIGHT TAKEDOWN DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH 4 PAGE GEORGE MADIS LETTER. SN 159992. Cal. 33 WCF. Fine deluxe Model ‘86 with 24” tapered lightweight rnd bbl, half magazine, takedown, ramp mounted Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight and slot blank in the rear seat and Lyman 56 receiver sight with target knobs. Mounted with 2-3X flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and capped pistol grip stock that has Winchester embossed hard rubber shotgun buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood has the assembly no. “121” with matching assembly no. on front tennon of buttstock. According to The Winchester Book, Madis there were a total of 159,994 Model 1886 rifles produced by Winchester 1886-1932 when the last 221 rifles were assembled. This rifle is only 2 numbers from the very last Model 1886 produced and may be the highest numbered rifle known. According to the referenced publication, by 1922 when production of the 1886 ceased , SN’s for the Model 1886 had reached 159,337. In the ensuing 10 years there were 657 more rifles assembled from remaining parts with the last 221 guns produced in 1932. Model 1886 rifles in this caliber were very popular with North woods hunters, throughout the Rocky Mountain region, Canada & Alaska. This extremely powerful cartridge was capable of taking any North American big game up to and including the great brown & polar bears.Accompanied by an outstanding and very detailed 4 page letter from noted Winchester authority George Madis. This 4 page document is very detailed about all the markings and the rifles great rarity due to its many special features. Madis also states that this rifle by production records is only 2 number from the very last 1886 ever produced.Also stated by Madis is the superior condition and amount of special order features would make this a great addition to any Winchester collection Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very good. Bbl retains about 95% strong orig blue as does the magazine tube, both of which show muzzle end wear. The takedown extension is mostly a gray patina. Receiver retains about 80% strong orig blue, thin over the top & bottom edges, turning gray on the bottom front. Hammer retains most of its orig blue showing light wear on the right side and face. Lever retains about 80% orig blue turning plummy brown. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and retains most of a restored oil finish on the buttstock and most of its orig oil finish on the forearm. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52665-8 JRL (6,500-9,500) C&R; ESA

1083. *BEAUTIFUL AND SCARCE DELUXE MODEL 1886 LIGHT WEIGHT TAKE DOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 147850. Cal. 45-70. Beautiful deluxe Winchester with 22” tapered lightweight rnd bbl, half magazine, take down with pedestal mounted combination front sight and semi-buckhorn rear sight. Mounted with very nicely figured flame & shell grain American walnut that has H-style checkered forearm and capped pistol grip stock with Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. Left side of lower tang is marked with the assembly no. “885” and “XX” along with an “R”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. This rifle was produced in about 1909 during a very low production year with only 914 Model ‘86 rifles produced. This almost certainly was someones prized north woods hunting rifle. These rifles were extremely popular in the Rocky Mountain Region and the woodlands of the Northeast, Canada & Alaska. The 45-70 is certainly capable of taking about any North American big game. CONDITION: Fine, matching as noted. Bbl & magazine tube retain about 98% crisp orig blue with the take down tip flaked to about 60% blue. Forend cap retains about 60-65% blue with losses flaked to light patina. Receiver retains about 50% orig blue with a few light scratches and sharp edge wear. The major loss areas are flaked to a light patina. The take down extension is flaked to a gray patina. Lever & hammer retain faded case colors on the sides, turned silver on outer faces. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and retains virtually all of its orig piano varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, very bright shiny bore. Shows very little use. 52404-4 JRL (6,500-7,500) C&R Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

100


1085. PRESENTATION WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 TO COLORADO INDIVIDUAL. SN 115080. Cal. 45-70. Standard grade rifle with 26” oct bbl, full magazine, half nickel front sight with screw and unmarked, early style 1,000-yd rifle ladder rear sight. Receiver is color case hardened. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut, straight stock & crescent buttplate. Left side of buttstock is inlaid with a 1-7/8” x 1-7/16” oval aluminum plaque which is engraved with the inscription “Sam Barnes / Loveland / Colo”. The plaque has a light zig-zag border with the vignette of a small bird perched on foliage. In the top 1/3 of the plaque are 2 rectangular cut-outs whose purpose could not be determined. Undoubtedly this was Mr. Barnes personal protection & hunting rifle or possibly he could have been in law enforcement. CONDITION: Very good. Bbl retains 90-92% orig blue, showing sharp edge wear with a few scratches. Magazine tube retains 88-90% thinning orig blue with a couple of small nicks & dings. Receiver retains about 60-70% orig case colors, strong & bright in sheltered areas, fading elsewhere, turned silver over top & bottom edges. Hammer retains bright case colors, turned silver on the spur. Lever retains faded case colors in sheltered areas, strong inside the trigger loop, faded to silver elsewhere. Forend cap & buttplate have silvered out. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and a couple of bruises and retains about 65-70% orig finish on the buttstock and traces of finish on the forearm with the balance a hand worn patina. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52665-14 JRL (5,000-7,500) 101

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1084. *SPECIAL ORDER DELUXE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LIGHTWEIGHT TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 129023. Cal 33 WCF. Fine lightweight rifle with 24” tapered rnd bbl, half magazine, takedown, with pedestal mounted Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight with series 22 style rear sight and a Marbles spring loaded tang sight. Mounted with very beautiful, center crotch, flame grain, H-style checkered American walnut with straight stock & Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with assembly number “222” and “XX” with an “RF”. Matching assembly number is found in top tang channel of buttstock. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle in caliber 33 with rnd bbl, plain trigger, half magazine, takedown, shotgun rubber buttplate received in warehouse Nov. 13, 1903 and not shipped until Jan. 13, 1904 to order #219326. This must have been one of the first 33 caliber rifles produced. Letter also indicates returned & repaired Feb. 1, 1908 and reiterates the identifying information with addition of “easy pull”. It was reshipped Oct. 5, 1910 to order #230464. The shotgun butt is mentioned in both entries but straight stock is not mentioned at all, however there is little doubt that this is the orig wood. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine,all matching. Bbl retains 95-96% strong orig blue with a few minor scratches & a small spot or two of rust. Receiver retains 70-75% strong orig blue with edge wear & about half of bottom turned silver. Wood is sound with forearm showing moderate wear & retaining about 70% orig piano varnish finish. Buttstock shows moderate wear to checkering with minor nicks & dings and retains most of its orig piano varnish finish with some heat crazing to surface. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52404-2 JRL (5,000-7,000) C&R; ESA


Session 1

1086. DELUXE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 84148. Cal. 45-90. Fine deluxe rifle with 26” oct bbl, full magazine, Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight, semi-buckhorn rear sight & Lyman combination tang sight. Receiver is color case hardened and has single set trigger. Mounted with about 2X flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm & black insert, serpentine grip buttstock that has smooth steel shotgun buttplate. Left rear side of forearm is crudely carved with the initials “P. J. D.”Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “894”, an “S” and an “X”. Left side of upper tang, under the wood is also marked with the matching assembly no. which is also found in top tang channel of buttstock & inside toe of buttplate. This rifle was produced in about 1894 and was likely someones prized hunting rifle. This caliber was certainly capable of taking any North American big game up to and including the great bears of Alaska and the Arctic. They usually saw fairly hard service and are rarely found with high orig finish, especially those with color case hardened features. The ultraviolet rays of sunshine rapidly fades these colors, turning them to silver. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Good, all matching. Bbl retains about 80% orig blue with moderate pitting on the top flat with scattered spots of pitting on the top left flat. Magazine tube retains about 90-92% dull orig blue. Receiver shows 15-20% faded case colors with the balance turned silver. Top of the receiver ring & top of the bolt are also finely pitted. Lever & hammer show traces of faded case colors, stronger on the hammer. Buttplate & forend cap are gray patina. Stock has a hairline right side of wrist, otherwise wood is sound with usual handling & storage nicks & scratches and overall retains about 85-90% orig piano varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 524047 JRL (4,500-5,500) ESA

1087. *LATE WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LIGHTWEIGHT TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 159957. Cal. 33 WCF. Standard grade rifle with 24” tapered, lightweight rnd bbl, 2/3 magazine, takedown with ramp mounted Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight & slot blank in rear seat. Receiver is mounted with a Lyman Model-56 sight with hunting knobs. Mounted with very nicely figured, uncheckered, about 2X, center crotch, flame grain American walnut with straight stock & Winchester embossed hard rubber shotgun buttplate. Bottom of the stock & forend cap have non-factory sling swivels with a leather sling. This rifle was produced between 1922-1932 with the “cleanup” of remaining parts when the company assembled the last 657 guns. The final 221 guns were assembled in 1932. This very powerful cartridge was very popular in the North woods, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada & Alaska. It was capable of taking any of the largest wild game including the great bears of Alaska and the Arctic. Those arms usually saw hard service under extreme conditions. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbl & magazine tube retain 95-97% strong orig blue with the takedown extension a blue/gray patina. Receiver retains about 95% strong orig blue showing sharp edge wear and some minor thinning on the top right edge. Lever & hammer retain most of their orig blue. Wood is sound and shows a fine restored finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. Sling is fine showing some dryness. 52665-9 JRL (4,000-5,000) C&R; ESA Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

102


1089. WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 85756. Cal. 40-65. Standard grade rifle with 26” rnd bbl, full magazine, Lyman ivory bead hunting front sight & semi-buckhorn rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate. Receiver is color case hardened. This rifle was produced about 1894 at a time when the daily use of a rifle was common place for hunting & self protection. Firearms of that era are rarely found today with high orig finish, especially those with color case hardening. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Good to very good. Bbl & magazine tube retain about 93-95% strong orig blue, turning a little plummy brown on the muzzle end of the magazine tube. The receiver retains about 35-40% fading case colors, strong in sheltered areas, turned gray on the bottom with faded colors over the top. Hammer retains bright case colors, turned silver on the spur. Lever retains colors in sheltered areas, mostly turned brown. Buttplate & forend cap retain faded colors. Stock has a hairline crack back of top tang, otherwise wood is sound and shows most of a high gloss refinish. Mechanics are crisp, very bright shiny bore. 52665-12 JRL (3,500-5,000) ESA

103

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1088. *1886 WINCHESTER 45-70 OCTAGON RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 130517. Cal. 45-70. Manufactured in 1903, octagon barrel caliber 45-70 with full magazine, blue receiver with case color hammer and lever, and 2-pc walnut stocks with crescent butt. 23” oct bbl with Watson sporting front sight and D.W. King sporting rear sight. Traditional 2-line Winchester address on top bbl flat with “45-70” cal. marking at rear bbl on top flat. Blue receiver with tang marked “-Model 1886-”. 2-pc straight grain walnut stocks with standard forend cap and crescent butt. Factory letter included indicating rifle was returned to the factory in 1908. Consignor’s notes state that the gun was sent back to the factory for shortening of the barrel. CONDITION: Good as having been modified. Oct bbl and magazine tube have been shortened to a length of 23”. Minor finish loss on corners of bbl flats with thinning of finish towards muzzle with balance turning plum. Magazine tube with replacement magazine guide have been finished in a plum brown finish. Forend cap has had a 1/8” sling swivel stud brazed into place. Receiver retains approximately one-third of its bright factory blue with thinning on bottom of receiver, as well as finish loss on high points of upper edges of receiver with upper tang having been worn silver. Balance of finish on receiver has turned somewhat plum with silvering at high points. Crescent butt is brown overall. Case colored hammer and lever have traces of case color in protected areas with balance having turned silver. Buttstock having been sanded and refinished at some previous point and having evidence of a fracture in the upper wrist area that has been repaired and is quite stable. Wood loss is evident along upper tang on left side and at confluence of stock with receiver on right. Bore has strong rifling with small areas of darkness in grooves. Mechanics are crisp and tight. 52154-14 (3,500-5,500) C&R


Session 1

1090. SCARCE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 3958. Cal. 45-90. Fine deluxe rifle with 26” replacement oct bbl, button magazine, half nickel front sight with screw, flat top V-notch rear sight & Lyman combination tang sight. Bottom flat of the bbl, above the forend cap has a tiny screw for an undetermined purpose. Mounted with about 2-3X flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm & black insert serpentine grip buttstock that has crescent buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “2792” & “XX”. Matching assembly no. is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Buttplate tang screw is a replacement. Top flat of bbl is marked with the very late 2-line address “MANUFACTURED BY THE WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. / NEW HAVEN CONN. U S A” with 2-patent dates. Caliber marking is on the top left flat over the chamber area and top flat along with the receiver ring have the Winchester “W P” proof, signifying that this rifle was returned for work at the factory after about 1905. It was probably at this time that the bbl was replaced and the wood refinished. CONDITION: Fine, all matching. Bbl retains about 98% orig factory blue. Receiver shows about 15-20% faded case colors with the balance turned silver. Left side of receiver has a large area of fine pitting. Lever & hammer are blued replacements, again probably at the time it was returned to the factory. Wood is sound and shows about all of a restored oil finish and freshened checkering. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Would make an outstanding Cowboy Action shooter. 52665-6 JRL (3,000-5,000)

1091. WINCHESTER MODEL 1886 SMOOTH BORE LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH BROWNING BROTHERS MARK ON BARREL. SN 18449. Cal. 45-90. Standard grade rifle with 26” oct bbl, smooth bore, full magazine, altered front sight and a replacement King rear sight. The replacement rear sight is lower than the original which necessitated lowering the front sight and also caused the owner to cut a small groove in the top of the receiver ring to permit a sight line. The bore measures .458” at the muzzle indicating that it was probably bored out after leaving the factory. Top flat of bbl is marked with the 2-line Winchester address and is also marked “BROWNING BROS, OGDEN U.T.” between the rear sight & bbl address. John Browning was the world’s most prolific firearms inventor who designed many of the Winchester rifles including this one. He and his brother maintained a manufacturing facility and sporting goods store in Ogden, UT and were distributors for Winchester Arms. Most of the arms sold by Browning Brothers saw extreme hard use on the American frontier and are rarely found today in any condition. Those few rifles that come to market usually have little or no finish. CONDITION: Fair. Traces of orig finish remain in the most sheltered areas being an overall mottled silver/brown patina with wrench marks on the bbl over the chamber area. Receiver, lever & hammer retain traces of silvered case colors, being mostly an overall dark brown patina with a series of what are probably vise marks on the front raised area of the receiver. Wood is sound with numerous nicks, dings & scratches with gouges on the buttstock and another on the forearm and overall shows very hard wear with a hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, strong bright bore. 52699-3 JRL (2,000-3,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

104


1093. *SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 92 LEVER ACTION SHORT RIFLE. SN 931493. Cal. 32 WCF (32-20). Standard grade rifle with scarce, special order 20” rnd bbl, 2/3rds magazine, Sheard gold bead front sight and late style semi-buckhorn rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with 8-3/8” shortrifle forearm and straight stock with crescent buttplate. This rifle is pictured on page 369 of The Winchester Book, Madis. Although the Model 92 was produced in fairly large numbers, special order features such as found on this rifle are quite rare, especially shorter than standard or longer than standard bbls. Special order short rifles with carbine length bbls had very little advantage, if any over a carbine and the extra cost would have been difficult to justify for the average working man. Small bore rifles such as this were usually not considered big game rifles and were generally relegated to small game or garden pest shooting for use by boys and ladies. As such they usually saw hard service, often with little or no maintenance and are rarely found today with much orig finish. CONDITION: Very fine plus. Bbl and magazine tube retain about 99% crisp, orig blue with a few small spots of old dried oil. Receiver retains about 70% glossy, orig blue with the loss areas flaked, not worn to a medium patina. Lever and hammer retain most of their strong orig blue. Top tang is a flaked medium patina. Buttplate and forend cap are also flaked to patina. Wood is sound with a few scattered, very light handling and storage marks with one small chemical spot on the forearm and overall retains virtually all of its orig factory oil finish. Mechanics are crisp. Brilliant shiny bore. 52634-12 JRL (6,500-8,500) C&R

105

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1092. RARE WINCHESTER MODEL 1892 DELUXE TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 146331. Cal. 25-20. Beautiful deluxe ‘92 with 24-1/4” rnd bbl, half magazine, takedown with Lyman ivory bead hunting front and semi-buckhorn rear sights. Mounted with very nicely figured, center crotch, flame grain American walnut with H-style checkered forearm and capped pistol grip stock that has crescent buttplate. Left side of lower tang, under the wood is marked with the assembly no. “10429” & “XX”. Rear face of buttstock, under the buttplate is marked with the matching assembly no., “92” and a “T”. Inside toe of buttplate is also marked with matching assembly number. This rifle was produced in about 1897 and was likely someones prized hunting rifle. Rifles of these small calibers were most usually regarded as boys or ladies, small game or garden guns and usually saw very hard service, often with little or no maintenance. Few of these fine little rifles survive today. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Fine, all matching. Bbl retains about 95% strong orig blue with a few fine freckles of surface rust and a series of scratches on bottom of bbl from takedown lever. Magazine tube also retains about 95% orig blue with the cap a gray patina. Takedown extension retains traces of blue, being mostly a gray/ brown patina. Receiver retains 70-75% orig blue, thin and turning brown over the top & bottom edges. Hammer retains dark case colors and the lever bright case colors in sheltered areas on the sides, turned silver elsewhere with light surface etching. Buttplate is silvered case colors. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches with the buttstock showing 92-93% piano varnish finish and the forearm about 85% with wear at the carry point. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52665-7 JRL (10,000-12,500) ESA


Session 1

1094. *WINCHESTER MODEL 1892 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 999435. Cal. 25-20 WCF. Standard grade carbine with 20” bbl, full magazine with rifle style band, square base front sight and 2000 yard carbine ladder rear sight. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with straight stock & carbine buttplate. Left side of receiver has a staple & ring. This 1930 produced carbine very likely would have been used by a young man or woman as a small game hunting rifle. Those rifles usually saw hard service with very little maintenance. CONDITION: Very fine. Overall the metal retains about 99% of a factory style restored finish with bright Winchester style blue showing only faint muzzle end and sharp edge wear with a couple of small scratches on the receiver. The wood appears to be new factory replacements with factory style varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52079-1 TEP (4,000-6,000) C&R

1095. FINE ANTIQUE WINCHESTER 1894 TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 30498. Cal. .38-55. Standard grade rifle with 26” oct bbl, full mag, takedown, half nickel front sight with screw and semi-buckhorn rear sight. Mounted with very highly figured, uncheckered American walnut with straight stock and crescent buttplate. These early ‘94s were Winchester’s first production of rifles built specifically for use of smokeless powder and were in great demand from the buying public. As such, it is extremely rare to find an antique takedown ‘94 especially one with high orig finish. This rifle was very likely someone’s prized hunting gun. PROVENANCE: The collection of Tim Zissler. CONDITION: Extremely fine. Bbl and mag tube retain about 98% plus strong, bright orig blue with only faint sharp edge wear on the bbl and one tiny ding on the mag tube. The takedown extension retains about 90% bright orig blue with the losses from flaking not wear. Receiver retains about 88-90% strong orig blue mixed with small flaked spots that are now a light patina. Screw heads retain thin orig finish, and loading gate retains most of its orig fire blue. Hammer retains brilliant case colors overall and the lever virtually all of its orig case colors strong and bright on the sides, lightly faded on outer faces. Buttplate retains about all of its strong, bright case colors, moderately faded. Wood is sound with a few minor handling and storage tiny nicks and retains virtually all its orig factory oil finish. Mechanics are crisp. Brilliant shiny bore. Appears to have been fired but very little, retains virtually all of its orig blue on the bolt face. A scarce high condition ‘94. 524633 JRL (6,000-10,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

106


1097. *SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 64 LEVER ACTION RIFLE IN A RARE CALIBER. SN 1138228. Cal. 219 ZIPPER. Standard grade rifle with 261/4” tapered lightweight rnd bbl, half magazine, hooded ramp front sight, slot blank in rear seat & scarce bolt peep sight. Left side of receiver is factory drilled & tapped for receiver sight with plug screws in the holes. Mounted with very nicely figured, uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with semi-beaver tail forearm and pistol grip stock that has checkered steel buttplate. According to The Winchester Book, Madis, the 219 Zipper caliber was not offered until 1937 on special order only. In 1938 it was added as a standard caliber and discontinued in 1941. There were a total of about 67,000 Models 64 produced 1933-1956. This model was offered in both standard & deluxe configuration in a variety of bbl lengths with only a very few chambered 219 zipper. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus. Overall retains about 99% crisp orig finish with bright blues showing only extremely faint sharp edge wear and a couple nicks on the receiver. Wood is sound with a couple of minor storage marks and retains most of its orig factory finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. May have been fired, but if so, very little. 52665-15 JRL (4,500-6,500) C&R

107

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1096. SCARCE ANTIQUE WINCHESTER MODEL 1894 SPECIAL ORDER DELUXE LIGHTWEIGHT LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 28099. Cal. 30 WCF (30-30). Fine deluxe rifle with 22” tapered oct bbl, button magazine, Lyman ivory bead express front sight, 3-leaf, platinum line express rear sight and Lyman combination tang sight. Top flat of bbl has standard 2-line Winchester address with caliber marking on top left flat over the chamber. Mounted with very nicely figured, center crotch American walnut with “H” style checkered forearm and straight stock with Winchester embossed hard rubber buttplate. Bottom tang has close-coupled double-set triggers and has the assembly no. “4697” & “XX” on the left side under the wood. Top tang channel of the buttstock is marked “94” indicating that this may be a factory replacement buttstock. This rifle was produced in about 1895 and likely belonged to a wealthy person or was a special presentation. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl retains about 98% strong factory blue with only faint sharp edge wear. Receiver retains 93-95% strong orig blue, showing sharp edge wear and some thinning around the bottom front edge with scattered pin-pricks of light surface rust. Lever retains bright case colors on the sides and faded colors on the outer faces. Hammer shows dark case colors. Stock has a repaired piece at the toe and probably a replacement buttplate, otherwise wood is sound with what appears to be a factory restored finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52328-53 JRL (5,000-7,000) ESA


Session 1

1098. *RARE SPECIAL ORDER WINCHESTER MODEL 1895 LEVER ACTION SHORT RIFLE. SN 400156. Cal. 30 Gov’t-06 (3006). Standard grade rifle with special order 22” rnd bbl, pedestal mounted Lyman ivory bead front sight, Lyman 6A 2-leaf folding rear sight and a Lyman 21 receiver sight. Mounted with very nicely figured, uncheckered American walnut with black insert, Schnable tip forearm and straight stock with checkered steel buttplate. Standard bbl length for 30-06 rifles was 24”, however long and shorter bbls could be obtained on special order. This rifle was produced in about 1920 and was very likely a prized hunting rifle.Provenance, Former Warren Webster Collection Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl retains about 98-99% crisp orig blue with only faint muzzle edge wear. Receiver retains 95-96% strong orig blue with sharp edge wear and thinning on the right front edge at the carry point. Magazine box retains about 85% orig blue,also showing wear around the carry point. Lever & hammer retain most of their strong orig blue. Wood is equally fine and retains 90% of its oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52325-5 (7,500-9,500) C&R; ESA

1099. *SCARCE HIGH CONDITION WINCHESTER MODEL 1895 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 400774. Cal. .30 ARMY (30-40 Krag). Standard carbine with 22” rnd bbl, pedestal mounted front sight with 1800 yard musket/carbine rear sight. Receiver has a stud and ring in the left side. Mounted with nicely figured, streaky, uncheckered American walnut with grasping groove forearm and hand guard with straight stock and carbine/musket buttplate that has a trap containing an orig brass and bristle brush string pull through cleaning implement. While the 1895 carbine is not especially rare, to find one in pristine unfired condition is a great rarity. Much of the 1895 carbine production was set to England during WWI under a land lease program for the British Home Guard. Most of those arms did not return to the United States. Of the production that stayed home, most were sold to outdoorsmen and sportsmen for hunting purposes. Most of those arms show evidence of use in the field. It is readily apparent that this carbine was not so used. PROVENANCE: The collection of Tim Zissler. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus. Appears to be new and unfired, retaining virtually 99% plus of its orig crisp, bright blue with only a small spot of wear at the front tip of the lever on each side where it slides into the receiver and very slight thinning on the front radius of the cartridge box. Lever & hammer retain virtually all of their orig factory blue. Buttplate retains about 90-92% bright blue with some flaking on the heel and below the trap opening. Wood is sound with no visible flaws and retains virtually all of its orig factory finish. Mechanics are crisp. Brilliant shiny bore. Appears to be new & unfired. 524636 JRL (6,000-10,000) C&R Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

108


1101. *VERY FINE WINCHESTER 1895 LEVER ACTION SPORTING RIFLE. SN 406149. Cal. 405 Win. Nickel steel 24” tapered rnd bbl marked “Especially for smokeless powder”. Pedestal mounted blade front sight with Winchester flat top V notch sporting rear sight. Left side of bbl at breech marked “405 W.C.F.” Top receiver ring is knurled with proof mark offset to the left. Schnable tipped walnut forearm with ebony insert having closed loops sling swivel replacing attachment screw. Straight grip walnut stock with crescent steel buttplate having added closed loop sling swivel. Includes one red and yellow box of Winchester Ammo with 300 grain soft point bullets. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Very fine condition, retaining 90-95% orig blue, with light scratches on lever and bottom of magazine. Stocks have lightly worn finish, showing scattered scratches and light dents. Fine mechanics and nice bright bore. 51980-30 DS (4,500-7,500) C&R

*WINCHESTER 1895 LEVER ACTION SPORTING 1102. RIFLE. SN 65402. Cal. 405 Win. 24” rnd bbl of nickel steel marked “Especially for smokeless powder”. Marbles No. 57 pedestal mounted bead front sight with Winchester V notch elevator adjustable rear sight. Front ring of action has checkered top with proof mark offset to the left. Ebony tipped Schnable forearm and straight grip walnut stock with hard rubber shotgun buttplate. Includes two red and yellow boxes of Winchester 405 ammo, having 300 grain soft point bullets. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Fine orig condition with nice bright bore. Mechanics are fine. Rifle retains over 90% bright orig blue showing small scratches. Hammer has bright case colors remaining. Orig wood finish shows scattered light scratches and marks. 51980-48 DS (3,000-4,500) C&R

109

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1100. *SPECTACULAR WINCHESTER MODEL 1895 SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 401025. Cal.30 ARMY (30-40 KRAG). Standard grade carbine with 22” rnd bbl, pedestal mounted blade front sight & musket ladder rear sight graduated to 3200 yards. Receiver ring has the caliber marking & Winchester “W P” proof. Left side of receiver has a stud & ring. Mounted with uncheckered straight grain American walnut with finger groove forearm and hand guard with straight stock and carbine buttplate with trap that contains an orig brass & braided cord pull-through cleaning implement. Bottom of stock & forearm band have factory-style sling swivels. These carbines were popular with law enforcement, especially in the Southwest with the Texas Rangers and other horse mounted officers. This carbine has been completely restored by the renowned Turnbull Restoration Co. CONDITION: Fine. Overall retains virtually all of its fine factory-style restored finish to both metal & wood with only a few minor handling & storage marks in the wood finish. Articulated part of the lever is a light purple finish and screw heads are of a slight different than orig color. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52665-16 JRL (6,000-8,500) C&R


Session 1

1103. *WINCHESTER 1895 LEVER ACTION SPORTING RIFLE. SN 79651. Cal. 35WCF. 24” tapered rnd bbl. Pedestal mounted blade front sight with Winchester V notch elevator adjustable sporting rear sight. Front ring of action is matted at top and left side of action has added holes for attachment of William’s sidemount holding Ted William 4X scope with standard crosshairs. Ebony tipped Schnable forearm with straight grip walnut stock having hard rubber shotgun buttplate. Stock is fitted with an unmarked leather sling on added swivels. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Rifle is in good condition, with fine mechanics. Bore has solid rifling showing slightly darkened appearance. Bbl retains over 90% lightly faded blue, showing spots of freckling. Action has 70% blue with edge wear and scattered spots of finish loss with tarnish. Wood finish shows areas of wear with scratches, dents and handling marks. Stock has small chip at left side of lower tang. Scope has good optics. 51980-51 DS (750-1,250) C&R

1104. *WINCHESTER MODEL 71 DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 29220. Cal. 348 Win. 24” tapered rnd bbl. Ramp matted bead front sight with filler in rear dovetail. Short tang action is fitted with Lyman No. 56 receiver sight. Half length mag. Checkered walnut forearm. Walnut stock with checkered wrist, hard rubber grip cap and checkered steel buttplate. Toe line of stock and forearm cap are fitted with bases for Super Grade sling swivels. PROVENANCE: Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Orig rifle in very good condition. Bore is bright with strong rifling. Mechanics are fine. Over 80% blue showing. Edge wear from carrying with area of light scratches on right side of receiver. Wood shows light finish and checkering wear with scattered scrapes, scratches and small dents. Left side of stock has a natural grain defect 4-1/2” forward of buttplate. 52170-37 DS (2,000-3,000) C&R

*RARE PRE-WAR WINCHESTER MODEL 71 LONG 1105. TANG DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 4571. Cal. 348 Win. 24” bbl. Ramp mounted bead front sight with hood, filler in rear dovetail with desirable bolt peep rear sight. Half length mag. Heavy walnut forearm with factory checkering. Walnut buttstock has checkered wrist with hard rubber grip cap and checkered steel buttplate. Toe line of stock and forearm cap are equipped with bases for Super Grade sling swivels. Early style action with long top tang. PROVENANCE: Prestigious and lifetime Parker and Winchester collection of Dr. Tom Bouwkamp. CONDITION: Very good condition with fine mechanics. 80% lightly faded blue with carry wear along lower areas of action resulting in salt and pepper appearance. Bore is bright with strong rifling. Stocks have lightly worn finish and checkering showing scattered scratches and marks with a dent along toe line. Right side by comb flute and left side at wrist in center butt areas have small natural grain defects. 52170-36 (3,500-5,500) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

110


1107. WHITNEY-KENNEDY LARGE FRAME LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 449. Cal. 45-60. 28” oct bbl. Top flat is marked “WHITNEYVILLE ARMORY, Ct. U.S.A. KENNEDY”. Rocky Mountain style blade front sight with elevator adjustable V notch sporting rear sight. Full length magazine. Action features serpentine lever. Top tang is marked with 1878 and 1879 patent dates. Walnut forearm with straight grip stock with trapdoor crescent steel buttplate. CONDITION: Good condition. Hammer follows bolt forward and needs attention. Bore shows lightly worn rifling with scattered pitting. Receiver has fading blue on sides blending with light brown patina over rest of rifle. Mag tube shows hammered out dents and remaining small dents in an area beginning 3-1/2” from muzzle and extending nearly to forearm cap. Wood has aged darkened and worn finish, showing scratches, dents and handling marks. Toe of stock is chipped with wood screw making a solid repair. 51935-8 DS (4,000-5,000)

111

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1106. RARE WHITNEY KENNEDY LARGE FRAME LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 293P. Cal. 45-60. Standard grade rifle with 28” oct bbl, full magazine, German silver Rocky Mountain front sight & sporting leaf rear sight graduated to 800 yards. Top flat of the bbl, forward of the rear sight is marked “WHITNEYVILLE ARMORY CT. U.S.A. KENNEDY”. Chamber area of the top flat has the caliber marking. Receiver is flat sided with serpentine shaped lever. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock & crescent buttplate with trap, containing an orig Winchester style 4-pc brass & iron cleaning rod. Bottom of stock and forend cap have period sling eyes that may not be orig to this rifle as the buttstock threaded shank of that sling eye extends into the buttstock trap recess. Left side of top tang, under the wood is marked with matching serial number which is also found on front end of stock tennon under the receiver and inside toe of buttplate. According to Flayderman’s Guide to Antique Firearms there were only about 15,000 of these rifles produced 1879-1886 in 2 frame sizes, both rifles & carbines and 7 different calibers with 2 different bbl lengths in the large frame version. These rifles are rarely ever found today in any condition, but especially with high orig finish. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain about 95% strong orig blue with some fine surface etching on the bbl. Receiver retains about 90% orig blue with a variety of fine scratches, showing sharp edge wear. Loading gate retains about 95% orig fire blue. Hammer retains moderately faded case colors and the lever about 88-90% orig blue. Buttplate shows about 70% orig blue with the losses flaked to a light patina, showing wear only at the heel & toe. Forend cap is a plum blue patina. Wood is sound with a few light nicks & scratches.Possibly a small amount of extra finish has been added but without any sanding. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore with a couple small spots of orange peel pitting. Cleaning rod is fine. 52609-4 JRL (6,500-11,000)


Session 1 1108.

EXCEPTIONAL SPECIAL ORDER DELUXE LARGE FRAME BULLARD LEVER ACTION RIFLE IN A SCARCE CALIBER. SN 615. Cal. 40-90 Bullard. Wonderful deluxe large frame Bullard with 28” oct bbl, first year production, full magazine half nickle front sight with screw and a 1000 yd Winchester-style rifle ladder rear sight. Left top edge of receiver is marked “BULLARD REPEATING ARMS COMPANY / SPRINGFIELD, MASS US” Cal marking is over the front receiver ring and SN is on the top tang behind the hammer slot. Mounted with very highly figured American walnut with deluxe checker forearm and serpentine grip buttstock that has Bullard embossed hard rubber buttplate with a bull elk in the center. Receiver, lever and hammer are color case hardened. According to the Blue Book of Gun Values, Fjestad there were about 1700 large frame rifles produced 1882-1891 very few had color case hardened receivers, extremely few were produced with deluxe features and of those an extremely small number were in caliber 40-90 Bullard. The Bullard rifle design was the smoothest and strongest of all the lever action rifles produced, having a rack & pinion action which, unfortunately required a much longer receiver making for a very long rifle overall. In addition to the extra length, the Bullard rifles were produced in proprietary calibers which ammunition was not readily available to the average buyer which limited sales and ultimately led to the demise of the company. The company was bought out by Winchester and the design shelved, never to be seen again. Few of these fine rifles remain today, especially with orig finish. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain about 98-99% strong orig blue with only faint sharp edge wear. Receiver retains about all of its strong orig case colors, brilliant in sheltered areas, lightly to moderately faded elsewhere. Lever retains most all bright case colors on the sides, slightly faded on outer faces. Hammer retains strong case colors, bright on left side moderately faded elsewhere. Dust cover, carrier and breechblock retain 75-80% glossy orig blue mixed with flaking which is a light patina. Wood is sound with a few light nicks and scratches, a bruise in one diamond on the forearm otherwise retains about 95-96% strong orig varnish. Toe of the butt stock has a nearly undetectable professionally repaired chip. Mechanics are crisp. Brilliant shiny bore. This is the finest Deluxe Bullard rifle to appear on the market in recent times and would be difficult to improve upon. 52176-1 (25,000-35,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

112


Session 1 1109.

RARE DELUXE ENGRAVED MARLIN MODEL 1889 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 64523. Cal. 38 WCF (38-40). Beautiful deluxe Marlin with 24� oct bbl, 3/4 magazine, nickel silver Rocky Mountain front sight & long semi-buckhorn rear sight. Mounted with very highly figured, center crotch, flame & shell grain B-style checkered American walnut with serpentine grip buttstock & crescent buttplate. Receiver is color case hardened and engraved by Conrad Ulrich on modified number one-style which consists of the vignette of a standing white-tail buck in a very detailed meadow scene surrounded by fine foliate arabesque patterns with shaded background. Left side is completely bordered by wavelet or latch hook patterns. Right side is engraved to match with matching foliate arabesque patterns and borders with light foliate arabesque patterns on side of the bolt. Light patterns of matching engraving also extend over the top of the receiver, top tang & bottom of the receiver. Accompanied by a Cody Firearms Museum letter which identifies this rifle in Cal. 38 with 28� half-octagon bbl, half-magazine & pistol grip stock shipped Jan 25, 1892. Rifle was apparently returned to the factory for the new bbl & magazine tube. There were only about 39,000 Model 1889 Marlins produced, 1889-1899 in 3 Calibers, both deluxe and standard grade. Few survive today in any configuration or condition. Pictured on page 172 in Marlin Firearms, Brophy. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Russell Grinnell. CONDITION: Very fine plus. Bbl & magazine tube retain about 98% crisp orig blue with only very faint sharp edge wear. Receiver retains about 75% faded case colors, turned silver on the bottom. Hammer retains bright case colors. Lever & buttplate retain faded case colors, turned silver on outer faces of lever. Wood has a couple of grain checks in the left side of the buttstock, otherwise it is sound with most of a fine restored finish. Crisp mechanics, brilliant shiny bore. 52204-4 JRL (10,000-15,000)

113

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1110.

RARE SPECIAL ORDER MARLIN MODEL 1893 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 313905. Cal. 38-55. Standard grade rifle with very rare 32” tapered rnd bbl with 30” magazine. Bbl has Lyman ivory bead express front sight, a slot blank in the rear seat and a thick base sporting tang sight with 3” staff. Mounted with uncheckered, straight grain American walnut with straight stock and Marlin semi-crescent smooth steel buttplate. Left side of upper tang is marked with matching SN which number is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. Buttplate is unnumbered but appears to be orig to this wood. The 32” bbl, as found here, was the longest that Marlin offered and the 30” magazine tube was the longest their machinery was capable of producing, therefore the disparity in length as compared to the bbl. Bbl has early style 2-line address & patent dates with the words “FIRE-ARMS” hyphenated as opposed to the later version of a single word. Left side of the bbl, above the forearm is marked “SPECIAL SMOKELESS STEEL” and top of receiver is marked “MARLIN SAFETY”, top tang is marked “MODEL / 1893”. The trigger plate is without the later added hole which is found on later models to inspect the fit of the carrier. Long barreled rifles, such as found here, were often ordered by shooters from the black powder era which required longer bbls to burn all of the powder before the bullet exited the muzzle. The “modern” smokeless powder was more rapid burning and did not require the extra bbl length to obtain maximum velocity. PROVENANCE: Ex- Dr. Frank Miller collection. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl & magazine tube retain 98-99% strong orig factory blue with only a couple small marks on the magazine tube and faint muzzle edge wear. Forend cap retains about 98% orig blue with faint sharp edge wear and 1 small screwdriver mark. Receiver retains about 95% strong orig case colors, lightly to moderately faded, turning silver on the bottom. Hammer retains bright case colors, turned silver on top edge. Lever retains strong case colors on sides, turned silver on outer faces. Wood is sound with some slight oil staining at the receiver and some cloth pattern in the finish and overall retains most of an old restored finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52396-2 (7,00010,000) ESA

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

114


Session 1 1111.

*SCARCE DELUXE MARLIN MODEL 1893 SPECIAL ORDER LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 184944. Cal. 3030. Fine deluxe Marlin with 26” oct bbl, full magazine Lyman gold bead front sight and 2-leaf Lyman 6A rear sight. Top flat of bbl has standard 2-line address & patent dates and top left flat is marked “Special Smokeless Steel”. Top flat of receiver is marked “MARLIN SAFETY” and top tang is marked “MODEL / 1893” mounted with very highly figured, center crotch, flame grain American walnut with F-style checkered forearm and serpentine grip buttstock that has an “M.F.A.Co.” embossed hard rubber buttplate. Toe of buttplate and correspondingly in the wood has a small chip. Left side of top tang, under the wood is marked with matching SN which is also found in top tang channel of buttstock. Receiver is color case hardened and beautifully engraved by Conrad Ulrich in no. 5 pattern which consist of a large oval vignette of a whitetail buck and doe in a detailed forest scene surrounded by foliate arabesque patterns that have fine pearled background. Both sides of receiver are outlined in latch hook and scallop border patterns. Right side and flat side of bolt are engraved in matching foliate arabesque patterns with a foliate spray back of loading gate recess. Each side of the lever boss is engraved to match. Bottom of receiver is engraved with a small matching arabesque pattern. Matching border patterns and engraving extend over top of receiver, top tang, each side of forend cap and about 2” of the exposed five flats of the bbl over the chamber area. While the model 1893 was produced in fairly large numbers, extremely few were ordered deluxe and of those exceedingly few were engraved. Color case hardened receivers rarely survive with any colors due to the fact that exposure to sunlight and ultraviolet rays rapidly fades the colors to gray. Consequently finding one with high orig finish is a great rarity. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl and magazine tube retain about 98% strong orig blue with only faint sharp edge wear and a couple of small scratches. Receiver and bolt retain most of their orig case colors, strong in sheltered areas moderately faded elsewhere and turned silver on the bottom. Hammer retains about 85% bright case colors and lever, strong case colors on sides, turned silver on outer faces. Wood, with the aforementioned chipped toe is otherwise sound with a few minor nicks and scratches a small chip on the grip cap and overall retains virtually all of its orig factory varnish. Mechanics are crisp. Bright shiny bore. 52215-1 JRL (10,00014,000) C&R

115

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1112.

SCARCE MARLIN MODEL 1893 DELUXE SPECIAL ORDER LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 98918. Cal. 38-55. Beautiful deluxe Marlin with oct bbl, full magazine ivory bead combination front sight and semi-buckhorn rear sight. Top tang is mounted with a Marbles spring-loaded sight with large disc aperture. Mounted with very highly figured, streaky, flame grain American walnut with G-checkered forearm and serpentine grip buttstock that has crescent buttplate. Left side of top tang, under the wood is marked with matching SN which is also found in top tang channel of buttstock and inside toe of buttplate. Receiver is color case hardened and beautifully engraved by Conrad Ulrich in no. 5 pattern which consist of the large oval vignette of a whitetail buck and doe in a detailed forest scene surrounded by foliate arabesque patterns that have fine pearled background. Both sides of receiver are outlined in latch hook and scallop border patterns. Right side and flat side of bolt are engraved in matching foliate arabesque patterns with a foliate spray back of loading gate opening. Each side of the lever boss is engraved to match. Bottom of receiver is engraved with a foliate spray around the floor plate screw with matching arabesque patterns. Matching border patterns and engraving extend over top of receiver, top tang, each side of forend cap and about 3-1/4� of the exposed five flats of the bbl over the chamber area. While the model 1893 was produced in fairly large numbers, extremely few were ordered deluxe and of those exceedingly few were engraved. Color case hardened receivers rarely survive with any colors due to the fact that exposure to sunlight and ultraviolet rays rapidly fades the colors to gray. Consequently finding one with high orig finish is a great rarity. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Russell Grinnell. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl retains 96-97% strong orig blue with some scattered spots of fine surface etching. Magazine tube retains about 98% strong orig blue, also with very few small spots of surface etching. Receiver & bolt retain about all of their orig case colors, bright in sheltered areas, lightly to moderately faded elsewhere. Top and bottom tangs retain brilliant case colors as does the hammer. Lever retains strong case colors on the sides, moderately faded and turning dark in out faces with some fine surface rust. Buttplate retains about all of its orig case colors, moderately faded. Wood is sound with a few light nicks and scratches and retains most of a lightly applied extra finish over what appears to be orig finish without sanding or cleaning. Mechanics are crisp. Very bright shiny bore with slight roughness in the grooves. 52204-3 JRL (12,500-17,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

116


Session 1 1113.

*INCREDIBLE DELUXE ENGRAVED MARLIN MODEL ‘97 LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 371253. Cal. 22. Spectacular small bore Marlin with 24” tapered oct bbl, full magazine, “certifiable antique ivory” bead front sight & semibuckhorn rear sight. Mounted with very highly figured, flame and burl grain, F-style checkered American walnut with serpentine grip & M.F.A. Co. embossed hard rubber buttplate. Left side of top tang, under the wood, is marked with last 3 digits of matching SN. Buttstock is matching numbered to this rifle. Receiver is beautifully engraved in #5 pattern by Conrad Ulrich. Engraving consists of the iconic large oval vignette of a royal bull elk in a forest & mountain scene with very fine stippled background on the left side. Right side has the equally iconic vignette depicting a grizzly bear standing over a steer that he has apparently just killed. This vignette is also laid in a detailed forest scene with fine stippled background. Both vignettes are fully surrounded by extremely well executed foliate arabesque patterns that have pearled background. Engraving extends over top and bottom of receiver, top tang & forend cap with about 1” of matching patterns over the 5 exposed flats of the bbl in front of the receiver. Additional deluxe engraving patterns are on both sides of the lever & hammer, a most unusual bonus. The additional deluxe features of this rifle are extremely unusually and rarely ever encountered. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Russell Grinnell. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain about 99% strong orig blue with only faint muzzle edge wear. Receiver retains strong case colors on both sides, fading to silver on top and bottom edges and top tang. Hammer retains most of its orig case colors, moderately faded. Lever retains faded case colors in sheltered areas, mostly having turned silver. Forend cap is a silver patina. Wood is sound with only 1 or 2 minuscule nicks and overall retains about all of the finest factory finish. Mechanics are crisp. Strong bore with good shine and light to moderate pitting. 52204-5 JR (17,500-27,500) C&R; ESA

117

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1114. *RARE MARLIN MODEL 39 ENGRAVED DELUXE LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 5291. Cal. 22. First year production Model 39 with 24” tapered oct bbl, Model 1897 style, full magazine, Sheard front sight & flat top rear sight. Mounted with very nicely figured European walnut, checkered in B-style with serpentine grip & crescent butt. Receiver is engraved, probably by Alden George Ulrich in #1 pattern which consists of the large rnd vignette of a squirrel on a limb surrounded by foliate arabesque patterns. Right side has light foliate arabesque patterns with leaf and vine patterns on the bolt. Top and bottom of receiver and top tang are lightly engraved to match. The early Model 39 rifles were simply a continuation of the model 1897 and were produced only 1922-1936 when the model became the “39A”. Very few of this model rifle was ordered deluxe or engraved. Not too long after the inception of this model the Great Depression struck making this model very expensive and the extra cost for deluxe features or engraving would have been prohibitive for most customers. CONDITION: Very good, all matching. Bbl, magazine tube and forend cap, along with the hammer retain about all of a restored finish. Receiver, lever & buttplate have faded to silver. Wood is sound and retains about all of a restored finish. Mechanics are fine. Bright shiny bore. Only a handful of engraved Model 39s are known to exist. 52634-8 JRL (5,000-7,000) C&R

1115. *DESIRABLE PREMIERE GRADE SAVAGE 1899 LEVER ACTION RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 79704. Cal. re-chambered to 300 Savage. 26” rnd bbl. Orig cal markings was “SAV 303” with overstamping changing it to current cal of 300 Savage. Rocky Mountain style German silver blade front sight with elevator adjustable V notch sporting rear sight. Action has beautiful full coverage. Grade F engraving by Enoch Tue. Enoch Tue was Savage’s in house English trained engraver. Sides of receiver have game scenes featuring white-tailed deer on right and elk on left with open area on bottom to allow personalized inscriptions. Balance of sides, bottom and top of action are covered with arabesque scroll engraving with fancy borders around top tang. Action features a hand jeweled bolt with cocking indicator, brass rotary magazine, bent tab safety and case colored curved lever. Schnable tipped forearm and S curved pistol grip stock of exhibition quality Circassian walnut, with stunning marbling and dark streaking. Forearm and wrist of stock have Grade C segmented fleur-de-lis hand checkering. Stock flats are also checkered with incised carved highlights on upper and lower borders. LOP is 13” to crescent steel buttplate. Included is a Savage Arms Corporation letter signed by Arms Historian, John T. Callahan and dated September 10, 2015. The letter confirms orig caliber and configuration and lists orig consignee as Savage Arms Office on May 1, 1909. Rifle was sold to Von Lengerke & Antoine of Chicago on October 4, 1910. CONDITION: Fine orig condition, retaining over 90% orig blue. Lever has lightly visible case colors. Forearm has lightly worn finish and checkering showing a few small marks. Stock has glossy appearance from added coat of finish over a few scratches and handling marks. Mechanics are fine. Bore has strong rifling. 52184-1 DS (16,000-24,000) C&R Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

118


Session 1 1116.

*SUPERB SAVAGE 1899 CD DELUXE ENGRAVED LEVER ACTION RIFLE. SN 84525. Cal. 303 SAV. 26� oct bbl. Lyman ivory bead front sight with Lyman folding tang rear sight. Action features brass rotary mag with circular view port, cocking indicator in bolt, bent tab safety and case colored curved lever. Action is decorated with Grade A factory engraving consisting of arabesque scroll surrounded by floral leaf designs on receiver sides. Upper left portion of receiver and top of front ring have additional scroll and floral highlights. Schnable forearm and S curved pistol grip stock of fancy thin shell walnut have vivid black streaking. Forearm and wrist of stock have point pattern hand checkering with flat stock panels also being checkered. LOP is 13� to crescent steel buttplate. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Russell Grinnell. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine orig condition, retaining 95% bright orig blue. Lever has brilliant case colors on sides. Good orig stock finish shows scattered small scratches and marks with some age darkening at rear of forend. Fine mechanics. Bright bore with strong rifling. 52204-2 DS (9,000-14,000) C&R; ESA

119

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1117.

*BEAUTIFUL CRESCENT GRADE FACTORY ENGRAVED SAVAGE MODEL 1899 TAKEDOWN LEVER ACTION RIFLE THAT BELONGED TO DR. O’CONNOR OF WISCONSIN. SN 109096. Cal. 303 Savage. Fine deluxe rifle with 26” tapered rnd bbl, replacement D. W. King Denver, CO 1908 patent ivory, copper and black composite triple bead front sight, Savage flat top sporting rear sight and Lyman folding tang sight. Mounted with very fancy, B-carved and checkered American walnut with schnable tip forearm and serpentine grip buttstock with Savage embossed hard rubber butt plate. Receiver is “C” engraved by master engraver Enoch Tue, with the round vignette of a running elk stag leaping a fence on the left side and a drinking elk stag on the right side. Both sides of the receiver have full coverage, foliate arabesque patterns with very fine pearled background. Engraving extends on top left side of receiver and receiver ring with light floral patterns on the bottom. This rifle was the property of Dr. Walter F. O’Connor (1874-1946) of Ladysmith, WI. He purchased it from Von Lengerke & Antoine of Chicago. Dr. O’Connor was the classical small town doctor & surgeon in Northwest Wisconsin at the turn of the century who apparently loved to hunt. Some of his exploits are recorded in the publication The Bucks Camp Log 1916-1928 and also On The Hunt, Willging. When Dr. O’Connor passed away in 1946, this rifle passed to his son, Walter F. O’Connor (1914-2006) who, in turn gave it to his son James C. O’Connor. While Savage Model 99 rifles are fairly common, those with engraving and especially those with carved highly figured wood are very rare. PROVENANCE: O’Connor Family as previously outlined; various books and photographs showing previous owners with this exact gun; Estate collection of Russell Grinnell. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching. Bbl retains about 96-97% glossy orig blue with light muzzle end wear and a spot of rust about mid-point. Receiver retains about 95-96% glossy orig blue with sharp edge wear and thinning on the belly. Lever retains strong case colors on the sides with some fine freckles of rust, turning silver on the outer faces. Stock has a hairline back of the top tang and several short grain checks in the buttstock and overall retains about 95% orig varnish, heat crazed on the buttstock. Mechanics are fine, forearm shows some looseness and forward movement indicating weakened latch spring. Bore shows lightly worn rifling, having dark frosted appearance. 52204-1 (7,000-11,500) C&R; ESA

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

120


Session 1 1118.

*SCARCE WINCHESTER MODEL 85 TAKE DOWN SINGLE SHOT SCHUETZEN RIFLE. SN 113288. Cal. 32-40. Fine deluxe Schuetzen with 30” No. 3 weight oct bbl, Wingage, spirit level globe front sight and slot blank in the rear seat. The 2-line Winchester address & caliber markings are on the left top flat to accommodate the Winchester target scope bases which contain a Winchester A-5 scope. Top flat of the bbl, just forward of the rear scope base has the Winchester “W P” proof, which is also found on top of receiver ring. Location of the bbl proof indicates that it has factory installed scope bases. Receiver is take down style with Schuetzen double-set triggers and a Schuetzen serpentine lever. Top tang has a thin base vernier sight with 3” staff. Mounted with very highly figured burl & flame grain, center crotch American walnut with checkered black insert, Schnable tip forearm & capped pistol grip stock that has high comb & right side cheek piece with Helm-Schuetzen buttplate. Forearm is inlet & mounted with a factory mushroom shaped palm rest. Left side of lower tang is marked with the assembly no. “1022”, “28” & an “X”. Left side of top tang is marked “302”, “SX” & “CP”. Buttstock is unmarked but may have had the assembly no. removed during a repair. Inside toe of buttplate is marked “766”. Buttstock has had a repaired crack in the wrist with wooden filler plugs showing. CONDITION: Very fine. Numbered as noted above. Bbl retains about 95% strong orig blue with only faint sharp edge wear. Receiver retains about 93-95% orig blue with thinning around the bottom front & top rear and a couple of small scratches. Bbl extension retains about 90% strong orig blue, thin on the bottom left. Lever retains about 70% orig blue and the buttplate 40-50% orig blue with the balance flaked, not worn to a medium patina. Stock has the aforementioned repair in the wrist with light handling & storage nicks & scratches and retains most of the restored finish probably applied at the time of the repair. Forearm is sound with a few small nicks & scratches and retains most of its orig factory varnish. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore. Optics are clear with intact crosshairs. 52416-1 JRL (7,000-9,000) C&R

121

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1119.

RARE AND UNUSUAL PRESENTATION QUALITY SLOTTERBEK CUSTOM SHARPS RIFLE. SN C45392. Cal. 38 CF (appears to be 38-40 Maynard). Fine custom Sharps with 29-3/4” oct bbl that has iron rib and 2 iron guides, attached to the bottom flat containing a replacement hickory ramrod, with fixed sights, front blade missing from the base. Chamber end of the bbl has a machined, tapered round section with beaded edges. Top flat of the bbl, between rear sight and receiver is marked “H.SLOTTERBEK LOS ANGELES” in a broken arch shape. Receiver is apparently from a model 1863 saddle ring carbine that has had the sling bar removed and the threaded hole in the receiver neatly plugged. Mounted with its original type buttstock that has the sling bar base still in the wrist and a brass crescent buttplate. Forearm is Sharps style, of uncheckered walnut with dimpled pewter nose cap secured by a single Joseph Wolfskill wedge through nickel silver oval escutcheons. Trigger plate has Sharps-style double-set triggers. Left side of buttstock is inlaid with a German silver plaque in arabesque shape which is engraved “J.W. Wolfskill from his Father”. Receiver and lock plate have standard Sharps markings. This is one of the most unusual Slotterbek rifles in that it is small bore, has a cleaning rod rail & guides and is light weight compared to his usual big bore, heavy plains-type rifles for buffalo and big game hunting.

Joseph W. Wolfskill was born 1844 in Los Angeles, the son of one of the founding fathers of the Los Angeles area and southern California, William Wolfskill. William had gone west from Boonesboro, Kentucky, a neighbor of Daniel Boone, and in about 1830 and joined a team of mountain men including the famous Mountain Men Jedediah Smith, Kit Carson, and George Yount, traveling from Taos, New Mexico Territory (Kit Carson’s home) to southern California across the Sierra Mountains, arriving in early 1831. Mr. Wolfskill was a very shrewd businessman and entrepreneur who acquired several tracks of land from the Mexican govt and various other private acquisitions where he planted vineyards and citrus and also raised sheep & other livestock. At his death in 1866 William was producing 50,000 gal of wine a year, was the greatest producer of table grapes and is credited with starting the commercial citrus industry by selling a shipload of lemons to gold miners for $1 each and followed the next year with oranges. William financed the first public school in Los Angeles and was a great supporter of education. Some of his ranch holdings encompass today’s Irvine & Santa Ana CA, as well as large tracts of Los Angeles. Joseph, the recipient of this rifle, was associated with his father in the business and upon his father’s death took it over. He introduced scientific methods into the culture of oranges and became the largest commercial producer in that area and remained so until an insect infestation from Australia decimated their citrus groves. Charles and Henry Slotterbek were sons of a long line of gunsmiths in Germany. At about age 10 or 11 the family emigrated to the U.S. and settled in Philadelphia. At about age 20 Henry began working for the famous gun makers Henry Deringer. In 1859 he left Deringer’s employment and worked for a succession of companies eventually forming his own company. In 1869 Henry moved to Los Angeles where he worked for gunsmith Henry Schaffer and in 1872 purchased that business making sporting and target rifles. He was killed in a freak shooting accident on a rifle range in June 1888. It seems likely that the Wolfskill family would have been acquainted with Henry Slotterbek given that they resided in the same small community and were both famous people in their day. Accompanied by three hardback books: 1). William Wolfskill 1798-1866, Wilson; 2). The Westerners Brand Book 16, Wood; and 3).The Irvine Ranch, Clealand. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl, cleaning rod rail and guides retain 96-98% strong orig brown finish with only sharp edge wear. Receiver, lock plate, hammer and breech block retain case colors in sheltered areas with the balance a smooth gray patina. Wood is sound showing an old restored finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52176-2 JRL (15,000-25,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

122


Session 1 1120.

RARE SHARPS MODEL 1874 LONG RANGE NO.2 SINGLE SHOT TARGET RIFLE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 156363. Cal. 45-100-2.4” Sharps. Beautiful Sharps target rifle with 34” oct to rnd bbl, Spirit level windgage globe front sight. Axtell vernier tang sight with 4-3/4”; staff, numbered to this rifle. Top flat of bbl has the “OLD RELIABLE” cartouche and “BRIDGEPORT” address. The bbl is numbered on the bottom “158176” while all other parts are numbered to the rifle except the lockplate & forearm on which no number could be found. Mounted with nicely figured, checkered American walnut with semi-schnable tipped forearm and pistol grip stock with checkered grip cap and Sharps checkered steel buttplate. Accompanied by a Sharps Armory letter fully identifying this rifle which states that it was invoiced at the Bridgeport Factory on May 3, 1876 to Dr. C.M. Carlton of 27 Broad Street, Norwich, CT and that it was equipped with a spirit level front sight. It was initially chambered for the 44-90-2.5/8” cartridge. Dr. Carlton returned the rifle to the factory on Oct. 24, 1877 where it was fitted with a new bbl in the new chambering of 45-100-2.4” and was returned to him on Nov. 8, 1877. According to the letter, the entry for the return does not show the serial number of the new barrel “but the serial number of the barrel now on the receiver, #158176, is a blank in the index of serial numbers, that, according to Dr. Labowskie, owner of the Sharps records, this indicates that a previously numbered barrel was taken from stock and fitted to the receiver of Carlton’s rifle.” The letter further states that this rifle with its mixed serial numbers “constitutes a factory-original Model 1874 Long Range Rifle No. 2”. Also accompanying the Sharps records letters are 4 letters from Dr. Carlton to the Sharps Rifle Co dated between Oct. 17 & Nov. 10, 1877. These letters deal with Dr. Carlson’s ordering the changing of the bbl on this rifle. Dr. Labowskie in the final paragraph of one of the letters states that Dr. Carlton was the President of the Norwich, CT rifle club and in the other letter stated that he did not achieve national reputation as a marksman. Accompanied by a fine case by Americase that is 58” length X 11 width X 5 1/4 in depth. Case has 4 latches with padlock hasp and 3 carry handles with wheels on end. Case is foam lined with a rubber weather seal. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except bbl, forearm & lock plate as noted above. Professionally refinished with rear slot blank filled. Bbl retains 97-98% strong factory style blue. Receiver, lever & lockplate retain most of their orig factory case colors, moderately faded, bright & strong in sheltered areas. Wood is sound with light handling & use marks and light cloth patterns in the varnish and retains most of its fine orig hand rubbed oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52396-1 JRL (12,000-15,000) 123

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1121.

AS FOUND, PEABODY MARTINI CREEDMOOR SINGLE SHOT TARGET RIFLE WITH ORIGINAL SIGHTS. SN 288. Cal. 44-100. 32” Half octagon, half round bbl is engraved “Manufactured by The Providence Tool Co. Providence R. I. U.S.A.” and with caliber on top flat. Case hardened action is engraved “Peabody & Martini Patents” on right side, and “Creedmoor” in Old English on left within line and small scroll borders. American walnut pistol grip buttstock measures 14-1/4” over steel buttplate with long top spur fitted with back position sight base. Matching forend has schnabeled steel tip. Rifle is equipped with its orig sights with bases SNed to gun, and front sight marked “Providence Tool Co” under vernier. Interchangeable rear long range vernier sight is 5-1/2” long and front sight with windage adjustment has interchangeable blades. CONDITION: Very good. Bbl retains most of its orig blue and action with approx 40% orig case color, both with considerable staining and light cleaning after poor storage. Stocks retain most of their orig finish with raised open grain. Checkering lightly worn. Bore is excellent. Mechanically fine. 52440-1 MGM191 (5,500-7,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

124


Session 1 1122.

COLT PATERSON #1 BABY PERCUSSION REVOLVER Reverse WITH 4” BARREL AND EXTRA MATCHING CYLINDER. SN 458. Cal. 28. Blue finish with 4” oct bbl, German silver front sight and usual 1-line left hand script letter address which reads “Patent Arms Mg Co. Paterson N.J. – Colt’s Pt.” with dashes at each end. Cylinder has 5 chambers with Centaur scene roll marking. Frame is usual configuration and is mounted with varnished 1-pc, square butt, walnut grip. Accompanied by an orig 3-handled Baby Paterson mold and additional matching cylinder. Matching SNs were observed on rear face of bbl lug, both cyls, side of trigger, cyl rotating sleeve and hammer. Gun was not further disassembled, but appears all orig. These diminutive revolvers are rarely ever encountered, and this is a nice representative orig example with good aesthetics. PROVENANCE: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Metal is grey overall with mottled patina, discernible markings. Mechanically, fairly functional, though trigger does not fully fold out when cocked. Gun appears orig and complete with about 1-1/2” x 1” inset repair on left stock. Extra cylinder with matching SN has full cylinder scene and is overall plum/grey. Mold has matching mottled patina to gun with hand worn patina to handles. 51957-1 JS (25,000-35,000)

125

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


1123.

Session 1

VERY RARE COLT PATERSON NO. 5 TEXAS HOLSTER MODEL PERCUSSION REVOLVER WITH ATTACHED RAMMER. SN 818. Cal. 36 (actually measures .41). Blue finish with 7-1/2” oct bbl, tiny German silver front sight with rear sight in the hammer nose. Top flat of bbl is marked “Patent Arms M’g. Co. Paterson, N.J.Colt’s Pt.”. There is a star & snake pattern at each end of the address. Bbl lug is fitted with a 3-pc Ehlers rammer with assembly no. “125” on all 3 pieces and on bottom flat of bbl by the spring catch. Cylinder is 5-shots with rnd stop notches, rnd shoulders and the stagecoach hold-up scene roll marking. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that is matching numbered to this pistol. Grip has repairs to the front edge & toes. SN was observed on the wedge, rear face of bbl lug, rear face of cylinder, cylinder pin ring, rotating ring, hammer, right side of front strap under the grip, inside backstrap and in the buttstrap channel of the grip. A tiny matching number is also found on outside of buttstrap. Bore has 11 lands & grooves with right hand twist. According to various publications there were about 1,000 of this model Paterson pistol produced 1838-1840. In 1841 the Patent Arms Co. had become insolvent and creditors, including John Ehlers forced a bankruptcy sale wherein Mr. Ehlers purchased the remaining stock of Paterson revolvers with rights to assemble and sell finished pistols. He apparently assembled a few hundred Paterson, of all models, with his patented rammer including a few No. 5’s. It is also reported that a few finished revolvers that had been sold by Colt were returned for the addition of the Ehlers lever. This exact revolver is pictured as part of a cased set on page 147 of The Paterson Colt Book, Wilson & Lavett with credit to the Paul Sorrell collection. The Paterson revolver series of pistols was Colt’s first successful revolvers in the beginning of a dynasty. 150 of the No. 5 model pistols were sold to the US Navy and 180 were sold to the Republic of Texas for their Navy. Many of the Texas Navy Paterson’s were subsequently issued to the renowned Texas Rangers where they gained fame and made Colt’s fortune. Of the 1,000 No. 5 pistols produced, subtracting the US Navy & Texas Navy orders, totaling 330 pistols leaves only 670 pistols that ever made it onto the civilian market. Of those few, extraordinarily few were fitted with Ehler’s levers. The vast majority of No. 5 Texas Paterson revolvers encountered today are completely without finish and usually in relic appearance. Finding one

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

126


Reverse

127

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

today with orig finish and strong cylinder scene is a great rarity. PROVENANCE: The Paul Sorrell collection. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching as noted above. Bbl retains about 50% orig blue with scattered spots of fine surface rust and the loss areas a medium to dark patina. Frame retains a mostly plummy blue/ brown patina with a few small spots of fine pitting and a series of small dings around the hammer screw, which is a replacement. Recoil shields are a mottled dark patina with light dings and scattered fine pitting. Cylinder is a blue/brown patina with traces of orig blue through the stagecoach hold-up scene roll marking and shows about 50% roll marking. Backstrap & buttstrap retain about 60-65% strong orig blue. Grip, with its aforementioned repaired front edges & toes has a couple of small dings on the left side and retains most of its restored finish. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore with moderate pitting. 52511-1 JRL (75,000125,000)


Session 1 1124.

VERY RARE COLT WALKER PERCUSSION REVOLVER AUTHENTICATED IN THE PARADE OF WALKERS. SN B COMPANY NO 25. Cal. 44. One of the most rare and desirable of all Colt firearms is the Walker pistol. These massive 4 lb. revolvers were manufactured in 1847 in a quantity of only 1,000 to arm mounted troops for the war in Mexico. Subsequent to the military contract of 1,000 revolvers, Colt assembled an additional 100-104 civilian model Walker revolvers. The Martial Walker revolvers were marked Company specific from Company A to Company E with various numbers assigned to each company. Company B had approximately 175 revolvers so marked. Company B is also the unit commanded by Capt. Samuel H. Walker, the inspiration to Samuel Colt to produce these revolvers. Capt. Walker was killed at Chapultepec, Mexico in 1847 during the war. The first shipment of Walker revolvers to Mexico was only about 220 units with a 2nd shipment of 280 revolvers arriving about a week later on Oct. 26, 1847. Out of the first shipment, 6 revolvers were reported stolen. Upon arrival in Mexico these 496 revolvers were issued to various Companies including Company A, B & C which included 394 pistols issued to the Texas regiments under Col. John Hays. The 2nd shipment of 500 was delayed and did not arrive in Mexico until the war was nearly over and were not issued at that time. When the war was over the Walker pistols that had been issued were recalled and turned in at the Vera Cruz Depot on May, 8 1848. Of the 394 pistols issued to the Texans, only about 316 were turned in, with many of those missing lost in battle and others simply stolen or retained by Officers of the various Companies. The 3rd shipment of 500 pistols had been held in a New York depot until Colt provided flasks & molds and in March 1848 were shipped to the Vera Cruz, Mexico depot and in Nov. 1848 all were shipped from Mexico to the Baton Rouge Arsenal and along with the other turned in pistols were subsequently shipped to San Antonio. Many of those Walker pistols at San Antonio were issued to various units operating in Texas and were issued to the 4 companies of the Dragoons and 3 companies of Infantry assigned there to fight Indians, bandits, and outlaws in the region. In April 1850 these units were ordered to turn in their Walker pistols in exchange for Dragoon revolvers. Many of the Walker revolvers were then issued to Texas Rangers and some friendly Indians. In Feb. 1861 the San Antonio Arsenal was seized by the State of Texas, including all remaining arms & accoutrements and turned over to the Confederacy. It seems likely that all those seized arms would have been issued to Confederate troops for use during the Civil War. Very few Walker pistols survive today in any condition with any orig finish. Such a revolver today is a great rarity and seldom ever seen today. This revolver appears to be generally orig and most respects with 8-15/16” oct to rnd bbl with altered German silver front sight and left hand address on top flat. Right side of bbl lug is marked “US / 1847” just over the wedge screw. Wedge is an unmarked replacement. Cylinder is 2-7/16” long, 6-shots with oval stop notches and the hole on one land between nipple recesses for a single safety pin. The SN is found on left side of bbl lug, left side of frame and buttstrap. The abbreviated number “B COMy No 25” is found on the trigger guard and partially visible on the cylinder. The number “25” is found on left side of front strap, under the grip, inside toe of grip and on the cylinder. The number on the cylinder arbor was obliterated during the cleaning process. The frame to bbl lug mating surfaces have been lightly filed to tighten up the space between the cylinder face & forcing cone and very likely the frame pins were replaced at the same time and the rear face of the forcing cone was filed flat which accounts for the 1/16” shorter bbl. The slight alteration on the front of the frame obliterated the “25” which is normally found in that area between the frame pins. The

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

128


tip of the rammer handle has been reapplied and an area on the bottom of the bbl, about 1-1/2 to 1-3/4” from the muzzle shows evidence of a dovetail having been filled. This information is verified by a photograph of this revolver along with its consecutively numbered mate which appeared in a Gun Report article by Herb Glass which shows this revolver in the top position with a different rammer handle and Navy style latch. The photograph is identifiable as this revolver by the rust patterns on the bbl. Pistol is mounted with its orig 1-pc walnut grip that has repaired heels and an old coating of varnish. Cylinder retains traces of the orig pressure ridge and a few spots of vise marks around the circumference. The T-lever latch spring is a modern replacement. Accompanied by a note by the very well known dealer/collector, the late Paul Sorrell which lists the provenance for this pistol. Also accompanied by a 10-page letter from renowned Colt researcher and author, the late Larry Wilson. Additionally accompanied by a Certificate of Originality from the Texas Gun Collectors Association “Parade of Walkers” dated Spring 2003, certifying the authenticity of Colt Walker SN B COMPANY 25. This is a fine, authentic Walker revolver with very few, minor alterations and would be suitable for any collection or museum display. PROVENANCE: 1951- Gerald Fox collection; 1952- listed on the “Quick List”; 1953- Herb Glass; 1955- pictured TGCA Magazine; 1957- Herb Green collection; 1999- Brian Bossier collection; 2001- Greg Martin; 2003- John Berra collection; The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good to fine, matching numbered as noted above. Bbl & bbl lug are a light, mottled gray/brown patina with heavy blood pitting on both sides of the bbl & rammer handle. The markings on both sides of the lug are clear and legible. Frame is a matching mottled gray/brown patina with clear markings. Cylinder is a matching patina with light, very fine areas of pin-prick pitting and some flash pitting around the nipple recesses. Pressure ridge is visible around most of the circumference and the SN is partially visible. Trigger guard has a few light nicks and shows a dark mustard patina. Backstrap is a matching gray/brown patina with completely legible SN on buttstrap. Grip with its repaired heels is otherwise sound with a couple of small nicks in the front edges and retains most of its restored finish. Mechanics are fine, strong sharp bore with fine pitting. 52328-5 JRL (100,000-150,000)

129

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1125. RARE PRE-FIRST MODEL 1847 WALKER REPLACEMENT DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 2695. Cal. 44. Rare Dragoon with 7-1/2” oct-rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line New-York City left hand address with serifs. Frame is marked about center on left side “COLT’S PATENT” over “U.S.”. Cylinder is about 2-3/8” long, 6-shots with Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking and a distinctive pressure ridge. The “MODEL U.S.M.R. / COLT’S PATENT” legends are discernible and rolled scene is 90% discernible though pitting has obscured some detail. The squareback brass trigger guard and backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip. All SNs on all the parts are of the tiniest variety. Several of the visible parts have small inspector initials. The rammer handle has the assembly number “356” and number “121” is found on bottom of bbl just forward of the rammer slot. Cylinder is numbered “2695” and the wedge is numbered “695”. They were apparently part of a 1,000pc order and utilized some orig Walker and Walker-reworked parts. Further information in the referenced publication states that a 1998 study by Dick Salzer Observation on Colt’s Second Contract theorizes that there were 1,000 of these revolvers contracted in 1847 and delivered in four shipments in 1848. It also states that this survey is conjecture based on the examination of over a dozen specimens. Regardless this is one of the most rare of all the Colt Dragoons. Most specimens of this particular gun are found in very poor, well used condition. This gun is well above average, retaining strong traces of original finish, and discernible inspector cartouches. PROVENANCE: Ex-Collection of Dr. Douglas Sirkin. Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Bbl and bbl housing retain 10-20% orig blue finish, especially in protected areas. Matching SNs as noted above. Metal overall retains a silver/gray patina with some pitting, especially on cylinder. Cylinder is matching patina and shows about 90% Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking with discernible legends as can be seen in photos; trigger guard and backstrap are a light yellow patina. Grips have small chipped toes on bottom inside toes and show honest wear with a dark hand worn patina with both cartouches discernible left side complete and right side over 50%. Mechanics are fine, bright bore with strong discernible rifling. 52328-6 (12,000-15,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

130


Session 1 1126. FINE COLT 2nd MODEL MARTIAL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER IDENTIFIED TO CIVIL WAR SERGEANT, 53RD OVI, WOUNDED AT BATTLE OF KENNESAW MOUNTAIN. SN 8151. Cal. 44. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” oct-rnd bbl, nickel silver front sight and New York City address. Left side of frame is marked with “COLTS PATENT” over a tiny “U.S.”. Frame, cylinder, hammer, frontstrap, backstrap and bottom edge of grip have small inspector initials. Cylinder is usual 6 chambers with “U.S. DRAGOONS / COLT’S PATENT” cartouches surrounding the SN. The un-plated brass squareback trigger guard and backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip with clear cartouche visible on each side and matching SN in backstrap channel. Family history states that this revolver was descended through the Higby family from Charles Davis Higby. Accompanied by a copy of a handwritten letter from Anne Menard addressed to consignor’s wife who also appears to be a Higby relative. Ms. Menard states that Mr. Higby was her grandmother’s father and is so listed in their family bible. He was born Oct 1843 and enlisted in the 53rd Ohio Infantry Nov 1861 at age 18 as a Sargent and was mustered out Aug 1865 at Little Rock, AR. He was wounded at Kennesaw Mtn.,GA June 1864 and survived the war. PROVENANCE: Higby Family Provenance. Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except wedge which is numbered “9533”. Bbl retains 30-40% orig blue with the balance a thin blue patina with several small nicks on right side. Rammer pivot retains about 60% faded case colors with the handle cleaned to bright. Frame retains about 40% smoky case colors, being mostly a silver/grey patina. Hammer is matching patina with fine pitting on both sides at the nose. Cylinder retains about 50% thin blue with the balance thin blue/grey patina and shows 85-90% Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking. The Ormsby address is completely legible. The “US DRAGOON” is a little thin on the left end, but mostly legible. The “COLT’S PATENT” cartouche is completely legible. All 6 safety pins are crisp and serviceable as are the 6 nipples. Trigger guard and backstrap are a medium mustard patina. Grip is sound showing light to moderate wear with a hand worn patina and both cartouches are legible. Mechanics are fine, strong blue bore with a few small spots of pinprick pitting. 52328-9 (12,500-17,500)

131

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1127.

RARE MASSACHUSETTS SURCHARGED MARTIAL COLT 2nd MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 10557. Cal. 44. Rare 2nd Model Dragoon made in 1851, standard configuration blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” oct-rnd bbl, nickel silver front sight and 1-line New York address. Trigger guard behind SN is stamped “MS” for Massachusetts. Left side of frame has a tiny “COLT’S PATENT” over a tiny “U.S.” The square back brass trigger guard & backstrap contain an oil finished 1-pc walnut grip with clear, faint inspector cartouches with an “X” stamped on left side grip which is also noted on at least two other Massachusetts surcharged Dragoons Julia’s has offered. Almost every part on the revolver has tiny inspector initials. Cylinder has the Ormsby Dragoon-Indian fight scene roll marking and “MODEL U.S.M.R.” and “COLT’S PATENT” cartouches surrounding the SN. There were only about 1,000 of these guns produced under government contract, 1850-1851. The 2nd Model Dragoon was the lowest production of all the Dragoon models and of that limited production, only a few hundred were issued to the Massachusetts militia. There is currently in Smithsonian SN 10603 which was one of a pair carried by Ben Butler when he was in the Massachusetts Militia; later Civil War general and governor of Massachusetts. This is a fine, tight, complete, well functioning example with especially nice cylinder scene and crisp markings. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall, fairly sharp crisp gun with traces of finish in protected areas. Gun appears all matching, though not disassembled as gun is tight and all external SN and inspectors match. Cylinder scene is almost totally discernible with matching grey/brown color found on rest of iron on gun, scattered staining and pitting. Markings all crisp and well defined. There are several dings and cuts on right side of bbl housing around wedge slot. Grips are well fit with discernible “WAT” (William A. Thornton) and “JCB” ( Joseph C. Bragg) cartouches, crack repair on right grip near frame and hairline on opposite side. Action is crisp with well defined rifling and bright shiny bore. 52328-10 JS (12,00015,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

132


Session 1 1128. RARE “NEW HAMPSHIRE” MARKED MARTIAL COLT DRAGOON 2nd MODEL PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 10244. Cal. 44. Rare New Hampshire Dragoon, blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” oct-rnd bbl, nickel silver front sight and right hand address. Left side of bbl lug is marked “NEW HAMPSHIRE”. Left side of frame has a tiny “COLT’S PATENT” over a tiny “U.S.”. The square back brass trigger guard and backstrap contain an oil finished 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN found internally. Almost every part on the revolver has tiny inspector initials. Cylinder has the Ormsby Dragoon-Indian fight scene roll marking and “MODEL U.S.M.R.” and “COLT’S PATENT” cartouches surrounding the SN. There were only about 1,000 of these guns produced under government contract, 1850-1851. The 2nd Model Dragoon was the lowest production of all the Dragoon models and of that limited production, only a few hundred were issued to the New Hampshire militia. This is a very nice matching, tight, complete, well functioning example of martial 2nd Model Colt Dragoon. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. All matching including bbl, frame, trigger guard, buttstrap, loading arm, cylinder, wedge and grip. Metal overall has been cleaned and is a silver/grey overall with light staining and pitting. SNs and address are all crisp, though inspector marks and patent markings are weak, though mostly discernible. Cylinder has matching patina and the rolled Dragoon-Indian fight scene is mostly discernible. Cylinder pins are all smashed, though gun still rotates and locks well. Brass trigger guard and backstrap exhibit light brass patina with old cleaning. Grip is sound and well fit, Apparently refinished as only hint of cartouche is visible, showing moderate edge wear and inside toes both rounded. Mechanically gun functions well with well defined crisp rifling, staining and pitting. 52328-11 JS (10,000-12,500)

133

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1129. RARE NEW HAMPSHIRE COLT 2ND MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 10229. Cal. 44. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” octagon to round bbl, replacement copper front sight with 1-line New York City address on top flat. Left side of bbl lug and left side of bbl are marked “NEW HAMPSHIRE”. Left front side of frame is marked “COLT’S PATENT” over a tiny U.S. Cylinder is unfluted with six chambers. The brass square back trigger guard and backstrap contain a varnished 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in backstrap channel. Rammer latch is the early vertical style. The 2nd Model Dragoon was the lowest production of all three models, with only approximately 2700 produced 1850-1851. Of that number, only a very few were marked “NEW HAMPSHIRE”. The bbl lug and cylinder appear to have been renumbered. The font on those two parts does not match that on the frame and other parts of the revolver. It appears that in order to renumber the cylinder it was machined to remove the orig SN, which also removed the entire Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking and cartouches. Regardless, this is a fine looking, representative piece to fill in a collection. CONDITION: Good to very good. Bbl and rammer appear to have been lightly buffed and now show a smooth light blue-grey patina. Frame retains about 60% silvered case colors with the hammer polished to match bbl and has light pitting around the nose. Cylinder is a matching mottled silver-grey patina. Trigger guard and back strap are a medium mustard patina. Grip is sound with good edges and retains about 98% applied varnish finish. Mechanics are fine. Strong bright bore with sharp rifling and scattered fine pitting. Tip of wedge spring is broken. 52705-2 JRL (4,000-7,000)

COMMERCIAL COLT 2nd 1130. MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 8851. Cal. 44. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” oct to rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line New York City address. Left side of frame has a small “COLT’S PATENT” over a tiny “U.S.”. The squareback brass trigger guard and backstrap contain a very nicely figured 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in backstrap channel. Cyl is usual 6-shots with Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking and “MODEL U.S.M.R. / COLT’S PATENT” panels on each side of the SN. Cylinder has three partially serviceable safety pins. Although the frame is “U.S.” marked and various parts have small inspector initials, the grip is without cartouches and it appears that this was a commercial Dragoon assembled from contract overrun parts. The 2nd Model Dragoon was produced only during 1850-1851 with only about 2,700 manufactured in that period. Of that small number 1,000 were on contract to the government. Colt, anticipating larger orders, produced parts to make the additional 1,700 revolvers, most of which were inspected at the plant but when the contracts from the government did not materialize, he simply had them assembled into revolvers and sold them on the commercial market. Regardless of where they were sold these revolvers saw hard frontier service which continued through the Civil War and remained in service well into the 1870s. This most rare of Dragoons is rarely found today with any orig finish with most having seen very hard use. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good, all matching except wedge which is numbered “9216”. All the steel parts retain a cleaned gray metal patina with scattered discoloration and some very fine pitting on right side of bbl; cyl is matching patina with scattered spots of fine pitting and shows 75-80% Dragoon/Indian fight scene with crisp clear panels; grip frame is a cleaned medium mustard patina. Grips well fit with 1/4” chip to rear left toe, showing moderate wear with handworn patina. Mechanics are fine, strong bright bore with a few small spots of pitting. 52328-7 (10,000-12,500) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

134


Session 1 1131.

SCARCE COLT 2nd MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 9980. Cal. 44. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” oct to rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line NYC address. Rammer is early type with vertical latch. Cylinder is unfluted with Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking and “MODEL U.S.M.R. / COLT’S PATENT” cartouches surrounding the SN. The 2nd Model Dragoon is the lowest production of all 3 models with only about 2,700 produced 1850-1851. The left front side of frame is marked “COLT’S PATENT” over a tiny “U.S.”. The square back brass trigger guard & backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in the backstrap channel. Left side of grip has a clear “JH” inspector cartouche and the right side a clear “W.A.T.” (William A. Thornton) sub-inspector cartouche. Wedge is numbered “9991”. Hammer spring is of the straight type with roller in the hammer. The contract with the government for 1,000 Dragoon revolvers was placed in Feb. 1850 with part of that contract filled from 2nd model production. Mr. Colt believing that additional contracts were forthcoming had many of the frames coming off the production line stamped with the “U.S.” on the left side. Only those revolvers with additional small inspector initials can be considered martial arms as the majority of the 2nd model production was sold on the civilian market. This revolver with its matching inspected grip and various inspector initials on individual parts most certainly was a martial arm. A large number of these arms were issued out of the San Antonio arsenal to Cavalry units and Mounted Infantry to combat the Comanche Indians, outlaws & bandits throughout the Southwest. At the outset of the Civil War, all arms at the San Antonio arenas and with troops assigned there were surrendered to the Confederacy when they continued in service throughout the war. Those arms generally saw extreme hard service afterward on the frontier and are rarely found today with high orig finish. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except wedge as noted. Bbl retains a smooth, thinning blue finish with some evidence of modern or contemporary finish added and blended to appear original. Light pitting around the front sight. Rammer pivot retains about 40% faded case colors and the frame fading, dark mottled case colors, turned brown on the recoil shields. Hammer retains dark case colors on the left side and rear edge, turned gray on top & right edges. Cylinder is a thin blue/brown patina with scattered spots of fine pitting and shows about 90% strong Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking. Grip frame is a smooth light mustard patina. Grip is battered on bottom edges, but is sound with clear cartouches and retains a hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, very bright shiny bore. Shows very little use with no visible pitting on the hammer nose or nipple recesses. A very fine example with a slight restoration. 52689-1 (8,000-12,000)

135

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1132. RARE ENGRAVED COLT HARTFORD/LONDON 2nd MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 168. 44 Cal. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” oct-rnd bbl, German silver front sight and stamped “ADDRESS SAML COLT NEW-YORK CITY”. Left side of frame has “COLTS PATENT” engraved in a ribbon. There were only 700 HartfordLondon Dragoons, very few engraved. The silver plated brass trigger guard and backstrap contain a deluxe varnished burl 1-pc grip. Cylinder is usual 6-shots with Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking and the “MODEL U.S.M.R.” and “COLT’S PATENT” cartouches partially visible. Left side of bbl lug and cylinder have British proofs. Revolver is engraved in English style with about 60-70% coverage fine foliate arabesque patterns and beautiful foliate and floral patterns on the recoil shields, frame and bbl lug. The rammer pivot is engraved to match with rosettes around each side of the pivot link screw. Backstrap, buttstrap and trigger guard are also engraved to match with line borders. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Gun appears orig and matching with exception of 4 screws and spring-loaded loading arm catch which are replaced. Iron is overall grey/brown with staining and pitting. Tiny trace of finish in protected area of well. Gun is well worn, though engraving is all discernible with most wear on bbl housing. Cylinder shows about half of its rolled Dragoon/Indian fight scene, though dark. Other markings on gun are mostly discernible, crisp address. Backstrap and trigger guard retain 20% orig silver plating. Grips are well fit with traces of orig varnish with several dings and gouges and heavy edge wear, with rounded chips at both inside toes. 52328-8 JS (6,000-8,000)

1133. FINE COLT THIRD MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 15387. Cal 44. Usual configuration with 7 1/2” oct-rd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line New York City address. Left side of the frame has a small “COLTS PATENT”. Cylinder is usual 6 shots with Dragoon/Indian fight scene roll marking. Four of the safety pins are crisp and serviceable. The brass trigger guard and backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip with last 4 digits of matching SN in backstrap channel. These Dragoon revolvers were produced from about 1851 to 1861 with a total production of about 10,500 revolvers, of which about 4,330 were purchased on military contracts. The balance of the civilian production were purchased by a variety of individuals for use on the American Frontier and virtually all saw service from earliest production right through the Civil War and afterward returned to service on the American Frontier and in various foreign nations and are rarely found today with any orig finish. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good to fine, all matching including wedge and grip. Bbl retains about 50% orig thinning blue with the balance turning plum with scattered light surface rust. Rammer and handle retain mottled brown finish. Frame and hammer are a mottled dark brown finish with some scattered pinpricks of rust. Cylinder is a grey metal patina and shows 75-80% Dragoon/Indian fight scene with the “MODEL U.S.M.R.” & “COLT’S PATENT” cartouches sharp and legible. Cylinder has some scattered fine pinpricks of rust. Grip frame is a medium mustard patina. Grip has chipped toes, otherwise is sound showing moderate to heavy edge wear and a hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine. Brilliant shiny bore with a few small spots of pitting. 52328-12 (10,000-12,500) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

136


Session 1 1134. MARTIALLY MARKED COLT 3rd MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 16801. Cal. 44. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” oct-rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line address. Top flat has a 3-leaf sight in a dovetail on the top flat near the breech end. Frame is 4-screw type cut for shoulder stock with flat head hammer screw and left front has a small “COLTS PATENT” over a tiny “U.S.”. The brass trigger guard and steel backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip with last four digits of matching SN in backstrap channel, which have been overwritten with the full SN in pencil. Cylinder is usual 6-shots with Dragoon/ Indian fight scene roll marking and “MODEL U.S.M.R. / COLT’S PATENT” panels surrounding the SN. One safety pin is still serviceable. Left side of grip has a faint cartouche which appears to be “GDS” (G.D. Shattuck) and the right side a legible cartouche “WAT” (William A. Thornton) and various parts have small inspector initials. According to Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms there were about 10,500 3rd Model Dragoons produced from 1851-1861 in both 7-1/2” and 8” variations with both 3 and 4-screw frames. They were virtually all issued to front line troops for use in the early frontier Indian Wars and continued in service throughout the Civil War, usually seeing very hard service and are rarely found today with any orig finish. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Fine, all matching including wedge and grip. No orig finish remains being an overall mottled brown patina with pitting on right side of bbl lug, on the rammer and at the muzzle. Frame also has an area of pitting at the right front end of the frame. Frame, hammer & backstrap have matching patina; cylinder is a lighter patina with a few small spots of pitting and shows 60-70% Dragoon/ Indian fight scene roll marking. Trigger guard retains a dark mustard patina. Grip has a gouge on bottom right edge and overall shows moderate to heavy wear and retains a dark hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, strong bright bore with moderate pitting. 52328-13 (8,000-10,000)

1135. COLT 3rd MODEL DRAGOON PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 14705. Cal. 44. Standard configuration with 7-1/2” oct to rnd bbl, German silver front sight with vertical rammer latch. It has silver plated brass trigger guard & back strap with varnished 1-pc walnut grip. It has 1-line New York City bbl address with usual 6-shot cyl. Left side of frame is marked with “COLT’S PATENT”. Small “U” inspector’s mark on left trigger guard. The hammer screw, trigger screw & lockbolt screw have either been refreshed or are proper replacements. According to Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms, only about 10,500 of these revolvers were produced in period 1851-1861. Most were issued and used prior to and during the Civil War with most seeing hard service during that conflict and are rarely found with remaining orig finish, as with this example. CONDITION: Good to very good, all matching including grip, cyl, rammer and wedge. No orig finish remains being a smooth gray patina having been cleaned long ago with some scattered fine pitting on bbl and around the nipple end of the cylinder, some older replaced nipples. Clear markings. No cyl scene remains. Grip frame retains traces silver plating in sheltered areas, now beginning to patinate. Grip is sound showing moderate wear and retaining traces of orig varnish being mostly a hand worn patina. Mechanics are crisp, strong bore with sharp rifling and moderate pitting. A sound affordable example. 52555-1 JWD (6,000-8,000) 137

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1136.

RARE AND VERY DESIRABLE FACTORY ENGRAVED CASED COLT MODEL 1848 BABY DRAGOON TRANSITION REVOLVER WITH RAMMER. SN 13538. Cal. .31. 5” bbl, blue and case color finish with silver grip straps and burl walnut grip. Revolver is engraved overall in a vine scroll design with a fine punch dot background. The engraving has a scalloped border on frame around the recoil shield and at the rear of the bbl lug. Fine line bordering also appears on the frame and the loading lever. The engraving can easily be attributed to Joseph Delaney because of its unique style. Screws have very unique floral decoration which are also rather unique. Engraving appears on the bbl lug with a band at the muzzle, on the flat of the loading lever, frame has almost full coverage, hammer also shows a very distinct decoration that can be definitely attributed to Joseph Delaney. A Colt 1851 Navy is pictured on pg 38 of Colt Factory Engravers of the 19th Century, 2012, Houze that has the same motif. There are small punch dot marks on the bbl lug, frame and trigger guard that indicate special polish for engraving. The inspector mark “T” is usually stamped on the right rear flat of the trigger guard, but in this case, because this part was engraved, the inspector mark was moved to the right rear bow of the trigger guard. Top bbl flat shows correct 2-line Colt New York City address bordered by dashes. SNs match on frame, bbl lug, trigger guard, backstrap, rammer and cylinder. Partial SNs appear on the arbor, wedge, and written in ink in the backstrap channel of the grip. “COLT’S PATENT” appears on the left forward side of the frame. Revolver is housed in a contemporary Colt factory casing made of mahogany with a pine bottom. Case is lined with purple velveteen. Case contains a correct Colt’s Patent bullet mold, a correct eagle flask that is embossed on both sides, an L-shaped combination tool, a box of paper cartridges and a 100-cnt tin of Eley caps. There are a few conical and rnd bullets also in the case. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbl has a smooth grey/brown patina with some slight roughness toward the muzzle and traces of orig blue in protected areas. Bbl address was rolled slightly to the side, leaving the upper line slightly faint. Bbl address has not been polished. Engraving is sharp and unmolested. Rammer shows a hint of case color present. Frame also shows a deep grey/brown patina with no roughness. Engraving is sharp and unmolested. Trigger and backstrap retain nearly all of the orig silver finish which is common for Colt revolvers of this vintage. Cylinder shows nearly all of the rolled stagecoach scene with some erosion above the Colt’s Patent mark. Patent mark is sharp. SN is sharp. 5-safety pins are intact, 2 are somewhat battered. Hammer is a grey/brown patina, engraving is sharp and unmolested. Grip retains nearly all of the piano varnish finish with slight wear at the bottom of both sides. Bore has dark stains with visible gain twist rifling. Action functions well. Cylinder locks up at full cock, half-cock is crisp. Case is very good with no cracks or breaks and a nice even patina finish. Lining is very good with some wear on partitions and on the bottom where revolver sits. Partitions are intact. Mold is very good with clean cavities and clear “COLT’S PATENT” mark. Flask is fine with no dents, sharp embossing and most of the clear lacquer finish. Combination tool is very good with nearly all of the dull blue finish. Cartridge box is wrapped and intact and appears to have cartridges inside. The Eley cap tin is also very good with most of the lacquer. The label may be a reproduction. A chance to obtain a very rare, low production factory engraved transition Baby Dragoon revolver. 49788-1 (8,000-10,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

138


Session 1 1137.

RARE CASED DAMASCENED COLT MODEL 1851 LONDON NAVY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 35232. Cal. 36. Circa 1855. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” oct bbl, pin front sight and 1-line address “COL. COLT. LONDON” with spears. Frame is marked with a small “COLT’S PATENT”. Damascened steel trigger guard & backstrap contain a 1-pc varnished walnut grip with matching SN in backstrap channel. Entire revolver including cyl, rammer & handle, wedge, hammer, trigger guard & backstrap are beautifully damascened in 22 karat gold wire in 3 distinct patterns with intricate vines and flower blossoms in heavy gold with a dark brownish background. Cylinder is inlaid in connecting circular patterns with linear foliations. All of the damascene work has the same dark brown background. Screw heads are also damascened. Left side of bbl lug & cyl have British proofs. Accompanied by an orig English mahogany casing with empty brass plaque in the lid. Case is scarlet velvet lined and compartmented in bottom for the revolver, a Dixon “COLTS NAVY FLASK”, bag shaped flask, a blued steel 2-cavity bullet & ball “COLTS PATENT” mold with sprue cutter, an L-shaped nipple wrench, an all steel cleaning rod and a lacquered tin of Eley’s caps. There is also a functioning key. Most of the Colts so decorated had the work done in India for the RAJ or for the occasional British officer. This exact Colt is pictured on p 141 in “Colt Engraving” by R. L. Wilson. PROVENANCE: Ex Frank Russell Collection. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching. Overall retains virtually all of this fine gold damascening with the only noticeable wear on the ends of the wedge and a couple of small spots on front strap. Grip has a chipped right toe, otherwise is sound showing light edge wear and overall retains about 95% orig varnish. Mechanics are fine, strong bore with moderate pitting. Case is sound with a few light nicks & scratches and retains most of an old restored finish; interior is lightly to moderately faded with light soil in bottom and light damage from front sight & hammer spur; flask has one small dent and overall retains 70-75% orig finish; mold has numerous small nicks & dings and retains about 50% orig blue; other accessories are fine. 52634-1 JRL (20,000-30,000)

139

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1138.

EXCEPTIONAL MARTIALLY MARKED COLT MODEL 1851 NAVY-ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 79154. Cal. 36. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” oct bbl, brass pin front sight and 1-line Hartford address. Left side of frame has a tiny “COLTS PATENT” over a tiny “U.S.”. The brass, 3rd Model small guard trigger guard and backstrap contain 1-pc walnut grip with last four digits of matching SN in backstrap channel. Both sides of grip have sharp, legible cartouches with “JH” ( James Harris) on left side and “WAT” (William A. Thornton) on right side. Most metal parts have small inspector initials. The Federal Government purchased approx. 35,000 ‘51 Navy revolvers of which about 15,050 went to the Navy leaving about 20,000 that were assigned to the Army, of which this revolver is one. This particular gun is near the end of the SN range of US Army purchased Colt Navies made in 1857. These revolvers were issued to front line troops and used throughout the Civil War and later on the American frontier, generally under harsh circumstances with little or no maintenance and are almost never found today in completely orig configuration with high orig finish. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching including wedge, cylinder and grip. Bbl retains over 95% orig strong military finish with only light muzzle and sharp edge wear. Rammer pivot retains bright case colors, fading to silver on the handle. Frame and hammer retain strong bright case colors fading on recoil shields with balance silver/grey. Cylinder retains 80% of thinning blue with balance a shiny plum/blue. Ormsby Naval battle scene is virtually all discernible with fine detail. Three safety pins are crisp and serviceable, the other are smashed. Chambers retain strong orig blue; trigger guard and backstrap are a medium mustard patina. Grips are sound and solid with moderate edge wear with small chip in left rear toe. Cartouches are strong and vivid. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore with sharp rifling. 52324-1 (25,000-35,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

140


Session 1 1139.

OUTSTANDING RARE EARLY EXHIBITION QUALITY ENGRAVED COLT MODEL 1851 PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 5597. Cal. 36. 7-1/2” bbl. Rare dovetail front sight with bead and 1-line New York City address. Left side of frame is engraved “COLT’S PATENT” in an unusual position. The silver plated brass trigger guard and backstrap contains a beautifully figured burl walnut with varnished 1-pc grip with last three digits of SN in backstrap channel. Revolver is engraved with full coverage foliate arabesque pattern with a small cross-hatched panel on each side all with shaded background. Engraving extends over bbl lug and onto rammer pivot with a fine border over the muzzle. Hammer is engraved to match. Backstrap, butt strap and trigger guard are also engraved to match. All screwheads are lightly engraved in matching patterns. Cylinder is usual 6-shot with Ormsby naval battle scene and five of the safety pins are mostly serviceable. These fancifully embellished Colt firearms have frequently been attributed to The Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851. Based upon the production date, this could well be a distinct possibility. CONDITION: Very fine as bbl retains about 80% glossy blue with sharp edge wear and light flaking. Rammer retains faded case colors in sheltered areas. Balance has somewhat turned silver. Frame and hammer are a mostly grey metal color. Cylinder is clean, grey metal color with a few prominent scratches and retains overall 60-70% of the Ormsby naval battle scene. Trigger guard retains most all of its silver finish as backstrap retains over 50% of its silver. Grip is very fine and retains most of its crisp deluxe varnish. Mechanics are crisp. All visible numbers have been found to be matching. Bore is very good with strong rifling and slight spotting from age. This is truly an exceptional example of Colt’s artistry. 52705-3 TDW (15,000-25,000)

141

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1140.

VERY RARE EARLY COLT 2nd MODEL SQUAREBACK 1851 NAVY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 937. Cal 36. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” oct bbl, brass pin front sight and 1-line block letter New York City address with dashes. Left side of frame has tiny “COLT’S PATENT”. Cylinder has usual 6 shots with Ormsby naval battle scene. The silver plated square back, small guard brass trigger guard and backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in the backstrap channel. Only about 3,000 of these rare revolvers were produced with the earliest SN noted by Swayze in 51 Colt Navies being 848 though first models with notched arbors still occur up to about 1250 serial range where the remainder of production to about SN 4000 are all second model configuration with slotted arbor (base pin). This gun features all the other early features including the thin profile grips, rammer screw entering from right side and small sgl inspector letter on trigger guard below SN. The very early revolvers, such as this one, are rarely ever found with any orig finish and this particular example is no doubt among the very finest. PROVENANCE: Ex-Norm Flayderman Estate Collection; Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching including rammer handle, cylinder and grip other then wedge which is numbered 822. Bbl and cylinder retain 90-95% orig bright blue, with sharp edge wear with areas of staining, pinprick pitting, scattered scratches, screws retain most of their fire blue. Ormsby rolled naval battle scene is fully discernible and crisp with scattered blemishes. Rammer & handle are bright/gray and show no case color. SN is stamped width-wise on the forward portion of lever which is unique to these early 3-digit Colts. Frame and hammer retain muted case colors with the balance silver/gray. Case colors of this era were notoriously light and dull. Grip is sound, well fit with a few small nicks & retains virtually all orig varnish with very light sharp edge wear. Mechanics are fine, crisp well defined bore with scattered spots of pitting. This is truly an exceptional early 2nd model ‘51 Navy that would be very difficult to upgrade. 52328-3 (6,000-8,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

142


Session 1 1141.

RARE CASED SECOND MODEL COLT 1851 NAVY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 1701. Cal. 36. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” oct bbl, brass pin front sight and 1-line New-York City address. Left side of frame is marked “COLT’S PATENT” and it has a small square back silver plated brass trigger guard and back strap containing a 1-pc walnut grip with the first three digits of SN visible in back strap channel. Trigger guard and backstrap are engraved with a heavy zig-zag border with a small engraved cartouche in the form of an oval inscribed “PRO DEO ET REGE” (Translation: For God and King) at the top. The center of the cartouche is inscribed with what appears to be “W R” in Old English and there is a figure above the cartouche that may be a fist or some other indistinguishable character. Center of backstrap is engraved with light foliate and floral patterns. Accompanied by an English oak casing with the lid medallion missing. Interior is purple velvet lined with a Colt directions label in the lid and compartmented in bottom for a Dixon “COLT’S NAVY” bag-shaped flask, a brass 2-cavity “COLT’S PATENT” mold with sprue cutter, an L-shaped nipple wrench and a lacquered tin of Eley’s caps. Right rear covered compartment contains a wood handled cleaning rod with broken tip. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: About fine, all matching including wedge and grip. Overall retains virtually all of a fine professionally restored finish to bbl and frame. Cylinder was re-blued but not polished. Cylinder retains 85-90% Ormsby Naval battle scene with an area of pitting. Trigger guard and back strap retain most of their post engraving silver finish. Wedge screw is a replacement. Grip is sound with moderate edge wear and numerous small nicks & dings and retains most of its orig varnish. Mechanics are fine, strong bright bore with scattered pitting. Case has a few minor chips in the edge of the lid, otherwise is sound with handling & storage nicks, dings and scratches and retains most of its orig varnish, missing brass plaque on top of lid. Interior is strong & bright with light soil in bottom and light damage from front sight and hammer spur. Mold, flask and cap tin are very fine, screwdriver tip of tool is slightly reshaped and cleaning rod with its broken tip is fine. 52328-4 (6,000-8,000)

143

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1142. FINE LATE COLT MODEL 1851 NAVY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 214367. Cal. 36. Blue & color case hardened with 7-1/2” oct bbl, brass pin front sight & 1-line “New-York U.S. America” address. Left front side of frame has small “COLTS PATENT” and left shoulder trigger guard is marked “36 CAL”. the brass grip frame contains a varnished 1-pc walnut grip with last 4-digits of matching SN in backstrap channel. Cylinder is un-fluted with 6 chambers and Ormsby Naval battle scene roll marking. Wedge has an orig number “17375” with last 3-digits of matching SN stamped above. Rammer handle is properly un-numbered. The model 1851 Navy was produced in fairly large numbers (215,348) 18501873 indicating that this revolver was produced in about 1873 near the end of production. The 1851 Navy was extremely popular throughout the Civil War, on both sides, for its light weight and fairly large grip with smaller caliber that still packed a pretty good punch. They were equally popular on the American frontier after the war with both lawmen and outlaws. It is well documented that James Butler (Wild Bill) Hickock carried a brace of these pistols during his storied career. Numerous other luminaries of that era are also known to have carried and used them. Most saw very hard service and are rarely found today with high original finish. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except wedge as noted above. Bbl retains about 85-90% glossy orig blue with sharp edge & muzzle end wear and a few scattered spots of light thinning. Rammer & handle retain strong, bright case colors. Frame retains about 90% bright case colors, somewhat faded on left recoil shield. Hammer retains faded case colors turned dark on top edge. Cylinder retains about 60% thin orig blue and shows about 95% Ormsby Naval battle scene roll marking. Chambers of the cylinder still show some of their orig blue indicating very little use. Trigger guard & backstrap retain traces of orig silver, being an overall medium mustard patina. Grip shows moderate sharp edge wear with a few light nicks & scratches in the finish and overall retains about 8890% strong orig varnish. Mechanics are crisp, strong bright bore with good shine and scattered pitting. 52705-4 JRL (5,000-9,000)

1143. VERY FINE EARLY COLT MODEL 1861 NAVY PERCUSSION REVOLVER WITH IVORY GRIPS, SN 312 WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 312. Cal. 36. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line New York address with dashes. It has 1860 Army-style rack & pinion rammer with “COLT’S PATENT” on left side of frame. The brass trigger guard & backstrap contain a 1-pc smooth ivory grip. This gun is in very fine condition, retaining much of its orig finish. This particular arm was made first year of production in 1961 at the height of Civil War fervor. Surviving Colts of this era are rarely found in high condition and fine aesthetics as this example. Factory letter states that it was shipped to J.C. Grubb Hardware Store, Philadelphia, PA, August 4, 1861 in configuration noted except grips were not listed and Grubb probably added the ivories. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine overall, all matching. Bbl retains about 60% bright orig finish. Cylinder retains traces of finish. Rolled Ormsby naval battle cylinder scene is almost all discernible. 4 safety pins are functional. Frame, loading arm and cylinder retain over 50% fading and muted case colors. Trigger guard and backstrap retain about 40% orig silver plate (turned black) balance of brass surface has a light mustard/yellow patina. Grip is sound and sharp showing mellow ivory patina with craquelure on butt. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52328-21 JS (6,000-8,000) ESA Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

144


Session 1 1144.

EXTREMELY RARE EARLY COLT MODEL 1860 7-1/2� ARMY WITH FACTORY ROUND CYLINDER AND FACTORY LETTER, NOT FLUTED, SN 35. SN 35. Cal. 44. Among the rare variations in Colt Percussion Armys, are early Armys made with rnd rebated non-fluted cylinder, brass backstrap Navy sized frame, 7-1/2� rnd bbl and not cut for shoulder stock. Few of these guns are known and are quite the anomaly among collectors. This rare gun has factory letter showing this exact configuration shipped to Smith, Crane & Co, NYC, July 9, 1861. This is an honest example of a rarely encountered firearm that is quite distinct and would fit into most any advanced Colt collection. CONDITION: Very good overall. Metal is overall grey/ plum with discernible matching SNs on bbl, cylinder, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, wedge and also on loading arm which is almost never seen on Armys. There is no discernible bbl address. Address purposely removed, still retaining the dashes and only a few partial letters. Patent markings both clear on cylinder and frame. Cylinder retains four functional safety pins and over half of its rolled Ormsby naval battle scene. Small assembly letters are stamped on left side of trigger guard as seen in photos. Grips retain about 80% orig factory varnish. Mechanics are fine with crisp rifling in bore. 52492-1 JS (12,000-15,000)

145

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1145.

VERY RARE FIRST YEAR PRODUCTION COLT MODEL 1860 FLUTED ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER WITH 7-1/2” BARREL AND NAVY SIZE GRIP WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 1521. Cal. 44 PERCUSSION. Very rare Colt 1860 Army with 7-1/2” rnd bbl, German silver front sight & 1-line block letter Hartford address. Left side of frame has tiny “COLTS PATENT”. Frame is rare 4 screw-type, cut for shoulder stock with flat head hammer screw and extended stock yolk screws. Cylinder is rebated with full flutes and 6 chambers marked on the outside with the SN in one flute and patent date in another. Five of the six safety pins are serviceable. The silver-plated brass trigger guard & iron backstrap are Navy sized and contain a 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in backstrap channel. According to The Book of Colt Firearms, Wilson, out of the more than 200,000 Model 1860 Army revolvers produced 1860-1873 fewer than 4,000 had fluted cylinders with the vast majority of those under serial number 8,000. Given that this revolver was produced in early 1861, just at the outset of the Civil War and it is well documented that several shipments of Model 1860 revolvers were shipped to Southern dealers. These early fluted Army revolvers are considered secondary Confederate arms. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 44 with 7-1/2” bbl, blue finish and wood stocks, shipped to the Colt New York office on Feb. 19,1861 in a 50 gun shipment. Since the Civil War did not officially commence until April 1861 and given the size of this shipment it seems likely that this revolver would have probably gone to the Confederacy. CONDITION: Very good to fine, all matching including wedge, cylinder & grip. Bbl retains traces of blue in sheltered areas being an overall smooth even blue/brown patina with rammer & handle matching patina. Frame retains very bright case colors on the sides, turning a little dark on the recoil shields and fading on the front left edge. Hammer retains about 60-70% equally bright case colors turned brown with light pitting on the nose and top edge. Cylinder retains thin blue in the flutes with a light blue/brown patina on the outer diameter. Trigger guard retains about 97-98% strong orig silver with a series of fine nicks on the trigger bow. Backstrap retains about 70% bubbly orig silver and the buttstrap about 90%. Grip shows heavy edge wear with usual light nicks & scratches and retains most of a fine restored varnish finish. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore with a few scattered spots of pitting. 52705-5 JRL (7,500-12,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

146


Session 1 1146.

FINE COLT MODEL 1860 FLUTED ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 310. Cal. 44. Usual configuration with 8” rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line Hartford address with dashes. Frame is 4-screw style cut for shoulder stock. Left side of frame has a tiny “COLT’S PATENT”. Cylinder is 6-shots, full fluted with SN in one flute. The silver plated brass trigger guard and steel backstrap contain a varnished 1-pc walnut grip with matching SN in backstrap channel. Given that this model of Colt made its debut shortly before the onset of the Civil War and there are records of numerous deliveries to Southern states, some just days before the shelling of Fort Sumter, these earliest fluted Armys are considered by many collectors to be secondary Confederate arms. This gun possibly could be researched from Colt and other sources that have listed many fluted SNs over the years. Regardless who carried this gun during the Civil War, this is a very high condition gun for a fluted Army that no doubt saw service. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall, all matching including wedge and grip with light muzzle wear. Bbl and cylinder retain about 10% bright orig blue turning to plum/brown. SNs and other markings on gun are well struck and easily discerned as can be seen in photographs. The frame, hammer and loading assembly retain traces of case colors being overall plum/brown. Trigger guard retains about a third of its orig silver with largest losses where held. Backstrap retains about 90% orig silver plating with freckling. Grips are sound and well fit showing moderate edge wear retaining 80% orig varnish. Action functions, though a bit sloppy with crisp, well discerned rifling in bore. 52328-18 JS (7,000-9,000)

147

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1147.

EXTREMELY FINE CIVIL WAR MARTIALLY MARKED COLT MODEL 1860 ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 8099C. Cal. 44. This is an extremely fine example of a martial late-1862 US cavalry purchased Colt Army revolver. Blue and color case hardened with 8” rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line U.S. America address. Frame has “COLT’S PATENT” stamped on left side and is 3-screw style. Cyl is usual rebated style with 6-chambers and Ormsby Naval battle scene roll marking. All of the safety pins are serviceable. The brass trigger guard and iron backstrap contain a 1-pc walnut grip with last four digits of SN found in grip channel. Both sides of grip have inspector cartouches “JT” ( John Taylor) and possibly “GDS”; most of the metal parts have inspector initials. According to Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms about 127,000 Model 1860 revolvers were purchased by the Federal Government for use in the Civil War. The vast majority of these revolvers were issued to front line troops and was the most extensively used handgun throughout the Civil War. This particular example is totally original and matching in every regard and has identical condition from muzzle to butt, you can not find a more honest Civil War example in such extremely fine functional condition with a scarce matching accompanying inspected “COLT’S PATENT” 2-cavity bullet mold. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Fine to very fine overall, all matching and orig. Bbl retains about 70-80% orig blue though thinning with dings and dents around wedge slot. “Feathering” in finish is easily discerned around sight and loading arm catch. Frame, hammer, and loading arm retain strong traces of their bright case colors with balance muted and grey/silver. Cylinder shows virtually all of its crisp and well discerned Ormsby Naval battle scene with traces of blue in protected areas and inside chambers. Trigger guard exhibits a smooth yellow brass patina. Backstrap and buttstrap retain about 50% of their thinning orig blue finish with the balance gray. Grip is sound, solid, well fit with very good discernible inspector cartouches with edge wear as can be seen in photos. Mechanics are excellent and bore is crisp, shiny and well discerned. Accompanying mold is very good to fine overall, retaining traces of finish with staining and pitting, well marked “44H” above inspection initials “AHK” (Albert H. Kirkham). 52328-19 JS (8,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

148


Session 1 1148.

FINE CIVIL WAR MARTIALLY MARKED COLT MODEL 1860 ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 135852. Cal. 44. Blue & color case hardened with 8” rnd bbl, nickel silver front sight and 1-line New-York U.S. America address. Left side of frame has a small “COLTS PATENT”. Frame is 3-screw type cut for shoulder stock with flat head hammer screw. The unplated brass trigger guard and blued steel back strap contain a martially marked 1-pc walnut grip with excellent fit that is a factory original Colt product, however the last four digits of the serial number recorded on the interior of the grip, in the backstrap channel read “0081”, and do not match the rest of the gun. However, one would never know it from the fit. Left side of grip has a clear, legible inspector’s cartouche and the right side a mostly legible cartouche. Grip does fit very well. Various parts have small inspector initials. Cylinder is rebated with six chambers and has the Ormsby Naval battle scene roll marking. All six safety pins are partial but serviceable. There were over 200,000 of these revolvers produced 18601873 of which the government purchased 127,156. They were the most widely distributed handgun in the Civil War and were popular with the troops for their hard-hitting 44 caliber ball/bullet. These revolvers remained in service with the military well into the 1870s until eventually replaced by the Model 1873 Single Action Army cartridge revolver. After the war they saw hard service on the frontier with several cavalry units and some infantry units. After they were replaced they were sold as surplus and remained in service for many years on the American frontier and around the world. They are rarely found today with any orig finish. PROVENANCE: Paul Sorrell Collection. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except grip, as noted. Bbl retains 8590% strong orig blue with an area of thinning on right side and with some pitting around the muzzle, very nice original feathering near sight, around ram rod latch and on the right side of the barrel near the ram rod pivot. Rammer pivot retains bright case colors and the handle faded case colors; frame retains about all of its lightly to moderately faded case colors, as does the hammer; cyl is a dull blue/brown patina and shows about 80% Ormsby Naval battle scene roll marking; trigger guard & front strap are a light yellow patina and the back strap retains about 80% thinning orig blue showing original feathering. Grip is sound with a couple of small nicks and retains a fine hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore with a few spots of pitting. 52511-2 (7,000-9,000)

149

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1149.

CASED PAIR OF COLT 1860 ARMY REVOLVERS. SN 130565/131872. Cal. 44. Composite cased pair of Colt Army’s both made in 1863; one US Martial and the other civilian. Both guns are standard configuration with 8” rnd bbls, 6-shot rebated cylinders with Ormsby rolled naval battle scene. Both guns retain some orig finish. Green velvet later lined aftermarket compartmentalized case retains loose bullets, two cap tins, 2-cavity Colt’s patent bullet mold, nipple wrench, 2-pc cleaning rod and double-sided eagle and panoply of arms powder flask. CONDITION: Very good overall. SN 130565 is civilian gun. SN’s all matching except wedge, which is “0632”. Bbl retains 10-20% bright blue finish, especially in protected areas with balance a mottled grey/plum, well struck 1-line New York address. Cylinder has a matching grey patina, fairly sharp, though no finish. 60-70% of rolled naval scene with pitting above well struck patent line. Brass trigger guard has been cleaned with a light mustard patina, tiny traces of silver plate. Marked “44CAL” on left rear. Grips retain about 90% of their orig varnish with moderate edge wear and minor cosmetic blemishes. Mechanics are crisp with bright bore. SN 131872 is military issue with discernible inspectors cartouches appears all orig and matching. Bbl retains about 10% bright finish, mostly on bottom of bbl with balance a mottled plum/grey, crisp 1-line New York address, muzzle wear. Cylinder exhibits about 80-90% discernible cylinder scene, tiny traces of finish in rebated area with matching silver/grey patina with pitting. Frame, loading assembly pivot and hammer retain areas of muted case colors with balance silver/brown. Backstrap retains strong traces of blue in protected areas. Grips are well fit with hand worn patina and discernible inspector cartouches with moderate edge wear. Inspector mark is found on bottom of one stock and set of initials “JHC” are cut into other side. Mechanics are strong with well discerned rifling in bore. Casing has inset plaque in shape of an ordnance symbol of crossed cannon with central ball. Green velvet lining is stained and soiled. Two compartments have double wood covers with similar cut wood knobs. Accompanying nipple wrench and bullet mold, both with dark patina and pitting. One cap tin has reproduction Ely paper label; the other is embossed, retaining about half of it’s orig varnish. Flask has reddish copper patina with good detail of panoply of arms and eagle. Brass top has dis-similar patina with bent spout. 52034-3 (17,500-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

150


Session 1 1150.

FINE COLT MODEL 1860 CIVILIAN ARMY REVOLVER. SN 133952. Cal. 44. Blue and color case hardened with 8” rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line New-York U.S. America address. Left side of frame is marked “COLTS PATENT” and left shoulder of trigger guard is marked “44 Cal.”. Frame is 3-screw type, cut for shoulder stock. Cylinder is rebated and has the Ormsby Naval battle scene roll marking. The silver plated brass trigger guard and blued steel backstrap contain a varnished 1-pc walnut grip with last four digits of matching SN in backstrap channel. This gun is interesting in that most metal parts have government inspection marks along with the now factory varnished grips show that this gun was military contract originally. The punch mark on left side of frame in shoulder stock cut-out is thought to show condemnation and the non-inspected cylinder was never SNd. Col. Colt was never one to waste government contract over-run or nonaccepted parts. Colt apparently just re-polished and finished this Army for private purchase. Regardless, this is a very fine Colt Army revolver made at the height of the Civil War in late 1863, retaining much orig finish and crisp action, sold in civilian market, possibly to a Civil War officer. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun appears orig and all matching with exception of un-serialized wedge, replaced wedge screw and as noted, orig contemporary un-serialized cylinder. Bbl and cylinder retain 30-40% bright orig blue, especially in protected areas with balance plum. Frame, hammer and loading assembly retain strong muted case colors with balance. Silver/grey. Stocks are well fit with light edge wear and scattered cosmetic blemishes. 52328-20 JS (5,000-7,000)

151

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1151.

EXTRAORDINARY CASED COLT MODEL 1862 POLICE PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 4197. Cal. 36. Blue and color case hardened with 4-1/2” rnd bbl, brass pin front sight and 1-line New-York U.S. America address. It has “COLTS PATENT” on left side of frame and Cal. marking on left shoulder of trigger guard. Cylinder is half fluted and rebated with 5 chambers and all 5 safety pins serviceable. The silver plated trigger guard and back strap contain a nicely figured, varnished, 1-pc walnut grip that has the SN in back strap channel. Accompanied by an orig burgundy velvet lined mahogany Colt casing compartmentalized in the bottom for the revolver, a dbl sided eagle and stars “E PLURIBUS UNUM” flask, a blued steel 2-cavity bullet and ball “COLT’S PATENT” mold with sprue cutter that is marked on right side “36P”, an L-shaped nipple wrench, a lacquered tin of Eley’s caps and a functioning key. Given that this revolver was produced during the early years of the Civil War and survived in unused condition is just short of miraculous. Then to further survive the great Manifest Destiny westward expansion still in unused condition, is even more astounding. Most of this model revolver saw hard service throughout the Civil War and on the American frontier and are rarely ever found with much orig finish. They remained in service well into the 1870s and even 1880s until supplanted by the “new” cartridge revolvers. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching including wedge and grip, probably un-fired. Bbl retains about 65-70% dark glossy orig blue with the loss areas flaked, not worn, to a medium patina. The rammer and handle retain brilliant, vivid case colors as does the frame and hammer. The cylinder retains about 90-92% dark glossy orig blue with a few flaked spots and retains about all of its orig blue on it’s front face and in chambers. All 5 safety pins are serviceable. The trigger guard and back strap retain virtually all of their orig silver plating with one small scrape on front strap, exposing brass. Back strap silver is slightly thinned. Grip is crisp with sharp edges and no discernible flaws and retains virtually all of its bright orig varnish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Case has one grain check in lid, otherwise is completely sound with very minor storage and handling mars in the finish and retains virtually all of its orig factory varnish. Interior is heavily faded with moderate soil with one slightly loose partition. Flask is crisp, retaining virtually all of its orig factory finish. Mold is equally new with some minor flaking on right handle. Cap tin shows soil and staining to the label. Altogether an outstanding cased set that would be difficult to duplicate. 52267-1 (12,500-17,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

152


Session 1 1152.

EXCELLENT 1st YEAR PRODUCTION CIVIL WAR 5-1/2” COLT MODEL 1862 POLICE PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 1025. Cal. 36. This gun conforms to other Model 1862 revolvers being blue and color case hardened with 5-1/2” rnd bbl, brass pin front sight and 1-line Hartford address. Left side of frame has a small “COLT’S PATENT”. Brass trigger guard and backstrap contain a 1-pc varnished walnut grip. Cylinder is typical half-flutes rebated and has a patent date in one flute. This gun was made in 1861 and rarely are first year production Hartford address guns found in such fine, almost new condition, especially with very fine orig with Colt’s Patent 2-cavity bullet mold. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Excellent overall, appears all matching though not disassembled as gun appears to be in its orig configuration, tight and well fit. Bbl and cylinder retain about 90% orig bright blue with staining and pitted area on right side of bbl as can be seen in photos. Frame, loading assembly and hammer retain most of their orig case colors, with balance turning silver/blue. Trigger guard and backstrap retain about 90% of their orig silver plating with some staining and freckling. Grip is sound, solid and well-fit retaining about 95% of its orig bright varnish with edge wear. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore with crisp rifling. Accompanying mold retains over 90% orig thinning dull blue finish with scattered staining, pitting and light tack marks. 52328-14 JS (7,000-9,000)

153

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1153. RARE FACTORY ENGRAVED COLT MODEL 1862 POLICE PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 4765. Cal. 36. Silver plated. Standard configuration with longest and most desirable 6-1/2” rnd bbl 1-line New York address. Gun finely engraved on bbl, cylinder, frame, hammer, trigger guard and backstrap. Gun has matching SNs with small “E”s stamped adjacent denoting engraving. This gun was made in 1861 at the start of the Civil War. This is an aesthetically pleasing gun, popular with Civil War officers, especially in this longer bbl length. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun appears orig as used. SNs matching except wedge “4904” and grips which have a partially discernible 4-digit number inked that do not match “4765”. Gun retains about half of its orig silver plate with staining and pitting. Engraving and markings all discernible. Grips retain about 80% of a bright varnished finish. Mechanically sound with crisp discernible rifled bore. 52328-15 JS (4,500-6,500)

1154. RARE 2-DIGIT 6-1/2” COLT MODEL 1862 POLICE PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 50. Cal. 36. Standard configuration with 6-1/2” rnd bbl, Hartford address, “COLT’S PATENT” on left side of frame. Cylinder is half-fluted and rebated with 5-chambers. This gun was made early in 1861, at onset of Civil War. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Good overall. Markings are all discernible, though bbl address is week as is patent found in cylinder flute. Gun is all matching including wedge and grips. There is a restoration to last 5/8” of loading arm tip and catch. Metal overall is plum/grey with staining and pitting. Trigger guard and backstrap have strong traces of orig silver plate. Grips are well fit with traces of orig factory varnish. Mechanically gun is functional, though sluggish with well defined rifling in bore. 52328-16 JS (1,500-2,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

154


1156. COLT MODEL 1871/72 OPEN TOP SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 3108. Cal. 44RF Henry. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line New-York U.S. America address with dashes and an integral rear sight at the forcing cone end of the bbl. Right side of bbl lug is mounted with an ejector rod housing with bull’s eye ejector rod head. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and hammer has firing pin attached with two rivets to left side of hammer nose. Blued steel trigger guard & back strap contain a 1-pc walnut grip. Only about 7,000 of these rare revolvers were produced in the period 1872-73. This predecessor of the venerable single action army, although a fine revolver in its own right, never gained strong popularity in the U.S. because the cartridge revolvers had already emerged on the scene making the rimfire cartridge obsolete. The majority of these revolvers were sold into Mexico and Latin America where the 44RF Henry cartridge was still popular and in extensive use. They are rarely found in orig configuration with any orig finish at all given their rough frontier service under extremely harsh conditions with little or no maintenance. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine. Overall retains about all of a fine professionally restored finish of the highest quality with high polish brilliant blues and strong bright case colors. Grip is equally new with one or two minor nicks. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52328-22 (3,500-4,500)

155

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1155. SCARCE COLT MODEL 1871/72 OPEN TOP SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER IDENTIFIED TO A MAN WANTED FOR MURDER. SN 6923. Cal. 44 Colt. Usual configuration with 8” rnd bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and left shoulder trigger guard is marked “44 CAL”. Cylinder is usual rebated style with re-rolled Ormsby naval battle scene marking. SNs on the bbl, frame, trigger guard and buttstrap are all matching which last 3 digits of matching number on the cylinder. Backstrap channel of the grip has a coating of dark dried oil with obscures any numbers present. Mounted with varnished 1-pc walnut grip that has had both toes replaced. Revolver has been cleaned with the appearance of having been on a wire wheel. There were about 7,000 of these revolvers produced 1872-1873. Accompanied by a letter bearing the signature of George F. White, US Marshal, Southern District of Georgia, dated February 5, 1913. This letter states in effect that this revolver was taken from the body of L. L. Williams who was being served papers by Mr. White. Apparently Mr. Williams resisted arrest and was killed by Deputy US Marshal J.A. Kelly. CONDITION: Fair to good, all matching except grip as noted above. No orig finish remains being an overall cleaned, bright metal finish with fine pitting. Grip, with its repaired toes is otherwise sound showing light to moderate edge wear and retains most of its bright, custom varnish finish. Wedge appears to be an un-numbered replacement and the wedge screw is battered. Ejector rod head is a replacement. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore. 52487-1 JRL (3,500-5,000)


Session 1 1157.

EXTREMELY RARE ENGRAVED AND NICKEL PLATED COLT MEDIUM FRAME LIGHTNING RIFLE THAT BELONGED TO PORFIRIO DIAZ. SN 3543. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Full nickel finish with 20� bbl, full magazine and barleycorn front sight with blued, reverse mounted 900 yard ladder rear sight. Mounted with exceptional Italian walnut buttstock that has checkered straight grip and carbine buttplate without trap. Left side of receiver has a stud & ring and the trigger guard has a safety. Forearm is of 2 pieces, double Schnable checkered hard rubber with the Rampant Colt trademark logo on each side. Underneath top tang has matching SN with matching SN in pencil on rear face of buttstock, under the buttplate and also Porfirio Díaz inside the toe of buttplate. Carbine is incredibly engraved by master engraver Cuno Helfricht with about full coverage on the receiver & top tang. Engraving consists of the large vignette of a cowboy, that resembles Buffalo Bill Cody, roping a bull buffalo in a prairie scene on the left side, a standing bull elk on the right side and the engraved Rampant Colt logo on top rear of the receiver. All the vignettes are surrounded by extremely well executed foliate arabesque patterns with extremely fine pearled background. The areas in front & behind the loading gate recess have extremely fine diamond & dot patterns with a matching diamond pattern over the receiver ring. Each side of the front edge of the receiver is engraved in a small shell pattern. Top tang is engraved with a fan pattern around the hammer slot

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

156


Session 1

Reverse

with foliate arabesque patterns down the tang. Trigger plate & trigger bow are engraved in foliate arabesque patterns and geometric patterns with smaller patterns on the bottom tang. Bottom tang is engraved in period script, also by Mr. Helfricht “Porf. Diaz�. Buttplate tang & heel are engraved to match. This carbine is pictured, both sides & bottom tang, in full color on page 493 of The Colt Engraving Book Volume One, Wilson, in the Cuno Helfricht section of that publication. The medium frame Lightning rifle was Colt’s first attempt at producing a pump action firearm. They made almost 90,000 between 18841902. Of that number only a limited few were carbines and of those exceedingly few were so elaborately engraved with special plating. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine, all matching. Bbl & magazine tube retain 97-98% strong orig nickel with some fine pimpling in a couple of spots on the bbl. Receiver retains about 90% strong orig nickel with losses from flaking, not wear on the right side. Top & bottom tangs, trigger guard & trigger plate retain virtually all of their strong, orig nickel. Buttplate retains about 60% orig nickel with the losses from flaking not wear. Buttstock has handling and storage nicks & scratches and retains about 90% strong orig varnish. Forearm has a couple tiny bruises on the left rear edge and shows light diamond point wear, turned chocolate on the left side. Mechanics are crisp, strong bore with sharp rifling and moderate pitting. 52428-1 JRL (25,000-45,000)

157

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1158.

*EXTREMELY RARE TRANSITIONAL COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER IN A SCARCE CALIBER FACTORY ENGRAVED BY WILBUR GLAHN WITH IVORY GRIPS AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 341804. Cal. 44 Russian & S&W Special. Nickel finish with 5-1/2” bbl, full thick front sight with V-notch rear sight in the top strap. Left side of the bbl has the roll marked caliber “RUSSIAN AND S&W SPECIAL 44”. Left front side of frame has 2-line 3-patent dates and the Rampant Colt trademark. Mounted with very beautiful 2-pc ivory grips that have deep left & right Colt medallions. SN was observed on the bottom front of frame and on the left side of the front & backstraps under the grip. Rear face of the cylinder has last 4 digits of matching SN. This revolver is beautifully engraved by Wilbur Glahn in about B-style which consists of about 50% coverage extremely well executed foliate arabesque patterns with nearly full coverage on the frame, recoil shield & loading gate. Top strap is engraved in extremely well executed leaf & vine patterns with beautiful, simple arabesque patterns on the bbl which extend from the frame to the front sight, surrounding the 1-line block letter address. Ejector housing is engraved with a snake pattern in the top gullet with extremely well executed geometric patterns on the outer radius. Each side of the frame bbl boss is engraved with Mr. Glahn’s distinctive V-shape pattern which are also found at the top of the backstrap and on the heel & toe of the grip frame. Buttstrap is engraved in a light arabesque pattern with an extremely detailed hunters star on the trigger bow. Cylinder is engraved to match with a continuous running foliate arabesque pattern between & behind the

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

158


Session 1 Reverse

flutes. Rear edge of the cylinder has a double wavy line border pattern. Rear edges of the frame on each side of the hammer slot are engraved in feather patterns with very nicely shaded background. Wilbur Glahn began working for Colt in 1919 and was greatly influenced by the master engraver Cuno Helfricht which shows in much of the extremely fine detail found on this revolver, particularly in the very fine shading & crisp, sharp cuts. The pearled background found in the engraving on the frame is very consistent and even, also an influence by Mr. Helfricht which was not so noticeable on Mr. Glahn’s later work. The leaf & vine patterns on the top strap of this revolver and the arabesque patterns on the bbl are also indicative of Mr. Helfricht’s influence and are reminiscent of the early leaf & vine patterns found on his work on early percussion Colt’s. A review of the book Colt Engraving, Wilson, in the Wilbur Glahn section, disclosed several other similarly engraved revolvers, but few with such simple artistic beauty as found on this one. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 44 S&W, with 5-1/2” bbl, nickel finish, ivory stocks & factory engraved, shipped to Baker, Hamilton, Pacific Co., San Francisco, CA / Ellery Arms Co. on May 9, 1921 in a 1-gun shipment. Also accompanied by a 1-page letter by renowned Colt Historian, author & researcher, the late R.L. Wilson wherein he discusses the Cuno Helfricht / Wilbur Glahn transition engraved pieces which he states are the best work by Mr. Glahn. A very similar example of this rare transitional work is seen in Wilson & Hables book of Colt pistols on page 216 and 217 further describing the rarity of these embellished arms. This is truly an exceptional work by Mr. Glahn. PROVENANCE: Vince Sepulveda Collection. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent plus, all matching . Overall retains about 99% plus crisp, orig nickel with only a very light cylinder line and a couple small spots of flaking under the grips. Grips are excellent with a few age lines and show a beautiful golden ivory patina. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore, new & unfired. Possibly a one of one ever produced. 525981 (75,000-125,000) C&R; ESA 159

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1159.

*EXTREMELY RARE FACTORY ENGRAVED COLT OFFICER’S MODEL FLAT TOP TARGET REVOLVER WITH BOX AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 20240. Cal 22. Blue finish with 6” tapered rnd bbl. Adjustable Patridge target front sight and adjustable rear sight in a dovetail in the top flat of the frame. Bbl has standard for the period 2-line address on top and is marked “COLT OFFICERS/ MODEL .22 LONG RIFLE” on the left side. Left side plate has the Colt trademark Rampant Colt. Trigger is checkered and all blue finish while the hammer is polished bright on the sides with blued top & rear edges. Top flat of the frame and rear of the frame are matte finish and the backstrap is checkered. Revolver is engraved by William Gough with class “B” coverage of about 60% of the revolvers surface. Engraving consists of fine arabesque scrolls with pearled background. Revolver is mounted with factory 2-pc pearl grips that have left & right Rampant Colt silver medallions and a raised carved eagle on the right side. Accompanied by a Colt factory

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

160


Session 1 Reverse

letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 22 with 6” bbl, blue finish, pearl stocks, class “B” engraving and shipped to Loan Account,(These rare loan account guns were the Colt Exhibition guns and were shipped for display purposes to selected and important Colt Dealers to exhibit the BEST Colt had to offer.) Spaulding W. Arms, Salt Lake City, Utah on May 31, 1938 in a one gun shipment. Remarks section indicates that the revolver was returned to the factory on Feb 1, 1939 and shipped 6 additional times to businesses in Albany, NY, Indianapolis, IN, Jamestown, NY, Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL and Jenkintown, PA and was finally sold on April 5, 1940 to the Bacharach Raisin Company in Baltimore, MD. Also accompanied by an orig burgundy hinged lid cardboard box with black & white end label identifying this revolver. Additionally there are 3 black & white overlabels, 2 on the end of the lid “TARGET” and “PATRIDGE SIGHTS”. The 3rd label is diagonally over the top “ENGRAVED” from which “EN” is missing. This exact revolver is pictured on page 330 of The Book of Colt Engraving, Wilson and on page 306 of Colt Pistols, Wilson & Hable wherein they state that it is “one of the most traveled of sample guns”. Wilson also states that this box was shipped 6 or 7 times and shows the travel wear but protected the gun during its travels. To say that this revolver is beautiful is a gross understatement. It is exceptionally beautiful and exceedingly rare. Accompanied by a copy of the Wilson & Hable book in which this outstanding revolver is pictured. PROVENANCE: R.E. Hable Collection, Vince Sepulveda Collection. CONDITION: Excellent, appears to be new and unfired showing no evidence whatsoever of having been fired. There is only the most faint cylinder line and a small spot or two on left side of the trigger. Grips are excellent, showing great fire and color. Box has worn edges and a couple of broken corners with the right end of the top partially detached, otherwise it is intact with mostly legible labels. This is the rare opportunity to own one of the most rare Colt’s extant. 52329-2 (22,500-27,500) C&R

161

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1160.

VERY RARE CUSTER BATTLEFIELD COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER IDENTIFIED TO SIOUX INDIAN RUNS-THE-ENEMY. SN 7087. Cal. 45 Colt. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line script letter address that had “U.S.A.” removed during the period of use. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and has also had “U.S.” removed from the frame. Ejector housing is first type with nickel plated bull’s eye ejector rod head and base pin is orig type with dimpled ends and slightly battered head. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that has partially obliterated matching SN in the backstrap channel. Only the “8” & “7” are completely legible. Left Runs-the-Enemy side of grip has the partial outline of an inspector’s cartouche with partially legible “O” for Orville W. Ainsworth. There are small “A” inspector initials on the bbl, trigger guard, cyl & backstrap. Bottom edge of grip is battered & worn, obliterating the inspector initial there. Matching SN is also found on bottom of bbl under ejector housing & on the cylinder. This revolver appears to have been from 1,000 Colts of Lot 7, shipped in May 1874, 166 of which where issued to the 7th Cavalry. A previous owner spent an incredible amount of time studying notes, descriptions and reports from troops who were first on the battlefield the day after Custer was annihilated, with special attention to the location of identifiable bodies. With careful extrapolation of the body locations and comparing the interviews of Indian participants, he determined that this revolver could only have been issued to Regimental Color Sgt. Robert M. Hughes of Company K. Accompanied by a 2-pg letter from renowned author, historian and collector, John Kopec, wherein he authenticates this revolver and verifies much of the technical information about the revolver. He speculates that it may have been simply a stolen revolver, but could have been captured by hostiles. Also accompanied by a copy of an interview of Runs-the-Enemy, a Two-Kettle Sioux who fought at the Little Big Horn, by Dr. Joseph K. Dixon was printed in his 1913 book The Vanishing Race from his 1909 publication. Additionally accompanying from about the same time is a copy of an interview by Ivan Stars who interviewed Chief Runs-the-Enemy and recorded it in the Sioux language then translated it into English. Both interviews relate nearly identical wording regarding the Custer Battle and the annihilation of his command. Mr. Star’s rendition also includes the statement that “All thought horse soldier all die. Then one horse soldier raise up,

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

162


all thought he returned to life from spirit land. Many frighten. He raise up arm to shoot six shooter pistol. I grab six shooter pistol from horse soldier. I shoot horse soldier in head with his six shooter pistol. He strong man. He have bad wound in belly before I kill him. His black whisker short hair. He have the white man called mustache long with curve at the end. He no horse soldier chief. He have marks on arm. He die close together with one called Yellow Hair... “. He continues near the end “I follow Kicking-Bear, mark on weapon with my possession. I wear ghost shirt. I dance the ghost dance. I give now to you my much thought. Coup, marked with sign, my possession, guard six-shooter pistol. To wash on red holy God, six-shooter pistol name 7-Zero-8-7. For I do this. I Run-the-Enemy.” The “7-Zero-8-7” in Runs-the-Enemy’s interview above certainly is the SN of this revolver. His statement “To wash on red holy God ---” appears to refer to an ocher wash applied to the grip which is now a very dark reddish brown similar to the two ocher dots found on Chief Two Moons’ Colt revolver previously sold by the James D. Julia auction company. The nickeled ejector rod head may have originated on another Colt Single Action captured by Runs-the-Enemy at the Little Big Horn battle. Chief Runsthe-Enemy also captured a nickel plated Colt after he killed a “Black” soldier (apparently Isaiah Dorman, a black scout and interpreter killed in the battle). CONDITION: Very good, all matching including bbl, cylinder and grip. Cylinder number has been partially defaced with only part of the first “7”, the “0” and last “7” visible. The “8” in the SN is completely gone. No orig finish remains being an overall cleaned gray metal patina showing muzzle edge wear and the muzzle filed flat during the period of use. Cylinder is in matching patina. Grip has chipped toes and left edge shows heavy wear with the aforementioned over all very dark reddish brown color. Mechanics are fine; strong, dark bore with fine pitting. 52454-1 JR431 (22,000-27,000)

163

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1161. SCARCE CUSTER RANGE COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER INSPECTED BY AINSWORTH WITH HISTORY TO THE SIOUX INDIANS IN CANADA. SN 5860. Cal. 45 Colt. Usual config with 7-1/12” bbl, slightly thinned front sight and 1-line script letter address with serifs at each end. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and a small “U.S.”. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that has matching SN in backstrap channel. Grip is hand carved on each side with deep geometric patterns that show wear consistent with their age. Ejector housing is 1st type with bullseye ejector rod head. Buttstrap retains its sharp toe and the ejector housing has had its sharp front edge rounded. Base pin is orig type with dimpled ends. All parts including bbl, cylinder, trigger guard, back strap and bottom left edge of grip are marked with a tiny “A”, the inspector initial of Orville W. Ainsworth. Grip is too worn to show a cartouche. This revolver was part of Lot 6, received in February 1874 and in the second and third quarters of 1874 issued to the 1st, 2nd and 7th Cavalry Regiments, of which the 7th received 166 revolvers. At that time, Companies D and I, 7th Cavalry were issued those arms. It has provenance back to 1965 when it was discovered in a collection owned by a Mr. Albert Mattern, a farmer who owned land adjacent to the Hobbema Indian Reserve in Alberta, Canada, about 45 mi. south of Edmonton. This revolver was sold by the Bud Haynes Auction Company of Reindeer, Alberta, Canada. The history of this revolver is that Mr. Mattern had “owned it for 20 years and had originally acquired it from one of the native people on the reserve”. This information was all contained in the auction description in 1965. The orig auction tag accompanies this revolver. The Hobbema Reserve is populated by the Anishinabe and Dakota native Indians and are related directly to the Sioux. This is the area to which Sitting Bull fled with his Sioux after the Battle of the Little Big Horn in June 1876. They remained in Canada until the early 1880’s when they returned to the U.S. and surrendered, to be placed on various reservations. The probability of this revolver having been issued to one of Custer’s troopers in Companies D or I is very strong given the fact that it was originally discovered in Canada near to where the Sioux retreated after the battle. Both the 2nd and 7th Regiments participated in fighting in June 1876. The 2nd Regiment was engaged at the Battle of the Rosebud with Gen. Crook, who was on his way to support Custer but delayed to rest horses and troops and the rest, as we know, is history. Company D was with Capt. Benteen who had three men killed in action with an unknown number of revolvers lost. Company I had all 38 men killed in action with Custer and all 38 revolvers recovered by the Indians. Seven troopers of Company I were with the pack train detail and none were lost in battle. Statistical information was obtained from Colt Cavalry and Artillery Revolvers, a Continuing Study, Kopec & Fenn. The authors also state that there were a total of 266 men killed and 59 wounded in the battle, and it is estimated that approximately 300 Colt revolvers were lost by the troopers and recovered by the Indians. CONDITION: Good, all matching including bbl, cylinder and grip. The metal, overall retains an even dark brown patina, thinning around the rear edge of the frame from handling. Left front side of the frame has a series of dings as though it may have been dropped on rocks. Grip frame is matching patina. Cylinder is also matching patina with one small area of pitting. Grip has chipped toes and shows heavy wear with a hand worn patina. Hammer is not solid in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Strong bright bore with sharp rifling and a few scattered small spots of pitting. 52454-3 JRL (12,000-15,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

164


Session 1 1162. SCARCE CUSTER RANGE COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH KOPEC LETTER. SN 6045. Cal. 45 Colt. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” bbl, slightly thinned front sight and 1-line script letter address with the correct broken letters in the roll die. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and “U.S.”. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that has a tiny “A” (Orville W. Ainsworth) subinspector initial on bottom left edge. Bottom right edge of grip has crude carved initials “WW”. Mr. Ainsworth’s “A” is also found on bottom of bbl, trigger guard, backstrap and cylinder. Matching SNs were found on the frame, trigger guard, backstrap, bbl and cylinder. Backstrap channel of the grip is dark and oil stained, obliterating any possibility of seeing the orig number. Ejector housing is 1st Type with bullseye ejector rod head and base pin is correct type with dimpled ends. Revolver has early features consisting of a sharp toe on the buttstrap, sharp front edge on the ejector housing and large cylinder stop notches without approaches. This revolver was part of Lot 6 from which the 1st, 2nd and 7th Cavalry regiments were issued the “new” revolvers from this lot in 1874 with the 7th Cavalry receiving about 166 revolvers from the SN range 55056516. The backstrap of a single action revolver, SN 6048, was located on the Custer Battlefield in relic condition during the archeological work in 1984. The 2nd Cavalry received 106 of these revolvers and the 1st 236 revolvers in that serial range. The history of the 7th Cavalry and Custer’s debacle at the Little Bighorn against hostile Indians is extremely well known and needs no enhancement. The 2nd & 3rd Cavalry were equally storied and historic Cavalry regiments having fought Indians from Arizona to Montana and were actually present with General Crook at the Battle of the Rosebud on their way to support Custer at the Little Bighorn. The 1st Cavalry regiment was primarily stationed in California and their issue of these revolvers was shipped from Rock Island to Benicia Arsenal, California. The 1st Cavalry was also a historic regiment having fought Indians, outlaws and Mexicans throughout California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Idaho and Utah. The 1st Cavalry also was engaged in the Nez Perce War in 1877. Given the close proximity of the SN of this revolver with that of the backstrap recovered at the Little Bighorn (#6048) and the revolver (#6046) documented as having been issued to Company H, 2nd Cavalry as of June 11, 1874 lends credence to the belief that this revolver was present at the Battle of the Little Bighorn or as a minimum at the Battle of the Rosebud with the 2nd or 3rd Cavalry regiments. The fact that this revolver has remained in orig configuration until today is indicative that it escaped the recalls of the 1890s and early 20th century and further promotes the idea that it may have been captured by hostiles in June 1876. Accompanied by a 2-pg letter from renown Colt historian, author and collection John Kopec wherein he verifies most of the above information. CONDITION: Fair to good, all matching except grip as noted, which is probably orig to this revolver. Overall retains a smooth brown patina with fine surface pitting. Bbl retains blue under the ejector housing. Grip is sound and shows and old amateur refinish. Mechanics are fine. Strong bore with some shine and a partial ring about mid-point along with moderate pitting. 52497-1 (8,00010,000)

165

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1163.

RARE EARLY AINSWORTH INSPECTED COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 3839. This is a nice complete Single Action Army, manufactured in 1874 in standard configuration with 7-1/2” bbl, early donut shaped ejector knob, 1-line Hartford address with daggers. Matching SN 3839 found on every part normally numbered, bbl, frame, trigger guard, backstrap and cylinder. Grips have an indiscernible non-matching number that fit gun fairly well. Ainsworth “A” inspector marks are found on backstrap, under bbl, with proof firing “P”, cylinder and trigger guard. This gun is in the serial range with noted documented guns issued to Company K 4th US Cavalry in 1874, known SNs issued to Company K 4th US Cavalry include SNs 3816, 3822, 3824. These three 4th Cavalry guns were part of a shipment of 1000 guns shipped to the San Antonio Arsenal, January 15, 1874 and other known guns in that shipment also include SN 3833, so no doubt this gun, if not issued to the 4th was issued to another of the western Cavalry units. This gun is an honest survivor of an early orig configuration Single Action Army that no doubt saw action in the Indian War. CONDITION: Good to very good overall, complete, orig and all matching with exception of grips which appear civilian with no discernible cartouche and only a single inked SN visible “2”. Bbl retains strong traces of bright blue finish in protected areas, especially under ejector housing. Bbl address, 2-line patent and “US”, SNs and inspector marks are well discerned. Gun is a mottled gray overall with old cleaning & pitting. Grips are refinished & varnished, but match gun well, with slight rounding at inside toe. Mechanics function with bright, crisp bore. 51935-3 JS (6,500-7,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

166


Session 1 1164. PRIME CUSTER RANGE “LOT FIVE” COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 4708. Cal. 45. This gun is accompanied by a John Kopec Letter of Authenticity written in 2004. He states “this revolver originated from within LOT FIVE. Lot Five was one of the prime lots from which the U.S. Seventh Cavalry received their initial issues of these revolvers in July of 1874. It was many of these revolvers which had seen service at the famous Battle of the Little Bighorn, or Custer’s Last Stand. One revolver #4729 is cited in our book “Colt Cavalry and Artillery Revolvers” as being a “Presumptive, Pine Ridge Sioux Reservation Indian use” example. Several examples from within this serial number range were returned to Colt’s during 1895 to be refurbished. Among these we find; #4704, #4716, #4718, #4727, #4728, #4743, #4785 and #4791.”. This gun has had a fair amount of restoration and could quite easily have been a Indian used gun as so many are found missing ejector housings and other parts. Matching SN’s found on bbl, frame, trigger guard and backstrap. There is no SN on the grips or cylinder. The bbl has excellent correct 1-line Hartford address with daggers, but has been trimmed to just under 5-1/2”. CONDITION: Fair to good overall. Metal is overall mottled gray, though markings well discerned except first line of patent markings on left side of frame which are very light. Small Ainsworth “A”’s are found on bbl, trigger guard and backstrap, though light on backstrap. Ejector assembly is replaced and of third type. Front sight is an older restoration as are grips which are heavily worn but appear to be original Colt. Cylinder is highly buffed and also appears to be a replacement. Firing pin, according to Kopec appears to be a homemade replacement, main spring, base pin and base pin screw are also replacements. Mechanically functional with discernible rifling in bore 51965-1 JS (5,000-7,000)

1165. SCARCE COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY ARTILLERY REVOLVER WITH SEVERAL CUSTER RANGE PARTS ALL INSPECTED BY AINSWORTH. SN 5039. Cal. 45 Colt. Usual configuration with 5-1/2” bbl, thinned front sight and 1-line script letter address with serifs at each end. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and a small “U.S”. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that shows a clear “OCH” (Lt. Odis C. Horney) inspector cartouche under the date 1901 on the left side and the right side a clear “RAC” (Rinaldo A. Carr) sub-inspector cartouche. Mr. Carr’s initials also appear on the bottom left edge of the grip. Ejector housing is 1st type with bullseye ejector rod head and orig type copper colored ejector spring. Base pin is without dimpled ends. The buttstrap has the orig sharp toe while the ejector housing sharp front edge has been rounded, probably during the period of use. All of the parts except the grip have tiny “A” (Orville W. Ainsworth) inspector initials. The following SN’s were observed: 4798 on bbl; 3051 on trigger guard; 5742 on the buttstrap and 5296 on the cylinder. All of these parts are Custer range except the trigger guard, which was probably issued to the 4th Cavalry in January 1874. Revolvers in the SN range 4500-5504 were issued to the 7th Cavalry in March 1874 and those in the range of 5505-6516 were issued to the 7th Cavalry in April 1874. In the book Cavalry & Artillery Revolvers a Continuing Study, Kopeck & Fenn, the authors state that SN 5740 was documented to the 7th Cavalry in 1888. Most of these parts can be presumed to have been issued on Cavalry revolvers to the 7th, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Cavalry regiments and probably were present at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Especially the backstrap, no. 5742. The authors also cite numerous examples of Indian used and Pine Ridge Sioux Reservation used revolvers that are in the same range. Obviously, this is one of the revolves recalled to the arsenal where they were altered to Cavalry configuration with no thought to continuity of SN’s. These revolvers remained in service well into the 20th century before being sold as surplus. CONDITION: Fair to good. No orig finish remains, being overall smooth blue-grey patina with fine frosty pitting on the frame. Cylinder is a cleaned grey metal patina. Trigger guard and backstrap are also cleaned grey metal patina with fine pitting on backstrap. Grip has chipped toes with a few dings and bruises, and retains a hand worn patina. Hammer is not solid in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Strong dark bore. 52454-2 JRL (3,500-5,500) 167

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1166.

EXCEPTIONAL CLARK INSPECTED COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 55629. Cal. 45 Colt. Blue and color cased hardened with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of the frame has 3-line patent dates and “U.S.”. Mounted with matching numbered, oil finish 1-pc walnut grip that has oval “DAL” (Lt. David A. Lyle) inspector cartouche under the date “1880” on the left side and a rectangular “DFC” (David F. Clark) subinspector cartouche on the right. Mr. Clark’s initials also appear on the bottom right edge of the grip, on the cylinder, bottom of the bbl and bottom of the frame adjacent to the SN. Frame, trigger guard and buttstrap have full matching SNs and the bbl, cylinder and grip, in the backstrap channel, are marked with the last 4 digits of matching SN. Ejector housing is 2nd Type with bullseye ejector rod head and orig bronze colored spring. Base pin is orig type with dimpled ends. This revolver was among the early part of the 4th Contract produced in 1880. Several revolvers from this early 4th Contract are known to have been issued to both the 6th and 7th Cavalry as well as the Philippines Cebu police. The fact that this revolver remains in orig configuration with high orig conditioning attests to it having escaped the recalls of the 1890’s and early 20th century where thousands of cavalry revolvers were returned to both Colt and Springfield Arsenal for conversion to artillery configuration. This is one of the finest Lyle/Clark inspected Cavalry revolvers extant. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching as noted above. Bbl retains 95-96% strong, glossy orig blue with distinct “feathers” on each side of the front sight and each side of the ejector housing stud. Frame retains about 98-99% crisp, bright, orig case colors with only faint sharp edge wear and some slight fading on the recoil shield and loading gate. Screws retain virtually all of their orig fire blue. Hammer retains about all of its orig case colors, moderately faded. Trigger guard and backstrap retain most of their orig factory blue with sharp edge wear and some dulling of the backstrap. Cylinder retains about 95% strong orig blue, lightly thinned on the outer diameter, strong and bright in the flutes. Chambers retain virtually all of their orig factory blue. Grip is sound with a few minor nicks and dings on the right side showing light edge wear and overall retains most of its orig oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny showing most of its orig blue bore with no evidence of ever having been fired. 51857-1 JRL (20,00030,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

168


Session 1 1167.

SCARCE CASEY INSPECTED COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 16632. Cal. 45 Colt. Blue and color case hardened with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line script letter address. Left side of frame has 2-line 3 patent dates and a small “U.S.”. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that has last 4-digits of matching SN in backstrap channel. Left side of grip has a legible “APC” (A.P. Casey) sub-inspector cartouche. Bottom of grip, bottom of bbl, trigger guard, backstrap and cylinder all have small “C” inspector initials. Bottom of bbl under ejector housing has last 4-digit of matching SN which are also found on cylinder. Ejector housing is 1st type with bullseye ejector rod head and base pin is orig type with dimpled ends. This revolver is still in its orig cavalry configuration having escaped the recalls of 1893 and early 20th century when thousands of cavalry revolvers were recalled by the armory, refurbished and had their bbls shortened to 5-1/2” artillery configuration. This revolver was manufactured in 1875 during the height of the Indian wars when cavalry revolvers were in great demand. Most of the production of that period would have been issued to front line cavalry units. Others however were issued to state militias where they remained until they were declared surplus, returned to the arsenal and sold as surplus. That this revolver remains in near unfired condition attests to the fact that it was either stolen from the army, captured by the Indians or remained in a militia armory until sold. Accompanied by a John Kopec 2-pg letter wherein he validates most of the above information and states that this revolver “remains 100% authentic in every respect”. Also accompanied by a letter from Rob Judd of Rural Retreat, VA dated June 25, 2008 wherein he states that he received this revolver after his grandfather’s death in about 1956. His grandfather was Burt L. Knight of Manchester, CT and that he has no information beyond that. PROVENANCE: ExTommy Rholes Estate Collection. CONDITION: Fine to very fine. Overall retains traces of orig finish in the most sheltered areas, being a clean, smooth gray/brown patina. Front gullets of frame retain strong case colors and the hammer faded case colors. Cylinder retains blue in the flutes with the outer diameter matching patina to the revolver. Grip is crisp, showing light edge wear and a legible cartouche, lightly battered on the bottom edges. Hammer will not catch in the safety notch and is not solid in the half-cock notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Brilliant shiny bore, shows very little evidence of having been fired. 52072-1 JR101 (15,000-20,000)

169

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1168.

FINE COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER FROM THE LAST CONTRACT WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 131615. Cal. 45 Colt. Blue & color case hardened with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left front side of frame has 3-line patent dates and “U.S”. Mounted with oil finished 1-pc walnut grip that has the large “SEB” (Capt. Stanhope E. Blunt) inspector cartouche under the date 1890. Right side has the large “RAC” (Rinaldo A. Carr) sub-inpector cartouche. Mr. Carr’s initials also appear one the bottom edge of grip, bottom of bbl, bottom of frame and cyl. The “mystery” “K” inspector initial appears on the trigger guard and butt strap. Ejector housing is third type with half-moon ejector rod head and base pin is proper type without dimples. Accompanied by a Colt Factor letter addressed to Mr. R.H. Vanyek, dated Aug. 22, 1962 which identifies this revolver in cal 45, blue finish with 7-1/2” bbl, type of stock not listed and delivered to the U.S. gov’t inspector at the Colt plant on Apr. 30, 1890 in a 270 gun shipment. SN was observed in the usual places on the frame, trigger guard and butt strap with last four digits of matching no. on bottom of bbl and cyl. Back strap channel of the grip has the last four digits “1574”, obviously that of another revolver from the same shipment. Grips were probably mixed during a cleaning session in an armory or in the field. The fact that this revolver remains in original configuration attests to the premise that it escaped the recalls of the 1890’s and early 20th century where thousands of Calvary revolvers were converted to Artillery configuration. Very likely this revolver was assigned to a Calvary militia unit or was possibly stolen by a deserting soldier. Also accompanied by a box of twelve Frankford Arsenal Revolver Ball Cartridges dated 1878. This revolver was part of the 12th and 13th contracts for 2000 such items manufactured 18901891. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except grip, as noted above. Bbl retains about 93-95% strong original blue with light muzzle end holster wear and a couple of small dings. Front sight shows strong “feathers” on each side and on each side of the ejector rod stud. Frame retains about all of its orig case colors, strong and bright in the most sheltered areas, light to moderate fading elsewhere. Hammer retains brilliant case colors on sides and rear edge, faded on top edge. Hammer screw fire blue has faded with the other screws retaining most of their bright, shiny fire blue. Trigger guard and front strap retain about 95% bright original blue with the backstrap showing strong blue at the top and on the butt strap having worn to blue/grey patina elsewhere. Cyl retains about 85% original blue with sharp edge wear and thinning on the outer diameter, strong and bright in the flutes. Chambers of the cyl and bore retain most of their strong original blue indicating that the revolver has been fired very little. Grip is sound showing moderate edge wear with a couple of small chips and dings and retains most of its orig oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Cartridge box has repaired broken edges, pull string is intact. 52527-15 (17,500-25,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

170


Session 1 1169.

FINE COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER INSPECTED BY CAPT. STANHOPE E. BLUNT. SN 134183. Cal. 45 COLT. Blue & color case hardened with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight & 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 3-line patent dates and “US”. Ejector housing is 3rd type with half moon ejector rod head. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that has last 4-digits of matching SN in backstrap channel. Left side of grip has the faintly legible cartouche “SEB” (Capt. Stanhope E. Blunt) under the date that appears to be 1890. Right side has the faint outline of what would be the “RAC” (Rinaldo A. Carr), sub-inspector initials in cartouche. Mr. Carr’s initials also appear on left bottom edge of grip, bottom of bbl, bottom of frame & cylinder. The trigger guard, backstrap & ejector housing are marked with the mystery “K” inspector initial. This revolver was produced in 1890 as part of the 12th and 13th contracts signed in Nov. 1889 & Sept. 1890 for 2,000 revolvers each. Many of these revolvers were assigned to militia units where they remained until recalled and were then sold as surplus. That this revolver escaped the recalls of the 1890s and early 20th century where thousands of cavalry revolvers were converted to artillery configuration by having their bbls cut to 5-1/2”, attests to the fact that it was with an active cavalry unit, assigned to a militia or possibly had been stolen, which was not an uncommon occurrence. Regardless, few cavalry revolvers of that era remain today in orig configuration and with orig finish. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching including bbl, cylinder & grip. Bbl retains 93-95% glossy orig blue with light muzzle end wear and some thinning to the left side. Each side of the front sight and each side of the ejector stud show strong “feathers”. Ejector housing retains about 90-92% strong orig blue, thinning to silver on about an inch of the outer radius at the muzzle end. Frame & hammer retain about 95-96% orig case colors, strong in the front gullets and in sheltered areas, brighter on the right side. Hammer shows strong bright case colors, turned dark on top edge. Cylinder retains about 75-80% thin orig blue on the outer diameter, strong & bright in the flutes. Chambers of the cylinder & bore retain most of their orig blue indicating that it has been fired very little. Trigger guard & trigger plate retain about 80% strong, bright blue thinning on the front strap. Backstrap & buttstrap retain about 70-75% strong orig blue, thin in the middle with a spot of cleaned pitting on the buttstrap. Grip is sound showing heavy edge wear on the right side and overall retains a hand worn patina. Hammer is not solid in half cock notch, otherwise mechanics are fine, very bright shiny bore. 52699-1 JRL (12,500-17,500)

171

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1170. SCARCE CASEY INSPECTED COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 16650. Cal. 45 Colt. Blue and color cased hardened with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has partial 2-line patent dates and a partial “U.S.”. Ejector housing is 1st Type with bullseye ejector rod head. Base pin is a replacement without dimpled ends. Grip is a varnished civilian replacement with spurious matching pencil number in the backstrap channel. Left side of grip is crudely carved “WA” and right bottom edge of grip is carved with an “M” or “W”. The bbl and cylinder show last 4 digits of matching SN. Bbl, trigger guard, backstrap and cylinder have small “C” (A. P. Casey) sub-inspector initials. Casey inspected Cavalry revolvers are some of the more scarce to find. CONDITION: Fair to good, matching numbers as noted above. Overall retains a high quality restored finish with the bbl showing 30-40% blue with scattered fine pitting. Frame retains about 60% faded case colors and the hammer dark case colors. Cylinder is mostly a blue/brown patina on the outer diameter with blue in the flutes. Trigger guard and backstrap retain 50-60% thin blue. Grip has a chipped left toe and shows moderate to heavy edge wear with about 20% orig varnish. All the screws are replacements, probably at the time of refinish. Hammer is not solid in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Strong bore with moderate to heavy pitting. 52511-11 (6,500-8,000)

1171. COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 35387. Cal. 45 Colt. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 3-line patent dates and “U.S.”. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip whose cartouches have been obliterated during refinish. Matching SNs were observed on the frame, trigger guard and buttstrap with last 4 digits of matching SN on the bbl and cylinder. The sub-inspector initials “JTC” ( John T. Cleveland) appear on the frame, bottom of the bbl, cylinder and bottom left edge of grip. Ejector housing is 3rd Type with bullseye ejector rod head. Base pin is correct style with dimpled ends. Revolver has been completely refinished. This revolver was part of the 9th Extension of the Contract which encompassed 2,003 revolvers delivered in about 1877. CONDITION: Fair to good, all matching except grip as noted. Overall retains most of a custom, smooth, blue/ brown finish with faint sharp edge wear. Grip is sound with a smooth custom oil finish. Mechanics are fine. Strong sharp bore with fine frosty pitting. 52493-1 JRL (3,000-5,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

172


1173. EXTREMELY FINE COLT ARTILLERY SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 96458. Cal. 45. Standard configuration blue and case hardened, 1-line Hartford address, full front sight, 3-line patent & “US” on left side of frame. Mounted with a 1-pc walnut grip that has the date “1903” over “RAC” (Rinaldo A. Carr). Gun is in truly remarkable condition retaining virtually all of its orig finish. Frame is SN 96458, backstrap is 138270 and trigger guard is 6957 with small inspector “A” for Ainsworth. Trigger guard was part of a gun from LOT SEVEN which a portion of it would have gone to the 7th US Cavalry and at least 3 revolvers have Custer Battlefield association, #6559, #7047 and #7119 (see Kopec & Fenn, Cavalry & Artillery Revolvers, page 259262). However most guns in this series are associated with the 2nd and 5th US Cavalries. Regardless this is a remarkable gun that would be difficult to upgrade. PROVENANCE: Accompanied by a Colt Factory Letter confirming shipment on August 24, 1883. CONDITION: Extremely fine overall, gun appears orig and complete, retaining 97-98% bright blue on bbl, ejector housing, backstrap, trigger guard and cylinder. Frame & hammer retain virtually all of their bright and muted case colors. There is a light drag line on cylinder and several cosmetic scratched scattered on bbl, slight reductions of blue at muzzle and face of ejector housing. Grips are sound, well fit with hand worn patina and crisp cartouche. Mechanics are crisp with bright shiny bore. 51988-1 JS (6,500-8,500) 173

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1172. COLT CAVALRY SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER PRODUCED IN 1880 WITH KOPEC LETTER. SN 54637. Cal 45. Colt. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” bbl, slightly altered front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 3-line patent dates and “U.S.”. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that is probably orig to this revolver, although any number that was in the backstrap channel has been obliterated with oil stains. Left side of the grip shows the oval cartouche “DAL” (Lt. David A. Lyle) inspector cartouche under the date “1880”. Right side has the barely legible “DFC” (David F. Clark) sub inspector cartouche. Grip has 4 notches on the bottom left edge and 2 on the bottom right edge. Whether these notches represent men that the owner killed, gophers or skunks is unknown. Right center of the grip has the initials “JUD” or “TUD”. The J is reversed which would make it a lower case t. Ejector housing is second type with bullseye ejector rod head and base pin is orig type with dimpled ends. Accompanied by a 2-page letter from renowned Colt Single Action collector, researcher and author, John A. Kopec wherein he details much of the above information. Mr. Kopec also correctly pointed out that the “DFC” sub inspector mark on the bbl is different from known specimens of that mark and that the individual digits of the SN on the bottom of the bbl differ from the other identical digits on the rest of the revolver. Whether this bbl was changed at a later date is unclear at this time. This revolver was part of a large order of Colt’s from the fourth contract, delivered in 1880 and would have likely seen service with one of the Cavalry Regiments fighting Indians on the American frontier. The fact that it remains in orig configuration attests to the premise that it escaped the recall and conversion to artillery configuration in the 1890s and early 20th century. Whether it had been stolen, captured by hostiles or assigned to a militia unit is unknown as of this writing. CONDITION: About good, all matching except grip as noted. Orig finish remains only under the ejector housing and in the most sheltered areas. Screws are mostly in fine condition. Hammer retains dark case colors. Cylinder is a matching gray patina with an area of battering around one flute. Trigger guard & backstrap are a plummy brown patina. Grip is sound with a few light nicks and retains most of a fine hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, strong bright bore with scattered fine pitting. 52506-13 JRL (4,000-7,000)


Session 1 1174.

EXTRAORDINARY COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY CAVALRY REVOLVER U.S. ISSUE WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 131728. Cal. 45 LC. 7-1/2” bbl. Blue and case color finish. 1-pc walnut grip. Bbl shows correct 1-line address on top with “RAC/P” stamped on bottom in front of cyl pin. There is a “K” inspector mark at ejector rod stud. Frame shows a 3-line patent mark on forward left side with US to the rear. SNs match on frame, trigger guard, backstrap, bbl, and cyl. Last 4-digits of SN are written in ink in backstrap channel of grip. Frame has “RAC” stamp above SN. Cyl shows “RAC” and “P” on periphery. Trigger guard has “K” proof in front of bow. Backstrap has “K” proof behind SN. Grip has “SEB” cartouche on left side with “1890” over cartouche. Right side of grip shows “RAC” cartouche. PROVENANCE: Colt Factory letter confirming delivery to the U.S. Government inspector on April 30,1890. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl retains 90% brightblue finish with visible feather marks around front-sight and ejector rod stud. Blue has flaked slightly on right side of bbl address toward the breech where it has turned a plumb-brown patina. All bbl marks are sharp. Front-sight is full-sized, ejector rod housing shows 90% blue with front edge wear. Frame retains 90% of the slightly faded case color that is vivid under loading gate and in gullets in front of cyl. Frame markings are sharp. Frame screws show considerable blue. Hammer retains 90% case color on both sides front and rear. Trigger shows considerable blue. Trigger guard shows 95% blue. Slightly faded on forestrap. Backstrap shows 90% blue with some light scratches down back side and on butt. Cyl shows 80% blue finish that has flaked somewhat, has high edge wear, and a slight dragmark. Cyl flutes show strong blueberry color. Cyl markings are sharp. Grip is fine with nearly all the oil finish, sharp cartouches, and a few small handling marks. There are 2 small dents on the right side of butt. A wonderfully preserved example of a Colt Single Action Cavalry revolver shipped in 1890. 52154-7 (10,000-15,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

174


Session 1 1175.

*EXTREMELY RARE COLT PRE-WAR - POST-WAR SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER ASSEMBLED PRE-WAR BUT NOT SHIPPED UNTIL 1962 WITH ORIGINAL INVOICE, POST-WAR BLACK BOX, SHIPPING SLEEVE, AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 356850. Cal. 45 Colt. Nickel finish with 5-1/2” bbl, full thick front sight, 1-line block letter address and Model/Cal. marking on left side. Left front side of frame is marked with 2-line 3-patent dates and the Rampant Colt trademark. Mounted with Rampant Colt hard rubber grips. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 45 with 5-1/2” bbl, nickel finish, type of stocks not listed and shipped to Don Glaser, Emporia, KS on February 6, 1962 in a 1-gun shipment. In the remarks section “Records indicate this firearm was assembled on April 8, 1940 and later shipped as noted above, indicating that it was definitely a pre World War II weapon.”. Also accompanied by a copy of an express receipt from Colt dated February 6, 1962 in the name of Don Glaser, Emporia, KS. Additionally accompanied by 2 copies of a Colt Factory invoice also made out to Mr. Glaser for this revolver identified by caliber & SN. An additional accompaniment is a typewritten letter to Mr. Glaser from Mr. Jim Wilson of Denton, TX inquiring about the history of this revolver which he states he had recently traded for. The back of this letter is Mr. Glaser’s response to Mr. Wilson, handwritten wherein he states that he traded this gun to John Rohner of Boulder, CO, he further states that he had purchased it directly from Colt and had never pulled the hammer. Mr. Glaser and Mr. Rohner were the inventors & marketers of the Gravermeister Pneumatic Engraving Machine. Finally accompanied by the orig post-war black hinged lid box with gold & black end label and a blue & white “NICKEL FINISH” label. Bottom of the box has the handwritten brick red grease pencil SN that matches this revolver. This box contains an owners pamphlet, warranty card & “Handling the Handgun” pamphlet. Inside the box also has the orig tan tissue paper & wire handle bristle brush and is all contained in the orig cardboard shipping sleeve with blue & yellow Colt label addressed to Mr. Glaser in Emporia, KS with the hand stamps “EXPRESS COLLECT”. One additional accompaniment is the book COLT’S SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER PREWAR POST-WAR MODEL, Wilkerson with personalized presentation to Roger Perlock expressing appreciation for his help with this book and that a revolver from his personal collection is featured within, dated April 1991. Page 16 of this publication is a full page black & white photo of this revolver which lists manufacturing & shipping dates with credit to The Roger Perlock collection. Page 47 of this publication is a reproduction of the shipping invoice for this revolver. Page 19 of this publication states that there were only 6 revolvers found to have been assembled before World War II, but not shipped until the 1950s and 1960s. This is an exceptional & rare Single Action, the likes of which are unlikely to be offered again in this lifetime. PROVENANCE: Vince Sepulveda Collection. CONDITION: Excellent. Overall retains 99% plus crisp, orig nickel with only a faint bit of evidence that the cylinder has ever been turned. Right side of frame, just forward of the grip, has a small ding, otherwise the finish is flawless. Grips are equally crisp & new. The action was not cycled to check the mechanics or condition of the bore as it is readily apparent that it has never been fired. The box & paperwork are equally crisp & new. Book is excellent. 52598-2 (15,000-20,000) C&R 175

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1176.

*COLT PRE-WWII SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH SPECIAL GRIPS, ORIGINAL BOX AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 350802. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Blue and color case hardened with 5-1/2” bbl, full thick front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of bbl is marked “COLT FRONTIER SIX SHOOTER 44-40”. Left side of frame has 2-line 3-patent dates and Rampant Colt without a circle. Mounted with scarce Fleur-de-lis and diamond checkered, silver medallion, 2-pc walnut grips. Inside each grip is marked in pencil “4”. SN was observed on bottom front of frame and right side of front and back straps, under the grip. Accompanied by it’s orig, matching numbered, hinged lid burgundy cardboard box with black & white end label and a small blue over-label that is mostly illegible. The label inside the lid is pasted over a second label and is upside down. Box also contains a wire-handled bristle brush. Additionally accompanied by a Colt factory letter dated March 10, 1961 and addressed to renowned collector Mr. George Lewis of Kansas City, MO. The letter states that this revolver was in Cal. 44 with 5-1/2” bbl, blue finish and checkered wood stocks, shipped to W. S. Brown, Pittsburgh, PA on October 7, 1927. It is rather uncommon to find these pre-war single actions with their orig box in such high condition. Also accompanied by a Smith & Wesson style hinged lid mahogany case with dovetail corners and yellow felt lining. PROVENANCE: George Lewis. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching except cylinder which is properly un-numbered and grips as noted. Overall retains about 99% plus crisp orig finish with brilliant case colors on the frame in sheltered areas, lightly to moderately faded elsewhere. Screws retain virtually all of their crisp orig blue. Hammer retains brilliant case colors, turned a little dark on top edge. Grip frame retains virtually all of its orig blue as does the cylinder. Grips are crisp, fit extremely well and are probably orig to this gun showing only faint diamond point wear. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Appears to be new and unfired. Box is sound showing moderate edge wear and light soil. Mahogany case is fine. 52527-11 (12,000-18,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

176


Session 1 1177.

COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY FLAT TOP TARGET MODEL REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 162899. Cal. 32 WCF. 7-1/2” bbl. Full blue finish. 2-pc checkered hard rubber grips with Colt medallion. Bbl shows 1-line Colt address on top with cal mark on left side. Front-sight is a brass blade type. Frame is of the flat top variety, with rear-sight in mortise adjustable for windage. Front of frame on left side shows 2-line patent address with rampant Colt logo in a circle to rear. SN matches on frame, trigger guard, and backstrap. Last 4-digits of SN is scratched on inside of each grip. Assembly no. “38” is stamped on inside face of loading gate and on frame under trigger guard. Cyl is not marked. Accompanied by a Colt Factory Letter confirming the features of this revolver and showing shipment on October 25, 1909 to R.H. Shayer, address unlisted. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl shows a professionally restored blue finish, with sharp address and cal mark. Bbl shows only slight muzzle wear and a few light scratches. Ejector rod housing also shows 95% blue finish with slight high point wear at muzzle end. Bore is frosty with strong rifling. Frame shows 80% dark blue finish with sharp markings. Some small stains on top strap and left outer re-coil shield and loading gate. There are few tiny scratches on right side. Trigger guard and backstrap show 7080% blue finish, turning plumbgray on the outside surface of trigger guard bow and on front and forestrap. All SN marks are sharp. Hammer retains 7080% orig case color with sharp knurling. Cyl shows 90% blue finish with a slight drag-mark and some staining on front face. Chambers are dark. Grips are fine with sharp checkering and no losses. One of only 925 single action flat top target revolvers manufactured. This revolver was shipped in 1909. Fourteen years after it was manufactured. 52154-8 (8,500-12,500)

177

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1178. ULTRA RARE COLT’S VERY FIRST CALIBER 44 CENTERFIRE SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER PRODUCED WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 36026. Cal. 44 RF Henry/44 WCF (44-40). This revolver has a somewhat long history beginning on April 26, 1877 when it was shipped to Colt’s London Agency for delivery to the Turkish Government for test trials. It seems that Baron Von Oppen, Colt’s brother-in-law and European representative, had learned that Winchester was attempting to sell the Turkish Government some 30,000 of their, then available, 44 caliber revolvers. He hurriedly contacted Gen. Franklin, Colt’s Vice President regarding the situation. Gen. Franklin, under the impression that Turkey was using the Winchester Model 1873, had three revolvers, including this one, made up and shipped to the London agency for delivery to Constantinople. This was apparently done in very short order as this revolver has no British proofs indicating it did not stay in England for any length of time. Gen. Franklin’s mistaken belief regarding the model of the Turkish rifles being .44RF Henry for the 1866 Winchester rather than the Cal 44-40 of the Model 1873, led to the modification of this revolver, apparently by a Turkish armorer. He cleverly replaced the orig firing pin with a hook-billed, pointed, flat firing pin retained with a sgl rivet and modified the frame firing pin recess to accommodate this rimfire adaptation. It is readily apparent in looking into the chambers that this revolver was fired innumerable times using the much shorter 44 rimfire case as there is a ring in each chamber at precisely the correct distance to where the mouth of the rimfire case would have been. The areas forward of the ring & face of cylinder have heavy pitting, a further indication of heavy use by these corrosive cartridges. The orig first type ejector rod housing was apparently lost or damaged and replaced during the period of use with a later second type stud mounted into the orig screw hole in bbl. Unfortunately the person doing this work was not an accomplished gunsmith as the stud extends into the bore. Had it been fired after installation it likely would have blown the stud back out of the hole. It still retains its orig bullseye ejector rod head. This revolver is described as having a standard 7-1/2” bbl with 1-line “script” address with serifs at each end. The bore has the standard rifling of six wide lands & grooves and was produced for the earlier rimfire revolvers. It has the broken die in the “O” of “CO” and on the “A” in “HARTFORD” of the bbl address. It is thought that this address was completely discontinued in the early 20,000 serial range, therefore further supporting the theory that this was a recycled 44 rimfire bbl that Colt was simply disposing of. As it stands, this is on record as probably being the highest serial numbered revolver with a script bbl address. This revolver also has the Cal. marking “44 CF” on left shoulder of trigger guard and is mounted with a 1-pc walnut grip. There is a spurious “U.S.” stamp on left side of frame, apparently by some nefarious individual thinking to make this a more valuable piece by marking it as a martial Colt. A previous consignor states that he had owned this revolver well over 40 years, having purchased it from an antique dealer at that time. Accompanied by a 3-page letter from renowned author, researcher & collector, John Kopec detailing most of the above information. Also accompanied by a copy of the Summer 2002 The Rampant Colt magazine in which Mr. Kopec has also written a 3-page article with photographs of this same revolver. Additionally accompanied by a Colt Factory letter identifying this revolver as having been shipped to Colt’s London Agency April 26, 1877 in a shipment of three same type guns. The other two serial numbers are 36327 & 36264. Additionally accompanied by a custom glass and walnut display case. PROVENANCE: The Forrest G. Rhodes collection. CONDITION: Good, all matching including bbl & cylinder. Traces of orig finish remain in very sheltered areas being mostly a smooth gray/brown patina. Grip is sound showing heavy wear with traces of orig varnish. Buttstrap screw is battered as are the frame screws and the base pin screw. Hammer is not solid in safety or half cock notches, otherwise mechanics are fine, strong bright bore with fine pitting. Display case is fine. 52465-9 JRL (9,000-15,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

178


Session 1 1179.

COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH VON OPPEN TRADEMARK STAMPED ON RIGHT SIDE OF TRIGGER GUARD WITH COLT FACTORY LETTER. SN 15304. Cal. 45 ELEY SHORT. 5-1/2” bbl. Blue and case color finish. 1-pc walnut grip. Top of bbl shows correct script Colt address with broken O-die. Left rear of bbl shows 2 small British proof marks. Last 4 digits of SN stamped under ejector rod housing at breech. “C” inspector mark behind ejector rod stud socket. “S” inspector mark between socket and screw hold. Ejector rod housing is of the first type with locating stud and no exit provision for the rod. Frame shows correct 2-line patent mark on forward left side. SN matches on frame, trigger guard, and backstrap. Last 4-digits of SN appears on bbl, cyl, and are written in ink in backstrap channel of grip. Assembly no. “25” is stamped on rear face of loading gate and on bottom of frame under trigger guard. Left side of trigger guard is stamped “45” over “B”. Cyl shows small British proofs around rear periphery. Right side of trigger guard shows the trademark stamped of Barron Fredrick Von Oppen, who was Colt’s London agent. Accompanying this revolver is a Colt Factory Letter showing cal and blue finish. Bbl lengths and grips are not listed, and showing shipment to Colt’s London Agency on November 5, 1874 in a shipment of 100 guns. Also included is a letter stating that this revolver was purchased from well-known collector/dealer Ron Dean. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl retains 50% bright blue finish with the balance having flaked to a smooth plumb-brown patina with some light scratches. Markings are sharp. Front sight is full-sized. Bore is frosty with sharp rifling. Ejector rod housing retains 70% blue finish with most of wear on outer edge toward muzzle. Donut ejector rod head shows wear on outer edge. Frame retains 90% of vivid case color finish that is somewhat thin on topstrap, left recoil shield, and loading gate. Frame screws retain nearly all of their fire-blue finish. Frame markings are sharp. Trigger guard retains 90% blue-finish that is slightly worn on outer edge of trigger guard and forestrap. Some scratching around front screw. Markings are sharp. Backstrap retains 80% bright-blue that has faded down backstrap and at heel of butt. Hammer shows vivid case color on both sides and rear face with some slight scratch marks on sides of hammer. Trigger shows bright blue on both sides. Grip screws retain a generous amount of blue finish. Cyl retains 30-40% blue that has flaked to a bluegray patina. Flutes have a strong blueberry color. Cyl has a slight drag-mark. Markings are sharp. Chambers are good. Cyl base pin retains nearly all of blue-finish and is not marred. Base pin screw also retains nearly all of blue. Grip shows almost all of orig varnish finish with a few dents and scratches particularly on right heel, and some high point wear. Grip fits perfectly. A chance to purchase a very fine example of a Colt Single Action Army revolver with early features and a genuine Von Oppen trademark. 52154-9 (8,500-12,500)

179

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1180.

EARLY COLT 44 CENTER FIRE SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH PERIOD HOLSTER THAT BELONGED TO MURDERER LINCOLN SPROLE AND DEPUTY U.S. MARSHAL BADGE OSTENSIBLY THE PROPERTY OF DEPUTY JOHN WILLIAMS. SN 89678. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Usual configuration with 7-1/2” bbl, thinned front sight & 1-line block letter address. Bottom of the bbl is hand stamped in small letters “PROP. USDC. WDA” (Property of the District Court. Western District of Arkansas). Left side of frame has 3-line patent dates and left front web of trigger guard is marked “44 CF”. Ejector housing is 3rd type with half moon ejector rod head and what appears to be the orig copper colored spring. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip whose backstrap channel is dark & oil stained obliterating any number. Left side of grip is crudely hand-carved “L SPROLE”. Right grip has a carved single notch. Base pin is orig type with dimpled ends. Accompanied by a period 3-loop tooled leather holster with 4 nickel-silver concho’s and a leg strap through a hole cut in the toe. Belt loop stitching apparently deteriorated and came loose so the owner secured the belt loop with 2 copper harness rivets, 1 of which has pulled through. Additionally accompanied by a nickel-silver shield shaped badge, 2” x 1-1/2” marked on the front “DEPUTY / U.S. / MARSHAL” with a spread winged eagle over the top and a small serpentine shaped mark at the bottom. Bottom side edges have small cast holes. The pin on the back is through a brass planchet with the pin itself of spring brass. Top left rear side is stamped “LAS&SCO” (Los Angeles Stamp & Stationary Company). This revolver was produced about 1883 in an era when these revolvers were in great demand on the American frontier. Lincoln Sprole was living on a farm in Paul’s Valley, Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma Territory in May 1885, when he had and argument with a neighbor, Ben Clark, and his 18 year old son, Alex, over watering livestock at a well. Nothing was settled and later as Clark and his son were returning home from the town of White Bead Hill, Indian territory, after having purchased provisions, they were ambushed by Sprole, who fired from the brush alongside the road. Mr. Clark was mortally wounded and his son was shot in the leg and the chest. Mr. Clark died six hours later and his son died eleven days later. Sprole left the area, but was tracked down by Deputy US Marshall John Williams and returned to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where he was convicted by the hanging judge, Isaac Parker and hanged July 23, 1886. A local newspaper observed “it is only to be regretted that he has not two necks to break instead of one”. Accompanied by a large packet of information regarding this incident and the trial records thereof, copies of records from the archives of the district court, western district of Arkansas, Fort Smith division. Many of these papers deal with the issuance of warrants for Sprole and subpoenas to witnesses for the trial, many of which either mention or are signed by Deputy Marshall John Williams. It is well known that back in that era, confiscated property of convicted felons was retained by the court or the law enforcement officer himself for future use. In this instance, this revolver and holster were retained by the court and probably issued to law enforcement officers for us in enforcing the law. With the addition of the badge, ostensibly that belonged to Deputy Williams, it can be surmised that this revolver and holster were issued to Deputy Williams. If in fact this was a U.S. Marshal’s gun it saw hard & continuous service under the most severe conditions, often with little or no maintenance. CONDITION: Fair, all matching, grip as noted. Bbl retains 10-15% bright blue under the ejector housing with the balance a blue/brown patina and pitting around the muzzle. Frame, hammer, cylinder, front & backstraps are a plummy brown patina. Grip is sound showing heavy wear with battering on both bottom edges and the buttstrap. Mechanics are fine, strong bore with sharp rifling and moderate pitting. The 6 &7 of the serial number on the buttstrap have been re-stamped. The 7 on the trigger guard is restamped. Holster shows commensurate wear, handling & use with heavy soil. Badge shows moderate to heavy wear with some minor oxidation on the front and heavy oxidation on the back. We do not guarantee the authenticity of the badge. 52700-24 JRL (4,000-6,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

180


COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER FROM THE 1182. RIMFIRE SERIES WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 778. Cal. 44 RF. 7-1/2” bbl. Blue and case color finish. 1-pc walnut grip. Bbl shows correct 1-line bold address with a small “44” stamped under cyl pin. Bbl has correct equal land, equal groove rifling with left hand twist. Frame has correct 2-line address on forward left side. SN matches on frame, trigger guard, backstrap, bbl, and cyl. Ejector rod head is of the correct donut type. Hammer slot has been widened and re-welded and shows remnants of a “G” inspector mark. Hammer is a replacement. Firing pin has been replaced. Hammer was originally center fire type. Frame screws are replacements. Loading gate shows assembly no. “253”. Revolver was not further disassembled. Backstrap is of the correct type with a sweep at the heel. Trigger guard shows no cal mark. Cyl is of the correct type with rim-fire cannelures that have been slightly bored out. Trigger guard and backstrap screws are replacements. Cyl base pin and screw are replacements. Accompanied by a Colt Factory Letter confirming cal 44 RF, blue finish, shipped to Schuyler, Hartley & Graham on March 14, 1876. CONDITION: Good, in general. This is an example of an orig Colt rimfire revolver that at one time was converted to a center-fire and at a later date, reconverted back to rimfire. Revolver has a reblue finish overall. Bbl markings are sharp. Bore is frosty with strong rifling. Frame has been blued overall and shows some minor pitting. Backstrap and trigger guard were also re-blued and show some roughness, especially around the straps. As previously noted, hammer has been converted with a new firing pin. Cyl is of the correct type and shows polishing and reblue overall. Grip is not numbered and is slightly under-sized all around. Hammer does not stay on half-cock. A good representative example of a very rare Colt Single Action revolver, one of approx 1,900 produced. 52154-1 (5,000-7,500)

181

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1181. RARE COLT RIMFIRE SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER DOUGLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE. SN 694. Cal. 44. This is an honest example of early production rimfire Single Action in standard configuration with 7-1/2” bbl with early single line Colt Hartford address with daggers. Bottom of bbl marked with tiny “44” and has matching SN under the ejector housing. Ejector housing is correct and of the first type with correct style bullseye ejector rod head. Left side of frame has 2-line patent and “44 CAL” is stamped on rear left side of trigger guard. This gun appears orig and complete with well weathered orig Colt ivory grips. Bottom of butt is engraved in block letters “DOUGLAS Co. S.0” (Douglas County, Sheriff ’s Office, Omaha?). Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Gun is good overall. All matching SN’s found except grips which are not numbered. SN’s found on bbl, cylinder, frame, trigger guard & backstrap. Markings are all easily discerned as is the Sheriff ’s Office markings on bottom of grip. Metal overall is a mottled gray with staining and light pitting. Light holster wear. Grips are slightly underfit and there is a old chip repair at rear of left toe. 52001-2 JS (5,500-7,500) ESA


Session 1

1183. SPECTACULAR SILVER PLATED TOMMY HAAS RESTORED AND ENGRAVED COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 11519. Cal. 45 Colt. Extremely beautiful silver plated single action with 7-1/2” bbl, 1-line script address with serifs at each end and without any broken dies. Left side of bbl has the caliber marking and left front side of frame has 2-line patent dates. Revolver is very beautifully engraved with full frame coverage Nimschke-style engraving with fine pearled background. Engraving consists of foliate arabesque patterns with Nimschke’s trademark flower at the center of a couple of the scrolls. Engraving extends 3” up the sides of the bbl with a Moorish pattern around the address and a scalloped border at the muzzle. Front sight is surrounded by an engraved flower blossom. It also has the scalloped pattern in the ejector rod housing gullet with other border patterns. Cylinder has engraving patterns on the lands between the flutes with border patterns at the rear edge. Top strap is engraved with feather & bar patterns. Top of the backstrap has a well executed fan with diamond & dot center. Balance of the backstrap, buttstrap & trigger guard are also beautifully engraved. Trigger, bullseye ejector rod head, base pin and all the screws show high quality fire-blue. Fitted with spectacular pearl grips that have a deep relief American eagle on the right side. Accompanied by a fine custom walnut & glass display case. PROVENANCE: The Forrest G. Rhodes collection. CONDITION: Extremely fine, unfired since custom plating after engraving. It retains all of this fine silver finish. The grips are equally exceptional with tremendous fire and color. Mechanics are crisp. Brilliant, shiny bore. Display case is equally new. 52465-10 JRL (7,50012,500)

1184. *FINE PRE-WWII COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH ORIGINAL BOX SHIPPED IN 1957 AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 357416. Cal. 45 Colt. Blue & color case hardened with 5-1/2” bbl, full thick front sight, 1-line address with model & caliber marking on left side. Left side of frame has 2-line 3-patent dates and rampant Colt. Mounted with rampant Colt hard rubber grips matching numbered to this revolver. SN was observed on frame & right side of front & back straps under the grip. Last two digits of SN are on rear face of cyl. Accompanied by its orig, matching numbered, dark burgundy, hinged lid box with black & white end label and an owner’s manual, a wire handle bristle brush & its orig factory target. Also accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in cal 45 with 5-1/2” bbl, blue finish, type of stocks not listed and shipped to Joseph A. Lorch Washington, D.C. on Jan 14, 1957 in a 5-gun shipment. It is believed that only about 850 single action Colts were produced in 1940, the year of manufacture of this revolver. A large percentage of those 1940-produced single actions were shipped to England on the lend-lease program. Very few remained in the factory, apparently forgotten until they were discovered and sold in the 1950s & 1960s. They are rarely encountered and almost never found in pristine new condition with their orig boxes. CONDITION: Extraordinarily fine, all matching, appears to be new & unfired. Overall retains 99%+ crisp orig factory finish with bright blue & brilliant case colors; cyl shows little evidence of ever having been turned. Grips are crisp. Box has a break in top front edge and has broken rear corners in the lid; bottom is sound with all corners showing wear. Accessories are fine. 52527-16 JR188 (7,500-10,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

182


1186. *EXTREMELY RARE PREWAR/POST-WAR SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER THAT WAS SERIAL NUMBERED PRE-WAR BUT PROBABLY NOT ASSEMBLED UNTIL WELL INTO THE 1950S OR 1960S AND NOT SHIPPED UNTIL 1965 WITH POST-WAR BLACK BOX AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 357709. Cal. 45 COLT. Blue & color case hardened with 5-1/2” bbl, full thick front sight with post-war bbl that has the address on the right side and Model & caliber marking on left side. Left side of frame has 2-line 3-patent dates and the Rampant Colt. Mounted with unnumbered Rampant Colt post-war hard rubber grips. Cylinder is post-war type with Rampant Colt on the rear face between 2 chambers and 3-digits of a SN “852” on the face between chambers and the number “60” around the cylinder pin bushing. Hammer is post-war type with high polish blue top & back edges and bright polished sides. Frame is color case hardened that appears to be cyanide coloring rather than Colt-style bone-meal color case hardening. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in caliber 45 Colt with 5-1/2” bbl, type of finish & type of stocks not listed, shipped to Major F.E. Smith, San Antonio, TX on Oct. 19,1965 in a one gun shipment. According to The Book of Colt Firearms, Wilson, pre-war production ceased in 1940 with SN 357859 which would indicate that this revolver was serialized in that series, however beginning in 1947 and running into the 1960s there were approximately 300 revolvers assembled from leftover parts. Given that this revolver was assembled with post-war parts, i.e. bbl, cylinder, hammer & grips and the fact that it has cyanide-style coloring rather than Colt-style bone-meal color case hardening, leads one to believe that this revolver may have been reworked outside the factory. Accompanied by its orig hinged lid, black cardboard box with brick red grease pencil matching serial number on the bottom. Inside the box has the owners pamphlet, a Handling the Handgun pamphlet and warranty card along with a wire handled bristle brush. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except cylinder & grips as noted. Overall retains 99% plus fine Colt blue on the bbl, cylinder, ejector housing & grip frame and about 99% plus cyanide colors on the frame & loading gate. Hammer retains bright blue on the edges and bright polish on the sides. Grips are equally new showing no flaws. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Box has broken corners in the lid and is missing the front edge of the top. Bottom of the box has a break in one end & another in the back side and shows internal wear in 2 places from the hammer. 52527-20 JRL (3,500-5,000) C&R 183

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1185. *FINE PRE-WII COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH SPECIAL ORDER GRIPS. SN 344297. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Blue & color case hardened with 5-1/2” bbl, full thick front sight and 1-line block letter address with left side of bbl marked “COLT FRONTIER SIX SHOOTER 44-40”. Left front side of frame has 2-line 3 patent dates and Rampant Colt in a broken circle. Mounted with special order fleur-de-lis and diamond checkered, deep gold medallion, Rampant Colt 2-pc walnut grips. SN was observed in the usual place on bottom front of frame and on right side of front & back straps under the grip. Last 2 digits of matching SN are on rear face of cylinder. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine, all matching including cylinder. Grips are properly unnumbered, however their fit is near perfect and appear to have spent their lifetime on this revolver. Bbl retains 98% crisp orig blue with a few small nicks and faint muzzle edge wear on the left side. Ejector housing retains 96-97% crisp orig blue. Frame retains brilliant case colors in sheltered areas with the balance strong and bright showing slight fading. Hammer retains brilliant case colors. Cylinder retains about 98% crisp orig blue with virtually all of its orig blue in the chambers, appears to be unfired. Front & backstraps retain blue turning to gray with strong blue at top of backstrap, on buttstrap and around the trigger guard. Grips are sound with an added light finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52527-14 JRL (6,500-8,500) C&R


Session 1 1187. *EXTREMELY FINE COLT “FRONTIER SIX SHOOTER” SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH FACTORY IVORY GRIPS. SN 353727. Cal. 44. Nickel finish with 4-3/4” bbl, full front sight, 2-line address and roll marked on left side “COLT FRONTIER SIX SHOOTER .44-40”. Left side of frame has 2-line 3-patent dates with Rampant Colt. SN was observed on bottom of frame and right side of front and backstraps under grip. Mounted with smooth 2-pc silver medallion ivory grips, matching numbered in pencil on the inside. Based on SN, this revolver was made in 1929. PROVENANCE: Ex-Tony Smith 1995; Ex-Robert Howard Collection. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching including “elephant ivory” grips. Overall retains virtually all crisp orig nickel finish with exception of front sight as noted below. Has seen little use, though face of the cyl cleaned. Front sight has a small blemish and loss of finish at top left. Grips are sound with a few age lines and retains a fine golden ivory patina. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52150-1 (7,500-12,500) C&R; ESA

1188. *BEAUTIFUL COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 206323. Cal. 45 Colt. Nickel finish with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 2-line 3 patent dates and Rampant Colt in a circle. Mounted with 2-pc smooth pearl grips. It is engraved in the style of Cuno Helfricht with full coverage on the frame & recoil shields. Cylinder is engraved with fine alternating flourishes of arabesque patterns and sunburst patterns on the lands between the flutes with a snake & dot decoration on the back edge. The bbl is extensively engraved from the frame to the end of the ejector rod housing and on both sides of the muzzle. Recoil shield & loading gate are engraved in Helfricht-style sunburst patterns. Ejector housing is engraved with snake & dot patterns in the top gullet and on the outer radius with foliate arabesque patterns at each end. The top of the backstrap is engraved with Helfricht-style fan pattern with wavy border and a geometric pattern down the backstrap & on the butt strap. The trigger guard is engraved with matching geometric patterns and all the engraving has pearl background. Screws, base pin & ejector head are beautifully fire-blued. Accompanied by a fine walnut & glass display case. PROVENANCE: The Forrest G. Rhodes collection. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching except grips which are unnumbered. It retains 99% plus factory-style restored nickel finish with bright fire-blued screws, ejector rod head and base pin. Grips are beautiful with lots of fire and fit extremely well. Mechanics are crisp. Strong bright bore, dark in the grooves with fine pitting. Display case is extremely fine, showing virtually all of its orig custom finish. 52465-7 JRL (5,000-10,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

184


Session 1 1189. CONSECUTIVE NUMBERED LOT OF TWO EARLY COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVERS WITH FACTORY LETTER. 1) COLT SAA. SN 33332. Cal. 45 Colt. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 3-line patent dates and left shoulder of trigger guard is marked “45 CAL”. Mounted with a varnished 1-pc walnut grip that may be an old replacement. Ejector housing is second type with bullseye ejector rod head and base pin is a modern replacement in the correct style with dimpled ends. CONDITION: Fair, all matching except grip which is unnumbered. No orig finish remains being an overall gray metal patina with the bbl, possibly a renumbered replacement has been polished bright with scattered fine pitting. Trigger guard & backstrap retain traces of orig blue and the cylinder, plummy blue in the flutes. Grip has chipped toes and shows extreme heavy wear with a couple of gouges and shows a hand worn patina with traces of orig varnish on the bottom edges. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore. 2) COLT SAA. SN 33333. Cal. 45 Colt. Nickel finish with 7-1/2” bbl, slightly altered front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 3-line patent dates. Ejector housing is third type with bullseye ejector rod head and base pin is a later replacement. Mounted with smooth 1-pc ivory grip built in the early Colt style consisting of a block of wood attached inside each grip, and are probably orig to this revolver. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in cal. 45, blue finish with bbl length & type of stocks not listed, shipped Dec. 30, 1876 to the H.D. Folsom Arms Co, NY,NY in a 50-gun shipment. Most likely the nickel plating & grips were added by Folsom Arms. These early single actions were prized possessions and working tools on the American frontier and are rarely found today in orig configuration with any orig finish. Finding a consecutive numbered pair such as we have here is indeed a great rarity. CONDITION: Poor to fair, all matching except grip which is unnumbered. Overall retains traces or of nickel in most the most sheltered areas, being mostly a dark rust patina with moderate to heavy pitting. Base pin screw, hammer screw & trigger guard screws are somewhat battered. Grip is sound with fine age lines in the bottom edge and shows a golden ivory patina that only comes with great age. Hammer is not solid in half cock notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Strong dark bore with moderate to heavy pitting. ESA Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. 52506-10, 52506-11 JRL (5,500-7,500) 185

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1190. SUPERB BLACK POWDER FRAME COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 151385. Cal. 41 Colt. Blue & color cased hardened with 4-3/4” bbl, full front sight and 2-line address with caliber marking on left side. Bottom of bbl is marked “41” just forward of the frame. Left side of frame has 2-line 3-patent dates and rampant Colt in a circle. Mounted with 2-pc rampant Colt hard rubber grips that have last four digits of matching SN scratched inside each grip. Of the approx. 357,859 single action revolvers produced in the period 1873 thru WWII only about 16,402 were made in caliber 41 Colt. Few of that small number were made with 4-3/4” bbls and of those very few survive today with high orig finish. With this revolver having been produced in about 1893, an era when carrying a sidearm was a daily way of life and given the high condition that it retains it is likely that this revolver was the property of someone in law enforcement or a wealthy cattleman. PROVENANCE: Colt factory records indicate shipment to Meacham & Co, St. Louis, in 1893. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching including grips. Bbl retains about 95% strong orig blue with light muzzle edge wear on the left side; ejector housing retains bright blue in the gullets having thin orig blue on the outer radius and wear on the tip; frame & hammer retain most of their bright, orig case colors, very strong on sides of frame and front gullets, faded over top strap, left recoil shield & loading gate; top edge of hammer has faded to silver; trigger guard retains strong blue with the front strap a blue/gray patina; top of back strap & butt strap retain strong, bright orig blue, faded to blue/ gray patina elsewhere; cyl retains 75-80% thinning orig blue on outer diameter, strong & bright in the flutes, front & rear faces; chambers of the cyl retain most of their bright orig blue showing very little use. Screws appear to be untouched, retaining about all of their bright fire blue. Grips are sound showing light diamond point wear, turning chocolate. Hammer is not solid in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore. 52699-2 JRL (5,000-7,500)

1191. COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER FROM 1880 WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 44404. Cal 45 Colt. Usual configuration with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight that has been welded in place and 1-line block letter address. Left side of frame has 3-line patent dates and left shoulder of trigger guard is marked “45 CAL”. Mounted with 1-pc walnut grip that has last 4 digits of matching SN in backstrap channel. Ejector housing is second type with bullseye ejector rod head and base pin is a later replacement. Right side of frame, below the loading gate is stamped “H:O:P:” and is a double stamp, below that marking is the letter “P”. Accompanied by a Colt Factory letter which identifies this revolver in cal 45 Colt, blue finish, bbl length & type of stocks not listed, shipped to Simmons Hardware Company, St. Louis, Missouri on March 2, 1880 in a 50 gun shipment. Single Actions of this era were in great demand on the American frontier and are rarely found today in orig configuration with orig finish. They usually saw very hard service in extremes of weather and harsh conditions, often with ordinary cowboys, lawmen & outlaws and occasionally captured by hostile Indians, lending further wear and damage. CONDITION: Fair to good, all matching including bbl, cylinder & grip. Overall retains a cleaned gray metal patina with traces of blue under the ejector housing and in the most sheltered areas. Cylinder is a matching gray patina. Numbers on the frame & cylinder have been re-stamped and most of the screws are replacements. Base pin & backstrap screws are orig and moderately battered. Grip has a chipped right toe, otherwise is sound showing heavy wear and a dark hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore with fine pitting. 52506-12 JRL (3,000-5,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

186


1193. *COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY BISLEY REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 218760. Cal. 38 WCF. 5-1/2” bbl. Blue and case color finish. Bbl shows 1-line Colt address with model and cal mark on left side. Front-sight has a high fat profile. Frame shows 2-line patent address on left side with rampant Colt logo to rear. Hammer slot shows “2 over W”. SN matches on frame, trigger guard, and backstrap. Loading gate shows assembly no. “436” on rear face. Revolver was not further disassembled. Left rear bow of trigger-guard shows an “&”. Inside of trigger-guard and backstrap shows “620B”. Backstrap and forestrap have been finely checkered. Front face of cyl also shows “620B”. Grips are not marked. This revolver is accompanied by a Colt Factory Letter confirming cal, bbl, and finish. Showing shipment to Blish, Mize, & Silliman Hardware Company, Atchison, Kansas on December 7, 1901. CONDITION: Fine, as totally refinished by Colt. Bbl has 95% of factory re-blue finish with sharp markings and slight muzzle wear. Bore is bright with strong rifling. Frame shows 80% formaldehyde case color finish that is vivid in the gullets in front of cyl and under loading gate. Frame screws show nearly all blue finish. Trigger-guard and backstrap show nearly all of the factory re-blue finish with sharp markings and sharp checkering. Hammer shows vivid color on right side, left side is somewhat scratched. Top of hammer is silver-gray with traces of case color and sharp checkering. Rear-sight slot has been enlarged to a V-shape. Trigger retains nearly all of blue finish. Cyl retains 90% blue finish with high point wear, a slight drag-mark, and some roughness on front face. Chambers are good. A very attractive Colt Bisley revolver that was refinished at the Colt Factory between World War I and World War II. 52154-10 (4,500-6,500) C&R 187

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1192. COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH 2-PIECE EAGLE GRIPS WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 176668. Cal. 45 LC. 4-3/4” bbl. Blue and case color finish. 2-pc checkered hard rubber grips with Colt medallions and American Eagle motif. Bbl shows 1-line Colt address on top with a thick front-sight. Right side of bbl shows model and cal mark. Frame shows 2-line patent date on forward side with rampant Colt logo in a circle to rear. SNs match on frame, trigger guard, and backstrap. Cyl has rampant Colt logo stamped on rear face. Hammer has polished sides. Trigger is of a fat profile. Grips are marked “Colt’s HTFD. Conn.”. Letter from Cody Firearms Museum indicating shipment to A. H. Shapleigh Hardware Company on February 26, 1898. CONDITION: Fine, as totally refinished and rebuilt. Bbl, cyl, trigger, base pin, screws, and grips are post World War II Colt manufacture. Bbl shows 95% blue finish with sharp marks. Frame shows 95% case color finish. Trigger guard and backstrap show 95% blue finish with some small scratches. Cyl shows 90% blue finish with a few small scratches. Bore is bright with strong rifling. Hammer has coarse knurling with a line border, with blue top and rear, polished sides. Grips are fine with sharp checkering and clear motifes. A nice antique Colt Single Action Army revolver that was rebuilt after World War II using factory parts. 52154-6 (2,500-4,500)


Session 1 1194.

*RARE BRACE OF COLT BISLEY SINGLE ACTION REVOLVERS WITH BOHLIN SILVER GRIPS AND BOHLIN DOUBLE BUSCADERO TOOLED SILVER MOUNTED HOLSTER RIG. SN 309570/262595. 1) Cal. 38 Colt. SN 262595. Blue and color case hardened with 5-1/2” replacement bbl that has a gold bead altered replacement front sight with 1-line block letter address, marked on left side “(BISLEY MODEL) 38 COLT”. Left side of frame has 2-line three patent dates and Rampant Colt trademark. Backstrap has been fully checkered. Mounted with fantastic engraved hollow Bohlin 2-pc silver grips with screw from right grip. Grips are engraved in incredible foliate arabesque and floral patterns with fine shaded background. Left grip, at the bottom edge is inlaid with the raised gold initials “HMH” (H.M.Horkheimer 18821962). Left side of front strap and buttstrap, under the grip is marked with the assembly number “359”, which number is also found inside the ejector housing but not on the bbl or cylinder. This number indicates that this revolver had been returned to Colt for rework, probably at which time the bbl and cylinder were replaced. 2) Cal. 38 Special. SN 309570. Blue and color case hardened with 5-1/2” bbl that has altered, wedge-shaped front sight pinned over the orig sight. Bbl has 1-line block letter address and left side is marked “(BISLEY MODEL) / COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY .38 SPECIAL”. Left side of frame has 2-line three patent date and Rampant Colt in circle. This revolver is mounted with nearly identically engraved grips to match number 1 above with the screw from the left grip. Right grip is inlaid with the raised gold initials “HMH”. Revolvers are accompanied by an incredible Bohlin-made dbl Buscadero rig about 44” l x 3-1/4 w lined dark brown leather belt tooled in foliate and floral arabesque patterns that have fine pearled background. The entire bottom edge of the belt is studded with small silver flower blossom buttons. The billets are mounted with a beautifully engraved Bohlin silver buckle set, marked on back of buckle. The holsters made for 5-1/2” bbl Single Action revolvers have elliptical Cheyenne plugs with sewn back edge and fine calfskin lining. Holsters are secured to the skirts with a sgl strap that each have a fine engraved Bohlin buckle marked on the back “STERLING”. One of these

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

188


Reverse

straps is broken and the other very dry and fragile. Top edge of holsters and completely around the skirts are mounted with matching silver floral buttons. Back of the belt and back of each holster has the “BOHLIN-MADE / CALIF. / HOLLYWOOD” cartouche and back of each holster and belt are professionally hand-carved “H.M.Horkheimer”. Mr. Horkheimer, along with his brother founded the Balboa Amusement Production Company, an early film production company based in Long Beach, California. They began making movies in 1911 and ceased production in 1918 after having produced 229 mostly short films. This is an incredible set by one of Hollywood’s most famous silver and leather companies. The likelihood is that Mr. Horkheimer may have starred in some of his own movies and used this rig with his costume. CONDITION: 1) Fine. Bbl and cylinder retain about 95-96% glossy Colt blue. Frame and hammer retain about 95% orig case colors, strong in front gullets, moderately faded elsewhere. Trigger guard and front strap retain about 95% thinning Colt blue and the backstrap is a blue-grey patina. Grips are extremely fine. Mechanics are crisp. Brilliant shiny bore. 2) Bbl and cylinder retain 95-98% crisp Colt blue with only sharp edge wear. Frame and hammer retain about 30-40% faded case colors with the balance silver-grey. Trigger guard and backstrap retain about 70% orig blue, strong on the trigger guard, faded on the backstrap. Grips are extremely fine. Hammer is not solid in safety or half-cocked notches, otherwise mechanics are fine. Brilliant shiny bore. Holster rig is somewhat dry, in need of treatment with its one broken strap. Otherwise, it is extremely fine with sharp tooling showing little wear or soil. 52587-1 JRL (15,000-25,000) C&R

189

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1195.

*EXCEPTIONAL CONSECUTIVE NUMBERED PAIR OF COLT STOREKEEPER MODEL SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVERS CATTLE BRAND ENGRAVED AND INLAID WITH SILVER BY COLT MASTER ENGRAVER GEORGE SPRING. SN SA65254/SA65255. Cal. 45 COLT. Revolvers are as nearly as possible precisely identical. They are 3rd generation storekeeper’s model with 2-line address on their 4” bbls. They have full front sights that have been slightly thinned during the engraving & finishing process. They are full blue finish with 100% coverage, fantastic silver inlaid cattle brands in the tradition of Cole Agee and his successor, Weldon Bledsoe. The entire surrounding surfaces are beautifully pearled except for fine artistic borders and in the flutes of the cylinder. Front straps & trigger plates are likewise not engraved and neither are the hammers. They are mounted with fleur-de-lis & diamond checkered 2-pc ivory grips that are matching numbered to the revolvers. Left side of buttstraps under the grips are engraved “SPRING”, the signature of George Spring, Colt Master Engraver for many years who was at one time in charge of the engraving department. Accompanied by a Colt custom shop oak display case that has gray velvet lining, compartmented in the bottom for both revolvers, with working key. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Revolvers are exactly identical in condition. Both appear to be new & unfired, possibly unturned. Grips are equally new with a light ivory patina. Case is equally new. 52543-1 JRL (15,000-25,000) ESA

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

190


*SCARCE COLT PEACEMAKER CENTENNIAL SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER WITH CASE. SN 520PC. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Nickle finish with 7-1/2 bbl, full thin front sight and one line script letter address with deep etched panel “COLT FRONTIER SIX SHOOTER” on the left side. Left side of frame has 2-line patent dates and left shoulder of trigger guard is marked “.44 C.F.” mounted with matching numbered eagle/rampant Colt hard rubber grips. Right side of bbl, above ejector housing is marked “1873 PEACEMAKER CENTENNIAL 1973” ejector rod has bullseye ejector rod head. Revolver is built on a black powder frame with early features of a sharp toe on the butt strap and sharp edge on front end of ejector housing along with the script letter address and 2-patent dates. Accompanied by a brown leatherette covered, hinged lid, brown velvet lined Colt Custom Shop case that is recessed in the bottom for the revolver and probably a small rectangular plaque, which is missing. Top of the case is embossed in dark brown lettering “1873 Peacemaker Centennial 1973” under the outline of the Rampant Colt. Left front corner of the lid is embossed “Cal. 44-40” and right front corner is embossed with the stylized Colt logo. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching including cyl and grips. Overall retains 99% plus bright orig nickel. Grips are crisp as are the mechanics, brilliant shiny bore, new and unfired. Case is equally new. 52001-3 JRL (1,500-2,500) C&R

1197.

RARE COLT MODEL 1878 DA FRONTIER REVOLVER ASSIGNED TO THE CANADIAN MINISTRY OF MILITIA AND DEFENSE WITH PROVENANCE TO THE BOER WAR. SN 14725. Cal. 45 Colt. Nickel finish with 7-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address. Left front web of trigger guard is marked “45 CAL”. Mounted with Rampant Colt hard rubber grips and has a lanyard swivel in the butt. Left front side of frame is stamped through the nickel, “223.MD”. According to an article which appeared in the June 1997 issue of The Gun Report, John Fera, in 1885 Canada was in turmoil with a full scale rebellion in Northwest Territories led by Louis Riel. Just prior to the beginning of the rebellion, the Canadian Government realizing that the rebellion was imminent began looking to the Militia to augment the Royal Canadian Northwest Mounted Police (RCMP) to suppress this rebellion. They realized that the Militia was poorly armed with Civil War surplus Spencer rifles and obsolete Colt 1851 Navy revolvers. They ordered that the Militia arms be immediately updated before the rebellion became a reality. This was the responsibility of the Department Of Militia & Defense. That department contacted the New York firm of Hartley & Graham to furnish 1001 Colt Model 1878 DA revolvers in cal .45 Colt with nickel finish. The first part of the order was immediately filled from stock with a rush order shipped from Colt in several increments. According to the article, these 1001 revolvers all fall within the serial range 8731 to 14996 with the majority in the 14,000 serial range. The rebellion was quickly suppressed with Louis Riel captured and hanged. Eventually all of these revolvers were returned to militia armories where they remained until about 1899 when they were re-issued to the militia for the Boer War in South Africa. Apparently many of these revolvers returned from South Africa and were sold surplus. Also several publications show that they were issued with a flap holster as found here. Accompanied by a brown leather flap holster with narrow security strap which attaches to a brass stud on the backside just above the belt loop. Inside the flap of this holster is marked in pen “A.A.G.” and “VIII C.M.R.” which stands for Canadian Mounted Rifles which was the first unit assigned to South Africa. Holster has a Cheyenne plug and marked as noted above. PROVENANCE: Phil A. Bleakney, Jr. collection. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except grips which are unnumbered. Overall retains most of its orig nickel with some very minor pitting on the bottom right front of the frame. Trigger & hammer retain strong fire blue on their edges. Grips are sound showing light diamond point wear. Mechanics are fine. Bright shiny bore. Holster is also fine. 52634-5 (5,000-8,000)

191

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1196.


Session 1

1198. COLT MODEL 1878 DA FRONTIER REVOLVER IN A SCARCE CALIBER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 30184. Cal. 476 Eley. Blue finish with 5-1/2” bbl, full front sight and 1-line block letter address with Cal. marking on the left side. Mounted with 2-pc Rampant Colt bird head hard rubber grips that are turning slightly chocolate. Bottom of grip frame is mounted with a factory lanyard ring. Left side of the grip frame, under the grip, is marked with assembly number “32” which also appears on the loading gate. Rear face of the cylinder is marked with last three digits of matching SN. Bottom of the bbl, just forward of the frame, is marked with the number “460” and tiny British proofs which also appear in flutes of cylinder. Accompanied by a Colt factory letter which identifies this revolver in Cal. 476 with 5-1/2” bbl, blue finish, type of stocks not listed and shipped to Colt’s London agency on April 2, 1892 in a 38 gun shipment. Of the approximately 51,000 Models 1878 produced 1878-1905, very few were chambered in 476 Eley. PROVENANCE: Ex-Bob Allen Collection. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching as noted above. Bbl and frame retain about 95% glossy orig factory blue with minor flaking and slight holster wear, more pronounced on the top strap. Ejector housing retains about 90% glossy orig blue and the cylinder also about 90% with losses mostly from flaking with some light holster wear and a couple spots of pitting. Grips are crisp showing extremely light diamond point wear. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore. 52173-1 JRL (4,000-6,000) 1199.

RARE AND FINE CASED FACTORY ENGRAVED PANEL SCENE SMITH & WESSON MODEL 1-1/2 SPUR TRIGGER REVOLVER. SN 111283. Cal. 32. 3-1/2” keyhole bbl, nickel finish, motherof-pearl grips. Frame, bbl, and cyl have extensive engraving including panel scenes on either side of frame of sailing ship and a landscape. Gun is housed in a red baize lined mahogany case with box of Peter’s .32 cal rimfire cartridges. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Gun is fine overall, retaining 98-99% original nickel, well fit mother-of-pearl grips with excellent color. Engraving crisp, as are other markings with scattered areas of staining and pinprick pitting especially near muzzle. Mechanical crisp, with bright bore, with patch of pitting near muzzle. Accompanying case is sound and solid with soiled and stained interior. Cartridge pack is still sealed and unopened. 52328-24 JS (4,500-6,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

192


FINE CASED SMITH & WESSON OLD MODEL 1-1/2 TIP-UP SPUR TRIGGER REVOLVER. SN 21293. Cal. 32 RF. Blue finish with flat side keyhole shaped bbl half-moon German silver front sight and 2-line bbl address. Cylinder is unfluted with five chambers and revolver is mounted with 2-pc smooth Rosewood grips matching numbered to this revolver. Left side of buttstrap, under the grip is marked with assembly number “G1” with matching assembly numbers on rear face of bbl lug and front face of cylinder. Accompanied by an orig burgundy velvet lined mahogany case compartmented in the bottom for the revolver and a mahogany cartridge block containing five cartridges, one of which is a dud. Box also has a slot containing a wire cleaning rod. There were approximately 26300 of these small revolvers manufactured 1865-1868. They were a smaller version of the venerable No. 2 Old Model revolver with some slight modifications, eliminating the cylinder stop spring and sight in the top strap. Their small size made them very popular as concealment arms, especially with gamblers and ladies as muff pistols. They often saw very hard service with little or no maintenance and are rarely found today with high orig finish and cased examples are extremely rare. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching including cylinder and grips. Overall retains 96-97% glossy orig blue with some minor flaking on bbl lug and flats of bbl, which spots have turned to medium patina. Cylinder retains about 98% orig blue. Ejector pin and hammer retain about 98% strong orig case colors. Grips are sound with a couple minor chips on right edge and show about 98% orig finish. Mechanics are crisp. Bright shiny bore, appears to be unfired. Case is sound with usual handling and storage, nicks and dings, and retains about 95% orig varnish. Interior is moderately to heavily faded with moderate soil and lining damage from the hammer spur. 52328-26 JRL (2,500-3,500)

1201.

EXCEPTIONAL CASED SMITH & WESSON NO. 2 OLD MODEL ARMY TIP-UP SPUR TRIGGER REVOLVER. SN 15103. Cal. 32 RF. Blue finish with 6” oct keyhole shaped bbl with half-moon German silver front sight and 1-line address. Cylinder is unfluted with six chambers and revolver is mounted with 2-pc Rosewood grips matching numbered to this revolver. Left side of buttstrap, under the heel is marked with the assembly number “CC8”. Matching assembly numbers are found on rear face of bbl lug and front face of cylinder. Accompanied by an orig green velvet lined mahogany case that is compartmented in the bottom for the revolver and a box for cartridges with two other empty compartments. The cartridge box compartment contains an opened U.S. Cartridge Co. box for 50 rnds of 32 short rimfire cartridges containing two live rnds and one fired bullet. Also in the box is a small yellow paper from U.S. Cartridge extolling the virtues of these cartridges. The box has a very artistic black and white top label with two panels of red lettering and two artistic panels in the bottom corners. It has an orange wrapper band with black printing. There were 77,155 of these revolvers produced 1861-1874. They were extremely popular throughout the Civil War and later on the American frontier. They rarely are ever found today with orig finish in orig configuration. Cased examples are extremely rare. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching. Overall retains 9899% glossy orig blue with only faint muzzle and sharp edgewear. Grips have one or two minor nicks, otherwise retain about 99% orig varnish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore appears to be new and unfired. Case is sound with light handling and storage nicks and scratches and retains about 98% orig varnish. Interior is lightly faded with moderate soil in the bottom and a damaged spot from the hammer spur. Cartridge box is lightly faded with moderate soil. A scarce example of a revolver usually found well-used. 52328-23 JRL (5,0007,500) 193

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1200.


Session 1 1202.

RARE SMITH & WESSON MODEL 320 REVOLVING RIFLE COMPLETE WITH CARRYING CASE, SIGHTS, AMMUNITION AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 376. Cal. 320 Smith & Wesson Rifle. Blue finish with scarce 20” ribbed keyhole shaped bbl and attachable globe front sight with crosshairs and a 2-positon flip rear sight. Mounted with mottled red & black hard rubber forearm and rnd butt diamond checkered 2-pc grips. Grips are matching numbered to the revolver in the right side. Accompanied by an orig attachable walnut shoulder stock with blued yoke and Smith & Wesson logo embossed, checkered hard rubber buttplate. Bottom of walnut stock is inlaid with a small gold shield which is inscribed “B.V. Howe / Cambridge / DEC 1880”. Also accompanied by an orig rare blued tang sight, the plug screw for the threaded hole in the buttstock yoke for when the tang sight is not installed and a blued disassembly pin. Additionally accompanied by a full box of Remington/UMC cartridges for this rifle along with 6 additional loose rounds. It is all contained in an orig brown baize lined oil cloth covered cardboard case with orig carrying handle. Case also contains a wooden cleaning rod and small pin punch. The two security straps are damaged with one missing its buckle. According to Smith & Wesson 18571945, Neal & Jinks, there were 977 of these rare rifles produced of which 840 were sold in the United States. They were all manufactured in 1880 but remained in inventory until 1887. Of the total production, only 224 were produced with 20” bbl which was the lowest production of all three bbl lengths. The chart on pg 97 of the referenced publication lists this revolving rifle by SN as having been produced with a 20” bbl. Very few of these rare firearms survive today, especially with orig sights, buttstock and case. PROVENANCE: Factory letter indicating that this gun was shipped to E.B. Platt on December 11, 1880. The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching including bbl, cylinder and grips, buttstock is properly un-numbered. Bbl retains about 95-96% glossy orig blue with a few spots of scattered rust on the left side. Frame retains 95-96% strong orig blue with a couple of scratches and the loss areas flaked to a light patina. Hammer & trigger guard show faded case colors. Cylinder retains about 88-90% orig blue with loss areas flaked to a light patina and showing sharp edge wear with a cylinder line. Front sight has a small ding on the front knurled ring. Forearm & grips are fine showing light diamond point wear and turned a little dark on the grips. Buttstock is sound with a couple of small nicks and dings and retains most of a fine professionally restored finish. The blued steel yoke retains about 50-60% orig blue with loss areas flaked to a light patina. Buttplate is sound showing light to moderate wear. Tang sight and plug screw retain most of their orig blue. Cartridge box is sealed in plastic but appears to be dark but well preserved. Case has broken edges with all of its brass reinforcing corners intact. Exterior is faded and stained showing heavy wear. Interior is also faded and stained with damage to the areas around the front and rear sights. A couple of the interior partitions have broken corners 52328-29 JRL (12,00015,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

194


Session 1 1203. EXTREMELY RARE FACTORY ENGRAVED WITH GOLD FINISH SMITH & WESSON NEW MODEL NO. 3 SINGLE ACTION TARGET REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 28020. Cal 44 Russian. Gold finish with 6-1/2” key hole shaped bbl, target front sight & target rear sight as part of the bbl latch. Mounted with 2-pc smooth pearl grips. Revolver is factory engraved with about 50-60% coverage very fine, intertwined foliate arabesque patterns that have pearled background. Matching engraving is found on the top strap, back strap & buttstrap with additional matching engraving on the cylinder lands between the flutes. Accompanied by a Smith & Wesson factory letter which identifies this revolver as a “Special Order Variation” in caliber 44 Russian which was shipped on Nov 5 1892 to James Conlin, no address listed. Records show that it was shipped with a 6-1/2” bbl, gold plated finish, engraved & pearl grips. The letter further states that this revolver was completed with a group of other special revolvers but the invoices are no longer available to provide details. Mr. James S. Conlin was a world famous target shooter who owned a shooting gallery in New York in the 1890s. He was very well known in target shooting circles and competed with some of the top name shooters of that day. This is revolver serial number 28020 is nearly identical to the Annie Oakley presentation gun currently housed at the Autry Museum in CA. A number of Model 3 revolvers in the upper 27000 and lower 28000 serial range where presented to notable shooters and Friends of the Wesson family. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching numbers. Overall retains 60-70% orig gold finish with the balance having flaked to dark metal patina. Trigger guard retains case colors on the sides with the balance turned silver. Hammer retains strong case colors especially on the right side and rear edge. Right grip has a chip at the frame otherwise grips are sound with good fire and color. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Appears to be unfired. Loss of finish appears to be simply from poor storage. 52347-1 (8,500-10,000)

195

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1204. SCARCE SMITH & WESSON 2nd MODEL AMERICAN SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 14933. Cal. 44 American. Blue finish with 8” keyhole shaped bbl, pinned half moon front sight with rear sight integral with the bbl latch. Left side of the bbl is hand engraved “WILLIAMS & POWELL, LIVERPOOL.” and it has tiny British proofs on bottom of bbl and in each flute of cyl. Mounted with matching numbered, very nicely figured, smooth 2-pc walnut grips. Buttstrap has a plug screw in the lanyard loop hole. Right heel of the grip frame, under the grip is marked with the assembly number “502” which is also found on rear face of cyl. and bbl. According to Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms there were about 20,735 of these revolvers produced 18721874 in both center fire and rim fire. This model was little changed from the first model, primarily with the addition of a reinforcing “hump” around the trigger guard pin and changing the front sight from German silver to blued steel. They were, like the first model, quite popular on the American frontier and saw extensive service on both sides of the law and ordinary citizens. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine, all matching including bbl, cyl. and grips. Overall retains about 93-95% strong factory blue with light muzzle end wear with minor flaking and sharp edge wear around the frame. Back strap is slightly thinned. Hammer retains about 60% faded case colors and the trigger guard faded case colors in sheltered areas having mostly turned grey. Grips are sound showing light to moderate edge wear and retained a hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine. Bright shiny bore with one or two small spots of pitting. Altogether a fine, scarce Smith & Wesson. 52328-27 JRL (5,000-8,000)

1205. SCARCE NICKEL FINISH SMITH & WESSON 1st MODEL AMERICAN SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 3336. Cal. 44 American. Nickel finish with 8” keyhole shaped bbl, pinned half-moon German silver front sight and rear sight integral with the bbl latch. Mounted with matching numbered, smooth, 2-pc walnut grips. Right heel of the grip frame is marked with assembly no. “PO”. The cylinder and bbl bear the assembly no. “P8”, obviously an assemblers mistake. According to Flayderman’s Guide to Antique Firearms there were about 8,000 of these large frame revolvers produced 1870-1872. Bottom of the bbl has the long ejector housing without hole and has a tiny “P” in a diamond stamp. These revolvers were extremely popular on the American frontier by members of law enforcement and outlaws and history records that the Ford brothers carried such revolvers which were used to assassinate the infamous outlaw Jesse James. Such luminaries of the Old West as Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley were also known to have owned these large frame Smith & Wesson’s. It is alleged that Wyatt Earp carried one of these revolvers in the shootout at the OK Corral and that there were a few of these revolvers at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, probably carried by Custer’s scouts or by hostile Indians. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching including grips, cylinder and bbl, numbered as noted above. Overall retains about 98% strong orig nickel with a few light scratches, some dulling and turning slightly milky. Hammer retains strong bright case colors on the sides and rear edge with the top edge faded to grey. Trigger guard retains faded case colors in shaded areas, mostly having turned to grey. Grips are sound showing light edge wear with a few scattered light nicks and scratches and retain virtually all of their orig oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 52328-28 JRL (5,000-8,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

196


RARE FACTORY CONTRACT CASED SMITH & WESSON 3rd MODEL SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 5639. Cal. 38. Nickel 4” keyhole bbl with 2-line address and “Model of 91”. Standard configuration with 5-shot fluted cylinder, custom mother-of-pearl medallion grips and fine purple baize lined mahogany casing. Accompanied by pictorial cartridge box. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Fine overall retaining 97-98% orig nickel with one 1/4” flake at left rear of top strap, minor cosmetic scratches and scuffs. Grips are fine, well fit with good color. Trigger guard and hammer retain muted case colors. Mechanically fine with crisp shiny bore. Casing is very good to fine, retaining most of its orig varnish with minor staining and scuffing. Interior has wear and soiling. Cartridge pack is taped and only contains 8 cartridges. Bore brush and functional key are also present. 52328-25 JS (4,5005,500)

1207. SCARCE SPECIAL ORDER SMITH & WESSON NEW MODEL NO. 3 TARGET SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 33453. Cal. 44 Russian. Blue finish with 6-1/2” keyhole shaped bbl, target front sight on the rib and adjustable target rear sight in the top strap/bbl latch. The trigger is full checkered and it is mounted with a 3rd Model Russian trigger guard with finger rest. Grip frame is mounted with diamond checkered walnut grips that have a crude carved “B” on the right side. Hammer and trigger guard are color case hardened. Accompanied by a Smith & Wesson factory letter over the signature of Roy Jinks, Smith & Wesson historian, which states that this revolver was shipped April 25, 1902 to M. R. Robinson (a major Smith & Wesson distributor in New York). No other information is included in the letter, although Mr. Jinks does state that while the checkered trigger and Russian trigger guard are not mentioned in the records “they are probably factory original”. Special order target models of this series are quite scarce, especially in high condition. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching except grips which are un-numbered. Overall retains about 96-98% strong orig factory blue with only some light flaking in a few spots on the bbl and bbl lug and slight muzzle end wear. Cylinder shows sharp edge wear with strong bright blue mixed with light flaking over most of the outer diameter, crisp and strong in the flutes. Hammer retains bright case colors on the sides fading to grey on the top edge. Trigger guard retains faded case colors in shaded areas, mostly faded to a grey patina. Grips are sound showing faint diamond point wear and retain most of their orig finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52328-31 JRL (5,000-7,500) 197

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1206.


Session 1 1208. *VERY FINE FACTORY ENGRAVED AND INSCRIBED SMITH & WESSON 32 SAFETY HAMMERLESS WITH MOTHER OF PEARL GRIPS AND FACTORY LETTER. SN 148804. Cal. 32. Accompanying factory letter states this gun was special engraved variation, shipped June 15, 1906 to W.A. Wilkins, Jr. at unknown address. Gun matches records received with 3-1/2” bbl, nickel finish, style 2 engraving with name engraved “MARIE BOSLER” on frame and pearl grips. Gun is in beautiful condition retaining most of its orig finish and fine aesthetics. CONDITION: Very fine overall retaining 95% orig bright nickel with scattered areas of staining & pitting. Mechanics are crisp with bright bore. Trigger guard retains about 70% bright blue and trigger retains most of its muted case colors with light pitting. 2-pc Mother of pearl grips complete with Smith & Wesson medallions with good color and well fit. 52536-1 JS (3,000-4,000) C&R 1209.

*EXTREMELY RARE SMITH & WESSON PRE-WWII REGISTERED MAGNUM DA REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 56287/REG NO. 3669. Cal. .357 Magnum. Blue finish with 6-1/2” full-ribbed bbl, McGivern gold bead Partridge front sight and adjustable rear sight. The entire top rib and top strap are beautifully checkered. Hammer has fine checkered spur with serrations on each side. Mounted with matching numbered, silver medallion, diamond checkered Magna 2-pc grips. Inside the crane, on the frame, is marked “REG. 3669”. Accompanied by its orig, matching numbered blue & gold 2-pc box with a picture of the revolver on the top. Interior is Chinese red with directions for use in both English and Spanish inside the lid. Also accompanied by a Smith & Wesson factory letter over the signature of Roy Jinks, historian for Smith & Wesson wherein he states that this model of revolver was introduced by Smith & Wesson in 1935 and was offered with bbl lengths 3-1/2” to 8-3/4”. He states that these revolvers were custom ordered to the individual buyers specifications and that only 5,500 were ever produced. The letter states that this revolver was shipped April 18, 1938 to the George Worthington Company, Cleveland, OH. Registered Magnums are inherently rare, but to find one with its orig numbered box is an extreme rarity. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus. all matching including bbl, cylinder and grips. Overall retains 99% plus crisp, glossy, orig factory blue with only a hint of muzzle edge wear and an extremely fine cylinder line. Grips are equally crisp and new with no apparent wear and retain virtually all of their orig factory finish. Trigger and hammer retain virtually all of their bright factory case colors. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore, appears to be new and unfired. Box is sound with light edge wear and faded blue on the top. 52469-1 JRL (9,000-14,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

198


Session 1 1210.

*RARE SMITH & WESSON PRE-WWII REGISTERED MAGNUM DA REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 47143/REG NO. 671. Cal. 357 Magnum. Blue finish with 8-3/8� ribbed bbl, Partridge front sight and adjustable rear sight. The rib and top strap of the frame are beautifully checkered. Hammer spur has very fine checkering with serrations on both sides. Mounted with Smith & Wesson large silver medallion diamond checkered walnut grips. Grips are un-numbered, but fit perfectly and are undoubtedly orig to this revolver. Grip frame is mounted with factory grip adapter with hard rubber insert back of the trigger guard. Trigger is standard with full length serrations. Accompanied by a Smith & Wesson factory letter which identifies this revolver with blue finish, 8-3/8� bbl, Partridge front sight and was sold with factory grip adapter. It was shipped December 23, 1935 to the Frank P. Hall Company, Columbus, OH in a one gun shipment. Bbl and frame have standard markings. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching including bbl and cylinder except grip, as noted above. Overall revolver retains 98-99% orig glossy factory blue with only faint muzzle edge wear and a fine cylinder line. Hammer and trigger both retain virtually all of their orig factory case colors. Grips are crisp showing virtually no wear and retain about all of their orig factory finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore, has been fired but very little 52328-41 JRL (7,500-10,000) C&R

199

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1211.

*EXTREMELY RARE SMITH & WESSON PRE-WWII REGISTERED MAGNUM DA REVOLVER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 51383. Cal. .357 Magnum. Blue finish with scarce 8-3/4” full-ribbed bbl, King illuminated red front sight on a ramp with King Model 112 white outline adjustable rear sight. The entire top rib, rear of front sight face to the ramp and top strap are beautifully checkered. Hammer has fine checkered spur with serrations on each side. Mounted with matching numbered, silver medallion, diamond checkered Magna 2-pc grips. Inside the crane, on the frame, is marked “REG. 2326”. Accompanied by an orig, un-numbered blue & gold 2-pc box for this model revolver with a picture of the revolver on the top. Interior is Chinese red with directions for use in both English and Spanish inside the lid. Also accompanied by a Smith & Wesson factory letter over the signature of Roy Jinks, historian for Smith & Wesson wherein he states that this model of revolver was introduced by Smith & Wesson in 1935 and was offered with bbl lengths 3-1/2” to 8-3/4”. He states that these revolvers were custom ordered to the individual buyer’s specifications and that only 5,500 were ever produced. The letter states that this revolver was shipped May 20, 1937 to the D. W. King Sight Company, San Francisco, CA with 8.75” (8-3/4”) bbl with King 1/10 red post on ramp with reflector base sight, King 112 white outline rear sight, blue finish with Magna grips and sighted at 50 yards with dead center hold. Also accompanied by this revolver’s orig registration certificate which identifies this revolver, as found, issued to Raymond A. Magnuson, Peoria, IL with 3-1/2# single action trigger pull and 10# double action trigger pull. Additionally accompanied by the orig document shipping tube and label from Smith & Wesson to Mr. Magnuson with a July 22 cancellation of a 3 cent stamp. Also accompanied by an extremely early US Cartridge Co. 50 rnd box of “.357 S. & W.” ammunition containing 39 rnds of orig ammo with head stamp only marked “357 S. & W.” and the company name with large primers. Box is 2-pc style with a faded red & black label. Registered Magnums are inherently rare, but to find one with complete documentation, a box and early ammo is an extreme rarity. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, all matching including bbl, cylinder and grips. Overall retains about 99% crisp, glossy orig factory blue with only faint sharp edge wear at the muzzle and a light cylinder line. Trigger and hammer retain strong case colors. Grips are crisp showing no wear or damage. Mechanics are crisp. Brilliant shiny bore, has been fired, likely the 11 rnds missing from the accompanying box. Box is sound showing edge and corner wear with moderate fading to the blue color on the lid. The orig registration certificate is equally fine. Cartridge box is heavily faded with moderate to heavy soiling and missing chips and part of the label. Ammunition is lightly soiled but will clean nicely. Altogether an extremely rare set. 52527-12 JRL (10,00015,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

200


Session 1 1212. *ENGRAVED SMITH & WESSON MODEL 29-2 DA REVOLVER WITH ALTERED FRONT STRAP POSSIBLY FOR PERSONALIZED WEAPON APPLICATION. SN N307954. Cal. 44 MAG. French grey finish with 3-7/8” ribbed bbl, red ramp & white outline sights with target hammer & smooth combat trigger. Mounted with smooth, gold medallion Cocobolo magnum grips. Left side of the buttstrap, under the grip is marked “XX243”, the meaning of which is unknown to this cataloger, possibly an experimental marking for the strange front strap of the grip frame. The front strap has about a 1-5/8” cutout that is fitted with a removable aluminum insert. This insert has a small spring for a detent in the top end with another opening in the bottom and an epoxy filled slot in the back. Best guess by this cataloger is that this was Smith & Wesson’s experimental piece for a personalized firearm that required a magnetic ring to activate which would have precluded anyone but the owner firing it. This revolver is beautifully engraved in semi-relief foliate arabesque patterns that have a fine shaded background. Frame has about 60% coverage with an incredible American eagle standing on an American shield clutching olive branches & arrows in its talons on the right side plate. Cylinder is engraved to match on lands between flutes with a wide foliate border at the back edge. Recoil shields are engraved in arrow-head patterns and the hump at the top of the backstrap and bottom front of the frame are engraved in fan patterns. Trigger bow is engraved with the script initials “AHC”. Bbl has 2-hole Magnaporting. The grip locator pin is missing. Accompanied by a Smith & Wesson blue velvet & plastic lined mahogany case. CONDITION: Extremely fine. Overall retains 99% plus custom French grey finish, remains unfired since engraving. Grips, probably not orig to this revolver, have been slightly altered on the top edges into a “fish-tail” shape and the right grip has a repaired chip in the heel, otherwise are sound and orig showing most of a restored finish. Case shows wear & damage inside the bottom, otherwise is sound with light nicks & scratches. 52634-15 JRL (5,000-8,000)

1213. *SCARCE SMITH & WESSON MODEL 38-44 TARGET DA REVOLVER. SN 41701. Cal. 38 Spcl. Blue finish with 6-1/2” rnd bbl, pedestal mounted Partridge front sight and adjustable rear sight in the rnd top frame. Frame is 5-screw style with color case hardened, patent marked trigger and hammer. Mounted with matching numbered, diamond checkered, large silver medallion walnut grips. Revolver also has a Smith & Wesson grip adapter with hard rubber insert behind the trigger guard. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching including bbl, cylinder and grips. Overall retains 97-98% glossy orig factory blue with faint muzzle edge wear, more on the left side, and a fine cylinder line. Grips are crisp with only faint diamond point wear. Mechanics are crisp, in need of a good cleaning, brilliant shiny bore. Appears to have been fired, but very little. 52328-30 JRL (1,500-3,000) C&R

201

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1214. SCARCE FACTORY ENGRAVED MERWIN & HULBERT EARLY OPEN TOP ARMY MODEL SQUARE BUTT SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 8390. Cal. 44 Merwin & Hulbert. Nickel finish with 7” rnd bbl that has integral front sight with groove rear sight on top of frame. Frame is open top with 6-shot scooped flute cylinder. Frame, bbl and cylinder are factory engraved in foliate and dot patterns with about full coverage on sides of the frame, full length on right side of bbl and cylinder pin housing with matching patterns on the left side leaving the Hopkins & Allen marking completely legible. Cylinder has matching patterns on lands between flutes. Left side plate has a small rnd vignette depicting a sailing vessel with building and mountains in background. Right side is engraved with a shield shaped pattern with flower blossom and foliate patterns. Mounted with smooth 2-pc pearl grips. Buttstrap is mounted with a factory lanyard loop. Left side of the grip frame is marked with assembly number “5761” which is also found on the cylinder pin, cylinder and rear face of the bbl lug. Note: a 44 American cartridge will also chamber in this cylinder. Merwin & Hulbert were themselves not manufacturers, but entrepreneurs who either designed or bought patents which they had manufactured by established manufacturers such as Hopkins & Allen. They then distributed the product themselves. One of the Merwin & Hulbert design, in some instances, is superior to other revolvers of the same era. The product was late on the market after Colt had already established contracts with the government. In addition, the early Army size revolvers were in a proprietary cartridge, as found here, which was not readily available throughout the buying market. They later chambered these large frame revolvers in Cal. 44-40 which was compatible with Winchester and other repeating rifles. CONDITION: Fine to very fine, all matching except grips which are un-numbered. Bbl retains about 60-70% orig nickel showing holster wear to grey metal on both sides. Frame retains about 6070% orig nickel with the front and backstraps worn to grey metal. Trigger and hammer retain faint case colors. Grips show minor chips around the edges with a larger chip near the left toe, otherwise are sound with great fire and color. The frame screws and one front strap screw are slightly battered. Mechanics are fine. Strong bright bore with some minor orange peel pitting. 51935-2 JRL (5,000-8,000)

FINE MERWIN & HULBERT 3rd MODEL ARMY 1215. REVOLVER WITH FOLDING HAMMER. SN 123896. Cal. 44/40. 4-1/4” bbl, standard configuration, blued with checkered 2-pc hard rubber grips. Bbl marked 2-line New York address “MERWIN HULBERT & CO. NEW YORK USA / PAT. APR. 17. 77 JUNE 15. 80 MARCH. 14. 82 JAN. 9. 83”. Left side of frame marked with Model date “1873” and “CALIBRE / WINCHESTER”. Hammer has patented folding spur. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Gun retains about 30% bright blue overall, with balance grey/plum with scattered pitting especially on ejector door and left side of bbl. Grips are sound and well fit with chip at inside right toe. Mechanics fine with bright crisp bore. 52634-2 JS (2,500-3,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

202


Session 1 Lots 1216 & 1217 203

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1216. EXTREMELY RARE REMINGTON MODEL 1875 SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER ISSUED TO THE PINE RIDGE SIOUX INDIAN POLICE ONE OF A CONSECUTIVE NUMBERED PAIR BEING SOLD IN THIS AUCTION. SN 718. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Nickel finish with 7-1/2” rnd bbl with German silver blade front sight and right hand “E. Remington & Sons” address. Left rear web of trigger guard is marked “44”. Mounted with smooth 2-pc walnut grips that are too stained to show a number, however condition & wear are consistent with the age of the revolver. Left side of ejector housing web is marked “P R” over “36”. Right side of frame has the hand scratched initials “B M” and what is either a triangle or a teepee over a “4”. Buttstrap is hand scratched “J H R”. Left grip has 2 notches on the front edge. Bore has been bored smooth, removing all rifling. This revolver is consecutively numbered to another Pine Ridge Police Model 1875 being sold elsewhere in this auction. This revolver was one of a shipment of 50 delivered to the Department of the Interior (U.S.I.D.), Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Dakota Territory on in June 1883 as part of a shipment of 325 such revolvers inspected June 18-20, 1883. There were a total of 639 such revolvers purchased by the U.S.I.D. between February and June 1883. The 50 revolvers delivered to Pine Ridge Indian Police was the largest allotment of the approximately 35 such police forces so equipped and were reportedly the only ones that were identification marked. These 639 revolvers are the only known government contract for handguns from Remington. Accompanied by a large volume of correspondence between Mr. Robert L. Laury, Mr. Charles E. Hanson Jr., Director of the Museum of the Fur Trade and several other individuals including renowned Remington collector Slim Kohler and Don Ware. The majority of the correspondence occurred in 1974 and fully documents the purchase of these revolvers along with cartridge belt, holster & 50 cartridges for each revolver. Each set of above enumerated equipment cost the U.S.I.D. $9.22. A letter to renowned Dallas firearms dealer Leon (Red) Jackson dated June 12, 1974 over the signature of Mr. Hanson states that this Remington revolver, SN 719 was owned for about 40 years by a man who traded extensively with the Indians from Pine Ridge Reservation and had a shop in Hot Springs, South Dakota. The letter further states that Mr. Hanson had seen this revolver about 20 years (prior to the date of the letter) when it was sold to Jack Strain of Parmalee, South Dakota. He further states that he purchased this revolver from a third party. Several articles also accompanying this revolver deal with the issuance to Indian Police and is speculated that they may have been used on December 15, 1890 when Indian Police shot and killed the famous Sioux Chief and Medicine Man, Sitting Bull at the Standing Rock Agency in Dakota territory. At about the same time, in December 1890, the Miniconjou Sioux had left the reservation with Chief Big Foot. They were overtaken in the South Dakota Badlands 30 miles east of Pine Ridge and ordered to move westward to set up camp at Wounded Knee Creek. On the morning of December 9, 1890 the soldiers, attempting to disarm the Indians resulted in a scuffle with a deaf Indian named Black Coyote which further resulted in the discharge of a rifle. Col. James Forsyth and the approximately 500 soldiers opened fire on the Indian camp with rifles and Hotchkiss cannons resulting in approximately 150 Indians killed and 50 wounded, including the death of Chief Big Foot. Very likely the Indian police accompanying Col. Forsyth carried, and probably used these Remington revolvers during that battle. Very few of these Pine Ridge agency marked Remingtons are known today. PROVENANCE: William Smith collection; Charles E. Hanson Jr. collection. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Overall retains about 65% strong orig nickel with most of the losses from holster wear on the bbl and hand wear on left side of frame. Muzzle has been crowned to a rnd shaped by hand with a file. Cylinder retains about 50% orig nickel with the losses gray metal and some spotted pitting. Grips have a chipped left heel, otherwise are sound, showing heavy wear and retain a fine hand worn patina. Timing needs adjusting, otherwise mechanics are fine. Bright shiny bore. 51929-6 JRL (15,000-20,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

204


Session 1 1217. EXTREMELY RARE REMINGTON MODEL 1875 SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER ISSUED TO THE PINE RIDGE SIOUX INDIAN POLICE ONE OF A CONSECUTIVE NUMBERED PAIR BEING SOLD IN THIS AUCTION. SN 719. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Nickel finish with 7-1/2” rnd bbl with German silver blade front sight and right hand “E. Remington & Sons” address. Left rear web of trigger guard is marked “44”. Mounted with smooth 2-pc walnut grips that are too stained to show a number, however condition & wear are consistent with the age of the revolver. Left side of ejector housing web is marked “P R” over “35”. This revolver is consecutively numbered to another Pine Ridge Police Model 1875 being sold elsewhere in this auction. This revolver was one of a shipment of 50 delivered to the Department of the Interior (U.S.I.D.), Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Dakota Territory on in June 1883 as part of a shipment of 325 such revolvers inspected June 18-20, 1883. There were a total of 639 such revolvers purchased by the U.S.I.D. between February and June 1883. The 50 revolvers delivered to Pine Ridge Indian Police was the largest allotment of the approximately 35 such police forces so equipped and were reportedly the only ones that were identification marked. These 639 revolvers are the only known government contract for handguns from Remington. Accompanied by a large volume of correspondence between Mr. Robert L. Laury, Mr. Charles E. Hanson Jr., Director of the Museum of the Fur Trade and several other individuals including renowned Remington collector Slim Kohler and Don Ware. The majority of the correspondence occurred in 1974 and fully documents the purchase of these revolvers along with cartridge belt, holster & 50 cartridges for each revolver. Each set of above enumerated equipment cost the U.S.I.D. $9.22. A letter to renowned Dallas firearms dealer Leon (Red) Jackson dated June 12, 1974 over the signature of Mr. Hanson states that this Remington revolver, SN 719 was owned for about 40 years by a man who traded extensively with the Indians from Pine Ridge Reservation and had a shop in Hot Springs, South Dakota. The letter further states that Mr. Hanson had seen this revolver about 20 years (prior to the date of the letter) when it was sold to Jack Strain of Parmalee, South Dakota. He further states that he purchased this revolver from a third party. Several articles also accompanying this revolver deal with the issuance to Indian Police and is speculated that they may have been used on December 15, 1890 when Indian Police shot and killed the famous Sioux Chief and Medicine Man, Sitting Bull at the Standing Rock Agency in Dakota territory. At about the same time, in December 1890, the Miniconjou Sioux had left the reservation with Chief Big Foot. They were overtaken in the South Dakota Badlands 30 miles east of Pine Ridge and ordered to move westward to set up camp at Wounded Knee Creek. On the morning of December 9, 1890 the soldiers, attempting to disarm the Indians resulted in a scuffle with a deaf Indian named Black Coyote which further resulted in the discharge of a rifle. Col. James Forsyth and the approximately 500 soldiers opened fire on the Indian camp with rifles and Hotchkiss cannons resulting in approximately 150 Indians killed and 50 wounded, including the death of Chief Big Foot. Very likely the Indian police accompanying Col. Forsyth carried, and probably used these Remington revolvers during that battle. Very few of these Pine Ridge agency marked Remingtons are known today and none with as strong provenance as this one. PROVENANCE: Unknown Collection in Hot Springs, SD; Jack Strain Collection, Parmalee, SD; Charles E. Hanson Jr. Collection, Shadron, NB; Leon (Red) Jackson; Dr. Robert L. Laury Collection, Dallas, TX. CONDITION: Fair to good. Bbl retains about 50-60% orig nickel, showing heavy muzzle end wear with fine pin-prick pitting in the loss areas. Frame retains 70-75% orig nickel, showing losses around the forcing cone area and wear on the recoil shield & loading gate with flaking on both sides. Left side of hammer nose is flaked to a dark patina. Right grip has a chipped toe, otherwise grips are sound showing heavy wear and a hand worn patina. Cylinder retains about 20% orig nickel with a heavy ding on the face on a land between two chambers. Cylinder pin is a replacement which is secured by an after market transverse pin through the tip of the ejector housing. Mechanics are fine. Strong dark bore with fine pitting throughout. 51929-7 JRL (15,000-20,000) Sgt. Black Dog 205

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1218. RARE REMINGTON MODEL 1875 MEXICAN CONTRACT SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 10727. Cal 45 Colt. Nickel finish with 7-1/2” rnd bbl, pinched post front sight and 1-line left hand address. Top of the bbl, adjacent to the frame is marked with the number “089” and a sunburst. Lower right front gullet of the frame and cylinder between 2 chambers are marked “R de M”. Buttstrap has a factory lanyard swivel. Mounted with smooth, 2-pc, walnut grips which are oil stained obscuring any pencil numbers that may be inside. This revolver was part of a contract with the Republic of Mexico for 1,000 revolvers delivered in the 1880’s. Extremely few revolvers from this contract were ever returned to the U.S. making them one of, if not the most rare Model 1875 Remington. This is the only documented foreign contract for Remington Model 1875 revolvers aside from a reported contract of 10,000 revolvers for the government of Egypt (one of which is being sold elsewhere in this auction). In addition Remington also sold 639 nickel plated Models 1875 to the interior department to arm Indian police on western reservations. CONDITION: Very good, grips unnumbered as noted. Overall retains about 90% orig nickel with the losses flaked to a dark patina. Cylinder retains about 60% orig nickel mixed with light flaking. Hammer retains dark case colors. Grips have a chipped left toe and show heavy wear with a hand worn patina. Hammer is not solid at half-cock or safety notches, otherwise mechanics are fine. Bright shiny bore. Right front side of cylinder pin has been filed or ground to clear the retaining screw. 51929-10 JRL (10,000-12,000)

SCARCE REMINGTON MODEL 1875 EGYPTIAN CONTRACT 1219. SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 754. Cal. 44 Remington. Blue finish with 7-1/2” bbl, pinched post front sight and E. REMINGTON & SONS” 1-line left hand address. Left side of bbl is stamped with a small 5-pointed star at the frame and upper left side of frame is stamped with an “R”. Buttstrap is mounted with a lanyard swivel and it has 2-pc smooth walnut grips with an oval “FR” (Cdr. Frederick Rodgers) cartouche on left side. Grips are matching numbered to this revolver in pencil inside each grip. This revolver is part of a reported 10,000 gun contract for the Egyptian government which, reportedly, only a few revolvers were delivered. The few existing Egyptian Contract revolvers usually show hard use without much orig finish. PROVENANCE: Ex. Ron Ogan; Ex. Robert Howard Estate Collection. CONDITION: Fine to very fine. Bbl retains 75-80% strong orig blue with the loss areas mostly flaked, not worn to a dark patina; there are a few small scratches on right side; ejector housing web retains 85-90% strong orig blue; frame retains traces of orig blue having flaked, not worn, to a dark patina; trigger guard retains about 80% blue with the front & back straps blue/gray patina; cyl retains 70-75% orig blue; hammer retains strong, bright case colors on sides & rear edge, faded to silver on top edge; grips have a chipped left toe and show moderate to heavy wear with several gouges, nicks & bruises and retain a dark oil finish. Hammer is without half cock, otherwise mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. 51929-12 JRL (10,000-12,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

206


1221. SCARCE EARLY REMINGTON MODEL 1875 SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 158. 44 WCF (44-40). Blue finish with 7-1/2” rnd bbl, pinched post front sight and groove rear sight in the top strap. Top of the bbl has the left hand Remington name & address. Mounted with matching numbered, nicely figured, smooth 2-pc walnut grips marked “44W” on the left side. The lanyard ring in the buttstrap has been cut leaving only a small stud. There were approximately 25,000-30,000 of these fine revolvers produced 1875-1889 in both blue & nickel in 2 different calibers and 2 different bbl lengths. These fine revolvers were in some ways superior to the 1873 Colt Single Action Army revolvers with their ease of removing the cylinder for cleaning. Unfortunately for Remington these revolvers weren’t produced until after Colt was already well established with military contracts and on the civilian market. An additional hindrance was that the first 15,000-16,000 revolvers were produced in Remington’s proprietary cartridge, the 44 Remington Center Fire which was not compatible with any other revolver or rifle of that era. Later the company chambered their revolvers in 44-40 and a few in 45 Colt. Those changes were insufficient to promote large sales or a government contract and even though in 1888 and 1890 Remington redesigned the revolver, by 1896 they had ceased production of their large frame pistols. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine. Grips are matching, cylinder is properly unnumbered. Bbl & ejector housing web retain about 95% glossy orig blue with slight muzzle end wear and a few light scratches. Frame retains blue in sheltered areas with the losses from flaking not wear. Hammer retains bright case colors on the sides & rear edge, faded to silver on the top edge. Trigger guard retains about 95% orig blue with the grip frame mostly blue/gray patina. Cylinder retains about 75-80% thinning orig blue, strong & bright in the flutes. Chambers of the cylinder & bore retain virtually all of their orig factory blue. Grips are sound with a few scattered light nicks and retain virtually all of their orig factory oil finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore, appears to be unfired. 51929-13 (10,000-12,000) 207

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1220. RARE 45 CALIBER REMINGTON MODEL 1875 SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 1109. Cal 45 Colt. Nickel finish with 7-1/2” bbl, pinched post front sight and groove rear sight in the top strap. Bbl has 1-line “E. Remington & Sons” address. Top left front flat of frame is marked “45”, as is the rear face of the cylinder. Mounted with nicely figured, smooth, 2-pc walnut grips with matching number in pencil inside the right grip. Buttstrap is without lanyard swivel. There were approximately 25,000-30,000 Models 1875 revolvers produced by Remington 1875-1889 in both blue & nickel in 2 different calibers and 2 different bbl lengths, only a very few were ever chambered in caliber 45 Colt. These fine revolvers were in some ways superior to the 1873 Colt Single Action Army revolvers with their ease of removing the cylinder for cleaning. Unfortunately for Remington these revolvers weren’t produced until after Colt was already well established with military contracts and on the civilian market. An additional hindrance was that the first 15,000-16,000 revolvers were produced in Remington’s proprietary cartridge, the 44 Remington Center Fire which was not compatible with any other revolver or rifle of that era. Later the company chambered their revolvers in 44-40 and a few in 45 Colt. Those changes were insufficient to promote large sales or a government contract and even though in 1888 and 1890 Remington redesigned the revolver, by 1896 they had ceased production of their large frame pistols. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine, matching as noted. Overall retains about 95% strong orig nickel showing slight muzzle edge wear with a few minor nicks & scratches and a few scattered spots of light pimpling. Right side of hammer shows light pitting with the loss areas a dark patina. Cylinder retains 93-95% strong orig nickel with some minor flaked areas a dark patina. Grips are sound and retain most of an old restored finish. Mechanics are crisp. Strong, sharp bore with moderate pitting. 51929-9 JRL (10,000-15,000)


Session 1

1222. SCARCE SECOND TYPE REMINGTON MODEL 1875 SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 650. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Nickel finish with 7-1/2” rnd bbl, full blade front sight and right hand “E. Remington & Sons, Ilion, N.Y.U.S.A.”. Top left front side of frame is marked “44”. Mounted with smooth, varnished, 2-pc walnut grips that are probably period of use replacements. Buttstrap is without the optional lanyard ring. There were approximately 25,000-30,000 of these fine revolvers produced 1875-1889 in both blue & nickel in 2 different calibers and 2 different bbl lengths. These fine revolvers were in some ways superior to the 1873 Colt Single Action Army revolvers with their ease of removing the cylinder for cleaning. Unfortunately for Remington these revolvers weren’t produced until after Colt was already well established with military contracts and on the civilian market. An additional hindrance was that the first 15,000-16,000 revolvers were produced in Remington’s proprietary cartridge, the 44 Remington Center Fire which was not compatible with any other revolver or rifle of that era. Later the company chambered their revolvers in 44-40 and a few in 45 Colt. Those changes were insufficient to promote large sales or a government contract and even though in 1888 and 1890 Remington redesigned the revolver, by 1896 they had ceased production of their large frame pistols. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus, grips are unnumbered as noted. Overall retains 9698% strong orig factory nickel with a few minor nicks & scratches and a few scattered spots of light flaking, primarily on the left side. Grips are sound and retain most of their bright custom varnish finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Possibly unfired. 51929-11 (10,000-12,500)

1223. SCARCE REMINGTON MODEL 1875 SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 14227. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Nickel finish with 7-1/2” bbl, pinched post front sight and 1-line left hand block letter address. Buttstrap has a factory stud & ring. Mounted with smooth 2-pc walnut grips that has “44” stamped at the bottom of left grip. Inside each grip is marked in pencil “14029” and they are also stamped “1312”. Left side of the heel, under the grip is marked with assembly no. “142”, which number is also found on rear face of cylinder. The Model 1875 was produced only from 1875 to 1888 with about 25,000 to 30,000 revolvers made in that time frame and was a direct competitor for the Colt Model 1873 Single Action Army revolver. Unfortunately for Remington, even though the design was much more convenient for cleaning and cylinder removal, at the time the Model 1875 appeared on the scene Colt was already well established with the U.S. Army and civilians alike. No large military contracts were ever awarded to Remington and since Remington was more known for rifles and shotguns, their distribution and advertising were inadequate, and therefore sales were slow. In 1888 Remington redesigned the Model 1875 and produced less than 1,000 of the Model 1888 before transitioning into the Model 1890. The Model 1875 was a popular sidearm, which saw extensive service on the American frontier and Mexico. They are rarely found today with high orig finish. PROVENANCE: Ex-Tommy Rholes Estate Collection. CONDITION: Extremely fine. Overall retains 95-97% strong orig nickel with only light muzzle end wear, a few nicks and scratches, a ding on the cylinder and some light flaking on the back strap; cylinder also retains most of its orig nickel on the rear face and outer diameter, being bare metal on the front face. Grips show heavy wear, especially on the right side with chipped toes and retain a hand worn patina. Hammer is not solid in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine; bright shiny bore. 51929-14 (8,000-10,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

208


1225. EXTREMELY RARE REMINGTON MODEL 1888 SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 169. Cal 44 WCF (44-40). Nickel finish with 5-3/4” rnd bbl, full German silver front sight, rear sight is a groove in the top strap and 1-line right hand address “E. Remington & Sons, Illion, N.Y., U.S.A.” Left rear web of the trigger guard is marked “44”. Bottom of the bbl, under ejector housing is marked with matching SN and assembly number “121”. Matching assembly number is also found inside the ejector housing. Mounted with nicely figured, smooth, 2-pc walnut grips with matching SN inside left grip and in pencil inside right grip. According to Flayderman’s Guide to Antique American Firearms there were fewer than 1,000 of these rare revolvers produced in the period 1888-1889 at which time this model was succeeded by the Model 1890. This is Remington’s attempt at a more stream-lined version of the Model 1875 in order to compete with the Colt Model 1873 Single Action Army revolver. Unfortunately for Remington, although their revolvers in some ways were superior to the Colt, they were unable to compete with Colt having established government contracts and a large footprint in the civilian market. Remington continued producing these large frame revolvers with the Model 1890, but by 1896 the demand for such firearms had waned and Remington ceased production in 1896. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except cylinder which is unnumbered. Bbl & ejector housing retain about 90% strong orig nickel with 3 spots of blood pitting. Frame retains 90-92% strong orig nickel, showing wear on the left recoil shield and some minor losses in the forcing cone area. Grip frame retains most of its orig nickel. Cylinder also retains about 93-95% orig nickel with sharp edge wear and a cylinder line. Hammer retains strong case colors on left side, fading elsewhere. Left grip has a large dent in the bottom edge with some battering on the bottom of the right grip, otherwise grips are sound and retain about 50-60% orig varnish. Hammer is not solid in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Strong dark bore with fine pitting. 51929-5 JRL (8,500-12,500) 209

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1224. REMINGTON MODEL 1875 FLAT TOP TARGET SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 60. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Nickel finish with 7-1/2” rnd bbl, slightly altered blade front sight and 1-line right hand address “E. REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, N.Y. U.S.A.”. Caliber marking “44” is stamped on left rear web of trigger guard. Serial number is in the usual place on left side of buttstrap under the grip which is preceded by a 6-point star and followed by an “M”. Mounted with 2-pc matching numbered walnut grips. Buttstrap shows no evidence of ever having had a lanyard stud. Top of the frame is flattened with an integral rounded top, square notch rear sight. The top strap on a standard revolver measures .254” to .256”. The top strap on this revolver measures .186” whereas over the sight measures .245”. The rear sight on this revolver and the pinched rear sight notch on a standard revolver measure exactly the same distance from the hammer nose cut-out. Therefore it is the conclusion of this cataloger that whether by Remington or someone else this revolver was created from a standard Model 1875. Knowledgeable Remington authorities are unaware of Remington ever having produced such an item. PROVENANCE: Ted Knee Collection. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching except cyl which is unnumbered. Overall retains 9697% strong factory quality nickel finish, possibly an old factory restoration. Grips are sound showing light to moderate wear and retain about 70-75% orig varnish. Hammer is not solid in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Strong bore with very fine frosty pitting. 52634-3 JRL (6,000-8,000)


Session 1 1226.

RARE REMINGTON MODEL 1890 SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 450. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Scarce blue finish with rare 5-3/4” bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line “REMINGTON ARMS CO. ILION. N.Y.” address. Left side of frame is marked “44 C.F.W.” Mounted with 2-pc checkered hard rubber grips with fancy Remington logo at the tops. Buttstrap has a factory stud and ring. The Remington Model 1890 was an improved version of their Model 1875 with cut out web on the ejector housing. There were only a little over 2,000 of these rare revolvers produced in the period 1891-1896, of which only a few were with 5-3/4” bbls. The Model 1875 & 1890 were produced as direct competitors for the Colt Model 1873 Single Action Army revolver. Unfortunately for Remington, even though the design was much more convenient for cleaning and cylinder removal, by the time they appeared on the scene Colt was already well established with the U.S. Army and civilians alike. No large military contracts were ever awarded to Remington and since Remington was more known for rifles and shotguns, their distribution and advertising were inadequate, and therefore sales were slow. By the time the Model 1890 was produced, sales of large bore single action revolvers had waned substantially in favor of the more convenient dbl action revolvers, and after only a short run, Remington stopped production of their big bore revolvers. It has been the experience of this cataloger that nickeled Models 1890 far outnumber blued ones. Finding a blue Model 1890 with orig shorter bbl and orig finish is quite rare. PROVENANCE: Ex-Tommy Rholes Estate Collection. CONDITION: Fine to very fine. Overall retains blue in most sheltered areas with the balance having flaked, not worn to a dark patina; hammer retains bright case colors; cylinder retains strong blue in the flutes, being mostly a thin blue, turning plum with a wide drag line. Grips are very fine to extremely fine showing very little wear. Hammer will not hold in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine; bright shiny bore. 51929-2 (10,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

210


Session 1 1227.

RARE REMINGTON MODEL 1890 SINGLE ACTION ARMY REVOLVER. SN 1894. Cal. 44 WCF (44-40). Scarce blue finish with 7-1/2” bbl, German silver front sight and 1-line “REMINGTON ARMS CO. ILION. N.Y.” address. Left side of frame is marked “44 C.F.W.” Mounted with 2-pc checkered hard rubber grips with fancy Remington logo at the tops. Buttstrap has a factory stud and ring. The Remington Model 1890 was an improved version of their Model 1875 with cutout web on the ejector housing. There were only a little over 2,000 produced in the period 1891-1896. The Model 1875 & 1890 were produced as direct competitors for the Colt Model 1873 Single Action Army revolver. Unfortunately for Remington, even though the design was much more convenient for cleaning and cylinder removal, at the time they appeared on the scene Colt was already well established with the Army and civilians alike. No large military contracts were ever awarded to Remington and since Remington was more known for rifles and shotguns, their distribution and advertising were inadequate, and therefore sales were slow. By the time the Model 1890 was produced, sales of large bore Single Action revolvers had waned substantially in favor of the more convenient dbl action revolvers, and after only a short run, Remington stopped production of their big bore revolvers. It has been the experience of this cataloger that nickeled Models 1890 far outnumber blued ones. Finding a blue Model 1890 with orig finish is quite rare. PROVENANCE: Ex-Tommy Rholes Estate Collection. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Overall retains 30-35% orig blue, mostly in sheltered areas with the balance flaked more than worn to a medium patina. Grips are sound showing light diamond point wear and have turned chocolate. Hammer will not catch in safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Strong bore with good shine and scattered fine pitting. 519291 (10,00012,000)

211

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1228. VERY RARE REMINGTON MODEL 1890 SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 746. Cal 44 WCF (44-40). Nickel finish with rare 5-3/4” bbl, full blade front sight and groove rear sight in top strap with 1-line “Remington Arms Co.” right hand address. Left front side of frame is marked “44 C.F.W”. Buttstrap has a factory lanyard swivel. Mounted with 2-pc Remington Arms Co. shield logo hard rubber grips. Right grip has a repaired crack at the heel. Both grips are matching numbered to the revolver. The Model 1890 was Remington’s last effort at producing a large frame revolver in a dying market. There were only about 2,020 of these rare revolvers produced 1891-1896. Remington simply was unable to compete with Colt’s Model 1873 Single Action Army revolver. Colt, early on had established the Model 1873 with government contracts and had garnered a large slice of the civilian market. By 1896 the demand for big bore, large frame revolvers had waned and with the precipitous drop in sales Remington ceased production of these revolvers. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine, all matching except cylinder which is unnumbered. Overall retains about 96-97% bright orig nickel with light holster wear around the muzzle, on the ejector head and loading gate. Inside the trigger guard, forward of the trigger shows loss of nickel turned to medium patina. Grips, with the aforementioned repaired crack have 3 or 4 small dings on each side and show light to moderate diamond point wear, turning slightly chocolate on the right side. Hammer will not catch in the safety notch, otherwise mechanics are fine. Bright shiny bore with scattered pitting. 51929-4 JRL (10,000-15,000)

1229. VERY RARE REMINGTON MODEL 1890 SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER. SN 87. Cal 44 WCF (44-40). Nickel finish with 7-1/2” bbl, full blade front sight and groove rear sight in top strap, with 1-line “Remington Arms Co.” right hand address. Left side of bbl is marked “44 W”. Buttstrap has a factory lanyard swivel. Mounted with 2-pc Remington Arms Co. shield logo hard rubber grips. Left grip has a repaired chip by the grip locator pin hole. The Model 1890 was Remington’s last effort at producing a large frame revolver in a dying market. There were only about 2,020 of these rare revolvers produced 1891-1896. Remington simply was unable to compete with Colt’s Model 1873 Single Action Army revolver. Colt, early on had established the Model 1873 with government contracts and had garnered a large slice of the civilian market. By 1896 the demand for big bore, large frame revolvers had waned and with the precipitous drop in sales Remington ceased production of these revolvers. CONDITION: About fine. Grips & cylinder are unnumbered. Overall retains about 93-95% orig nickel with some flaking and fine pitting in the left front gullet, on the ejector rod housing and bbl at the frame. Trigger guard & grip frame retain most all of their orig nickel, slightly dulled from handling. Cylinder retains 96-97% strong orig nickel with two areas of small dings. Grips, as noted, are otherwise sound showing light diamond point wear, turning slightly chocolate. Mechanics are fine. Strong bore with very fine pitting. 51929-3 JRL (10,000-15,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

212


Session 1 1230. BEAUTIFUL GOLD AND PLATINUM INLAID REMINGTON ROLLING BLOCK IVORY MOUNTED SINGLESHOT PISTOL. SN 4. Cal. 50. Pretty much follows configuration of Model 1867 Navy pistol with 2-stage oct-rnd with cannon muzzle bbl. A majority of metal surfaces are inlaid with arabesque gold and platinum inlays with gold inset address “E REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, NEW-YORK U.S.A”. Breech is inset with a 1” American eagle with shield and 15 stars on rounded breech. This is quite a showpiece and very similar to a pair of Model 1865’s pictured on pg 328 of The William M. Locke Collection, 1973. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun appears orig and all matching with SN “4” found internally on bbl, frame, trigger guard and nicely inked in trigger guard channel of 1-pc grip. Gun retains about 95% of its blue finish overall, with areas of thinning and pinprick pitting. Gun shows substantial pitted areas under ivory forestock and internally in grip strap frame. Gold and platinum inlays are virtually all intact with minor cosmetic blemishes. Gold address and gold inset eagle are well defined. Orig antique elephant ivory stocks are sound and well fit with golden ivory patina. Butt of grip has old sanding, possibly removal of an old inscription. Mechanically sound with shiny crisp blued bore. 52255-1 JS (5,000-7,500) ESA

1231.

SCARCE REMINGTON CANE GUN WITH 3” DOG’S HEAD HANDLE. SN 16. Cal. 32 RF. Made of black gutta percha, 32-1/4” long with metal tip that has reeded band. It has long handle shaft and domed trigger button with concentric rings. The joint between the dogs head handle and shaft has a 5/16” brass band. SN discernible on tip only. Handle is unscrewed from the shaft for loading and unloading and when reassembled, handle is pulled to cock the striker and raise the rear sight. There were about 1800 of these scarce cartridge cane guns produced 1866-1888 with at least 4-handle styles and a variety of lengths. Finding one of these canes completely orig and intact is a great rarity. CONDITION: Fair to good overall. Gutta percha is intact with about 3” cracked area with reductions at tip, gutta percha orig black has faded to a mixed dark brown. Metal tip is a mottled grey/brown patina. Dog’s head handle is very good with about 1” crack at base and German silver plaque on top of head has been re-glued. Mechanically functional with pitted clear bore. 52511-10 JS (2,500-3,500)

213

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1232.

EXHIBITION GRADE ENGRAVED, GOLD AND IVORY LARGE BORE MODEL 1868 TRANTER REVOLVER BY H. HOLLAND. SN 5978. Cal. 450. This is about the fanciest Tranter cartridge revolver you will find mounted with ivory grips with royal cypher as are ivory handled tools in case. 5” oct engraved bbl with gold inset designs and address “H HOLLAND 98 NEW BOND ST. LONDON”. Fine floral and scroll engraving are found on most of the flat surfaces of frame with about 50% coverage on cylinder, bbl, trigger guard and buttcap. Tranter’s patent markings are found on left side of frame and left side of lever. Frame, cylinder, trigger guard and buttcap are gold plated, as is brass tip to cleaning rod, screwdriver and Dixon oiler. The custom French fitted English case is maker marked “P & F SCHAFER MAKERS / 27 PICCADILLY LONDON”. Casing is also bound in leather with same crown over unknown cypher that is on gun and each cleaning tool ivory grip. Case has two compartments, one with functional key and small chamois bag with extra mainspring and triggerspring. The second compartment retains cutouts for 36 cartridges retaining a mix of 34 complete cartridges and brass, all with “ELEY” backstamps. The quality of engraving, plating, ivory finish and casing are all exceptional. This gun was obviously made for a very important person. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine. Bbl retains over 90% orig bright blue finish with slight muzzle wear and small reductions near frame. Cylinder retains about 90% orig gold. Frame retains about 70% orig gold, worn on gripstrap and worn at high areas of frame flats. Trigger guard and buttcap retain strong traces of gold, especially in protected areas of trigger bow. Hammer and trigger retain about half of their orig bright finish. Mechanics are crisp with bright shiny bore. Casing is matching fine condition internally with a green baize lining, with some soiling and wear at contact areas of muzzle and hammer. Gold plating to oiler and screwdriver is thinning. Ivory grips and tool handles are smooth with fine patina, with crisp scrimshawed seals with black backgrounds. Leather covering to case is very good with scuffing and cosmetic blemishes expected after 150 plus years with well discerned embossed cypher in lid as seen in photos. Casing has an orig attached leather folding handle seen on other high grade English sporting arms. 52700-20 (17,500-27,500) ESA

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

214


Session 1 Reverse

1233.

RARE FRENCH 40-SHOT GUYCOT CHAIN SHOT PISTOL. SN 33. Cal. 25. 11” overall with 4” oct sleeved bbl. This is among the earliest high capacity pistols. This gun was invented in 1878 and probably no more than couple hundred were made (highest SN we note is 112) with maybe a dozen surviving examples. The interesting and complex chain mechanism utilized black powder 25 cal. rocket balls much like those used in Volcanic Arms of an earlier era. This gun has been interestingly fitted on left side with a piece of Lucite to show and demonstrate the mechanism which still works quite well. The orig side plate, of course, accompanies and pistol can be displayed either way. The only markings noted on gun is maker’s mark on top of bbl as seen in photos, position marking “A” at top of safety slot on left sideplate and SN “33” on butt. Gun was loaded by slide on top of frame which also retains fixed rear sight, folding trigger and 2-pc wood grips. CONDITION: Very good overall. Metal is grey with old cleaning. Salt and pepper pitting, maker’s mark and SN discernible. Grips retain about half of their thin varnish with moderate edge wear and cosmetic blemishes. Gun appears orig and complete with possible restoration to loading slide. Gun appears quite functional and action can be observed through Lucite window on left side of frame. Tacking marks on butt. 52288-2 (15,000-25,000)

1234. SPECIAL DANA-FARBER CANCER INSTITUTE LOT. This lot consists of twelve past Julia auction catalogs, together with their prices realized list. These catalogs serve as a valuable reference source. We regularly sell our past auction catalogs to collectors and dealers alike for that purpose. Please note, the hammer price of the lot will be matched dollar for dollar up to a $1,000 match and donated to the DanaFarber Institute, commonly known as the “Jimmy Fund” locally. Founded in Boston in 1947, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is world-renowned for its leadership in adult and pediatric cancer treatment and research. Your gift provides Dana-Farber with crucial dollars that can be directed where and when they are needed the most. Thank you for your participation. CONDITION: Very good. 52734-1 (300-400)

215

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

216


Session 1 1235.

FABULOUS SPRINGFIELD MODEL 1873 SADDLE RING CARBINE THAT BELONGED TO CUSTER’S BUGLER JOHN MARTIN FORENSICALLY PROVEN TO HAVE FIRED A CARTRIDGE AT THE BATTLE OF THE LITTLE BIG HORN AND THE ONLY IDENTIFIED FIREARM EVER FOUND WHICH HAS BEEN PROVEN TO HAVE BEEN IMMEDIATELY WITH CUSTER DURING THE BATTLE. SN 19573. Cal. 45-55. Standard 1873 carbine with 22” bbl, barleycorn front sight & carbine ladder rear sight. Breech block has standard markings with the date “1873”. Lock plate is likewise marked “1873” with the US Eagle in the center. Mounted in a 1-pc, uncheckered walnut stock secured with a single band that has a stacking swivel. Trigger guard is in 2 pieces, without sling swivel. Buttplate is standard carbine style without trap and neither is there a recess under the buttplate, signifying that this carbine did not receive the later updates. Left side of wrist has the outline of the “ESA” (Erskine S. Allin) cartouche. Left side of the stock has the sling bar, missing its ring, which was common practice among Indians with captured arms. Left side of forestock is crudely carved “J. MArTiN” and left side of buttstock is carved with an “H”, ostensibly representing Company H of the 7th Cavalry to which Trooper Martin was assigned. The Martin carving shows moderate to heavy wear on the edges with heavy patina down in the cuts. The hammer screw has crystallized and broken.

217

John Martin, Custer’s Bugler

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

This carbine is well documented as having belonged to Custer’s bugler, John Martin who was the individual to whom the famous note was given which read “Benteen / Come on. Big village / Be quick, Bring packs. / W.W. Cooke / P.S. Bring Pacs.”. Martin subsequently recalled that Custer had called him over and said “Orderly, I want you to take a message to Benteen. Ride as fast as you can and tell him to hurry. Tell him it’s a big village and I want him to be quick and bring the ammunition packs”. He further recalled that Lt. Cooke called out “Wait Orderly” and pulled out a field order pad and wrote the above quoted note. Martin also recalled that Custer perused the note and called an orderly to Frederick Benteen deliver it. An unidentified trooper, probably another orderly came forward to which Custer said “No, No, the other man, Martin.” As Martin took the dispatch Custer instructed, “Trumpeter, go back on our trail and see if you can discover Benteen and give him the message. If you see no danger come back to us. But if you find Indians in your way, stay with Benteen and return to him and when you get back to us, report”. Martin apparently discovered Indians in the way, reporting that his horse was hit twice by rifle fire before he reached Benteen. He stayed with Benteen who, as we all know did not reach Custer in time. John Martin, an Italian immigrant, whose name was Giovanni Crisostomo Martino (or Martini, a sobriquet given to Martin by Major Benteen whose favorite drink was a martini). Martin had immigrated to the U.S. in 1873, settling in Brooklyn, NY. Prior to leaving Italy he had been a drummer boy in Italy’s Army in 1866 in their war against Austria. John Martin enlisted in the US Army in 1874 as a Trumpeter and was assigned to Company H, US 7th Cavalry. Martin survived the battle and remained in the US Army fighting in the Nez Perce campaign in 1877 and then fought in the Spanish-American War and retired in 1904, having completed nearly 30 years of service. He died in December 1922, the result of injuries from a beer truck accident.

George Custer Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

In 1983 an accidental range fire burned some 700 acres of prairie including a large portion of the Custer battlefield. The result of this fire disclosed numerous artifacts, bones and articles from that battle. A team of volunteers and park personnel conducted a search using metal detectors and in the process uncovered hundreds of fired cartridge cases, bullets and other artifacts. A team of forensics experts from Nebraska began examining firing pin & extractor marks found on these cartridge cases and were able to identify them to cartridge cases fired for test purposes in various arms believed to have been at the Custer battlefield. One of the cartridge cases, identified as #707 was found about 10 feet from the monument on Custer Hill (Last Stand Hill) was forensically proven with at least 90% positive marks that this artifact cartridge case was fired in this carbine. Since we 218


Session 1

Reverse

know that Trooper Martin was not with Custer on Last Stand Hill, but was with Capt. Benteen & Major Reno leaves one to speculate how this cartridge case could have been fired in his carbine at that location. Various theories have been proposed, the most likely of which is that 1). Trooper Martin discarded his carbine to prevent it banging on his horse during his frantic ride. 2). According to Trooper Martin’s statements his horse was struck by rifle fire which would likely have disabled the horse and caused it to fall, leaving his carbine still attached to the saddle to be recovered by the Indians who then turned it on Custer’s troops on Last Stand Hill. 3). That Trooper Martin had given his carbine to another trooper whose carbine had jammed or had been lost when he left Custer’s command for his fateful ride. Obviously we will never know how this cartridge case came to be on Last Stand Hill, but there is no doubting Copy of the letter Martin carried the scientific evidence that cartridge case #707 was fired in this carbine. Bullets (not included in this lot) found on the battlefield, in some instances were discovered to have entered the dirt vertically which indicates that the Indians administered the “coup de gras” to wounded troopers by shooting directly down into their bodies. This seems to be the most likely reason that trooper Martin’s carbine was fired at Last Stand Hill in the position where it was found. Accompanied by a 4x6 cabinet photo of Trooper Martin in full uniform with medals by D.F. Barry of West Superior, WI. This carbine was the subject of a 2-page article by Donald Moore which appeared in the June 2013 issue of Wild West magazine. Additionally accompanied by a 7-page article about this carbine which appeared in the publication Military Classics Illustrated, date unknown. Also accompanying are copies of the original note carried by Trooper Martin to Capt. Benteen, which is currently at the US Army Military Academy, West Point, NY. Also accompanied by copies of 2 photographs of John Martin, one is dated 1879 depicting him as a young man seated with a bugle, with the caption “While he was called to testify at the Reno Court of Inquiry”. Finally accompanied by the 138-page paperback book Archeological Insights Into The Custer Battle, Scott & Fox. PROVENANCE: Glen Swanson collection. CONDITION: Fair, no orig finish remains with the bbl retaining a cleaned mottled silver/black patina. Other metal parts are a dark brown patina with light surface rust and pitting on the trigger plate and trigger bow. Buttstock has 2-grain checks on the right side and another on the left at the buttplate, otherwise wood is sound showing heavy wear and a hand worn patina. Mechanics are fine, strong bright bore with sharp rifling. 52694-1 JRL (175,000-275,000)

219

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 Reverse

1236.

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER USED NATIONAL ARMS COMPANY DERINGER WITH GREAT PROVENANCE. SN 2443. Cal. 41. Standard all metal National Firearms Deringer, 4-3/4” overall, with 2-1/2” bbl marked “NATIONAL ARMS CO BROOKLYN, NY”. This is one of the few firearms in private hands with documentation direct to General George Armstrong Custer. Lot is accompanied by a facsimile image of Custer in a 9-1/2” x 11-1/2” frame. Accompanied by copy of John DuMont’s Custom Battle Guns. PROVENANCE: George Armstrong Custer, 1865; Elizabeth Custer, 1876; George A. Custer II, 1923; Marvin Brice Custer; Illustrated in the “Columbus Sunday Dispatch”, February 8, 1956; James Hutchins, 1961; Leon “Red” Jackson Catalog, Dallas, Texas; William A. Bond Collection, 1961; Listed by SN and described in inventory on pg 85 of John du Mont, “Custer Battle Guns”, 1974; Greg Martin Collection; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Good to very good overall, sound and complete. Crisp markings with a mottled grey patina with patches of pitting on both side of frame. Mechanically sound with good well defined bore. 51957-15 JS (20,000-30,000)

220


221

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

1237.

RARE 1875 GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER LETTER SIGNED WITH IMPORTANT INDIAN CONTENT, ARCHIVALLY FRAMED. Two-page LS written March 11, 1875 to Indian agent Edmond Palmer at Standing Rock, Dakota Territory. The letter is regarding an Indian peace conference which would take place May 29th, 1876 at Fort Abraham Lincoln where less than 30 days later Custer and his clan would march to their deaths at the Little Bighorn. The 700 Sioux and other affiliated tribes after signing the peace treaty feasted, danced and sang. Anyone present would have thought the Indian Wars were over. The peace between the tribes lasted as long as it took for the Indians to clear the fort. The letter can be read in full on website, but a portion reads, “’...I have received your letter acquainting me with the reasons which prevented the delegations of Indians from your Agency from coming as intended to this post to confer with the delegation of the Rees now here. As it was of importance that the date upon which the proposed council assemble should be determined upon promptly and notice thereof sent to the various tribes interest.... Every tribe and band should be represented by its most influential men otherwise the council will terminate in results of no value. Please communicate with me in regards to the decision of the Sioux. I will send a communication to the agent at Cheyenne informing him of the date fixed and will be greatly obliged to you, if you will

Session 1

cause it to be transmitted by a courier from your Agency. I am, Sir Very Respectfully Truly Yours.” He signs his name ‘G.A. Custer’ above his rank. ‘Lieutenant Colonel of Cavalry Brevet Major General, U.S.A. Comdg.’ at the close.’” Letter is mounted in archival 52” x 22” fancy molded frame with 2-sided glass so obverse can be seen from the rear, facsimile obverse is framed adjacent to signed second page along with 2 facsimile photographs of Custer and engraved brass plaques. Two letters of authenticity accompany, one from well known manuscript authority John Reznikoff. PROVENANCE: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Document was not removed from its archival mounting but appears to be very good with one 1/2” area of paper loss along one side margin effecting no text. The Custer signature is especially crisp and bold. There is a large chip to upper right corner of frame and linen mats have a water stained area which does not effect the letter on the right edge inward about 6”. 51957-27 JS (10,000-15,000)


Session 1

1238.

FINE AND RARE HALF PLATE TINTYPE OF AMERICAN INDIAN “OSAGE DELEGATE”, CIRCA 1865. This beautiful hand-tinted image of an Osage chief with scratched inscription on top of the emulsion “Osage Delegate” is in beautiful condition. With a little research, this particular chief could possibly be identified as other images of Osage Chief ’s are known from the 1866 & 1868 delegations sent to Washington from Kansas, attempting to protect their lands. The Osage were finally given a reservation in 1870 in Oklahoma. CONDITION: Very good with small bends and creases. Good contrast overall. 52051-1 JS (4,000-6,000)

1239.

LARGE PAINTING OF A NATIVE AMERICAN ON HORSEBACK IN PANORAMIC LANDSCAPE BY ACE POWELL. The oil on canvas scene shows a broadside view of a Native American holding spear in colorful attire. They stand on a snow covered plain with distant hills under a cloudy blue sky. The artist Ace Powell (American, 1912-1978) has signed the painting on the lower left “Powell” and has painted a playing card, the ace of diamonds, above. The painting is housed in a molded wood dark frame with linen and gold liner. SIZE: 24” x 40”. Overall: 33” x 49-1/2”. CONDITION: Very good to excellent 52184-2 (4,000-7,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

222


Session 1 1240.

EXTREMELY RARE AND POSSIBLY UNIQUE 1876 INDIAN WAR “PROTOTYPE” PRAIRIE BELT, ALONG W/REGULATION MODEL 1874 SABER KNOT WHICH MAY BE THE ONLY SPECIMEN KNOWN, GREAT COLLECTION HISTORY. 1) Unique narrow prototype Prairie Belt. This unique prototype belt is 1-3/4” wide with a single bottom seam and sure appears to be an arsenal product as noted by Steven Dorsey in Gun Report article accompanying this lot. Dorsey had previously written an excellent six page article titled The Modified Prairie Belt in the December 1992 Gun Report. This belt surfaced after that article was written and this is thought to be the earliest example still utilizing the 1872 sword belt plate as opposed to the typical open prairie buckle. Read attached Dorsey articles for more information. 2) “Regulation 1874 Sabre Knot”. Ordnance memo #13 in 1872 describes the 1872 sabre knot as black bridle leather - thin 0”.625 wide 30” long, one end is fastened to a braided knot without tassels, 1”.5 long and the other end passed through the knot after going around the guard of the sabre and to have one sliding loop. In ordnance memo #18 in 1874 the army adopted the 1872 sabre knot with one change, the addition of another sliding loop, and the knot is shown in the drawings. Interestingly Doug McChristian in his book The U.S. Army in The West 1870-1880 does not show the regulation knot but offers a photo of what may be an experimental but different sabre knot probably of the period. The knot is unmarked and undoubtedly made at Watervliet Arsenal,, though there is some question as to how many were made since there were C.W. Sabre knots left in inventory, this is the only recognized, surviving 1874 sabre knot and is in live and complete condition. PROVENANCE: Howard Coles collection; Steven Dorsey collection; David Pierce collection. CONDITION: Belt is very good overall, canvas is soiled, leather is sound solid with some crazing. Sword knot solid with crazing. 52156-4 JS (4,0006,000)

1241.

LOT OF THREE BOXES OF ANTIQUE CARTRIDGES INCLUDING SHARPS AND SMITH’S CARBINE. 1) Full 5-rnd box of Sharps 40-90 3-1/4” cartridges by Union Metallic Cartridge Company with green and black label. 2) Sealed box of 10 Sharps 52 cal. percussion cartridges with “12 caps” by the Sharps Rifle Company. 3) Sealed 10-rnd box of Poultney’s patent metallic cartridges with 12 caps for Smiths breech-loading carbine. The top label is also marked “No.1 50-100 Caliber” CONDITION: Boxes are all wrapped in plastic or sealed and cartridges were not examined. 1) Label is clean and clear with only very light soil. Box has a couple of broken edges and corners, otherwise is intact. 2) Fully sealed showing light soil to the top label. 3) Box is sealed with one broken top end showing light edge and corner wear with light soil to the top label. Pull string is intact. 52651-3 JRL (4,0006,000)

223

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1242. HISTORICALLY DOCUMENTED SHARPS 1853/68 CONVERSION ISSUED TO 7TH INDIANA CAVALRYMAN JOSEPH BLACKBURN, ONE OF THE LUCKIEST SURVIVORS OF THE CIVIL WAR. SN C14097. Cal. 50-70 Gov. 22” traditional carbine bbl. 2-pc walnut stocks with sling bar on left side with faint patent markings on left side of receiver with lockplate marked “C.SHARPS.PAT.OCTOBER 5 1852”. Forearm retained by sgl band and spring retainer. Open rear sight dovetail with plugged screwhole. Documented by U.S. National Archives records search to have been issued to Pvt. Joseph Blackburn, whom had enlisted 8-17-1862 and been assigned to Company E, 89th Indiana Infantry. With further documentation also recovered from the National Archives that fully encompassed Pvt. Blackburn’s military record and application for disability and later for death benefits for his bereaved wife and children. Joseph Blackburn, while serving with the 89th Indiana Infantry, was captured by Southern forces in September 1862 in Mumfordville, Kentucky, was paroled and sent back to Indiana, re-enlisting after his parole and assigned to the 7th Indiana Cavalry Company E on September of 1863 and was issued Sharps carbine C14097. Again captured by Southern forces in a Cavalry skirmish on the Holly Ford Road near Memphis, Tennessee October of 1864. After violating his prior parole, he was transferred and incarcerated at the infamous Andersonville Prison in Georgia. Surviving his incarceration, he was released at wars end and sent to Vicksburg, Mississippi for travel home to Indiana, whereupon, he boarded the doomed steamer Sultana in April of 1865. A grossly overloaded 300-ft long Sultana with an estimated 2100 Union and Southern troops unexpectedly exploded on the morning of April 27 at approximately 2:30 in the morning. Between 1400 and 1500 of the traveling veterans met their watery grave in what was then the largest maritime disaster in United States history. Again, private Blackburn escaped death and made it home to his state of Indiana. This Sharps carbine originally 52 Cal. Percussion was converted with approximately 10000 others to 50-70 Gov cartridge to be re-issued for use during the Indian Wars period. The history of this rifle is not known since its conversion, however, it shows hard utilitarian use that is frequently found in Confederate, Western and Indian used firearms. Evidence of this hard use is a sliver of wood missing forward of bbl band on right side with eight very old but distinguishable holes in forearm and buttstock that possibly were tack decoration. Rear sight was purposely removed and bbl bored smooth to be used for foraging uses. A very primitive V shaped slot was cut into top of receiver ring as a provision for sighting use. CONDITION: Fair overall with lightly pitted smooth bore and functioning mechanics. Stocks are extremely weathered from a long life of outdoor use. Top receiver tang is cracked of forward screw, as is a very common ailment of these carbines. Carbine is complete and functioning with a unique and detailed history of having been issued to either the luckiest or unluckiest survivor of the Great War of Northern Aggression. 52191-1 TDW (7,500-10,000)

1243. WHITNEY-LAIDLEY STYLE 1 ROLLING BLOCK MILITARY SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 63002. Cal. 45-70. Possible trials rifle. Whitney entered the 1871 trials and did not receive a U.S. or state contract. Left side of stock has clear ESA (Erskine S. Allin) cartouche. Allin was master armorer at Springfield Armory. Carbine has no manufacturer markings. 22” rnd bbl with blade front sight and 500 yard folding leaf rear sight. Case colored action with saddle and bar on left side. Band attached walnut forearm with straight grip walnut stock having steel carbine buttplate. Toe line of stock behind trigger guard has smaller indistinguishable cartouche. Left side of butt has hand scratched marking “Mexico/First”. Right side of butt and forearm have other hand scratched markings. CONDITION: Very good condition. Bbl retains 90% dull lightly faded blue with spots of finish overspray near muzzle. Action shows 80% case colors being bright on sides and fading in carry areas. Stocks have worn finish with age darkened appearance, having heavy dents and gouges at comb and right side of butt. Mechanics are fine. Bore has strong rifling with largely bright appearance. 52325-7 DS (4,000-5,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

224


Session 1 Lots 1277, 1324, 1245, 1244, 1283 & 1325 (holster) (top to bottom) 225

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1244.

EXTREMELY RARE COFER PORTSMOUTH, VIRGINIA, PERCUSSION CONFEDERATE REVOLVER, FINEST EXAMPLE KNOWN, WITH AN ORIGINAL COFER HOLSTER. SN 11. Cal. 36. One of the true rarities and among the most coveted revolvers in Confederate collecting is the brass framed percussion revolver made in Portsmouth, Virginia by Thomas W. Cofer. There are 13 known percussion specimens plus an additional three made for special percussion cartridges. These percussion models were true martial Confederate pistols being contracted by the 5th Virginia Cavalry. 82 revolvers were contracted and delivered in January and May of 1862. Several of the few extant examples are heavily restored. Existing percussion Cofers are either uniquely numbered or lettered; existing authentic examples are 1, 11, 13, 59, F, L, M, N, T, V and three examples with no number or letter; 5 of 13 examples are in museums and one is unknown since 1934. An excavated frame SN 10 was found near Macon, GA in 1955. SN 11 is by far the finest example known and was the prize revolver of renown Confederate collector Fred Edmunds prior to purchase by Morris Racker. For a Confederate revolver, this is a truly magnificent example with crisp markings, strong traces of orig finish and smooth,beautifully patinaed brass frame. This revolver

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

226


has only been in two collections since it left the family who had it since the war. There is a large file with provenance and history on this gun and the orig Cofer holster. The orig Cofer holster originated with Serial “F” and was added in 2003. PROVENANCE: Charles Frederick, Gettysburg, PA; Fred Edmunds, 1992; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2008. CONDITION: Overall very good plus, excellent for a Confederate handgun. All matching and complete. SN 1l is found on top of cyl pin, left side of loading lever, left side of plunger, bottom of bbl, front of frame, hammer on left side, trigger on left side, sideplate, grip screw, rear of cyl between cones, both frame screws on left side and other two screws in frame are stamped with “1”. Both lever screws are SNd “11”. Gun is marked on brass top strap “T.W. COFER’S / PATENT” and on top bbl flat “PORTSMOUTH VA”. Gun is overall “as found” with iron surfaces overall smooth brown/plum, light pitting and scattered small blemishes. Loading assembly has strong traces of orig finish, especially bright on plunger. Traces of blue are still seen on bbl, though mostly plum. Frame has smooth mustard patina with several small scratches and dents. Grips are sound and fit well with hand worn patina, base of each grip has about 1/8” x 1/2” inset where a lanyard was possibly fit light edge wear and light tacking. Single initial “F” is scratched into buttstrap. The orig Cofer holster is well worn and has a gilted Civil War eagle “I” button as finial so often seen on Confederate holsters. Holster displays gun well and fits nicely though muzzle protrudes. 51957-22 JS (100,000-150,000)

227

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1245. VERY FINE AND RARE, EARLY CONFEDERATE DANCE ARMY REVOLVER, SERIAL NUMBER 14. SN 14. Cal. 44. This is a very fine orig, authentic & complete early specimen of the Confederate Dance Brothers revolver, probably made at East Columbia, TX in July 1862 before moving to Anderson, TX according to Dance expert Gary Wiggins, author of Dance & Brothers Texas Gunmakers of the Confederacy,1986. Dance made approx 325 or so Dragoon-sized Army Revolvers of which less than 90 are known to have survived. Dance Revolvers are much like Colt Dragoons in appearance with the exception of the lack of recoil shields. Dance Revolvers, like other Confederates, saw hard use and rarely are found this nice and complete. Indeed, this is among the finest examples known. This gun conforms to the normal configuration having a 7-7/8” half oct-rnd bbl with low brass blade front sight. This gun is properly SNd with matching number “14” found in all areas normally SNd which include bbl housing, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, cyl, arbor, grips, loading arm and loading arm latch. The hammer is classic Dance being similar to a Colt Dragoon but without the knurling that Colt put on the spur and SNed 14 on right side. Overall, edges are crisp & sharp, metal is smooth with a beautiful plum color overall where orig blue has turned. Mechanically, gun functions well and exhibits good crisp rifling to bore. By NRA standards, this gun grades Good to Very Good, but by Confederate standards, this gun is Excellent. All screws, cones, sight and internal parts appear orig, even the wedge screw which is often lost appears orig. Accompanying this revolver are letters of provenance and authenticity by Fred Edmunds and Gary Wiggins, as well

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

228


as special limited edition No. 14 leather bound Dance & Brothers 1988 text by Wiggins, signed by the author and the two living Dance descendants at time of publication. PROVENANCE: Donald Sayrs, West Collingswood, NJ, purchased gun from Texan at unknown date though he states “many years ago” in his 1961 letter; Collection of Ashley Halsey, Charleston, SC, 1961; Pictured on pages 36-37 of Gary Wiggins’ “Dance & Brothers Texas Gunmakers of the Confederacy”; Fred Edmunds; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2000. CONDITION: Very good overall, excellent for a Confederate revolver. Gun shows light use with all safety pins intact. Gun appears 100% orig with exception of non-serialized Colt-style spring wedge that Edmunds refers to in his letter as potentially of contemporary replacement. According to letter from Wiggins, main spring and hand spring are replacements. This may be reason for gun being so fine and showing so light use. A vertical hairline crack is found on the right side of the frame through forward frame screw which is seen on several other early Dances which does not affect aesthetics or functionality. SNs are all well-struck and fully discernible. Metal surfaces overall are brown/ plum with scattered areas of staining & pitting. Brass backstrap and trigger guard have light mustard patina with minor cosmetic blemishes. Grips are sound & solid, well fit with edge wear, hand worn patina with light cosmetic blemishes, still retaining traces of orig thin varnish. Mechanically, gun functions well with crisp rifling in bore. 51957-18 JS (40,000-60,000)

229

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1246.

EXTREMELY RARE SPILLER & BURR CONFEDERATE REVOLVER, 1st MODEL, 1st TYPE, SERIAL NUMBER 13, ONLY KNOWN SURVIVING EXAMPLE. SN 13. Cal. 36. This gun has remarkable provenance and collection history, first being discovered by William Albaugh from a direct descent of the Union solider who had taken it home as a souvenir. This is one of the true iconic rarities in Confederate collecting. Interested parties unfamiliar with the history of the Atlanta Pistol Factory should read the provenance that accompanies this pistol. This pistol, SN 13, was in the first lot of 12 revolvers submitted to the War Department at Richmond for testing, December 26, 1862. This is the only surviving specimen of this group known. A second lot of 1st Model Spillers were resubmitted for testing in April 1863 at the Macon Armory, only 7 of the 40 revolvers submitted passed inspection and the balance returned to Spiller for reworking. Only 1 example survives of these 40 guns: 1st Model 2nd Type, SN 23. By mid-May, the Chief of Ordnance requested strengthening and other design changes and Spiller & Burrs produced after this date are of that standard; heavier

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

230


frame without exposed threads of the bbl and Colt-style latch. This early Spiller is indeed a rarity in that it survived being made almost to the same proportions of a Whitney Navy but only in brass, which was much weaker than Whitney steel. Dimensionally the frames would be strengthened as noted in the standard production models and also in the rare transitional heaviest framed Spillers such as the example in the following lot. SN 13 appears orig and complete with firm name stamped on top bbl flat “SPILLER & BURR”, 7” crowned octagonal bbl. SN “13” appears on the bottom flat of bbl, cylinder pin, cylinder pin latch, right side of frame, both grips, bottom of frame and trigger guard. Cylinder is also made without safety notches. PROVENANCE: Acquired Spring 1973 by William A. Albaugh in Maryland from a direct descent of the Union soldier, probably from Wisconsin, who brought the revolver home as a war souvenir, featured on cover and within “North/ South Trader”, Vol. 1, No. 2, July 1973, pictured “The American Rifleman”, January 1974, p. 31, pictured “North/South Trader”, Vol. III, No. 3, March-April 1976, p. 12, pictured “The Illustrated History of American Civil War Relics”, 1978, p. 167, pictured “America-The Men and Their Guns That Made Her Great”, 1981, p. 55, sold to Ted Meredith, September 1987, pictured “Confederate Revolvers”, 1987, p. 30,pictured “Man-at-Arms”, January-February 1995, p. 36, pictured “Colonel Burton’s Spill and Burr Revolver”, 1996, pgs. 36 and 47; Jay Huber, 2001; Burnie Crooke Collection, Pensacola, FL, 2004; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good but truly fine for a surviving Confederate brass frame revolver. Iron is grey overall with strong traces of thinning blue on bbl, especially in protected areas. Some muted case colors can be seen on hammer. Stocks are sound and well fit with hand worn patina, with small chip at inside left toe. Front sight, which is unusual but appears orig to time of use, brass post mounted on dovetailed iron base unlike the crowned ends seen on standard production guns. This gun also retains traces of silver plating in protected areas on frame. It is noted that plating was discontinued after first government inspection so this only original plated gun known. Cylinder shows distinct twist lines with slightly battered nipples. Brass shows casting flaws not seen on later production guns, with an overall smooth medium mustard patina. Two sets of initials are found scratched into butt and are partially discernible as seen in photos. Orig holster and roller buckle belt that were added for display by Mr. Racker are supple, crazed. Holster loop and tab have small repairs. 51957-12 JS (30,000-50,000)

231

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1247.

RARE CONFEDERATE SPILLER & BURR SOLID FRAME “TRANSITIONAL” ATLANTA PISTOL FACTORY REVOLVER, BEST OF THREE KNOWN EXAMPLES. NSN. Cal. 36. Just after the first model Spillers were completed and inspected in April 1863, so many failed due to the thin brass frame copied from Whitney, this model is thought to be transitional by the late Spiller scholar Bruce Kusrow. This model has a heavier, thicker frame than the standard production guns. This is by far the best known and finest condition of the 3 surviving specimens. Like the other transitional guns this example is devoid of SNs and has a distinct “keyhole” shaped loading aperture unique to these transitions. This particular example has been known for many years and was once part of the famous William Locke collection and is pictured in his book. Dimensionally these guns are quite similar in iron components, but the top strap of the frame is much bulkier, fully 25% more metal. The stocks are also heftier though still with the distinctive ferule and flat interface at frame. The cylinder shows distinct twist lines where cylinder was made from twisted iron bar prior to the Confederate government buying the Atlanta pistol factory and using steel most often seen on the Macon produced revolvers. William Albaugh in his 1955 text writes a good history and description of one of these unserialized guns, The Confederate Brass Framed Colt & Whitney. A more recent history of Spiller & Burr revolvers was written by Matthew Norman, Colonel Burton’s Spiller & Burr Revolver, 1996. PROVENANCE: William Locke collection; pictured on page 281 “The William M. Locke Collection” by Frank Sellers, 1973; Gary Bizacky collection. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall and especially nice for a Confederate revolver. Gun appears original and complete with traces of finish in protected areas and smooth mustard colored brass. The well fit grips retain traces of original varnish. There is an odd shallow inset on front edge of top of frame which quite possibly is from time of manufacture and appears to be from where a front sight would have been slotted. Mechanically functional with crisp, well defined rifling in bore. 52240-1 JS (20,000-25,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

232


Session 1 1248.

RARE EARLY SPILLER & BURR, ATLANTA, GEORGIA CONFEDERATE REVOLVER WITH FULL FIRM MARKING, “CS” AND SERIAL NUMBERED CYLINDER. SN 43. Cal. 36. Spiller & Burrs were made in Atlanta and Macon, Georgia with a total production of less than 1,500 guns. This particular brass framed copy of a Whitney revolver is the most difficult of the major Confederate manufacturers to find complete and orig. It is also difficult to find these guns with the firm marking on bbl and cylinders which are SNd. This gun exhibits both these features and also has “CS” stamped on right side of frame. Extrapolated from Matthew Norman’s 1996 scholarly text Colonel Burton’s Spiller & Burr Revolver, this particular example SN “43” was one of 112 guns submitted for inspection August of 1863. One hundred guns were accepted and these pistols were then sent by Express for final issue to John Wharton’s Division of Cavalry under Major Gen Joseph Wheeler. The first lot of New Pattern revolvers would have been issued in time to be field tested at the Confederate victory at the Battle of Chickamauga. There are various thoughts as to why so few Spillers have SNd cylinders and why only about half have “CS” stamped on frames. It’s probable that these pistols were actually accepted and inspected for Confederate Ordnance Dept. in Macon, Georgia, where the “CS” surcharge was added. This is among the few early Spiller & Burrs that can be documented as issued in 1863. PROVENANCE: Bill Gary Collection, Prescott, AZ, 1995; Don Bryan Collection; private collection, 1996. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Gun appears orig with matching SNs on bbl, frame, trigger guard, loading lever, cylinder and internally penciled on each grip. The cylinder pin has no discernible number but appears orig from time of use. Cryptic “M” is found stamped internally on right side of grip frame. Fairly smooth surfaces with pitting, scattered dents, dings and scratches. Brass frame shows old cleaning with a medium mustard patina. Gun appears all matching and orig with exception of restored bbl latch and some internal parts such as hand, cylinder has added small flange between ratchets to aid in guns mechanics. “SPILLER & BURR” markings on bbl flat are well discerned. Stocks are sound, solid and well fit with hand worn patina. This gun conforms to other standard model Spillers, functioning well with well-defined rifling in bore. 51571-5 JS (20,000-30,000)

233

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1249.

BRASS FRAMED CONFEDERATE SPILLER & BURR REVOLVER. SN 345. Cal. 36. This exact gun is pictured at least two references on Confederate guns and has unusual inscription under grips “JOHN H. FOWLER 1888” and “JHE / ELKTON / MD”. This gun conforms to the standard configuration of other Spiller revolvers and has a 6-7/8” oct bbl with unique crowning. Spiller & Burr revolvers were a Confederate brass-framed copy of Whitney’s Navy Revolver. This gun shows probable Confederate Government acceptance with a large “CS” stamped on right side of frame. SN “345” appears on bbl, frame, trigger guard, and inside stocks. There is a cryptic “M” stamped on right side of grip frame. Cylinder is not SNd, is orig. Cylinder shows distinct twist lines where cylinders were made from twisted wrought iron unique to Georgia manufacture utilized by Spiller and Griswold. This is a pleasing example of a popular brass framed Confederate revolver with smooth surfaces and a crisp “CS” that would make a great addition to any Confederate collection. PROVENANCE: John H. Fowler, Elkton, MD, 1888; Ben Michel Collection; James D. Julia Auctions, October 2007; pictured in “Warman’s Civil War Collectibles Identification and Price Guide”, pg 339, 2010; pictured on pg 72 “The Whitney Revolver”, D. W. Williams, 2012. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun appears orig throughout other than apparent addition of un-serialized loading assembly. Metal shows old cleaning overall, brass now has a light mustard patina and iron is overall mottled plum/brown with staining and pitting. Replaced iron pin front sight. Grips are sound and solid with right grip having a 1” x 1/2” chip repaired and a much smaller chip opposite it. Mechanically functional with restored mainspring, pitted bore with discernible rifling. 51551-1 JS (20,000-30,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

234


Session 1 1250. FINE CONFEDERATE SPILLER & BURR REVOLVER, UNIQUELY SILVER PLATED WITH MASONIC DECORATION. SN 651. Cal. 36. Spiller & Burrs were made in Atlanta and then Macon, Georgia with a total production of less than 1,500 guns. This is a standard brass framed copy of a Whitney revolver with “CS” surcharge on left side of frame, SNd cylinder showing clear twist lines. Whether or not this gun was silver plated during the war or after is unknown, but it does retain much of its plating, especially on grip strap. This gun has an unusual set of cryptics on left side of grip frame with “L” stamped 3 times. Normally only one cryptic is seen in this position near mainspring mortise. Another cryptic “G” is also seen on opposite side of grip frame at top, which this cataloger has not noticed before. A cryptic “W” is also found on bottom of right grip. This Spiller has more cryptic markings (4) than previously noted on a Spiller. Gun has matching SN “651” on bbl, cylinder, frame, trigger guard and penciled inside each grip. The loading assembly is not numbered. There is a silver saber which appears to be a Masonic emblem inset into left grip. This gun is listed by SN in the 1963 text “Confederate Handguns” by Albaugh on pg 74. Based on most recent scholarly research, based on SNd cylinder and “W” inspector on butt, this gun was most likely made in Atlanta after the CS government took over the private operations in March 1863. PROVENANCE: Listed by SN “Confederate Handguns”, Bill Albaugh, 1963, pg 74; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun is matching and orig with exception of restored loading assembly and latch. Silver plating is intact on grip frame, internally and externally, and traces on frame and trigger guard in protected areas. Iron surfaces are grey/brown with staining and pitting. Grips are well fit with hand worn patina, edge wear and chip above the 1-3/4” silver scimitar inset on right grip. Mechanically functional with good discernible rifling in bore. 52430-8 JS (15,000-20,000)

235

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1251.

RARE CONFEDERATE RIGDON & ANSLEY REVOLVER, AUGUSTA, GEORGIA. SN 1786. Cal. 36. All SNs on this revolver are stamped with the correct small number dies. It is also to be noted that the number “1” is a broken die which became broken at pistol #1237, continuing to be used through the small-die run to R&A pistol #1900, or thereabouts. This gun has cryptic “W” stamped on left front web of trigger bow. Gun appears all orig with matching SNs “1786” that are found on bbl housing, latch, loading arm, frame, arbor, cylinder, backstrap, trigger guard and wedge. The grips are also SNd internally in the channel and have a “WH” (Wescom Hudgins) inspector’s cartouche. Top bbl flat is properly stamped “CSA”. Sometime in late November or early December of 1862, the firm of Leech & Rigdon, then located in Columbus, Mississippi, contracted with the Confederate Government to manufacture percussion revolvers of the Colt patent design, though contract was not signed for 1500 guns until firm settled in Greensboro, GA. With Union troops threatening the Columbus area, Leech & Rigdon moved its operation (its third move) to Greensboro, Georgia, where they began turning out revolvers in March of 1863. Approximately 1000 revolvers were produced at Greensboro, before it was again necessary to move because of Yankee pressure in the area. The Leech & Rigdon partnership split up in January of 1864, and Rigdon took all the gunmaking machinery with him, moved to Augusta, Georgia (the fourth and last move) forming a new partnership with Jesse Ansley. Rigdon & Ansley assumed the responsibility of completing the orig Leech & Rigdon contract, by manufacturing the remaining 500 revolvers of that model, then going on with a new contract to furnish 1500 Rigdon & Ansley revolvers. While the Rigdon & Ansley revolvers were practically identical in design to the Leech & Rigdons, there were some changes made which were considered improvements at the time. The most obvious change was the addition of six (6) more cylinder stops on the Rigdon & Ansley, and the omission of the locking pins on the rear shoulders of the cylinder. This was thought to be a safety improvement in that it allowed the cylinder to be locked in place with the hammer resting between the percussion nipples. An additional change was the milling-out of a groove in the recoil shield, which now came to be called a “cap release groove”, which allowed spent percussion caps an easier exit from the frame, so that they were expelled via the groove at the right top side of the recoil shields as the cylinder rotated to the right in the firing and re-cocking procedure, after each round was fired. This “cap release groove” is found on this revolver along with the employment of a “Colt-type” loading lever latching assembly, rather than Leech & Rigdon ball and pin type catches. This is a pleasing example of Georgia made Rigdon & Ansley revolver with fine aesthetics, complete and orig. PROVENANCE: Ex-Clifford Young Collection, 1954; Ex-Fred Slaton Collection, 1960; Lifetime Collection of Dr. Zack Catterton. CONDITION: Very good overall, matching throughout, all major parts orig, the only discernible replacement is the wedge screw. Bbl retains tiny traces of orig blue finish with balance plum/brown with scattered nicks, dings, scratches and pinprick pitting. Frame and loading assembly have matching plum/brown color with pitting. Cylinder has rougher surface than rest of gun, grey/brown color with pitting, old cleaning and file marks, worn ratcheting and stops; SN is only partially discernible and may not actually match gun, though it does appear to be an orig Rigdon cylinder with correct partial SN dies. Front brass post sight is orig. Brass trigger guard and backstrap have yellow to dark mustard patina. Grips are sound and well fit with thin traces of orig varnish. Mechanically gun functions with well discerned rifling in bore. 51566-8 (17,000-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

236


Session 1 1252. RARE CONFEDERATE “AUGUSTA, GA CSA” MARKED RIGDON & ANSLEY REVOLVER. SN 1656. Cal. 36. There are only 18 known early model Rigdon & Ansleys with the “AUGUSTA, GA CSA” address. The highest known SN with this marking is “1689”. All SNs on this revolver are stamped with the correct small number dies. It is also to be noted that the number “1” is a broken die which became broken at pistol #1237, continuing to be used through the small-die run to R&A pistol #1900, or thereabouts. This gun has cryptic “W” stamped upside down on rear left of trigger guard. Gun appears all orig with matching SNs “1656” that are found on bbl housing, latch, loading arm, frame, arbor, cylinder, backstrap, trigger guard and wedge. The grips are also SNd internally in the channel. Top bbl flat is inspected “CSA” just rear of the rare “AUGUSTA, GA” bbl marking. Sometime in late November or early December of 1862, the firm of Leech & Rigdon, then located in Columbus, Mississippi, contracted with the Confederate Government to manufacture percussion revolvers of the Colt patent design, though contract was not signed for 1500 guns until firm settled in Greensboro, GA. With Union troops threatening the Columbus area, Leech & Rigdon moved its operation (its third move) to Greensboro, Georgia, where they began turning out revolvers in March of 1863. Approximately 1000 revolvers were produced at Greensboro, before it was again necessary to move because of Yankee pressure in the area. The Leech & Rigdon partnership split up in January of 1864, and Rigdon took all the gun-making machinery with him, moved to Augusta, Georgia (the fourth and last move) forming a new partnership with Jesse Ansley. Rigdon & Ansley assumed the responsibility of completing the orig Leech & Rigdon contract, by manufacturing the remaining 500 revolvers of that model, then going on with a new contract to furnish 1500 Rigdon & Ansley revolvers. While the Rigdon & Ansley revolvers were practically identical in design to the Leech & Rigdons, there were some changes made which were considered improvements at the time. The most obvious change was the addition of six (6) more cylinder stops on the Rigdon & Ansley, and the omission of the locking pins on the rear shoulders of the cylinder. This was thought to be a safety improvement in that it allowed the cylinder to be locked in place with the hammer resting between the percussion nipples. An additional change was the milling-out of a groove in the recoil shield, which now came to be called a “cap release groove”, which allowed spent percussion caps an easier exit from the frame, so that they were expelled via the groove at the right top side of the recoil shields as the cylinder rotated to the right in the firing and re-cocking procedure, after each round was fired. This “cap release groove” is found on this revolver along with the employment of a “Colt-type” loading lever latching assembly, rather than Leech & Rigdon ball and pin type catches. This is a pleasing example of Georgia made Rigdon & Ansley revolver with good aesthetics. PROVENANCE: Jackson Arms, Catalog 23, Dallas, TX, 1966; William Hozie, Crozet, VA, 1974; Herb Rosenthal, Great Guns, 1976; Ted Meredith, Boca Raton, FL, 1983; Bob Lewis Collection, Tujunga, CA; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Gun appears orig throughout, though several screws appear replaced, but are excellent restorations. The grips are SNd internally but have a slightly different profile than those typical of this manufacturer and are probably old restorations. Metal is mottled gray overall with old cleaning. Brass has light mustard patina with old cleaning. Gun appears to have been painted red at one time with traces of paint visible in protected areas. This was possibly done as a captured souvenir. Markings are mostly discernible though SN is weak on bbl housing and cylinder. “Augusta” is quite weak though several letters are discerned, “GA” and “CSA” are discernible. There is muzzle wear, loading arm is a bit loose. Grips are well fit with hand worn patina with tacking marks at butt. Mechanically gun is functional with discernible rifling in pitted bore. 51957-10 JS (15,000-25,000) 237

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1253.

RIGDON & ANSLEY CONFEDERATE PERCUSSION REVOLVER, SN 1785. SN 1785. Cal. 36. This is a consecutive number revolver to the next lot, SN 1786 from the Zack Catterton Collection. If Mr. Racker had known that gun had existed, there’s little doubt he would have tried to make these two into a pair. Guns have very similar aesthetics overall though this example has a “Leech & Rigdon” cylinder with 6 stops with no safety pins, but has matching SN. This exact gun is the only example known with this variation and is pictured on pg 27 of William Gary’s “Confederate Revolvers”, 1987. This is an interesting variant with strong traces of original finish with sharp edges. Matching SNs are found on all parts normally numbered including bbl, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, cylinder, loading arm, latch, arbor and wedge. This gun is somewhat of an enigma in that it has a deeper bevel cut into frame at front of trigger guard, longer flat of rammer swivel, but appears original throughout. PROVENANCE: Eric Vaule, 1963; William Albaugh; Bob Howard, 1964; Cecil Anderson, 1970; Don Bryan, 1983; pictured on pg 27 William Gary “Confederate Revolvers”, 1987; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good overall. Crisp action. Well defined rifling and bore. All markings are discernible and “CSA” proof is particularly sharp as is the “W” cryptic on left front web of trigger bow. Stocks are well fit with hand worn patina. Metal overall is dark with strong traces of thin finish on bbl housing and under bbl. Muted case colors are found on protected areas of loading assembly. The cylinder has a plum, patina though SN is stamped in the same style as are the matching numbers on gun. 51957-21 JS (15,000-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

238


Session 1 1254.

EXTREMELY RARE AND FINEST KNOWN AUGUSTA MACHINE WORKS CONFEDERATE REVOLVER. SN K. Cal. 36. Without doubt, this is the best known, best provenanced and highest condition Confederate revolver made at the Augusta Machine Works. Less than 10 of these guns are known in this configuration. There is little information published on this particular manufacturer other than the government factory was located at the site of the Augusta Machine Works. Well known antebellum Augusta gunsmiths E.H. Rogers and W.D. Bowen were contractors for the Machine Works according to Bowen descendants. This particular revolver was the property of Lt. Col. Roswell M. Russell of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry. This gun descended in the family of Charles H. Dorsey Jr who in 1959 was the managing editor of the Baltimore Sun. The gun was photographed and featured in a March 1960 Gun Report article as an unknown maker where several Confederate authorities recognized the gun as being Confederate. Hugh Benet from Baltimore immediately found the gun and featured it in his and William Albaugh co-authored text Confederate Handguns. Not only is the gun pictured and described in the text but it is also featured on the cover of this 1963 definitive text. As with most Augusta Machine pistols there are very few markings, some examples being marked only 2 or 3 times. However this gun is marked with SN or assembly number “K” on most parts including the unique “pinched” grips. This gun is in exemplary condition retaining vivid case colors on frame, hammer and loading assembly. PROVENANCE: Lt. Col. Roswell Moale Russell, 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, 1863; Charles H. Dorsey, Jr. through family descent; pictured and described pg 32-33 of “Gun Report”, March 1960; pictured in “Confederate Handguns” on cover and described and pictured pg 5; Listed by SN on pg 45 of “Confederate Revolvers” by Bill Gary, 1987; Burney Crooke collection, Pensacola, Florida. Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Fine overall. Gun has crisp, sharp lines retaining most of its case colors on frame and hammer. Plunger and rammer pivot also retain bright colors. The full octagonal 7-19/32” bbl retains bright finish in protected areas, though thinning, and bright overall. Cylinder retains much of its thin sky blue original finish. Grips are well fit retaining most of their varnished finish with moderate edge wear. Brass trigger guard and backstrap have a smooth, dark mustard patina. Mechanically, gun is functional with crisp, shiny rifled bore. There is an accompanying affidavit stating the gun’s lineage. 51957-20 JS (30,000-50,000)

239

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1255.

VERY RARE EARLY CONFEDERATE COLUMBUS MISSISSIPPI MADE LEECH & RIGDON REVOLVER SN 59. SN 59. Cal. 36. This rare Confederate revolver with small die variation stamped “LEECH & RIGDON” only is first noted on the earliest production. These earliest guns probably total only 75 revolvers made in Columbus, Mississippi (per document cited in text by Bill Gary, Confederate Revolvers) due to the factory being forced to move their manufacturing operation in December 1862 due to Union threat. A great detail of production notes and opinion concerning these rare pistols can be found in William Gary Confederate Revolvers and American Society of Arms Collectors articles published by Ted Meredith and Kent Wall. (Kent Wall & the late Bruce Kusrow, leading Leech scholars opine and reason in these articles that possibly all 375 “small die” guns were made in Columbus). Regardless, there are only 10 known Columbus, Mississippi surviving guns SN under 75 that show the dramatic physical changes as the company improved their product. This is among the best provenanced and well known of Columbus, Mississippi produced revolvers by Leech & Rigdon and this is a fine complete example being originally in the famous Ted Meredith collection. The consecutive numbered gun SN 60 which is being sold in the following lot has equally fine condition and provenance. This gun in additional to having matching SNs found on the normal places Leeches are numbered, bbl, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, loading arm, latch and wedge is also numbered on the lever screw. This is only noted on four other early Leechs SN 15, 26 (though it is mismatched 36), 52 and 60. PROVENANCE: H.D. Steward, Miami, FL, Gun Report, Nov-Dec 1975; Ted Meredith Collection, Boca Raton, FL, 1986; ASAC Bulletin #72 May 1995 p 23; Burney Crooke collection, Pensacola, FL, 2000; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2006. CONDITION: Very good overall. Iron is overall a mottled gray/brown with staining and pitting. Markings very good and discernible. Tiny traces of finish are found in protected areas. Brass has a mustard patina. Grips are fairly well fit with some shrinkage and tacking marks at butt. Mechanically functional with crisp rifled bore. 51957-7 JS (30,000-50,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

240


Session 1 1256.

VERY RARE CONFEDERATE COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI MADE LEECH & RIGDON REVOLVER, SN 60. SN 60. Cal. 36. This particular revolver from the famous Dr. Robert Moore Collection is consecutively numbered to the previous lot in comparable if not slightly better condition. What an opportunity to have the rarest consecutive pair of Confederate revolvers that Mr. Racker spent years putting together. This rare Confederate revolver with small die stamped “LEECH & RIGDON” only is first noted on the earliest production. These earliest guns probably total only 75 revolvers made in Columbus, Mississippi (per document cited in text by Bill Gary, Confederate Revolvers) due to the factory being forced to move their manufacturing operation in December 1862 due to Union threat. A great detail of production notes and opinion concerning these rare pistols can be found in William Gary Confederate Revolvers and American Society of Arms Collectors articles published by Ted Meredith and Kent Wall. (Kent Wall & the late Bruce Kusrow, leading Leech scholars opine and reason in these articles that possibly all 375 “small die” guns were made in Columbus). Regardless, there are only 10 known Columbus, Mississippi surviving guns SN under 75 that show the dramatic physical changes as the company improved their product. This is among the best provenanced and well known of Columbus, Mississippi produced guns by Leech & Rigdon and this is a fine complete example being originally in the famous Ted Meredith collection. The consecutive numbered gun SN 59 which was sold in the previous lot has equally fine condition and provenance. This gun in additional to having matching SNs found on the normal places Leeches are numbered, bbl, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, loading arm, latch and wedge is also numbered on the lever screw. This is only noted on four other early Leechs SN 15, 26 (though it is mismatched 36), 52 and 59. PROVENANCE: Billingslea Collection 1930’s; Wm. Locke Collection 1973; Pictured ASAC Bulletin #30, Fall 1974 p. 121; Pictured “Confederate Revolvers” by Wm. Gary pp 12 & 16, 1989; ASAC Bulletin #72, May 1995, p. 25; Collection of Dr. Robert L. Moore, Philadelphia, MS; Conestoga Auctions, June 2000, Lot 174; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2000. CONDITION: Very good overall, all matching and complete. This is one of the first Leech and Rigdons to show inset braised repair to frame which is seen on several later Leech products. This gun has the crispest “LEECH & RIGDON” marking of this style known. Mechanically functional with crisp fine bore. Tiny traces of finish in protected areas. Well discerned SNs. Stocks are sound and well fit with hand worn patina. Brass has a light mustard patina. 51957-8 JS (30,00050,000) 241

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1257.

UNIQUE “LEECH & CO - CSA” MARKED CONFEDERATE REVOLVER, SN 125. SN 125. Cal. 36. This is the only specimen known of this particular Leech product that has a long, distinguished collection history. This gun conforms somewhat to other Leech products being round barreled copy of Colt Percussion Navy except for unique bbl marking and Colt-style latch. Gun is SNd on bbl, frame, face of cyl, wedge, hammer, arbor and partial inked number is found on grip. Backstrap is unmarked and trigger guard has a small “6” stamped internally. Gun is well worn but is the only known example. Accompanied by orig “Sam Smith Collection” card stating history back to 1950 by Bernie Crooke who sold this gun in 2002 to Mr. Racker. PROVENANCE: Joseph Desserich Collection, 1950; Sam Smith Collection; Charles Foster Collection, 1983; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2002. CONDITION: Fair to good. Appears orig and complete except wedge screw which appears replaced. Markings appear crudely stamped with dies not normally associated on Georgia made revolvers. Gun overall is cleaned with numerous small dings, dents and scratches. Cleaned to a mottled silver/grey with pitting. Stocks are well fit with light edge wear. Brass has heavy dark patina in protected areas where not cleaned; balance overall a light mustard. 51957-3 JS (12,00015,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

242


Session 1 1258.

FINE ORIGINAL CONFEDERATE LEECH & RIGDON REVOLVER. SN 597. Cal. 36. This revolver was made under contract from the Confederate States government in Greensboro, GA in 1863. It conforms to other Leech & Rigdon’s with 7-1/2” rnd bbl with oct bbl housing, marked on top flat “LEECH & RIGDON CSA”. By NRA standards, this revolver would grade very good, but is quite fine for a Confederate revolver. PROVENANCE: Ex-Ted Meredith Collection, 1980; Pictured on pg 24 “ASAC Bulletin”, #72, May 1995; Lifetime Collection of Dr. Zack Catterton. CONDITION: Very good overall, all matching. Everything normally SNd is numbered and numbers all discernible. Numbers are found on bbl, arbor, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, loading arm, latch, wedge, cylinder and penciled inside grips. Maker’ mark is especially crisp and discernible. Metal is grey/plum, smooth overall with traces of orig finish in protected areas and scattered areas of staining and pitting. Grips are sound and well fit with light edge wear, hand worn patina, small chip on inside left toe. Good mechanics, clean, crisp bore with light pitting. This revolver has had several professional conserved screws and the latch is an apparent restoration though properly numbered. 51566-7 JS (15,000-20,000)

243

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1259.

FINE ORIGINAL RECENT DISCOVERY CONFEDERATE LEECH & RIGDON REVOLVER, SERIAL NUMBER 820 WITH ORIGINAL HOLSTER. SN 820. Cal. 36. This is newly discovered revolver from a Western estate that has not been seen in collectors market before. Family knows gun has always been in family and dates back to a greatgreat-uncle on mother’s side who came from battlefield to Nevada during the Gold Rush and it has been retained in the family ever since. There are 2 sets of initials on this gun which probably would identify the man who carried it ‘JSE” on butt and “HWE” inside grip strap. This revolver was made under contract from the Confederate States government in Greensboro, GA. in 1863. By NRA standards this revolver would grade good+ but is quite fine for a Confederate revolver. This example shows honest use, as does its fine orig holster. CONDITION: Very good overall, all matching. Everything normally SNd is numbered and numbers all discernible. Numbers are found on bbl, arbor, frame, trigger guard, backstrap, loading arm, latch, wedge, cylinder and penciled inside grips. Makers mark is especially crisp and discernible with a light rebound in “Rigdon” which is not uncommon. Metal is grey and smooth overall with scattered areas of staining and pitting. Stocks are sound and well fit with moderate edge wear, hand worn patina, ½” chip on left side. Good mechanics, clean, crisp bore with light pitting. 100% orig with exception of 4 properly conserved screws. Accompanying holster is a rare find and is in relatively fine condition overall, though missing closure tab and belt loop is resewn with rawhide as is top 2” of closure, which truly appears to be alternations made when this gun was brought out west after the Civil War. 51029-1 JS (15,000-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

244


Session 1 1260. LEECH & RIGDON CONFEDERATE REVOLVER, IDENTIFIED TO SOUTH CAROLINA CAVALRYMAN. SN 1174. Cal. 36. This is a nice example of an orig and authentic Leech & Rigdon maker marked revolver in standard configuration. This gun appears “as found” orig and complete in every regard having a much better and discernible than average bbl marking. The firm of Leech & Rigdon started business in Memphis, TN and being chased by advancing Union forces, moved their operations to Columbus, Miss. where pistol production began, and then to Greensboro, Georgia where this gun was made. This gun is marked “LEECH & RIGDON CSA” on top flat of half-oct bbl housing. Matching SNs are found on bbl, loading arm, cylinder, frame, trigger guard, wedge, arbor, backstrap and penciled into backstrap channel of grips. This gun has all features consistent with this model including a cryptic mark found on the front right web of trigger bow and in this example cryptic is 4-dots in a square. Gun was made with no safety pins, solid hammer face with no slots, ball and pin loading arm type. There is no cap release groove in recoil shield. These features are typical and consistent to these Georgia made Confederate revolvers. The “CSA” marking on bbl is consistent with this gun being part of Confederate Government order that ends in the 1500 serial range. Stamped on bottom of right grip is partial “SC” marking seen on other guns in this serial range. There is also a set of initials “JBC” scratched into butt which Mr. Donaldson had identified to cavalryman James B. Cureton. Holcombe’s Legion, 7th SC Cavalry. Pvt. Cureton was killed in action May 30, 1864 on the James River. We are not sure where Mr. Donaldson obtained this gun, but the initials do match his proposed ID. Mr. Donaldson was the first purported owner of this gun and bought it “out of the woods”. Regardless of who carried this gun, it is a fine, honest, complete example with the rarely seen “SC” inspector mark. There are two wonderful articles detailing the history of Leech & Rigdon revolvers published by the American Society of Arms Collectors in their bulletins by Ted Meredith originally and updated by Kent Wall. Copies of these articles will be included. These articles add to the primary research published by William Albaugh and William Gary in their texts on Confederate handguns. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. Metal is grey overall with tiny traces of finish in protected areas. Markings are all crisp and well discerned. Gun appears orig with exception of two restored screws and loading arm latch which could be contemporary but is not numbered. There are numerous small dings, dents and bruises to surfaces of this gun with pitting. Brass has light mustard patina. Grips are sound, well fit, only the “S” in the “SC” inspector mark is visible, moderate edge wear, tacking marks at front toes with chipping, hand worn patina. Mechanically functional with discernible rifling in bore. 52430-15 JS (15,000-18,000) 245

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1261. UNIQUE CONFEDERATE C.H. RIGDON 5” BARRELED REVOLVER. NSN. Cal. 36. For the Confederate handgun collector who wants every model, this is the only “Pocket Sized” revolver known. There are only 6 C.H. Rigdon marked pistols known and the other 5 are all standard Navy models with 7-1/2” bbls. This gun is pictured in William Albaugh’s text Confederate Arms,1957. Albaugh comments that in his opinion, “This is the arm from which the Rigdon-Ansley were modeled.” In Frank Seller’s and Sam Smith’s book American Percussion Revolvers Sam Smith states that he believed this gun to have been Charles Rigdon’s personal gun. This gun has remained in the same collection for all these years until 2013. Regardless of the thoughts of these respected early authors on Confederate arms, studying the other Rigdon revolvers known, I have little doubt that this gun was made near the end of production. There is no doubt this gun was made as a 5” barreled revolver and is not simply a “cut-down” Navy revolver. The cylinder is over 5% shorter than standard production Rigdon & Ansley revolvers. The back of frame and arbor are correspondingly milled to accept this shorter cylinder. In the opinion of this cataloger, this gun, like a few late Griswold’s and Spiller & Burr’s, were privately purchased and had non-military features such as special finishes and higher grade grips, such as the burled and varnished grips seen on this unique gun. The loading assembly latch, bbl catch and front sight are identically made to those seen on late production Rigdon & Ansley’s, further substantiating the originality and authenticity of this unique revolver. There is only one other identically marked “CH RIGDON” revolver and it is among the highest SN of standard Rigdon & Ansley production, 2316. One other “CH RIGDON” gun is known, also marked “AUGUSTA GA”, that being SN 1490, which is among the earliest 12 stop revolvers (1482 is lowest SN known, no maker’s mark). Three other “CSA” marked and inspected “CH RIGDON, AUGUSTA GA” standard Navy revolvers are known (SN 2154, 2180 and 2182). Two features that stand out substantiating this gun as late production are the “milled cap release channel” and wedge is “non-spring” type (first seen approximately SN 2150). When Herman Stumpf sold his gun collection in the 1950’s he only retained this unique 5” “pocket sized” revolver he felt was Charles Rigdon’s personal gun. This gun is in wonderful condition for a Confederate revolver. PROVENANCE: Herman Stumpf collection; pictured pg 13 Albaugh “Confederate Arms’, 1957; pictured and described in Sellers & Smith “American Percussion Revolvers”, 1971; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Appears all orig and authentic with exception of lap welded repair to mainspring and missing screw in backstrap. Metal overall is gray with tiny traces of blue finish in protected areas with scattered staining and pitting. Brass backstrap and trigger guard have mustard colored patina. Stocks retain 40-50% of their orig varnish. Rifling in bbl is well defined, though pitted overall. Gun functions mechanically though mainspring is weak. There are discernible tool marks on frame, bbl and cyl, typical of other late production guns. Maker’s mark on bbl is easily discerned, as can be seen in photos. A rebound of die can be seen in a ghost of some letters, this is noted also on other examples as marking identical on all. There are no other external marks but internally there are a pair of punch marks on wedge and backstrap. There is a large punch mark on left side of trigger guard that possibly removed “cryptic” often seen stamped on standard production Augusta made revolvers. 51957-2 JS (30,000-40,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

246


Session 1 1262.

FINE 1st MODEL GRISWOLD REVOLVER FROM ESTATE OF CAPTAIN JOHN MORTON, N.B. FORREST’S CHIEF OF ARTILLERY. SN 974. Cal. 36. This is an honest, well used Confederate 1st model Griswold that came from John W. Morton’s estate. John Watson Morton (1842-1914) Chief of Forrest’s Artillery, CSA. In 1861 John Morton was a student at the Western Military Institute in Nashville. After a short stint in the infantry, Morton joined the artillery. He was captured at Fort Donelson in 1862 and was held as a POW for several months before being exchanged. He joined Forrest’s command at Columbia, Tennessee and took command of his artillery. He was wounded at Parker’s Crossroads and at Thompson’s Station, Chickamauga, Brice’s Crossroads, Johnsonville and numerous other engagements he led his command with distinction. He was paroled at Gainesville, Alabama on May 10, 1865. After the war he returned to school to study medicine and was valedictorian of his class at the University of Tennessee. His postwar career included medicine, farming, journalism and politics, 1901-1909 was secretary of Captain John Morton state for the State of Tennessee. He had the honor of being the first President of the Tennessee Division, United Confederate Veterans and was very involved with Confederate veteran organizations. His memoirs, “The Artillery of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Cavalry” were published in 1909. In the last years of his life Capt. Morton lived with his daughter in Memphis and when he passed away was escorted by many prominent Memphis Confederate Veterans to his final resting place at Mount Olivet Cemetery in Nashville, TN where so many other prominent Confederates are buried. When Morton’s estate was sold in the house sale of Anne Morton Stout in 1982, many associated items were sold and dispersed with the late Mike Miner assembling most of his material, including sword, uniform and battery flag along with many photographs and reunion memorabilia. Miner always tried to buy this revolver and the gold portrait lockets being sold in the next lot. Revolver comes with notarized letter stating provenance from estate and a copy of March-April 1992 North South Trader’s Civil War telling the story of the Morton estate. PROVENANCE: John W. Morton; Morton family descendants; Anne Morton Stout Estate; David H. Wilson, 1982; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson, 1998. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Gun appears all matching and orig with exception of 3 replaced screws. Iron is overall dark with pitting. Brass has been cleaned and now exhibits a medium mustard patina. Grips are sound with small putty repair where abutting frame. Grips have gap at backstrap, but are orig though no discernible penciled number can be seen, hand worn patina with tacking marks. Bbl has added brass blade front sight which appears contemporary to time of use. SN “974” found on bbl, cylinder and frame, secondary number “74” found on loading arm, hammer, trigger, backstrap and trigger guard. Roman numeral “IIIV” found on backstrap and trigger guard. Cryptic “U” is found on back of cylinder, bottom of bbl near latch, frame, trigger guard and backstrap. Mainspring is replaced, but mainspring screw appears orig. The wedge is unusual in that it appears orig, though originally a spring type (note orig spring wedges have been excavated at Griswoldville). The wedge is numbered “647”, the “6” is actually an upside down Griswold “9”. Normally wedges only had a secondary number, this is an anomaly which could be original. Mechanically gun functions, although sloppy with well defined rifled bore. 52430-6 JS (25,000-30,000) 247

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1263.

UNIQUE AND FINE IRON FRAME CONFEDERATE GRISWOLD REVOLVER. SN 1941. Cal. 36. This is the only known iron frame Griswold. This gun is original and complete and has well known collecting history. At the factory site a good many iron frames have been excavated, though incomplete. Why there are no other iron frame guns is a mystery as obviously these frames were more substantial and wouldn’t crack like their brass counterparts. The iron frame shows the same striations externally as other Griswold iron. There is also an “H” stamped on the right side of the bbl housing which early Griswold scholar Cecil Anderson believed denoted guns that had gone back for repair and that might be the case as the arbor has a slightly different profile than normally seen with a few less grease grooves. Regardless, this is a nice example of the only known iron frame Griswold revolver. For anyone who wanted every Georgia Confederate revolver variant, this is an important one. PROVENANCE: Dr. Conrad Smith, Augusta, GA, 1969; Burney Crooke, Pensacola, FL, 1995; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good overall for a Confederate revolver. All components appear original with possibly exception of a couple screws and internal parts which were frozen and repaired in 1969 by Red Hayden. The frame is unserialized, but is no doubt original. Full SN “1941” is found on left side of bbl and cylinder. Secondary number “21” is found on loading arm, wedge, hammer, trigger guard, backstrap and penciled into channel of grips. Cryptic backwards “S” is found on bottom of bbl, backstrap and trigger guard. Roman numeral “III” is found on backstrap and trigger guard. Metal on gun overall is a mottled gray/brown with a distinct twist seen in cylinder. Grips are slightly shrunk with edge wear and hand worn patina. Mechanically gun functions, though sloppily with well discerned rifling and pitted bore. 51957-13 JS (30,000-50,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

248


Session 1 1264.

RARE INSCRIBED CONFEDERATE 2nd MODEL GRISWOLD REVOLVER OF CAPT. BEZALIEL BROWN, 7th VIRGINIA INFANTRY, WHO WAS CAPTURED AFTER BEING WOUNDED DURING PICKETT’S CHARGE AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. SN 2198. Cal. 36. This particular Griswold revolver was the first one identified as inscribed and was originally in the William Albaugh Collection pictured and described in his 1955 text The Confederate Brass-Framed Colt & Whitney , pgs 16-21 (an orig copy of this book is included in this lot). Pistol is commemoratively inscribed on backstrap “MAJOR B.G. BROWN COMPANY I, 7TH VA. REGt, C.S.A.”. Brown was a member of the immortal 600 wounded and captured after Pickett’s Charge. This gun has been in some of the most illustrious Confederate collections dating back to the 1940’s. The most popular brass frame Griswold Revolver was made by Samuel Griswold from converted cotton gin factory near Macon, Georgia. Confederate soldiers lucky enough to be issued a Confederate made “Colt” often wrote of their pride in ownership of such high Southern quality. Rare are these revolvers in high condition. This is a standard 2nd model Griswold revolver having half oct bbl housing being among the finest examples, 100% orig, all matching, retaining strong traces of bright orig blue and case colors. Overall, this gun is in very good condition by NRA standards, but is extremely fine and among the best for Confederate revolvers. Brass has a smooth mustard patina and iron is smooth with silver/grey patina overall, with bright blue in protected areas. This gun is SN’d 2198 on right side of bbl housing, frame, and cyl. Secondary number “8” found stamped on wedge, hammer, loading arm, bottom of backstrap and bottom of trigger guard. Cryptic “A” is found on bottom of bbl near latch, back of frame, right side of trigger guard, right side of backstrap, and back of cyl. A Roman numeral “XI” is found on backstrap and trigger guard. This extremely fine Griswold revolver retaining strong orig finish ranks it in the top 2-3% of all surviving Confederate brass framed revolvers as to originality and finish. I know of few better examples, though none are inscribed. PROVENANCE: Richard Steuart Collection, Baltimore, MD, author of 1944 text “Firearms of the Confederacy”; William Albaugh Collection; Lewis Leigh, Jr., Leesburg, VA, 1968; pictured on pg 16 “Confederate Brass Framed Colt & Whitney”, 1955; S. L. Hutchinson Collection; pictured and described, pgs 142-143 “Confederate Presentation & Inscribed Swords & Revolvers”, Dan Hartzler, 1988; Bill Turner Collection, 1982; Cliff Serbin Collection, Williamsburg, VA; Don Bryan Collection; pictured and described on pg 106, “Arming the Glorious Cause”, Whisker & Yantz, 1998; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 1998. CONDITION: Overall very good-fine, well fit and matching. Gun appears 100% orig including screws. Metal is overall smooth and cleaned. Iron is a silver/grey and brass is a light mustard with scattered small dings and dents and holster wear. Cyl shows good twist lines, slight battering to a couple of cones and safety pins are intact. Action is crisp with bright, clean bore. 51957-17 JS (25,000-35,000)

249

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1265.

INTERESTING CONFEDERATE COMPOSITE GRISWOLD REVOLVER. SN 3300/1360. Cal. 36. There are a handful of Griswold revolvers that have had parts utilized on Colt’s. This is the only “marriage” of a Confederate Griswold and Manhattan I have noted. Bbl, loading arm and cylinder are Griswold and serial numbered “3300”. Bbl has cryptic “AA” stamped on bottom and “AA” over “C” stamped on back of cylinder. This is the only example I have noted with 2 cryptics on back of cylinder and they are quite clear. Bbl & cylinder both show traces of orig finish and bbl has large casting flaw in bottom. Loading arm has secondary “0” and casting flaw. The remainder of gun is Manhattan Navy SN “1360” with exception of arbor which appears made especially for these combined parts so they could be used. The wedge appears to be from a Colt and is SN “4706”. Frame housing was filed to fit the bbl and cylinder and bbl has a small fitted silver blade sight instead of the orig post. Bbl measures 7-7/16” and gun is 13” overall. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson, 1985. CONDITION: Good overall though loose and wobbly and bbl over hangs frame, but locking pins still mate. Loading lever screw has been smashed flat. Metal is a mottled gray overall with tiny traces of finish. Butt screw is replaced, otherwise gun appears orig with hand worn patina to well fit stocks with rounded corners at toes. Mechanics are very sloppy and cylinder only turns intermittently, clear crisp rifled bore. 52430-12 JS (5,000-6,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

250


Session 1 1266. INSCRIBED COLT BREVETTE NAVY REVOLVER OF CONFEDERATE BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM Y. SLACK OF MISSOURI, KILLED IN ACTION AT BATTLE OF PEA RIDGE, ARK. NSN. Cal. 34. Brigadier General William Y. Slack (1816-1862) of the Missouri State Guard at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek, August 10, 1861, his command was the first to attack Union General Lyon’s troops and suffered severely. 36 were killed and 76 wounded, General Slack himself fell with a dangerous wound at the head of column. After Slack recuperated he was back in action and commanding troops in the spring campaign of 1862 in Northeast Arkansas which resulted in the fierce battle at Elkhorn Tavern (Battle of Pea Ridge). William Y. Slack At the opening of the fight on March 7, while maintaining a successful attack, he was shot through the body, a wound which proved mortal. “I hope his distinguished services will be restored to his country,” wrote General van Dorn. General Sterling Price also alluded to him as “one of his best and bravest officers”. In this fatal battle, in which so many brilliant officers lost their lives he was one of the costliest sacrifices of Missouri. (Quotes taken from Confederate military history.) This brevette of unknown manufacture is original and has great collection history. It is pictured and described in Confederate Presentation & Inscribed Swords & Revolvers by Dan Hartzler, 1988 and has a large file of correspondence starting in 1974. This gun has been in several fine Confederate collections and was studied by early Confederate authority Henry Stewart. The inscription on backstrap reads “BRIG. GEN’L WM.Y.SLACK IV Mo.S.G.” The gun is beautifully made emulating Colt Navy with 7-3/4” octagonal bbl, iron frame, trigger guard and backstrap. The metal of bbl and frame show striations not seen on American or European brevettes and Henry Stewart and Russ Pritchard commented in a 1984 letter that the gun is quite a mystery as to maker. Engraved under loading arm on bottom of bbl “GEO. S. POLLEYS ARKADELPHIA 1862”. Captain George S. Polleys was in charge of the Confederate Ordnance Works at Arkadelphia, AR and when this establishment moved to Tyler, TX he was placed in charge of the armory there. Polleys also served with Arkansas regiment and was captured in 1865. The connection between the Polleys and Slack is unknown. Accompanying revolver is a rare signature on legal document signed by Slack in 1841. Regardless, this is an interesting revolver with good collection history. PROVENANCE: Collection of Fred Slayton, Nebo, KY; Don Bryan collection; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun is crisp with traces of finish. Markings are excellent as can be seen in photos. Mechanically functional with crisp rifled bore. Hand worn checkered wood stocks. Cylinder retains crisp safety pins and unique knurling on surface. 5195716 JS (10,000-20,000)

251

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1267.

RARE CONFEDERATE INSCRIBED COLT ARMY REVOLVER, CAPTURED BY GEORGE HILBERT, COMPANY B 12th VIRGINIA CAVALRY WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 95849. Cal.44. This is a standard Model 1860 US issued Colt Army revolver shipped to the Frankfort Arsenal, February 17, 1863. This gun would have been issued immediately to US Cavalry and could have been captured by the 12th Virginia Cavalry at the Battle of Brandy Station June 10, 1863 where Col. A. W. Harman of the 12th VA reports capturing 68 Colt Army pistols along with some rifles, sabers and horses. The 12th Virginia was hard fought at that battle, having 55 casualties killed, wounded and/or captured including George’s brother John Hilbert killed. Both brothers enlisted in 1862 in Harrisburg, VA. Hilberts’s records, which are included, are sketchy but he was captured late in the war and was sent to Elmira Prison and not released until June 27, 1865. Gun is honest and dark and well used. Left stock is impeccably carved “G. Hilbert / Co. B 12 V”. PROVENANCE: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 1986. Accompanied by a Colt Factory Letter. CONDITION: Fair to good overall. Metal is a mottled grey/brown. Appears all orig and matching with exception of replaced wedge and wedge screw. Gun is functional with discernible rifling in bore. Stocks are well fit with carved inscription as noted with hand worn patina, with much edge wear and rounded wear at toes. Lot includes a framed 25” x 20” limited edition print by Don Troiani of the “12th VA Cavalry CSA”. 51957-30 JS (8,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

252


1269. INSCRIBED COLT NAVY, CHARLES G. PEARSON 9th FLORIDA INFANTRY IN ORIGINAL HOLSTER. SN 54359. Cal. 36. This was one of Mr. Donaldson’s most recent purchases and was found in North Florida in 2010 in fine orig brown leather holster. The gun is standard 3rd model Colt Navy with small trigger guard, all orig and matching with a contemporary inscription on backstrap “C.G. PEARSON”. Though we cannot state unequivocally that this is Charles G. Pearson’s gun (it could be another C. G. Pearson), it sure has the look and feel of a Confederate used revolver in a well made Confederate style military flap holster. Sgt. Major Charles G. Pearson was the son of John Pearson of the Oklawaha Rangers who outfitted his men personally while on a trip to Charleston prior to the war. He bought 125 smooth bore muskets and 100 Colt revolvers. It makes sense that Pearson could have easily bought older revolvers as it is noted in text attached in provenance that after the war began his obsolete smooth bore muskets were returned to his machine shop in Orange Springs for rifling. Charles G. Pearson enlisted with his fathers independent company of Florida volunteers at 18 years old on May 14, 1862. He was promoted to Sgt in Oct. 1863 and listed as Sgt Major in May 1864. Charles was wounded and changed to staff and field duties, surrendering at Appomattox April 9, 1865. Charles died August 1870 at the age of 27 at Newnansville (where he was born) and is buried at Orange Springs, FL. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Good to very good overall with mottled gray patina with pitting, especially on left side of bbl and loading arm. Gun appears orig and all matching, all SN parts normally numbered are numbered including wedge. Markings are crisp and discernible including 1-line New York address and SN’s. Cylinder retains 60-70% discernible rolled Naval battle scene. Grips are well fit with hand worn patina and rounded corners at rear toes with no SN. Backstrap and trigger guard retain about 20% of their orig silver plating with clear discernible description on backstrap. Mechanically functional with well defined rifling in bore. Accompanying holster fits gun well, is sound and fairly supple with crazing and resewn belt loop from time of use. 52430-13 JS (4,000-6,000) 253

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1268. CONFEDERATE, POSSIBLY LOUIS HAIMAN COPY OF COLT NAVY REVOLVER. SN 16. Cal. 36. 13” overall, 7-7/16” oct-rnd bbl. Comparing the SN dies of this gun and three known complete Columbus Firearms revolvers and the one composite gun with makers marks, numbers on this gun are very similar. This gun was thought to be a product of Columbus, GA by Mr. Racker and he could be correct. SN “46” with oct bbl housing in the Hayes Otoupalik Collection is also unmarked but with an oct bbl, made by same maker as subject gun. We can not state that this indeed is a product of the Columbus Firearms Company, but it indeed closely emulates their product with lack of markings. Subject gun and SN “46” both originated in Georgia, further adding to the speculation. PROVENANCE: Unknown private collection; Don Bryan, Roanoake, VA, 1992; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 1992. CONDITION: Good to very good overall for a Confederate arm, with traces of finish found in protected areas. Gun appears orig with exception of possibly restored latch, one cone and possibly a couple of screws. SN “16” found on bbl, frame, trigger guard and cylinder. Wedge is SNd “8”. Metal overall is a mottled dark grey patina with staining and pitting; brass has a medium mustard color. 51957-19 JS (8,000-12,000)


Session 1 1270.

EXTREMELY RARE, UNIQUE AND IMPORTANT ARCHIVE OF PATENT PAPERS ALONG WITH PGT BEAUREGARD LETTER OF INTRODUCTION OF COL. LEMAT FOR PURPOSE OF SUBMITTING HIS PATENT. Included in this archive is the original 20” x 12-1/2” hand drawn patent illustration along with printed United States patent letter and similar drawing printed by U.S. Patent Office. The original drawing has the bold signature of Dr. LeMat and is well known in the literature having been published in at least 3 important texts. The highly detailed LeMat drawing has inscription in upper right corner translated from French “To my excellent friend, Mr. Robert Benguerel” signed boldly “A. LeMat”. Though LeMat’s full name was Jean Alexandre Francois LeMat he was always simply known as Dr. Alexandre LeMat. After 1859 he was always known as “Colonel Alexandre LeMat”. The accompanying letter from LeMat’s business partner at the time in April 1859, PGT Beauregard, introduces Col. A. LeMat. “Permit me to introduce to you my friend Col. A. LeMat who is on a visit to Washington for the purpose of submitting to the government his ‘grapeshot revolving pistol’ which is a great improvement on Colt’s revolver...” This is a spectacular archive that was originally put together by prominent Confederate revolver collector, Don Bryan. PROVENANCE: Original drawing: Dr. Alexandre LeMat 1856; Robert

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

254


Session 1 Benguerel (Col. LeMat’s friend and attorney); John W. Boyle; pictured on page 481 in “The Powder Flask Book” by Ray Riling 1953; pictured on page 85 of “Confederate Handguns” by Albaugh, Benet & Simmons 1963. Printed patent paper: pictured on page 16 of “Colonel Francois A. LeMat” by Marie and Alain Serpette 1995; pictured on page 26 of “LeMat The Man, The Gun” by Forgett and Serpette 1996; pictured on frontispiece and page 17 of “The Confederate LeMat Revolver” by Doug Adams 2005. Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 1998. CONDITION: Documents are all mounted in 4 frames. None were removed. The two printed patent documents both show cracks and folds and the printed document has several reductions and that particular piece of paper appears yellow and brittle as can be seen in photographs. The hand drawn document shows several repaired cracks but drawing does not appear affected. The ink inscription and signature are discernible. The Beauregard letter of introduction appears very good-fine also. 51957-29 JS (8,000-12,000)

255

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1271.

EXTREMELY RARE INSCRIBED CASED EARLY 1st MODEL LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER BELONGING TO CONFEDERATE SURGEON THOMAS B. MEMMINGER SON OF CONFEDERATE SEC. OF TREASURY CHRISTOPHER G. MEMMINGER. SN 25. Cal. 42/18ga. This is an extremely fine and complete orig example of a rarely offered 1st Model LeMat carried by Thomas. B. Memminger, a Confederate surgeon and son of the Confederate Secretary of the Treasury. SN “25” has all the rare 1st Model features, including earliest bbl markings of “COL. LeMAT’S PATENT”, loading assembly attached to bbl on right side of gun, spur trigger guard and pinned lanyard ring stud, and reciprocating pin cylinder rotation system. The 2-pc walnut grips with escutcheons are in excellent condition and stamped “Baquet” internally as are the few other surviving very early LeMats. Another early feature in LeMat #25 is the rabbetted slip-fit joint between the grapeshot barrel and the regular barrel; later models were held together by a series of threads and were screwed off in disassembly. The piece at hand is an excellent example of perhaps the most intriguing firearm used in the American Civil War identified to prominent SC family, all original, complete, functional and preserved in beautiful condition in “Paris” Confederate South Carolina marked casing with accessories. The brass plaque in top of lid “T. B. Memminger”. Thomas B. Memminger (1838-1918) was a Confederate surgeon during the Civil War in South Carolina and the son of Confederate Secretary of the Treasury Christopher Memminger (1803-1888). His wartime papers along with his fathers are deposited in the University of South Carolina and University of South Carolina archives. A large file of copied papers accompanies this rare and historical firearm. PROVENANCE: Edward Simmons collection: pictured and described in Wm. Albaugh’s “Confederate Handguns” 1963; pictured and described Doug Adams “The Confederate Lemat Revolver”, 2005: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good. Fine overall, gun retains traces of finish in protected areas with good markings, complete and original. Fully functional with crisp bright bore. The accompanying casing retains an original LeMat mold marked 18 on sprue cutter and 19 on brass body. There is a pewter oiler, tin of Ely caps, bag flask, several loose balls and buckshot, and a well patinaed brass compass. Partitions are potentially relined with remnants of the original blue velvet on sides of box. Lock escutcheon has been replaced by a French coin. Latches have French makers mark as does lock. 51957-14 JS (25,000-35,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

256


Session 1 1272.

RARE CONFEDERATE 1st MODEL LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER FOUND AFTER BATTLE OF CHICKAMAUGA, SN 105. SN 105. Cal. 42/18. Standard configuration 7-1/4” oct to rnd bbl, 5-1/8” shotgun bbl, 9 shot cylinder with central shotgun cylinder which is operated by latch on hammer. This is a fine orig example of a rarely offered 1st Model LeMat that Mr. Donaldson purchased from an Ocala, FL family that related the story that their grandfather who as a boy found it on the Chickamauga battlefield. The gun was missing the loading assembly and latch which Mr. Donaldson had restored. This gun has all the rare 1st Model features, including earliest bbl markings of “COL. LeMAT’S PATENT”, loading assembly attached to bbl on right side of gun, spur trigger guard and pinned lanyard ring stud, reciprocating pin cylinder rotation system. This gun is all orig with exception of well restored latch and loading arm, now complete and functional. SN “105” is found on every other part where SN’s are normally found including shotgun bbl, frame and cylinder. 1st Model LeMat’s are rarely found today with such honest aesthetics and crisp discernible markings showing honest use. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gray/ plum color overall. Crisp markings, edgewear, staining and pitting. Gun was not disassembled, but appears orig and matching with exception of restored loading arm and latch. Stocks are well fit with diamond point wear, hand worn patina. Mechanically sound with good rifled bore. 52430-10 JS (15,00018,000)

257

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1273. RARE CONFEDERATE TRANSITIONAL LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER. SN 732. Cal. 42/18. This is an orig example of a transitional LeMat with mostly 1st Model features including most notably swivel lanyard loop on butt and spur on trigger guard. Other than that placement of the loading assembly on the frame and not bbl and bbl address, this gun appears as a 1st Model. No doubt most all 1st Models and transitional models with these features saw hard Confederate use. All parts observed on this gun are SNd 732. This gun has full oct breech and bbl with bbl address reading “COL. LEMAT Bte s.g.d.g. PARIS”. This gun appears orig and authentic, however, the loading assembly which is so often missing on actually used LeMat revolvers is professionally restored on this specimen. Some estimates on 1st and transitional Models surviving with orig loading assemblies may be only 10-20%. This gun conforms to other known examples with spur trigger guard and reciprocating pin mechanism and 1st Model style lever latch. This is an honest and orig example of a functional transitional LeMat that most likely saw Confederate service during the Civil War. PROVENANCE: This gun has been in the family collection and has not been on the market for over 50 years. CONDITION: Metal overall is grey/brown with pitting. SNs and bbl address are all well marked and discernible as can be seen in photographs. Lanyard stud retains orig ring. Dove-tailed front sight is orig. Hammer is complete, retaining orig shotgun selector with the early side projections. Gun appears all orig with exception of restored loading assembly which has excellent matching color to rest of gun. Grips are well fit, sound and solid with heavily worn checkering, numerous dings, dents, scratches and other minor blemishes consistent with the gun overall, hand worn patina. Mechanically, gun functions fairly well with well defined rifling. Overall, this is a very honest early Confederate LeMat that no doubt saw use with good markings and aesthetics from muzzle to butt. 522501 JS (12,000-15,000)

1274. RARE TRANSITIONAL LEMAT REVOLVER WITH ORIGINAL HOLSTER OF JAMES M. LOUDON, 7th LOUISIANA. SN 1093. Cal. 42/18. Mr. Donaldson purchased this gun about 1977 in Jackson, LA and family provenance stated that it had been owned by James Mortimer Loudon (1824-1919). Loudon served originally as a private in Co. B 7th LA Infantry, later under Capt. Ambrose’s 18th Battalion LA Cavalry and was paroled Gainesville, AL May 12, 1865. Revolver is an early 2nd model with several transitional features showing hard honest use. The gun appears all orig with minor restoration and crisp markings. The accompanying orig LeMat holster is extremely well made utilizing waterproof interior lining. Belt loop has iron buckle for attachment for over the shoulder strap, not seen on any other LeMat holsters. PROVENANCE: Loudon family, Jackson, La; Bill Moore collection, Baton Rouge; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson (1977). CONDITION: Gun appears orig, complete and authentic with a most unusual original transitional latch. SN’s are found on all major parts normally numbered with exception of loading arm pivot, which is orig but has welded repair over area where SN would be found, the rammer, detachable rod and loading arm screw are all properly numbered. The 2 ears to hammer have also been restored, otherwise this is totally orig and “as found” gun with its unique orig LeMat holster which has reductions and tearing at folded flap which still retains orig tarred linen liner and most unusual brass locking finial. Mechanically sound with well defined rifled bore. 52430-11 JS (15,000-18,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

258


Session 1 Reverse

1275.

Reverse

CONSECUTIVELY NUMBERED PAIR OF CONFEDERATE LEMAT “GRAPESHOT� REVOLVERS. SN 1108/1109. Cal. 42/18. Rarely found are consecutive pairs of martial arms, especially when you get two Confederate arms which are so scarce to start with. We are offering here maybe the only consecutive pair, SN 1108 and 1109, to have ever turned up. Both guns are in similar condition and will present nicely in any collection. Numerous texts talk of the Lemat revolvers. Confederate Handguns by William Albaugh and Ed Simmons denote their largest chapter on this particular manufacturer. Other texts have emerged over the years with the most definitive being written by Doug Adams. Even in the 1997 prize winning and top selling novel Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier, the hero, Inman, carries a pair of LeMat revolvers. LeMat revolvers were, indeed, prized by Confederate soldiers as they were 9-shot pistol with 18 gauge shotgun barrel in addition. Both guns here are well marked, as can be seen in photos. Bbl addresses are crisp as are SNs that are found on all major component of guns. Checkered stock on guns are very good. Loading assemblies, which are so often missing from these guns, are both correct and intact. There is minor restoration to both guns, such as the frame latch on SN 1108, however all major SN parts are complete and intact. Both guns function with the action being a little sticky on SN 1108. SN 1109 is the better of the two guns and exhibits some finish in protected areas, though the right ear of the hammer face is chipped off. You are bidding on probably the only consecutively pair of LeMats to have ever been publicly offered. PROVENANCE: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: SN 1108 good overall. Metal is overall mottled grey. Good markings and numerous small cosmetic blemishes. The only apparent restorations appear to be frame latch and lever screw. Mechanically functional. SN 1109 good to very good overall. Slightly better than 1108 with broken right ear to hammer and shotgun selector is missing thumb protrusion. Mechanically, gun is sloppy and only turns cylinder intermittently, though holds at full cock. Metal overall is a cleaned grey/white with good discernible markings. Stocks are sound with wear to checkering, hand worn patina matching closely to SN 1108. 51957-5 JS (30,00040,000)

259

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1276.

FINE CONFEDERATE “AS FOUND” LEMAT SECOND MODEL GRAPESHOT REVOLVER WITH UNIQUE EXPERIMENTAL CYLINDER LOCKING SYSTEM. SN 1309. Cal. 42/18. This unique gun, noted on page 68 of Doug Adams The Confederate LeMat Revolver mentions the unique cylinder locking system not seen on any other LeMat. “Serial number 1309 has unique system in which the cylinder is secured by a locking pin that protrudes from the center of the floor of the frame, resting against the shoulder of the nipple cut-outs. Experts who have had the opportunity to examine these systems indicate that the final version is by far the most dependable and amenable to duplication. Even to the relatively uninitiated, cocking this mechanism has a much more secure feel than the reciprocating [pin] system”. Otherwise this is a classic second model LeMat in serial range that no doubt made it to the Confederacy. The bbl address “Col. LeMat Bte s.g.d.g. Paris”. is typical of 1862 as noted in Serpette. This is an interesting example showing transition to cog mechanism, note lack of cylinder bolt adjusting screw on frame, this is the earliest SN noted we are aware. This is a fine untouched gun with dark patina, crisp markings, orig finish and fine mechanics. PROVENANCE: Fred Edmunds Letter 2004; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun appears complete and original in every regard with matching SN’s found on parts normally numbered. Fred Edmunds in his letter of authenticity notes that it is in the top 5-10% of all surviving examples. Gun is overall dark plum/brown patina with strong traces of thin blue finish on bbl, cylinder and frame with staining and light pitting. Markings are crisp. Grips are well fit with diamond edge wear and hand worn patina. Mechanically functional with crisp rifled bore. 52430-9 JS (15,000-18,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

260


Session 1 1277.

VERY FINE CONFEDERATE SECOND MODEL LEMAT GRAPESHOT REVOLVER. SN 1318. This is a beautiful orig example of the standard production Confederate contracted LeMat grape-shot revolver retaining much original finish. Standard production Paris guns, often called 2nd Models, feature some improvements made by LeMat that worked the best after service in the field by Confederates in the field reporting problems in the early Civil War years. This gun still retains the reciprocating pin system for turning cylinder which would eventually be changed to the cog & ratchet system. (note: previous lot SN 1309 is the earliest noted gun with a experimental cog & ratchet). The revolver has the distinctive LeMat 9-shot cyl. 42 caliber rifled bbl with smooth bore ‘grape-shot’ 18 ga bbl for firing buckshot. Top bbl flat is engraved “Col. LeMat Bte s.g.d.g. Paris” which is the typical address on standard production revolvers. Wiley Sword in his text Firepower From Abroad notes that probably only the first 1450 LeMats made it to the Confederacy in time for the Gettysburg Campaign. If that is the case this would have been one of the last shipments to make it through blockade for the major 1863 and 1864 Campaigns of the Civil War. LeMat revolvers were prized by their Confederate owners (and Yankee capturers too). Many notable Confederate Generals and Officers were known to have carried these unique weapons as noted by General Beauregard’s and General Lewis’s sold by Julia’s in a previous sale. In Charles Frazier’s 1997 National Book Awards winning Cold Mountain the book’s hero Inman proudly owned a pair of LeMat revolvers showing how well known this particular revolver is among modern culture. This is very fine example, all matching with fine aesthetics and high finish. CONDITION: Very Fine overall, orig bright blue finish is retained on about 50% of gun, balance of surface is mottled plum/gray with some staining, scratches and other minor cosmetic blemishes. Gun appears 100% original, authentic and matching. Matching SN 1318 was found on bbl, shotgun bbl, loading arm & loading arm screw, plunger, cleaning rod, cylinder, frame, trigger, frame pin, each grip and grip screw. Gun was not further disassembled for other matching numbers, which many other small parts would be numbered. Mechanics are fine, bright well discerned shotgun and rifled bores. 52554-1 JS (15,00020,000)

261

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1278.

RARE & UNIQUE CIVIL WAR BRASS FRAME LEMAT PINFIRE CARBINE FROM THE RENOWNED ALAIN SERPETTE COLLECTION. SN 101. Cal. 11/13.6mm. A most unusual Belgian LeMat carbine, the left recoil shield maker stamped “J Mariette Bte” with a small number “2”. The right side of the lower tang stamped “DDJ”. The upper tang stamped with the SN “101”, this number repeated at the back of the pinfire cylinder with an “ELG” and Crown V Liege proof, and on the bottom of the rifled bbl along with a number “2” which must be an assembly number matching that found on the recoil shield. The bottom of the percussion shotgun bbl stamped “13.6” for 13.6mm, the bore diameter, and a small arrowhead shaped proof plus a small Crown V, a proof that’s repeated on the left side of the bbl and bbl lug. The right bbl flat stamped “COLl. A.LE.MAT BRTe” in block letters. LeMat, The Man, The Gun discusses this carbine on page 125 and illustrates it with markings and proofs on page 126. Strangely the text mentions a top bbl flat marked “COL.A.LE MAT BRTe” (the illustration is “COLl. A.LE.MAT BRTe”) which is actually on the right flat and there is no top flat marking; it also illustrates and mentions in the text “COLONEL LE MAT.PATENT” right bbl flat marking credited to this specimen. Colonel François A. LE MAT also illustrates incorrectly the “COLONEL LE MAT.PATENT” marking credited to this specimen on page 68. Mr. Surpette’s brochure “1997/Prototypes and Extremely Rare Le Mat/Revolvers and Carbines/Alain F. Serpette’s Collection” illustrates both bbl markings, which is a mistake. The English marking was transcribed in the book from carbine SN 208. Mr. Serpette favors the idea that this is a prototype; Val Forgett in LeMat, The Man, The Gun favors the brass frame and trigger guard as promotional or display features. This carbine had to have been made prior to 1865 as Mariette went out of business then and most likely made in 1863 along with the other few pinfire carbines known. Accompanied by first edition signed copy of Colonel François A. LE MAT by Alain & Marie Surpette, 1995 with this gun illustrated. PROVENANCE: Alain Serpette Collection; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 1997. CONDITION: Very good overall. Cleaned in the European style with bright metal. Markings worn but mostly discernible as can be seen in photos. Stock is sound with a 2” inset at the toe and crack repair on left side at junction of frame. The stock carefully sanded overall and refinished. A very rare LeMat definitely made during the Civil War. 51957-25 JS (10,00020,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

262


Session 1 1279.

FINE MATCHED CONSECUTIVELY NUMBERED PAIR OF CONFEDERATE ASSOCIATED KERR ARMY REVOLVERS. SN 10110/10111. Cal. 44. The London Armory Co. produced about 11,000 large 54 bore revolvers from 1859-1866. The largest part of that production were purchased by the Confederacy. The majority of guns with Confederate association have the stamp “JS/anchor” on grips just behind trigger guard. Serial numbers range from 1019-9975 with this marking. Excellent new information can be found on English Confederate imports in the monumental text just published in 2014 by Russ Pritchard, Tim Prince and C.A. Huey, The English Connection. Seven high serial range Kerr revolvers are known to have been used by Company H of the 18th Virginia Cavalry and are listed on the squad roll of Lt. Julian Pratt, July 1864. The 7 guns on Pratt’s list are all in the SN range 9240-9974. This pair are SNs 10110 & 10111 and though they do not have the “JS/anchor” markings, they were found in New Orleans and most likely were shipped to the South. PROVENANCE: Conrad Mayer, III, New Orleans, LA; Douglas Carleson, Des Moines, IA, 1991; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker 1992. CONDITION: SN 10110 is very good with strong traces of finish. Metal overall grey with light pitting. Good markings. Functional with pitted bore. SN 10111 has been cleaned and markings light, especially SN on cylinder. Bbl has been trimmed 1/8” from muzzle but is still crowned. Also a secondary number “431” is found stamped inside trigger guard and on face of cylinder, gun is grey overall with staining and pitting, traces of finish on frame. Gun is functional though trigger will not reset forward and has to be pushed by hand, bright clean bore. 51957-6 JS (7,000-9,000)

1280.

RARE AND FINE JEFFERSON DAVIS & JUDAH P. BENJAMIN SIGNED CONFEDERATE APPOINTMENT DOCUMENT. Archivally framed 16” x 12” “HOYER & LUDWIG, RICHMOND VA” imprint of extremely rare Confederate Presidential appointment to Philip A. Clayton, Marshall of the District of Georgia, April 3, 1863. Document is boldly signed by Confederate President “JEFFERSON DAVIS” and Secretary of War “J. P. BENJAMIN”. Jefferson Davis signed appointments and commissions are extremely rare in any form and this particular document is the only example we note. Julia’s sold another unique, rare example February 10th (Lot 2021) of this year. Hoyer & Ludwig were official Confederate contract printers best known for stamps and currency. The quality seen in their currency can be seen in the details of this document. This is a great opportunity to obtain a rare pair of Confederate signatures on a beautiful and rarely seen Presidential Appointment. CONDITION: Very good overall. Document was not removed from archival framing. There are no apparent losses of text, though there are repaired cracks at folds. Signatures and inscription are dark and easily read. Impressed Confederate seal appears complete though cracked and details only partially discernible. The 42” x 25-1/2” frame is fine retaining document, portraits and biographies of both Jefferson Davis and Judah P. Benjamin. 52663-1 JS (8,000-12,000) 263

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1281.

EXTREMELY RARE CONFEDERATE SCOPED 2nd QUALITY WHITWORTH SHARP SHOOTER’S RIFLE. SN C544. 52 bore, .451 cal, with Whitworth’s distinctive hexagonal bore. There are 19 SNs known on scoped 2nd Quality Whitworth rifles. This example falls within this range that saw Confederate service, B509 and the highest C619. This gun conforms to the other examples known with “WHITWORTH RIFLE CO MANCHESTER” forward of hammer on lock and Crown over “W” rear of hammer and engraved on trigger guard plate “2ND QUALITY”. Bbl marked on left of breech with Birmingham proofs, “52” gauge markings and SN “C544”. Matching SNs are also found on lock, trigger guard, breech, major screws, bbl bands and other parts not removed to check internally for SNs. The Japanned brass tube Davidson scope was adjusted for elevation by turning the knurled knob on the right side of the forearm. This loosened the clamp on the left side so the 1-1/2” bar graduated in 1/16” increments could be raised and lowered, pivoting on the rear mount secured by the rear lock plate screw. There is extensive documentation accompanying this rifle, along with correspondence regarding the use of these guns during the Civil War. This gun was originally found with the telescopic sight and mounts missing which were later restored. This gun is just 10 numbers removed from the Whitworth which is part of the Chickamauga National Park Museum (SN C554) which is pictured in Firearms of the Confederacy (1944), plate XXIII and discussed on pages 27 and 28. C544 is in the database of The English Connection by Russ Pritchard and C. A. Huey. This text is the most definitive and recent book on Confederate imports from Britain. This is an extremely rare Confederate sniper’s rifle with well defined bore and original Davidson scope with excellent optics. Rifle is accompanied by a battlefield recovered Whitworth bullet with letter of provenance. PROVENANCE: Joe Deserich collection; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Iron is brown overall with staining and pitting. Gun appears orig and matching with addition of restored scope and mounts. The bbl is proper 33” including internal beveled crown to fit projectile to bore. Stock is sound with old refinish and several large gouges and crack repair at wrist. Restoration was done by master craftsman Louie Parker of Jackson, Missouri. Checkering is worn. Gun was not disassembled, but this gun is well known with old collection history. Ramrod is newer addition. Mechanically sound with crisp well defined bore. Scope has good optics with crosshairs. 51957-23 JS (40,000-60,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

264


Session 1 1282.

EXTREMELY FINE & RARE PATTERN 1862 BRITISH MILITARY WHITWORTH SHARPSHOOTER’S RIFLE, USED IN FIELD TRIALS. SN UNK. Cal. 52 bore, .451 cal. This rare 1863 dated Enfield rifle with broad arrow proof has 33” bbl with Whitworth’s unique hexagonal 52 bore. Gun is made for bayonet that attached to front band and has long range adjustable ladder sight, which is marked “C” on right and “H” on left showing two separate ranges for use of either “Conical” or “Hexagonal” ammunition. The British military version Pattern 1863 which would eventually be adopted from of this rifle is more common with 36” bbl and 3-bands. Subject rifle here is same configuration of Confederate used versions, however British military is of 1st quality. Tim Prince, co-author of The English Connection” stated “these 1,000 rifles were utilized in various field tests, and were commented upon favorably enough for the Board of Ordnance to authorized the production of 8,000 more rifles for field trials. These rifles, which would become the Pattern 1863 Whitworth Rifle, had slightly shorter barrels, at 33”, due to the fact that the barrels were made of steel rather than iron, and consequently weighed more than their iron counterparts. The new P-1863 also incorporated some minor improvements in the rear sight, and introduced a bayonet lug on the upper barrel band to accept a bayonet based upon the Pattern 1856 saber bayonet. The reason the bayonet lug (“bar” in English terminology) placed on the upper barrel band rather than directly on the barrel was the belief that it would be too difficult to adequately weld the bayonet lug directly to the steel barrel. As a result, the upper band was of the wide variety with a transverse pin through the band and stock for additional support. This pattern of barrel band had been introduced for the P-1856 Type II (or P-1858) “Bar on Band” series of rifles. These 8,000 rifles were produced at R.S.A.F. and were issued to a large number of regiments for field trials. In general, 68 of the rifles were issued each of the regiments that received them for trial (possibly to equip the “light companies”), and field reports were to be complied regarding the rifles in service performance over the next few years. At least 12 regiments not in service in Indian were issued the new P-1863 Whitworth Rifle, including the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, 1st Battalion Scots Fusilier Guards, 1st Battalion 3rd Foot, 2nd Battalion 5th Foot, both 1st & 2nd Battalion of the 60th Rifles and the 73rd Foot. Five additional regiments in Indian service were also issued the rifles, including the 42nd Highland Foot and 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade. In general, the reports from the field were quite similar, the rifles tended to foul badly when used in hot environments. In many cases it was difficult for the average solider to ram more than a half dozen rounds before the rifle became too fouled to load. When combined with the much higher cost per unit versus a standard P-1853 Enfield rifle musket, as well as the slower rate of fire, it quickly became obvious that the P-1853 was more than sufficient for the typical needs of the line infantry, and that even though the Whitworth had tremendous advantages in accuracy, it was not practical weapon for general issue. Although the guns remained in limited experimental issue through 1867-1868 with many of the regiments testing them, they were never considered a potential replacement for the P-1853 Enfield. In the end, the Whitworth design became an anachronism that proved the potential for smaller bore rifle accuracy, but at a time when the age of muzzle loader was coming to an end and the metallic cartridge breechloader was about to change the world of warfare forever. The Pattern 1863 Whitworth rifles were eventually returned to storage and eventually sold as surplus, becoming a sort of footnote in the history of 19th century British military small arms development. While the rifles never made a significant difference in the British military, they did manage to gain iconic status in the hands of a few of Confederate sharpshooters, and at the shooting competitions at Wimbledon, insuring that the Whitworth Rifle would never be merely a footnote to arms historians and collectors.” PROVENANCE: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbl retains 90%+ original thinning blue finish. Lock and hammer retain 60% of their bright case colors. Mechanically excellent with crisp, bright bore. Stock has several dings and dents and an indiscernible stock marking with fairly crisp checkering. 51957-24 JS (10,000-15,000) 265

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1283.

RARE, EARLY CONFEDERATE 1st MODEL BRASS FRAMED, BREECH LOADING MORSE CARBINE. SN 19. Cal. 50. Nice example of a very scarce 1st Model Morse carbine with solid brass breech door. SN 19 is found inside breech and bottom of frame. This gun has earliest configuration, being about 40” overall with 20” oct-rnd bbl, fixed rear sight, dovetailed brass slotted blade front sight. Exhibits maple stock with assembly letter “C” stamped on bottom just rear of frame. Only about 200 of these scarce 1st Models were made in Greenville, SC and most saw hard use during the Civil War. Few survive in such fine, unaltered, orig condition. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. This is among the nicest 1st Models you will find, complete and orig missing only the cleaning jag and a small frame pin. Gun was not disassembled to check for other matching numbers as we have no doubt this is the configuration manufactured and it does not appear to have been apart in a long time. The brass on this gun is fairly smooth with old cleaning and now a light mustard patina. Stocks are well fit with scattered dents, dings and minor cosmetic blemishes unaffecting overall aesthetics. Bottom of comb is slightly eroded with chipping at bottom toe. Mechanics are fine, with a crisp, well defined rifled bore. 52702-1 JS (20,000-25,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

266


1285. RARE CONFEDERATE KEEN-WALKER CARBINE ATTRIBUTED TO RICHARD H. HARRIS, 1st VA RESERVES. SN UNK. Cal. 52. This is an “as found” example of a rare Confederate carbine. The Keen, Walker & Co. carbine long known as the Confederate “Perry” or “Tilting Breech” carbine was the subject of much speculation as to where it was manufactured in early texts, scholarly research identifies it definitively as the product of Keen, Walker & Co. in Danville, Virginia. John Murphy & Howard Madaus in their comprehensive 2002 text Confederate Carbines & Musketoons devote a chapter on this manufacturer. They note a receipt for 101 breech loading carbines delivered May 19, 1862 to the Confederate Ordnance Department. The frame is of brass and unmarked externally. Internally Roman numerals would be found, but this gun has not had a screw removed. The 22-1/2” bbl is rifled and marked only with a “P” proof on the left side. The stock is carved “R H HARRIS” though “HARRIS” is much lighter than the first 2 initials. Accompanying this gun is a large file of research telling provenance and history of this gun. Dr. Richard Herbert Harris (18471876) was a member of the 1st Virginia “Nottoway Reserves”, he is buried in the town cemetery in Blackstone, VA. PROVENANCE: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Good overall, though iron is heavily pitted, brass frame has pleasing dark mustard colored patina. Gun is totally orig and complete. Stock is sound and solid with minor cosmetic blemishes and hand worn patina. The action is functional though slightly loose. Bore exhibits well-defined rifling though heavily pitted. 51957-26 JS (10,000-15,000)

267

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1284. FINE “AS FOUND” BRASS FRAME CONFEDERATE MORSE CARBINE MADE IN GREENVILLE, SC. SN 724. This is the standard model of the Morse carbine and this is a fine orig and authentic example. These rare Confederate breech loading carbines utilized Morse patent 50 caliber self contained reusable percussion cartridges. The Third Model (or Type III) Morse carbine, produced at the State Military Works in Greenville, South Carolina, is distinguished by a more sophisticated locking and firing mechanism than earlier models. The most improved mechanism is the presence of a flanged iron rod connected to an iron plate with knurled edges which covers the forward top portion of the brass operating lever and iron catch on frame. The serial number range on type III carbines range from about 400 to end of production about 1,000. This is a nice well patinaed all matching gun which would make a nice addition to any Confederate collection. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. All SN parts matching along with matching assembly marks internally. Gun appears orig and complete with possible addition of recast brass ramrod tip and jag. Iron has dark brown/plum patina. Brass has mottled dark mustard patina with old pry marks at breech which don’t affect the overall aesthetics. Stock is well fit, weathered with hand worn patina. Mechanically sound with well discerned rifled bore. 52430-24 JS (15,000-20,000)


Session 1

1286. RARE EARLY CONFEDERATE S. C. ROBINSON SHARPS CARBINE. SN 348. Cal. 52. 38” overall, 21” rnd bbl with brass bbl band and fixed sights. Confederate Robinson Sharps were made early in the war and generally saw hard service. About 2000 of these carbines were made. This is a nice presentable example with crisp lock and bbl markings. “S.C. ROBINSON / ARMS MANUFACTORY / RICHMOND, VA / 1862” and “348” found on lock and “S.C. ROBINSON / ARMS MANUFACTORY” forward of rear sight and “RICHMOND, VA / 1862” rear of sight. Though Richmond die on bbl is double struck. All in all, this is a very presentable, scarce, early Confederate Sharps breech loading carbine in standard configuration. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Good-very good overall. Matching SNs found externally on lock and tang. Matching assembly numbers “309” found on breech components. Gun was not further disassembled but appears in correct configuration. Forestock has correct half-moon cutout and brass ferrule. Metal cleaned and grey overall with staining and pitting, but especially crisp markings as can be seen in photos. Stocks are sound with hand worn patina. Erosion, dents, dings and obvious saddle wear, 3-1/2” inset above lock and glued crack repair opposite inset. Bbl band appears to be restoration, otherwise gun appears all orig. Mechanically sound with discernible rifling in pitted bore. 52430-23 JS (8,000-10,000)

1287. FINE CONFEDERATE BILHARZ MUZZLE LOADING CARBINE. SN 182. This gun is a copy of the US Model 1855 rifle/carbine. These carbines typically come with pewter nosecaps, and sometimes early SN with brass nosecaps, such as this one. Gun is serial numbered internally “182” with matching roman numeral assembly marks. These guns were made at Pennsylvania Court House, Virginia in small quantities. These guns typically saw very hard use with no discernible markings and poor stocks. This example has seen use, but does have discernible “CSA / P” stamped on breech and even retains traces of brown finish on bbl under dark iron patina. Long mistakenly referred to as D. C. Hodgkins carbines and so listed in the early texts. Murphy & Madaus in their definitive 2002 text Confederate Carbines and Musketoons, dedicate a chapter which is copied in provenance. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Bbl is dark brown/plum with areas of scattered pitting. “CSA” surcharge is stamped on top of bbl breech and is discernible though pitted, but “P” on left side of breech is crisp and well struck. Rifling in bore is very good, though pitted. Lock, buttplate, and trigger guard have matching iron patina. Stock is sound and solid with hand worn patina with scattered cosmetic blemishes with chipping just rear of nose cap and does not affect overall aesthetics, hand worn patina. Loading assembly has been added, otherwise gun is original. Mechanically functional with clean well discerned bore. 52430-25 JS (8,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

268


1289. RARE CONFEDERATE COOK & BROTHERS MUSKETOON, ATHENS, GEORGIA. SN 5499/4642. Cal 58. 24” bbl. This configuration is sometimes known as an artillery carbine or short rifle. John Murphy and Howard Madis, in their exemplary 2002 text Confederate Carbines and Musketoons explain configuration of these musketoons. Survival on Cook Brother long arms in complete condition are quite scarce and though this is a mixed SN gun it still has fine overall aesthetics with good patina and surfaces. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Bbl has dark brown patina overall with hints of orig browning with heavy pitting at breech, “PROVED” is only visible bbl marking. Hammer has matching surface. Lock is cleaned to a lighter color showing, first National flag and only portion of makers mark, though SN and “1864” date are well discerned. Brass mounts all appear orig. Bands & nose cap are serial numbered “4642”. Buttplate, trigger guard & nose cap also have different assembly numbers, often seen. Lock screws have indiscernible numbers and no number is visible on tang screw though it appears orig. Sling swivel are both good restorations. Stock is sound, well fit with repair crack beneath lock. Ram rod appears orig. Bore is heavily pitted with no discernible rifling. Lock is functional. 52430-26 JS (12,000-15,000)

269

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1288. RARE AND FINE J.P. MURRAY, COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 1864 DATED CONFEDERATE ALABAMA CONTRACT RIFLE. SN 67. Cal. 58. This is among the most aesthetically pleasing J.P. Murray rifles you will find with fine dark “attic” patina, one of very few surviving today. Lockplate is marked in small letters in front of hammer “J.P. MURRAY / COLUMBUS GA”. Mounted in a 1-pc walnut stock with brass mounts consisting of nose cap, two flat spring retained bbl bands, 2-pc trigger guard and buttplate. Trigger guard has an iron sling swivel with corresponding swivel on upper bbl band. Accompanied by a contemporary unthreaded ramrod. SN “67” was observed on inside of lockplate, inside hammer, bottom of bbl near breech plug and bbl channel of the stock. There is also a secondary number “15” found internally on bbl, trigger, hammer below SN, lock screws and tang screw. Bbl is also marked externally on left side of breech “ALA. 1864”. It is unknown the quantities of arms produced by this facility except for 262 rifles and 73 carbines delivered under Alabama state contract in 1864 such as this particular carbine. Regardless, these rifles are quite scarce and desirable Confederate arms. John Murphy & Howard Madaus discuss this manufacturer at length in their 1996 text Confederate Rifles and Muskets, they refer to this gun as a Type I made without model 1841 style lock escutcheon. Renowned Confederate collector Fred Edmunds wrote a letter of authenticity on this example which is found in provenance. PROVENANCE: Fred Edmunds collection, 1993; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. Well marked with dark patina and well fit stock which is spliced under rear band. Bbl bands, sights, nose cap and forestock are restorations in this catalogers opinion, however in the 1993 letter of authenticity written by renowned Confederate collector Fred Edmunds, he states as you can read in provenance, that gun is totally original and the splice is factory. Bbl originally was rifled in 58 caliber, is now smooth bore 64 caliber which is often seen on guns carried home by soldiers for use as fowlers. Regardless this is still a beautiful example that would display well in any Confederate collection. Mechanically sound with smooth clear bore. 52430-22 JS (10,00015,000)


Session 1

1290.

1862 DATED RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET IN FINE “AS FOUND” CONDITION WITH ORIGINAL VERY RARE RICHMOND ANGULAR BAYONET. NSN. Cal. 58. The Richmond Armory was the largest Confederate long arms maker utilizing equipment captured from Harper’s Ferry in 1861. Early Richmond’s utilized many captured Harper’s Ferry parts, but by late ‘62, guns are predominantly all of Richmond manufacture. Richmond muskets, though the most common Confederate made long arm of the Civil War, are extremely difficult to find in superior “as found” condition as they all saw hard and long use. This gun appears all orig and authentic and totally of Richmond manufacture with the exception of reused Harper’s Ferry iron buttplate which has had the US surcharge removed. Musket is marked forward of hammer “C.S. / RICHMOND VA” and “1862” behind hammer. The bbl has matching bbl date of “1862” and a “V / P” bbl proof. The bands all show a centrally-struck Richmond style “U”. The ramrod is correct and orig tapered style that are almost as hard to find as the flat sided angular bayonets. The bayonet fits gun well. Julia’s has not offered a fine, untouched Richmond musket since the Ben Michel Collection was sold in October, 2009 and cannot ever remember orig musket and bayonet being offered by any source. PROVENANCE: Lifetime Collection of Dr. Zack Catterton. CONDITION: Metal surfaces have dark iron patina with pitting. Rear sling swivel is missing. Rear and front sights appear orig with matching patina. Lock markings are crisp and well struck. 1862 bbl date and “V / P” proof are discernible, but light, as can be seen in photos. Iron buttplate is well fit and has matching patina to rest of gun. Brass nosecap has dark mottled brown/mustard patina. The stock is sound a solid with good edges, hand worn patina and a pair of lightly carved initials “WA” on right side, no doubt denoting the soldier who carried it. There is a large 1” sliver broken out just rear of breech on left side and based on surface, it has been missing since the war. The bore has been reamed to 64 Cal. smooth bore with no discernible rifling. Mechanically, gun functions well. Bayonet is overall grey, lighter than the gun, shows typical laminated flaws always seen on these rare bayonets thought to have been contracted in Raleigh, NC. 51566-11 (9,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

270


Session 1 1291.

1863 DATED RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET. NSN. Cal. 58. This is a standard production Confederate Richmond musket in relatively fine, complete condition. It is very difficult to find an aesthetically pleasing 63 dated musket with matching and visible bbl dates. This example has a fine Confederate canvas sling attached. Musket is marked forward of hammer “C.S. / RICHMOND VA” and “1863” behind hammer. The bbl has matching bbl date of “1863” and correct Richmond “V / P” bbl proof. The bands all show a centrally-struck Richmond style “U”. The ramrod is correct and orig tapered style that are rarer than the muskets themselves. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Metal surfaces have mottled grey/brown iron patina with pitting. Gun appears all orig and complete. Stock has been cut under middle band and glue repaired, but forestock matches rest of gun quite well and appears orig. Both sling swivels are present retaining a very good Confederate canvas sling with two glue repaired breaks to attached leather sizing strip. Rear and front sights appear orig with matching patina. Lock markings are crisp and well struck. 1863 bbl date and “V / P” proof are easily discernible, though light, as can be seen in photos. Brass buttplate is well fit with medium mustard patina. Brass nosecap has a more mottled mixed light to medium mustard patina. Stock is sound and solid with good edges, hand worn patina and splice repair hidden under middle band as noted. Gun is mechanically sound with clean rifled bore. 52328-43 JS (5,000-7,000)

1292.

RARE 1862 DATED HIGH HUMP RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET. NSN. Cal. 58. 56” overall with 40” bbl. This is a good looking example of an early Richmond Confederate product complete with a rare surplus canvas sling. Gun still retains a partial bbl date and correct “V/P” proofs with broken die in “P” seen on Richmond’s still utilizing Harper’s Ferry stamps. Standard configuration overall with lock marked forward of hammer “C.S./RICHMOND, VA” and “1862” rear of hammer. High humps saw hard service and rarely found with such nice aesthetics. PROVENANCE: Don Bryan Collection; private collection, 1999. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Iron is gray overall with scattered staining and pitting, especially at breech though bbl date is still mostly discernible, as are inspector proofs. Breech tang is replaced. The Richmond hammer has the worst casting flaw cataloger has ever seen on a Confederate arm. It never would have passed most inspection but is hidden in the back, laminated fault has separated slightly, though still sound and functional today. Stock has been refinished still retaining rich red color with a burned area on right side of forestock rear of middle band where gun probably sat too close to a camp fire. Brass buttplate well fit with light mustard patina. Brass nosecap has a more mottled and pitted appearance. Bbl bands all stamped with large “U” in proper style for Richmond. Ramrod appears original to use though swelled of 55/61 manufacture. Accompanying added canvas sling is very good overall though sewn leather is crazed and worn. Mechanically gun functions well with well discerned rifling in bore. 51571-6 JS (6,000-8,000)

271

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1293. 1861 DATED HIGH-HUMP RICHMOND RIFLED MUSKET. NSN. Cal. 58. Standard configuration of early State of Virginia musket made from captured Harpers Ferry parts measuring 55-1/2” overall with 40” bbl. All parts appear Harpers Ferry with exception of lockplate which is Richmond production dated “1861” at tail and “RICHMOND, VA” forward of hammer. Gun is totally iron mounted as so many of the earliest Richmond’s were with the US surcharge purposely removed from buttplate. CONDITION: Metal is overall dark with pitting, though lock is much better with lighter pitting, still retaining some case colors. Stock is sound and solid with numerous dings and dents and somewhat weathered and beaten opposite lock. Mechanically functional with heavily pitted bore with barely discernible rifling. Ramrod is replaced, otherwise gun appears orig and complete. 52511-12 JS (4,000-6,000)

1294.

CONFEDERATE RICHMOND MUSKETOON. NSN. Cal. 61. There is a fair amount written in the literature concerning this particular configuration of a Richmond longarm with a 30” smooth bore bbl, about 46” overall. There is also controversy whether these are post-war reconfigured muskets for cadet use or actual Confederate manufactured. Regardless, this specimen appears orig, authentic and well fit as manufactured. This gun exhibits a beautiful 1863 dated “CS / RICHMOND, VA” marked lock. Bbl shows Confederate striations seen only on Richmond products and the correct Richmond “VP” and eagle proof with broken “P” die. This gun is totally iron mounted, including un-surcharged buttplate. Gun is accompanied by a very fine orig Confederate canvas sling. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Complete and matching. Metal overall has a grey mottled patina. Stock is well fit with sanded edges, which were removed at time of manufacture, hand worn patina. Mechanically crisp with clear smooth bore. Accompanying bayonet is in matching condition, well fit with US surcharge. 52328-42 JS (4,0006,000)

VERY RARE AND FINE BRAISED 1861 BOLSTER PERCUSSION 1295. CONVERSION OF 2nd MODEL VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY RIFLE BY MERRILL, 1861. NSN. Cal. 50. 51-1/2” overall, 36” oct bbl. Bbl is unmarked externally with exception of “44” stamped on muzzle face which is the presumed alternation number. Murphy & Madaus in their definitive text Confederate Rifles & Muskets, state that the State of “Virginia paid Merrill, Thomas & Co. $345 for altering 172 flintlock rifles to percussion”. This was paid just after secession to this Baltimore firm, April 20, 1861. Murphy & Madaus show an 1818 dated rifle with alteration number “46”. A Roman numeral “VIII” is also found cut into breech and bottom of bbl. Note: the hammer and bolster are almost identical in form to Civil War rifles and carbines made by Merrill. After discussions with Giles Cromwell, author of The Virginia Manufactory of Arms who does not show an example in his text states that these are indeed a very rare alternation, “only a couple of examples known. Virginia Manufactory rifles are rare to begin with in any configuration. Only 2,000 rifles were made over a period of 18 years and few survive. This is a beautiful example of possibly the rarest of all Confederate used rifle percussion conversions. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Gun appears orig, complete and unaltered with exception of restored nosecap and 1-1/2” inset of wood to hold nosecap in place. Markings are all discernible. Stock is sound and solid with a couple of hairlines and long sliver missing on left ramrod channel which does not affect overall aesthetics. There is an indiscernible name stamped rear of trigger guard. Mechanics are functional with strong discernible rifling in bore. 52577-1 JS (6,000-8,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

272


1297.

CONFEDERATE 1863 DATED FAYETTEVILLE RIFLE. NSN. Cal. 58. This is a nice example of the classic CS rifle made at Fayetteville, North Carolina from captured machinery from the US Harper’s Ferry Armory. This model conforms to other late 1863 models without saber bayonet lug, 33” bbl which originally was 58 Cal. Lock markings are crisp and discernible “Eagle over CSA” and “FAYETTEVILLE” and “1863” at tail. Stock exhibits good red color often seen on Richmond and Fayetteville stocks. Gun is complete as are all brass mounts including the CSA surcharged butt plate. Correct style VP/Eagle head proofs are seen on bbl as correct “U” stamped on each bbl band. Correct oval “JB” cartouche is found opposite the lock stamped vertically. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. Metal overall brown with staining & pitting. Brass exhibits a medium mustard patina. Sights are orig though rear sight is missing adjustable leaves, so often removed and found on “as found” guns. Bore has been reamed to about 60 cal. with no discernible rifling. Stock is sound and solid, well fit handworn patina, small reduction behind lock in mortise and burned out area rear of breech which shows honest use. Mechanically functional with smashed nipple. 52430-20 JS (6,0008,000)

273

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1296. RARE 1864 CONFEDERATE DICKSON NELSON RIFLE. NSN. Cal. 58. Dickson Nelson in Dawson, GA made a majority of their guns for the State of Alabama. These guns are rarely encountered and this is an honest example from direct family descent in Trussville, AL. 32-1/2” bbl marked on breech “ALA. 1864” and lock marked “DICKSON / NELSON & CO / C.S.” forward of hammer and rear of hammer “ALA. / 1864”. This gun is in the typical configuration of other guns of this type with brass nosecap, bbl bands, trigger guard, and buttplate. John Murphy & Howard Madaus in their definitive text Confederate Rifles and Muskets 1996 describes these rare guns at length and the probable delivery of only 645 rifles delivered before Union Army totally disrupted their operations. PROVENANCE: Family descent. CONDITION: Good to very good overall for a well used long arm utilized after war as a hunting gun, now about 64 Cal. smooth bore, instead of orig 58 Cal. rifled bore which is also been trimmed about 1/2”. Lock & bbl markings all discernible as can be seen in photos. Missing sling swivels and rear band, otherwise orig. Dovetailed rear sight is missing, exposing Roman numeral “VII” in mortise. Stock is sound, heavily sanded and refinished with several hairlines. Brass has been cleaned and varnished overall like the wood. Brass has light mustard patina under varnish. There is wood burned and reduced around bolster. Nipple is smashed from lots of use, just like you would expect to see on an old military rifle taking on a new role of shooting game and protecting the homestead. Lock & bbl are brown/plum overall with iron patina and heavy pitting at breech. The wooden ramrod which was added after the war shows lots of age and hand worn patina. Mechanically gun is functional but will not hold half-cock. Smooth bore is clear with pitting. 52271-1 (6,000-8,000)


Session 1 1298.

EXTREMELY RARE & UNIQUE IDENTIFIED CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN PATTERN 1856 IRON MOUNTED 2-BAND RIFLE. SN 963. Cal. 577. Not only is this gun beautifully carved with soldier’s name in the 9th Louisiana infantry, it is also one of only 5 specimens known of this rare pattern blockade run rifle. This pattern is described in the text The English Connection by Pritchard & Huey. This gun is SN’d in the wood “963” and has a matching number cut into the ramrod. James H. Whitlock was mustered into Company A 9th Louisiana infantry July 6, 1861. The regiment was known as “Lee’s Tigers”. Whitlock stayed in this unit the entire war until his capture the week before Appomattox at the Battle of Saylor’s Creek. The 9th Louisiana fought on Culp’s Hill during the Battle of Gettysburg suffering 73 casualties on that first day’s fight. Whitlock’s service records accompany the rifle. The “JS/anchor” marking is not easily discerned, but noted in Huey’s original notes on this gun. Regardless, this is among the rarest and most aesthetically pleasing of all Confederate blockade run rifles. PROVENANCE: C.A. Huey collection; Danny Lee collection, Lakeland, Florida. CONDITION: Very good overall with some stock repair while camouflaged forward of wrist. Metal overall is dark brown with pitting. There are no external bbl proofs, but internal markings of both lock and bbl are show in provenance from Mr. Huey’s notes. External lock markings of crown and “1859” are crisp. Mechanically gun is fine with smooth 61 cal. bore which originally was rifled. Carving in stock has nice hand worn patina. 52043-2 JS (8,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

274


Session 1 Reverse

1299.

EXCEPTIONAL CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN “JS ANCHOR” ENFIELD SADDLE RING CARBINE. NSN. Cal. .577. 21” bbl. Lock exhibits standard London proofs. Lock marked with a crown over “TOWER” rear of hammer. Forward of hammer marked “BARNETT/LONDON”. This gun is one of a handful of really minty survivors most likely captured from blockade runner and similar to one described as captured off Cuba in 1861 as mentioned in the definitive text The English Connection by Pritchard and Huey. This text speculates that as many as 10,000 pattern 1856 cavalry carbines were imported but rarely are they found without extremely hard use. If you want the finest example known of a JS/anchor surcharged Confederate Enfield carbine, this is your opportunity. CONDITION: Very fine overall. Bbl retains 90% plumb/blue finish. Bore is excellent and shiny. Other metal surfaces smooth with traces of finish. Brass nose cap, trigger guard and buttplate uncleaned and matching patinas. Retains original chained nipple protector and an added brass and wood tompion. Stock is sound with crisp “JS/anchor” and areas of raised grain. 52043-1 JS (7,000-9,000)

275

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1300. 1862 DATED CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUN JS/ANCHOR SERIAL NUMBERED ENFIELD RIFLE MUSKET. SN 8988A. Cal. 577. This is a standard Model 1853 Enfield rifle musket with 39” bbl with Birmingham proof and gauge marks, long range ladder rear sight. This gun has a rarely seen suffixed SN 8988 / A” engraved on buttplate along with “JS/anchor” mark stamped rear of trigger guard. Pritchard & Huey in their definitive 2014 text The English Connection dedicate a chapter on these long guns. This particular gun was contracted by C.W. James of Birmingham and so noted by his makers mark stamped in bottom and on right side of buttplate comb along with “J” found forward of engraved buttplate tang. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Good overall. This gun has seen some use with overall gray patina, darker on bbl and heavily pitted around breech. Hammer screw has been replaced by a bolt. Stock is sound with hand worn patina and a name scratched on left side of buttstock “John Zirkle” and a pair of initials “JR”. A quick search of Civil War database shows 5 John Zirkle’s who all served in Virginia regiments during the war. Mechanically functional with discernible rifling in pitted bore. 52430-21 JS (3,000-4,000)

1301. FINE AND RARE PALMETTO ARMORY RIFLED MUSKET. NSN. Cal 69. 42” rifled bbl. Only a small percentage of these smooth bore muskets were converted to rifled muskets as is this one, which also entailed the addition of a fixed rear sight, which is present here. The markings on breech of bbl include “S.C.” which is seen only on a small percentage of these arms. “V” over “P” over “Palmetto Tree” are well stamped and discernible as is the rare variant “W.G&CO.” at breech of bbl which are seen in photographs. There is no bbl date on breech tang, but it is smooth and never had one. Lock is smooth and gray with crisp “Palmetto Armory, S*C” around a Palmetto tree forward of lock and rear of lock is well struck “Columbia/S.C. 1852”. Buttplate also has “SC” surcharge. See attached excellent American Society of Arms Collectors bulletin on Palmetto rifles by Dr. Fred Novy with interesting comments concerning the bbl proofs showing that Palmetto utilized Springfield 1842 inspected bbls, stamping the Palmetto tree proof over Springfield eagle head proofs such as example here. This is a very fine example of an all orig Palmetto musket which is well marked complete and orig. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall, complete and orig. This gun is actually quite fine for a surviving Confederate long arm. Metal is smooth and gray with areas of staining and pitting. Bore shows very discernible rifling with apparent little use as there is little pitting at bolster. Buttplate is gray with scattered scratches, scuffs and dings, scattered staining and pitting and exhibits a deeply struck “SC” surcharge. Brass bands have light mustard patina. Stock is sound and solid with typical cosmetic blemishes, hand worn patina. Mechanically sound with well defined rifle bore. 52430-19 JS (7,000-9,000)

1302. SCARCE CONFEDERATE IRON MOUNTED PALMETTO RIFLEDMUSKET. NSN. Cal. 69. These muskets were part of a 1852 State of South Carolina contract, William Glaze provided the State of South Carolina with muskets, rifles, pistols, and sabers. This is one of the 1842 pattern muskets which is thought to be rifled by Glaze at beginning of Civil War with the added long range rear sight. This musket conforms with other known examples, 57-1/2” overall, 42” bbl with “VP” over “Palmetto tree” proof and “W. G & CO” on left breech. Buttplate has large “SC” surcharge. Lock is properly marked forward of hammer with Palmetto tree surrounded by “PALMETTO ARMORY S*C”, rear of hammer “COLUMBIA / SC 1852”. This is an example of an all orig complete and authentic, secondary Confederate arm that saw hard service by South Carolina forces in the Confederacy. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Iron has mottled brown/grey patina with pitting, especially at breech. Gun appears complete and orig, including slings swivels, correct cupped ramrod and long-range rear sight. The only restoration is bbl tang which is missing date. Markings are all discernible as can be seen in photos. Stock is sound and solid with hand worn patina with scattered cosmetic blemishes and large hairline opposite lock. All-in-all, this is a superior example with great aesthetics. 52719-1 JS (6,000-8,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

276


RARE, FINE AND POSSIBLY UNIQUE JEAN BAPTIST 1304. REVOL NEW ORLEANS BREECH LOADING HAMMERLESS PERCUSSION RIFLE. NSN. Cal. 36. Multi-groove rifling. 20-15/16” oct bbl with adjustable rear sight and hooded front sight, double set triggers, post attachment on tang for peep sight, brown & case hardened finish. Pivoting breech block which exposes nipple and chamber while loading. Front trigger cocks hammer, which is in turn released by the rear set trigger for firing. Jean Baptist Revol (1799-1886) according to Kit Gorman in her excellent 2005 text New Orleans Gunsmiths “...was among the top-rung of New Orleans gunmakers. His guns were honored in local competitions and are still highly prized by collectors of 19th century Southern firearms. Born in France, Revol arrived in New Orleans about 1838”. Revol appears in city directories from 1838 through 1859 and later directories through 1885. Revol’s exhibit at the Louisiana Grand State Fair 1868 earned him a gold medal for the “Best double shotguns made in Louisiana”. This particular gun thought to be of Revol’s design is made about 1850 and is stamped on the left side of frame “J.R. Revol / N. Orleans”. Accompanying this rare Southern breech loader is a limited edition of Kit Gorman’s New Orleans Gunsmiths No. 78 of 200 printed. PROVENANCE: Collection of Stanley Diefenthal (1918-1992), New Orleans; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbl retains about 75% thinning brown finish with staining and pitting. Frame is overall silver/ gray with muted case colors especially in the protected areas. Mechanically functional with crisp rifled bore. Stock is sound and solid with hand worn patina. Buttplate still retains screwed in sling swivel eye which can be removed and screwed into stock. 52430-16 JS (5,000-7,000)

277

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1303. RARE AND EXTREMELY FINE JEAN BAPTIST REVOL, NEW ORLEANS PERCUSSION HALF STOCK RIFLE. NSN. Cal. 32. Iron and German silver mounted. 47” overall with 30” oct bbl with engraved breech. Marked on top flat of bbl and lock “REVOL / N ORLEANS”. Mounted on deluxe varnished walnut stock with gold rectangular thumb plate and detachable blued adjustable tang sight. Engraved trigger guard terminates in acorn shaped finial as does floorplate tang. Hooded front sight, brass tipped wood ramrod with removable jag screwed to end of rod. Gun is in beautiful condition, retaining much of its orig finish with crisp double set triggers and bright bore. PROVENANCE: Damon Mills 2001; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Fine to very fine overall. Bbl retains about 90% thinning orig brown finish. Lock, hammer and breech retain most of their bright and muted case colors. Stock is sound and solid with few cosmetic blemishes retaining sharp edges and most of a piano finish varnish. Tang sight retains about half of its orig fire blue. Buttplate & trigger guard have traces of finish with crisp engraving as can be seen in photos. Mechanically fine with shiny bright rifle bore. 52430-17 JS (5,000-7,000)


Session 1 1305.

RARE AND FINE KRAFT, GOLDSCHMIDT & KRAFT CONFEDERATE STAFF OFFICERS SWORD. This is among the most beautiful and desirable of Confederate staff officer’s pattern swords. There are probably less than 20 examples known and fewer that are all orig with complete orig scabbards with fine etched blades with full maker’s marks. At least one sword of this pattern is identified to a Confederate General, Joseph Kershaw. This pattern exhibits “CS” in a pierced guard of oak leaf and acorns. An identical pattern is pictured as fig. 21-A in William Albaugh’s text Photographic Supplement to Confederate Swords, 1960. The hilt, pommel, and knuckle guard are well finished with traces of gold plating. The grip is leather covered and wrapped with a single strand of copper wire. The blade is beautifully etched in 15” panels on either side of foliate and patriotic design including a large “C.S”, cannon balls, crossed cannons, patriotic Confederate shield with flags and etched “K.G&K, Columbia SC”. The orig and correct scabbard is brazed with brass mounts with a matching patina to hilt. This is a fine example of a very rare Confederate sword and is the first complete and orig example to come to auction in many years. CONDITION: Very good overall. 32” blade is gray overall with staining and a “bent” area about 5” from ricasso showing an area where blade was possibly straightened though etched patterns are unaffected other than a few dents & tool marks as can be seen in photos. Hilt, pommel, scabbard mounts exhibit mustard colored patina where gold gilt is missing. Leather grip is dry and flaking but still appears about 90% intact including orig copper wire wrap. Scabbard throat missing one of its two retaining screws. Scabbard body is brown overall, pitted but smooth with discernible brazed line to overlapped construction, typical of this rare Columbia, SC manufacturer. Otherwise sword appears 100% orig and complete in every regard. 52716-1 JS (20,000-25,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

278


Session 1 1306.

UNIQUE CONFEDERATE CAVALRY OFFICER’S SABER POSSIBLY FOR THE PERSONAL USE OF A.B. GRISWOLD, “ORLEANS LIGHT HORSE” CAVALRY. This is the only example known of a Thomas, Griswold, New Orleans made light cavalry officer’s saber. Beautiful etched blade, “A B G” etched on one ricasso opposite of makers mark and large panel in Old English script “O.L.H.” (Orleans Light Horse). Other side of blade is etched in large 8” panel “RIGHT MAKES MIGHT”. Rest of 23” etched panels are typical New Orleans style etched cotton bolls, floral and geometric motifs. When Mr. Donaldson found this sword in New Orleans in 1978, the family associated was named Pollack and Mr. Donaldson was able to research a Quartermaster Sgt. John F. Pollack who was in the Orleans Light Horse, but I do not understand why this sword does not bear his name, but only the initials of Arthur Breese Griswold who indeed was also an early member enlisting January 1, 1861. Regardless who carried this sword, it is a unique example of the finest New Orleanian cutlery skill. The original iron scabbard appears converted from a enlisted cavalry sword with throat removed by Griswold, wood-lined (to protect etching) and fitted with a standard Griswold brass throat seen on brass scabbarded heavy cavalry sabers which they are most famous for. I know of no reason Griswold’s initials would be etched on this blade other than it being his personal saber or did the late Bill Osborn, renown New Orleans sword expert & collector. The Orleans Light Horse, Louisiana cavalry was an independent small organization, acting primarily as an elite escort company. A recent book written by the Historic New Orleans Collection, A Fine Body of Men: The Orleans Light Horse, Louisiana Cavalry 1861-1865 just recently published in 2015 by Donald Moriarty accompanies this lot. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Fine overall. 33” blade is gray overall with traces of orig luster with well discerned etching which can be seen in photos, though makers mark is weakly stamped on bottom. 5-1/2” of blade tip have been restored and almost indiscernible. Polished leather grip is 98% intact with several scuffs to high area and one chip. Twisted wire wrap is tight and complete. Decorated brass guard, pommel and throat have matching dark mustard/olive patina. Scabbard body has iron patina as found with a couple light dents. 52430-1 JS (20,000-25,000)

279

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1307.

FINE CONFEDERATE INSCRIBED LOUIS HAIMAN, COLUMBUS GEORGIA FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD OF LT. JOSEPH CONE, 47th GEORGIA INFANTRY. Joseph S. Cone from Schley County Georgia originally entered service in October 1861, rising through the ranks until Lt. Col. commanding the 47th Georgia. Joseph Cone attended the Georgia Military Institute, before having distinguished Confederate military record being cited by Gen. Braxton Bragg for his skill and judgement during the Chickamauga campaign. The 47th Georgia had casualties of 350 men, killed and wounded out of its original 1,000 enrolled. Cone was captured late in the war in 1865 at Savannah, GA where Frank Flynn of 38th Massachusetts took sword home as a souvenir where it remained in his family until purchased in 1983 by the renowned Confederate sword collector, Fred Edmunds. Sword is classic Louis Haiman foot of which only a handful are known. The top mount is inscribed “Lieut. / J.S. Cone”. Similar inscriptions are seen on the handful of other known examples. Sword conforms to other examples with 28-1/2” heavy single fullered blade, floral decorated guard with un-decorated smooth quillon and pommel cap. The distinctive Haiman scabbards are leather covered and woodlined with 3 brass mounts. Inscribed Confederate officer’s swords are a rare commodity and this is a fine example with great condition and collection history. PROVENANCE: Lt. Joseph S. Cone 47th Georgia Infantry 1863; Frank M. Flynn, 38th Massachusetts Infantry who captured sword in Savannah, Georgia in 1865; Flynn Family descendants; Fred Edmunds Collection, Vero Beach, FL 1983; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Blade is gray overall with scattered staining and pin-prick pitting near point. Still retains portion of its orig protective washer. Leather covered spiral cut wood grip is tight and complete though worn through at high areas with light scuffing. Tiny thin brass wire wrap is tight & intact. Scabbard body is sound with craquelure and large scratched line from movement of little mount and its stabilizing pin. Drag is a well done conservation with similar matching patina to top mounts and sword hilt and pommel. 52430-3 JS (8,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

280


Session 1 1308.

INSCRIBED CAVALRY OFFICER’S SABER WITH SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF CAPTAIN C.S. BAILEY, 2nd LOUISIANA CAVALRY. This is a most unusual grouping with beautifully engraved import cavalry officer’s saber inscribed on knuckle bow “C.S. BAILEY / 2ND LOUISIANA CAVALRY”. Grouping came with a once framed image showing Confederate flags and a 1904 UCV cavalry reunion badge mounted with 2 Confederate flags and fine New Orleans CDV of Bailey in uniform apparently holding this exact sword signed on verso “C.S. Bailey / CAPT 2ND LA CAVALRY”. Clarence S. Bailey was in the 2nd Louisiana Cavalry U.S. Army and why he visited a UCV reunion in Nashville is unknown. Regardless this is a fine “as found” sword imported by Horstmann with large etched panels of generic panoply of arms, shark skin grip and metal scabbard. Clarence S. Bailey originally enlisted 9-30-1861 as a corporal in the 3rd Massachusetts cavalry and was commissioned in the 2nd Louisiana cavalry 10-8-1863 as lieutenant and later promoted to captain 5-12-1864. Both units Bailey served had extended service in Louisiana including service at Port Hudson and other actions around New Orleans and Baton Rouge. Copies of service and pension records accompany this lot. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. 32” blade is gray overall with crisp discernible 16” panels. Shark skin grip is complete though worn through at high areas. Scabbard is dark with iron patina with several dents. Sword retains its protective washer. The displayed ephemera is good to very good. Silk ribbon on the 1904 pin is broken in several areas. The 2 silk flags are frayed and glued to board. CDV was once glued to board and has matching glue stains, overall very good with good contrast, detail and good signature. 52430-2 JS (8,000-12,000)

281

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 Reverse 1309.

CONFEDERATE NASHVILLE PLOW WORKS CAVALRY OFFICER’S SABER. Beautiful example of the popular Confederate saber with large “CSA” cast in hilt beneath the maker “NASHVILLE PLOW WORKS”. There are two varieties of this sword, the rarest is this type with stippled background and no doubt the earliest as the markings are more easily read before mold filled in lettering. This example has a fine patina and uncleaned 35” unfullered blade. Sword is accompanied by its orig Nashville scabbard with brass throat, drag and ring mounts. This is a fine example with good aesthetics that displays beautifully. PROVENANCE: The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. Blade is overall grey retaining orig tool & polish marks with scattered areas of staining and light pitting. The grip has fine hand worn patina to wood which long ago lost its leather wrap. There is a braised repair to top of brass backstrap where the untouched brass patina is now a light yellow. Scabbard is sound and solid retaining some orig black finish though more black has been added especially between drag and middle mount covering several cracks. Brass mounts are orig including the classic “canoe” shaped throat and beveled brass drag unique to this manufacturer. 52430-4 JS (8,000-10,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

282


Session 1 1310.

CONFEDERATE THOMAS, GRISWOLD FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD WITH SASH TAKEN AS SOUVENIR AT GETTYSBURG BY JOSEPH DALTON, 3rd PA CAVALRY ALONG WITH HIS DECORATIVE WAR SERVICE ESCUTCHEON. According to the accompanying affidavit of descendant of Joseph Dalton, this sword and sash were taken from the body of a dead Confederate officer at Gettysburg, as this was the story told by several generations of the Dalton family. Dalton’s escutcheon lists his role for his long service in the Civil War. We researched Joseph Dalton and found he indeed entered service August 17, 1861 in Philadelphia into Company I of the 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry which did see action at Gettysburg having 21 casualties and one officer was given the Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions. Escutcheon states that Dalton was detailed to service as Orderly to five different Union generals where he clearly would have had better chance than most to take nice souvenirs. Regardless of family legend or history, the sword indeed is an orig “as found” Confederate foot officer’s sword maker marked “T. G & CO / N.O.”. The accompanying scabbard which does not appear to be by the same manufacturer does exhibit similar “as found” look. The accompanying sash has dark staining that under UV light exhibiting the black UV signature associated often with blood. This is a neat Confederate souvenir that would display nicely along with the capturer’s framed, very decorative war record. PROVENANCE: From direct family descent of Private Joseph Dalton, 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry. CONDITION: Sword and scabbard overall are sound and good. Sword measures 35” with 29” typical pen knife style blade associated with this New Orleans manufacturer. Blade is uncleaned gray overall with grime, rust and pitting especially last several inches where blade protrudes through end of broken scabbard body. Blade exhibits several cuts and nicks on its edge. Hilt and pommel exhibit a green bronze patina. The grip retains about 70% of its original leather. Though heavily worn and weathered the original brass wire is intact with similar patina to hilt. The leather scabbard is missing drag and several inches at end. The two brass mounts exhibit a dark mustard patina and impressions of the sash fabric are found on each mount. Sash retains good color with much staining, soiling and small reductions. Knots are faded and worn. Remnants of the original silk ribbon that tied the sash to sword are in fragments. Escutcheon measures 22” x 30” including gold painted gesso frame with loss of some decoration as can be seen in photographs. Escutcheon is fair to good, not examined out of frame, but water staining is seen around each edge. However, colors and text are still very good. 51965-2 JS (5,000-7,000) 283

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


1311.

Session 1 Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

EXTREMELY RARE BOYLE, GAMBLE & MACFEE RICHMOND VIRGINIA BOWIE-BAYONET IN ORIGINAL SCABBARD. 19-3/4” overall, 15” clip point blade. Cast in brass hilt “BOYLE, GAMBLE & MACFEE / RICHMOND / VA”. This is among the single rarest of Confederate made Bowie’s and of Confederate made bayonets. Only a handful of these examples are known and this is one of no more than 2 or 3 are known with scabbards. This is a fine “as found” relic, just surfaced from a Northern estate that must have been brought home as a souvenir by a Union soldier. CONDITION: Very good overall. Blade is overall gray with soiling, staining, pitting and old sharpening. Brass hilt has dark, grungy, chocolate colored mottled patina with tacking marks on flat. Scabbard is sound and solid, though dry and scuffed. Throat is missing its pin and is a contemporary replacement cleverly using a knapsack rivet. Drag is missing plug and mounts both have dark patinas. 52459-1 JS (20,000-25,000)

284


Session 1 1312.

FINE & RARE CONFEDERATE “CATHERINE’S FURNACE” NAVAL CUTLASS IN ORIGINAL SCABBARD WITH EXTREMELY RARE ORIGINAL CANVAS FROG. Classic Confederate Naval cutlass with “CSN” and fluted anchor cast in pommel. These cutlasses now known to have been made in Fredericksburg, Virginia at Catherine’s Furnace by Charles Wellford and delivered to Richmond as early as mid-1861 to individual Confederate vessels. (research soon to be published by Russ Pritchard, Jr. Rarely are these weapons found in high condition and even rarer are the original scabbards with the unique integrally sewn frog button and even rarer is the canvas and leather frog. 27” overall. 21-1/8” double edged blade. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Blade is white/gray overall showing numerous flaws inherent in Confederate steel. Hilt has “III” and “V” cut into top of hilt. Brass has light mustard patina with old cleaning and matching patina to frog button. Leather scabbard body and face of frog retain a portion of their original black dyed surface with craquelure and scuffing, but central sewn seam is intact and tip is most unusual in that it is complete. Canvas frog is complete, though soiled with 1-1/2” opening at top seam. It would be difficult to find a better complete example. 52043-3 JS (7,000-9,000)

1313.

EXTREMELY RARE COLUMBUS, GA MADE NAVAL CUTLASS WITH ORIGINAL CANVAS SCABBARD. This cutlass is consigned from the same Guilford, CT family who consigned Civil War archive of Griswold brothers who served mostly on the North Carolina coast during the Civil War. One of them brought back this really fine short sword which is not extremely rare; however the original sail cloth and tarred scabbard is one of no more than a few examples known. Cutlass is about 2’ overall with an 18-1/4” double edged wasp waist shaped blade with 6” large S-shaped cross guard, turned wood grip with brass ferule. Poorly cut into grip appears to read the initials “JG?” and “1864”. Joel Griswold stayed in the service until 1865 and it could have been his souvenir. Be sure to see the large archive of other Civil War memorabilia of the Griswold Brothers also in this sale. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall for a Confederate edged weapon. Blade is gray with areas of old sharpening and small nicks in cutting edge. Blade has staining and light pitting. Cross guard and ferule have dark patina. Wood grip has hand worn patina. Tarred canvas scabbard is sound and complete with openings from 2-4” on either side and some reductions at tip. 8-1/2” sewn belt loop of same material is sound and intact. 51943-1 JS (4,000-6,000)

285

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1314. FINE CONFEDERATE D-GUARD BOWIE IN ORIGINAL SCABBARD ATTRIBUTED TO PVT. JOSEPH DINWIDDIE, CHARLOTTE CAVALRY WHICH BECAME 14th VIRGINIA. Knife is 20” overall, with 15” well ground blade with 4” partially sharpened top edge made from a file with beautiful well patinaed crown stag grip. This knife has survived in beautiful “as found” condition and saw little use as Joseph Dinwiddie enlisted May 15, 1861 and discharged July 31, 1861 after serving only about 45 days. Joseph Dinwiddie (1832-1906) was born in Plum Branch, Campbell County, Virginia and enlisted at Charlotte Courthouse. Like so many early war Confederate soldiers, these big knives were popular sidearms and so often seen in early war photographs, but they were soon thrown away or sent home as there was little use for this weapon as there was so little hand to hand combat. This knife appears to have been well preserved by family retaining much of its orig finishing marks and well fit scabbard. This is a fine example of rarely seen big Confederate D-Guards with orig crown stag grips. PROVENANCE: Ex-John Hammer Collection; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson. CONDITION: Very good overall. Blade is grey overall showing orig tool marks. Tip is broken. Scattered areas of staining and pitting. Guard has dark iron patina. Crown stag is sound, solid with good “as found” hand worn patina. Scabbard is sound and solid with crazing and cracking. Stitching loose about 1” at point and about 5” opening along sharpened edge near top. Integrally cut belt loop still intact but fragile. 52430-5 JS (4,000-5,000)

INSCRIBED IVORY GRIPPED 1315. BOWIE OF THOMAS LAMBERT, 12th MISSISSIPPI, CSA. Well used 15-1/4” overall, 10-1/4” IXL Sheffield Bowie with ivory slabs beautifully scrimshawed with a Confederate First National flag and Lambert’s name and unit which can be seen in photos. This knife has been well known for a long time with great collection history. Thomas E. Lambert is listed originally in the 1st Mississippi Infantry. Regardless the inscription appears impeccable though no records can be found of Thomas in the 12th. You will not find a more visually pleasing Confederate used Sheffield Bowie with the great scrimshaw as seen in photos. PROVENANCE: William L. Wilson, Lynchburg, VA (found in attic of home); Courtney Smith, Highland Springs, VA 1991; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson, 1992. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Good overall. Blade is gray overall with staining. Markings discernible. Ivory slabbed grip are folky carved with a large “CSA”, 7 star First National flag and on opposite grip “12TH MISS. Co E.”. “T. E. Lambert” is inscribed on escutcheon plate. Scabbard is missing tip, is heavily scuffed, missing frog button, but throat has matching patina to cross guard and escutcheon plate. 52430-14 JS (4,000-6,000) ESA 1316.

RARE LARGE SHEFFIELD FOLDING BOWIE KNIFE WITH HALF HORSEHALF ALLIGATOR POMMELS. This massive folder measures 16” open with 7-1/4” clip point blade with maker’s mark on ricasso “J. GREEN & CO / FARGATE”. Knife is German silver mounted with 2-1/2” pommels depicting half-horse half-alligator which is purely American device from American Frontier folklore. Norm Flayderman in his monumental text The Bowie Knife: Unsheathing an American Legend p. 434: “I AM HALF-HORSE AND HALF-ALLIGATOR AND CAN WHIP ANY MAN ON THE MISSISSIPPI BY GOD! That graphic, swaggering boast and analogy in early American literature to characterize Mississippi River boatmen, frontiersman and Kentuckians.” Davy Crockett’s almanac published in 1835 provided the major impetus for the adoption of half-horse, half-alligator symbol on Sheffield Bowie knives. Knife has unique cyphers on blade with kanji and “OF THE BEST QUALITY” and “IMPROVED CHINESE”. Knife is unique overall and you will not find another like it. CONDITION: Very good overall. Blade is gray overall with staining and pitting and appears to have lost its tip and been contemporarily sharpened to compensate. Maker’s mark is crisp and easily discerned as are other blade markings. Stylized German silver cross guard has several shallow dents and scratches. Pommels are well defined. Stag grips are very good with hand worn patina with one pin battered and potentially replaced just forward and above escutcheon. All in all, this is a very nice massive knife with unique character. 52353-1 JS (7,000-9,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

286


EXTREMELY RARE CIVIL WAR “WARLOG” FROM THE BATTLE OF CHICKAMAUGA CONTAINING 10-POUNDER PARROT SHELL. This massive 144 lb 36-1/2” x 16” x 14” section of pine tree has 5” x 2-1/2” canvas backed card attached reading: “A FRAGMENT / FROM CHICKAMAUGA / PRESENTED TO / JOHN A ANDREW POST 15 / BY COMRADE E W FROST”. Emery W. Frost (1846-1915) was a member of the 14th Massachusetts Light Artillery and a member of the John A. Andrew Grand Army of the Republic Post 15 in Boston, Massachusetts where this souvenir was displayed for many years prior to coming into collector’s market. This large section of tree has three 3/4” bands attached like bbl bands to hold bark in place. There have been many fake warlogs fabricated over the years, but this is among the nicest examples you will see clearly showing the base of a rifled 2.9” Parrott projectile with wrought iron sabot rarely seen in such collected souvenirs from the battlefield. Pictured and described in In the Line of Fire by Mullinax and Melton, 2006. Copy of book is included in lot. PROVENANCE: John A. Andrew, GAR Post #15, Boston, MA; Steve Mullinax Collection, Villa Rica, GA. CONDITION: Very good and among the best of its genre. Some bark is chipping and missing and a small cigar box about 1/4 full of bark that has fallen off over the years when on display. 52447-2 JS (20,000-30,000)

287

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1317.


1318.

Session 1

EXTREMELY RARE AND HISTORIC “WARLOG” CONTAINING 12LB CANNON BALL AND GRAPESHOT FROM THE SLOPE OF SNODGRASS HILL, BATTLE OF CHICKAMAUGA, SEPTEMBER 19, 1863. Sections of trees containing battlefield projectiles were popular souvenirs after the Civil War. Sections of trees containing intact cannon projectiles are extremely rare and few are privately owned outside of institutions. This particular example was collected from the battlefield by Captain George I. Robinson (1840-1909), of the Chicago Board of Trade Artillery who fired the first cannon opening the Battle of Chickamauga, which was the bloodiest battle of the war after Gettysburg. This warlog is 32” high by about 16” x 13”, retaining much of its orig oak bark with other areas well patinaed. The 12lb cannon ball and the four 4” grapeshot have fine iron patina and display beautifully where tree has grown around them over the years prior to Captain Robinson collecting this 116 lb souvenir that he displayed at The Wisconsin MOLLUS Commandery in which he was involved until his death. The Wisconsin Commandery Loyal Legion Collection was later given to the Milwaukee Public Museum which de-assessed part of their military collection about 60 years ago. There were two reunions at Chickamauga in 1890 and 1893 when this warlog most likely was cut from battlefield. Pictured and described in In the Line of Fire by Mullinax and Melton, 2006. Copy of book is included in lot. PROVENANCE: Captain George I. Robinson, about 1890; Wisconsin Commandery of the Loyal Legion of the United States; Milwaukee Public Museum; Estate collection of Steve Mullinax, Villa Rica, GA, 1986. CONDITION: Very good and among the best of its type. Sound and solid overall, with good surface and patina, retaining about 60% of its orig bark with balance of wood surfaces an old dark 1319.patina. Accompanying note and framed card are very good. 52447-1 JS (20,000-30,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

288


Session 1 1319.

VERY RARE CIVIL WAR SAWYER CANNON, ONE Reverse OF ONLY 2 SURVIVORS. SN 13. Rifled 6-pounder, 3.67” Sawyer cannon saw service in the western theatre of war. The most famous battery was Captain Pythagoras Holcomb, 2nd Vermont’s six 6-pounder Sawyer rifles which saw major action at Port Hudson, Louisiana where many unique lead-covered Sawyer projectiles are found. These cannons were made of cast steel, most likely by Putnam Machine Company, of Fitchburg, Mass. Sylvanus and Addison Sawyer made at least 3 cal. of projectiles and guns of which there are only two known. This gun is registry “No. 13”; and the only other example is in a memorial, which is registry “No. 16”. This is only privately owned example. Hazlett, Olmstead & Parks in their definitive text Field Artillery Weapons of the Civil War list other survivor as registry number “16” and is at Lakeview Cemetery, Minneapolis in memorial to fallen Union soldiers. This is no doubt the rarest of all Civil War-used Union field guns that would fit on a standard No. 1 carriage. Cannon has total length of 78 ½” with weight as noted 872 pounds. PROVENANCE: New York estate. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gold painted with iron patina, well defined rifled pitted bore. Three drilled holes rear of vent for sighting bracket which is still found on No. 16. Left trunnion marked with 872 which is the weight. It will be interesting to see if any other markings will be found after the paint is removed. 52758-1 JS (30,000-40,000)

289

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


1320.

Session 1

FINE CIVIL WAR CYRUS ALGER 1853-DATED BRONZE 12 POUNDER MOUNTAIN HOWITZER. SN 109. Cal. 12 Pounder. This a beautiful Model 1841 mountain howitzer on correct carriage. These “petite” cannon are of ingenious design to breakdown as they could be dis-assembled and carried on three pack animals (including ammunition). It was inspected by Louis A. de Barth Walbach who only inspected for US Army for a few months before his untimely death June 26, 1853. Walbach was a brilliant Ordnance Officer who developed a proprietary system for testing gun metal for cannon. Walbach was a graduate of West Point and his father was the oldest officer to serve on active duty in the history of the US Army. 12-pounder mountain howitzers were used in many engagements in the Mexican War and the Civil War, especially in mountainous terrain and in the West. They saw much use in the Indian Wars. They were greatly feared by the Indians, who called them ‘gun that shoots twice’ apparently in recognition of the second report produced by the howitzer’s exploding shell. The piece was designed to fire only anti-personnel ammunition, consisting of either explosive shell, spherical case shot, or canister. The piece is chambered, as are most muzzle-loading howitzers. This is a

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

290


Session 1 fine example of one of the most popular Civil War cannon with bbl weight of only 223 pounds, 500 pounds overall, and bbl length of about 37”. PROVENANCE: GAR Post 184, Corning, Tehama County, CA, 1912; transfered to VFW at later date; Mike Magaldi, Corning, CA, 1994; Paulson Brother’s Ordance, 1994; Denny Pizzini Collection. CONDITION: Very good overall. Good markings including well struck “US” on top of bbl, makers mark and date on trunnions, weight markings below cascabel and registry number and inspector marks on muzzle face. Brass exhibits good patina. Numerous nicks and scratches which do not affect aesthetics. The carriage was made by Paulson Brothers and is in excellent matching condition. 52662-1 JS (45,000-60,000)

Reverse

291

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1321. FINE MASSACHUSETTS SURCHARGED MODEL 1842 ASTON SINGLE SHOT MARTIAL PERCUSSION PISTOL. NSN. Cal. 54. This 1851 dated H. Aston, Middleton, CT Model 1842 pistol is a fine example. This gun conforms to other examples measuring about 14” overall with an 8-1/2” rnd bbl, captive swivel type steel ramrod and brass furniture. Bbl is stamped with Massachusetts surcharge “MS” above “US / GW / P” (Lt. George Wells). Most all metal parts have small inspector initials throughout with two bright inspector’s cartouches stamped in stock opposite lock. “WN” (Walter North) and “WAT” (William A. Thornton). These pistols saw hard use and are difficult to find in apparently unused or lightly used condition such as this example. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Metal surfaces are fine and smooth, grey overall with areas of scattered staining and pitting. Markings are crisp and well defined as can be seen in photos. Bore is bright and clean. Brass has cleaned yellow patina with small nicks and scratches. Stock is fine overall, hand worn patina, cartouches are crisp and well struck with scattered small cosmetic blemishes including 1/4” chip just rear of lock. 52328-35 JS (1,250-1,750)

OUTSTANDING MODEL 1322. 1855 PERCUSSION PISTOL CARBINE WITH MATCHING SHOULDER STOCK. NSN. Cal. 58. This is among the nicest examples of this popular martial Civil War pistolcarbine. This gun conforms with rifled 12” rnd-oct bbl marked at left breech “V/P” over eagle’s head and dated “1855” forward of folding 3-leaf sight on tang. Lock marked on primer door with spread winged eagle and “U.S./SPRINGFIELD” in front of lock and dated “1855” behind the hammer. Walnut stock has inspector cartouche. Gun appears orig, authentic and excellent overall. Ramrod, brass nosecap, brass bbl band and swing swivels all fine. Buttcap numbered “5” as is its attached stock. It is always difficult in this model to find matching lock and bbl dates and matching assembly numbers which this example exhibits. This is among the most aesthetically pleasing examples of the popular Civil War era pistol carbine you will ever find. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: All metal has been lightly cleaned and is bright white/grey overall with small areas of pinprick pitting mostly around muzzle. Adjustable 3-leaf rear sight has crisp markings. Brass mountings are all cleaned with a light mustard color. Walnut stocks are sound and solid with sharp crisp edges with light edge wear and several cosmetic blemishes. Stocks have been varnished, single cartouche is thinly stamped “JS” (Col. John Symington). Impressed line where buttstock fits is present on either side. Gun functions well including Maynard tape device. Bore shows crisp, shiny rifled bore. Gun is accompanied by an orig Civil War era leather sling which is good to very good overall; sound, solid with scuffing and crazing. 52328-49 JS (7,000-9,000)

FINE CIVIL WAR MODEL 1323. 1855 SPRINGFIELD PERCUSSION PISTOL CARBINE WITH DETACHABLE STOCK. NSN. Cal. 58. This is a fine example of the unique and popular martial Civil War era pistol-carbine. This gun conforms with other examples with rifled 12” rnd-oct bbl marked at left breech “V/P” over eagle’s head and dated “1855” forward of folding 3-leaf sight on tang. Lock marked on primer door with spread winged eagle and “U.S./SPRINGFIELD” in front of lock and dated “1856” behind the hammer. Walnut stock has crisp inspector cartouche “JS” (Col. John Symington). PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Overall very good to fine, markings all crisp and discernible. Bbl and lock have been cleaned to a white/grey patina overall with staining and pitting. Adjustable 3-leaf rear sight complete with good markings. Brass mountings are light to medium mustard patina. Walnut stocks are sound and solid with fairly sharp edges with cosmetic dings and dents, hand worn patina, inspectors cartouche is crisp. Gun functions well with partial roll of caps inside Maynard device with well discerned rifling in bore. Stock has assembly number “6” and pistol is “2”. 52328-48 JS (5,000-6,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

292


Session 1

Extraordinarily Rare Shawk & McLanahan Brass Ring Revolver SN 1 together with its Original Presentation Silver RepoussĂŠ Holster of Confederate General James Chestnut

293

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1324. RARE SHAWK & MCLANAHAN BRASS FRAMED REVOLVER, SN 1. SN 1. Cal. 36. Silver plated brass frame, blue and case hardened. This rare gun was made in St. Louis, Missouri. just prior to the Civil War firm owned by Abel Shawk and J.K. McLanahan. This Navy cal. revolver, with a 7-3/4” totally rnd bbl, is based somewhat on Whitney’s design and functions quite well. This gun and the original silver plated holster that always accompanied this gun had an interesting recent history. This pistol was stolen from a good client of ours, but at the time it was stolen, the gun thief could not also steal the holster, only the pistol. After the discovery of the loss of the pistol, our client put in a claim with their insurance company and collected for the loss. Most recently the crook offered the gun for auction (with a competitor). It was then that the insurance company discovered the unique gun that they had paid a settlement on. We are fortunate to have been selected by the insurance company to sell this rare and historic pistol for their account. We knew that the client still had the holster and so approached him about consigning it to this same auction. This rare, beautiful, inscribed holster will be sold immediately after this pistol is sold. Its very unfortunate that we could not reunite this holster and pistol, but as you can understand, they each belong to different individuals. We certainly hope that the winning bidder of the pistol will acquire, and once again reunite, this rare and historic pistol with the important rare and inscribed silver holster so that they can once again be together as they have been for about 150 years previously. The separate silver repoussé inscribed holster will be sold immediately after this pistol and as its description states, the inscription on the holster reads “FROM FELLOW OFFICERS / OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA / RESERVE FORCE / JAN 3RD 1865 / TO A FINE MAN AND OFFICER / BRIGADIER GENERAL / JAMES CHESTNUT CSA”. This gun and silver holster are both discussed (only gun is pictured) in an article by Frank Graves December 2013 issue of Arms Heritage magazine. It together with the holster also is illustrated and discussed (both the holster and the pistol) in Topper’s “Relics of South Carolina” on pg 81. Only 8 of these unique guns are known and each was handmade and finished with minor differences as noted in referenced article. This example is complete, all orig and once associated with a Confederate general. Gun is now missing its orig silver holster with Confederate inscription. This particular example is marked just like SN “2”, only marked “WM. TEGETHOFF” on bbl and cylinder. Frank Graves in his exemplary research shows that Tegethoff probably designed this pistol and was an early gunsmith working for Hawkens. This is the only example known which is silver plated. PROVENANCE: Confederate Brig. General James Chestnut, January 3, 1865; Ted Meredith Collection; pictured pg 81 “Civil War Relics From South Carolina”, Celeste & David Topper, 1988; Butterfield & Butterflied Auction. CONDITION: Very good overall. Bbl and cylinder retain about half their blue finish with staining and pitting. Brass frame and trigger guard 95% plus silver plate with edge wear and pitting with scattered stains, nicks and scratches. Stocks are sound and solid with strong traces of orig varnish. The last 1-1/4” of loading assembly is spliced 2-pc construction, but appears absolutely orig from its manufacture. SN “1” is only found on left side of grip frame and penciled inside each grip. Mechanically gun functions well with crisp bright bore. 52428-2 JS (20,000-30,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

294


Session 1 1325. PRESENTATION SILVER REPOUSSÉ HOLSTER OF CONFEDERATE GENERAL JAMES CHESTNUT. This unique hinged silver holster which contained the silverplated Shawk & McLanahan revolver sold in previous lot originated in this holster. This original silver plated holster and the gun that it has always accompanied had an interesting recent history. The pistol (being sold immediately before this item) was stolen from a good client of ours, but at the time it was stolen, the gun thief could not also steal the holster, only the pistol. After the discovery of the loss of the pistol, our client put in a claim with their insurance company and collected for the loss. Most recently the crook offered the gun for auction (with a competitor). It was then that the insurance company discovered the unique gun that they had paid a settlement on. We are fortunate to have been selected by the insurance company to sell this rare and historic pistol for their account. We knew that the client still had this holster and so approached him about consigning it to this same auction. This rare, beautiful, inscribed holster will be sold immediately after the pistol is sold. Its very unfortunate that we could not reunite this holster and pistol, but as you can understand, they each belong to different individuals. We certainly hope that the winning bidder of the pistol will acquire, and once again reunite, this rare and historic pistol with the important rare and inscribed silver holster so that they can once again be together as they have been for about 150 years previously. The separate Shawk & McLanahan brass ring revolver, SN 1 will be sold immediately before this holster. This silver holster and gun are both discussed (only gun is pictured) in an article by Frank Graves December 2013 issue of Arm’s Heritage magazine. In addition to the beautiful floral repoussé work and large panoply of arms is found a well executed presentation on verso which has the South Carolina state seal and reads “FROM FELLOW OFFICERS / OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA / RESERVE FORCE / JAN 3RD 1865 / TO A FINE MAN AND OFFICER / BRIGADIER GENERAL / JAMES CHESTNUT CSA”. James Chestnut 1815-1885 was a signer of the Constitution of the Confederate States and previously a prominent Democratic senator. Even though moderate on the slavery question he resigned from the Senate upon Lincoln’s election in 1860, helping to draft the Confederate Constitution. Chestnut was aide to PGT Beauregard and ordered the firing on Fort Sumter. His wife published diaries after the war that are considered among the most important Confederate text concerning life in Charleston during the Civil War. Chestnut had an exemplary military career serving as President Jefferson Davis’s aide and his eyes and ears in the field. This is a unique presentation holster formerly in the renowned Confederate revolver collection of Ted Meredith. PROVENANCE: Collection of Ted Meredith; Pictured with Shawk & McLanahan Revolver, SN 1 in Celeste and David Topper, Relics of South Carolina 1988. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Repoussé is well detailed and though the style is not normally seen in the U.S. The inscription appears impeccable and fits gun well. 52458-1 JS (8,000-12,000)

295

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1326. UNIQUE SILVER INLAID CIVIL WAR COLT 1860 ARMY REVOLVER OF LEVI BLASDELL, 50th PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS. SN 23620. Cal. 44. Levi S. Blasdell (1833-1910) enlisted 9-6-1861 at Montrose, PA as a Private in Company D, 50th PA Infantry. He was captured at Spotsylvania Courthouse May 12, 1864 and was promoted to Corporal after his release. The two marvelous silver insets, one with Blasdell’s name and unit with a well chased American eagle and the other, of a color bearer holding American flag, certainly appear to be wartime, but why would an enlisted man in the infantry have a government purchased Colt in his possession as infantrymen were not issued revolvers? Even more interesting, is the fact that this gun was purchased in the small town of Americana in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil and that Americana was a city founded by descendants of Confederate soldiers who did not want to return to the United States. A most likely scenario is that this gun was taken from Blasdell when he was captured and kept as a trophy by a Confederate who was among the founders of the Brazil Confederate colony at Americana. Regardless, this is a very fine early 4-screw Colt Army with the finest silver inlays. Accompanying lot are series of letters detailing history and genealogy which should be read. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun is sharp, though cleaned with no orig finish. Markings are crisp including 1-line New York bbl address, SNs and patent markings. The Ormsby rolled naval battle scene on cylinder is only partially discernible, otherwise crisp action with bright well defined bore. Silver insets are of the highest quality, mounted flush with chased pins matching engraved backgrounds. 52489-1 JS (4,000-6,000)

1327. EXCEPTIONAL 6” COLT MODEL 1849 POCKET PERCUSSION REVOLVER INSCRIBED TO GEORGE TISDALE, 1st MASS REGIMENT. SN 141468. Cal. 31. You will not find a nicer Civil War presentation 6” Colt Pocket Model. Inscription on butt “GEO. E. TISDALE / 1. MASS REGT”. George E. Tisdale (1833-1918) entered service from Leominster, May of 1861 as a musician which was quite fitting for the 33 year old piano maker. He served just over a year, mustering out in July of 1862 and I don’t think he ever used his gun which appears un-fired, retaining virtually all of its bright orig finish. Blue and color case hardened with 6” oct bbl, brass pin front sight and 2-line New York address with brackets. Left side of frame has a tiny “COLTS PATENT”. The silver plated brass trigger guard and backstrap contain a varnished 1-pc walnut grip with last four digits of matching SN in back strap channel. Cylinder is 5-shot with stagecoach holdup scene roll marking. This particular revolver was produced in 1858 and probably sat on a shelf until sold in 1861 when Tisdale joined service. This is a beautiful gun with a most desirable 6” bbl and an exceptional cylinder retaining most all its orig blue that would be difficult to upgrade. PROVENANCE: The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Excellent overall, all matching. Bbl and cylinder retain 90-95% of their glossy orig blue with the losses flaked, not worn to a medium patina with only faint sharp edge wear. Rammer and handle retain bright and muted case colors, frame and hammer retain 80% brilliant case colors, with balance faded to a plum/silver. Cylinder shows virtually all sharp rolled stagecoach hold-up scene. Trigger guard and backstrap retain about 96-97% of their orig silver plating (dark patina). Grip is sound, well-fit retaining 97-98% plus orig varnish with losses only at edges. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52328-17 JS (6,000-8,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

296


1329.

CASED ENGRAVED REMINGTON NEW MODEL ARMY REVOLVER. SN 91009. Cal. 44. Beautiful Nimschke style engraved Remington with gold & nickel finish having an 8” oct bbl, pinched post front sight and carved 2-pc ivory grips. Frame has about 60% coverage, fine foliate arabesque pattern engraving with pearled background. It has small flourishes of engraving and geometric patterns on the bbl & backstrap with more fine patterns on the bottom of the trigger guard and bottom of the frame. Cylinder has about 30% coverage fine arabesque patterns. Grips are carved ivory with a shallow relief carved American eagle perched on an American shield holding a ribbon in its beak all surmounting olive branches on each side. Revolver is accompanied by an orig Remington walnut casing with purple velvet lining, compartmented in the bottom for the revolver, a Remington style flask with angled spout, a wood and brass cleaning rod and a brass Remington 2-cavity bullet mold with sprue cutter having a small “H” inspector mark in the right side. It also has a tin of cartridge primers and an open compartment for cast lead balls. Also accompanied by a fine oak & glass custom display case. PROVENANCE: Ex- Bruce McDowell collection. The Forest G. Rhodes collection. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Fine to very fine, matching except grips which are unnumbered. Frame, grip frame & trigger guard retain most of their strong, bright nickel finish. Cylinder & rammer retain 6070% thin gold wash over nickel finish. Grips have a fine mellow patina and are sound. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Finish is possibly an old re-work of high quality as there appears to be some fine pitting under the finish on the hammer and other areas. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. Case has a grain check in the lid and another in the bottom but overall is sound with no loose corners and retains about 95% orig varnish. Lining is much faded and worn at the front sight area, otherwise is intact. Flask has a couple of minor nicks with a slightly open seam and retains most of an old polish. Mold is extremely fine with the brass a fine mustard patina and the sprue cutter retaining most of its orig fire blue. Custom display case is equally fine. 52465-6 JRL (6,000-10,000) ESA 297

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1328. RARE REMINGTON BEALS ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 1173. Cal. 44. Blue finish with 8” oct bbl, dovetailed German silver cone front sight with grooved top strap rear sight. Frame, bbl & cylinder are blue finished with color case hardened hammer and silver plated brass trigger guard. Mounted with smooth 2-pc walnut grips numbered to this revolver. Buttstrap bears the white ink number “FB-182”. This number is similar to the markings frequently found on specimens from the famous Karl Moldenhauer Collection. Grips, although matching numbered, do not exhibit inspector cartouches, however various other metal parts of this revolver have small inspector initials. Few Beals Army revolvers remain today with only about 1,900 produced in the period 1861-1862. They were virtually all issued to Union troops and saw continuous service throughout the Civil War and later on the American frontier, usually under harsh and adverse conditions with very limited or no maintenance. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine. Bbl retains 94-95% glossy orig blue with light muzzle & sharp edge wear; rammer handle retains about 75% thin orig blue; frame retains 60-70% flaked orig blue with the loss areas a light patina; hammer retains about all of its brilliant orig case colors; trigger guard retains 60-65% orig silver plating; front & backstraps are a gray metal patina and the buttstrap is a light brown patina; cyl retains 60-65% glossy orig blue with a light drag line. Right grip has a repaired crack, otherwise grips are sound showing light to moderate edge wear and overall retain about 50% orig finish. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. A rare Civil War era revolver in truly exceptional condition. 52328-2 (5,000-7,000)


Session 1

1330. EXTREMELY RARE CIVIL WAR PRESENTATION 2nd MODEL BURNSIDE SADDLE RING CARBINE. SN 1731. Cal. 54. Usual configuration with 21” tapered rnd bbl, pinched blade front sight and 2-leaf, 3-position flip rear sight graduated 100-300-500 yards, made without forearm. Receiver is mounted on the left side with a sling bar and ring. Mounted with highly figured burl walnut stock. Lockplate is marked “BURNSIDE RIFLE CO / PROVIDENCE RI” and the lever latch is stamped “G. PAT. FOSTER / APRIL 10TH 1860”. Left side of buttstock is inlaid with an oval silver plate, 3” x 1-1/2”, inscribed “PRESENTED TO / 2ND LIEUT. E. K. SHERMAN / CO. C. 2d REGt. R.I.V. / by his friends / OF / PROVIDENCE R.I.”. It is interesting that the Captain of this same company had an almost identical presentation to Captain Viall which was sold by Julia’s as Lot 2420, March 2011. Edwin K. Sherman entered service when the regiment was first called up June 5, 1861 at Camp Burnside, Providence, Rhode Island. No doubt, the presentation to Captain Viall was that same date as both were among the earliest officers recruited. Viall would go on to become Brigadier General. Edwin Sherman was rapidly promoted through the ranks, becoming 1st Lieutenant June 22, 1861 and then Captain November 28, 1861. The 2nd Rhode Island was prominent at battles of the Army of the Potomac. Lt. Sherman was present at 1st Bull Run where the 2nd Rhode Island fired the opening volley of the battle! He contracted Typhoid Fever during the Peninsula Campaign and later died at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, July 9, 1862. 2nd Model Burnsides are rarely offered and Deluxe presentations are almost unknown, other than the example noted above and SN 593 which was presented by Abraham Lincoln to Senator John Crittenden. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Metal surfaces are dark grey/brown overall with pitting. Gun appears orig, complete and matching. Obviously this gun was not stored properly and rusted on the non-case hardened portions, but all markings are clear and discernible with exception of patent markings on top of frame which are only partially discernible. Presentation plaque is well fit with silver patina. Stock is sound with storage dings and dents, old sanding and light chipping and one hairline. Mechanics are crisp with pitted rifled bore. 52492-2 JS (7,000-9,000) 1331.

RARE ENGRAVED REMINGTON NEW MODEL ARMY PERCUSSION REVOLVER. SN 118088. Cal. 44. Nickel finish with 8” oct bbl, pinched post front sight and usual 3-line address. Revolver is engraved by L.D. Nimscke with about 60 % coverage fine foliate arabesque patterns that have fine pearled background. Engraving patterns extend over the side and top side flats of the bbl, down the backstrap with geometric patterns on the buttstrap and extremely fine detailed hunter’s star on the trigger bow. Cylinder has full circumference engraving in matching patterns. Rammer and lever are modern replacements with light engraving patterns. Although the new model Army was produced in large quantities during the Civil War, very few were plated or engraved, they usually saw hard service and are rarely found with high orig finish today. PROVENANCE: Michael Leff Estate Collection; The collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Overall retains 60-70% orig nickel with strong grip frame. Hammer, rammer handle and cylinder are bright metal. Mechanics are fine. Strong sharp bore with good shine and scattered light pitting. being offered without grips. 52328-1 JR28 (4,000-8,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

298


1333.

SCARCE FINE 1861 DATED SPRINGFIELD RIFLED-MUSKET. NSN. Cal. 58. 40” bbl. This is a very nice example of Civil War model 1861 Springfield musket which over 450,000 were made in 1861 and 1862 and few survive in high condition as this was the workhorse musket of the Union Army during the Civil War. Indeed these muskets were often captured and saw continued use by the Confederacy. This gun is consistent with other 1861 Springfield’s being iron mounted, fitted with three flat bands that are spring retained, two leaf rear sight and swelled tulip tip ramrod. This gun is properly marked “US/SPRINGFIELD” with Eagle forward of hammer on lock and “1861” on tail of lock. Barrel flat has matching “1861” date and “VP/Eagle Head” proof. There are two inspectors cartouches “ESA” (E. S. Allin) and “FWS” (possibly - F. W. Sanderson) crisply stamped opposite lock as can be seen in photos. This particular Springfield is hard to find in nice condition and appears 100% orig and complete in every regard. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Fine overall. Metal is grey/bright showing old cleaning, staining and light pitting. Markings are all discernible though bbl date and “VP” proof are worn as can be seen in photos. Stock is fine overall with crisp edges, very sharp inspector cartouches, raised grain with hand worn patina. This gun has crisp action and fine crisp shiny bore. 52328-50 JS (4,5005,500)

299

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1332. RARE AND FINE CIVIL WAR 1st MODEL ENGRAVED MERRILL OFFICER’S CARBINE. SN 1081. Cal. 54. This is a fine example of the rarely seen 1st Model Merrill Officer’s Model carbine, engraved and German silver mounted and once part of the well known Merrill Collection of Bill Moore of Baton Rouge, LA. The handful of engraved 1st Model Merrill carbines are quite scarce and all very different. This particular example is totally German silver mounted with flat hinge. Lock, hammer, bbl band, trigger guard, breech, sling bar mounts, buttplate and patchbox are all engraved. Stock is deluxe burled walnut and highly polished. Otherwise, this carbine is standard configuration with patent markings on breech and lock with 21-1/2” browned bbl. This gun is in beautiful condition and is pictured and described in the accompanying privately printed book of Mr. Moore’s collection of Merrill’s on pgs 37-39, (Fig. 17). PROVENANCE: Ex-William D. Moore Collection, Baton Rouge, LA. CONDITION: Very good to fine, orig, complete. Traces of finish in protected areas of breech, bbl retains much of its orig thinning brown finish. Assembly number “43” noted on many parts. Stock is well fit with long hairline on right side rear of sling ring. Markings and engraving all fine and discernible with some wear noted to engraving on high portions of “star” on trigger bow. Scattered small, cosmetic blemishes. Mechanically functional with crisp bright bore. 52154-15 (5,500-7,500)


EXTREMELY RARE CIVIL WAR 6-TUBE BLAKESLEE “QUICK LOADER” SPENCER CARTRIDGE BOX. Colonel Blakeslee’s original pattern model and drawings show a sixtube cartridge carrier with a wood block, bored with longitudinal holes to hold six tin tubes. Each tube held seven Spencer cartridges, the correct number to reload the buttstock magazine. The wood block was encased in smooth black leather, with a hinged leather lid to protect the open tops of the tubes. A leather strap held the loaded box under the trooper’s left arm, close to his body. Only 500 of these boxes were ordered by the U.S. government and not more than a handful are known today. The earliest of these 500 had roller buckle closures instead of finial and tabs. This is the rarest early version with roller buckle, thought possibly to be used only on last 500. The only box we have seen previously was sold in the Roy Marcot Spencer collection and is the one printed in his 1983 text Spencer Repeating Firearms. This is a very rare box in complete original condition and as noted rarely do these come to market. PROVENANCE: David Pierce collection. CONDITION: Sound and solid retaining most of its original black finish. Patent markings are discernible on top flap “BLAKESLEE’S PATENT/U.S./CAVEAT FILED SEP. 19,64”. Wood block is intact with 6 tin tubes. Implement pouch retains tab and roller buckle though tab is heavily crazed with leather backed repair. 52156-1 JS (7,000-9,000)

1335.

CIVIL WAR 10-TUBE BLAKESLEE “QUICK LOADER” SPENCER CARTRIDGE BOX WITH ORIGINAL PAPER LABEL. This rare cartridge box is an original and authentic Civil War era example of a rare military accoutrement. Dubbed “Quick Loader” by the soldiers, this is one of 22,000 produced in 1864-65 by Emerson Gaylord of Chicopee, Massachusetts under army ordnance department contracts. This is the most typical box seen, but a vast majority are in very poor condition. This is among the nicest you will see complete with all ten tin tubes. PROVENANCE: Don Stoops, Sharpsburg, MD; David Pierce collection. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall and about as nice as you will find a Civil War leather accoutrement with good markings and rarely seen original paper label inside lid. Brass finial has glued repair. This label is not photographed or mentioned in any literature cataloger is aware of. 52156-2 JS (4,000-6,000)

1336.

EXTREMELY RARE AND DESIRABLE CIVIL WAR 13-TUBE BLAKESLEE “QUICK LOADER” SPENCER CARTRIDGE BOX, 1 OF ONLY 4 KNOWN. This is the rarest and most desirable of all the Blakeslee quick loader boxes. Even though there was a contract for 1,000, one noted collector states there are only four known extant today. This box, when fully loaded, would weight 10 lbs and was made to be issued to the infantry. PROVENANCE: Norm Flayderman collection; Butterfield & Butterfield, lot 1623, January 1997; Hayes Otoupalik collection; David Pierce collection. CONDITION: Overall box is good and complete. Though tab is replaced, it still retains all 13 original tin tubes. Hinged lid is functional, and complete with both belt loops and strap loops. Implement pouch is marked “BLAKESLEE’S CARTRIDGE BOX/U.S./PATD DEC. 20, 1864/E. GAYLORD/CHICOPEE/MASS”. There is an indiscernible inspector’s cartouche below maker’s mark. Leather has shrunk and there are several reinforced repairs where lid has cracked at folds and implement pouch tab is reinforced. 52156-3 JS (7,000-9,000)

Session 1

1334.

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

300


PAIR OF UNIQUE GOLD LOCKETS WITH SCRIMSHAWED IVORY IMAGES OF CAPTAIN JOHN MORTON AND GENERAL N.B. FORREST FROM MORTON ESTATE. Captain John W. Morton’s memoirs were published in 1909, “The Artillery of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Cavalry”. Among the earliest wartime images of Morton is an engraving shown opposite page 207 of Morton as a 21 year old Captain, this is the engraving that the scrimshaw images appear copied from. The large oval locket measures about 2-1/2” x 2” in low karat gold casing with t-bar pin, typical of Civil War era jewelry. The 1-3/4” round gold-plated double sided locket shows similar scrimshawed and colored vignettes of Morton and Gen. Forrest. The round locket appears possibly executed by a different hand and possibly copied from the large oval which most likely was made for Morton’s mother or sweetheart. Both lockets were purchased from the Morton estate in 1982 and have letters of provenance from the original buyer to Mr. Donaldson. Accompanying this lot is a fine First Edition copy of Morton’s 374 page memoir published in Nashville in 1909. PROVENANCE: Morton family descendants; Anne Morton Stout Estate; David H. Wilson, 1982; The Confederate and Civil War estate collection of Fred Donaldson, 1998/2004. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Folk art scrimshawed images are well discerned. Glass bezel of Morton in the double locket has chip as can be seen in photograph. There is area of deep scratching on face of one locket, apparently attempting to ascertain whether they were solid gold or plate. 52430-7 JS (6,000-8,000) ESA

1338.

FINE ARCHIVE OF CIVIL WAR AND RELATED MEMORABILIA OF THREE GRISWOLD BROTHERS, 15th CONNECTICUT INFANTRY & 1st CONNECTICUT LIGHT ARTILLERY. NSN. Cal. 58. This grouping is fresh to the market from direct family descent still in Guilford, CT. Lot includes: 1863 dated Springfield musket in very nice orig condition with orig bayonet & scabbard, two 6th plate ambrotypes of Joel Griswold with old paper tags and five additional family photographs. Regulation US canteen with initials “JG”. Regulation holster for Colt Army revolver, infantry belt with rare, small US enlisted belt plate and cap box. Two boxes of Sharps rifle cartridges, each retaining four complete linen cartridges, reunion era kepi with New Bern, NC label, detached visor. Also included is 1816 regulation U.S. bayonet, two Civil War infantry cartridge boxes one with orig sling and eagle breast plate and U.S. cartridge box plate. Cartridge box has seven complete wrapped orig 58 Cal. paper cartridges along with several broken cartridges. There is also an Indian War era campaign hat with star-shaped vent holes cut, label on sweatband reads “US ARMY HAT”. The is also a GAR hat device, two GAR membership medal (No. A8675 and R25291) and numbered MOLLUS medal (280). There is a box with miscellaneous insignia and buttons mostly post Civil War, but a couple Civil War enlisted buttons. Joel Griswold’s framed discharge paper with eagle vignette is dated at New Bern, North Carolina, June 27th 1865. Is also present with a small loose tintype of full seated soldier with musket and uniforms. There are two Indian War era mess kits and two brass powder flasks also in lot. Joel Griswold, Jr enlisted August 5, 1862. He was captured at Kinston, NC March 8, 1865 and was paroled March 26, 1865, then mustered out of service the following day. Edward Griswold enlisted October 9, 1861 in the 1st Connecticut Light Artillery which also served in North Carolina, probably explaining the New Bern made kepi with Artillery insignia. Sgt. Charles Griswold served with Joel in the 15th Connecticut and was promoted to Captain, February 18, 1864 of the 29th Connecticut. The Griswold family letters are found in the New York Public Library. There are a few other miscellaneous items as can be seen in photos. CONDITION: Overall good to very good. Musket is very good. Complete orig and authentic though missing sling swivels, metal cleaned bright with crisp lock and bbl markings, matching lock and bbl dates. Stock is sound and solid with hand worn patina with faded, barely discernible inspectors cartouches. The ambrotype showing Joel and his wife is broken, but still discernible. The leather holster, cap box, bayonet scabbard and belts are all worn and crazed but sound and supple. Accompanying bayonet is very good. Campaign hat is very good overall. Kepi has good blue color. Lining is loose but intact as is sweatband. Nap is considerably insect damaged; visor is detached as noted. Cartridge packs have good discernible labels. Remaining cartridges are very good, along with sufficient original caps. Cartridge box breastplate and box plate have been reattached with paperclips but are both very good with both iron hooks on each. GAR medal and GAR hat pin are all good to very good as is MOLLUS medal. 51943-2 JS (2,000-3,000) 301

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1337.


Session 1 1339.

ICONIC AND HISTORIC SILVER MOUNTED HAWKENS RIFLE OF GEORGE W. ATCHISON, ST. LOUIS, MO, 1836. NSN. Cal. 52. This is no doubt the finest and most elaborate of all Hawkens rifles. This gun has never left the family descent of E.R. Butterworth who obtained the gun on his travels west in the 1870’s until now. This gun had previously been on public display at the Cody Firearms Museum for the past 20 years. This gun is orig and complete in every regard. This earliest form of Hawkens pre-dates their famous plains rifles. This gun was made during the “Mountain Man” era where few Hawkens products are known and none as elaborate or as fine as this example which measures 53-1/2” overall with 37” full oct bbl with 3 gold bands at breech and muzzle, browned finish, inset silver engraved maker’s mark “J & S HAWKENS”, dovetailed German silver front sight, full buckhorn rear sight on 3” spring extension. Silver inlaid plaque on paneled cheekpiece engraved “G W ATCHISON / ST LOUIS / 1836”. The gun is totally silver mounted, including ramrod pipes, thimble, nosecap, forend wear plate, trigger guard, escutcheons for each key, buttplate, buttplate extensions, 4-pc patchbox, presentation plaque on paneled cheekpiece, plus 10 more decorative silver insets. In addition to silver mountings, there are an additional 6 mother-of-pearl scrimshawed insets and a horn oval inset between trigger guard and pierced silver buttplate extension which contains push button to open lid. Most silver is engraved with floral and geometric scrolls as is steel breech tang, hammer and “Golcher” lock and set trigger. Lock is attached via face by sgl screw into the steel breech tang. All screws are also engraved. Wood ramrod has iron threaded end for worm and silver plated brass tip. George W. Atchison first came West from Vermont in 1830 as a private in the US Army fighting along the rivers during the Black Hawk War (1831-1832). It is interesting to note that private steamers were used by the Army during the war. Atchison established himself as a well

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

302


Session 1

Reverse

known steamboat captain and boat builder on the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers not long after his army service. He first secured a clerkship on the steamship “Winnebago” when it came up from St. Louis to Armstrong in the Fall of 1832; the next summer he commanded The Winnebago himself and ran her in the St. Louis and Galena trade. In 1834, he commanded the steamer “Iowa” and later “Dubuque”, both in the upper river trade. The next year found him on the Lower Mississippi commanding “The Belle of Missouri” which he built in the winter of 1834-35. This ship sunk on its first trip by collision with another steamer. According to his obituary from a Davenport, IA newspaper Quad-City Times. This was “the beginning of enough bad luck to discourage a saint.”. In 1835, he built the steamer “George Collier”, she was too big to pass through the locks at Louisville, KY. In 1838, he built the steamer “Governor Dodge”, she sunk at Island 21 that Fall. The then built the steamer “Corsican” which sunk above Baton Rouge, LA”. Atchison went on to build other boats including the double engine “Amaranth” for the New Orleans trade. On May 1, 1843, he loaded almost 500 tons of cargo on the ship made to carry 200 tons; he did make it to New Orleans. No wonder so many of his ships litter the Mississippi and Missouri River basins. Atchison obviously made a very good living as he was able to buy the most magnificent Jacob & Samuel Hawken rifle of its day. Atchison did retire in 1853 selling his last ships and retired to a fine farm in Missouri. Read the various newspaper clippings on line; it’s amazing how many ships he built and sunk and the massive amounts of cargo he transported. It is interesting to note that a fluted anchor is among the engraved designs found in the finial of the patchbox, no doubt representing Atchison’s maritime history. PROVENANCE: George W. Atchison, 1836; E.R. Butterworth about 1870; Butterworth family descents. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun is complete and orig. Half of one ear of rear sight is broken and there is a contemporary to time of use repaired wood chip just forward of lock which is backed internally with well patinaed piece of cloth. Remainder of stock is well fit with one crack opposite lock. Checkered wrist is worn. Areas of dark orig varnish are found mostly in protected areas. Bbl is overall plum/brown with minor cosmetic blemishes. Iron lockplate, hammer and breech have traces of case colors, overall a dark silver/grey. Silver mounts have light patina. Reinforced iron tip at top of silver buttplate has dark iron patina. All insets are complete and intact though one mother-of-pearl “leaf ” forward of presentation plaque is cracked. Engraving on silver mostly crisp with some wear on forearm wear plate. Mechanically functional with crisp 7-groove rifled bore. 52461-1 JS (80,000-100,000)

303

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1340.

WELL MADE, HIGH CONDITION, SWIVEL BARREL OVER UNDER DOUBLE PERCUSSION RIFLE BY O. G. THAYER OF CHARDON, OHIO. NSN. Cal. 45 (.465 Groove diameter, 9 narrow groove rifling). 35” Browned octagonal two bbl rifle group is marked with makers name on one and address on other top flat. Brass tipped ramrods are on each side in groove between bbls. Each bbl is fitted with small U-notch rear sight and silver blade front. There is geometric engraving around muzzles and in front of each rear sight. Breech bosses have geometric borders around scroll. Bbl group is locked in position by push button in false lockplate on left side. Back action percussion lock on right is fitted with tall round bodied serpentine hammer with deeply engraved stylized dolphin head. Lock and sideplate are nicely engraved with large flowing open scroll within geometric borders. Buttstock of crotch figured American walnut is fitted with crescent steel buttplate with 3” return along flat toe line. Steel patchbox is inlet on right side of stock, and left side has angular shaped cheekpiece inlet with American eagle in German silver. Grip checkering is widely spaced and has bold groove and line borders. Spurred trigger guard has scrolled “grip”. All of this furniture is engraved en suite with locks, with delicate floral tips to scroll. CONDITION: Fine. Bbls retain most of their orig brown, other iron parts have a considerable amount of brown. Patchbox and buttplate are cleaned to silver gray, with some brown remaining. Stock has numerous nicks and marks in its orig finish. Grip has been cracked and repaired. Bores are excellent. Lock is fine. A really well made rifle by this Ohio craftsman known to have been working in Chardon in the 1860’s. 51872-26 MGM174 (10,000-15,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

304


Session 1 1341.

IMPORTANT AND HISTORIC DOUBLE BARREL PERCUSSION SHOTGUN PRESENTED TO INFAMOUS “BOSS TWEED” CONSPIRATOR JOHN J. BRADLEY APRIL 1858. NSN. Cal. 12ga. If this gun could only talk and tell us why this simple mid-grade engraved Liege dbl bbl 12 ga percussion shotgun was presented by sixteen listed New York City aldermen with a contemporary German silver repair to broken forestock held by seven brass screws. This gun looks much like a Manton Muzzleloader, however the maker is unknown. Presentation as seen in photos was expertly etched in raised relief on buttplate that was then Sheffield plated and reattached. This gun must have had some historic memorialization to Bradley and to the other aldermen presenters. The etching, presentation, and plating most likely cost more than the cost of this gun in 1858. John J. Bradley (1831-1891) owned a livery stable at the corner of 4th Ave and 18th St. He was a long time New York local politician, serving as a State Senator for a total of seven years. Bradley was often the subject of newspaper articles including a wonderful Oct 31, 1871 New York Times article titled “Respectable John J. Bradley”’. “It seems inconceivable that at this time of day, anybody endorsed by Tammany Hall should be able to secure a single vote on the ground of his ‘respectability’. John J. Bradley is not only endorsed by the Ring of public plunderers, but his election is of the most vital importance for the perpetuation of their rule. His greed in securing the spoils of office is only equaled by the rapacity of TWEED for extra-official plunder. And yet this man, who is not ashamed to extract at least 200,000 a year from a depleted Treasury for his services....”. Bradley joined the Tammany Hall when quite young, and was never indicted retiring back to his livery business and staying away from politics the last years of his life. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Presents well with presentation buttplate and German silver shield repair to forearm. Iron is overall brown/grey with staining and pitting. Stock other than break is sound, retaining much of its orig varnish, hand-worn patina, scattered cosmetic defects. Buttplate which was silver-plated retains 98% orig silver with some bubbling. Mechanically sound, with clear smooth bores. 51745-1 (4,500-7,000)

305

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1342.

HIGHLY INLAID CURLY MAPLE BEDFORD COUNTY JACOB STOUDENOUR (ATT) FLINTLOCK KENTUCKY RIFLE. NSN. Cal. .50. Overall 61”. Buttplate 4-3/8” x 1-1/4”. 45-1/4” full oct unmarked rifled bbl. This curly maple stocked rifle has 31 silver inlays and engraved forepiece brass patchbox with a Q type finial. 9” brass toeplate. 9” brass engraved saddle plate running from trigger guard to rear ramrod pipe. The Bedford style lock is flint. The oval silver wrist inlay is engraved with a capital “SH”. Jacob Stoudenour (1795-1863) was a major gunsmith in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Jacob died January 27, 1863 having been a very prolific Bedford County maker. A significant number of his guns were originally flint. CONDITION: Many parts of this rifle appear to be new replacements. The majority of the silver inlays have either been reset or replaced. The bbl tang is a new replacement but there is evidence of orig tang having extended another 1” back over the wrist, suggesting the bbl may be a replacement. The flint lock also appears to be a replacement. Mechanics are functional. Overall condition is good as restored. 52550-1 (7,500-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

306


Session 1 1343.

FINE PAIR OF HIGH CONDITION AMERICAN MADE DUELING/ HOLSTER PISTOLS BY ROBERTSON OF PHILADELPHIA WITH CASE AND ACCESSORIES. NSN. Cal. 48. 10” Browned octagon bbls with under ribs are engraved “PHILADA” on tops, and are otherwise unmarked nor proofed. Breech plugs, without “blow-outs”, are scroll engraved on tops. Breech irons with matching scroll are fitted with V-notch rear sights. High quality bar locks with flat faced serpentine dolphin hammers are engraved with about 50% coverage well cut shaded scroll within geometric borders. “ROBERTSON” (William working at 102 Carpenter Street 1829-55) is on front parts of locks. Triggers are set. Lock tumblers have “fly”. Traditionally shaped, dense American walnut half stocks with horn tips and long checkered flared grips, are iron mounted with trigger plates having stylized pineapple finials. Trigger guards with finger spurs are scroll engraved. Rectangular vacant German silver crest plates are at tops of grips. Stocks attach to bbls with captive side bolts through oval German silver escutcheons. Ebony ramrods with German silver tips and brass tails, are held by single plain pipes and nicely filed thimbles. What appears to be a bleached American walnut case, most likely orig to pistols, has inlet brass corners and fancy shaped inlet medallion on top. Case is lined in dark green coarsely woven cloth and contains a number of good quality accessories including ebonized handle turnscrew, nipple wrench, rosewood loading rod, steel nutcracker type bullet mold, brass 3 compartment flask with fluted sides, and a tin of Winchester percussion caps. Two covered compartments have turned bone knobs, one compartment holds balls, the other the orig key. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Fine, original, retaining a considerable amount of orig finish on metal parts. Bbls have most of what appears to be their orig brown. Locks have lots of their orig color where protected, thinning and browning otherwise. There are traces of blue on trigger guards. Stocks retain over 90% of their orig French polish finish with light marks, scratches, and rubs. Bores are very good, with light pitting. Locks are excellent. Triggers set. Case retains most of what appears to be its orig varnish, lid has a few cracks. Interior cloth appears to be orig, and has some rubs and marks. Accessories are good. A high quality pair of American made pistols, it is obvious that Mr. Robertson felt his competition was from England, as these pistols reflect contemporary English styling. 52033-2 (15,000-30,000) ESA

307

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 Reverse

1344.

Reverse

PAIR OF KENTUCKY FLINTLOCK PISTOLS ATTRIBUTED TO HENRY HUNSICKER, LEHIGH COUNTY. NSN. Cal. 35. Each pistol is 11-3/4” overall with 6-5/8” octagonal bbls with brass insets signed “HH”. Locks are marked “CALDERWOOD” (Philadelphia lock maker). Guns are simply brass mounted. Guns are obviously made by the same hand but stocks have different embellishment and finish as can be seen in photographs. There guns were originally sold by Floyd Everhart in a September 1999 Gun Report ad described as “near mint pair of original flintlock Kentucky pistols by Henry Hunsicker...gorgeous red-varnished stocks.” Searching information on Hunsicker cataloger can only find rifles, but Ron Gable in his ASAC article in bulletin 61 states that Hunsicker worked circa 1820 in Macungie Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania and generally signed his guns only with his initials. PROVENANCE: Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Very good overall. The lighter colored gun has weak frizzen spring. Both guns have medium mustard patina to brass hardware. Bbls have similar mottled gray patinas with fairly identical engraving with pitting especially at breeches. Locks are smooth with functional cocks. One top jaw screw has smaller diameter than its mate. The darker gun retains most of a red colored piano-like varnish with edge wear and scuffing. The lighter colored gun has thin remnants of varnish and some extra small brass pin decoration around thumbplate and opposite locks between escutcheons. Both guns mechanically very good with clear smooth bores. 51957-11 JS (8,000-12,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

308


Session 1 309

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1345. RARE AND FINEST KNOWN EXAMPLE OF AFRICAN AMERICAN GUNSMITH JAMES M. JONES PERCUSSION DERRINGER. NSN. Cal. 38. Beautiful and rare pocket derringer with 2-7/8” ovoid shaped Damascus bbl, dovetailed front sight with silver or platinum blade and fixed rear sight on top tang. Top flat of bbl is engraved “J.M. JONES”. Breech plug is inlaid with two wide gold bands and has an engraved screaming eagle’s head in between. Back action lock is engraved in tiny letters “J. M. JONES” above fine delicate scrolls en suite with delicate serpentine shaped flat sided, square edged hammer and decorative scalloped bolster with platinum blow-out plug. Mounted in a 1-pc walnut stock with schnable tip and secured with a sgl wedge through dog-bone shaped silver escutcheons. Pistol is silver mounted with a tapered trigger guard that is engraved with panoply of arms with two different American shields framed with floral sprays. Trigger plate has an elaborately engraved silver pineapple finial. Top of wrist has an empty inlaid rectangular gold thumbplate with cut corners. Sideplate has Mr. Jones’ distinctive sweeping floral design, also lightly engraved. Buttcap has a pinned teardrop shaped silver plate with an engraved triangular silver plate in tip of forestock. Grip is finely checkered in Mr. Jones’ usual patterns. James Monroe Jones, or James “Gunsmith” Jones, was an exceptional African American gunmaker. He was the eldest son, born in the Raleigh area of the Carolinas. It has been published that his father bought the family out of slavery, and according to that article, paid twice for their freedom due to a deceptive master. When the family relocated to Ohio, Mr. Jones’ father made sure that his four sons attended Oberlin College; the first college in the country to accept African American students. When J. M. Jones graduated from Oberlin in 1849 with a Bachelor of Science degree, he was the fourth African American to have achieved this high honor. Mr. Jones later moved to Chatham, Ontario, Canada, a thriving community of well-known African American residents, and abolition sympathizers. It was the hometown of the former runaway slave, Josiah Henson, featured in the famous book by Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. It was also an important Underground Railroad terminal, and home to Harriet Tubman. And it was the town where the very famous abolitionist, John Brown, planned his raid on Harpers Ferry, recruiting local Chatham men to participate in that raid.

One of the few men that participated with John Brown in planning that famous raid was Mr. J. M. Jones, a skilled gunsmith, engraver and Justice of the Peace for his county, whose connection to John Brown is outlined in The Canadian Magazine of Politics, Science, Art and Literature, Vol. 4, November 1894 to April 1895. In this lengthy article, the details of J. M. Jones involvement with the Chatham Convention of May 8th, 1858 are examined. At this convention, Mr. Jones and John Brown among others took an oath of secrecy, adopted and signed a constitution, and put forth their ambitious goal to gain freedom for 4 million slaves. There are sections in this article that offer insight into J. M. Jones, the man; as he narrates a portion of the details contained within the article, and included within are several sketches he penned and a handsome photograph of him.

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

310


Another interesting story published about J. M. Jones is the article written by James Gooding, publisher of the Canadian Journal of Arms Collecting, titled “The prince & the pistols: James Gunsmith Jones’ gift was fit for royalty. His patrimony was not.” This article describes an event in September of 1860, when a member of the English royal family, the Prince of Wales, future King Edward VII, was invited to tour the town of Chatham and accept a finely crafted pair of derringer pistols made by a local gunsmith and businessman. But it was only decided at the last minute, after the Prince had already arrived and been kept waiting by the local officials, that it would be unseemly to present these exquisite pistols to a member of the Royal family, simply because they had been crafted by a man of color. Apparently, the account was published in the Chatham Tri-weekly Planet, a local newspaper at the time. It is not known, as of this writing, if the presentation of these pistols was ever actually made. There also exists a letter dated March 15th, 1861, in the Library of Congress archives, from Mr. J. M. Jones to President Abraham Lincoln giving advice on the reconstruction of the South, and wishing for Mr. Lincoln in the final line of the letter, “.... a bloodless and prosperous administration.”; a rather ironic twist of fate, since President Lincoln was indeed killed with a similar type derringer, not too many years after this letter was delivered.

Mr. J. M. Jones’ work is stunning and extremely rare, seldom coming to auction, though Julia’s has had the pleasure of auctioning most every example known including this one, originally in 2010. Each individual piece is unique, but has recognizable embellishments that distinguish his craftsmanship from other gunsmiths’ work made during the same period. This particular derringer is considered a fantastic representation of his style and in beautiful “as found” condition. PROVENANCE: Copy of the reference The Canadian Magazine of Politics, Science, Art & Literature, 11/94-4/95(Vol 4)which documents Jones’ contribution to the abolition movement. CONDITION: Very fine plus. Bbl retains about all of its fine brown finish with visible Damascus pattern. Lockplate & hammer are dark case colors. Hammer screw is a replacement. Silver furniture is all cleaned bright. Stock has a hairline by the lockplate escutcheon, otherwise wood is sound showing light to moderate high point wear and retains most of its orig varnish. Mechanics are fine, strong dark bore. 52705-1 (7,500-10,000)

311

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1346. RARE NORTH & CHENEY FLINTLOCK PISTOL, SERIAL NUMBER 816. SN 816. Cal. 72. 8-5/8” rnd bbl marked “V/P” and “US” at breech. Bbl and tang each marked with full SN and assembly number “II”, also cut into back of bbl and breech. Assembly number “II” found on most external screws and inside bow of trigger guard. Further disassembly was not attempted to search for other markings as this gun is so well known with great collection history. Brass frame is marked underneath “NORTH & CHENEY BERLIN”. SN “816” marked inside frame. Like the frame, the butt cap is made of brass. Here is the opportunity to own the Rosetta Stone of United States martial pistols. Simeon North and Elisha Cheney signed a contract with the government to manufacture 500 pistols on March 8, 1799 and were the first pistols manufactured entirely by a contractor, as all previous procurements were assembled from parts either in storage or made by various people. These are truly the 1st American government contracted martial pistols. These new pistols were copied from the French Model 1777 Pistol with several improvements incorporated such as approximately 1/2” longer bbl and an additional screw securing the frame to the bbl. The first 500 were marked “S.NORTH & E. CHENEY BERLIN” along the brass frame while the second contract were marked “NORTH & CHENEY BERLIN”. With these first 500 pistols delivered by early 1800, a second contract was forthcoming to Simeon North and Elisha Cheney for 1,500 pistols dated February 6, 1800. The final delivery of the 1,500 pistols were delivered by mid-year 1801 and effectively launched Simeon North into his pistol making venture that lasted another 25 years. PROVENANCE: Pistol was originally purchased by Henry M. Stewart, 1950; Clay Bedford Collection, 1967; James Lucie; Eric Vaule offered for sale in “Gun Report”, June 1976; Outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker. CONDITION: Iron bbl and tang are in good condition with pitting clearly showing “VP” and “US” markings. Frizzen and hammer are well fit and functional with matching patina to bbl, as does frizzen spring. Ramrod appears to be replaced. Brass frame and butt cap are in very good condition with all markings sharp and clear with old cleaning, shows numerous nicks, dings and scratches from normal handling. Orig stock is correct having old repaired crack and minor chipping at frame, hand worn patina. An interesting inked note in channel by early collector Henry Stewart “H.M.STEWARTPURCHASED AUGUST 1950”. Pistol is orig flint. Considering that only about two dozen of these rare and historic martial pistols are known to exist of the 2,000 orig delivered, this gun being a 2nd Model in original flint with great collection history would make this an important addition to any advanced martial pistol collection. 51957-4 JS (30,00050,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

312


Session 1 1347. EXTREMELY RARE AND POSSIBLY UNIQUE SCHWEITZER “COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA” BRASS CANNON BARREL FLINTLOCK PISTOL, 1795. NSN. Cal. 54. 141/2” overall, 9” brass 2-stage cannon bbl. This unique, early-American contract pistol is quite well known, pictured in numerous texts and has good collection history. The gun appears in wonderful condition with fine aesthetics. The gun is brass mounted with the lines of a fine Kentucky pistol. Gun is well described in several texts. Bob Reilly describes this gun in his 1986 text United States Martial Flintlocks “Abraham Schweitzer (often spelled “Sweitzer”) was a skilled craftsman of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania who was born in 1769 and died in December, 1831. Several superb Pennsylvania rifles are known bearing his name and he is known to have delivered twelve rifles to the government under the contracts of 1792. Contract muskets of 1798 are also known which are stamped on the inside of the locks with Sweitzer’s name. The historic significance of this pistol cannot be overstated. It may be the sole survivor of yet uncovered contracts issued by Pennsylvania for pistols, and the use of the Liberty Cap proofmark dates the arm from 1799 at the latest, during which year it was discontinued in favor of the more commonly seen “CP” (Commonwealth of Pennsylvania) mark, placing this weapon in the same time frame as the Assembled pistol contracts of 1797 and 1798 as well as those produced by North and Cheney. The use of a brass cannon barrel on an American martial arm is completely unique, and interestingly, the ‘...return of military stores on hand...’ at Philadelphia, dated May 1, 1781, included ‘...93 brass pistol barrels.’ By 1793, a more logical date perhaps, for this pistol, the same returns showed a total of ‘...80 brass pistol barrels...’ still on hand. These figures provide conclusive evidence that brass barrels were, indeed, among the military stores of the era, and in combination with the Liberty Cap proofmark, may well make this not only the earliest known post-Revolutionary War contract pistol, but may place it with the earliest contract arms of any kind!”. PROVENANCE: Highlighted and described pgs 64-66 “US Martial Single Shot Pistols”, Hartzler & Whisker, 1997; Norm Flayderman Collection; Pictured and described “Historic Pistols, the American Martial Flintlock 1760-1845 by Smith & Bitter”, pgs 102 & 103; Reilly’s “United States Martial Flintlocks”, 1986, pgs 207 & 208; pictured in “Flayderman’s Guide to American Antique Firearms”, 9th Edition, 2007, pg 347. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun appears orig and matching with possible restoration of two battery screws. Iron is grey/silver overall with pitting. Brass has been cleaned with a light mustard patina. Bbl proofs are crisp including “Liberty Cap” over “P” and inspector “PG” (Peter Getz of Lancaster, PA) cartouche. Bbl is also marked “WISE” on top bbl flat which is thought possibly to be the officer or barrel maker’s name. The only other example known in this configuration is also marked in script “Simpson”. Walnut stock is sound and solid, one hairline just rear of lock, small ding, dents, scuffs and scratches expected after 200 years, with hand worn patina. Mechanically functional with clean smooth bore. 52304-6 JS (25,000-30,000) 313

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1348.

U.S. MODEL 1805 HARPERS FERRY PISTOL, SERIAL NUMBER 61. SN 61. Cal. 54. The Model 1805 pistol was the first American military handgun produced by a national armory. There were 4,096 guns made from 1806-1808 and they were issued in pairs with the same SN. This is a nice early example conforming to other guns with 10” rnd bbl, breech marked with raised eagle over “P” in a sunken oval behind a raised “US” in a sunken oval behind SN 61. Lock is marked “HARPERS/FERRY/1806” in vertical arcs behind cock. Under the pan is a spread-winged eagle facing toward the cock over “US”. Harpers Ferry brass furniture consisting of rear rammer pipe, trigger guard, buttcap and sideplate all of correct pattern and configuration. There is a cartouche “V/CW” (Charles Williams) on wood opposite the lock. Harpers Ferry Model 1805 pistols are among the most sought after U.S. sgl-shot martial pistols and this piece is a very pleasing example with crisp markings. Many collectors feel the lines of this gun are the finest of any collectible martial pistol such that the prestigious American Society of Arms Collectors adopted an image of this gun as their logo. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun appears all orig and correct, with especially crisp bbl markings. When this gun was cataloged in 2007, it was noted as an early re-conversion. Upon closer examination, gun appears orig with no discernible welds in bbl and lock parts all appear orig and matching. If this is a re-conversion, it’s undetectable. Lock also has well discerned markings with pitting. Bbl has been cleaned to a smooth, mottled grey/plum with pitting, especially around vent. Stock is sound, solid with discernible cartouche, hairline rear of escutcheon, hand worn patina. Brass cleaned with a light mustard patina. Mechanically sound with clear, smooth pitted bore. 52328-40 JS (10,000-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

314


Session 1 1349. U.S. MODEL 1805 HARPER’S FERRY PISTOL, SERIAL NUMBER 66. SN 66. Cal. 54. The Model 1805 pistol was the first American military handgun produced by a national armory. There were 4,096 guns made from 1806-1808 and they were issued in pairs with the same SN. This is a nice example conforming to other guns with 10” rnd bbl, breech marked with raised eagle over “P” in a sunken oval behind a raised “US” in a sunken oval behind SN 66. Lock is marked “HARPERS/FERRY/1806” in vertical arcs behind cock. Under the pan is a spread-winged eagle facing toward the cock over “US”. Harper’s Ferry brass furniture consisting of rear rammer pipe, trigger guard, buttcap, and sideplate all of correct pattern and configuration. There is a cartouche “V/CW” (Charles Williams) on wood opposite the lock. Harper’s Ferry Model 1805 pistols are among the most sought after U.S. sgl-shot martial pistols and this piece is a very pleasing example with crisp markings. Many collectors feel the lines of this gun are the finest of any collectible martial pistol such that the prestigious American Society of Arms Collectors adopted an image of this gun in their logo. PROVENANCE: Pictured in Gun Report, pg 10, 2004; Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall as reconverted from percussion. Otherwise, gun appears all orig and correct and as noted, especially crisp lock and bbl markings. Stock is sound, solid with crisp cartouche with hand worn patina over varnished stock. Mechanically sound with clear, smooth bore. 52328-36 JS (6,000-8,000)

1350. U.S. MODEL 1805 HARPERS FERRY PISTOL, SERIAL NUMBER 824. SN 824. Cal. 54. The Model 1805 pistol was the first American military handgun produced by a national armory. There were 4,096 guns made from 1806-1808 and they were issued in pairs with the same SN. This is a nice example in orig flint conforming to other guns with 10” rnd bbl, breech marked with raised eagle over “P” in a sunken oval behind a raised “US” in a sunken oval behind SN 824. Lock is marked “HARPERS/FERRY/1807” in vertical arcs behind cock. Under the pan is a spread-winged eagle facing toward the cock over “US”. Harper’s Ferry brass furniture consisting of rear rammer pipe, trigger guard, buttcap and sideplate all of correct pattern and configuration along with correct iron ramrod thimble. There is a script cartouche “V/JS” ( James Stubblefield) on wood opposite the lock. Harper’s Ferry Model 1805 pistols are among the most sought after U.S. sgl-shot martial pistols and this piece is a very pleasing example with crisp markings. Many collectors feel the lines of this gun are the finest of any collectible martial pistol such that the prestigious American Society of Arms Collectors adopted an image of this gun in their logo. PROVENANCE: Walter Nee Collection, 2005; Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun appears. Otherwise, gun appears all orig and correct with possible exception of ramrod. Especially crisp lock and bbl markings. Stock is sound, solid with discernible script cartouche and hand worn patina. Mechanically sound with clear, smooth pitted bore. 52328-37 JS (8,000-12,000)

315

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1351. US MODEL 1805 HARPERS FERRY FLINTLOCK PISTOL, NEW TO MARKET, JUST DISCOVERED. SN 881. Cal. 54. This is considered among the most beautiful and aesthetically pleasing of American martial pistols. The prestigious American Society of Arms Collectors chose this gun in profile as their logo. These guns were made in pairs between 1806 and 1808 with a total production of about 4,000 guns with each gun of a pair having same serial number. This gun is in the normal configuration of other guns in this pattern with 10” rnd bbl, breech marked with raised eagle over “P” in a sunken oval behind a raised “US” in a sunken oval behind SN 881. Lock is marked “HARPERS/FERRY/1807” in vertical arcs behind cock. Under the pan is a spread-winged eagle facing toward the cock over “US”. This gun appears all orig and authentic with excellent markings as can be seen in photos. The orig flint mechanism is complete and orig. The wood opposite the lock is marked with script inspector initials “V” over “JS” ( James Stubblefield). This gun as noted is from Southern estate is not listed in “Harpers Ferry Arsenal and Joseph Perkin The Classic Arms of the Early Years”, 2012, Hudak. This gun appears “as found” with exceptionally fine good markings. This would be a great addition to any collection. CONDITION: Very good overall with metal being gray overall with scattered areas of staining, rust and pitting, tool mark at breech unaffecting aesthetics. Brass mounts have light/medium mustard patina with numerous tiny dents and scratches. Markings on lock are well struck and all discernible. Bbl markings “US” “eaglehead” over P” and “881”are good and discernible. Stock is sound and solid with good discernible inspector marks opposite lock and Mechanically sound with smooth pitted bore. 52754-1 JS (15,000-20,000)

1352. US MODEL 1805 HARPERS FERRY FLINTLOCK PISTOL. SN 1283. Cal. 54. This particular gun, SN 1283, was unknown to the collectors market prior to this sale and is not listed in any of the literature including the 2012 text by Hudak on the Harpers Ferry 1805’s. The consignor states this gun has been in his family for multiple generations and is in beautiful “as found” condition with fine markings, especially crisp markings on bbl, lock and stock. Gun in standard configuration with 10” rnd bbl, SNd 1283 and two raised cartouche inspector marks at breech “US” and “eagle head” over “P”. Lock is marked with “eagle” over “US” forward of cock and rear of cock “HARPERS / FERRY /1807”. The wood opposite the lock is marked with script inspector’s initials “V” over “JS” ( James Stubblefield). CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun appears all orig and authentic with dark mottled plum/grey patina with staining and pitting with exception of the cock which is a cast replacement. No wonder this rare martial survived as well as it had no cock for firing. The consignor was unaware of this replacement and states it had been in this configuration since he was a child. Stock is sound with hand worn patina with about a 2” crack opposite lock and scattered cosmetic blemishes not affecting aesthetics. There is a “3 / WR” stamped in stock on right just above buttcap. There is a small chip in brass ramrod thimble. All-in-all, this is a superior gun that would be worth finding an orig hammer. Mechanically fine with smooth pitted bore. 52683-1 JS (15,000-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

316


Session 1 1353.

US MODEL 1805 HARPERS FERRY FLINTLOCK PISTOL. SN 1820. Cal. 54. This is considered among the most beautiful and aesthetically pleasing of American martial pistols. The prestigious American Society of Arms Collectors chose this gun in profile as their logo. These guns were made in pairs between 1806 and 1808 with a total production of about 4,000 guns with each gun of a pair having same serial number. This particular gun is among the last 200 pair made in 1808 bearing the serial number 1820. This gun is in the normal configuration of other guns in this pattern with 10” rnd bbl, breech marked with raised eagle over “P” in a sunken oval behind a raised “US” in a sunken oval behind SN 1820. Lock is marked “HARPERS/FERRY/1808” in vertical arcs behind cock. Under the pan is a spread-winged eagle facing toward the cock over “US”. This gun appears all orig and authentic with excellent markings as can be seen in photos. The orig flint mechanism is complete and orig. The wood opposite the lock is marked with script inspector initials “V” over “JS” ( James Stubblefield). This gun appears “as found” with old cleaning to metal with exceptionally fine lock markings. This would be a great addition to any collection. PROVENANCE: Pictured on pg 86 “Harpers Ferry Arsenal and Joseph Perkin The Classic Arms of the Early Years”, 2012, Hudak. CONDITION: Very good overall with metal being gray overall with scattered areas of staining, rust and pitting. Brass mounts which also show old cleaning have light mustard colored patina with numerous tiny dents and scratches. Markings on lock are well struck and all discernible. Bbl markings “US 1820” are discernible though worn as can be seen in photos. Stock is sound and solid with good discernible inspector marks opposite lock and “MB” stamped on right side, just above buttcap at edge of tail of trigger guard. There is some wallowing around the slot for bbl to stock locking key. Mechanically sound with smooth pitted bore. 52304-4 JS164 (15,00020,000) 317

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1354.

LAST PAIR OF U.S. MODEL 1805 HARPERS FERRY PISTOL, SERIAL NUMBER 2048, LAST PAIR MADE. 1) HARPERS FERRY 1805. SN 2048. Cal. 54. The Model 1805 pistol was the first American military handgun produced by a national armory. There were 4,096 guns made from 1806-1808 and they were issued in pairs with the same SN, first SN “1”, last SN “2048” and this is the last pair. Both are IN nice orig flint conforming to other guns with 10” rnd bbl, breech marked with raised eagle over “P” in a sunken oval behind a raised “US” in a sunken oval behind SN 2048. Locks are marked “HARPERS/ FERRY/1808” in vertical arcs behind cock. Under the pan is a spread-winged eagle facing toward the cock over “US”. Harpers Ferry brass furniture consisting of rear rammer pipe, trigger guard, buttcap and sideplate all of correct pattern and configuration. There is a weak script cartouche “V/JS” ( James Stubblefield) on wood opposite the lock. This gun is featured on pg 45 of The Gun’s of Harper’s Ferry, Stuart Brown and the more recent text on pg 96, 126-130 Harpers Ferry Arsenal and Joseph Perkins The Classic Arms of the Early Years, Rich Hudak, 2012. The example just recently discovered in 2011. PROVENANCE: Jim Wertenberger Collection; Rick Hudak Collection; Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun appears all orig with crisp markings other than inspectors cartouche in stock which is still visible in outline. Stock is well fit with hand worn patina. Iron overall is a mottled grey with crisp markings. Brass has a light mustard patina overall. Functional with smooth clear bore. 2) HARPERS FERRY 1805. SN 2048. This gun was actually previously known, but because the “4” in SN 2048 is not easily discerned, it took a bit of detective work to realize what it was. This pair has the most intriguing story which is found on the provenance link on website, which is a narrative from Harper Ferry Arsenal and Joseph Perkin The Classic Arms of the Early Years, Rick Hudak, 2012. What an opportunity to own the final pair of the most aesthetically pleasing of all American patterns of martial flintlock revolvers. These are not only very fine guns but the last pair made in exemplary condition with great collection history. PROVENANCE: Jim Wertenberger Collection; Rick Hudak Collection, 2011; Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun appears orig and matching with good markings, with exception of the SN which on other example is extremely well struck. I imagine this was the very last gun made and whoever did the final serialization was tired and that’s why the numbers are only partially struck, though the US cartouche is exceptionally deep. Lock markings are excellent and script inspectors cartouche “V / JS” ( James Stubblefield) is excellent and barely discerned on its mate. Like its mate, this gun is functional with clear smooth bore. 52328-38, 52328-39 JS (20,000-30,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

318


Session 1 1355. RARE 1809 DATED VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY 1st MODEL PISTOL, 3rd VIRGINIA REGIMENT. NSN. Cal. 69. 12-1/4” rnd bbl. Marked on left side of breech with a raised “W” in rectangular cartouche and “P”. “W” denotes Master Armorer George Williamson. Top of bbl at breech dated “1809” and regimentally marked forward of date “3’ VA REG”. Bottom of bbl is heavily pitted and no discernible marks were found. Orig ramrod retention spring still attached to bbl. Bbl is orig flint, as is the lock. Lock is marked “VIRGINIA / Manufactory” underneath the iron pan. Stamped vertically behind the cock “RICHMOND / 1809” (“1” not discernible). Inside lock plate stamped “A” and “IIV”. Front band, buttcap and sideplate are numbered “IIII” on inside. Trigger guard was not removed as it was pinned and probably has same matching number. Bbl tang is marked “V”. In 1809, there were 260 pistols made. It is difficult to find these guns in orig flint, especially with the very desirable Virginia Regimental markings. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Gun appears all orig with exception of top jaw and top jaw screw. Metal is dark with iron patina with pitting overall, but lock and bbl markings are crisp and discerned. Walnut stock is fairly sound and well fit with a well disguised crack repair, about 2” above buttcap and buttcap has internal putty repair. Edges worn and slightly rounded, hand worn patina. Mechanically functional with smooth pitted bore. 52328-32 JS (8,000-12,000)

1356. 1812 DATED 2nd MODEL VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY FLINTLOCK PISTOL. NSN. Cal. 58. 10-1/8” unmarked bbl externally and the bottom is marked “5555” with hash mark. Lock is marked reading in two vertical curves behind the cock “RICHMOND/1812” and forward of cock “VIRGINIA”. Inside the lock is stamped “H” and reversed “E” and each internal part is marked with a small cryptic “S” or “5”. All lock components appear orig with exception of a well restored frizzen. Same cryptic found internally is also found stamped on inside of cock. Walnut stock is marked opposite the lock with pair of small initials,appears to be “JJ”. Furniture consists of a brass sideplate, trigger guard, buttcap, ramrod pipe and inset band near the tail pipe are orig to this gun. Inside trigger bow is stamped “5555”. Only 386 Virginia Manufactory pistols were made in 1812 and orig flint examples are rarely found, this is a beautiful example with great collection history and fine markings and aesthetics. PROVENANCE: O.J. Bierly, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, 1933; Malcolm MacFarlane, Sewickley, PA, 1954; pictured in “A Pictorial History of U.S. Single Shot Martial Pistols”, Kalman & Patterson, 1957; C. Meade Patterson Collection, Arlington, VA; Conestoga Auctions, Lot 17, November 11, 1999; Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Bbl has been cleaned externally with overall plum/brown patina with staining and pitting. Brass is fairly smooth with dark mustard patina. Stock is sound and solid with about a 1” hairline at underlock at rear, fairly crisp edges, hand worn patina. Frizzen has welded repair, probably an old part that has been repaired and utilized on this gun. Old notes state the top jaw and top jaw screw, frizzen, frizzen spring and screw are replacement “old parts”. Without these notes, I would not have questioned any part other than frizzen and frizzen spring screw. The ramrod is a restoration, however swivel appears orig. Mechanically sound with clear pitted bore. 52328-33 JS (8,000-12,000)

319

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1357. RARE SIMEON NORTH 1808 NAVY CONTRACT PISTOL WITH LARGE BAG GRIP. SN 622. Cal. 64. 16-1/4” overall, 10-1/8” rnd bbl. 5-1/2” lock marked with eagle over “U.STATES.” forward of cock and at tail “S.NORTH / BERLIN / CON.”. Gun has brass mounts with 5-1/4” belt hook. Bbl is unmarked externally like other examples noted. Gun is SNd internally on breech “622” and still retains some of the orig brown finish on bottom of bbl as this model was orig all finished brown. Bottom of bbl marked with series of assembly marks including “II”, “VII” and “IIII” along with double set of punch marks. Breech is marked with 3 punch marks opposite SN. Stock mortise for backstrap is serialized “622” with “IIII” forward and “II” rear. Bbl is marked with 3 punch marks and lock mortise is marked “VII”. Lock parts including screws are marked “I”. Trigger guard has “II” stamped rear of bow. Escutcheon has small letter “K” and belt loop has 2 internal punch marks. About 2,000 pistols were made by North under the 1808 contract, in several variations; this example being the most often seen. These guns sold in pairs, most likely having matching SNs like Model 1805 US pistols. These pistols were the first pistols produced by Simeon North after completion of the North & Cheney arms. Most are converted to percussion. This is a scare survivor in orig flint with orig belt hook. CONDITION: Very good overall, orig flint. Metal overall has been cleaned, iron is grey/bright overall with mottled surface with pitting. Gun appears orig and complete with exception of restored 3-3/4” of forestock and brass pipe. Matching assembly numbers are found throughout as noted. Lock markings discernible though eagle is weak. Stock is sound and solid with hand worn patina and restored 3-1/4” as noted of forestock. Restored brass pipe matches color of brass buttcap, trigger guard, pan and lock escutcheon. Mechanically functional with smooth clear bore. 52414-3 (7,0008,000)

1358. RARE NORTH MODEL 1811 ARMY WITH WICKHAM BAND MODIFICATION. NSN. Cal. 71. 15” overall, 8-7/8” bbl marked on breech. “P / US / 1774”. This 1774 is a rack number of sorts. Lock- plate marked with eagle above “U.STATES” forward of cock and at tail “S.NORTH / BERLIN / CON.”. Tang is marked “P” just forward of screw. Gun is brass mounted with walnut stock, inspection mark opposite lock “V / HHP” (Henry H. Perkins). Only several hundred of the Model 1811 had the Wickham band modification. Sam Smith in his text Historic Pistols The American Martial Flintlock 1760-1845, 1986, pg 146, states “It has been estimated that only 300 or so of the 2,000 pistols were so modified”. PROVENANCE: Stephen D’Arrigo, Jr. Collection. CONDITION: Very good overall. Iron is overall grey with mottled patina, slightly brighter on bbl than lock. Markings all crisp and discernible, orig flint. Replaced top jaw and top jaw screw. Well disguised inset of wood above lockplate, crack repair between lockplate escutcheon and bbl. Otherwise, stock is sound and solid with cosmetic blemishes unaffecting aesthetics with hand worn patina. Mechanically sound with smooth clear pitted bore. 52414-4 JS (7,000-9,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

320


Session 1 1359. MODEL 1826 SIMEON NORTH FLINTLOCK NAVY PISTOL DATED 1828. NSN. Cal 54. This an honest, complete example of the scarce Navy Flintlock pistol made between 1826 and 1829 in orig flint with total production of about 3,000 guns. This example conforms to others with 8-5/8” rnd bbl, brass blade front sight iron mounted, 3” belt hook, captive swivel ramrod and measuring 13-1/4” overall. Bbl is marked “US / AH / P” (Asabel Hubbard). This example is marked forward of hammer “U.S. / S. NORTH” and dated “1828” behind the hammer. Stock has inspectors cartouche opposite lock “ET” (Elisha Tobey). This particular model in orig flint is quite scarce. CONDITION: Very good overall, appears complete and orig. Metal is mottled grey patina overall with staining and pitting, though marks are crisp and discernible. Stock is well fit with hand worn patina, discernible cartouche with several dings, dents and other minor cosmetic blemishes. Mechanically sound with smooth pitted bore. 52414-2 (5,000-7,000)

1360. EXTREMELY FINE MODEL 1836 U.S. MARTIAL FLINTLOCK PISTOL. NSN. Cal. 54. This is as fine an “R. JOHNSON”, Middleton, CT sgl-shot martial flint pistol you will find. This gun conforms to the usual configuration having 8-1/2” rnd smooth bore bbl, brass blade front sight, oval shaped rear sight on the bbl tang with an overall length of about 14”. Gun is iron mounted with swivel-type steel ramrod. Lockplate is flat and beveled ahead of the hammer marked “US/R JOHNSON/ MIDDn CONN/1842”. Proof stampings on the breech of the bbl are “US/JH/P” ( James Harris). Small subinspector mark “B” is found on trigger guard, bbl and stock. This was the last US martial flint pistol manufactured. Norm Flayderman states in his Guide to American Antique Firearms “Many collectors regard this as the best made, most attractive and best performing of all U.S. military flint handguns. It was standard issue handgun during the Mexican War and continued to see extensive use, converted to percussion, in the Civil War.” Even though 41,000 of these guns were made between 1836 and 1844, most were converted to percussion and few survive as orig flint in as fine condition as this gun. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Bbl and iron mountings are overall bright/grey with scattered areas of staining. Case hardened lock and breech retain traces of their case colors in protected areas. Stock is fine and solid, hand worn patina, raised grain with two bright well-struck cartouches “JCB” (Lt. John C. Beaumont) and “WAT” (William A. Thornton). Bore is bright and shiny and mechanically crisp. 52328-34 JS (2,750-3,750)

321

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1361. FINE 18th CENTURY FLINTLOCK EUROPEAN PISTOL. NSN. Cal. 20 bore. Beautiful brass mounted French-style 15” overall, with 9-3/4” slightly swamped 2-stage rifled bbl. Gun is mounted in well figured stock with cast relief mounts with panoply of arms, masks, with lion faced buttcap. The breech is brass with a raised sight and front sight is 4-legged brass inset with brass blade. Stock has relief carving and moldings. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Gun appears orig, complete and authentic with a fairly smooth iron patina, light mustard to brass. There’s an old putty repair to stock with small reductions at rear and top of lock. Ramrod is replaced, otherwise complete. Only markings discernible are on lock “NIQUET / LE LEUNE”. Mechanically fine with clean rifled bore. 51821-2 JS (1,500-2,000)

1362. ELEGANT 18th CENTURY EUROPEAN FLINTLOCK OFFICER’S PISTOL. NSN. Cal. 70. 19” overall, 12” 2-stage bbl with brass blade sight. Gun is brass mounted with lock escutcheon in shape of a sea serpent. Gun has incised and raised relief carving with no external proofs. CONDITION: Very good overall. Brass has medium mustard patina; steel is a mottled grey with staining and pitting. Stock is well fit with light insect damage. Putty repair at rear of trigger guard. There has been an added spur mounted to top jaw screw for added ease in cocking. Gun appears orig and matching with good action and smooth clear bore. 51821-1 JS (800-1,200)

RARE AND FINE “WAR OF 1812” US 1363. REGULATION NAVAL BATTLE AX. Desirable early 19th century naval boarding ax stamped on 5” blade “U.S., NYW, JT”. The “NYW” denotes manufacture at the Navy Yard Washington. “JT” stands for the inspector, Captain Joseph Tarbell (1780-1815), who inspected naval weapons at the Navy Yard during the War of 1812. Hasp is almost 2” long with correct bulbous end. Identical specimen is noted on pg 3 in Col. Robert Rankin’s text Small Arms of the Sea Services, 1972 and notes that these are quite rare. This is among one of the nicest examples that I have encountered. There is a thick layer of old black paint covering iron which appears contemporary to time in the Navy. We know that naval arms were continuously painted to protect from sea salt. The markings are much better then normally seen and the haft has a fine surface. CONDITION: Very good to fine overall. Iron is fairly smooth with areas of pitting visible below paint though mostly smooth. Haft is sound and solid with hand worn patina, the only defect being a large 1-1/2” chip out of bulbous end of haft on reverse. 52693-1 JS (7,000-9,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

322


Session 1 Lot 1364 323

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


1364.

Session 1

EXTREMELY RARE AND FINE ARCHIVE OF AMERICAN PATRIOT JOHN GLEN, Jr. WHICH INCLUDES HIS INSCRIBED REVOLUTIONARY WAR AMERICAN SILVER MOUNTED, FLINTLOCK OFFICER’S FUSIL. The treasure in this archive is, perhaps, the finest known example of an American made fusil of the American Revolutionary War period. The maple stocked fusil has its original commercial flintlock marked “JOVER” and the 38 ½” 65 caliber smooth bore barrel has Birmingham proofs. All of the mountings are nonhallmarked silver with relief Rococo design and fine chiseled martial engraving. The ornate thumbplate has Glen’s initials in the 18th century style where “I’s” and “J’s” are interchangeable, “JGJr”. The sole of the buttplate is engraved in large block letters “JOHN GLEN Jr”. There is fine relief carving at the barrel tang. The overall architecture of the gun is superb. This fusil presents beautifully and was made for a man of means. It represents the finest achievement in mid 18th century American gun making. Col. John Glen Jr (1735-1828) was Quarter Master of the Continental Army of the Northern Department and was a close associate of George Washington, who on occasion stayed at the Glen Plantation in New York. Glen had prior service in the French and Indian Wars in various New York units from 1755. Archive also includes two documents: one bureaucratic signed by John Glen Sr October 21, 1745 and the second is a fine archivally framed document dated 1758, appointing John Glen Jnr as 2nd Lieutenant of the 3rd Company of Militia of Schenectady, signed by James Delancy, the British Lieutenant-Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Province of New York. The chair, which is a typical New England mid-18th century splat back chair, was in the Glen home when Commander-in-Chief George Washington visited and stayed there in 1775 during the Revolutionary War and at other times according to provided research. General Washington could very well have sat in this chair and could have handled this wonderful fusil that no doubt was a prized possession. After the Revolutionary War, the area around the Glen home was renamed “Glen’s Falls, NY’ a name by which it is known today. The area was originally named Wing’s Falls, but Abraham Wing was not the ardent patriot as John Glen and John Glen was a patriot! There is a large file of research concerning the naming of “Glen’s Falls” and also information concerning George Washington’s visits to Col. Glen’s house and provenance on this archive. PROVENANCE: Montreal auction (1970s) of Glen Family items, descended in John Glen’s Jr’s oldest son’s family who were Torries and relocated to Canada prior to the War of 1812. Ex-collection Mark Berube, 2000; Alan Para collection, 2009. CONDITION: Fusil is very good to fine overall. Metal surfaces are dark grey/brown with light pitting. The wood has a rich, mellow, hand-worn patina. The silver mounts have a soft grey patina with minor losses from over 250 years. In the accompanying 2013 appraisal document by well known American Revolutionary War, Kentucky rifle expert and collector Stephen Hench of Lancaster, PA he states: “To the best of my knowledge, there is no finer, documented silver mounted American officer’s fusil from the Revolutionary war than this surviving example of John Glen Jr’s”. Framed commission is very good, complete with seal and stamp. Contemporary 2009 carved powder horn made for display purposes is in fine condition made in the style of 1759 when Glen was in the militia during the French and Indian Wars. Chair- old multiple coats of paint removed. Proper left side of splat absent. Seat remains mostly intact with normal and expected wear. 52610-1 JS (40,000-50,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

324


Session 1 1365. RARE AND MASSIVE AMERICAN COLONIAL ERA SWIVEL BLUNDERBUSS, CIRCA 1700. NSN. Cal. 1.5”. Weighs 23-1/2 lbs including yoke, 46-1/4” overall, 28” brass bbl with 2” flared cannon muzzle, bore 1.5” overall. This impressive early blunderbuss, once in the well known collection of Norm Flayderman, has few comparables. Stock is New England style “fish belly” seen on other early 17th century American arms. Harold Peterson, on pg 41 of his 1956 text, Arms and Armor in Colonial America, 1526-1783 states “The blunderbuss has always been associated with 17th century American in the popular mind. Actually, however, the weapon was little used in this country before the 18th century. It was too specialized an arm for widespread use, and the particular conditions under which it was most useful were seldom encountered. An idea of its popularity may be obtained from the 1678 military inventory of Maryland arms referred above. In that list, there is only one blunderbuss listed out of a total of 791 arms. As late as 1694, Maryland listed only “one old Iron Blunderbuss without a Lock” and one fixt Brass blunderbuss.” It was not until the 18th century brought greater urbanization and increased naval activity that the blunderbuss achieved any prominence among American weapons”. Regardless, this is a fine example of an early swivel blunderbuss that few examples are extant and this specimen is in beautiful, orig condition. CONDITION: Very good overall. Iron, trigger guard, breech, lock and bbl band have smooth dark patina with pitting. The iron yoke is a restoration with matching patina. Brass bbl has medium mustard patina with clear unknown markings “MA / 810”. Stock is sound with numerous small worm holes and several hairlines in forestock of which a couple have been glue repaired. Gun is functional with clear smooth bore. Brass tipped ramrod appears orig with iron base; wood shaft has matching hand worn patina to stock. 52043-4 JS (8,000-12,000)

1366. 18th CENTURY NEW ENGLAND CLUB BUTT FOWLER. NSN. Cal. 80. 581/2” overall, 43” rnd bbl with blade front sight and sighting line cut into breech. Brass mounted with no buttplate on walnut stock. Similar guns are pictured in several texts on American Revolutionary War era arms. Harold Peterson in his text Arms and Armor in Colonial America, pg 46 describes similar guns as “LONG FOWLERS”. These very early fowlers were very simple, utilitarian weapons/food gatherers that never even had a buttplate and existent from the 17th century into the early 19th century. Peterson further states, this particular butt shape, is only found on New England guns”. This is a pleasing example with nice aesthetics. CONDITION: Very good overall. Probable re-conversion with replaced external lock components. Metal has dark smooth iron patina. Brass has mustard color with old cleaning. Stock sound and solid with old refinish, several repaired cracks in forestock and replaced wood forward of stock. Mechanically sound with smooth pitted bore. 52304-1 (7,000-9,000)

325

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1367.

RARE AND FINE REGIMENTALLY MARKED 1st MODEL BROWN BESS MUSKET. NSN. Cal. 78. 46” bbl. Breech has inspection and initials “FG” with broad arrow proof. Engraved on top of bbl “Po Dn Ms”(Portsmouth Division of Marines). The Royal Marines were founded in 1764 in 3 divisions, Chatham, Portsmouth, and Plymouth. During the American Revolutionary War, John Pitcairn commanded the 300 Marines at battle of Bunker Hill where he was killed and was buried at Old North Church in Boston. Lock marked with “crown” over “GR” and broad arrow under pan and behind the cock is “GRICE” and “1758” in 2-lines. Gun is in beautiful “as found” condition with rich patina to the brass mounts. Iron is dark with good markings. Full length stock with four pipes and correct ramrod. Stock is exceptionally nice, still retaining British storekeeper markings. This is a rare long land pattern Bess that was made at the time of the French and Indian Wars and continued to be used through the Revolutionary War and so rare in that it could have been at Bunker Hill where the Royal Marines in front of the action. Bess’ in this condition, of this era, are even difficult to find in England. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun appears complete and orig, though lock components appear added with smoother surfaces than bbl and lock. Gun was not dis-assembled for further inspection but the fit shows that all major components appear orig to gun. Stock is sound and solid with hand worn patina, cosmetic blemishes do not affect the overall aesthetics with hand worn patina. There are small six sets of three initials “GRT” in right buttstock behind storekeeper marks that unknown meaning to this cataloger but have been there since the time of use as patina and wood surfaces are the same. Brass components have a dark mustard/olive patina with rack numbers engraved on top of buttplate; thumbplate is blank. 5232847 JS (6,500-9,500)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

326


1369.

RARE 1812 DATED HARPERS FERRY MODEL 1795 FLINTLOCK MUSKET. NSN. Cal. 69. 44-1/4” rnd bbl with proofs at breech and partially discernible SN. Lock is well marked with small eagle with “US” inside shield forward of cock and “HARPERS / FERRY / 1812” behind cock. Harpers Ferry produced almost 100,000 muskets between 1806-1818, 10,200 in 1812, but rarely are complete examples found. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Fair to good overall. Gun appears orig and complete though lock which appears orig flint is better than the rest of the gun. This appears to be a reconversion utilizing a complete orig lock. Metal overall is a mottled brown/grey with good lock markings and partially discernible bbl markings including eagle head, “S” from US cartouche, “V” and SN which in part reads “841”. Stock appears orig and complete with several cracks including crack repair to left side of forestock between front bands, refinished with varnish finish. Mechanically functional with smooth clear bore. 52328-45 JS (3,500-4,500)

327

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1368. RARE 1809 DATED MODEL 1795 HARPERS FERRY FLINTLOCK MUSKET. SN 914. Cal. 69. Early Harpers Ferry’s pre-War of 1812 are always difficult to find in all models. This musket has 441/2” rnd bbl with discernible “US” and eagle head over “P” proofs along with SN “914”. This gun has a particularly nice “as found” look with exception of obvious re-conversion from percussion. 7,348 muskets were made at Harpers Ferry in 1809, but few survive in complete condition. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Good overall. Metal is overall mottled grey and bright where protected. Markings are discernible, including the early Federal eagle over “US” forward of cock and “HARPERS / FERRY / 1809” rear of cock. Lock components are all replaced. Stock is sound with hand worn patina, several hairlines and crack repair above lock. Inspector stamp discernible forward of lock and rear of trigger guard and script cartouche can be discerned opposite lock. Mechanically functional with pitted smooth bore. 52328-44 JS (3,500-4,500)


Session 1 1370.

1815 DATED HARPERS FERRY MODEL 1803 FLINTLOCK RIFLE. NSN. Cal. 54. 33-1/8” half rnd-half oct bbl having a V-notch rear sight mounted 8” forward of the breech and a brass sight mounted 1-3/4” from the muzzle. The left top breech is stamped with a raised “US” and an eagle head over “P” in sunken ovals. The iron rib holds a brass ramrod pipe at the stock, with a middle iron pipe, a forward one also of iron that is slightly flared and retains the orig iron ramrod. The trigger guard, forestock inset band, sideplate, buttplate and patchbox are brass having the proper latch device on the patchbox operated from an iron button located behind the top brass buttplate screw. The lock plate is marked with an eagle facing the cock with a “US” within the shield on the eagle’s breast. Behind the cock in 3-lines is “HARPERS/FERRY/1815”. The orig walnut stock is nicely marked with the script “JS” ( James Stubblefield) and “V” over “AT” at tail of wood opposite the lock. Behind the trigger guard is “SN”. This is a fine example of a scarce Harpers Ferry with excellent markings, orig finish and “as found”. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun appears orig and complete with strong areas of orig browning visible on bbl. The metal is in very good orig condition with the iron parts having a dark brown/plum patina. Brass has a mix of light mustard to dark olive patina. Stock is sound with several cosmetic blemishes, small hairline behind lock and reduction just below lock tail as seen in photos, hand worn patina with discernible inspectors marks and cartouche. Rifling in bore is crisp and well discerned. Gun is mechanically sound. 52328-54 JS (10,00012,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

328


Session 1 1371.

RARE 1816 DATED 1803 HARPERS FERRY FLINTLOCK RIFLE. NSN. Cal. 54. seven groove rifling, 33” half-rnd/ half-oct bbl having a V-notch rear sight mounted 8-1/2” forward of the breech and a brass sight mounted 1-1/2” from the muzzle. The left top breech is stamped with a raised “US” and an eagle head over “P” in sunken ovals. The iron rib holds a brass ramrod pipe at the stock, with a middle iron pipe, a forward one also of iron that is slightly flared and retains the orig iron ramrod. The trigger guard, forend stock band, sideplate, buttplate and patchbox are brass having the proper latch device on the patch box operated from an iron button located behind the top brass butt plate screw. The lock plate is marked with an eagle facing the cock with a clear “US” within the shield on the eagle’s breast. Behind the cock in 3-lines is “HARPERS/ FERRY/1816” reading vertically. Inside the lock are the initials “V/GM” and a numeral “3”. The orig black walnut stock is nicely marked with the script “JS” ( James Stubblefield) and “AT” at tail of wood opposite the lock. Behind the trigger guard is “CL”. PROVENANCE: William Gerber Collection, Memphis, TN; Robert Howard Estate Collection, 1991. CONDITION: The metal is in very good original condition having been once lightly cleaned with the iron parts having a nice aged color but not a dark patina. The rifling is excellent. The stock is in very good condition, having been refinished with a coat of varnish, probably when some wood restoration around the butt plate tang was done. There is a 2” x 1” area in front of the toe of the butt stock that has been replaced and a 1/2” x 1” area in front and around of the butt plate tang that has also been replaced. The brass furniture is very nice and again showing its age but not dark. There is a 2” stress crack along the side plate area that originates near the breech of the bbl and runs through the rear lock screw terminating just above the trigger pin. 52304-5 (10,000-12,000)

329

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1372. VERY RARE STATE OF NEW YORK SURCHARGED US MODEL 1814 CONTRACT FLINTLOCK RIFLE MUSKET. NSN. Cal. 54. Rare flintlock rifle even though 1,300 were delivered, few survived. This rifle conforms to unique configuration with 33-3/8” oct-rnd bbl, brass dovetailed Rocky Mountain front sight and fixed rear sight. Top flat over chamber area is marked “SNY” and “V”. Right top flat is stamped “HHP” (Henry H. Perkins). Left top flat has large “P” over “US” proof. Lockplate measures 5-3/16” with beveled edges and convex surfaced cock with heart-shaped hole in its reinforced throat. Lock is marked forward of hammer “R. Johnson / US”. Mounted in a 1-pc walnut stock secured by three bbl bands with unique, short band springs. Stock is stamped “JP” ( James Perkins) behind trigger bow. Stock has two initial cartouche which is really not discernible but should be “LS” (Luther Sage). 4-1/2” x 1-1/4” iron oval patchbox has piano hinge at the bottom. Iron trigger guard has two diagonal finger ridges behind the trigger bow. This is a nice example; orig and complete, of a difficult pattern to find in orig flint and fine aesthetic condition. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Gun has good matching look from muzzle to butt, iron is overall a mottled grey/bright surface with crisp markings. Stock is sound and solid with hairline forward of lock, 1-1/2” inset left side behind bbl at tang, hand worn patina, some raised grain and small sanded area behind cheekpiece. The grain is somewhat open making the cartouche difficult if not impossible to discern. Mechanics are fine with crisp, rifling in bore. 52304-2 JS (9,000-11,000)

1373. EXCEPTIONAL MODEL 1817 U.S. MILITARY RIFLE. NSN. Cal. 54. This is an extremely fine, possibly the best example extant of a scarce Model 1817 contract rifle made by Robert Johnson retaining virtually all of its orig bright finish, un-fired with near new crisp shiny bore. It would be difficult, if not impossible, to upgrade this example. Gun conforms to the usual configuration with 36” rnd bbl fastened by three steel bands. Iron mountings finished brown including bbl, bands, buttplate, patchbox and trigger guard. Lock, frizzen and hammer are case hardened retaining much of their bright colors. Lock is maker marked and dated “1825” and “R. & J.D. Johnson Middleton, CT.” Bbl tang has matching date of “1825”, inspector marks, “US”, “JW” ( Joseph Weatherhead) and “P” proof in serrated raised cartouche. Stock has inspectors cartouche opposite the lock, script “JW” ( Joseph Weatherhead). Small sub-inspector initials are found on most other parts of gun including stock, trigger guard, bbl & buttplate. CONDITION: Overall extremely fine, all orig, authentic and matching. Bbl, patchbox, buttplate and trigger guard retain about 98% of its orig reddish brown finish with only minor scratches and other blemishes. Bands, sideplate and ramrod are armory bright, though middle band has a more mottled finish and an unusual proof of a small circle around a “C” that is not en suite with other components for color on fit, though close. Lock, hammer and frizzen retain much of their orig muted case hardened finish. Frizzen shows absolute no use or any scratching on friction pad showing gun was probably never fired. Stock is sound and solid with crisp cartouche and sharp edges, scattered small storage dings, dents and scratches. Mechanically gun functions well with crisp action and bright shiny crisp bore. 52304-3 JS (15,000-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

330


1375. EXTREMELY RARE 1st MODEL VIRGINIA MANUFACTORY RIFLE WITH RATTLESNAKE PATCHBOX. NSN. Cal. 48. No doubt the most iconic patchbox on any American military arm is 1st Model Virginia Manufactory like this one with 4-pc iron patchbox terminating in rattlesnake’s head, rattlesnake’s body on lid and “DON’T TREAD ON ME” engraved on either side of lid. Giles Cromwell, in his exemplary text The Virginia Manufactory of Arms, 1975, tells the story of these rare rifles. Only 32 guns are noted by Cromwell in first year of production of this variation and indeed no more than 200-250 were made. There is actually an earlier version rifle made in 1803 and 1804 thought to have a plain brass patchbox, but there are no examples known and only 72 were made. The orig configuration of this gun had 46” bbls. This example has been shortened to 33-1/2” and is no longer rifled in 44 Cal., but is now smooth bore measuring 48 Cal. and converted to percussion. Regardless, only a few are known and this gun is orig and as found. The bbl is marked “1 VA REGt NORFOLK COUNTY”. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Good to very good overall. Gun has a hand worn patina overall with an old varnish or shellac covering metal and wood. Iron overall is dark brown/plum, brass has mixed light mustard to chocolate patinas, all protected by the old varnish. Bbl markings are not totally discernible as seen in photo, but “NORFOLK COUNTY” is quite bold. The lock is missing the “V” in Virginia but other markings are discernible. Patchbox details are easily discerned as seen in photographs. Stock has several long hairlines in forestock, tack repair just below lock and lock mortise is wallowed out, but gun is still functional though it won’t hold on half-cock. Ramrod was made for this gun in this configuration with matching patina to stock. 52328-55 JS (4,500-7,500)

331

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1374. RARE AND INTERESTING PRESENTATION DECORATED AND ENGRAVED HARPERS FERRY MODEL 1816 FLINTLOCK MUSKET. NSN. Cal. 69. This unique musket is beautifully decorated with 18 inset German silver stars varying from 1” to 1-1/2”, a 4” spread wing eagle sitting atop a globe, and 4” blank presentation plate. Lock is marked “HARPERS FERRY 1822” rear of cock and small American eagle with “US” forward of cock. The walnut stock has fine color and checkered wrist not seen on standard military guns. There are other known presentation muskets similarly decorated. Most identified examples were gifts or prizes after the flintlock era in 1840’s or 50’s. The maker of these guns appears consistent, but he utilized muskets of different contractors and even mixed parts. There is a very similar decorated musket displayed in the iconic Claude Fuller Collection at Chickamauga Battlefield Museum and R. L. Wilson shows several almost identical examples in a collage on pg 83 of Steel Canvas. This gun does have a finely engraved name in scroll decoration on top of bbl which is not easily discerned. The last name appears to be “Hamilton” and possibly Schuyler Hamilton who received a similar example as a gift from his friends at the US Military Academy, June 1845. Regardless of recipient, this is a true work of American military art. PROVENANCE: Collection of Robert Roughton. CONDITION: Very good overall. Appears orig and complete with typical Harpers Ferry assembly numbers on most metal parts. Bbl, lock and iron mounts show old cleaning with pitting and staining. Bbl is dark with other iron components showing great contrast along with German silver insets and decorations. Wood is sound and solid with crack repair in forestock, there several large dents, dings and scratches. Musket is mechanically sound and functional. 52328-46 JS (4,500-6,500)


Session 1

1376. FLINTLOCK SMOOTH RIFLE SIGNED W. ALLEN, SUTTON, MASSACHUSETTS. SN N/A. Cal. .54. Overall 55-3/8”. Buttplate 4-3/8” x 1-1/2”. 40-1/2” full oct bbl signed in script “W. Allen Sutton”. This rifle has a 2-pc brass patchbox with two piercings in the finial which ends with an engraved eagle and shield. The flint lock is marked “J. Tarratt Warranted”. Bbl is held to stock by 3 bbl wedges and stock is checkered at the wrist. The forward finial on the trigger guard is characteristic of Allen rifles. By the end of the 18th century New England gun makers were well into the manufacture of sporting rifles. The center of this activity was the Worcester-Sutton area where Silas and W. Allen were outstanding makers. CONDITION: Very good throughout, with all orig parts. Patchbox release needs adjustment. Some minor wood is missing or stressed under lock, in part due to lock spring requiring adjustment. Mechanics need attention. Lock is in operating condition, however its spring needs adjustment. 52414-1 RGG (3,000-4,000)

MAGNIFICENT CIRCA 1720 SILESIAN FLINTLOCK RIFLE 1377. MADE IN THE 17TH CENTURY STYLE. NSN. Cal. 24 bore. 40-3/4” overall, 29-1/2” slightly swamped oct bbl with fixed rear sight and front blade sight with gilted foliate engraving over 50% of surface. Lock and cock engraved en suite with addition of deer. Fruitwood stock inset with engraved bone and Mother-of-pearl inlaid panels covering about 90% of exposed wood surfaces. Panels depict woodland scenes including largest panel of a mounted horseman in a stag hunt, other hunters with game, various animals, fantastic beasts and foliate designs. Iron tipped ramrod probably of a later period. This is truly a spectacular piece of art in amazing “as found”, very high condition. CONDITION: Fine to very fine. Bbl is overall plum patina with strong traces of bright orig blue. Traces of gilt decoration are found in protected areas of engraving on lock, bbl and trigger guard. Stock is sound with sharp edges, hand worn patina with only minor cosmetic blemishes, tiny reductions and only a couple of small hairlines. Insets are virtually all intact with only minor warpage and rising of a few panels. Patchbox has front tombstone-shaped bone inset replaced apparently as it is not en suite, but is well fit with same patina to other bone and could easily have been added contemporarily. Mechanically fine with shiny bright bore. 52630-5 JS (12,000-15,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

332


Session 1 1378.

EXTRAORDINARY GERMAN WHEELOCK SPORTING RIFLE WITH CHISELED LOCK AND BBL, ENTIRE STOCK VENEERED IN WHITE STAG HORN. NSN. Lock, bbl and mounts circa 1720. The stock decoration possibly of the period, but regardless fully veneered stocks are rarely seen of this quality. The artwork is masterful and equal to the finest work found on the well known series of late 17th century German flattened cow horn flasks. The lock is chiseled in relief with the wheel cover a double headed eagle, possibly that of the Austrian Hapsburg family. PROVENANCE: HH Thomas collection; sold James D. Julia, Inc. March 2010, lot 2561; outstanding estate collection of Confederate and historical arms of Morris Racker, 2010. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Metal retains an overall dark brown/gray surface. Stag horn inlays all appear original with only minor restoration. Missing a thin 6” piece of veneer on left side of forestock. Regardless this is a magnificent piece of art from the well known HH Thomas collection. 51957-28 JS (8,000-12,000) ESA

1379. COMPOSITE 17th CENTURY GERMAN WHEELOCK WITH 19th CENTURY INLAID STOCK. NSN. Cal. 60 bore. 23” overall, 151/2” oct-rnd bbl. Victorian castles of the mid-late 19th century seemed to have a need for historic arms and armor. This is one such gun that filled that need. The metal parts are 17th century German, but the engraved bone inlays were added mid-late 19th century. Regardless, this is a very attractive and decorative Wheelock in the 17th century-style. CONDITION: Very good overall. Gun is sound and complete as configured with minor losses of bone insets. Mechanics are functional; cock and spring are good, but wheel was not cranked to see if truly functional, pitted clear bore. 52630-6 JS (3,000-4,000) 333

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1380. EXTREMELY RARE AND FINE RUSSIAN TULA ARSENAL MODEL 1833 FLINTLOCK DRAGOON PISTOL. SN 1363. Cal. 71. Russian military arms of this era are quite rare in America. This gun is in the kind of condition you would expect to find in a fine Russian museum. Gun measures just over 15-1/2” overall with 9-1/2” bbl retaining most of its orig blue finish. Bbl has several proofs along with “1833” date at breech, “No. 1363”, lock is marked in Cyrillic “TULA / 1833”. Gun is brass mounted with Cyrillic proofs and date on each piece. Thumbplate has Cyrillic mark under crown for Czar Nicholas I. Unique to this Russian arsenal is the black stained stock. This gun is museum quality and would be impossible to upgrade. CONDITION: Very fine overall. Mechanics are crisp with smooth, clear bore. Brass hardware is polished and varnished giving illusion of gilting. Black dyed surface of stock is 95% intact with light scuffing and edge wear. Bbl retains virtually all of its mottled black/plum arsenal blue finish with pin-prick areas of pitting, staining and light scratching. Lock & breech are smooth with a gray iron patina with traces of muted case colors in protected areas. 52536-2 JS (3,000-5,000) 1381. EXCEPTIONAL CASED PAIR OF 50 BORE FRENCH PERCUSSION TARGET PISTOLS BY DEVISME, 1845. SN 648. Cal. 50 bore. 16” overall, 9” blued oct bbls with fixed sights dated on underside of breech “1845”, signed in gold Gothic letters “DEVISME a PARIS” and each gun signed in gold “1” and “2”. Locks are foliate scroll relief engraved, signed “DEVISME A PARIS”. Hammer, trigger guard, buttcap and other steel mounts are engraved en suite. Ebony stocks are relief carved at forends and 3-panels of fluted grips. Buttcap has central diamond-shape cap with a crest of crown over foliated “R”. The same crest is found on lid of mahogany casing. Casing is purple velvet lined with gilt imprint address of DeVisme and case is fitted for 5 gun tools, 2 ebony cap containers, and ball mold. Lidded compartment contains 1 ball and functional key PROVENANCE: Carl Styne Collection, 1964. CONDITION: Extremely fine overall. Guns are matching with complete compliment of accessories. Guns retain virtually all of their orig bright blue and gold on bbls with tiny cosmetic blemishes and light sharp edge wear. Other steel components of guns retain their orig bright finish and luster with minor staining. Polished steel powder measure and levered ball mold also retain virtually of their orig polish with light staining. Other ebony and steel tools and components are equally fine. Casing has some cracks to the thin ebony veneer on lid with scuffs and scratches as can be expected after 170 years. There is a 1” piece of ebony veneer missing right rear and bottom corner casing. Silver inlaid 2-3/4” x 2” pierced and engraved crest is well fit with a silver/grey patina. Case still retains thin varnish. Mechanics are crisp with bright, shiny multigroove rifled bores. 52630-2 JS (15,000-20,000) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

334


ATTRACTIVE HIGH GRADE CASED SINGLE-SHOT PERCUSSION TARGET PISTOL BY GASTINNE RENETTE, GUN MAKER TO THE KING OF SPAIN AND EMPEROR NAPOLEON III. NSN. Cal. 48/42 bore. 16-1/2” overall, 11-1/8” oct bbl with dovetailed inset silver bead front sight, chisel engraved address “GASTINNE RENETTE A PARIS”. Breech is relief engraved as is lock, hammer, trigger guard and buttcap. Lock is also marked with same address as bbl. No doubt exhibition grade and cased most unusually with detached bbl in separate French fitted partition. The elaborately relief carved fluted stock terminates in a highly faceted buttcap with finely detailed finial. This is a beautiful cased pistol by one of the great 19th century gun makers, quite renowned, even mentioned in novel by Balzac. Royal purple velvet lined French fitted casing is complete retaining ball mold with sprue cutter marked “JC 42”. Casing with brass plaque in lid with crown over ornate pair of initials. Also includes two powder measures, loose balls, brass tipped cleaning rod and tiny 2-1/2” powder flask. Cased sgl pistols are more rare than cased pairs and this is a beautiful example. CONDITION: Fine overall. Bbl retains no finish though sharp and grey; markings all crisp and discernible. Bbl marked on bottom with crown over “AR” proof and “1844” (date?) and “385” (SN?). Metal surfaces otherwise are fairly bright with crisp etching. There is a hairline crack in the hammer spur. Stock is sound and solid with small chip to left side and several small dings, dents and scratches not affecting overall aesthetics. Implements are matching condition. Mold retains most of its thinning blue finish. Flask retains much of it bright varnish and fire blue to spring. Mechanically sound with crisp multi-groove bore. Mahogany case is sound, retaining much of an old varnish with scattered scuffs and scrapes. Inset plaque has light mustard patina. Key is functional. Lining has light fading, staining and soiling. 51933-2 JS (6,000-7,000)

1383.

SUPERB QUALITY PAIR FRENCH PERCUSSION TARGET/ DUELING PISTOLS HAVING EBONY STOCKS WITH ORIGINAL CASE HAVING A Ls. LEFAURE LABEL AND ACCESSORIES. NSN. Cal. 50. 10-1/2” Browned swamped octagon bbls with multi groove rifling, are gold inlaid “CANON ACIER FONDU” around breech ends. Breech irons and patent breeches are beautifully engraved with finely cut attenuated scroll with unusual shaded acanthus terminations. Shaped island locks with tall serpentine hammers have similar engraving with game scenes of ducks in marsh toward front ends. Ebony stocks with relief carved forend tips and no provision for ramrods, have flared fluted butts. Furniture is of polished iron. Trigger guards have spurs. Trigger plates have nicely shaped finials. Grip caps have lozenge shaped finials. These parts are also engraved with more of that unusual scroll matching locks, etc. More scenes of birds are on front radii of trigger guard bows. Guns are housed in rosewood veneered case with bronze edges and corners, and shaped bronze central medallion. Case is lined in purple velvet and has old paper label printed with scene of hunter, dogs, and stag, as well as “Ls LEFAURE Arquebusier, Bte” then with address and “A Paris”. Case contains a fine array of high quality accessories, most orig, including a rosewood loading mallet, two loading rods, two rosewood containers, small fancy steel oil bottle, powder dipper, small powder flask with ribbed copper body, and a mainspring vice. Other, probably not orig accessories include a high quality steel ball mold with sprue cutter, and nipple wrench with walnut handle. Covered compartment with turned rosewood knob contains some balls and a spare nipple. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain nearly all of their brown, silvered on sharp edges. All other metal parts retain most of their bright polish, darkened a bit to an overall pewter gray. Stocks are very fine with nearly all of their orig finish, one pistol showing some checks through lock area, and a sliver missing in front of bbl bolster. The other has repaired cracks around upper rear portion surrounding lock. Bores are excellent. Locks are crisp. Exterior of case is very fine with nearly all of its orig finish, with some cracks through top. Interior cloth is good with rubs and compressions, considerably faded with two large spots corresponding to leakage of oil or cleaning fluid from breeches of bbls. Label is a bit tattered but legible. Accessories are very fine to excellent. 52700-60 MGM421 (5,000-7,500) 335

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1382.


Session 1 1384.

RARE HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT EARLY BREECH-LOADING DOUBLE SHOTGUN BY JEAN SAMUEL PAULY. SN 193. Cal. 20 ga. 32” Bbls. Swiss born, Jean Samuel Pauly, moved to Paris in 1802, and invented one of the first breech-loading systems using the earliest self contained cartridge in 1808. It gained limited popularity and was the predecessor of later systems, one of which was patented by Dreyse, one of Pauly’s employees. Pauly left Paris in April 1814 and went to London and worked for Durs Egg. This interesting gun, made by Pauly while he was in Paris (obviously) is nicely gold inlaid in Gothic script “Invention Pauly” “Brevette a Paris” on tops of bbls. Breech section with gold poincons of a crown over “AR” (?), and gold damascening, are fitted with monkey tail lifting breech mechanism, sides of which are engraved with same patent information as bbls. Hidden roller strikers are housed in lower section and cocked by nicely filed “hammers”. SN (193) is stamped on most major parts. Nicely marbled and figured European walnut stock with right hand cheekpiece, is iron mounted with well filed trigger guard and heavy steel buttplate. Grip and forend are nicely checkered and a well detailed carved boar’s head forms termination of long pistol grip. Sling eyes are on bottom of bbls and toe line. CONDITION: Very good to fine. Bbls cleaned and most likely re-browned over some scattered pitting. Breech section is mottled gray to brown. Stock rates fine with nearly all of its orig rubbed oil finish with numerous marks and dents, checkering lightly worn. Bores are excellent. A good example of this scarce milestone in the development of firearms. 52030-1 MGM73 (7,000-11,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

336


Session 1 1385.

IMPORTANT JAPANESE SAMURAI SWORD, TACHI. Signed “BIZEN OSAFUNE MOTOSHIGE SAKU” Oriikoshi mei (folded over signature) with origami (certificate of appraisal) by the well known famous appraiser of the early 20th Century, Fukushima Seido. Of the existing swords by MOTOSHIGE very few are signed, most are attributed. He lived and worked in the village of Osafune (now Okayama) & he worked early to mid 14th Century. Tempering and point are typical of his work, possibly re tempered. Translation of envelope: “FUKASHIMA SEIDO, SENSEI SHINTEI”. Translation of paper: BIZEN OSAFUNE MOTOSHIGE SAKU - MEI (signature) BIZEN OSAFUNE MOTOSHIGE SAKU - JIDAI JOJI KORO (about mid 14th century) - NAGASA (length) NI SHAKU ICHI SUN HACHI BU (about 65 cm or 26-1/16 length) - ORIKOSHI MEI (folded over and inlaid signature) - SHINOGI ZUKURI (ridge blade) KOGISAKI (small point) - YAKIBA (temper pattern) KOGUNOME (small rounded bead pattern) JIAETSU SEIHI NISHITE - NIOI SHIMARI BOSHI (temper pattern in the point) TOGARITE NOBITE AGARI - SUKOSHI MARUKUKDERU KONO OSHI NI KOMOSAKUNO - TOKUCHO ARA WARU - SHOWA ROKU NEN GO GATSU ( date of paper May 1931). - SAIDO (name with seal). REFERENCE: Fujishiro kotohen page 559, rating JO JO saku, old Hawley’s first edition MO 639 rating 100 BKS 300. CONDITION: Blade in very good old polish in old shirasaya (resting case) with purple bag along with its original saya (scabbard). With excellent worked gold foil habaki (collar). Length: 26 1/16” cutting edge, Overall length in shirasaya mounts approx 37”. 52753-1 (10,000-15,000)

337

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1386. EXTREMELY RARE SCAGEL CAMP KNIFE IN MINT CONDITION WITH SHEATH. Very rare, double edged camp knife that has a 9-5/16” x 1-3/4” up-sweep blade with triangle shaped ricassos, hand-stamped on the left side of blade “OTTO L. HANKISON. / TOLEDO. O.”, who is the consignor’s grandfather. Left ricasso is marked in small letters “W. Scagel / Handmade / USA”. Handguard is 1/4” thick brass, elliptical shape with fluted top edge. Handle is stacked leather with red synthetic, aluminum, copper and brass spacers. Pommel is dog’s head shaped of 7/8” thick brass secured to the tang with 2 brass pins. Accompanied by custom brown leather sheath with thumb-strap and belt loop. This knife was given a full color picture on page 149 of the book Scagel Handmade, Lucie with credit to the Douglass H. Sandrock collection. The size and the shape of this knife is somewhat an anomaly for Mr. Scagel and finding such a knife in pristine condition is certainly a great rarity. William Scagel was the great grand daddy of American custom knife makers in the modern era. He was born February 1875 in Ontario, Canada and in 1900 immigrated to the United States. In 1917 he opened his shop in Muskegon, MI where he worked in metal & cutlery and in the 1936-1937 period began his knife-making career and died in 1963. Mr. Scagel’’s knives have been the inspiration for numerous custom knife-makers ever since. He produced knives from the tiniest bird & fish knife to the giant camp knives, along with axes & folding knives. He also produced numerous other articles such as copper-ware skillets, pots & pans. He even made corkscrews. His knives rarely come to market. PROVENANCE: Douglass H. Sandrock collection. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus. Overall retains virtually all of its orig polish & finish, showing only very light sharpening on both edges. Blade has coarse polish lines. Handle is smooth & clean showing no hand oil staining. Brass, hand guard & pommel are a light mustard patina. Sheath is equally new. 52579-2 JRL (20,000-30,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

338


339

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

1387. EXTREMELY RARE INSCRIBED SCAGEL UTILITY KNIFE WITH ULTRA-RARE IVORY SCALES AND ORIGINAL SHEATH. Extraordinary Scagel knife with 7-9/16” flat ground clip point blade marked on the right side in period script, undoubtedly by Mr. Scagel himself, “Otto L. Hankinson, / Toledo, Ohio”, who is the consignor’s grandfather. note the script arrow under Hankinson’s name is identical to that on Scagle’s personal knife. Jim Lucie published a couple of Scagle letters dated 1937 and 1939 in a July-August issue of Blade Magazine where Mr. Scagel tells of making this “fine silver mounted ivory handled knife that was sent to Toledo, Ohio”. Right side of blade near the ricasso is marked with Mr. Scagel’s trademark Kris stamp and the partial mark “W. Scagel / Maker”. Hand guard is 3/8” thick base with fluted top edge and oval shape set at an angle to the blade & handle, which is also a rare feature of Scagel knives. The handle has two smooth slabs of ivory attached to the tapered tang with 7 nickel/silver pins. Pommel is Mameluke shape. Accompanied by its orig brown leather sheath with thumb-strap and integral belt loop. This exact knife is pictured in full color on page 154 of the book Scagel Handmade, Lucie with credit to the Douglass H. Sandrock collection. Mr. Scagel apparently made very few knives with ivory handles and finding one in such pristine condition with original sheath is a true rarity. William Scagel was the great grand daddy of American custom knife makers in the modern era. He was born February 1875 in Ontario, Canada and in 1900 immigrated to the United States. In 1917 he opened his shop in Muskegon, MI where he worked in metal & cutlery and in the 1936-1937 period began his knifemaking career and died in 1963. Mr. Scagel’s knives have been the inspiration for numerous custom knife-makers ever since. He produced knives from the tiniest bird & fish knife to the giant camp knives, along with axes & folding knives. He also produced numerous other articles such as copperware skillets, pots & pans. He even made corkscrews. His knives rarely come to market. PROVENANCE: Douglass H. Sandrock collection. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Very fine. Blade is full length showing sharpening stone marks on about the bottom 1/3 at the cutting edge, retaining orig polish over the rest of the blade with slight surface etching on the backgrind on one side. Right handle scale shows numerous age lines, otherwise the ivory has a wonderful, mellow golden patina. Sheath shows moderate wear with moderate soil, heavier on the back. Strap is intact. 52579-1 JRL (20,000-30,000) ESA


Session 1 1388. VERY RARE SCAGEL HAND AX WITH SHEATH. Rare Scagel hand ax, 14” overall with integral head & handle. Head is 4-1/4” long, 1/2” thick, tapered to sharp edge and 3-11/16” across the cutting edge. Hand guard is 1/4” thick brass, elliptical shape with fluted top edge. Handle is stacked leather with synthetic red material, aluminum & copper spacers with a crown stag pommel secured with 2 brass pins. Left side of the handle is hand-stamped “OTTO L. HANKINSON. TOLEDO”, who is the consignor’s grandfather. Left side of the head has the partially visible “W. Scagel” mark a light strike with a clear “W Scagel / Handmade” / “USA” stamp. Right side of the head is marked with Mr. Scagel’s trademark Kris stamp and two other unknown stamps. Accompanied by a custom, tooled brown leather head cover marked on the back with a cartouche “S.D. MYERS / EL PASO, TEX.”. Front of the cover is deeply tooled with foliate & floral patterns and a fine pearled background. This ax was given a full page, #178, in color in the book Scagel Handmade, Lucie with the caption crediting the Douglass H. Sandrock collection. William Scagel was the great grand daddy of American custom knife makers in the modern era. He was born February 1875 in Ontario, Canada and in 1900 immigrated to the United States. In 1917 he opened his shop in Muskegon, MI where he worked in metal & cutlery and in the 1936-1937 period began his knife-making career and died in 1963. Mr. Scagel’s knives have been the inspiration for numerous custom knife-makers ever since. He produced knives from the tiniest bird & fish knife to the giant camp knives, along with axes & folding knives. He also produced numerous other articles such as copper-ware skillets, pots & pans. He even made corkscrews. His knives rarely come to market. PROVENANCE: Douglass H. Sandrock collection. CONDITION: Very fine to extremely fine. Sharp edge shows light stone scratches from sharpening with some fine pitting on right side of the head and back edge of the head, otherwise the head & handle retain about 95% bright orig polish. Handle is equally fine with a couple of small dings, showing light wear to the leather & stag. Sheath has a small mouse chew at the back edge of the flap with a small break in the body of the cover at the back edge, otherwise is sound with numerous nicks & scratches and retains about 80% orig brown finish. Altogether an extremely rare set. 52579-3 JRL (15,000-20,000)

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

340

Reverse


Session 1 1389.

FINE AND RARE CIRCA 1835 “ARKANSAS TOOTHPICK” IVORY COFFIN HILT SHEFFIELD BOWIE KNIFE. 11-1/2” overall, 7-1/2” clip-point blade with 4-1/4” false edge. This is among the finest examples you will find of the iconic W & S butcher coffin-hilt clip-point Bowie with “ARKANSAS TOOTHPICK” etched in central panel. There are only a handful of this early pattern known which are all highlighted in the important Bowie texts, including Bob Abel’s Bowie Knives and Norm Flayderman’s The Bowie Knife. These early knives typically saw hard use and this example has survived with a relatively fine blade, retaining most of its orig luster and easily discerned etched panel. The scabbard is also sound, complete and solid with all three German silver mounts and frog button. The ivory slab grips have beautiful mellow patina. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Fine overall. Blade shows about 50% orig polish and luster with old sharpening, staining and light pitting. Maker’s mark is crisp and etched panel is very good and about as fine as these are found. The ivory slabs exhibit smooth ivory patina retaining all German silver mounts, with one slab having thin 1” chip missing and hairline crack as can be seen in photos. Scabbard is sound and solid retaining much of the gilt decoration and most of it’s dyed deep blue color, some crinkling in scabbard surface, but no bends or weak area. German Silver mounts have matching patina to cross-guard, pins and body of knife. 52413-1 JS (8,000-12,000) ESA

Reverse

1390.

MAGNIFICENT BEN SHOSTLE CUSTOM CLIP-POINT BOWIE KNIFE. 13-1/2” overall with 8-5/8” massive clip-point, 6” sharpened top edge. Ben Shostle from Muncie, Indiana was a well known master craftsman and engraver who died in 2006 and was known for his high quality, very deep, dramatic engraving style. He was founding member in 1981 and past president of the prestigious “FEGA” (Firearms Engravers Guild of America). This particular knife is totally steel mounted with a gold inset elephant’s head in pommel cap. Grip is formed from polished, fossilized bone. Knife weighs over 1-1/4lb and is among the most menacing edged weapons you will hold. CONDITION: Excellent overall. Steel retains most of its orig polish. Shostle’s signature is easily discerned on ricasso. Shostle’s signature engraving covers virtually all surfaces of pommel, ferrule, crossguard and flat areas of knife. 52174-2 (4,000-5,000)

341

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1391.

RARE WWII V-42 FIGHTING KNIFE FROM ESTATE OF SERGEANT CHARLES E. FIEGE, 1st SPECIAL SERVICE FORCE. This knife is being offered by direct family descent of Sgt. Charles Fiege, along with copies of a few of his service documents and photo of his awards and uniform patches, including bronze star. This very rare V-42 fighting knife made by Case Cutlery Company were issued to the first joint American Allied Special Services Unit. The 1st Special Service Force (also called The Devil’s Brigade, The Black Devils, The Black Devils’ Brigade, and Freddie’s Freighters) was an elite American-Canadian commando unit in World War II, under the United States Fifth Army. The unit was organized in 1942 and trained at Fort William Henry Harrison near Helena, Montana in the United States. It fought in the Aleutian Islands, Italy, and southern France before being disbanded in December 1944. This knife is in fine “as found” condition with blade measuring 7-3/8” retaining much of its blued finish in its correct scabbard. The V-42 was primarily designed by officers of the FSSF, including its commanding officer, Lt. Colonel Robert T. Frederick, who desired a combat knife that could be used to silently eliminate enemy soldiers as well as perform the role of a close-quarters combat knife. The blade’s design has been attributed to Col. Frederick, who had encountered the Fairbairn–Sykes commando knife while on duty in England. While the V-42 had a double-edged blade similar to the Fairbairn–Sykes knife, the V-42 has a cross section with concave hollow ground blade facets, compared to the Fairbairn with a flat four sided diamond cross section. The narrower V-42 stiletto blade profile is designed to optimize penetration when used for thrusting, and the V-42 could easily penetrate a G.I. steel helmet and liner with a single thrust. With its relatively thin, narrow blade, the V-42 was designed from the outset for use as a fighting knife, and was consequently prone to breakage when used for utility chores such as opening ration tins or ammunition crates. Unusual for military combat knives of the period, the V-42’s twin edges were double hollow-ground for increased cutting performance. The addition of the skull-crushing pommel was attributed to the input of Major Orval J. Baldwin, the FSSF Supply Officer. The thumb groove on the V-42’s ricasso was designed to promote a flat grip with the thumb over the crossguard, which positioned the double-edged blade horizontally. In this manner a soldier could slash an opponent with either a forehand or backhand stroke, while ensuring that his blade would slip between the ribs when used in a thrust or stab. This is a rare identified WW II fighting knife that is rarely offered. CONDITION: Knife is very good to fine overall, retaining about 50% of its orig thinning blue finish with staining and pinprick pitting, blade has an extremely fine point. Three initials “WRB” have been scratched into face of scabbard. Scabbard is sound and solid with crazing, scuffing and other small cosmetic blemishes unaffecting aesthetics. 52042-1 JS (5,000-7,000)

1392. *RARE COLT COMMERCIAL MODEL 1900 SEMIAUTO PISTOL WITH ORIGINAL SIGHT SAFETY AND BRITISH PROOFS. SN 2185. Cal. 38 ACP. Blue finish with 6” bbl, thin half-moon front sight and groove rear sight in the articulated sight/safety in top rear end of slide. This device functions as a sight when in the erect position and as a safety when in the down position. Very few of these pistols were produced with this feature and many were modified with a fixed rear sight in later years. By mid 1901 between the serial range of 700-1400 is when this change occurred. There were only a total of about 3500 of all types of this type of pistol produced 1900-1903. Left side of frame is marked with SN and additional hand-stamp number “L8847”. Left rear side of slide, below the Rampant Colt in a circle are two tiny British proofs. Mounted with smooth walnut grips and accompanied by an orig nickel finish magazine with patent dated base. Very few of these pistols survive today with orig configuration and high orig finish. This model was Colt’s first attempt at manufacturing a semi-automatic pistol. It was very successful which transitioned into the model 1902 and several subsequent models including the venerable, world famous model 1911. CONDITION: Fair to good. Overall retains about 60-65% orig blue, bright in sheltered areas, dulled and turning plum elsewhere. Grips show heavy wear and a hand worn patina with a couple of dings in the right side. Sight safety and hammer show dark case colors. Magazine retains about 90% strong orig nickel. Mechanics are fine. Strong bore with good shine and fine pitting. 52511-7 JRL (3,000-5,000) C&R Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

342


Session 1 1393. *SCARCE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY MODEL 1911 SEMI-AUTO MILITARY PISTOL. SN 116001. Cal. 45 ACP. Blue finish with 5” orig Springfield marked bbl with small “S” and tiny “P” proofs on left side of lug. Slide has standard Springfield markings and flaming bomb stamp on left side with usual markings on the right side along with the Springfield spread-winged eagle. Slide has orig thin front sight and flat top, U-notch rear sight. Left forward side of frame is marked “UNITED STATES PROPERTY” and it also has the flaming bomb stamp above the magazine release. Mounted with large diamond checkered walnut grips that are modern replacements. Accompanied by an orig Springfield 2-tone magazine that has copper slide strip on the top rear edge and a distinctive Springfield folded bottom with lanyard loop. Slide stop is also marked with a small “S” on the inside face. Bbl bushing is a replacement. No further disassembly was affected to check for other matching parts. Given that this pistol was produced in 1915 there is a strong likelihood that it saw service in WWI and later during WWII and possibly Korea. These pistols were in service with the U.S. military well into the 1960’s and 1970’s and elsewhere around the world. Very few are found today in orig configuration with any orig finish. CONDITION: About fine. Overall retains most all of a fine professionally restored finish with only faint sharp edge wear. Magazine is completely orig that shows handling and use with dull finish. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore with pitting in the grooves. 52511-6 JRL (2,000-4,000) C&R

1394. *VERY RARE TRANSITION COLT MODEL 1911/1911A-1 MILITARY SEMI-AUTO PISTOL. SN 700798. Cal. 45 ACP. Brushed military blue finish with 5” all blued bbl that has connected “HP” inspector initials. Frame has the inspector initials “WTG” (Maj. Walter T. Gorton) below the slide lock. Mounted with full checkered walnut grips and accompanied by an original military 2-tone magazine. Frame has the 1911 A-1 relief cuts back of the trigger with short checkered trigger, wide, finely checkered hammer spur, long spur grip safety and arched checkered spring housing. It also has the narrow front sight and flat top “U” rear sight. This pistol was produced in 1924 as part of an order of 10,000 pistols and was the first military order post-WWI. The vast majority of these pistols were issued to line units of the army and generally saw hard service throughout WWII, Korea and elsewhere. They are rarely found today in orig configuration with any orig finish. Accompanied by a modern Colt Custom Shop mahogany case that has black velvet lining and recess for the pistol. The lock for the case is missing. This is an extremely rare pistol in extraordinary condition the likes of which are seldom seen today. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus. Overall retains about 98-99% crisp original factory blue with only a faint scrape from reinsertion of the slide stop and some minor ring marks on the front strap. Magazine shows crisp blue with bright white top. Grips are crisp showing only faint wear on the diamond points. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore, has been fired but very little. Case is equally new. 52527-19 JRL (6,000-10,000) C&R 343

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1395. *LOT OF TWO ITHACA GUN COMPANY 1911 A-1 CAL. 45 AUTOMATIC LUNCHBOX PISTOLS. 1) ITHACA 1911-A1. NSN. Cal. 45 ACP. 5” bbl. Slide right side is devoid of markings. Slide left side marked “ITHACA GUN COMPANY INC. ITHACA N.Y.”. Front sight is serrated ramp. Rear sight is square notched flat top sight. Rear sight registration mark lines up. Hammer is serrated Ithaca type. Grip safety is long tang. Mainspring housing is serrated. Stocks are full checkered with reinforcing ribs. Magazine is unmarked, Parkerized with brazed baseplate. Right side frame marked “UNITED STATES PROPERTY” over “NO” behind slide stop pin. In front of slide stop pin marked “M1911 A U.S. ARMY”. Pistol has no other internal or external markings. CONDITION: Extremely fine condition. Overall 98% orig factory Parkerizing. Slide above holdback notch shows takedown scratch. Frame shows takedown scratch under slide stop notch. Edgewear on muzzle end of slide and front sight. Minor edgewear on rear edges. High Standard bbl shows moderate loss of bluing. Bore is bright but dirty. Drag mark from dust cover on muzzle. Front and rear grip straps excellent. Magazine catch lock shows moderate screwdriver damage. Stock screws near perfect. Mechanics are fine. C&R 2) ITHACA 1911-A1. NSN. Cal. 45 ACP. 5” bbl. Slide right side is devoid of markings. Slide left side marked “ITHACA GUN COMPANY INC. ITHACA N.Y.”. Slide left has minor takedown scratch above hold down notch. Front sight is serrated ramp. Rear sight is square notched flat top sight. Rear sight registration mark lines up. Hammer is serrated Ithaca type. Grip safety is long tang. Mainspring housing is serrated. Stocks are full checkered with reinforcing ribs. Magazine is unmarked, Parkerized, with brazed baseplate. Right side frame marked “UNITED STATES PROPERTY” over “NO” behind slide stop pin. In front of slide stop pin marked “M1911 A U.S. ARMY”. Pistol has no other internal or external markings. CONDITION: Fine condition. Overall 95% orig factory Parkerizing. Slide shows minor takedown scratch. Moderate deterioration of left slide finish. Frame shows takedown scratch under slide stop notch. Edgewear on muzzle end of slide and front sight. Minor edgewear on rear edges. Minor scuffs all over. High Standard bbl shows moderate loss of bluing. Bore is dirty and appears to have globs of dirt or grease. Drag mark from dust cover on muzzle. Front and rear grip straps excellent. Magazine catch lock shows no apparent screwdriver damage. Stock screws near perfect. Mechanics are fine. C&R 51964-1, 51964-2 KXK (4,000-6,000)

Reverse

1396. *FACTORY PRESENTATION 1911 COLT GOVERNMENT MODEL PISTOL. SN C45495. Cal. 45. 5” bbl. Left side of slide inscribed “Presented By Harvard Regiment/ To Constant Cordier/May 30, 1916”. Left side rear has Rampant Colt. Right side has “COLT 45 AUTOMATIC CALIBER 45” with Colt’s standard address and patent markings Checkered ivory grips have fine patina with carved Old English “C” cartouche. This gun is listed by SN in William H.D. Goddard’s book The Government Models, 1988, in this exact configuration “checkered ivory stock, ‘C’ on each stock, engraved on receiver “PRESENTED BY HARVARD REGT. LT CONSTANT CORDIER MAY 13, 1916”. Goddard also notes that the gun was shipped to Iver Johnson Sporting Goods Company in Boston along with SN 46081 with identical inscription and ivory grips. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Extremely fine condition as refinished. Verified proof appears sharp and crisp. Rear sight has dent on left side and registration marks do not line up. Magazine catch shows rounded corners as do pin holes in rear of receiver. Front sight is missing. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. 52684-1 (6,000-9,000) C&R; ESA Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

344


Session 1 1397. *COLT GOVERNMENT MODEL SEMI-AUTO PISTOL MADE IN 1917. SN C90230. Cal. 45 ACP. Blue finish with 5” commercial bbl. Slide has standard markings with last patent date of 1913 on the left side and standard commercial markings on the right side. Frame is marked “GOVERNMENT MODEL” and SN on right side. Mounted with diamond checkered walnut grips and accompanied by a military 2-tone magazine. This pistol was produced probably in the last half of 1917 just as WWI was winding down so there is a distinct possibility that it may have seen service during that war. CONDITION: Fine. Slide retains about 90% fine restored blue finish with a series of nicks over the top and some surface spotting with light pitting on left side. Frame retains 96-97% strong professional restored finish showing only very light sharp edge wear and spring housing turning a plummy. Grips are sound with a few chipped diamonds and retain most of their org oil finish. Mechanics are fine, bright shiny bore. Magazine retains dull finish with the white area turning dark. 52511-5 JRL (1,500-2,500) C&R

1398. *SECOND GENERATION COLT SERVICE MODEL ACE TARGET PISTOL WITH SPARE MAGAZINES AND PARTS. SN SM43580. Cal. 22 LR. Blue finish with 5” floating chamber bbl, thick partridge front sight and fully adjustable rear sight. Slide & frame have standard markings. Pistol is fitted with adjustable aluminum trigger, extended slide release, beavertail grip safety and Commanderstyle hammer with serrated rnd spur and hole. Spring housing is 1911-style and very nicely checkered. Magazine release has an after-market mushroom head. Mounted with diamond checkered, gold medallion faux ivory grips. Accompanied by 3 orig 1970s Ace magazines with stamped metal bases and 1 orig earlier magazine with flat metal base. Also accompanied by a variety of parts which seem sufficient to build another Colt automatic minus the frame, grips, slide & bbl. CONDITION: Extremely fine. Overall retains about 99% bright factory blue. Slide release, bbl bushing, trigger, hammer & grip safety are of a different color. Grips are crisp with no visible wear. Mechanics are crisp, brilliant shiny bore. Has been fired, but very little. Spare magazines & parts are fine. 52007-4 JRL (900-1,200)

345

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1399.

*RARE FACTORY ENGRAVED COLT 1st SERIES PREWWII WOODSMAN SEMI-AUTO PISTOL WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 102096. Cal. 22LR. Blue finish with 6-5/8” tapered rnd bbl, adjustable front and rear sights and mounted with full checkered walnut grips. Accompanied by an orig 2-tone magazine with marked base. Also accompanied by a Colt factory letter which identifies this pistol in Cal. 22 with 6-1/2” bbl, blue finish, type of stocks not listed and factory engraved Class “B”. It also shows that it was equipped with Partridge front sight, shipped September 30, 1936 to David A. Hay, Wilmington, DE in a 1-gun shipment. Under remarks section of the letter, it shows that it was returned to the factory August 2, 1937 and subsequently shipped August 16, 1937 to Camp Perry, OH where it was finally sold. The engraving consists of about 60% coverage, well executed foliate arabesque patterns with fine pearled background. Front & backstraps and trigger bow are engraved to match. Additionally accompanied by a custom made felt lined mahogany case. According to the Blue Book of Gun Values, Fjestad, there were about 112,000 1st Series Woodsman pistols produced 1927-1947 of which only 151 were factory engraved and of that, only 126 were of this model making those few engraved items some of the most rare of Colt handguns. CONDITION: Extremely fine, all matching except grips which are properly un-numbered. Overall retains 98-99% orig factory blue with faint muzzle end wear and some dulling to the front and backstraps. Grips are crisp with only faint diamond point wear. Magazine shows moderate wear and is darkened on the white upper portion. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. Case is fine. 51918-1 JRL (6,000-8,000) C&R

1400. *ENGRAVED COLT MARK IV - SERIES 70 GOVERNMENT MODEL SEMI-AUTO PISTOL THAT BELONGED TO TEXAS RANGER JOHN (NICK) HANNA. SN 78226B70. Cal. 45 ACP. Nickel finish with 5” bbl, and fixed sights. Slide has standard Series 70 markings on both sides with normal markings on the frame above the grip & trigger bow. Hammer & grip safety are standard items with serrated, arched mainspring housing. Mounted with smooth, 2-pc ivory grips that have a miniature gold Texas Ranger badge inlaid in the right side. Pistol is engraved by Weldon Bledsoe with full coverage foliate arabesque patterns that has fine pearled background. Accompanied by a letter on Texas Ranger letterhead over the signature of Ranger J. Nick Hanna, Sgt, Co. E, Brownsville, TX wherein he states that this pistol was his duty weapon which he carried while working. Also accompanying is an 8-1/2” x 11” color photo of the Rangers in Co. E with their signatures. Additionally accompanying is Sgt. Hanna’s business card. Texas Ranger arms & equipment rarely ever come to market, especially as well documented as this. Additionally accompanied by a fine hand-tooled brown leather zipper case with D-ring carrier attachment and lined with synthetic orange sheep-skin. Each side bears a 4” diameter circle reproduction of a Texas Ranger badge. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Extremely fine. Overall retains about 98% crisp custom nickel finish applied after engraving. Front & backstraps are slightly dulled from handling. Mechanics are crisp, bright shiny bore. Shows moderate use. Case is equally new. 52174-3 JRL (7,500-12,500) ESA Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

346


Session 1 1401. *SCARCE COLT FIRST EDITION ANACONDA DOUBLE ACTION REVOLVER WITH ORIGINAL CASE. SN MM00154. Cal. 44 MAG. Bright polished stainless with 6” vent rib bbl, red ramp and white outline sights, marked on left side “COLT ANACONDA / - First Edition -”. Right side is marked with a cal and company name & address. Left side plate is embossed with the Rampant Colt trademark. Mounted with varnished, 2-pc, checkered walnut grips that have silver medallions. Accompanied by its orig, very high quality aluminum carrying case with latches and combination lock. Also accompanying is a small aluminum plate apparently intended to be attached to the lid which is embossed “Colt / Anaconda / FIRST EDITION / 44 MAGNUM”. Also accompanying is the orig owners manual and a form letter from Colt. According to the Blue Book of Gun Values, Fjested, there were 1000 of these fine revolvers manufactured only in 1990. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Extremely fine plus. Appears to have been factory test fired only. Overall retains 99% plus crisp, bright orig polish. Case is equally new. 51980-41 JRL (1,750-2,500) 1402. *EXTREMELY ATTRACTIVE AND RARE FURR 1/3 SCALE MODEL 1874 GATLING GUN ON FIELD CARRIAGE. SN 130. Cal. .22 short. Gun is brass and steel construction in precise scale with ten 12-1/2” bbls with brass housing, rails and trunnions. It is set up for the Broadwell drum & is accompanied by one 220 rnd complete drum. Mounted on a miniature scale walnut field carriage with square axle and tapered trail with correct elevation and traversing screws & all brass furniture. Wheels are 18” in diameter with concave construction as in the originals. Top of the housing has a replica miniature Colt plaque. Features are complete to include the scale model folding seat on the top of the trail. SIZE: Height-21”. Length-36”. Weight45lbs. Visible SNs match. Solder of support cradle has come loose and should be a straight forward repair. CONDITION: Very fine, all matching, including drum and frame, along with the two drum keepers. No additional disassembly was effected to check for other matching numbers. Overall retains virtually all of its orig polish on brass with nickel finish on bbls starting to dull with a few flecks of corrosion apparent, and strong varnish on the wood. Bright shiny bores. Very clean action. Mechanics are fine. A fantastic display piece which could be taken to the range. 52076-1 JWK141 (8,000-12,000) C&R

347

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 Lots 1403, 1404 & 1405 (top to bottom) Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

348


Session 1 1403.

*EXCEPTIONALLY RARE (ONE OF THREE) AND EXTREMELY FINE 20 BORE A. H. FOX “FE” SHOTGUN WITH SPECIAL GOLD INLAYS WITH CALLAHAN LETTER. SN 202194. Cal. 20 ga. 2-1/2” Chambers. 28” Bbls with narrow, matted rib, and special order ivory and copper Lyman bead, are hand engraved “CHROMOX FLUID STEEL” “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA U.S.A.” on tops. Breech ends are engraved with classic “F” grade 3” triangles of large scroll and acanthus bisected by gold inlaid lightning bolts. 3/16” Bands of geometric engraving are around muzzles. Bbl flats are hand engraved with SN, grade, and stamped with Fox proof. Sides of flats, cocking slide, and breech ends of bbls are damascened. Bottoms of bbls are stamped with striking weight “3”. Small sized case hardened action with rebated and dbl ogee backed frame, features automatic safety (SAFE inlaid in gold), and dbl triggers. Water table is hand engraved with patent dates, SN, and grade. Action is engraved with full coverage well done open shaded scroll with acanthus and floral highlights which surrounds unusual dbl vignettes of gold inlaid dogs; pointers on left side in mountainous backgrounds, and setters on right in open meadows. There are gold bands around fences and gold inlaid stars on hinge pin heads. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is in arched band above rear dog scenes. Bottom of action depicts ruffed grouse with four chicks in woodland scene within fancy border. Trigger plate is engraved with scroll, acanthus, and flowers to match remainder of action. In front of triggers engraver signature “W.H. Gough” noted in tiny print, an extreme rarity on a Fox. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking twin vignette of flying snipe. SN is in gold on tang. Round knob pistol grip buttstock is of very finely marbled and lightly figured dense European walnut, and measures 14” over leather faced Silver pad. Side panels have closely spaced checkering with attractive fleur-di-lis intrusions. Borderless checkering at grip is of fancy crenelated pattern shot through with ribbons and fleur-di-lis in typical “FE” style. A gold shield on toe line is engraved “Chester Snyder”. Typical high grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled horn tip, is checkered to match buttstock in fancy pattern with ribbons and fleur-di-lis. Interior of iron has wiggle and line border engraving, and standard roll stamped patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.623, right - .624. Bore restrictions: left - .032 (full), right - .018 (mod). Wall thickness: left - .022 (one very small area 6” back from muzzle, mostly .026), right - .026. Drop at heel: 2-7/8”, drop at comb: 1-11/16”. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 1 oz. LOP: 14”. PROVENANCE: Callahan letter confirming specifications and specifying Chester Snyder

349

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Reverse Session 1 as orig consignee, and with his name engraved on shield. Copy of build card for 202194 confirming specifications. Letter, discussing another SN, (202698) with comparisons to this item. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Ex: Tom Kidd and Jack Puglisi Collections. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain essentially all of a very light sympathetic touch-up blue added to areas on sides of bbls over some evidence of light marks and wear. Damascening appears orig and is strong. Action retains most of its orig case hardening color, actual percentage difficult to ascertain because of extensive engraving, but most likely is in excess of 70%. Bottom of action (bird scene) is gray to light brown. Trigger guard retains most of its bright original blue on bow, silvering on tang. Stocks retain nearly all of their orig finish with numerous old marks and dings, and some rubs and thinning on toe line. Checkering is untouched, a bit dirty, with light wear. Pad appears to be orig, alligatored on sides, and flattened at heel. There is a slight 3/4” grain check on left side panel running from center of bottom ogee back into checkering, which appears to have been repaired by factory at time of manufacture. Bores are excellent, bright and shiny throughout, with no visible imperfections. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong. One of the finest small bore Fox’s extant, factory records indicate a total of 6 “FE” 20’s made, only 3 in Philadelphia. The double dog treatment is very unusual with only one other FE Grade known engraved in this pattern which is offered elsewhere in this sale. 51980-12 MGM10 (150,000225,000) C&R; ESA

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

350


Session 1 351

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1404.

*EXTREMELY RARE A. H. FOX “FE” SHOTGUN WITH DOUBLE DOG GOLD INLAYS, USED BY FOX AS AN “EXHIBITION” GUN WITH CLARK LETTER. SN 30067. (1924) Cal. 12 ga. 2-3/4” Chambers. 32” Bbls with narrow, matted rib, and double steel bead, are hand engraved “CHROMOX FLUID STEEL” “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA U.S.A.” on tops. Breech ends are engraved with classic “F” grade 3” triangles of large scroll and acanthus bisected by gold inlaid lightning bolts. 1/8” Bands of geometric engraving are around muzzles. Bbl flats are hand engraved with SN, grade, and “2-3/4” Chambers” and stamped with Fox proof. Sides of flats, cocking slide, and breech ends of bbls are damascened. Bottoms of bbls are stamped with striking weight “3”. Case hardened action with rebated and dbl ogee backed frame, features automatic safety (SAFE inlaid in gold), and nickel plated Kautzky single selective trigger. Water table is hand engraved with patent dates, SN, and grade. Action is engraved with full coverage well done open shaded scroll with acanthus and floral highlights which surrounds unusual dbl vignettes of gold inlaid dogs; pointers on left side in mountainous backgrounds, and setters on right in open meadows. There are gold inlaid stars on hinge pin heads. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is in arched band above rear dog scenes. Bottom of action depicts ruffed grouse with four chicks in woodland scene within fancy border. Trigger plate is engraved with scroll, acanthus, and flowers to match remainder of action. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking vignette of two flying snipe. SN is in gold on tang. Round knob pistol grip buttstock is of strikingly fiddle figured and beautifully marbled European walnut, and measures 13-1/2” over ribbed composition buttplate. Side panels have closely spaced checkering with attractive fleur-di-lis intrusions. Borderless checkering at grip is of fancy crenelated pattern shot through with ribbons and fleurdi-lis in typical “FE” style. A vacant silver shield is on toe line. Typical high grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled ebony tip, is checkered to match buttstock in fancy pattern with ribbons and fleur-di-lis. Interior of iron has wavy and line border engraving, and engraved patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.729, right - .728. Bore restrictions: left - .036 (full), right - .033 (full). Wall thickness: left - .030,

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

352


right - .030. Drop at heel: 2-7/16”, drop at comb: 1-1/2”. Cast 1/4” on. Weight: 7 lbs. 6 oz. LOP: 13-1/2”. PROVENANCE: 5 Ledger cards indicating return to factory, one with note “loaned to Johnson Morgan ?”, another with “Savage Exhibit Chicago”. Roe S. Clark letter with specifications. Information card with specifications. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Excellent, appears near new, as partially and very lightly restored, appears unfired. Bbls retain 95 - 98% of what appears to be orig blue, but is most likely a very sympathetic re-blue over some light marks and scratches. Action retains nearly all of what appears to be orig color, but is most likely a simple re-color, with very little polishing or work necessary, and shows only a touch of subsequent silvering on highest edges (knuckle not polished). Stocks retain nearly all of a fine hand rubbed oil finish over a number of nicks and dents, most notably 3 or 4 fairly deep dings on right side of butt, and a few inside of pistol grip. An incipient, but old, 1/4” stress crack is behind top tang. Checkering is slightly worn and has not been re-cut. Bores are excellent. Action is tight. Bbls are on face. Ejectors are slightly out of time. Trigger works. Factory records indicate that this particular gun was exhibited by Fox at trade shows, etc. and has been returned to the factory numerous times. Most certainly restoration work was done at one of these times to preserve a “factory new” look. 51980-34 MGM9 (75,000125,000) C&R

353

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1

1405.

*RARE AND SUPERB A. H. FOX “FE” SHOTGUN WITH SINGLE TRIGGER. SN 25992. Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chambers. 30” Bbls with narrow, matted rib, and twin ivory beads, are hand engraved “CHROMOX FLUID STEEL” “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA U.S.A.” on tops. Breech ends are engraved with 2-1/2” triangles of large scroll and acanthus bisected by gold inlaid lightning bolts. Bbl flats are hand engraved with SN, grade, and stamped with Fox proof. Sides of flats, cocking slide, and breech ends of bbls are damascened. Bottom of left bbl is stamped with striking weight “1”. Case hardened action with rebated and dbl ogee backed frame, features automatic safety (SAFE inlaid in gold), and gold plated Kautzky single selective trigger. Water table is hand engraved with patent dates, SN, and grade within acanthus borders. Action is engraved with full coverage well done bold open shaded scroll with acanthus and floral highlights which surrounds vignettes of gold inlaid dogs; pointer on left side in mountainous backgrounds, and setter on right. Gold inlaid quadrants transected by leaves are on hinge pin heads. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is in scrolled ribands behind dog scenes. Bottom of action depicts ruffed grouse with four chicks in woodland scene within fancy border. Trigger plate is engraved with bold rose bouquet within acanthus scroll borders. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking vacant lozenge. SN is on tang. Round knob pistol grip buttstock is of very finely marbled and lightly figured dense European walnut, and measures 13-5/8” over brown leather faced Silver pad. Side panels have closely spaced checkering with attractive fleur-di-lis intrusions. Borderless checkering at grip is of fancy crenelated pattern shot through with ribbons and fleur-di-lis in typical “FE” style. A gold shield on toe line is engraved with initials “JHMcD”. Typical high grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled horn tip, is checkered to match buttstock in fancy pattern with ribbons and fleur-di-lis. Interior of iron has wiggle and line border engraving, and hand engraved patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.725, right - .725. Bore restrictions: left - .035 (full), right - .019 (mod). Wall thickness: left - .038, right - .038. Drop at heel: 2-3/8”, drop at comb: 1-3/8”. Cast 1/4” on. Weight: 7 lbs. 10 oz. LOP: 13-5/8”. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

354


Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain essentially all of what appears to be their orig blue, with only a few light handling marks and minor thinning. Damascening appears orig and is strong. Action retains nearly all of its orig case hardening color, with a touch of silvering on fences, thumbpiece, sides of trigger guard bow, thinned on tang. Forend latch is excellent, thinned a bit. Gold of trigger is excellent, worn through only a bit on ridge above finger blade. Stocks retain nearly all of what appears to be their orig finish with a few old marks and dings, and possible addition of a bit of oil at butt with installation of newer pad. Checkering is untouched, a bit dirty, with a hint of wear. There is a slight 3/8� grain check behind top tang running into checkering on right side. Bores are excellent, with a few extremely light striations (possibly leading) in right bbl. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong. Trigger works. Undoubtedly one of the best examples of this scarce top of the cataloged Fox line of guns one could ever hope to find, truly superb. 51980-29 MGM106 (60,000-90,000) C&R; ESA

355

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1

1406.

*EXCEPTIONALLY RARE (ESTIMATED 9 PRODUCED) FOX “M” GRADE SINGLE BARREL TRAP SHOTGUN. SN 400346. Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chamber. 32” Bbl with raised, ventilated, matted rib, are hand engraved “CHROMOX FLUID STEEL” “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA. U.S.A.” either side of rib, red front and white ivory mid-bead. Varying sized well cut open, shaded, scroll, along with some standard scroll adorn the breech section, which also has arcaded and geometric gold wire inlay. Bbl flats are engraved with grade, SN and stamped with Fox proof. Sides of flats along with cocking slide are engine turned. Unique case hardened action with gold plated top lever release button on left side, is fitted with gold plated trigger having checkered finger blade, and has SN and grade engraved on water table, which also has some scroll engraving and wiggled triple line borders. Action is engraved with near full coverage exceptionally well cut shaded intertwined medium scroll with acanthus highlights, within gold inlaid arcaded and geometric borders. This treatment is counterpoint to other gold inlays, some in two color, including 2-color gold fleurdi-lis at point of action sides, light and yellow gold olive branch on right side, as well as gold foliage on top of action, and foliate and floral branch on top lever. “FOX” is in gold in arched rectangle on both sides of action, and 9-petal gold flowers are on ends of hinge pin. Bottom of action depicts low relief pair of well detailed gold pigeons in flight. Trigger plate continues theme of scroll, within geometric border. Case hardened trigger guard has matching scroll flanking gold initials “CWS” in geometric gold border. (Build card indicates gun was made for Charles W. Steiger). SN is in gold at grip. Finely marbled European walnut straight grip buttstock measures 14-1/8” over open sided brown white line pad. Side panels are checkered with fleur-di-lis and ribbon intrusions. Fancy pattern checkering with fleur-di-lis and ribbons is at grip. Matching long reverse tapered beavertail ejector forend with exceptional checkering including ribbons and fleur-di-lis, has Fox’s Deeley type release. Interior of iron is engraved with SN and grade. Bore diameter: .730. Bore restriction: .036 (full). Wall thickness: .032. Drop at heel: 2-1/16”, drop at comb: 1-1/2”. Neutral cast. Weight: 7 lbs. 13 oz. LOP: 14-1/8”. PROVENANCE: Factory build card confirming specifications, and indicating gun was

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

356


originally made with full pistol grip for E. K. Tryon Co. This name is scratched out and Charles W. Steiger is written in, and it should be speculated that he specified change of grip before delivery. This very gun is pictured on page 188 of A. H. FOX; THE FINEST GUN IN THE WORLD by Michael McIntosh, Revised edn. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbl retains over 95% orig blue. Action retains perhaps 80% orig case hardening color, which was never very strong, as evidenced by coloring on water table. Actual percentage very difficult to determine because of extensive engraving. Case color on trigger guard shows only some thinning and silvering at grip. Forend latch retains most of its orig color. Trigger and top lever latch retain most of their orig gold plate. Stocks retain nearly all of what appears to be their orig hand rubbed oil finish, with only a few very light handling marks. Checkering very lightly worn and dark. Bore is excellent. Action is tight. Mechanically excellent. An exceptionally fine example of this very rare Fox gun. It is estimated that fewer than 570 single bbl traps were produced, only 9 in this highest and tastefully executed grade. 51980-28 MGM15 (30,000-50,000) C&R; ESA

357

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

Session 1

Reverse


Session 1 1407.

*EXTREMELY RARE (ESTIMATED 25 PRODUCED) FOX “L” GRADE SINGLE BARREL TRAP SHOTGUN. SN 400347. Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chamber. 32” Bbl with raised, ventilated, matted rib, are hand engraved “CHROMOX FLUID STEEL” “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA. U.S.A.” either side of rib. There are 2” triangles of open, shaded, scrolling acanthus on side of breech end. Bbl flats are engraved with grade, SN and stamped with Fox proof. Sides of flats and breech end of bbl are damascened, cocking slide is engine turned. Unique case hardened action with top lever release button on left side, has SN and grade engraved on engine turned water table. Action is engraved in classic late “D” style in a special pattern developed for the single trap with near full coverage shaded scrolling acanthus with large floral accents on bottom and trigger plate. Both sides of action are gold inlaid “FOX”. Case hardened trigger guard has matching acanthus with SN at grip. Finely marbled European walnut Fox capped long pistol grip buttstock measures 14-5/8” over open sided brown white line pad over 1/4” black spacer. Side panels are checkered and fancy pattern checkering with lozenge intrusion and scroll flourishes into butt is at grip. Matching long reverse tapered beavertail ejector forend has Fox’s Deeley type release. Interior of iron is engraved with SN and grade. Bore diameter: .730. Bore restriction: .033 (full). Wall thickness: .054. Drop at heel: 2-3/16”, drop at comb: 1-5/8”. Neutral cast. Weight: 7 lbs. 12 oz. LOP: 14-5/8”. PROVENANCE: Factory build card confirming specifications, and indicating gun was made for E. K. Tryon Co. with no date given. This very gun is pictured on page 180 and 187 of A. H. FOX; THE FINEST GUN IN THE WORLD by Michael McIntosh, Revised edn. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Excellent, as partially refinished. Bbl retains over 90% of what appears to be orig blue, silvered and thinning on breech portion. Action retains approx 85 - 90% correct, factory, case hardening color, as engine turning on water table is underneath color, and some engraving detail is softened on bottom of action. Stocks retain most of an old oil refinish over a number of light dings with a few subsequent marks. Checkering lightly worn. Pad is new. Bores are excellent with a few light scratches. Mechanics are fine. 51980-26 (17,500-27,500) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

358


Session 1 1408.

*FANTASTIC HIGH ORIGINAL CONDITION PHILADELPHIA FOX “J” GRADE SINGLE BARREL TRAP SHOTGUN WITH ORIGINAL HANG TAG. SN 400282. Cal. 12 ga. 2-3/4” Chambers. This extremely well preserved example features a 32” bbl engraved “CHROMOX FLUID STEEL” and “MADE BY A.H. FOX GUN CO PHILA PA USA” on either side of the raised, matted ventilated rib. Breech section has well cut scroll engraving on sides. Bbl flat is stamped with grade, SN, and Fox proof. Sides of flat and cocking slide are engine turned. Case hardened action with top lever trip on left side is engraved with 70% coverage varying sized scroll. “FOX” is in arched device on each side. Case hardened trigger guard has SN on tang. Attractively marbled and lightly stump figured flesh-toned European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 14-3/4” over black leather faced Hawkins pad. Side panels are checkered and point pattern checkering with beaded borders is at grip. Matching reverse tapered long beavertail ejector fore-arm has Deeley type release. Bore diameter: .727. Bore restrictions: .031 (full). Wall thickness: .067. Drop at heel: 2-3/16”, drop at comb: 1-7/16”. Neutral cast. Weight: 8 lbs. 0 oz. LOP: 14-3/4”. With roughly 410 produced, finding a J Grade in this condition with its original factory hang tag is indeed an extremely rare occurrence. PROVENANCE: Factory original hang tag included. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbl retains over 95% original blue, with some light edge wear and minor silvering around breech end. Action retains 90-95% bold orig case hardening color, thinned on thumb piece, top tang, and along right side from normal hand wear. Trigger guard blue is silvered on tang. Stock retains most of its original oil finish, with slight finish added at butt due to installation of a later style Hawkins pad and has a number of minor scratches and light marks as well as a fairly heavy dent in the “V” of checkering on right side of grip. Bore is excellent. Action is tight. Trigger pull is very light, perhaps 1/2 pound. 52249-1 (4,000-7,000) C&R

359

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1409.

*UNUSUAL A H FOX “SPECIAL” SHOTGUN WITH SINGLE TRIGGER AND EJECTORS, MOST LIKELY BUILT BY BURT BECKER. SN 126434. Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chambers. 30” Bbls with narrow, matted rib, are engraved “FLUID STEEL” “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO PHILA. PA. U.S.A.” on tops, twin ivory beads. There are 1-1/2” pyramids of scroll and geometric bands at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, Fox proof, and “BB”. “S.” is engraved. Cocking slide and sides of bbl flats are engine turned. It appears that this gun started life as a Sterlingworth ejector, and has usual Sterlingworth type spring tension forend release. Case hardened action with SN and “SPECIAL.S.” engraved on water table, has filed in rebate for stock and double ogee back. Action also features automatic safety and gold plated Kautzky single selective trigger. Action screw has small set screw as found on most Becker guns. Action is engraved with 70% coverage scroll which appears to have been done by Becker himself, as it matches his “hand”. Game birds are on sides of action; tom and hen turkey on left, and a pair of ducks flying toward viewer on right. Bottom of action portrays a well detailed semi-relief gold inlaid setter in classic “F” grade style, with mountains in background, all within fancy crenelated border. Scroll engraving continues onto trigger plate as well as blued trigger guard where it flanks gold inlaid monogram of crossed “J”s (?). SN is on tang. Lightly marbled and figured European walnut Fox capped pistol grip buttstock measures 13-3/4” over black leather faced NOSHOK pad. Side panels are checkered in “DE” manner, and grip checkering is of unusual borderless spiked pattern. Matching splinter forend has ejector patent numbers stamped on iron, and has Sterlingworth type release. Bore diameter:

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

360


Session 1

Reverse

left -.727, right - .727. Bore restrictions: left - .039 (extra full), right - .017 (mod). Wall thickness: left - .032, right - .030. Drop at heel: 3-7/16”, drop at comb: 1-7/8”. Neutral cast. Weight: 7 lbs. 13 oz. LOP: 13-3/4”. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain over 95% orig blue, thinned a bit on sides and along sharp edges of rib. Action retains 85 - 90% orig case hardening color, thinning and browning on bottom. Stocks retain over 90% of their orig varnish finish with a number of chips and light scratches. Pad is a newer replacement. Checkering is lightly worn. Bores are excellent. Mechanically fine. 51980-11 MGM113 (27,500-35,000) C&R; ESA

361

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1410.

*ICONIC BURT BECKER FOX IN SUPERB ORIGINAL CONDITION. SN 114. Cal. 12 ga. 2-3/4” Chambers. 28” Bbls. American born Burt Becker served a four year apprenticeship with “Uncle” Dan Lefever, during the 1880’s and worked for Batavia Gun Works and Remington. He is first listed in the Philadelphia 1909 city directory as a “gunmaker”. Although he was competent in all areas of gunmaking, it was his expertise in boring barrels producing extremely close patterns, that brought him to national fame, mostly through being canonized by Nash Buckingham, as Becker was instrumental in the building of Buckingham’s famous shotgun, “Bo Whoop”. Becker was closely associated with the A. H. Fox Company, and helped in the development of the “super” Fox, and in fact was responsible for the special boring of every “super”. With Nash Buckingham’s loss of the original “Bo Whoop”, a friend of Buckingham’s contacted Becker, now retired and near 80 years old, to build a replacement. This replacement gun was Becker’s number 121. Seven guns later than the gun offered here (SN 114). This gun has 28” bbls with slightly raised matted rib fitted with two ivory beads. Tops of bbls are hand engraved “FLUID STEEL” “Built by Burt Becker Phila PA U.S.A.” There are bands of small scroll and wiggle borders around breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped “114”, and “PROOF” within an oval. There are some other marks including an “X” and “II”. Bottom of right bbl has tube makers mark “D” over “3” surmounted by a crown. Left bbl is marked with striking weight “3”. Raised sides of flats and breech ends of bbls are damascened. Standard size case hardened Fox action has rebated and double ogee back, as typically found on “FE” guns. Water table is stamped with usual Fox patent dates, and SN “114”. On this particular stamping the “1”’s are inverted. Michael McIntosh in A. H. FOX; THE FINEST GUN IN THE WORLD relates that the new “Bo Whoop” has the “one” dies upside down on the bbl flats. He attributes this to Becker’s failing eye sight. The action features automatic safety and double triggers, and is engraved with coverage similar to that found on early “C” grade guns. It exhibits

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

362


Session 1

Reverse

80% coverage fairly well cut varying sized scroll within geometric borders; a duck flushing from marsh is in circular vignette on bottom of action. Becker is known to have done his own engraving, and most likely did the work on this gun, as it does not match the style and “hand” of usual Fox engraving. Case hardened trigger guard has scroll on bow, and SN “114” on tang. Buttstock is of very attractive well marbled and lightly fiddle figured European walnut and has a slight “swan-neck” to its straight grip. It is fitted with a Jostam open sided pad, and has rather squarish point pattern checkering wrapping over top of grip with execution similar to other Becker made guns. Matching splinter forend has Fox type inset schnabeled horn tip, and Deeley type release. Interior of iron with engraved borders, is stamped with Fox patents, and “114”. Bore diameter: left -.727, right - .727. Bore restrictions (restrictions start approx 2-1/2” behind muzzles): left - .011 (lt mod), right - .008 (IC). Wall thickness: left - .029, right - .031. Drop at heel: 2-1/4”, drop at comb: 1-1/2”. Cast 1/2 off. Weight: 7 lbs. 6 oz. LOP: 14-1/8”. PROVENANCE: Consignor’s notes. Photographs by William Hedrick of another Becker built gun, showing similarities of engraving and checkering. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain well over 95% orig blue, with only a very few light marks. Action retains 85 - 90% orig case hardening color, silvered a bit on fences and bottom. Stocks retain nearly all of their orig hand rubbed oil finish with numerous light scratches and handling marks. Checkering very lightly worn. What appears to be orig pad, is darkened. Bores are excellent. Mechanically excellent. A superb condition, exceedingly rare American classic. 519808 MGM24 (15,000-25,000) C&R; ESA

363

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1

1411.

*SUPER “DE” “SUPER FOX” SHOTGUN WITH STRAIGHT GRIP AND SPECIAL ORDER TRIGGERS WITH CALLAHAN LETTER. SN 31044. (1926) Cal. 12 ga. 3” Chambers. 32” Bbls with Becker over-boring and long tapered chokes, are hand engraved “CHROMOX FLUID STEEL” and “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA U.S.A.” on tops either side of slightly raised, matted rib. Breech ends are engraved with second generation “D” grade 2” triangles of large scroll and acanthus. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, “3IN”, and Fox proof. Sides of flats and cocking slide are engine turned, and breech ends of bbls are damascened. Bottoms of bbls are stamped with striking weight “1”. Case hardened and rebated action features automatic safety (SAFE inlaid in gold), and dbl triggers which are unusually shaped, in that they turn straight down (per factory letter, where they were specified as “not to be curved”). Water table is stamped with SN, and grade and hand engraved with patent information. Action is engraved with full coverage well done bold open scrolling acanthus which surrounds vignettes of snipe on left, and grouse on right. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is in scrolled ribands behind bird scenes. Bottom of action depicts a pointing setter watching as a pair of grouse fly off away in woodlands within fancy border. Trigger plate is engraved with more acanthus scroll. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking vacant shield. SN is on tang. Straight grip buttstock is of lightly streaked and finely stump figured dense European walnut, and measures 14-1/2” over black leather faced Jostam pad. Side panels are checkered and checkering at grip is of fancy pattern with flourishes into butt separated by ribbons in typical “D” style. High grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled ebony tip, is checkered to match buttstock in fancy pattern. Interior of iron has wiggle and line border engraving, and engraved patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.735, right - .734. Bore restrictions: left - .046 (extra full), right .045 (extra full). (These dimensions are typical of Becker bored guns.) Wall thickness: left - .032, right - .030. Drop at heel: 1-7/8””, drop at comb: 1-7/16”. Neutral cast. Weight: 8 lbs. 0 oz. LOP: 14-1/2”. PROVENANCE: Callahan letter giving specifications from orig build card including orig pad, chamber length, shaping of triggers, weight, etc. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain nearly all of what appears to be orig blue, although matting on rib is a bit soft. Engine turning on flats is somewhat stained. Traces of damascening remain on breech ends of bbls and locking lug. Action retains 70 - 80% orig color, silvered and thinned on fences and beads, considerably lightened on bottom of action and trigger guard. Stocks retain most of their orig hand rubbed oil finish with a number of light marks and compressions. Checkering lightly worn and a tad dirty. Bores are excellent, with a hint of frosting. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong and in time. As the Super Fox was intended for use in waterfowling, often in wet and salty conditions, they are mostly of low grade, and often found in less than good condition; this high grade high condition example is very unusual. 51980-37 MGM108 (10,500-15,500) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

364


Session 1 1412.

*VERY RARE (54 PRODUCED) HIGH ORIGINAL CONDITION SPECIAL ORDER FOX 20 GAUGE “DE” SHOTGUN WITH SINGLE TRIGGER. SN 202068. Cal. 20 ga. 2-1/2” Chambers. 26” Bbls with matted rib holding two ivory beads, are hand engraved “CHROMOX FLUID STEEL” “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA. U.S.A.” on tops. There are 2” triangles of open, shaded, scrolling acanthus at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with grade, SN and Fox proof. Sides of flats and cocking slide are engine turned. Small rebated frame, case hardened action has all correct markings on water table, patent info is hand engraved. Action features automatic safety (SAFE in gold) and Kautzky single selective trigger. Action is engraved in classic late “D” style with full coverage shaded scrolling acanthus surrounding oval vignettes of game birds; snipe flying over marsh on left and quail flying over marsh on right. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is on riband at upper rear of each scene. Bottom of action depicts a setter standing in meadow within crenelated border. Trigger plate is engraved with acanthus matching action. Case hardened trigger guard has matching acanthus flanking central shield on box, with SN at grip. Well marbled European walnut Fox capped extra long (obviously special order) pistol grip buttstock measures 13-5/8” over black leather faced Silver pad. Side panels are checkered and fancy pattern checkering with lozenge intrusion and scroll flourishes into butt, is at grip. Matching long slim ejector forend with inset ebony tip, has Fox’s Deeley type release. Interior of iron has border engraving and has all correct marks and numbers. Bore diameter: left -.616, right - .615. Bore restrictions: left - .018 (mod), right - .007 (IC). Wall thickness: left - .031, right - .031. Drop at heel: 2-3/8”, drop at comb: 1-13/16”. Cast 1/4 on. Weight: 5 lbs. 15 oz. LOP: 13-5/8”. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain 90 - 95% orig blue, thinning slightly on sides from normal hand wear, with a few cleaned minor rust spots. Action retains approx 90% orig case hardening color, silvered on high edges and thinning on bottom. Trigger guard retains most of its orig color, silvered at grip. Stocks retain most of an old hand rubbed oil finish, possibly orig, with some minor marks and nicks. Checkering cleaned and slightly worn. Newer pad is somewhat flattened. Bores are excellent with some light scratches. Action is tight. Mechanically excellent. An extremely rare small bore Fox. Factory records indicate a total production of 54, 49 in Philadelphia. 51980-36 MGM13 (27,500-42,500) C&R; ESA

365

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1413.

*SUPERB HIGH ORIGINAL CONDITION EARLY FOX “DE” SHOTGUN. SN 13409. (1909) Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chambers. 30” Bbls with matted rib are marked “Krupp Fluid Steel Made By” “A. H. Fox Gun Co. Phila Pa” on tops. There are 2-7/8” triangles of simple scroll at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with grade, SN and Fox proof. Sides of flats, breech end of bbls, and cocking slide are damascened. Bbls are marked with Krupp steel information, and splinter is reinforced. Case hardened action has all correct markings on water table (patent info is engraved), and features automatic safety and nickel plated dbl triggers. Action is engraved in early “D” style with approx 90% coverage nicely executed large open shaded scroll within line and geometric borders. Flat sides of action have matching smaller scroll, as counterpoint to interesting well detailed vignettes of game with feeding quail in woodland opening on left, and a pair of snipe feeding in marsh on right. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is in rectangle under each scene. Bottom of action depicts a pair of setters in circular vignette. Trigger plate has matching large scroll, and blued trigger guard has scroll on bow and SN on tang. Attractively streaked dense European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 14” over ribbed composition buttplate. Side panels are checkered and point pattern checkering is at grip. Matching slim ejector forend has Fox’s Deeley type release. Interior of iron has engraved wiggle borders, and is also marked with SN and “PATENTS” “PENDING”. Bore diameter: left -.728, right - .728. Bore restrictions: left - .37 (FULL), right - .038 (FULL). Wall thickness: left - .032, right - .034. Drop at heel: 2-7/16”, drop at comb: 1-11/16”. Cast is 3/8 on. Weight: 7 lbs. 11 oz. LOP: 14”. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Excellent, very close to “as new”, with only a hint of sharp edge wear on bbls, and some silvering on fences, and sharp edges of action thinning a bit on bottom. Trigger guard and forend release retain nearly all of their orig blue. There are only some minor marks in orig gloss finish of stock, with some lifting at grip, and some dings on toe line. Checkering shows only light wear, and is clean. Bores are excellent, with a hint of extremely light frosting in right bbl. Mechanically excellent. A truly beautiful gun. 51980-33 MGM16 (12,500-17,500) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

366


Session 1 1414.

*SUPERB EXCEPTIONALLY HIGH ORIGINAL CONDITION A. H. FOX “DE” SHOTGUN. SN 25638. Cal. 12 ga. 2-3/4” Chambers. 30” Bbls with narrow, matted rib, are marked “CHROMOX FLUID COMPRESSED STEEL” “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA U.S.A.” on tops. Breech ends are engraved with second generation “D” grade 2” triangles of large scroll and acanthus. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proof. Sides of flats and cocking slide are engine turned, and breech ends of bbls are damascened. Case hardened and rebated action features automatic safety (SAFE inlaid in gold), and dbl triggers. Water table is stamped with SN and grade and hand engraved with patent information. Action is engraved with full coverage well done bold open scrolling acanthus which surrounds vignettes of snipe on left, and grouse on right. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is in scrolled ribands behind bird scenes. Bottom of action depicts a pointing setter in woodlands within fancy border. Trigger plate is engraved with more acanthus scroll. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking vacant shield. SN is on tang. Round knob pistol grip buttstock is of nicely streaked and lightly figured European walnut, and measures 14-1/8” over ribbed composition buttplate. Side panels are checkered and checkering at grip is of fancy pattern with flourishes into butt separated by ribbons in typical “D” style. High grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled horn tip, is checkered to match buttstock in fancy pattern. Interior of iron has wiggle and line border engraving, and stamped patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.731, right - .730. Bore restrictions: left - .039 (extra full), right - .021 (mod). Wall thickness: left - .028, right - .034. Drop at heel: 2-3/16”, drop at comb: 1-5/16”. Neutral cast. Weight: 7 lbs. 4 oz. LOP: 14-1/8”. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Exceptionally fine, very close to new, with only a few very minor rubs and marks on bbls. Damascening and engine turning is bright. Action retains essentially all of its orig case hardening color, with a touch of silvering on top tang and thumbpiece. Trigger guard and forend latch show a bit of silver. Stocks show a scattering of light marks in their orig finish. Checkering crisp. Bores are excellent. Action is tight. Ejectors are in time. A screaming near new high grade Fox. 51980-27 MGM107 (10,000-15,000) C&R

367

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1415.

*VERY FINE HIGH CONDITION EARLY FOX “DE” SHOTGUN WITH CALLAHAN LETTER. SN 14741. Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chambers. 28” Bbls fitted with wide matted rib are marked “Krupp Fluid Steel Made By” “A. H. Fox Gun Co. Phila. Pa” on tops. Breech ends have 3-1/8” pyramids of simple scroll engraving. Bbl flats are stamped with grade and SN. Cocking slide and sides of flats are damascened. Splinter is reinforced. Case hardened early type action without stock rebate, features automatic safety (SAFE engraved) and dbl triggers. Action is engraved with near full coverage nicely cut and shaded large open scroll within dbl line and geometric borders. This attractive scroll surrounds vignettes of game on sides of action; pair of feeding grouse on left, and snipe on right. These scenes are nicely detailed with dark shaded trees and limbs in backgrounds. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is on a banner under each scene. Bottom of action depicts a pair of setters in circular vignette. Trigger plate is engraved in matching scroll which extends onto blued trigger guard bow, with SN on tang. Classically marbled European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 14” over ribbed composition buttplate. Side panels are nicely checkered, and grip checkering is of point pattern. Matching short splinter ejector forend with wiggle border engraving and “PATENTS PENDING” on iron, has typical Deeley type release. Bore diameter: left -.725, right - .725. Bore restrictions: left - .018 (mod), right - .003 (IC). Wall thickness: left - .029, right - .030. Drop at heel: 2-1/2”, drop at comb: 1-1/2”. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 12 oz. LOP: 14”. PROVENANCE: Callahan letter with specifications, and Callahan hang tag with specifications. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbls retain 90% of what appears to be orig blue. Damascening remains strong on flats. Action retains 40 - 50% orig case hardening color, quite strong where protected, but is mostly worn to a pleasant pewter gray. Trigger guard retains most of its orig blue. Stocks retain most of their orig finish with raised grain that has some oil added. Finish is somewhat worn through around grip, checkering somewhat worn. Bores are very fine, shiny over some scattered very light pitting. Action is tight. Ejectors are in time. A very pleasing older Fox. 51980-32 MGM112 (9,00014,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

368


Session 1 1416.

*SCARCE 20 GAUGE FOX “XE” SHOTGUN WITH CASE. SN 201025. Cal. 20 ga. 2-3/4” Chambers. 28” Bbls are stamped “Krupp Fluid Steel” and “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA “ on tops either side of slightly raised, matted rib. Breech ends are engraved with second generation “X” grade 2” triangles of large shaded scroll and acanthus. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proof. Cocking slide and sides of flats are damascened. Case hardened small sized rebated action features automatic safety (SAFE engraved), and dbl triggers. Action is engraved with near full coverage bold open scrolling acanthus which surrounds vignettes of ducks on left, and grouse on right. Fences are also acanthus engraved. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is over each bird scene. Bottom of action depicts a bushy tailed fox in mountainous background within oval border. Trigger plate is engraved with more acanthus scroll. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking vacant shield. SN is on tang. Beautifully marbled and finely figured dense European walnut Fox capped pistol grip buttstock measures 13-3/16” over ribbed composition buttplate. Side panels are checkered and checkering at grip is of modified point pattern in two sections separated by ribbons. Typical high grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled ebony tip, is checkered to match buttstock. Interior of iron is stamped with patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.620, right - .620. Bore restrictions: left - .032 (full), right - .012 (mod). Wall thickness: left - .028, right - .029. Drop at heel: 3-3/16”, drop at comb: 1-3/4”. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 6 oz. LOP: 13-3/16”. Included with gun is a green canvas tan leather trimmed Browning case lined in olive green cloth. PROVENANCE: The Larry Kelley Estate Collection. CONDITION: Very fine. Bbls retain approx 90% orig blue, with a number of light marks and some silvering on edges of rib. Action retains 50 - 60% orig case hardening color, pleasingly silvered on fences and bottom. Stocks retain most of their orig finish with a very light refresh and cleaning of rear portion of buttstock, checkering slightly worn and soiled. Bores are fine, with some scattered very light pitting. Action is tight. Mechanically fine. Case is excellent. A scarce little Fox (with estimated production of 152), which has truly wonderful stock wood. 52082-1 MGM111 (17,500-27,500) C&R

369

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1417.

*FINE AND RARE 20 GAUGE A. H. FOX (PHILADELPHIA) “XE” SHOTGUN WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 202017. Cal. 20 ga. 2-1/2” Chambers. 26” Chromox bbls with Philadelphia address, are fitted with two ivory beads on narrow matted rib. Engine turned bbl flats are marked with SN, grade, and Fox proof. Small sized case hardened action features automatic safety, rebated frame, and dbl triggers. Action is engraved in typical “X” style with pairs of birds; quails on left and ducks on right, surrounded by fields of oak leaf acanthus scroll. This scroll extends 1-1/2” down breech ends of bbls. “ANSLEY H FOX” is above each bird scene, and bottom of action portrays oval vignette of bushy tailed fox in mountainous background. Trigger guard with acorns and oak leaves surrounding shield on bow, engraved “JCI”, has SN on tang. Well streaked and lightly figured dense European walnut Fox capped pistol grip buttstock measures 14” over leather faced Silver pad. Side panels are checkered with arcaded front border, and grip checkering is of fancy crenelated pattern. Matching long and slim splinter ejector forend has inset schnabeled ebony tip, and usual Fox Deeley type release. Bore diameter: left -.615, right - .615. Bore restrictions: left - .028 (full), right - .008 (IC). Wall thickness: left - .030, right - .032. Drop at heel: 3-1/2”, drop at comb: 1-7/8”. Cast off slightly. Weight: 5 lbs. 14 oz. LOP: 14”. PROVENANCE: Factory letter confirming specifications, and that the gun was shipped to William Read and Son Sept 1920. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain 80 - 85% orig blue thinning at breech ends from normal hand wear, silvered on sharp edges. Action retains approx 80% orig case hardening color, silvered on fences, sharp edges, and around bottom. Trigger guard retains over 30% of its color on bow, silver gray on tang. Forend latch shows color where protected. Stocks retain most of their orig finish with numerous light marks and scratches. Orig pad has been cleaned up. Checkering lightly worn at grip, considerably worn at rear portion of forend with denting and other damage on left side. Bores are excellent. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong and in time. A scarce little gun, factory records indicate a total of 152 “XE” 20 bores were made, nearly all in Philadelphia. 51980-25 MGM7 (12,500-17,500) C&R; ESA

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

370


Session 1 1418.

*EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND RARE 16 GAUGE A. H. FOX (PHILADELPHIA) “XE” SHOTGUN WITH SCARCE 30” BARRELS AND SINGLE TRIGGER WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 301081. Cal. 16 ga. 2-3/4” Chambers. 30” Chromox bbls with Philadelphia address, are fitted with two ivory beads on narrow matted rib. Engine turned bbl flats are marked with SN, grade, and Fox proof. Small sized case hardened action features automatic safety, rebated frame, and Kautzky single selective trigger. Action is engraved in typical “X” style with pairs of birds; ducks on left and quail on right, surrounded by fields of oak leaf acanthus scroll. Matching scroll extends 1-1/2” down breech ends of bbls. “ANSLEY H FOX” is above each bird scene, and bottom of action portrays oval vignette of bushy tailed fox in mountainous background. Trigger guard with acorns and oak leaves surrounding shield on bow, has SN on tang. Nicely mottled dense European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 13-3/4” over leather faced Silver type pad. Side panels are checkered with arcaded front border, and grip checkering is of fancy pattern. Matching long and slim splinter ejector forend has inset schnabeled horn tip, and usual Fox Deeley type release. Bore diameter: left -.657, right - .666. Bore restrictions: left - .025 (full), right - .034 (full). Wall thickness: left - .040, right - .038. Drop at heel: 2-15/16”, drop at comb: 1-11/16”. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 9 oz. LOP: 13-3/4”. PROVENANCE: Factory letter confirming specifications, and that the gun was shipped to Galef with no date given. Copies of two cards which exist for this gun, one stamped “Rush”. Handwritten cover note from Roe S. Clark (Savage Arms historian). Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Extremely fine. Bbls retain 95 - 97% orig blue, most loss due to silvering on sides of rib, and a bit of thinning from normal hand wear. Bbl flats, extractors, cocking slide, and breech ends of bbls retain nearly all of their engine turning and damascening. Action retains over 90% orig case hardening color, silvered on high edges, thinning a bit on bottom. Thumbpiece of top lever is silvered. Trigger guard has thinning color on tang. Stocks retain nearly all their orig finish, with scattering of light nicks and dents. Some thinning of finish has occurred with installation of new pad. Checkering is dark and very lightly worn. Forend latch retains most of its color. Bores are excellent, bright and shiny throughout. Breechface shows very little evidence of ever being fired. Mechanically excellent. Ejectors are strong. Trigger works. Undoubtedly one of the finest “XE’s” in existence. Factory records indicate that a total of 90 16 bores were made in this grade, 79 in Philadelphia. How many with 30” barrels? 51980-20 MGM6 (12,500-17,500) C&R; ESA 371

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1419.

*SPECIAL ORDER FOX “XE” PIGEON SHOTGUN MADE FOR W. R. ROSEBRUGH (FIRST EVER MADE) WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 19225. Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chambers. 30” Bbls with broad matted pigeon rib are marked “Krupp Fluid Steel Made By” “A. H. Fox Gun Co. Phila PA” on tops. There are 1-1/2” triangles of rudimentary oak leaves at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proof. Case hardened action features automatic safety, and dbl triggers. Engraving was obviously special ordered, and is different from that usually found on Fox guns, and consists of 70% coverage varying sized scroll within scrolling borders. Side panels of action are engraved in small scroll in the area where game scenes are usually found. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is on each side above and to the rear of fine scroll lozenge. Bottom of action portrays a pigeon perched on a stump in wooded background. Per factory letter, the name “W. R. Rosebrugh” is in gold on scroll engraved trigger guard bow. SN is on tang. Nicely streaked and well figured European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 14-5/8” over Silver type pad. Side panels are checkered and checkering at grip is of typical point pattern. Matching splinter ejector forend has Deeley type release. Bore diameter: left -.726, right - .727. Bore restrictions: left - .035 (full), right - .036 (full). Wall thickness: left - .029, right - .030. Drop at heel: 2-3/4”, drop at comb: 1-5/8”. Cast off slightly. Weight: 7 lbs. 6 oz. LOP: 14-5/8”. PROVENANCE: Factory letter confirming specifications, including “D” grade stock checkering, special “X” grade engraving, and gold inlay on trigger guard, and that the gun was shipped Feb 22, 1912 to Marshall - Wells, Canada “W. R. Rosebrugh”. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Excellent, as partially refinished. Bbls retain nearly all of orig blue, with some minor marks and thinning at breech ends. Orig damascening on flats is good. There are some electric pencil marks on bottom of left bbl where covered by forend. Action retains 60 - 70% orig case hardening color, silvered on sharp edges, fences, and bottom of action. Trigger plate retains most of its color, as does trigger guard, which is silvered considerably at grip. Stocks retain essentially all of a very well done hand rubbed oil refinish, with a few subsequent light marks. Checkering nicely re-cut. Bores are very fine to excellent, with a hint of frosting, mostly in right bbl, along with one or two very light pings. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong and in time. Mainspring of right bbl sounds a bit weak. Very few of these high grade guns were made. 51980-17 MGM8 (10,000-15,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

372


Session 1 1420.

*FINE CONDITION PHILADELPHIA FOX “XE” GRADE SHOTGUN. SN 22088. Cal. 12 ga. 30” Bbls with narrow, matted rib are marked “Krupp Fluid Steel Made By” “A. H. Fox Gun Co. Phila Pa” on tops. There are 1-3/4” pyramids of shaded acanthus scroll at breech ends. Bbl flats are marked with grade, SN, and Fox proof, twin ivory beads. Sides of flats and cocking slide are damascened. Case hardened action with automatic safety and dbl triggers is engraved in “X” style with near full coverage semi-relief acanthus surrounding oval vignettes of game on sides; ducks on left and quail on right both under “ANSLEY H FOX”. Bottom of action shows oval vignette of fox with bowed head. Trigger plate has more acanthus which continues onto trigger guard bow where it surrounds a vacant shield. SN is on tang. Dark, somewhat burl figured European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 14-1/4” over brown Old English pad. Side panels are checkered and modified point pattern checkering at grip has ribbons through pattern. Matching splinter ejector forend has inset ebony tip with patent dates barely legible on iron. Bore diameter: left -.726, right - .727. Bore restrictions: left - .008 (IC), right - .032 (full). Wall thickness: left - .029, right .027. Drop at heel: 2-1/2”, drop at comb: 1-9/16”. Neutral cast. Weight: 7 lbs. 0 oz. LOP: 14-1/4”. PROVENANCE: The Forrest G. Rhodes collection. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Fine, as partially refinished. Bbls retain 90 - 95% of what appears to be orig blue, thinning at carry point and silvered at high edges. Action retains 40 - 50% orig case hardening color where protected, remainder a pleasing silver gray. Stocks retain nearly all of an older rubbed oil finish with some subsequent marks, checkering nicely re-cut. Bores are excellent, with some light scratches. Action is tight. Ejectors are in time. A nice classic “XE”. 52465-8 MGM234 (9,000-15,000) C&R; ESA

373

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1421.

*RARE, AS FOUND, HIGH ORIGINAL CONDITION SMALL BORE PHILADELPHIA FOX “XE” SHOTGUN WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 301648. Cal. 16 ga. 2-1/2” Chambers. 28” Bbls are stamped “CHROMOX FLUID COMPRESSED STEEL” and “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA U.S.A.” on tops either side of slightly raised, matted rib. Breech ends are engraved with second generation “X” grade 2” triangles of large shaded scroll and acanthus. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proof. Cocking slide and sides of bbl flats are engine turned. Breech ends of bbls are damascened. Striking weight “3” is stamped on bottoms of bbls. Case hardened action with rebated frame, features automatic safety (SAFE engraved), and dbl triggers. Action is engraved with near full coverage bold open scrolling acanthus which surrounds vignettes of snipe on left, and grouse on right. Fences are also acanthus engraved. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is over each bird scene. Bottom of action depicts a bushy tailed fox in mountainous background within oval border. Trigger plate is engraved with more acanthus scroll. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking vacant shield. SN is on tang. Well streaked and lightly figured European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 13-1/2” over essentially flattened leather covered Silver pad. Side panels are checkered and checkering at grip is of modified point pattern with fancy back. A silver oval on toe line is engraved with indecipherable monogram. Typical high grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled ebony tip, is checkered to match buttstock. Interior of iron is engraved with patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.661, right - .657. Bore restrictions: left - .019 (mod), right - .008 (IC). Wall thickness: left - .031, right - .032. Drop at heel: 2-11/16”, drop at comb: 1-5/8”. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 2 oz. LOP: 13-1/2”. PROVENANCE: Clark letter giving specifications from orig build card and stating gun was originally built for “O. Zischang” most likely “W. O. Zischang” the son of famed rifle smith “A. O. Zischang” who died in 1925. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Excellent, original as found. Bbls retain 95 - 98% orig blue, with only some light handling marks and rubs. Engine turning and damascening are strong. Action retains 70 - 80% orig case hardening color, pleasingly silvered around bottom and fences from normal hand wear. Thumbpiece is slightly silvered as is trigger guard tang. Color on forend latch is thinning at rear. Stocks retain nearly all their orig finish with some light marks. Later pad has rubber considerably flattened and deteriorated. Orig factory specifications were for a LOP of 13-1/8” and wood is at its orig length of 13”, giving a 13-1/8” LOP with a thin buttplate, or 14” with a new pad. Bores are excellent. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong and in time. It is estimated that only 90 “XE” 16 bores were made, 79 in Philadelphia. 51980-10 MGM110 (9,000-14,000) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

374


Session 1 1422.

*UNUSUAL FOX “XE” SHOTGUN WITH DEEPLY CUT ENGRAVING WITH CALLAHAN LETTER. SN 22490. Cal. 12 ga. 3” Chambers. 32” Bbls are stamped “Krupp Fluid Steel” and “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO. PHILA. PA “ on tops either side of slightly raised, matted rib, with front ivory bead. Breech ends are engraved with second generation “X” grade 2” triangles of large shaded scroll and acanthus. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proof. Case hardened action features automatic safety (SAFE engraved), and dbl triggers. Action is engraved with near full coverage bold open scrolling acanthus which surrounds vignettes of snipe on left, and grouse on right. The engraving on the sides of this gun is exceptionally deep. Fences are also acanthus engraved. “ANSLEY H. FOX” is over each bird scene. Bottom of action depicts a bushy tailed fox within oval border. Trigger plate is engraved with more acanthus scroll, but not as deep as action. Trigger guard has more scroll flanking vacant shield. SN is on tang. Very finely figured and well marbled dense European walnut pistol grip buttstock measures 13-3/4” over ribbed composition buttplate. Pistol grip ends in an ogee flourish instead of being capped. Side panels are checkered and checkering at grip is of modified point pattern in two sections separated by ribbons. Typical high grade Fox extra long splinter forend with inset schnabeled ebony tip, is checkered to match buttstock. Interior of iron is engraved with patent dates. Bore diameter: left -.727, right - .727. Bore restrictions: left - .034 (full), right - .021 (mod). Wall thickness: left - .032, right - .030. Drop at heel: 2-1/2”, drop at comb: 1-1/2”. Cast about 1/4” on. Weight: 7 lbs. 4 oz. LOP: 13-3/4”. PROVENANCE: Callahan letter giving specifications from orig build card and stating gun was originally built with single selective trigger. (It appears gun was returned to factory for new trigger plate and trigger guard at some time.) Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Excellent. Bbls retain nearly all of a well done rust re-blue, over some light scratches and marks, with subsequent silvering on rib. Action retains 70 - 80% orig color, silvered and thinned on fences and beads, considerably lightened on bottom of action (color was never very strong.). Trigger guard retains nearly all of what appears to be its orig blue with some small rust stains. Stocks retain most of their orig hand rubbed oil finish with a number of light marks and compressions. Checkering lightly worn. Bores are very fine to excellent, very lightly frosted. Action is tight. Ejectors are strong and in time. 51980-13 MGM109 (8,000-12,000) C&R; ESA

375

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1423.

*SUPERB HIGH ORIGINAL CONDITION FOX LIGHTWEIGHT 20 GAUGE “CE” SHOTGUN. SN 202659. Cal. 20 ga. 2-1/2” Chambers. 26” Bbls with slightly raised matted rib are marked with Chromox steel information and Philadelphia name and address on tops. There are 1-1/2” triangles of simple scroll at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with grade, SN and Fox proof. Sides of flats and cocking slide are engine turned. Breech ends of bbls are damascened. Right bbl is marked with striking weight “4” (light). Small frame, case hardened action has all correct markings on water table, and features automatic safety and dbl triggers. Action is engraved in classic late “C” style with 60% coverage simple scroll within line and geometric borders. This attractive scroll surrounds oval vignettes of game birds on each side of action; quail (?) on left, and snipe on right; both under “ANSLEY H. FOX”. Bottom of action depicts a setter in wooded background in circular vignette. Trigger plate is nicely scroll engraved and blued trigger guard has scroll on bow and SN on tang. Nicely stump figured American walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 13-3/4” over black leather faced Silver pad. Side panels are checkered and point pattern checkering is at grip. Matching slim ejector forend with inset ebony tip, has Fox’s Deeley type release. Interior of iron and stock have all correct marks and numbers. Bore diameter: left -.619, right - .619. Bore restrictions: left - .011 (Lt mod), right - .007 (IC). Wall thickness: left - .024, right - .025. Drop at heel: 2-7/8”, drop at comb: 1-11/16”. Neutral cast. Weight: 5 lbs. 12 oz. LOP: 13-3/4”. PROVENANCE: Copy of build card, stamped “Rush” with all specifications matching except stock length and chokes, and indicating that shotgun was shipped to Abercrombie & Fitch Co, with no date given. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Excellent, very close to “as new”, with only a hint of sharp edge wear on action, and a few very minor marks in orig wood finish, most notably a few light scratches on left side of butt. Case hardening on forend latch and blue on trigger guard are both exceptional, over 97%. Old pad shows deterioration and flattening. Bores are excellent. Mechanically excellent. An incredible closet queen. 51980-21 MGM12 (15,000-22,500) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

376


Session 1 1424.

*INCREDIBLE VERY NEAR TO NEW 16 GAUGE “CE” PHILADELPHIA FOX SHOTGUN. SN 302327. Cal. 16 ga. 2-1/2” Chambers. 28” Bbls are marked “CHROMOX FLUID COMPRESSED STEEL” and “MADE BY A. H. FOX GUN CO PHILA PA U.S.A.” on tops. There are 1-1/2” triangles of simple scroll at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proof with sides as well as cocking slide engine turned. Breech ends of bbls are damascened. Bottom of left bbl is stamped with striking weight “3”. Small sized case hardened action features automatic safety and dbl triggers. Action is engraved in typical “C” fashion in a style that did not change from the introduction of this grade, having 80% coverage simple scroll within line and geometric borders surrounding oval game scenes on each side; pair of grouse (?) on left, and snipe on right, both under “ANSLEY H FOX”. Bottom of action has setter in circle. Trigger plate is scroll engraved. There is a vacant scroll flanked serpentine banner on trigger guard bow. SN is on tang. Nicely marbled European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 141/8” over ribbed composition buttplate. Side panels are checkered, and standard point pattern checkering is at grip. Matching splinter forend has inlet ebony tip, and typical Deeley type release. Ejector patent information is stamped on iron. Bore diameter: left -.661, right - .661. Bore restrictions: left - .030 (full), right .017 (mod). Wall thickness: left - .032, right - .033. Drop at heel: 2-7/16”, drop at comb: 1-11/16”. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 5 oz. LOP: 14-1/8”. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Exceptionally fine, very nearly as new, appears unfired since proof, with only a few of the very faintest marks in all wood and metal surfaces. Breech ends of bbls and end of locking lug show some very minor rust stains. Mechanically excellent. A truly superb small bore Fox, with an estimated production of 305 in this grade. 51980-3 MGM114 (12,500-17,500) C&R

377

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1425.

*INCREDIBLE NEAR NEW ORIGINAL CONDITION EARLY FOX “CE” GRADE SHOTGUN WITH ORIGINAL BOX. SN 15699. (ca 1910) Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chambers. 28” Bbls with matted rib are marked “Krupp Fluid Steel Made By” “A. H. Fox Gun Co. Phila Pa” on tops. There are 1-3/4” triangles of simple scroll at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with grade and SN. Sides of flats and cocking slide are bright polished. Bottoms of bbls are marked with Krupp steel information, and splinter is reinforced. Case hardened action has all correct markings on water table, and features automatic safety and nickel plated dbl triggers. Action is engraved in early “C” style with approx 50% coverage simple scroll within line and geometric borders. This scroll surrounds oval vignettes of game birds, with a pair of quail on left, and pair of snipe on right, both under “ANSLEY H. FOX”. Bottom of action depicts a setter in circular vignette. Trigger plate has a ring of matching large scroll, and blued trigger guard has scroll on bow and SN on tang. Wavy streaked and broad tiger stripe figured European walnut round knob pistol grip buttstock measures 14-1/8” over ribbed composition buttplate. Side panels are checkered and point pattern checkering is at grip. Matching slim ejector forend has Fox’s Deeley type release, and SN on interior of iron flanked by “PATENTS” “PENDING”. Bore diameter: left -.725, right - .725. Bore restrictions: left - .017 (mod), right - .003 (IC). Wall thickness: left - .032, right - .036. Drop at heel: 2-7/16”, drop at comb: 1-1/2”. Neutral cast. Weight: 6 lbs. 15 oz. LOP: 141/8”. Gun is accompanied by what appears to be its orig yellowish brown cardboard box with green and black end label marked with specifications for this gun, as well as SN. Bottom is stamped “Edw. K. Tryon Co.” “for”. Box contains a large amount of newspaper used as packing from the Bangor Daily News, Friday March 19, 1915, as well as old cloth bags for action and bbls. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Exceptionally fine, very close to new, with only the barest hint of high edge wear on all metal parts, and a few light marks in wood finishes, except for a 1/4” x 1/8” ding above side panel checkering on left side. Mechanically excellent. Box is very fine. Label is beginning to fade. It is hard to imagine finding a higher condition early high grade Fox. 51980-6 MGM18 (6,500-9,500) C&R

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

378


Session 1 1426.

*EARLY 20 GAUGE PHILADELPHIA FOX “CE” SHOTGUN. SN 200664. (1915) Cal. 20 ga. 2-1/2” Chambers. 28” Bbls with narrow matted rib are marked “Krupp Fluid Steel Made By” and “A. H. FOX GUN CO PHILA PA” on tops. There are 1-1/2” triangles of simple scroll at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proof along with “20 GA”. Cocking slide and sides of flats are damascened. Small sized case hardened action features automatic safety and dbl triggers. Action is engraved in typical “C” fashion in a style that changed little since the introduction of this grade, having 80% coverage simple scroll within line and geometric borders surrounding oval game scenes on each side; pair of quail on left, and snipe on right, both under “ANSLEY H FOX”. Bottom of action has setter in circle. Trigger plate is scroll engraved. There is a burst of scroll on trigger guard bow. SN is on tang. Dark, somewhat marbled European walnut capped pistol grip buttstock measures 13” over ribbed composition buttplate. Side panels are checkered, and modified point pattern checkering is at grip. Matching splinter ejector forend has inlet ebony tip, and Sterlingworth type spring tension release. Ejector patent information is stamped on iron. Bore diameter: left -.625, right - .625. Bore restrictions: left - .026 (full), right - .012 (mod). Wall thickness: left - .035, right - .036. Drop at heel: 3-3/8”, drop at comb: 1-13/16”. Cast slightly off. Weight: 6 lbs. 7 oz. LOP: 13”. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Fine. Bbls retain approx 80% of their orig blue with most thinning and silvering at breech ends. Action retains 20 - 30% orig case hardening color, strong where protected, the balance a smooth pewter gray. Stocks retain most of their varnish finish, considerably worn through at grip, comb and around side panels with numerous light marks and dings. Checkering slightly worn and dirty. There is a 1” crack running from bottom of forend iron forward into checkering, and there is some lifting and slight cracking of wood behind top tang. There is a good sized chip out of the toe of buttplate, wood unaffected. Bores are excellent, with some light scratches in right bbl. Mechanically fine. Approx 413 of these great little guns were made, around 370 in Philadelphia. 51980-18 MGM116 (5,500-9,500) C&R

379

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1427.

*SUPERB ORIGINAL CONDITION EARLY PHILADELPHIA FOX “CE” GRADE SHOTGUN WITH STRAIGHT GRIP. SN 18423. (1910) Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chambers. 30” Bbls with broad matted rib are marked “Krupp Fluid Steel Made By” and “A. H. FOX GUN CO PHILA PA” on tops, twin ivory beads. There are 1-1/2” triangles of simple scroll at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with SN, grade, and Fox proofs. Cocking slide and sides of flats are damascened. Splinter is of reinforced type. Case hardened action features automatic safety and dbl triggers. Action is engraved in early “C” fashion having 80% coverage simple scroll within line and geometric borders surrounding oval game scenes on each side; pair of quail (?) on left, and snipe on right, both under “ANSLEY H FOX”. Bottom of action has pointing setter in circle. Trigger plate is scroll engraved. There is a splash of scroll on trigger guard bow. SN is on tang. Well marbled and very nicely figured European walnut straight grip buttstock measures 14-1/4” over leather faced Silver type pad. Side panels are checkered, and point pattern checkering is at grip. Matching splinter ejector forend has Deeley type release. Ejector patent information is stamped on blued iron with last date of 1910. Bore diameter: left -.725, right - .725. Bore restrictions: left - .036 (full), right - .035 (full). Wall thickness: left - .030, right - .030. Drop at heel: 2-11/16”, drop at comb: 1-5/8”. Neutral cast. Weight: 7 lbs. 5 oz. LOP: 14-1/4”. PROVENANCE: Estate collection of Dana Tauber. Special Note: This item(s) contains plant or animal properties that may be covered by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Please read the Conditions of Sale, section 15, for more information regarding the Endangered Species Act, and your responsibilities as a buyer. CONDITION: Exceptionally fine. Bbls retain nearly all of their satiny orig blue. Action retains 95% + orig case hardening color. Trigger guard and forend latch retain 80 - 90% orig blue. There are a number of light marks and scratches in the orig finish of stock, checkering lightly worn. Old Silver pad, possibly orig, is petrified. Bores are excellent with some very light scratches. Mechanically fine. When one looks at the superb fit and finish of these early guns it is easy to understand why they became so popular. 51980-7 MGM118 (5,500-8,500) C&R; ESA

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information

380


Session 1 1428.

*FINE EARLY FOX “C” GRADE SHOTGUN WITH STRAIGHT GRIP AND ORIGINAL SKELETON BUTT WITH FACTORY LETTER. SN 11532. (1910) Cal. 12 ga. 2-5/8” Chambers. 32” Bbls with matted rib are marked “Krupp Fluid Steel Made By” “A. H. Fox Gun Co. Phila Pa” on tops. There are 1-3/4” triangles of simple scroll at breech ends. Bbl flats are stamped with grade and SN. Sides of flats and cocking slide are lightly damascened. Bbls are marked with Krupp steel information, and splinter is reinforced. Case hardened action has all correct markings on water table, and features no safety and nickel plated dbl triggers. Action is engraved in early “C” style with approx 50% coverage simple scroll within line and geometric borders. This scroll surrounds oval vignettes of game birds, with a pair of snipe on left, and pair of quail on right, both under “ANSLEY H. FOX”. Bottom of action depicts a setter in circular vignette. Trigger plate has a ring of matching large scroll, and blued trigger guard has scroll on bow and SN on tang. Well marbled and lightly figured dense European walnut straight grip buttstock measures 14-1/2” over skeleton steel buttplate. Side panels are checkered and point pattern checkering is at grip. Matching slim forend has Fox’s Deeley type release, and SN on interior of iron. Bore diameter: left -.730, right - .729. Bore restrictions: left - .036 (FULL), right - .037 (FULL). Wall thickness: left - .037, right - .040. Drop at heel: 2-1/8”, drop at comb: 1-3/8”. Neutral cast. Weight: 8 lbs. 1 oz. LOP: 14-1/2”. PROVENANCE: Factory letter confirming specifications, and relating that notes on the card were “very thick comb”, “very thick grip, 4-1/8” circumference” “take off safety and plug slot” “skeleton butt”. This gun was shipped to Mr. Pratt C/O E.K Tryon for H. A. Bender in 1910. Estate collection of Dana Tauber. CONDITION: Fine. Bbls retain most of an old sympathetic blue enhancement with subsequent thinning on sides. Action retains 40 - 50 % orig case hardening color, strong where protected, turning a pleasing silver to pewter gray elsewhere. Trigger guard retains perhaps 20% of its orig blue, mostly on bow. Stocks retain 60 70% orig finish with numerous minor scratches, dents, and rubs, worn through from normal hand wear at grip and on high edges. Checkering is considerably worn, and has not been re-cut. Bores are excellent with few light scratches. Action is tight, when gun is assembled. Mechanically fine. 51980-15 MGM17 (3,750-5,500) C&R

381

Visit www.jamesdjulia.com for more information


Session 1 1429.

*NICELY RESTORED LIGHTWEIGHT 20 GAUGE “CE” FOX SHOTGUN WITH CALLAHAN LETTER.