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T H E M A G A Z I N E O F H U D S O N VA L L E Y F A R M S , F O O D A N D C U I S I N E NUMBER 85   MARCH–MAY 2019   VALLEYTABLE.COM

INSIDE: HUDSON VALLEY RESTAURANT WEEK


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number 85  march–may 2019

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featured articles

17 more & more more good

Have you noticed? There’s a craft beverage revolution going on. One former bartender spotted an opportunity, and the soda syrups, bitters, teas and tisanes he produces are now at the core of a new food hub that, in turn, is breathing new life to an old industrial complex. by Jeff Storey

25 hudson valley restaurant week Pop quiz: If you scheduled lunch and dinner at different restaurants participating in Hudson Valley Restaurant Week, how many lunches and dinners would you have to eat each day in order to have a meal at all of them within two weeks?

40 adams at 100 Adams Fairacre Farms, one of the most iconic businesses in the Mid-Hudson region, at first was just a simple farm stand near Poughkeepsie. Now it’s a fourstore mega market with a nationally known garden center. And yes, it was, and still is, family owned. by David Handschuh

68 locally grown: where have all the farmers gone? With the average age of working farmers hovering around 60, a wise and (dare we say) old farmer, who thus far has defied the trend to retirement, ponders who will be around to operate the farms in the decades ahead. by Keith Stewart

PHOTO BY MELISSA HARJES, SWEET MELISSA PHOTOGRAPHY

departments 8 Good Stuff 11 Openings 48 Eating by the Season Chives, by Alice Gabriel Radishes, by Leslie Coons Bostian 55 Farms, Food & Markets The CSA model; 2019 CSA farms 63 Up Close bluecashew Kitchen Homestead, by Robin Cherry 74 Index to advertisers 76 Directory 80 Last Call Photograph by David Handschuh

recipes 49 Chive and mint butter 50 Mushroom and egg with chives 51 Hot parsely mousse with chive cream 52 Lobster and daikon slaw with black radish and yogurt vinaigrette 53 Butter-poached radishes

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EDITORS LETTER

five shades of black and white We rarely do a theme issue, and we didn’t plan for this issue to be one, but as it evolved, we saw a pattern, and the more we explored it the more fun it became. We’re talking about opposites here—young and old, veteran and neophyte, mainstream and experimental. There’s no inviolate party line, not a sole outlook or single analysis of a subject that’s acceptable, no oath or allegiance. (Thankfully, we’re not part of the Washington crowd these days—the contentious, confrontational culture that has become our government unfortunately infects our entire society with fear and conformity—exactly the opposite of what our founders envisioned.) In these pages, we celebrate an iconic Hudson Valley market, established by Italian immigrants near Poughkeepsie exactly 100 years ago. Adams Fairacre Farms, once not much more than a roadside vegetable stand, is now a four-store force that pretty much sets the standard when it comes to select local and organic products, garden and landscape supplies. On the other side of that coin is a young entrepreneur in Beacon who could have written the book on “doing it my way.” Jason Schuler is a part of the current craft beverage renaissance in the valley, but he didn’t follow the crowd into distilled spirits, beer, wine or cider. He developed a line of specialized non-alcoholic syrups and tinctures for mixing with cocktails or carbonated water. Initial production was in a rented restaurant kitchen in Beacon after hours; his success spurred the move to a new manufacturing center in Dutchess County that is a whole ’nother story. If there was yet another side of the coin it would no doubt feature a bust of Keith Stewart, our farmer-turned-writer, who here muses on the fate of Hudson Valley agriculture when the current crop of decidedly aged farmers moves on, or under, as the case may be. The counterpoint is a look at the valley’s Community Suppported Agriculture farms and the influence of the newly formed Hudson Valley CSA Coalition, which aims to promote both the philosophy and practice of CSA subscription farming, itself an innovative, forward-looking agricultural and economic model. Reinvention, too, was the whole purpose behind the migration of bluecashew Kitchen Homestead from Rhinebeck to downtown Kingston last year, and by all accounts the Kingston duo that owns the business chose a winning move. Robin Cherry tells the whole story. We cover a lot of exciting ground in this issue, literally and thematically. (You may cover a lot of ground, too, once you’ve looked over the list of participating restaurants in this spring’s Hudson Valley Restaurant Week. A trip to any of them is worth it.) There’s a whole lot more where this came from, so stay with us.  —JN

THE VALLEY TABLE THE MAGAZINE OF HUDSON VALLEY FARMS, FOOD AND CUISINE THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. 380 MAIN STREET, SUITE 202 BEACON, NY 12508 (845) 765-2600 valleytable.com hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com NUMBER 85 MARCH – MAY 2019 PUBLISHER Janet Crawshaw janetc@valleytable.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jerry Novesky jerryn@valleytable.com Managing Director Jennifer Bannan jennifer@valleytable.com Content Coordinator Lesley Rozycki Marketing Coordinator Marcella Micillo Office Administrator Meghan Merry meghan@valleytable.com Graphic Design & Production Honest Creative Intern Jillian Wozniak Advertising sales@valleytable.com Contributors to this issue Susan Baker Melissa Harjes Robin Cherry Lisa Kelsey Leslie Coons Bostian Meghan Spiro Eva Deitch Keith Stewart Alice Gabriel Jeff Storey David Handschuh THE VALLEY TABLE is exclusively devoted to Hudson Valley agriculture, food and cuisine. We support sustainable agricultural practices and efforts to strengthen the links among regional producers, marketers, restaurateurs and consumers. We urge you to patronize businesses that feature Hudson Valley products and to support initiatives that benefit regional agriculture and related efforts. Letters to the editor regarding magazine content are welcome and will be published as space permits. Letters should be mailed to the address above, or emailed to editor@valleytable.com. To be considered for publication, letters must be signed. THE VALLEY TABLE is published four times a year (March, June, Sept and Dec). Distribution is free at selected sites throughout the Hudson Valley or by subscription. Subscriptions are $20 per year. To subscribe, mail a check or money order payable to The Valley Table, 380 Main St., Suite 202, Beacon, NY 12508 or visit valleytable.com. COPYRIGHT © 2019, THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, mechanical or electronic, without written permission of the publishers. Advertisements designed by The Valley Table are copyrighted and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. ISSN 1257-8417

ON THE COVER: PHOTO BY MEGHAN SPIRO

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Time For A Classic. Wüsthof Classic, the ergonomic internationally renown for classic functionality, balance and long-lasting sharpness. Wüsthof, based in Solingen, Germany, still family owned for seven generations, and top rated by Consumer Reports. Celebrated for precision edges and balanced design. Known by chefs everywhere for its extensive line. And it’s on sale from March through May 2019. Each design offers exceptional sharpness, feel and authority. We stock the full range all because we believe it’s the only way to choose. The Wüsthof Trident symbolizes three values, to which the company are committed: Passion, Diligence and Perfection. These values form the guiding principle for the manufacture of Wustof products. Warren Kitchen & Cutlery offers more Wüsthof than any retailer in the Hudson Valley, and proud to be the Hudson Valley’s only retailer to stock the full range of Wustof cutlery.

6” Utility Knife reg. 94.99, Sale 69.99

8” Offset Deli Knife reg. 109.99, sale 79.99

5” Santoku reg 109.99, sale 59.99

The Hudson Valley’s best selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances, serving pieces and kitchen tools. • • • • •

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6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection 845-876-6208 Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30 Visit us on the web, or order on-line, at www.warrenkitchentools.com


GOOD STUFF

HEAD GAMES Move over kombucha, there’s a new health trend in town, and it’s becoming just as famous. Cannabidiol (CBD), an oil derived from the cannabis plant (marijuana), has cropped up in health stores, cocktail bars and farmers’ markets across the Hudson Valley. If you believe the hype, it’s an elixir that relaxes and calms almost instantly—stress relief in a bottle. Is it too good to be true? In most health food stores, CBD can be found somewhere between the natural supplement and personal care aisles (we found it near the lavender essential oils and antiinflammatory turmeric pills). At farmers’ markets, look for it between mainstay produce vendors and cheese mongers. Record stores, head shops, vape shops and some pet stores also carry the oil. Tinctures complete with glass droppers and infused lotions allow for diverse, individualized applications. CBD lotion can be applied directly to the skin for targeted pain relief, for example, or it can be mixed into a soothing cup of tea for a full-body effect. Italian ices containing CBD provide cool relief from summer heat. Chewy sweets

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reminiscent of gummy worms wrapped in bonbon-esque packaging deliver sweet, stress-relieving CBD for the candy connoisseur. Behind the bar, CBD has infiltrated the cocktail scene with Instagrammable presentations and punny names like Hemptation, but there’s no proof whether CBD truly aids relaxation, combats the sugar rush from mixers and juices, or just imparts a perfect placebo effect. Recess, a non-alcoholic CBD sparkling beverage, made headlines for its “antidote to modern times.” The drink exudes good vibes through pastel, color-coordinated cans and unique flavors developed by Beacon’s own Drink More Good team. Lemonade, iced tea and even bottled water adorn store shelves in glass bottles, drawing in clientele looking to unwind with style. Beyond its trendy, photogenic draw, whether CBD in any of its many forms will capture the hearts and minds of consumers and go mainstream, remain a niche product within a specific market, or run its course and fade away like a purple dream is yet to be determined.  —Marcella Micillo


BAO WOW The best-kept secret at The CIA (aka The Culinary Institute of America) may be The Egg, a food court-style student dining hall that also is open to the public. The fare is elevated street-food at street‑level prices. One of the dining stations is a student-designed, student-run pop-up that changes each semester. This spring, Bao Town is coming to The Egg. The menu is built around the bao, a Taiwanese open-face steamed bun with a filling (traditionally roasted pork belly, pickles and scallions). But, expect to find more adventurous expressions of the steamed bun here. Developing the recipes, students are experimenting, using everything from waffle irons to pasta machines and deep fryers to test the boundaries of bao. “We want to take it to the limits of where it can go,” says Carson Moreland, a senior student in the program. “We don’t want to be a boring concept.” Think: southern fried chicken bao with slaw and smoky, spicy aioli; jerk chicken bao (oven-roasted chicken, crispy plantain chip, and grilled pineapple salsa). What about a bao ice cream sandwich—deep fried, rolled in cinnamon sugar and filled with vanilla ice cream? The pop-up is the most recent project of the school’s Intrapreneurship Program that puts junior and senior students through the paces of conceiving, pitching and producing a restaurant—start to finish. The aim: fostering business innovation skills. In the program, begun in 2015, students, working in groups, develop quick-service restaurant concepts that they believe will appeal to the discerning palates of fellow students and faculty. In a competition reminiscent of Shark Tank, the students pitch their concepts to a panel of industry experts. Once a winner is selected, the entire class takes a semester to develop the concept from recipes to staffing, materials and marketing, and the concept is launched at The Egg. Students, faculty (and the general public) can start enjoying bao at The Egg in mid-May. The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 905-4747; ciachef.edu

BOTTOM PHOTO: CARSON MORELAND

ROCK ON A star in Westchester County’s food scene, the Westchester Wine & Food Festival draws more than 7,000 visitors from the tri-state region to sample what the area’s top chefs, sommeliers and specialty food purveyors have to offer. With events peppered at various locations across the county, the June 4-9 event promises to be more spectacular than ever, with more than 100 area restaurants featured. Tickets are available now. New this year is the Friday night event, “An Evening with Westchester’s Tastemakers,” an exclusive, five-course dinner in a private dining room at five of Westchester’s premier restaurants. Diners can choose from X20/Xaviars on the Hudson (Yonkers), the Inn at Pound Ridge (Pound Ridge), RiverMarket (Tarrytown), Crabtree’s Kittle House (Chappaqua)and La Panetiere (Rye), each featuring custom wine pairings from the Harrison Wine Vault. The main event of the festival—the Grand Tasting Village (Valhalla)— features tastings from 50 local restaurants and more than 200 wines and spirits, chef demonstrations and a variety of food trucks. Burgers, beer, music, wine, spirits and the best grilling this side of the Hudson River come together at the Burger & Beer Bash (Kensico Dam Plaza). For the family, the Junior Chef event (White Plains) gives kids hands-on experience learning from working chefs, decorating cupcakes, making pizza and having fun. A portion of festival proceeds benefits Feeding Westchester and the Westchester Parks Foundation. Visit winefood.westchestermagazine.com for complete details and to buy tickets.

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LETTERS

To the Editor: I read your great article ["The American Chestnut: Tree of Trees," Valley Table Issue 84] on the American chestnut tree a few months ago and was very interested in planting some at our farm in Hyde Park (My dad loves chestnuts). I was wondering if you knew of any local nurseries that sold saplings? Brian Arnoff Keith Stewart responds: Good to hear that you enjoyed my article on chestnuts. I haven’t looked into local sources of seedlings/saplings but I think Fedco Trees in Maine sells pure American chestnuts. However, as I understand it, if there’s any remnant of blight in your area, the Fedco Trees will, sooner or later, catch it. With regard to hybrids that have blight resistance, I think there are a number of possibilities, depending on what you’re looking for—nuts, timber, wildlife value, etc. Check out Empire Chestnut Company in Ohio. Their site will give you a sense of what’s available. I’m pretty busy with general farm planning and haven’t had a chance to think about what chestnuts I might plant this spring. If you come up with any interesting local possibilities, let me know. Good luck.

SCOOPED Chef Nick DiBona loves big flavors. He credits his traditional Italian upbringing and learning how to cook with fresh local ingredients as the source of his focus. Subtlety is not his forte. Indeed, DiBona pulled out all the stops in his newest venture, Bona Bona Ice Cream Shop. After he won the Food Network’s “Chopped” cooking competition with his “chef-crafted” ice cream, DiBona opened Madison Kitchen in Larchmont, but eventually left that to persue his ice cream dreams full time. He took his homemade ice cream on the road with a food truck, traveling throughout Westchester and New York City. Notable on his route was Smorgasburg, an openair food market in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, which was the inspiration for Bona Bona. The massive, 5,000-square-foot ice cream store in Port Chester opened in December. The Willy Wonka-esque space is designed to encourage visitors both young and old to indulge their sweet tooth through a variety of devices. There’s a chocolate fountain, as well as a milkshake bar where patrons can enjoy no less than seven different craft milkshakes (including Key lime pie and crème brûlée) under ice cream cone-shaped lights. And no self-respecting, over-the-top ice cream parlor would be caught without a sprinkle room—a private room where it actually rains sprinkles. DiBona’s frozen creations don’t stop there. The shop features over a dozen different ice cream flavors, ranging from Rainbow Cookie and Holy Cannoli to B Dough (brownie cookie dough) and Nutella S’mores. Purists can also enjoy rich Valrhona chocolate, vanilla bean and ripe strawberry ice cream. Cones and cups can be made “Bona style”—with DiBona’s signature torched and scorched topping of fresh Italian meringue. Soft-serve and vegan flavors also are available, as are baked Alaska with carrot cake and salted cream cheese ice cream, s’mores lava cake and burnt banana split. If that doesn’t satisfy your craving, you can take a pint (or two) home.  —Lesley Rozycki Bona Bona Ice Cream 10 Westchester Ave, Port Chester (914) 481-5712; bonabonaicecream.com

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OPENINGS

HUDSON TACO 27 S Water St, Newburgh (845) 565-8226; hudsontaco.com

The West Shore Railroad Station, a Newburgh architectural gem built in 1909 by Warren and Wetmore (designers of Grand Central Station), had fallen into disrepair over the past half century. The stately rose brick structure overlooking the Hudson River was barely a shell of its former self. Now, thanks largely to Newburgh businessmen Nick Citera and Nicolas DiBrizzi (of Cosimo’s Restaurant Group), the building has been exquisitely restored and given a new life as Hudson Taco, a Mexican-fusion restaurant and bar. Both Citera and DiBrizzi have deep roots in the area and have developed numerous other properties. “Doing our part to help the community thrive not only makes sense to us, we consider it a serious responsibility to the people that support our businesses,” Citera says. Citera and DiBrizzi originally opened the popular Pizza Shop in part of the former station in 2011. By 2014, they had acquired the entire building and began major reconstruction of the main section in 2018. The new eatery features massive windows offering a panoramic view of the Hudson from inside. Cosimo’s Corporate Executive Chef Matthew Sherry and Executive Chef de Cuisine Jason Kooperman developed a

PHOTOS THIS PAGE: MELISSA HARJES, SWEET MELISSA PHOTO

menu featuring tacos at two price points ($2.50 and $3.50), and diners are encouraged to share, Citera says. Fillings range from upscale versions of traditional, citrus-marinated chipotle chicken to Asian/fusion-inspired offerings like sesame-and-soy shaved ribeye with kimchi. The all-corn tortillas are gluten-free, as are almost all the other items on the menu, and many of the fillings on the carefully crafted menu are available over brown rice or quinoa. “I tested probably 20 different rotisserie chicken recipes before deciding on the one we put on the menu,” Sherry says. Rounding out the menu are “not taco” choices, including tuna poke, empanadas filled with New York State cheddar and Hudson Valley Cattle Company ground beef seasoned with sofrito, and sides like sweet corn and spicy cucumber salad. Desserts include Mexican spiced brownies served with Kahlua crunch ice cream or churros with chocolate dip and local jam. The beers, wines and cocktails have been selected specifically to pair well with the cuisine. On the beer list is a unique, custom-made corn lager from neighboring Newburgh Brewing Company.  —Lisa Kelsey

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THE JOLLY ONION 625 Glenwood Rd, Pine Island (845) 981-7272; thejollyonion.com

The “Jolly,” as it is familiarly and affectionately known, is back, and Pine Island could not be more thrilled. Legendary Onion farmer Vincent Kosuga, who had created controversy by buying and selling onion futures in the 1950s, opened the original Jolly Onion Inn in 1961. Two owners followed Kosuga. The restaurant/banquet hall had been a popular place for Orange County residents to eat, but it was a special focal point for the Black Dirt region—a place where locals went to celebrate weddings, to talk business, to listen (and dance) to polka king Jimmy Sturr and other entertainment. In 2008, however, the restaurant was buffeted by the recession and was forced to close. It took 10 years to find a new management team with restaurant experience and the finances for the November 2018 re-opening. After the restaurant went out of business, William Brown, owner of Lowland Farms, acquired the building and became a financial partner of the restaurant. Tom Mastrantoni, whose family owned the Roccoroma food market in Goshen, became the director and another partner. Armand Vanderstigchel, a Dutch native who has written about Adirondack cuisine, joined as chef and co-owner. A fourth partner is handling the bar. “The Jolly Onion Inn has been a treasured landmark in Pine Island for decades,” says Pine Island Chamber of Commerce Vice President Janet Zimmerman. “It’s been sorely missed. Our neighbors have been looking forward to a new Jolly Onion Inn for years, and they are just ecstatic that it’s happened.” Vanderstigchel’s menu accents central European cuisine—German Jagerschnitzel, Polish pierogies and Dutch bitterballen (meatballs). “Our onion soup is becoming quite famous,” Vanderstigchel says. “We make 180 gallons a week.” “Given our experience in our first few months, I’m confident that the restaurant will be a success,” Brown says. “We have tremendous support locally, and Pine Island—in the heart of the Black Dirt region—is an increasingly attractive destination for people from the city and suburbs who want to get out to the country or farm area.”  —Jeff Storey

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PHOTOS THIS PAGE: PROVIDED BY THE JOLLY ONION


THE RARE BIT 23 Cedar St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 693-8000; therarebitdf.com

The British have made their way to Dobbs Ferry, this time by way of a new restaurant. Modeled after classic British gastropubs, chef/owner David DiBari (perhaps best known for his two other restaurants, The Cookery and The Parlor) opened The Rare Bit in December. Inspired by the simplicity of British cuisine and chefs like Fergus Henderson, DiBari says he gladly accepts the challenge to change the minds and palates of diners regarding the much-maligned food culture of the former empire. The name accentuates the playfulness on the menu and on full display throughout the restaurant. Diners can enjoy classic British dishes like fish & chips, Welsh rarebit and Yorkshire pudding in a whimsically decorated space complete with bold wallpapers, chandeliers and quirky art. The bar, too, honors British traditions with an impressive cocktail program (including an extensive gin & tonic selection, naturally), along with British-inspired cocktails like Tea Thyme (vodka, Earl Gray tea, honey and fresh thyme) and The Royal Wedding (a carbonated gin-based cocktail with grapefruit and Aperol). The Rare Bit shares Dobbs Ferry with The Cookery and The Parlor, and DiBari lauds the village as being a place where good food, art and culture are appreciated. He adds that it doesn’t hurt that it offers riverfront views of the Palisades, as well.  —Lesley Rozycki

PHOTOS: THE RARE BIT

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more & more

more good J

A S O N S C H U L E R WA S B E H I N D T H E B A R

at Gleason’s in Peekskill during the 2012 holidays when one of his regulars asked to buy, as gifts for his friends and family, nine bottles of a simple syrup Schuler had created for one of his cocktail programs. From such simple events are revolutions born.

by jeff storey photos by meghan spiro march

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Schuler, who has a business degree from Marist, soon got $2,000 in seed money from his best friend (the first of many modest contributions from friends and family) to startup and incorporate a beverage manufacturing company that creates hand-crafted soda syrups, bitters, tea and tisane concentrates using organic ingredients. (That initial nine-bottle request, incidentally, is currently available as Cassia Kreme soda syrup, a cinnamon-and-vanilla cola concoction.) A Hopewell Junction native, Schuler spent about two hours coming up with a name for his company, Drink More Good. “Not only do our customers get the opportunity to drink more good into this world, but they get to drink more good into their bodies,” he says. “We treat good as a noun.“ Six years after hand-bottling his first Drink More Good product in a cramped, rented kitchen, Schuler was producing his own products as well as those of eight other emerging beverage companies in a 10,000-square-foot space in the former IBM complex in East Fishkill. Early in 2019, the company, in the midst of its first major capital drive, began planning to expand to 27,000 square feet and increasing its production capacity to more than 10,000 gallons per day, up from its current production of 5,000 gallons per week. What started as a one-man shop now employs 25 people (a dozen of them full-time) and is still hiring.

What started as a one-man shop now employs 25 people (a dozen of them full-time) and is still hiring.

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His success hasn’t gone unnoticed. In 2017, Drink More Good was named the Business of the Year by the Think Dutchess Alliance for Business. Think Dutchess CEO Sarah Lee says Schuler has “invested his whole self in the company.” Schuler, 37, says these are “exciting times” for the beverage industry. While sales of traditional soft drinks are faltering, adult artisan and craft sodas are coming on strong, and innovators are finding success with healthful ingredients and reduced sweetness. Schuler fits the profile. He developed his syrup recipes while still tending bar, and tested his beverages on patrons at local farmers’ markets on weekends. It inevitably sold out.


“For eight months I was bartending four nights a week from 6 until midnight, then locking the doors of Gleason’s and producing my syrups by hand using their kitchen from 1 until 6 in the morning. I’d get home by 7, make my son some breakfast, sleep for a few hours, then do it all over again,” Schuler recalls. Eventually, “It got to the point where it was no longer sustainable—there wasn’t a kitchen available or accessible to me in the area, so I built my own.” In 2014, Schuler leased a 2,000-square foot space at 383 Main Street in Beacon. A retail storefront featured the herbs, spices and other ingredients Schuler used to create his syrups. He covered 70 percent of his overhead by subletting the kitchen to other food-focused small businesses. Schuler quit his bar job and More Good stepped up its marketing efforts. In June 2014, More Good syrups were given shelf space in Whole Foods’ new Albany location. Schuler did in-store demonstrations there every week; by March 2015, product was was on the shelves of all 33 Whole Foods stores in the Northeast. However, More Good’s limited production capacity made it progressively more difficult to meet growing demand. Schuler searched for a company that would take on his manufacturing. All the companies he found, though, required minimum order quantities that were unrealistic for emerging, undercapitalized entrepreneurs like him, or they could not meet his specifications

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CLEAN ROOM TO FOOD HUB White-coated technicians used to produce computer chips at the sprawling, scrupulously clean facility operated by IBM in East Fishkill. Now, a new generation of workers is gearing up to produce a different kind of product in the Hudson Valley: an American crepe. Crepini, which started out manufacturing a trademarked crepe that is a fusion of French crepe and Russian blini, is leaving the 10,000-square-foot factory it has occupied in Brooklyn since 2010 because there is no room for expansion. By late this summer, the company expects to be up and running in new, 33,000-square-foot quarters with excellent highway connections to nearby Interstate 84. Crepini also has been helped by the site’s legacy. “The majority of the building we are moving into is ‘clean,’” says Lisa Peitzer, Chief Marketing Officer for Crepini. “The space we are moving into is where IBM would clean their chips. This saves us both time and money because the floors, walls and set-up are ready for food production.” Crepini now employs about 30 people, but expects to hire at least 100 more when it expands in East Fishkill. Suppliers, including the Newburg Egg Corp. in Sullivan County, will be in reasonable proximity, says Crepini Director of Sales and Marketing Sam Shkolnik, who adds the move “is a dream come true for us.” Crepini is part of a “food hub” that will include up to a dozen businesses being assembled by National Resources, a real estate development and investment firm that purchased 300 acres of the IBM campus in 2017. The hub is one component of a $300 million mixeduse “iPark 84,” a planned development that will include manufacturing, retail, residential and recreational components. National Resources has successfully applied the iPark model and transformed similar industrial sites to iParks in Lake Success, NY, and Norwalk, CT. The food hub will further cement the region’s status as a food destination, claims Sarah Lee, CE0 of the Think Dutchess Business Alliance. Food is “one of the top reasons people come here,” she notes. Several businesses already have located in the food hub. Jason Schuler, who grew up near the IBM campus, rented 10,000 square feet for his Drink More Good beverage factory and has plans for major expansion. Sloop Brewery has moved its production from Elizaville to what it calls “The Factory” in East Fishkill, thereby increasing capacity from 4,000 to 28,000 barrels a year. Other businesses on the roster include Cozzini Brothers, which offers knife sharpening services to area restaurants, and a Brooklyn-based private label smoked fish purveyor, which has leased 10,000 square feet, with an option on an additional 16,000 square feet. Meanwhile, National Resources is negotiating with an Israeli company that would produce malabi (milk pudding) on the site. The milk would come from local dairy farms.­—JS

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(an issue he shares with other emerging beverage entrepreneurs). His solution was simple, if not predictable: He would tackle the job himself. Now, using his own expertise and equipment, Schuler assists other entrepreneurial beverage makers with ordering, manufacturing and fulfillment (“co-packing”). His first co-packing client, Pilot Kombucha, came on board in mid2016, just as the Brooklyn-based business was losing its lease. Schuler says more than 95 percent of his company’s revenue now comes from co-packing clients. “Throughout 2016 and 2017, we saw a massive transformation in our budgetary model,” Schuler says. “We went from a small emerging beverage brand that was doing some packing for other companies, to a beverage manufacturing company that had its own branded line of syrups and mixers.”


In October 2017, More Goods’ Beacon facility was becoming cramped and inefficient, and the company signed a lease with National Resources, a real estate development and investment company, to become part of a 300-acre commercial project in East Fishkill that will transform the former IBM complex into a unique live/work/ play community [see related sidebar]. More Good moved its manufacturing operations there in June 2018; the store remains in Beacon and small food vendors continue to rent space there. Schuler’s syrups are used with seltzer, but many consumers “want a ready-to-drink product,” according to More Good sales director Scott Brenner. This summer, the company plans to launch a line of canned craft sodas, as well as iced teas and flavored seltzer. Brennan predicts the demand will be “explosive.” Schuler also now sidelines as a consultant on recipe development and formulation. He worked closely on Curious Elixir No.1, “a bold but not boozy” nonalcoholic alternative to cocktails. Curious Elixirs owner John Wiseman says Schuler’s approach is local and sustainable, adding, “You couldn’t ask for a better partner.” Schuler worked for eight months developing recipes with Benjamin Witte for Recess, a sparkling water infused with hemp extract, whose advertising touts its ability to leave consumers “calm, cool and collected.” The brand had a successful launch in November. It, too, is produced in East Fishkill.

Schuler’s ultimate goal is to develop an “incubator model” for emerging brands that shepherds them from startup through high‑volume production.

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Before More Good took off, Schuler signed a contract promising to donate a portion of his company’s net profits to a charity called Generosity.org that funds clean water for poor people around the world. To date, Drink More Good has donated about $36,000 to the charity—enough for seven wells serving 5,000 people. Ryan Pettus, the friend who donated the initial capital for the new venture, admits he “wasn’t a big fan” of the donations, but Schuler was adamant. The commitment “motivated him to work harder,” Pettus, who serves on Drink More Good’s board, says. “He’s always talking about what he wants to

do.”
Schuler’s ultimate goal is to develop an “incubator model” for emerging brands that shepherds them from startup through high-volume production. He says there is lots of demand for More Good’s services, but he worries that if More Good doesn’t grow along with the demand, it could lose successful clients. Pettus worries that his friend may be working too hard. “The whole company is on him,” he says. For his part, Schuler says he would be bored if he slowed down. Schuler admits he has a passion for making syrup. “There is a lot of garbage out there,” he says, and these days, as he deals with the challenges of a growing business, he is as much a chief executive officer as a “good maker.” He doesn’t spend as much time as he would like on the production floor (his “fun place”) but, he jokes, employees always manage to find him with their questions. Schuler’s parents work for the company, too (he insists on paying them): His mother, Angela, is the bookkeeper; his father, Charles, does everything from order fulfillment to picking up supplies. Charles is particularly proud of his son, who he says is a “real go-getter,” adding, “Whatever he sets his mind to, he will accomplish.”   More Good (845) 765-0115 drinkmoregood.com

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Come See What 20 Years Tastes Like Making World Class Wines Since 1998 Gardiner, NY

WHITECLIFFWINE.com

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DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

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Intensive training program to help farmers and food entrepreneurs develop the necessary skills and materials to scale their business, build sales and access financial sources.

The Hudson Valley’s regional food rescue and gleaning network dedicated to meeting the needs of neighbors while mitigating the impacts of food waste. www.feedhv.org

Hudson Valley’s online searchable portal for all the gastronomical bounty the valley has to offer. www.hudsonvalleybounty.com

Hudson Valley agriBusiness deVelopment Corporation 507 Warren Street, 2nd Floor • Hudson, NY 12534 • 518.432.5360 • www.hvadc.org

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T H E

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P R E S E N T S

Photos: Cellaio, The Hudson Room, Maura’s Kitchen, Winston Restaurant, Bona Bona Ice Cream

march 11–24, 2019 $22.95 LUNCH • $32.95 DINNER *

R

E S E R V E Y O U R TA B L E AT T H E

region's finest restaurants during Hudson Valley Restaurant Week. This two-week event celebrates the restaurants and chefs that have made this region a true culinary destination. Enjoy a wide variety of dining experiences as chefs serve up their most innovative menus for fourteen delicious days. Dining out during restaurant week supports the region's agricultural heritage, renowned dining culture and drives the “eat & drink local movement.”

* excludes

tax beverage

&

tip

Be sure to make note of the sponsors displayed throughout this guide, without their continued support Hudson Valley Restaurant Week would not be possible. Through their partnership, they are contributing to the Hudson Valley's culinary identity and helping to boost the local economy. Restaurant Week is the perfect time to discover new restaurants or visit your favorites. To browse restaurants, menus or book your reservation, visit HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com. Happy Spring Restaurant Week!

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THE VALLE Y TABLE’S HUDSON VALLE Y RESTAUR ANT WEEK

Participating Restaurants

As of Press Time

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CONVENIENT TO METRO NORTH 

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HAS EXCLUSIONS

HVRW restaurants are the best restaurants. Book your table today at HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com. 105-TEN BAR & GRILL L D 127 Woodside Ave, Briarcliff Manor (914) 236-3651; 105ten.com A modern New American menu featuring craft brews and local wine; a hometown eatery with modern, rustic decor.

808 BISTRO L D T 808 Scarsdale Ave, Scarsdale (914) 722-0808; the808bistro.com This “neighborhood restaurant with a downtown feel” serves chicken, fish, shrimp and veal with a light Italian touch.

121 RESTAURANT L D X 2 Dingle Ridge Rd, North Salem (914) 669-0121; 121restaurant.com This popular gathering spot embraces comfort foods, with freshness and simplicity in a farmhouse setting.

808 SOCIAL L D 185 Summerfield St, Scarsdale (914) 723-2600; 808socialny.com An industrial-rustic eatery offering a menu that mixes classic and inventive Italian fare.

273 KITCHEN L D X T 273 Halstead Ave, Harrison (914) 732-3333; 273kitchen.com From Chef Constantine Kalandranis of 8 North Broadway, a 30-seat small plates Mediterranean bistro with a seafood-heavy menu including various raw, cured and ceviche dishes, meatbased dishes and small bites. 3 WESTERLY BAR AND GRILL L D T 3 Westerly Rd, Ossining (914) 762-1333; 3westerly.com A nautical-themed gastropub and globallyinfluenced grill featuring fresh seafood, wood-fire artisanal pizzas, burgers and stunning views of the Hudson River waterfront. 76 HOUSE L D T 110 Main St, Tappan (845) 359-5476; 76house.com “America’s oldest tavern,” built in 1686, features the cuisine of celebrated chef Doug Mulholland and live entertainment. 8 NORTH BROADWAY L D X 8 N Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-1200; 8northbroadway.com This Mediterranean restaurant offers a changing menu “inspired by local farms and neighborhood friends.”

HOW IT WORKS

A TAVOLA TRATTORIA D 46 Main St, New Paltz (845) 255-1426; atavolany.com With a focus on farm-to-table, the menu is seasonally inspired and includes fresh homemade pastas, breads, and desserts. Partners Rosemay Smith and Nathan Ganio have a combined experience of over 30 years in Hudson Valley restaurants ; and are now bringing their creative take on rustic Italian food with chef Emma Rose and bar manager Kyle Miller. AESOP’S FABLE RESTAURANT L D T 13 King St, Chappaqua (914) 238-3858; aesopsfablerestaurant.com Locally-inspired New American restaurant offering eclectic fare and seasonally-inspired craft cocktails in an intimate setting. AMERICAN BOUNTY L D X 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com By consciously focusing on regional and seasonal products, the American Bounty Restaurant offers contemporary and traditional dishes brought to life in an honest and flavorful way. APPETIT BISTRO D T 540A Willett Ave, Port Chester (914) 690-2000; appetitbistro.com Sister restaurant to Capers, this New York Times reviewed Paris in Port Chester serves French classics and fan favorites like escargots en croute, duck à l’orange and fois gras terrine. Pair dinner with a French wine from the bistro’s curated wine list. AQUATERRA GRILLE L D X 420 N Middletown Rd, Pearl River (845) 920-1340; aquaterragrille.com Casual family eatery boasting an extensive menu of modern American fare from the sea (Aqua) and land (Terra).

D  L 

ARTIST’S PALATE D T X 307 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 483-8074; theartistspalate.biz Cosmopolitan elegance meets edgy, industry style. Innovative menu offering intriguing combinations and variations on classic American comfort food with an extensive variety of unique wines and spirits. AUGIE’S PRIME CUT D 3436 Lexington Ave, Mohegan Lake (914) 743-1357; augiesprimecut.com A staple in the local community, favorites at this popular steak and seafood house include prime rib, porterhouse and fresh lobster.

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BAJA 328 L D T 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-2252; baja328.com Beacon hot spot offering over 110 tequilas to accompany authentic Southwestern cuisine. BEEHIVE RESTAURANT L D 30 Old Rt 22, Armonk (914) 765-0688; beehive-restaurant.com Designed by a family that loves to cook, this family-friendly restaurant serves Continental and American classics in the heart of Armonk. BENJAMIN STEAKHOUSE D X 610 Hartsdale Rd, White Plains (914) 428-6868; benjaminsteakhouse.com Serious steaks created by an alumnus of the venerable Peter Luger restaurant in a handsome setting with a central fireplace. BIRDSALL HOUSE T 970 Main St, Peekskill (914) 930-1880; birdsallhouse.net Chef Richard Norbutt’s globally eclectic culinary talents perfectly compliment the gastropub’s beercentric beverage program. BISTRO Z D T 455 S Broadway, Tarrytown (914) 631-5700; bistroz.com Conveniently located in the DoubleTree Hotel, offering casual comfort, fireside dining and an American menu blending fresh ingredients with an imaginative presentation. BLU AT THE LAKEHOUSE L D 825 South Lake Blvd, Mahopac (845)621-5200; bluatthelakehouse.com Lakeside farm to table restaurant located in Mahopac offering fresh seafood, steak, and a raw bar. BLU POINTE L D X 120 Front St, Newburgh (845) 568-0100; blu-pointe.com This seafood-focused venue features a menu of the freshest products available, a contemporary lounge with fireplace, set right on the Hudson River. BOCUSE RESTAURANT L D 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 451-1012; bocuserestaurant.com This Culinary Institute of America restaurant re-imagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques with a new style accompanied by casual yet sophisticated service. BONA BONA ICE CREAM L D T 10 Westchester Ave, Port Chester (914) 481-5712; bonabonaicecream.com Chef Nick DiBona’s colorful and fun sit-down ice cream restaurant. Find a selection of alcoholic beverages in addition to unique dessert creations like carrot cake baked Alaska, s’mores dip lava cake and pineapple upside down cake. Vegan ice cream and desserts available.

CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH

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EXCLUSIONS APPLY


M ARCH 11–24, 2019

THE BORLAND HOUSE INN L X 130 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-1513; theborlandhouse.com This bed and breakfast features a restaurant offering seasonal farm fresh ingredients with Southern comfort-food influences. BRASSERIE 292 L D T 292 Main St, Poughkeepsie (845) 473-0292; brasserie292.com Transporting diners to the heart of Paris, serving classic brasserie fare: duck confit, steak frites and cassoulet. THE BRIAR’S RESTAURANT L D 512 N State Rd, Briarcliff Manor (914) 762-3424; thebriarsrestaurant.com Traditional American restaurant offering “down-home” traditional American fare with a touch of Mediterranean influence in a warm lodgelike setting. BROADWAY BISTRO L D X 3 S Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-8361; 3broadwaybistro.com Authentic Tuscan cuisine with dishes ranging from terrine of eggplant to cavatelli, broccoli rabe pesto and sweet Italian sausage. BROTHER’S FISH AND CHIPS D T 172 N Highland Ave, Ossining (914) 488-5141; brothersfishandchips.com Classic seafood restaurant with specializing in fish and chips as well as reimagined dishes like fried bass tacos and red snapper ceviche. BUTTERFIELD D X 3805 Main St, Stone Ridge (845) 687-0887; butterfieldstoneridge.com An 18th century Dutch Colonial stone mansion tastefully renovated in the historic hamlet of Stone Ridge sets the stage for a seasonal new American menu redefining farm-to-table cuisine. CAFE AMARCORD D T X 276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, served in a warm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the onyx bar before having dinner in the bistro-style dining room or on the street-side terrace. CAFFE REGATTA D T 133 Wolfs Ln, Pelham (914) 738-8686; cafferegatta.com Italian-inspired seafood restaurant offering a diverse menu of reimagined American classics and fresh seafood. CANTERBURY BROOK INN D 331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Swiss-influenced European continental fare served in a rustic setting with fireplaces and an outdoor terrace overlooking a brook. CAPERS MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT L D 531 N Main St, Port Chester (914) 481-8833; caperspc.com Enjoy a fresh new take on Mediterranean cuisine. Indulge in decadent Foie Gras Dumplings and sip on their signature Herbs de Romance cocktail in a cozy, intimate setting. CATHRYN’S TUSCAN GRILL L D T 91 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-5582; tuscangrill.com Romantic and whimsical with an Italian menu that leans toward the north. The wine list is extensive and the welcome is warm.

CELLAIO D 888 Resorts World Drive, Monticello (845) 428-7497; cellaiosteak.com Italian inspired steakhouse with a menu curated by acclaimed chef Scott Conant. Offerings include dry aged Black Angus beef, antipasti, fresh pastas made in-house daily and a raw bar.

CLOCK TOWER GRILL L D X 512 Clock Tower Commons Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com In a renovated barn setting, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated. A farm-to-table menu features rustic American cuisine, including prime burgers, lobster mac and cheese and osso buco.

CELLAR 49 L D 49 East Sunnyside Ln, Tarrytown (914) 591-3183; tarrytownhouseestate.com Fine tavern food in the cellar of the Biddle Mansion within the Tarrytown House Estate offering a casual, energetic atmosphere and wine cellar.

COMMUNAL KITCHEN D X 162 Main St, Nyack (845) 535-3133; communalkitchennyack.com Drawing inspiration from local, organic products, chef and owner, Jed Gidaly, serves globally inspired cuisine accompanied by handcrafted cocktails, small production wines and local craft beers.

CENA 2000 L D 50 Front St, Newburgh (845) 561-7676; cena2000.com Cena 2000 pairs an upscale Mediterranean menu and a serious wine list with Hudson River views on the Newburgh waterfront. CHAR L D T X 2 S Water St, Greenwich, CT (203) 900-1100; charct.com A sister restaurant to Dolphin, this upscale yet casual restaurant offers contemporary American cuisine in a setting to match.

THE COOKERY D T 39 Chestnut St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 305-2336; thecookeryrestaurant.com Neighborhood eatery serves a neo-nostalgic menu, capturing the warmth of Italian comfort food while using sustainable products.

HVRW BOARD OF ADVISORS

CHAR STEAKHOUSE & BAR D 151 Bryant Pond Rd, Mahopac (845) 526-1200; charsteakhouseandbar.com Casual dining with a classic steakhouse feel. The menu centers on dry-aged steaks and fresh seafood but with options for every taste. CHAT 19 L D T 19 Chatsworth Ave, Larchmont (914) 833-8871; chat19.net A casual, relaxed atmosphere to enjoy owner Mario Fava’s selection of grilled food, seafood, appetizers and salads. CHAT AMERICAN GRILL L D T 1 Christie Pl, Scarsdale (914) 722-4000; chatamericangrill.com Upscale pub and American grill serving steaks, sandwiches, seafood and salads. Enjoy a meal by the fireplace, or watch the game on one of three flat-screen TVs. CHUTNEY MASALA L D T X 76 Main St, Irvington (914) 591-5500; chutneymasala.com Chef Navjot’s beloved northern Indian restaurant on Irvington’s Main Street. Chef Navjot brings flavors from his childhood and experience in hospitality in India and New York City to Westchester. Praised by The New York Times, Chutney Masala uses homemade spices, organic and free range lamb and farm fresh produce to deliver an authentic experience. CITY LIMITS DINER L D T X 200 Central Ave, White Plains (914) 686-9000; citylimitsdiner.com Redefining the American diner with a menu of comforting, sophisticated dishes, from housesmoked meats to gourmet pastry. CITY PERCH KITCHEN + BAR D 1 Hamilton Street, Dobbs Ferry (914) 348-7003; cityperch.com Seasonal American dining from James Beardrenowned Chef Sherry Yard meets handcrafted garden-to-glass cocktails and a boutique wine list. Featuring an open kitchen, raw seafood bar and brick oven pizza.

HUDSONVALLEYRESTAURANTWEEK.COM     #HVRW

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THE VALLE Y TABLE’S HUDSON VALLE Y RESTAUR ANT WEEK

DOLPHIN L D T 1 Van Der Donck St, Yonkers (914) 751-8170; dolphinrbl.com On the banks of the Hudson River and decorated in dramatic, modern fashion, Dolphin’s menu draws liberally and fittingly from the sea.

EAT. SHARE. WIN.

DUBROVNIK RESTAURANT L D T X 721 Main St, New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farm-to-table, sea-to-table approach. Known for its seafood and its authentic wine list.

  

COPPER HOUSE L D X 11 Taylor Square, West Harrison (914) 949-5810; copperhouseny.com Collaboration between Chef Joseph D’Angelo and CIA grads Joseph Engongoro and Alexander Avellino blends together Italian inspiration with farm-to-table creations. Comfort food meets sophistication in this rustic atmosphere. The locally sourced menu features reimagined Italian classics including prosciutto di Parma pizza, butternut squash orecchiette, and risotto fritters. COPPER KETTLE CAFÉ L D T X 201 E Hartsdale Ave, Hartsdale (914) 723-1065; copperkettlecafe.com In this sister restaurant of Copper House, Chef Joseph D’Angelo serves up his favorite childhood comfort food meals in this relaxed yet chic establishment. Fan favorites include the kettle short rib, free range chicken pot pie, and grilled octopus starter. CORTLANDT COLONIAL RESTAURANT D 714 Old Albany Post Rd, Cortlandt (914) 739-3900; cortlandtcolonial.com Reminiscent of a private country estate, the menu offers a wide range of American favorites, from seafood to beef. COSIMO’S WOODBURY L D 100 County Rt 32, Central Valley (845) 928-8265; cosimoswoodbury.com Casual and contemporary Italian cuisine with some of the world’s best wines. Warm, friendly and sophisticated atmosphere in four uniquely designed locations. COSIMO’S BRICK OVEN L D 620 Rt 211 E, Middletown (845) 692-3242; cosimosmiddletown.com COSIMO’S ON UNION L D 1217 Rt 300 (Union Ave) Newburgh (845) 567-1556; cosimosunion.com COSIMO’S TRATTORIA L D X 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7172; cosimospoughkeepsie.com CRABTREE’S KITTLE HOUSE L D 11 Kittle Rd, Chappaqua (914) 666-8044; kittlehouse.com Stately country inn, emphasizing hospitality, offering a modern American menu and one of the world’s finest wine lists. DINO’S VIGNETO CAFÉ L D 80 Vineyard Ave,Highland (845) 834-2828; dinosplace.com Stop in for freshly homemade pasta among other Italian dishes and lunch specials.

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EASTCHESTER FISH GOURMET L D X 837 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-3450; eastchesterfish.com This popular cosmopolitan restaurant and fish market provides a bounty of seafood and delicious house-made pastas.

EMILIO RISTORANTE L D T 1 Colonial Pl, Harrison (914) 835-3100; emilioristorante.com Set in a century-old colonial home with rambling dining rooms, featuring house-made pastas, classic antipasto table and seasonal regional Italian menu. EQUUS RESTAURANT AT CASTLE HOTEL AND SPA D T X 400 Benedict Ave, Tarrytown (914) 631-1980; castlehotelandspa.com First-class service meets award-winning meals like dry-aged New York Strip with blue cheese polenta or organic Scottish salmon. Situated atop rolling hills in a castle-turned-hotel and restaurant, views of the Hudson River are plentiful. FARM TO TABLE BISTRO L D 1083 Rt. 9, Fishkill (845) 297-1111; ftbistro.com New American menu is committed to crafted food and the community of farmers and purveyors that provide the freshest seasonally available ingredients. FIG & OLIVE L D T 696 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-2900; figandolive.com The impossibly chic environs of Manhattan’s meat-packing district transported to suburban Scarsdale, with an invigorated Mediterranean menu. FIN AND BREW D T 5 John Walsh Blvd, Peekskill (914) 788-4555; finandbrew.com A New American restaurant restores life to a former factory, focusing on seafood, small plates and a high-end take on comfort classics. Come for the food and local brews, stay for the sweeping views of the Hudson River. FLAMES STEAKHOUSE L D 121 E Main St, Elmsford (914) 592-3500; flamessteakhouse.com Prime steaks & an extensive wine list draw crowds to this casual, high-end steakhouse.

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FORTINA (ARMONK) L D 17 Maple Ave, Armonk (914) 273-0900; fortinapizza.com Chef Christian Petroni’s popular casual Italian eatery serves straightforward Italian food cooked in wood fired ovens—and charred in all the right places. FORTINA (RYE BROOK) L D 136 South Ridge St, Rye Brook (914) 937-0900; fortinapizza.com

ELEVEN 11 GRILLE & SPIRITS L D 1111 Main St, Fishkill (845) 896-0011; eleven11main.com Lively tavern & family-friendly spot serving traditional American favorites in a rustic setting.

KEY:

FLORRIE KAYE’S TEA ROOM AND GIFTS L 69 Gleneida Ave, Carmel (845) 225-8327; florriekayes.com A traditional English Tea Room, specializing in delicate finger sandwiches, including coronation chicken on zucchini bread and house-made baked goods such as scones, Victoria sponge cake and sticky toffee pudding.

t

FORTINA (YONKERS) L D T 1086 N. Broadway, Yonkers (914)358-3595; fortinapizza.com FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S STEAKHOUSE L D T X 77 Purchase St, Rye (914) 925-3900; frankieandjohnnies.com Distinguished reputation for the finest steaks, chops and seafood, the menu is classic steakhouse fare. Stylish, sophisticated ambiance. FREEBIRD KITCHEN AND BAR L D T 161 Mamaroneck Ave, White Plains (914) 607-2476; freebirdkitchenandbar.com Southern-style restaurant featuring comfort dishes like fried green tomatoes and chicken & waffles, made with fresh local ingredients and all served with a side of Southern hospitality. FURCI’S RESTAURANT L D X 334 Underhill Ave, Yorktown Heights (914) 302-7900; furcisrestaurant.com Family-owned Italian restaurant featuring homemade soups, salad dressings, Sicilian rice balls, gnocchi bolognese, chicken parmesan, and other specialties all served by a friendly staff. GIULIO’S RESTAURANT D 154 Washington St, Tappan (845) 359-3657; giulios.biz A romantic setting complete with fireplaces and candlelight; serves Italian-inspired continental cuisine with extensive gluten-free options. GLEASON’S L D T 911 South St, Peekskill (914) 402-1950; gleasonspeekskill.com An offshoot of the popular Birdsall House, Gleason’s specializes in fashionable flabtreads, simple rustic fare and well-crafted cocktails. GROWLER'S BEER BISTRO L D T 25 Main Street, Tuckahoe (914) 793-0608; growlersbeerbistro.com A revolving list of craft beers & seasonal small plates in an industrial-chic setting. HARPER’S RESTAURANT & BAR D T X 92 Main St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 693-2306; harpersonmain.com A hip neighborhood tavern serving American food with an all-American wine list. Simple home cooking using local, seasonal ingredients. HARVEST ON HUDSON L D T X 1 River St, Hastings-on-Hudson (914) 478-2800; harvesthudson.com Overlooking the Hudson River and Palisades, a magnificent Tuscan farmhouse is the perfect setting for inspired Mediterranean cuisine.

CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH

x

EXCLUSIONS APPLY


FACTORIA IS THE HUDSON VALLEY’S PREMIER DESTINATION FOR DINING AND ENTERTAINMENT. Factoria is Westchester’s grandest multi-functional venue in Peekskill, New York. The space houses Fin & Brew, a restaurant with panoramic views of the Hudson River; River Outpost Brewing, a craft brewery; and Spins Hudson, entertainment with intense adventure. With scenic views of the Hudson River, Factoria is the perfect place to host corporate events, team building exercises, private parties, weddings, showers, rehearsal dinners and anything you can imagine!

5 JOHN WALSH BLVD. PEEKSKILL, NY 914-788-4555   /FactoriaCP   FactoriaCP.com   @FactoriaCP


THE VALLE Y TABLE’S HUDSON VALLE Y RESTAUR ANT WEEK

HAVANA CENTRAL L D 1 Ridge Hill Blvd, Yonkers (914) 423-5500; havanacentral.com A lively restaurant and bar serving fresh Cuban classics. Sit down with a glass of sangria or a mojito and enjoy the live music and tropical ambiance. HENRY’S AT THE FARM L D 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; buttermilkfallsinn.com A dining destination at the Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa, Henry’s sources locally and from its own 40acre farm. Elegant cuisine in a charming setting. HERITAGE FOOD+DRINK D X 1379 US 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-1555; heritagefooddrink.com Chefs Max Renny and Frank Camey craft the Hudson Valley’s bounty into a mix of classic and new dishes like wood fired skirt steak or roasted broccoli with cornmeal-fried stems at this impressive 250-seat farm-to-table dining destination. HUDSON FARMER & THE FISH L D T 11 River St, Sleepy Hollow (914) 631-8380; farmerandthefish.com Just like its sister restaurant, Purdy’s Farmer & the Fish, diners can enjoy the freshest local ingredients prepared as beautiful delicious dishes. HUDSON HOUSE OF NYACK D X 134 Main St, Nyack (845) 353-1355; hudsonhousenyack.com An antique village hall/jailhouse turned restaurant and bar sets the stage for enjoying refined American cuisine and delicious desserts.

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HUDSON HOUSE RIVER INN L D T 2 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-9355; hudsonhouseinn.com A historic 1832 landmark serving dry-aged, handcut steaks and market-fresh fish on the riverfront. HUDSON’S RIBS AND FISH D 1099 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 297-5002; hudsonsribsandfish.com Popular steakhouse specializing in hand-cut, aged choice meats, fresh seafood and trademark homemade popovers with strawberry butter. THE HUDSON ROOM D T X 23 South Division St, Peekskill (914) 788-3663; hudsonroom.com Dedicated to Hudson Valley sources, serving fresh, fusion cuisine including dishes like grilled sliced bavette steak, seared organic vegetable stirfry and a wide variety of sushi. HUDSON VALLEY STEAKHOUSE D X 3360 Old Crompond Rd, Yorktown Heights (914) 930-8688; hudsonvalleysteakhouse.com Partners Elvis Cutra and Klevis Tana bring their passion for creating quality dishes to the table. Experience elegance in its truest form in the four thousand square foot dining room and bar of this steakhouse. A minimalistic menu features cult classics including surf and turf, Chilean sea bass, and filet mignon. IL CASTELLO L D X 576 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 777-2200; ilcastellomenu.com Old world influenced Italian eatery specializing in handmade pastas and tableside presentation.

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IL CENACOLO L D X 228 S Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 564-4494; ilcenacolorestaurant.com A dining landmark in the Hudson Valley since 1988, celebrating the simplicity of classic Tuscan cuisine. INN AT POUND RIDGE L T X 258 Westchester Ave, Pound Ridge (914) 764-1400; theinnatpoundridge.com Chef Jean-Georges brings casual elegance to Pound Ridge with a seasonal, farm-to-table menu and a contemporary country atmosphere. THE JOLLY ONION L D X 625 Glenwood Rd, Pine Island (845) 981-7272; thejollyonion.com A Pine Island landmark in the middle of onion country. This homage to the 1965 original maintains the kitschy authenticity with elevated gastropub fare. The internationally inspired menu features pierogis, Swedish meatballs and the Jolly Onion Classic Austrian Zwiebel Rostbraten. THE KITCHEN IN THE HUDSON VALLEY/ FREELANCE CAFE & WINE BAR L D X 506 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 359-7007; kitcheninhudsonvalley.com Eclectic, locally-sourced, internationally-inspired food meets a chic and elegant dining room. Pair appetizers like the crispy pork belly over creamy polenta with a glass of wine from the extensive wine cellar. The Kitchen’s HVRW menu will also be available at Freelance Café & Wine Bar, the attached bar at the same address.

CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH

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M ARCH 11–24, 2019

L’INIZIO D X 698 Saw Mill River Rd, Ardsley (914) 693-5400; liniziony.com Award-winning chefs, Scott and Heather Fratangelo, bring their inventive, Italian-inspired, locally sourced cuisine and hospitality to Ardsley. LA CREMAILLERE D X 46 Bedford-Banksville Rd, Bedford (914) 234-9647; cremaillere.com A charming French country restaurant nestled in a 1750 white clapboard farmhouse offering classic French cuisine. LA LANTERNA L D 23 Grey Oaks Ave, Yonkers (914) 476-3060; lalanterna.com Executive chef Valterio Tarone offers a unique Italian-Swiss menu served in an elegant yet cozy atmosphere. LA PANETIÈRE L D X 530 Milton Rd, Rye (914) 967-8140; lapanetiere.com A Westchester landmark restaurant serving Southern French cuisine, complemented by an exceptional wine cellar, fresh baked breads and pastries. LAKEVIEW HOUSE L D X 343 Lakeside Rd, Newburgh (845) 566-7100; thelakeviewhouse.com Enjoy views of Orange Lake while browsing a menu of classic favorites, modern fare and daily specials. Excellent service in a cozy atmosphere.

LE FONTANE RISTORANTE L D X 137 Route 100, Katonah (914) 232-9619; lefontane.net Authentic Southern Italian cuisine and hospitality headed by talented Neapolitan chef. LE JARDIN DU ROI L D T 95 King St, Chappaqua (914) 238-1368; lejardinchappaqua.com A local favorite, this cozy, French Bistro is perfect for a romantic meal or a night out with the family. LE PROVENÇAL BISTRO L D T X 436 Mamaroneck Ave, Mamaroneck (914) 777-2324; provencalbistro.com Mediterranean-French bistro food with a flair that lives up to the French tradition, served in a charming, tastefully decorated dining room. LENNY’S NORTH L D X 386 Main Street, Armonk (914) 273-8686; lennysnorth.com The newest Lenny’s location features old favorites in a new scene. Lenny’s incorporates farm fresh ingredients in their new American specialties. LENNY’S SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE L D T 2047 Boston Post Rd, Larchmont (914) 630-7800; lennyssteakhouse.com From Lenny Balidemaj (Il Castello), a popular seafood and steakhouse with Italian flavors and hospitality. LEXINGTON SQUARE CAFE L D T 510 Lexington Ave, Mount Kisco (914) 244-3663; lexingtonsquarecafe.com A unique combination of spacious dining with an intimate feeling. Offers an eclectic menu of American fusion cuisine and a lively bar.

LIBERTY STREET BISTRO D X 97 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 562-3900; libertystreetbistro.com Chef/Owner Michael Kelly offers classic Frenchinfluenced cuisine within a contemporary American style restaurant, embracing local flavors in each dish on his menu. LIMONCELLO AT THE ORANGE INN L D X 159 Main St, Goshen (845) 294-1880; limoncelloatorangeinn.com The historic Orange Inn (the oldest operating in Orange County) offers a northern Italian menu with an international twist. LITTLE DRUNKEN CHEF L D T X 36 Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 242-8800 This tapas-style eatery offers flavorful globally-influenced food with live music, an oyster bar, internationally-sourced craft beer and more. LOTUS D 888 Resorts World Drive, Monticello (845) 428-7496; rwcatskills.com/dining/lotus Like its namesake, Lotus combines elegance with an inspired menu of authentic Chinese delicacies in a fine dining atmosphere. Dishes include Salt & Pepper Pork Loin, Peking Duck and Coconut Curry Crab. LUSARDI’S RESTAURANT L D T X 1885 Palmer Ave, Larchmont (914) 834-5555; lusardislarchmont.com A favorite neighborhood eatery with a reputation for flavorful Mediterranean dishes in a warm, friendly atmosphere.

EMBARK ON A FOOD ADVENTURE

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MACARTHUR’S RIVERVIEW RESTAURANT AT THE THAYER HOTEL L D X 674 Thayer Rd, West Point (845) 446-4731; thethayerhotel.com American dishes using local ingredients like grilled heritage pork porterhouse complement expansive views of the Hudson River in a one-ofa-kind historic setting.

MAURA’S KITCHEN D X 81 S Broadway, Nyack (845) 535-3533; mauraskitchen.com Latin-inspired bistro featuring heart-warming meals including stews, roast pork, and a variety of rice and beans. Experience the eclectic flavors of Peru and immerse yourself in the culture and traditions of the western South American region.

MADISON KITCHEN L D T X 7 Madison Ave, Larchmont (914) 732-3024; mklarchmont.com Seasonally inspired cocktails and craft beer complement Chef Di Bona’s assortment of small plates, charcuterie boards and entrées.

MEDITERRANEO (WHITE PLAINS) L D T 189 Main St, White Plains (914) 448-8800; zhospitalitygroup.com/mediterraneowhiteplains Named Best New Restaurant in Westchester 2017, Mediterraneo serves mediterranean dishes with a focus on seafood. Savor a signature seafood dish accompanied by one of their specialty cocktails. A chic urban-inspired atmosphere.

MAGNO’S GRILL L D T 108 Centre Ave, New Rochelle (914) 235-0008; magnosgrill.com Chef Magno offers a sophisticated menu of Italian and Argentinian dishes. An intimate, casual dining experience with a new take on classic favorites. MARIA RESTAURANT L D T 11 Huguenot St, New Rochelle (914) 636-0006; marianewrochelle.com New Italian cuisine in a trendy bistro and bar setting. Sit down to real deal baked clams, chianti braised pork shank, and the “Yo Maria,” the beautiful blue-hued house cocktail.

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MELTING POT L D T X 30 Mamaroneck Ave, White Plains (914) 993-6358; meltingpot.com/white-plains Fun and interactive dining experience featuring a menu of signature fondue dinners. MELZINGAH TAP HOUSE L D T X 554 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-2844; melzingahtaphouse.com A place for craft beer enthusiasts, cocktail connoisseurs and food fanatics to come together. An aesthetically industrial Gastropub serving re-imagined, local cuisine with 23 unique rotating beers. Indulge in comfort classics like mac & cheese and poutine with the Off the Beacon Path, a signature cocktail.

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MERITAGE RESTAURANT D X 1505 Weaver St, Scarsdale (914) 472-8484; meritagerestaurant.net Chef Chris Vergara brings a New American menu sourced from local purveyors to diners in a warm, comfortable neighborhood restaurant. MILL HOUSE BREWING COMPANY L D T X 289 Mill St, Poughkeepsie (845) 485-2739; millhousebrewing.com A spacious upscale gastropub serving innovative locally sourced dishes. A wide selection of ales (brewed on site) and cocktails. MIMA VINOTECA L D T X 63 Main St, Irvington (914) 591-1300; mimasrestaurant.com A charming, simply decorated neighborhood restaurant and wine bar serving rustic fare. MISSION TAQUERIA L D T 472 Bedford Rd, Pleasantville (914) 741-5285; missionpleasantville.com A new location from the owners of 105-Ten Bar & Grill. This Pleasantville eatery features traditional Mexican fare with a modern and local twist, featuring the freshest ingredients from local farms. The beautiful, blue tiled bar features local beers on tap decorated with Mexican sugar skulls. MODERNE BARN L D X 430 Bedford Rd, Armonk (914) 730-0001; modernebarn.com From the Livanos family, this urban-country-chic restaurant is casual but sophisticated. American menu with global influences.

CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH

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M ARCH 11–24, 2019

MORGANS FISH HOUSE L D T 22 Elm Pl, Rye (914) 921-8190; morgansfishhouse.net Casual, upscale restaurant in a contemporary space that is warm and sophisticated. Fresh seafood served in a classic style along with steaks and chicken dishes.

NORTH PLANK ROAD TAVERN D X 30 Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 562-5031; northplankroadtavern.com Diverse new American fare using farm-fresh, local ingredients in a historic tavern setting.

MORTON’S STEAKHOUSE D X 5 Mamaroneck Ave, White Plains (914) 683-6101; mortons.com/whiteplains A popular nightspot specializing in aged, prime beef, seafood, chicken, chops and gluten-sensitive options.

NORCINA L D 186 N Main St, New City (845) 638-8030; norcinanewcity.com Specializing in house made pasta, burrata and mozzarella. Enjoy the signature Fusilli Norcina, charred brussel sprout Caesar salad and a long list of specialty cocktails, bottles of wine and local craft beers on tap.

MOSCATO RESTAURANT L D T X 874 Scarsdale Ave, Scarsdale (914) 723-5700; moscatorestaurant.com Named for the sweet, floral grape of the muscat family, enjoy sweet service and Mediterranean fare in the casual dining room.

THE OLDE STONE MILL RESTAURANT L D T X 2 Scarsdale Rd, Tuckahoe (914) 771-7661; theoldestonemill.com Old stone mill turned Italian restaurant overlooking the Bronx River, serving pasta, steak, seafood and other traditional dishes.

MP TAVERNA L D T X 1 Bridge St, Irvington (914) 231-7854; michaelpsilakis.com A modern interpretation of a traditional Greek tavern by Chef Michael Psilakis, awarded Food & Wine’s Best New Chef and Bon Appétit’s Chef of the Year.

OSCAR’S RESTAURANT L D 589 NY-303, Blauvelt (845) 359-0608; oscarsblauvelt.com An unassuming yet elegant Italian restaurant, offers classic tastes of Italy in Rockland County.

MULINO’S OF WESTCHESTER L D X 99 Court St, White Plains (914) 761-1818; mulinosny.com This local landmark combines classic and modern Italian cuisine in an elegant dining room. Serving modern Italian fare like carbonara and thinbreaded veal with vine ripe tomato salad.

THE PANDORICA L D T X 165 Main St, Beacon (845) 831-6287; thepandoricarestaurant.com A unique dining experience with a casual eclectic menu, offering alternative dietary options that are out of this world.

PAS-TINA’S RISTORANTE D T 155 S Central Ave, Hartsdale (914) 997-7900; pas-tinas.com Authentic Italian restaurant specializing in traditional antipasto, pasta, poultry, meat and seafood dishes. PERCH D X 1 King St, Marlboro (845) 236-3663; perchmarlboro.com From the owner of Cathryn’s Tuscan Grill, offering a globally inspired, locally sourced menu. An eclectic list of wine and beer. PETER PRATT’S INN D X 673 Croton Rd, Yorktown Heights (914) 962-4090; prattsinn.com The setting: a Revolutionary War-era home. The food: regional American—from charcuterie to Rohan duck breast and NY strip—is prepared with imaginative flair. PIER 701 RESTAURANT & BAR L D 701 Piermont Ave, Piermont (845) 848-2550; pier701ny.com Chef-owner, Denis Whitton, offers traditional French cuisine with Mediterranean influences at this waterfront spot. PLATES D T X 121 Myrtle Blvd, Larchmont (914) 834-1244; platesonthepark.com Chef-owner Matthew Karp’s artisanal culinary craft menu includes hand-rolled pasta, homemade sourdough breads, home-fermented vinegars and a repertoire of American classics.

for fresh Get lost in sprawling orchards, picturesque vineyards, family farms and green markets.

SEEK FOR YOURSELF. ulstercountyalive.com

HUDSONVALLEYRESTAURANTWEEK.COM     #HVRW

ULSTER COUNTY NEW YORK

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PRIMAVERA RESTAURANT AND BAR L D T X 592 Rt 22, Croton Falls (914) 277-4580; primaverarestaurantandbar.com A friendly atmosphere and fine dining experience, with a small-town spirit that is warm, welcoming and inclusive.

RIVERMARKET BAR & KITCHEN L D T X 127 W Main St, Tarrytown (914) 631-3100; rivermarketbarandkitchen.com Veritable epicurean hub across from the MetroNorth train station features a farm-to-table restaurant, wood-fired pizzeria and wine shop.

PUBSTREET D X 20 Wheeler Ave, Pleasantville (914) 909-5408; pubstreet.com Contemporary American cuisine served in an intimate setting, featuring thoughtful and approachable dishes.

RIVERVIEW RESTAURANT L D T 45 Fair St, Cold Spring (845) ) 265-4778; riverdining.com A contemporary American restaurant with Hudson River views offers a seasonally inspired menu of market fresh seafood, brick oven pizza and creative daily specials in a casual, friendly atmosphere.

PURDY’S FARMER AND THE FISH L D T 100 Titicus Rd, North Salem (914) 617-8380; farmerandthefish.com When a fishmonger partners with a chef who studied agriculture, the result is a communityoriented restaurant with locally grown produce and high-quality seafood. RAMIRO’S 954 D X 954 Rt 6, Mahopac (845) 621-3333; ramiros954.com Nuevo Latino cuisine with a contemporary approach and creativity. Hospitality and warmth reign supreme. THE RARE BIT L D T X 23 Cedar St, Dobbs Ferry (914) 693-8000; therarebitdf.com Chef David DiBari’s newest Dobb’s Ferry restaurant specializing in elevated English pub fare. The menu features traditional English dishes like bangers and mash and the namesake Welsh rarebit along with Indian dishes like chicken tikka masala and chef DiBari’s version of Papdi Chaat.

ROSIE’S BISTRO ITALIANO L D T X 10 Palmer Ave, Bronxville (914) 793-2000; rosiesbronxville.com Vintage posters in a festive dining room with splashes of yellow and wood accents. The Italian menu is designed to keep things fresh and seasonal. THE ROUNDHOUSE D T 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com An innovative, locally-inspired seasonal menu, offering local craft beers and creative artisanal cocktails. Floor-to-ceiling windows in the dining room yield stunning waterfall views. RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE L D X 670 White Plains Rd, Tarrytown (914) 631-3311; ruthschris.com The classic steakhouse, complete with mahogany bar and lounge, offers aged steaks and fresh seafood. Located in the Westchester Marriott.

RED HAT ON THE RIVER L D T X 1 Bridge St, Irvington (914) 591-5888; redhatontheriver.com A bustling, multi-level eatery, affording 180˚ views of the Hudson. French bistro classics mixed with seasonally changing dishes.

SAINT GEORGE BISTRO D T X 155 Southside Ave, Hastings-on-Hudson (914) 478-1671; saintgeorgebistro.com This French bistro offers reworked classics, local seafood, fine meats, seasonal vegetables and French wine.

RESTAURANT 1915 L D X 3020 Seven Lakes Drive, Bear Mountain 845-786-2731; visitbearmountain.com Located at the historic Bear Mountain Inn, enjoy a seasonal menu in a beautiful lodge setting.

SALTAIRE OYSTER BAR & FISH HOUSE L D T X 55 Abendroth Ave, Port Chester (914) 939-2425; saltaireoysterbar.com A Westchester fish and oyster bar serving 10 varieties of oysters and 5 signature sauces alongside craft cocktails.

RESTAURANT X & THE BULLY BOY BAR L D X 117 N Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555; xaviars.com Peter Kelly’s elegant roadside restaurant features four dining rooms, a welcoming bar, a menu of classic dishes, and modern American cuisine. RISOTTO D 788 Commerce St, Thornwood (914) 769-6000 ; risotto-restaurant.com Authentic Italian cuisine in a cozy neighborhood restaurant. Known for braised meats, homemade pastas and specialty soups; save room for dessert. RISTORANTE CATERINA DE’ MEDICI L D 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 451-1013; ristorantecaterinademedici.com Authentic regional Italian cuisine crafted at the Culinary Institute of America includes wood-fired pizza and other simple rustic dishes. RIVER CITY GRILLE L D T X 6 S Broadway, Irvington (914) 591-2033; rivercitygrille.com Eclectic American cuisine served in a vibrant bistro setting. Over a dozen wines by the glass and the bottle. Cocktails are both modern and classic.

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SAMBAL L D 4 W Main St, Irvington (914) 478-2700; sambalny.com Chef Navjot of Chutney Masala brings Southeastern Asian cuisine to the Irvington waterfront. Enjoy Thai and Malay inspired dishes like ground chicken with chilies and basil and penang duck along with a variety of curry, noodle and rice specialties. SAM’S OF GEDNEY WAY L D 50 Gedney Way, White Plains (914) 949-0978; samsofgedneyway.com A modern American bistro with room for everyone offering a variety of atmospheres for any dining occasion. SAPORE STEAKHOUSE L D X 1108 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-3300; saporesteakhouse.com Dry-aged beef cooked to your instructions in a spacious, comfortable, club setting. SAPORI ITAIAN RESTAURANT L D T X 324 Central Ave, White Plains (914) 684-8855; saporiofwhiteplains.com Savory Italian dishes prepared with love and passion. Homemade pastas, fresh seafood with an extensive Italian and American wine list.

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DINE YOUR WAY   

SCALIA & CO CRAFT KITCHEN & BAR L D 785 State Rt 17M, Suite 2, Monroe (845) 395-0906; scaliaandco.com Chef Mark Glielmi’s open kitchen turns out classic Italian cuisine including homemade burrata, mozzarella and cannoli in a casual, upbeat setting. SERGIO’S RISTORANTE D 503 Fifth Ave, Pelham (914) 278-9771; sergiosofpelham.com Enjoy fine Italian cuisine in a newly designed space and savor classic dishes like linguini alle vongole or trenete al tartufo. SHADOWS ON THE HUDSON L D T 176 Rinaldi Blvd, Poughkeepsie (845) 486-9500; shadowsonthehudson.com On a forty-foot cliff overlooking the Hudson River, Shadows offers five dining rooms and a varied menu of steak and seafood. SHIP LANTERN INN D 1725 Rt 9W, Milton (845) 795-5400; shiplanterninn.com Since 1925, genuine hospitality and gracious black-tie service, white tablecloths and fine American cuisine for a relaxing experience. SHIRAZ KITCHEN L D X 83 E Main St, Elmsford (914) 345-6111; shirazkitchen.com/ This white-tablecloth Persian and Middle Eastern restaurant brings fragrant flavors and colorful dishes to Elmsford. Taste the crispy traditional Tahdig, tangy and spicy labneh and beautiful saffron ice cream. SOFRITO L D T X 175 Main St, White Plains (914) 428-5500; sofritowhiteplains.com The aromatic mix of onions, garlic, and tomato are the essence of authentic Puerto Rican cuisine in this colorful, contemporary dining scene. SONORA RESTAURANT L D T X 179 Rectory St, Port Chester (914) 933-0200; sonorarestaurant.net South American flavors with French-Asian infusion, complemented by a great wine list, delightful cocktails and attentive service. SPARKILL STEAKHOUSE L D X 500 Route 340, Sparkill (845) 398-3300; sparkillsteakhouse.com Traditional steakhouse experience with classic sides and fresh, expertly butchered cuts of meat and seafood. STAGECOACH INN L D X 268 Main St, Goshen (845) 294-5526; stagecoachny.com Dishes like truffle lasagna and hand-cut steaks served in three unique areas of this historic boutique inn, including the main dining room, fully-windowed solarium and an outdoor porch.

CONVENIENT TO METRO-NORTH

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M ARCH 11–24, 2019

THE STEWART HOUSE D X 2 N Water St, Athens (518) 444-8317; stewarthouse.com Recently reopened under the guidance of Chef Bob Turner and under new ownership. Find menu items at the ca. 1883 Tavern like 5th generation Irish soda bread with brandied prunes and cultured butter, house made country pate and the ca. 1883 Boulevardier.

TAUK KITCHEN + BAR L D 402 Main St #5, Armonk (914) 730-1144; taukkitchen.com Inspired by the coastal Long Island town of Montauk, Tauk brings the seaside atmosphere to Westchester creating a carefree nautical atmosphere. Signature summertime classics including the lobster roll, lobster mac & cheese, and fish and chips graze the extensive menu.

THE STONE MANOR @ 101 L D 101 Saw Mill River Road, Hawthorne (914) 703-4112; thestonemanor101.com Modern steakhouse serving Mediterranean influenced dishes and signature cocktails.

TERRA RUSTICA L D T 550 North State Road, Briarcliff Manor (914) 923-8300; terrarusticaristorante.com Traditional Italian spot offering delicious Italian favorites from Orecchiette Gaeta to Ossobuco Di Angello.

SUNSET COVE L D T 238 Lower Green St, Tarrytown (914) 366-7889; sunsetcove.net Contemporary Italian restaurant with views of the Hudson River and Palisades. Offerings include a fresh raw bar and hand-crafted dishes including their deconstructed lasagna, a modern take on a classic. TARRY LODGE L D T X 18 Mill St, Port Chester (914) 939-3111; tarrylodge.com A suburban outpost of New York’s BataliBastianich outfit, famous for thin-crust pizza, house-made pasta and authentic Italian cooking.

TERRAPIN RESTAURANT D X 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Italian, Asian and French influences and local products served in a creative interpretation of New American cuisine. TEXAS DE BRAZIL D X 1584 Palisades Center Dr, West Nyack (845) 727-1313; texasdebrazil.com An authentic Brazilian-American churrascaria (steakhouse) combines the cuisine of Southern Brazil with the spirit of Texas. TEXAS DE BRAZIL D X 1 Ridge Hill Blvd, Yonkers (914) 652-9660; texasdebrazil.com

TRADITIONS 118 D 11 Old Tomahawk St, Somers (914) 248-7200; traditions118restaurant.com Traditional cuisine with classic Italian influences in an eclectic and comfortable atmosphere and an extensive martini menu. TRAMONTO BY ZUPPA L D X 27 Saw Mill River Rd, Hawthorne (914) 347-8220; tramontos.com The newest addition to the DaMaRo restaurant group with Zuppa and Mima Vinoteca. Genuine values and classic dishes blend with classic black and white decor creating a seamless trattoria experience. TRATTORIA 141 L D T X 141 Chatsworth Ave, Larchmont (914) 937-7200; trattoria141ny.com Combining Italian roots with a background in classically trained french culinary skills, the chef creates the cult classics as well as modern dishes. The menu is guaranteed to satisfy any craving, with staples including brick oven pizza, bolognese rigatoni, and chicken scarpariello. TRATTORIA LOCANDA L D X 1105 Main St, Fishkill (845) 896-4100; locandarestaurant.com Charming neighborhood eatery serving fine southern Italian cuisine in a casual, brick-walled dining room.

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TUTTABELLA TRATTORIA L D X 754 White Plains Rd, Scarsdale (914) 725-0566; tuttabellatrattoria.com Offering classic Northern Italian-style cuisine and an extensive wine list in a relaxed, family-friendly atmosphere.

VELO BISTRO & WINE BAR L D X 12 N Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-7667; velonyack.com Upscale corner bistro and wine bar serving refined New American cuisine in a warm and stylish atmosphere.

THE WOULD RESTAURANT D 120 North Rd, Highland (845) 691-9883; thewould.com New American cuisine with a French flair and a long history of warm hospitality in the heart of apple country.

THE TWISTED OAK L D T X 61 Main St, Tarrytown (914) 332-1992; thetwistedoakny.com Italian influenced American farmhouse cuisine with homemade pasta and charcuterie pair nicely with ingredient-driven cocktails, craft beer and modest wine list.

THE VILLAGE TEAROOM RESTAURANT & BAKE SHOP L D 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com A European-style tearoom offering a full menu of sophisticated foods, showcasing Irish roots and a commitment to local farms.

X20 XAVIARS ON THE HUDSON L D T X 71 Water Grant St, Yonkers (914) 965-1111; xaviars.com Classic French technique with Italian and Spanish influences and Asian embellishments yields an original cuisine unique to the Hudson Valley.

TWO SPEAR STREET D X 2 Spear St, Nyack (845) 353-7733; 2spearstreet.com New American cuisine in a romantic setting on the river overlooking the Tappan Zee.

VINTAGE 1891 KITCHEN D T 2089 Boston Post Rd, Larchmont (914) 834-9463; vintage1891kitchen.com A creative New American restaurant and lounge for diners to relax and renew in a beautifully renovated space to enjoy a seasonal menu.

ZERO OTTO NOVE L D X 55 Old Rt. 22, Armonk (914) 273-0089; 089armonk.com Chef Roberto Paciullo provides the a taste of Southern Italy in abundant portions fueled by local products brought directly to the restaurant’s quaint farmhouse tables.

WASABI L D X 110 Main St, Nyack (845) 358-7977; wasabinyack.com Chef Doug Chi Nguyen brings his international influence and love of food to Nyack, serving artfully plated sushi and entrées.

ZUPPA’S RESTAURANT L D T 59 Main St, Yonkers (914) 376-6500; zupparestaurant.com Trendy upscale restaurant serving locally-inspired modern Italian dishes in a historic building near the Yonkers’ waterfront.

WINSTON RESTAURANT D T X 130 E Main St, Mount Kisco (914) 244-9780; winstonrestaurant.com Sophisticated yet approachable bistro offering New American fare and unique signature cocktails in a sleek multilevel dining complex.

Visit HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com for the latest additions, menus and to make reservations.

UNION RESTAURANT & BAR LATINO L D 22 New Main St, Haverstraw (845) 429-4354; unionrestaurant.net Continental cuisine with a Latin twist in an upscale hacienda setting, offering specialty cocktails and sangrias. VEGA MEXICAN CUISINE L D T 189 E. Hartsdale Ave, Hartsdale (914) 723-0010; vegamexican.com Expand your palate and immerse your tastebuds in the culinary delights of Mexico—carne asada, flautas, ceviche, chile rellenos and other flavorpacked dishes.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

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Look for the NYS Grown & Certified logo in a retail store near you.

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“Best Chef Brian Arnoff”

Fine Dining in a Historic Tavern & Former Speakeasy Burgers, Fries, Salads, Full Cocktail Bar

Join us in Welcoming Chef Jerusalem Marsten-Reid to the Hudson Valley! Chef Jerusalem, formerly of Pomme & Oceana, is excited to present his creative cuisine in our intimate, historic setting.

— SUN - THURS: 11:30AM TO 9PM | FRI - SAT: 11:30AM TO MIDNIGHT

184 MAIN STREET, BEACON, NY | 845-440-6900 MEYERSOLDEDUTCH.COM

Paulas’ House

NORTH PLANK ROAD TAVERN —

30 Plank Rd, Newburgh, NY • (845) 562-5031 (Just off of 9W at I-84)

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“Food is Love Served on a Plate” 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie 845.454.7821 | paulaspublichouse.com 38

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WINE

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adams a

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text and photos by david handschuh 40

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H E R E ’ S N OT A T R AC E L E F T O F W O O D S I D E FA R M ,

the small patch of land on Cedar Avenue in Poughkeepsie that James Adamuccio purchased after he emigrated from Padula, Italy and settled in Poughkeepsie in the late 1800s. Nor are there any remnants of the small farmstand Ralph A. Adams and his wife, Mary, set up in 1919 on their 50-acre farm on Dutchess Turnpike.

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But the ghosts of that farm and its humble roadside stand topped with baskets of tomatoes, corn, peppers, cucumbers, apples and peaches still linger in the aisles of Adams Fairacre Farms, the Hudson Valley’s premiere gourmet market. Throughout a century of significant growth and expansion, Adams has maintained its core values and philosophy, reaffirmed by its mission statement, “Giving You Farmstand Quality Every Day.” That philosophy is at the core of a company that now owns four major markets in the region, employs more than 1,200 workers and generates more than $180 million in sales a year, and it’s what drives Ralph’s grandsons, company CEO Patrick Adams, 59, and his younger brother and company COO Steve, 47. “We’ve never forgotten our roots,” says Adams Marketing Director Bill Lessner. His office is in the company’s “corporate headquarters” above Adams’ Poughkeepsie store, just feet away from where the family’s original farmstand stood. “The mission statement is more evocative than literal,” Lessner adds, “but, basically, it’s about product freshness and farmstand roots.” From 1919 to 1957, Ralph A. Adams ran the farm. In 1958, his sons Ralph and Donald took over and built a small store. At first, they just sold fruits and vegetables, but soon people were asking for more. “Once you sell produce, they want cheese, then meats, then a deli,” Donald, the current patriarch of the family, observes. “It was a slow, natural progression.” Adams’ growth began in the early 1960s with the addition of the first garden center; by the mid-1970s, a deli, imported and domestic cheeses and gourmet foods were added. Kingston got its own store on Route 9W in 1981; Newburgh opened in 1998 with a salad bar, prepared foods, a sweet shop, gift shop and a gourmet food selection. The fourth store opened on Route 9 in Wappinger in 2011. Today, all four Adams markets feature produce, meat, seafood, a bakery, garden center, greenhouse, nursery, gift shop, flowers, candy and gifts, prepared foods, deli, grocery and cheese departments. The growth of the market is tied to the growth of the Hudson Valley as both a bedroom community of New

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Today, local sourcing is what the people want.


York City and as a tourist destination. “As we expanded, we expanded to a growing population base,” Patrick notes. “People moving from the city upped the demand for a wider selection of products.” But growth brought with it a concern. “We were afraid that as we added meat and fish, as we expanded the grocery, as we added a bakery, people would think we’re a supermarket, not a farm market,” he adds. That its approach to expansion has been successful is particularly evident at the Adams Greenhouses, located behind the Poughkeepsie store and beyond Adams Power Equipment, Adams Landscaping and Adams Fences (known as the “backyard businesses”). The greenhouses stand where the original farm was located, and they’re where all the bedding plants for the garden shops in all the stores are grown. That small part of the business is ranked among the top 100 Independent Garden Centers in the entire country. Part of the company’s success might be due to its unique management approach, Patrick says. While most store managers lay down universal rules with no autonomy for department managers, “We allow our managers to run their departments like it’s their own shop—but they have the backing of the whole company. They have autonomy but communicate with each other so the best practices come out of it.” The result is that the company maintains “a good culture of treating our employees well,” and so retains smart, outgoing employees," Steve adds. “In return, they treat the customers well.”

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Several employees have been on the payroll for 40 years, and three or four recently celebrated 30 years. “Many people work here [who] bring retail experience from other places feel that they’ve landed in retail heaven,” Patrick notes. “We have a lot less turnover than other stores.” Human Resources Director Gaye Mallet is the first (and only) hiring professional on the Adams roster. She’s been there 21 years. When hiring, she says she looks for ”someone with a great attitude, good energy, who is friendly, hard-working and not afraid to make eye contact. We always say that we can train anyone with the right attitude.” IT Director Mike DeCiutiis is another life-long Adams employee. Starting at age 16, he worked his way up from cashier and grocery clerk. Greg White started as an office manager, worked his way through accounting and is now the company controller. Adams’ customer base remains loyal, too, and it shows at the register: Customers spend an average of just over $40 per visit to Adams, while the average grocery shopper spends $34.61 per visit, according to The Food Marketing Institute. Adams nurtures its customer community with a variety of enticements. Free, in-store seminars cover subjects ranging from cake decorating and sushi making to German pretzel making and beekeeping. For the annual Lawn & Garden Show, held at all stores, crews design and install hundreds of spring bulbs, annuals, trees and shrubs in the greenhouses. It’s always a big hit.

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The growth of the market is tied to the growth of the Hudson Valley.

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“Adams is a store in a state of constant evolution,” Lessner says. “We work with 30 local farms to bring the best and the freshest to our customers. We’re trying to have fresher products, better service, as many local products as possible and try to be fair with our pricing.” Prepared foods are the company’s largest growing product segment. Roast chicken, wings, fresh salads and salad makings, lasagna, mac and cheese, prepared fish and meats are the big sellers. Mozzarella, made in the Newburgh store daily, is delivered fresh to the other three locations. Each week, 2,000 pounds—a ton—of Adamsmade mozzarella is served on pizzas and Caprese salads throughout the Hudson Valley. “Shoppers are impressed that there are actually people here cooking stuff, and the menu changes every day. All day long, workers are chopping vegetables for the salad bar, roasting chickens, baking French and Italian bread,” Lessner says, noting it’s not unusual to see a social media post asking, “Are the donuts being made yet?” For the Adams team, working with local producers and farms was “not only part of their own history as farmers, but also the first means of the expansion of their farmstand,” Lessner continues. “Working with local farmers broadened their list of offerings, thus paving the way for the successful grocery and garden supply businesses. Today, local sourcing is what the people want.” One of those local producers is the Haight family, owners of Hudson Valley Cold Pressed Oils in Pleasant Valley. Though 70 different olive oils crowd Adams’ shelves, the Haight’s sunflower oil also is available—Adams in Poughkeepsie was the first local retailer to carry the product, in fact. “I started working at the store stocking shelves with Steve [Adams] in high school,” Jeff Haight says. “I have lots of great memories and friendships from working there. I spoke to Steve and Mark Griffin about the sunflower oil project. They came to the farm for a tour and demo of the entire process—from pressing the oil to bottling—they placed the first order to go into their store that day!” he recalls. “For us, being sold at Adams gives us credibility in the community.”  Adams Fairacre Farms adamsfarms.com 765 Dutchess Tnpk, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-4330 1560 Ulster Ave, Lake Katrine (845) 336-6300 1240 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 569-0303 160 Old Post Rd, Wappinger (845) 632-9955

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SAVE THE DATE Tuesday, May 14, 2019 The Culinary Institute of America

HUDSON VALLEY

FOOD &

BEVERAGE

INNOVATION SUMMIT

Where is your market growing? Join us, Tuesday, May 14th in the Marriot Pavillion at The Culinary Institute of America to learn what’s trending in booths, tastings and networking opportunities with top Dutchess County food and beverage producers.

Presented by:


EATING BY THE SEASON

chives by alice gabriel

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and crocuses, garden chives push through barely thawed earth with almost alarming vigor. More than most herbs, chives demand that we use them: The plants respond to regular beheadings by redoubling their efforts, producing slender dark green leaves from early spring until long after the first fall frost. The bulbous, bright green clumps of mature chives require periodic division to thrive, like daffodils. Hapless gardeners must find new homes for their drawnand-quartered chives—they’ll be foisted off on family and friends who, in turn, will dutifully snip away and repeat the cycle all over again. Allium schoenoprasum gives new meaning to the term “hardy perennial.” A close cousin of garlic, shallots, leeks and scallions, chives are the only allium native to both the Old and New Worlds. Bees love them; chive flowers present early, when few other plants are blossoming, so they serve as a kind of hors d’oeuvre for pollinators. (There is nothing quite as entertaining as watching a bumble bee bob precariously on a chive blossom as it sucks nectar.) Chives entice, but they also repel. There are widespread claims among gardeners that when planted near roses they prevent black spot and deter aphids and Japanese beetles. Orchardists plant chives among apple trees to control apple scab. Because chives have a naturally high sulfur content, chive tea applied to cucumbers and

PHOTO THIS PAGE: LESLEY ROZYCKI

gooseberries is said to prevent powdery mildew and ward off cabbage white butterflies. Chives can also repel people. “He who has chives on his breath is safe from being kissed to death,” wrote the Roman satirist Martial. The good news for chive lovers is that, more recently, researchers at Ohio State University have found that eating fresh mint leaves, apples or lettuce can solve the problem. For home cooks, there’s no excuse for not having fresh chives on hand—growing them successfully is kid’s stuff. In fact, raising chives from seed is a favorite elementary school activity, like growing beans in milk cartons. All they require to get up and running is a sunny spot with loose, well-drained soil and adequate water. They’re that easy to grow, really. Everything chive that grows above ground is edible: leaves, scapes, buds and flowers. The faded flowers scatter their seeds with abandon, so it’s a good idea to eat them before they do this— given half a chance, they will take over your garden, though they’re just as happy confined to pots or window boxes. The Old Farmer’s Almanac website (almanac.com) includes a marvelous thread, kept going by chive enthusiasts, that suggests dividing clumps every three or four years. This is when having a large, extended family comes in handy. Chives are one fourth of the classical quartet known in French cooking as fines herbes. In Recipes From a French Herb

CHIVE AND MINT BUTTER ALICE GABRIEL Ingredients 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 2 teaspoons fresh chives, neatly snipped 1 teaspoon fresh mint leaves, minced salt to taste Method Gently blend the butter and the herbs. Place dots of the butter mixture on lamb or beef hot off the grill, or melt over spring peas.

HERB GARDENS If you’d just like to visit some chives, a few historic sites in the Hudson Valley maintain exemplary herb gardens. There is an admission fee to Philipsburg Manor; admission to the grounds of the other sites is free. Montgomery Place Campus at Bard College, in Annandale-on-Hudson, has an herb garden based on maps drawn in the 1930s. The John Jay Homestead, in Katonah, features a walled herb garden in the style of a seventeenth-century English knot garden, maintained by the New York Chapter of the Herb Society of America. The grounds of Philipsburg Manor, an active “living museum” in Sleepy Hollow, feature a colonial herb garden that includes more than 80 herbs. —AG

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Garden (Simon & Schuster, 1989; $34.95 hardcover), the English food writer Geraldene Holt extols chives as “quite distinctive and superior” in flavor to other members of the onion family. Noting their affinity with eggs and cream, she calls for chives in resolutely French dishes: boudin blanc seasoned with chives and parsley; Dover sole coddled with chive butter and

bread crumbs; clams stuffed with almonds, chives and parsley; Cantal-laced brioche spread with chive butter; hot parsley mousse cloaked in chive cream; and snow peas sautéed with shredded butterhead lettuce, chives, scallions and mint. On the other hand, un-haute chives neatly snipped into tiny rounds give a pop of color and a shot of verve to plain baked

MUSHROOMS AND EGG WITH CHIVES CHEF ALEX BURGER THE AMSTERDAM Ingredients 8 eggs 1/2 pound cremini mushrooms 1/2 pound hen of the woods mushrooms 1/2 pound oyster mushrooms 1/2 pound shiitake mushrooms 1/2 pound locally foraged seasonal mushrooms, washed, dried 1/4 cup olive oil 1 tablespoon butter 1 shallot, chopped 1 clove garlic, chopped salt and pepper to taste 2 tablespoons sherry 1/4 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons crème fraiche 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar pinch of Maldon sea salt for each serving 1 bunch chives, chopped serves 8 Method 1. Cut all the mushrooms into equal, bite-size pieces. 2. Set up a water bath with an immersion circulator to 144.5˚F/62.5°C and cook the eggs in the shell for one hour. 3. When the eggs are almost done cooking, in a large sauté pan, heat the olive oil until just smoking. 4. Add all the cut mushrooms and cook until all the liquid is gone from the pan. 5. Add the butter, chopped shallot and garlic and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. 6. When the mushrooms are nicely roasted, deglaze the pan with sherry. 7. Add the heavy cream and crème fraiche and reduce until glazed. 8. Finish with the sherry vinegar and chopped chives (reserve some of the chopped chives for a garnish). To serve Divide the mushroom mixture equally into the center of individual, shallow bowls, forming a small well in the middle. Crack the eggs into the well—it should be a perfect, slow-poached egg. Sprinkle with a pinch of Maldon sea salt and chopped chives. Serve with grilled bread.

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PHOTO THIS PAGE: SUSAN BAKER


HOT PARSLEY MOUSSE WITH CHIVE CREAM Ingredients Mousse 1 large bunch flat-leaf parsley 6 tablespoons whole milk 1 slice onion 1/2 cup ricotta cheese 2 large eggs 1/2 teaspoon finely chopped chives salt one scant tablespoon butter Chive cream 2 ⁄3 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons finely chopped chives juice of 1/2 lemon 1/4 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest Garnish 4 leaves flat-leaf parsley serves 4

potatoes, and bring a bit of confetti-like gaiety to scrambled eggs and omelettes. The tufted amethyst blossoms, which make a little can-can show all their own, lend a delicate fragrance and a pretty touch to salads, soups and fish filets. At The Amsterdam, in Rhinebeck, executive chef Alex Burger is another fan of chives, which, he says, add “a nice depth of flavor that sets them apart from other alliums.” A favorite on his taut dinner menu is a dish of oven-roasted wild mushrooms sautéed with shallots, garlic and sherry, laced with heavy cream and sherry vinegar, crowned with a slow-poached egg and showered with bits and batons of fresh chopped chives. (In the spring, he uses the flowers as a garnish for his bright green arugula-pesto risotto.) Dan Barber, chef and a co-owner of Blue Hill at Stone Barns, in Pocantico Hills, keeps chives in play year ’round. Known for turning unsuspecting root vegetables into things of

great beauty, he also produces a special elixir: chive oil. “It adds that green allium flavor that I love so much,” he says. Barber works his alchemy by first freezing grapeseed oil, then blending it with raw chives, sometimes adding a tablet of Vitamin C to keep it “very, very green.” He doesn’t bother to strain the oil. (“I like the sludge for flavor,” he notes.) Barber uses fresh chives as the French do, too, mingling them with chervil and parsley to strew over “fish, meats and vegetables—everything!” In summer, when chives produce their charming flowers, he even plucks apart the blossom heads. “I use them everywhere,” he says. “I love them with fattier fish, like halibut—I sprinkle individual petals all over the fish.” Despite his enthusiasm for chives, Barber counsels against too much of a good thing. “The whole thing with chives,” he cautions, “is that you have to tame them.” 

Method Mousse Preheat oven to 350˚F. 1. Take 1/4 of the leaves from the bunch of parsley. Chop finely and set aside in a small bowl. 2. Roughly chop the remaining parsley stems and leaves. 3. Place the roughly chopped parsley, milk and onion slice in a small pan and simmer for 3 minutes. 4. Strain the hot milk into the bowl of finely chopped parsley and let cool. 5. Whisk the ricotta with the eggs, cooled parsley milk and the chives. Add salt to season to taste. 6. Pour mixture into 4 small, buttered dessert cups (or small ramekins or very small soufflé dishes). The cups should be about 2/3 full. 7. Place the mousse cups in a bain-marie of hot water and bake in a 350˚F oven 20 to 25 minutes, until set. 8. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for a few minutes. Chive cream 1. Beat the cream with the chives until stiff. 2. Fold in the strained lemon juice and zest. 3. Gently heat the cream over low heat until it becomes warm and pourable. Place in a dish of hot water to keep warm. To serve 1. Run a knife around each mousse cup and turn out onto individual plates. 2. Spoon some chive cream around each mousse. Garnish with a parsley leaf. Serve immediately. Adapted from Recipes From a French Herb Garden, by Geraldene Holt

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EATING BY THE SEASON

radishes by leslie coons bostian

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accompaniment status, the radish is no wallflower. (Well, it is, sort of—botanically, both radishes and wallflowers are members of the Brassicaceae family.) Among spring’s first offerings, the plant’s sometimes sweet, sometimes spicy, hot, peppery and sometimes bitter swollen roots (the part this is usually eaten) make themselves known in any presentation. Radishes were once so popular in this country that they were a staple of every meal. “I can recall many old Pennsylvania Dutch relatives who lamented the fact that people had stopped serving radishes for breakfast,” wrote food historian William Woys Weaver in his 1997 classic, Heirloom Vegetable Gardening (revised and updated in a new 2018 edition), “A glance at seed lists from the 19th century would certainly support this, for there were radishes for every imaginable culinary situation.” Radishes seem to be experiencing a resurgence, and more varieties—many of them heirloom—are making their way onto our tables. Walter Hinds, executive chef of The Roundhouse in Beacon, says he’s always on the lookout for different textures and flavors. “Radishes range from the spicy (think Purple Ninja) to the sweet and crunchy Watermelon,” he says. “We do a refreshing plate here that features a variety

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LOBSTER & DAIKON SLAW WITH BLACK RADISH & YOGURT VINAIGRETTE CONSTANTINE KALANDRANIS 8 NORTH BROADWAY; 273 KITCHEN Ingredients Slaw 1/2 pound cleaned and cooked Maine lobster, cut in chunks 1 cup Napa cabbage, shaved 1/2 red onion, sliced 1/2 daikon radish, julienned 1 cucumber, sliced in coins 1 pinch celery seed Vinaigrette 1 cup Greek yogurt 1/2 cup red wine vinegar juice of half a lemon 1 black radish, grated 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/2 bunch dill, chopped salt and pepper Method 1. In a large bowl, toss the slaw ingredients to mix evenly. 2. Whisk all the vinaigrette ingredients until mixture becomes creamy. The dill, lemon and salt flavors should be prominent (add more of any of these if needed, to taste). 3. Dress over lobster and vegetables. Serve with warm pita and more olive oil. Local Riesling or Vidal Blanc pair well with this dish.


BUTTER POACHED RADISHES RIC ORLANDO NEW WORLD BISTRO BAR This is inspired by Gabrielle Hamilton’s sexy little dish at Prune, in New York City. Ingredients About 20 red radishes, trimmed of stem and greens water about 1 cup (2 sticks) melted butter salt to taste radish sprouts serves 4

of colorful radishes. We pair them with our Red Goddess dressing—our take on the more familiar Green Goddess sauce. Ours features roasted red peppers and garlic for a unique extra punch of flavor. It’s a great opener before indulging in one of our heartier entrees.” “I love the classic red Cherry Belle radish. They are beautiful to look at—bright red and round— and they have some of my favorite veggie characteristics: They’re spicy, crunchy and they ferment like champs,” says Ric Orlando, owner of New World Bistro in Albany and former chef/ owner of New World Home cooking in Saugerties. “I also love daikon radish—I do a lot of fermenting and they create the best stink! All of the other beautiful varieties available at the farm stands—Watermelon, French Breakfast, Sparklers—they are all fun, but at the end of the day, the red Cherry Belle is my favorite for salad and braising.” “Radishes are awesome,” agrees Constantine Kalandranis, chef and proprietor of 8 North Broadway in Nyack and 273 Kitchen in Harrison. “It is funny how we all crave a texture even more than a flavor. Some radishes, like French Breakfast, are exciting with very little spice; others like Black or Watermelon, have texture (but) surprise (you with) spice notes.” One of the easiest and fastest vegetables for home gardeners to grow, radishes thrive in the Hudson Valley’s cool spring weather, though seeds also can be found for varieties that withstand hotter temperatures.  

Method 1. In a heavy skillet, arrange the radishes in a single layer. Add water to come up about 1/2 inch around the radishes. 2. Add the melted butter and sprinkle lightly with salt. The combined liquid should come at least halfway up the radishes. Add water if needed. 3. Bring liquid to a gentle simmer over medium heat. (Do not bring to a hard boil.) The liquid should taste slightly briny (add salt if needed). 4. After simmering a few minutes, turn a radish. If it is beginning to turn pinkish and starting to lose its bright red color, turn them all over. Repeat process, cooking radishes gently until they are tender but not soft. (Cut one in half: The center should be slightly translucent and just tender.) To serve 1. Arrange radishes on a plate and sprinkle with salt. 2. Drizzle with the butter-water liquid. (It is a great combo of salty pink water and bright yellow butter.) 3. Top with a few radish sprouts if available.

8 North Broadway 8 N. Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-1200; 8northbroadway.com 273 Kitchen 273 Halstead Ave, Harrison (914) 732-3333; 273kitchen.com New World Bistro Bar 300 Delaware Ave, Albany (518) 694-0520; newworldbistrobar.com The Roundhouse 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com

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2019 HUDSON VALLEY CSA FARMS

FA R M S , F O O D & M A R K E T S

the csa model Community Supported Agriculture provides structure and security for small farm businesses. The CSA model was created so that farmers could receive income when business demands it. Consumers invest in the farm early in the season (January to May) and receive the fruits of their investment when the farm is most abundant (June to December). This payment structure allows farmers to invest in their annual startup costs (seeds, equipment, and paying employees) when the bulk of the farm work is happening but there are few products to sell. CSA members (or “subscribers”) usually pick up their “share” at the farm (or at a predetermined dropoff location) on a weekly schedule. Though there is much variety in different CSA share offerings, a standard vegetable share usually includes up to a dozen seasonal crops and costs from $25 to $45 per week. The vegetables (or herbs, flowers, eggs, dairy, grains, meats or a combination) are freshly harvested and locally grown. Each CSA share is prepared with little waste or packaging; it will have logged low food mileage and it will have been grown with beneficial agricultural and environmentally responsible practices.

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FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS

FIND THE RIGHT CSA Not all CSA farms operate the same— there’s often flexibility in terms of cost, pickup schedule or location, contents and more. Finding the CSA that works best for you may take some time and a few phone calls, but it’s worth the effort to avoid disappointments or surprises. Here are a few options to consider when choosing your CSA.

CSA members have access to elements of a farm that the average market consumer does not. Many farms offer pick-your-own gardens, on-farm events, classes and workshops, educational newsletters and specialty shares. There is flexibility built into the CSA model, including varying share sizes and lengths, payment plans, working shares, pick-up and distribution sites. All these choices make each CSA membership as unique as the farm operation it supports. The CSA Model brings two of our most basic needs together in one package: fresh food and community. In addition to receiving a selection of fresh, local, seasonal food, share pickup time is an opportunity to meet the farmer, learn about the farm, greet friends new and old, and experience the benefits of investment in community. Leon Vehaba, a Farm Manager at Poughkeepsie Farm Project, says, “My CSA members are like an extended family. We have members that were on this farm as babies; now they’re finishing college. Coming to the farm to pick up each week is a family ritual for all of us.” In an effort to make the CSA model more accessible to more people, the CSA farmers of the Hudson Valley have created the Hudson Valley CSA Coalition with coordinating support from the non-profit Glynwood. The Coalition’s mission is to expand and

Payment plans Some CSAs offer time-payment or other customized payment plans (Abode, Tributary), sliding scale payment based on income or family size (Rock Steady, Sisters Hill, Solid Ground, Old Ford), partial share or partial season plans (Great Song), or even debit plans that allow you to add to your account during the season (Evolutionary Organics). Some CSAs accept EBT/food stamps (Soul Fire) or allow you to work off some or all of your share cost with working shares (Hawthorne Valley). Pickup site Many CSAs offer only on-farm pickup on a set schedule; some may have one or more off-farm distribution sites. Some offer both. Choose a CSA that best suits your schedule and location.

diversify CSA membership and to organize opportunities for residents to connect with local farmers and learn more about becoming CSA members. “I opted to get involved in the Coalition because it’s important for small farmers to work together, and because it connects our farms to new members,” says Wes Hannah of Solid Ground Farm. “Working hand-in-hand with the people who eat our food is why we started farming in the first place,” he adds. No matter where you live in the Hudson Valley, there is a CSA nearby. There are many ways to purchase food, but there is no better way to eat like you live here.

Share contents Most CSAs offer pre-bagged shares based on what’s available at the farm. Some, however, offer free-choice shares that allow you to fulfill your share from a variety of available items (Common Hands, Poughkeepsie Farm Project, Blackhorse). Some CSAs may offer specialized shares, including meat or dairy (Hemlock Hill, Kinderhook, St. Croix), flowers (Tiny Hearts, Shoving Leopard) and even herbs and medicinal products (Earthly Remedies, Field Apothecary & Herb Farm, Good Fight Herb Co). Pick your own Some farms now allow you to go into the fields to pick your own vegetables, fruit or flowers (Fishkill, Letterbox, Kelder’s).

Hudson Valley CSA Coalition hudsonvalleycsa.org

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2019 HUDSON VALLEY CSA FARMS

2019 Hudson Valley CSA Farms available. Full share: $625. Pick-up: on the farm, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

COLUMBIA COUNTY Abode Farm 10 Chair Factory Rd, New Lebanon abodefarmcsa.com June-November No synthetic fertilizers, herbicides or pesticides. Uses Belgian draft horses as primary source of power. Vegetable share: $600-$800; half share: $400-$600. Sliding scale available. Pick-up: at farm, Tuesday, Friday.

Letterbox Farm 4161 U.S. 9, Hudson letterboxfarm.com June-November Collectively owned and operated farm. Vegetable, meat, eggs, flowers and herb shares available. Spring share: $315; summer share: $1,040; halfshare: $575. Pick-up: on the farm, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday.

Common Hands Farm 257 Stevers Crossing Rd, Hudson commonhandscsa.com June-November Vegetable share. Large: $700; medium: $550$650; small: $375-$425. Pick-up: Hudson Upstreet Market, Wednesday; Philmont Coop or Chatham Farmers’ Market, Friday; Hillsdale Farmers’ Market, Saturday.

Lineage Farm 1630 County Route 7A, Copake lineagefarmcsa.com June-October Vegetables grown without pesticides, herbicides or artificial fertilizers. Large share: $510-$530; medium share: $410-$430; small share: $310$330. Pick-up: Hudson, Wednesday; Croton and Poughkeepsie, Thursday; Brooklyn and White Plains Saturday.

Field Apothecary & Herb Farm 245 Main St, Germantown fieldapothecary.com Year-round. Medicinal herbs. Approximately $150 per season. Pick-up at farm. Also, offers shipping. Good Fight Herb Co. 253 1/2 Warren St., Hudson goodfightherbco.com Year-round Herbal share: $365 Hawk Dance Farm 362 Rodman Rd, Hillsdale hawkdancefarm.com May-October Assortment of heirloom vegetables grown using organic practices. Full share (3-4 adults): $600; half share (1-2 adults): $300. Pick-up at Copake Hillsdale Farmers’ Market, Saturday. Hawthorne Valley Farm 327 Route 21C, Ghent farm.hawthornevalley.org June-October Demeter-certified biodynamic farm growing vegetables and fruit. Full vegetable share: $500$550; half share: $275-$320. Fruit share: $205. Pick-up: at farm, Friday; at Riverdale, Inwood, and Garden City, Thursday. Hearty Roots Community Farm 1830 Route 9, Germantown heartyroots.com June-November Top-quality, certified organic produce. Weekly vegetable share: $620; biweekly vegetable share: $330. Weekly egg share: $110. Pick-up: Red Hook, Tuesday; at the farm, Kingston or Woodstock, Wednesday. Ironwood Farm 103 County Rd 9, Ghent ironwood.farm Certified organic vegetable operation with specialty crops. Fruit and meat shares also available. Summer share: $500-$665 depending on size and location. Pick-up: Ghent, Saturday. In conjunction with Rivertown CSA, pick-up: Irvington and Sleepy Hollow, Saturday. Kinderhook Farm 1958 Co Rd 21, Valatie kinderhookfarm.com April-February Year round, Animal Welfare Approved, grass-fed and pasture-raised meat share. Payment plans

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Little Seed Gardens PO Box 195, 541 White Mills Rd, Valatie littleseedgardens.com June-October Certified organic vegetables and herbs. Full share: $550; half share (biweekly): $325. Beef shares also available. Pick-up: at gardens, Tuesday. New Leaf Farm 15 Crystal Springs Dr, Lebanon Springs newleaffarm.wordpress.com June-November All crops grown organically, without the use of synthetic fertilizers and chemical sprays. Full share: $575; small share: $375. Subsidized shares also available. Flower share: $150. Pick-up at farm, Tuesday.

breads available. Pick-up: Upstreet Farmers’ Market in Hudson, Wednesday; Millerton Farmers’ Market, Saturday. The Farm at Miller’s Crossing 170 Route 217, Hudson farmatmillerscrossing.com June-September Certified organic vegetables, plants and flowers in addition to a small grass-fed beef herd and maple syrup. Meat and vegetable shares available. Pickup: on farm, Tuesday, Friday. Threshold Farm 16 Summit St, Philmont 518-672-5509 July-November Fruit grown using biodynamic practices and no chemicals. Share: about $200. Pick-up: on farm, Tuesday or Friday; at Woodstock Jewish Congregation, Wednesday. Tiny Hearts Farm 1649 County Route 7A, Copake tinyheartsfarm.com June-October Large arranged bouquet of cut flowers, vase ready. Spring tulip share: $100; summer bunch share: $170; fall dahlia share: $150. Pick-up at farm flower shop, Friday and Saturday. Trusted Roots Farm 402 County Route 34, East Chatham trustedrootsfarm.com June-November Vegetables and eggs grown with no herbicides or pesticides. Relies on compost, grazing animals, and cover crops for fertility. Full vegetable share: $550; working share: $450; small share: $350; egg share: $62-$116. Pick-up: on the farm Friday, Saturday.

Red Oak Farm 1921 US Route 9, Stuyvesant redoakfarmny.com May-November Seasonal selection of certified organic vegetables, berries, fruit, herbs and teas. Members have option to select items in their share each week. Full share: $495. Half share: $260. Pick-up: Tuesday at Albany Public Library; Saturday on the farm or at Hudson farmers’ market.

Woven Stars Farm 52 Winter Hill Road, Ghent wovenstarsfarm.com June-November Organically grown egg, mushroom and seasonal meat shares. Regular share: $650; Family share: $1,300. Pick-up: on farm or Kingston.

Roxbury Farm 2501 Route 9H, Kinderhook roxburyfarm.com June-November Vegetable, fruit, beef, lamb and chicken shares. Vegetable share: $600-$686 depending on location. Small share: $400-$450. Fruit: $75; lamb: $118; beef: $155; pork: $150; chicken:$130. Pick-up: on farm, Friday; at locations in the Capital District, Tuesday, and Westchester County, Wednesday.

Common Ground Farm 79 Farmstead Ln, Wappingers Falls commongroundfarm.org June-September Nonprofit educational farm project. Ecologically grown without chemical fertilizers, herbicides or pesticides. Herbs, vegetables and flowers. U-pick share: $210. Pick-up: at farm, Wednesday, Saturday.

Sparrowbush Farm 2409 Route 9, Hudson sparrowbushfarm.com November-April Full-diet Winter shares. Root vegetables, greens, herbs, dairy, lamb, beef, eggs, chicken, pork, and fresh bread. Share: $1250 for 12 weeks. Pick up: on farm, Wednesday. Ten Barn Farm 1142 County Route 22, Ghent tenbarnfarm.com June-October Organically grown vegetables. Shareholders choose from variety of items each week. Full share: $535; half share: $330. Flowers, fruit and

DUTCHESS COUNTY

Diana Mae Flowers Beacon June-September dianamaeflowers.com Naturally grown, specialty cut flowers. Weekly share: $100-$200. Pick-up: TBD. Fishkill Farms 9 Fishkill Farm Rd, Hopewell Junction fishkillfarms.com June-November Seasonal fruit, vegetables and pick-your-own produce. Full share: $1,045; small share: $650. Egg and winter shares available. Pick-up: at the farm, Friday, Saturday.


FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS

Celebrating 20 years as one of the Hudson Valley’s best CSA’s! Pickup your share in Stanfordville or the Bronx. Join today at sistershillfarm.org

Amazing taste, fantastic value; our average member has been with us for 6 years and saved over $2,200 on grocery bills!

Local shares include PYO

Flowers and herbs!

Weekly and biweekly shares available for a 24 week season.

Spirit of the Hudson Valley Farm to Whiskey Tasting Room Open Fri-Sun 11AM-6PM Stoutridge Distillery 10 Ann Kaley Lane Marlboro, NY (845) 236-7620

www.stoutridge.com

GLORIE FARM WINERY

We grow grapes. We make wine. Wines you know, and Wines you should meet.

“We GROW Glorie Wine.” Tasting and Sales:

Weekends April through December. 40 Mountain Rd. Marlboro, NY 12542

845.236.3265

gloriewine.com

Full Circus Farm 27 Mils Path, Pine Plains fullcircusfarm.wordpress.com June-November Certified organic, horse-powered farm. Vegetable and fruit shares on sliding scale. Full share: $625$725; half share: $400-$500. Pick-up: at farm, Tuesday, Saturday. Great Song Farm 475 Milan Hill Rd, Red Hook greatsongfarm.com June-November Seasonal vegetables and fruit shares as well as pick-your-own crops, flowers and herbs. Organic and biodynamic farm. Full share: $615. Biweekly and family size available. Pick up: on farm, Tuesday and Saturday. SNAP benefits accepted. Hepworth Farms at Primrose Hill 23 Spring Brook Park, Rhinebeck Primrosehillschool.com June-October Partnership between Primrose Hill Farm Collective and Hepworth Farms. Allows children the opportunity to work with animals and vegetable gardening. Full share: $650; half share: $325. Fruit add-on available. Pick-up: Primrose Hill School, Tuesday. Maitri Farm 143 Amenia Union Rd, Amenia maitrifarmny.com June-October Certified-organic vegetables. Pasture-raised meat, eggs and winter share also available. Full share: $625; half share (biweekly): $340. Egg share: $65-$130. Meat share: $100-$300. Pick-up: on farm, Friday. Meadowland Farm 689 Schultzville Rd, Clinton Corners meadowlandfarmny.com June-November Vegetables and flowers. Vegetable share: $650; u-pick flower share: $120. Farm-raised lamb and pork also available. Pick-up: at farm, Friday evening. Miracle Springs Farm 709 County Route 11, Ancram miraclespringsfarm.com Year-round Small goat dairy growing non-certified organic vegetables. Vegetable share: $700; Cheese share: $186. Pick-up: on farm or in Millerton, Saturday. Northwind Farms 185 W Kerley Corners Rd, Tivoli northwindfarmsallnatural.com Year-round All-natural, antibiotic-free meat and poultry. Multiple share sizes available. $85 for 8 to 10 pounds of meat; $125 for 10 to 12 pounds. Pick up: at farm, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday; Woodstock Farmers’ Market, Wednesday; Kingston Farmers’ Market, Saturday. Obercreek Farm 59 Marlorville Rd, Wappingers Falls obercreekfarm.com June-October Certified-organic produce and herbs as well as u-pick flowers. Full share: $550. Boxed delivery $50. Meat and eggs also available. Pick-up: at farm, Wednesday. Poughkeepsie Farm Project 51 Vassar Farm Ln, Poughkeepsie farmproject.org June-November A nonprofit farm project offering weekly seasonal vegetables, berries and flowers. Full share: $859; half share: $467. Working share discount available. Fruit and winter shares available. Pickup: on farm, Tuesday, Saturday.

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2019 HUDSON VALLEY CSA FARMS Rock Steady Farm and Flowers 41 Kaye Rd, Millerton rocksteadyfarm.com June-November Utilizes holistic and sustainable farming practices. Offers shares on a sliding scale. Full vegetable share: $650-$800; half share (biweekly): $350-$425. Limited working-share discount available. Flower share: $88-$275. Egg share: $78-$132. Pick-up: at farm, Saturday. Sawkill Farm 7770 Albany Post Rd, Red Hook sawkillfarm.com June-November Meat shares. Grass-fed beef, pastured poultry, lamb and heritage hogs. 10-pound share: $500; 15-pound share: $750. Pick-up: at farm, Tuesday, Friday. Shoving Leopard Farm 845 River Rd, Barrytown (Red Hook) shovingleopardfarm.org April-September Specialty flowers grown without synthetic pesticides or fertilizers. Spring share: $95; summer share: $200; fall dahlia share: $95. Pick-up: on farm, Sawkill Farm Market or Clove Kitchen Market, Friday. Sisters Hill Farm 127 Sisters Hill Rd, Stanfordville sistershillfarm.org May-November Vegetable shares on sliding scale. Full share: $695-$795; half-share (biweekly): $375-$425. Pick-up: on farm or at College of Mount St Vincent, Bronx, Tuesday.

Blackhorse Farms 10094 Route 9W, Athens blackhorsefarms.com June-October Organic vegetables, milk, and eggs. Full share: $650; Half share: $450, Personal share: $350. Pay in full or weekly. Pick-up: Farm Store, Thursdays; Saugerties, Menands, Ravena and Catskill, Saturdays. Heather Ridge Farm 989 Broome Center Road, Preston Hollow heather-ridge-farm.com Year-round Animal Welfare Approved frozen meat shares. Regular, Combination, 5-Month, 12-Month Shares available. Pick-up: on farm or shipped. Stoneledge Farm 145 Garcia Ln, Leeds stoneledge.farm June-November USDA certified organic vegetables. Standard share: $545-$560 depending on location. Optional fruit, mushroom and coffee shares also available. Pick-up: on farm, Tuesday; multiple locations throughout Westchester County and metro-New York area.

ORANGE COUNTY Bialas Farms 74 Celery Ave, New Hampton bialasfarms.com June-October Summer and winter vegetable shares. Full and half share price: TBD. Pick-up: on farm, Tuesday, Saturday and Sunday. Blooming Hill Farm 1251 Route 208, Monroe bloominghill.farm Year-round

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Gray Family Farm 261 Otterkill Rd, New Windsor grayfamilyfarm.com June-October Members receive a weekly basket with a combination of meats (chicken, beef, pork), vegetables, eggs and specialty items. Full share: $1,275. Pick-up: on farm or in Highland Falls, Friday. J&A Farm 12 Indiana Road, Goshen jafarm.org May-October Certified Naturally Grown vegetables grown in the black dirt region. Share: $600. Pick-up: on farm, Tuesday. Peace and Carrots Farm 153 Johnson Rd, Chester peaceandcarrotsfarm.com June-October A variety of seasonal vegetables. Full share: $650 (four adult omnivores); half share (two adults): $390. Pick-up: at farm or at West Point, Monday. Royal Acres Farm and CSA 621 Scotchtown Collabar Rd, Middletown facebook.com/RoyalAcresFarmAndCSA June-October Certified naturally grown vegetables. No GMOs used on the farm. Full share: $540; half share: $270. Pick-up: at farm, Wednesday, Friday.

PUTNAM COUNTY

GREENE COUNTY

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Organically grown vegetables. Fruit and plants also available. Market style CSA. Members receive 10% added value on investment. Full share: $500; half share: $250.

Glynwood 362 Glynwood Rd, Cold Spring glynwood.org May-November Regenerative practices. Vegetable, meat and egg shares. Full share: $740; half share (biweekly): $385. Meat and egg share: $1,000. Winter shares also available. Pick-up: at farm, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday. Longhaul Farm 69 S Mountain Pass, Garrison longhauling.blogspot.com June-September Organically grown vegetables. Chicken, turkey, pork and eggs also available. Full share: $650; half share: $325. Pick-up: at farm, Tuesday. Ryder Farm 400 Starr Ridge Rd, Brewster spaceonryderfarm.org June-October Organically grown vegetables. Full share: $450; half share $300; biweekly share: $225. Pick-up: at farm, Wednesday.

ROCKLAND COUNTY Cropsey Community Farm 220 S Little Tor Rd, New City rocklandfarm.org May-November Organically grown vegetables. Full share, on-farm pick-up: $750; off-farm pick-up: $790. Workingshare discount available. Hungry Hollow Co-op, Nyack Farmers’ Market or the Valley Cottage Library. Cut-your-own flower or herb share: $100. Pick-up: on farm, Tuesday; Valley Cottage Library, Tuesday; Hungry Hollow Co-op of Nyack Farmers’ Market, Thursday. Pfeiffer Center 260 Hungry Hollow Road, Chestnut Ridge pfeiffercenter.org/agriculture/csa/

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June-November Biodynamically raised vegetables, herbs and flower shares. Market Style CSA where you can pack your own boxes. Pick-up: on campus.

ULSTER COUNTY Evolutionary Organics 283 Springtown Rd, New Paltz facebook.com/EvolutionaryOrganics June-November Certified naturally grown heirloom vegetables, herbs, fruit and pasture-raised eggs. Market-style CSA. Suggested pre-payment: $350, replenish account as needed. Pick-up: at farm, Wednesday. Grass & Grit Farm Lenape Lane, New Paltz grassgritfarm.com Year-round Offering “farmers choice” meat shares with a diverse selection of pasture-raised pork, chicken, lamb, and 100% grass-fed ground beef. Monthly distribution. Summer share: $595. Winter share: $495. Pick-up: Multiple locations and days. Huguenot St Farm 205 Huguenot St, New Paltz huguenotfarm.com June-October Vegetable and fruit shares. Full vegetable share: $649; half-share: $440. Full fruit share: $165; half share: $95. Pick-up: at the farm, Thursday, Friday. Kelder’s Farm 5755 Route 209, Kerhonkson keldersfarm.com May-October Vegetable, fruit, herbs and flower shares. Full share: $700; half share: $450; double share: $1,300. Meat shares also available. Pick-up: at the farm, Tuesday, Saturday. Old Ford Farm 1359 Old Ford Rd, New Paltz oldfordfarm.com May-November Produces vegetables, grass-fed raw milk and pastured eggs, pork, chicken and turkey. A flexible CSA model priced according to members of household. First adult: $370, additional adult: $300; kids $8 times their age. Pick-up: at farm, Wednesday. Phillies Bridge Farm Project 45 Phillies Bridge Rd, New Paltz philliesbridge.org June-November Organically grown vegetables, herbs and flowers. Full season, big share (3 to 4 people): $750; small share (1 to 2 people): $475. Partial season shares also available. Pick-up: at farm, Tuesday, Saturday. Roundout Valley Organics 331 Dowe Road, Ellenville rustyploughfarm.com Year-round Collaborative markety-style CSA offers eggs, flowers, fruit, herbs, meat and vegetables. Annual membership fee of $50.00 creates an account. Fill account with an initial $100.00 then add funds as you need. Pick-up: multiple days/ locations. Sea Change Farm & Flower 221 Marcott Road, Stone Ridge Seachange.farm June-September Sustainably grown fresh flowers from late spring through fall. Hand-picked CSA bouquets will feature a delightful blend of what is in bloom each week. Full share: $255. Pick-up: on farm, Tuesday.


FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS Second Wind CSA at Four Winds Farm 158 Marabac Rd, Gardiner secondwindcsa.com June-October Certified organic and no-till. Full share: $600$768. Also offers local fruit when available and optional local egg share. Pick-up: at the farm, Tuesday; in Garrison, Wednesday.

“Premium fresh organic food grown and produced mostly local... Truly a superstore that includes selling raw milk from cows you can thank in person...” aresh j.

Solid Ground Farm 205 Hidden Valley Rd, Kingston Solidground.farm June-November Uses organic and regenerative practices. Fruit and vegetable shares, $450-$550. Egg, mushrooms and maple syrup can be added on. Also raises pastured chickens and grass-fed beef. Pick-up: at farm, Tuesday, Saturday.

ANOTHER 5-STAR GOOGLE REVIEW!

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BIODYNAMIC CHEESE, YOGURT, RAW MILK | ORGANIC SOURDOUGH & YEASTED BREADS + MORE!!

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“Baked & Grown, Just Like Home”

SustainAbility Farm 2880 Lucas Tpk, Accord sustainabilityfarm.org June-October Organically grown vegetables. Full share: $595; half share: $295; 10-week share: $295. Pick-up: at farm, Thursday. Taliaferro Farms 187 Plains Rd, New Paltz taliaferrofarms.com June-November Market-style CSA providing organically grown vegetables. Full share: $1,000; half-share: $550. Pick-up: at farm, Thursday, Friday, Saturday.

WESTCHESTER COUNTY

Jones Farm & Country Store

Clearwaters Distinctive Gifts

Grandma Phoebe’s Kitchen

Clearwaters Gallery & Custom Framing

Homegrown Seasonal Produce Local & Gourmet Foods Homemade Baked Goods Fudge & Gift Baskets Breakfast & Lunch Cafe

Fable: From Farm to Table 1311 Kitchawan Rd, Ossining fablefoods.com June-October Sustainable agricultural practices. Provides fresh fruits and vegetables without pesticides. Fruit, vegetable and egg shares. Farmer’s share: $750; forager’s share: $500; gardener’s share: $250. Pick-up: on farm Saturday, Sunday.

Fine Gifts, Home Decor, Toys, Ladies Clothing & Accessories

Archival Framing

Artwork by Terri A. Clearwater

190 Angola Rd. Cornwall, NY 845-534-4445(P) • 845-534-4471(F) www.JonesFarmInc.com Mon & Wed - Fri: 8-6 • Sat & Sun: 8-5 Closed Tuesdays

Com m u n i t y Su p p o r t e d Ag r i c u l t u re

E nj oy a we e k ly su p p ly o f f re sh , Eco - Ce r t i fi e d Fr u i t s & O rga n i c Ve g e t ab l e s f ro m ou r f a r m to you r t ab l e. JU N E- N OV E M B E R | 2 5 W E E KS

Harvest Moon Farm & Orchard 130 Hardscrabble Rd, North Salem harvestmoonfarmandorchard.com July-October A variety of vegetables grown using organic practices as well as low-spray fruit. Milk, cheese, meat and flower shares also available. Full season, full share: $810; half-share: $450. Partial season, full share: $585; half-share: $325. Pickup: at the farm store, Thursday. Hemlock Hill Farm 500 Croton Ave, Cortlandt Manor hemlockhillfarm.com June-September Vegetables grown with biodynamic, bionutrient and permaculture techniques. Animals raised hormone- and antibiotic-free. Vegetable share: $630. Egg share: $90. Whole farm (vegetable and meat) share: $1,800. Half shares available. Pickup: at farm, Thursday. Hilltop Hanover Farm & Environmental Center 1271 Hanover St, Yorktown Heights Hilltophanoverfarm.org June-October Vegetable shares. Full share: $700; half share: $350. Pick-up: on farm, Tuesday, Thursday. Peace and Carrots Farm at Groundwork HV 22 Main St, Yonkers groundworkhv.org June-October Vegetable shares on sliding scale: $350-$495.

Hopewell Jct. NY, 12533 | (845)897-4377

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2019 HUDSON VALLEY CSA FARMS Pound Ridge Organics 22 & 24 Westchester Ave, Pound Ridge poundridgeorganics.com Year-round Full-diet share offers vegetables, herbs, meat, dairy, eggs, flowers, fruit. $50 initiation fee, buying is free choice with no minimums. Pick-up: on farm, Saturday.

ONSUME OMETHING WESOME

Sweet Earth 20a Salem Rd, Pound Ridge Sweetearthco.com June-September Flowers and herbs grown naturally without the use of synthetic chemicals. Flower and herb shares. Spring share: $125; summer share: $299; late summer dahlia share: $529. Pick-up: on farm, Friday, Saturday.

For updates visit valleytable.com and HVCSACoaltion.org

CSA can stand for a lot of things. The

stands for sharing good food.

Join a CSA to discover what it means to you. f in d your loc al f ar m at hudsonvalleycsa.org

Farm Market & Bakery Specialty Groceries Certified Organic Meats & Produce

Grass-fed Beef & Lamb Pastured Pork

Daily Lunch Specials Family owned and organic since 1987

Organic Soils & Compost

Raised naturally on Warwick’s LOWLAND FARM

Visit our website for hours, events & specials at:

On-Farm Store: Open Saturdays 10 - 3 Enter at 32 Prices Switch Road (845) 461-3459 info@lowlandfarm.com Warwick, NY 10990

5409 Route 22 Millerton, NY 12546 518.789.4191

mcenroeorganicfarm.com

Ten family farms located in Columbia, Dutchess & Ulster Counties

Natural, Local, Fresh Premium Quality Dairy

No other milk comes close! hudsonvalleyfresh.com 

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adams fairacre farms

From farm, to farmstand, to super farm market...we’re celebrating our centennial throughout 2019! Go to adamsfarms.com for promotions, historic information and more! POUGHKEEPSIE

KINGSTON

NEWBURGH

WA P P I N G E R

Route 44 845-454-4330

Route 9W 845-336-6300

Route 300 845-569-0303

Route 9 845-632-9955

www.adamsfarms.com


EAT. LAUGH. LIVE. CLOCK TOWER GRILL

LUNCH & DINNER | 13 Craft Beers | Live Music Catering | Party Venue 512 Clock Tower Drive, Brewster, NY 10509 | (845) 582-0574 Stay in touch with special events and menus at CLOCKTOWERGRILL.COM

Love The Valley Table? Receive The Magazine of Hudson Valley Farms, Food & Cuisine at home! You’ll find inspiring stories about the talented chefs, growers, artisans and markets that make the Hudson Valley home. Be in the know about the region’s most delicious destinations for food and drink. SPECIAL OFFER Subscribe to The Valley Table and receive a free tote bag!* ValleyTable.com/subscribe (845) 765-2600

*Offer available through May 31, 2019

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UP CLOSE

kingston duo:

bluecashew kitchen homestead

W    

by robin cherry PHOTO THIS PAGE: JESSICA TAMSON PRICE

E TO O K G A R BAG E A N D N A I L E D I T TO T H E WA L L .”

That’s how J.T. McKay describes how he and Sean Nutley designed bluecashew Kitchen Homestead, their relocated and re-imagined retail and cooking demonstration space that opened in Kingston’s Stockade District in October 2017. The two men re-used and repurposed materials wherever possible—from ceilings made from reclaimed beams to shelving made from old Victorian garden posts. The result is, well, a warm take on shabby industrial chic.

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Nutley originally opened bluecashew Kitchen Pharmacy in High Falls in 2004 with Gregory Triana, then moved the business to Rhinebeck for seven years before decamping to its present location, the former J&J Hobby Shop in Kingston. Nutley had his eyes on Kingston for over six years, but the attraction to this particular space is personal: Though a Staten Island native, Nutley spent a lot of time growing up in the Hudson Valley. “This is full circle for me,” he says. “This is the place [where] I used to buy my grandfather’s Christmas presents, here in the hobby shop— this one had trains and everything.” McKay, who hails from New Jersey, became infatuated with the Hudson Valley 12 years ago during a visit to Kate’s Lazy Meadow Motel in Mt. Tremper (Ulster County). While tubing the Esopus, he saw a bear cub playing in the river and immediately started looking for a house in the area. McKay moved up full-time six years ago after meeting Nutley at the Burning Man festival in Nevada. The two now share their Accord home with Briggles, a Shiba Inu. Rechristening the business, Nutley and McKay were determined to work with local designers and artisans. The bar carts are custom made and the shelves were made from reclaimed wood by Kingston’s Excelsior Wood Products, located a mere six minutes away. The Louise Nevelsonlike pieces of “garbage” nailed to the wall are barrel stave

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PHOTOS THESE PAGES: TOM MOORE


offcuts picked up from the floor of John Cox’s studio at Quercus Cooperage in High Falls. The lamps hanging over the counters are derived from a Midcentury Modern chandelier once owned by McKay’s grandmother. Other whimsical design flourishes include a lime green wall, polished copper tiles and two hidden owls. The Kingston store is “100 percent different from Rhinebeck,” Nutley stresses. “It’s a completely different concept—we’ve been reaching out to a lot of local makers and bringing in products that are not made in China, while also trying to avoid Amazon.” Determined to offer a range of price points, the owners initially hesitated about about selling high-end items like handmade Italian Match pewter, but it’s been (surprisingly) extremely popular, as are the MUD ceramics from Australia

and Littala dinner and glassware from Finland. (So are the $3.50 silver and gold scrub sponges, by the way.) On the other hand, “You won’t find that little plastic thing that pulls the herbs off the stem here. That’s just not us,” McKay shrugs. In line with this mission, bluecashew offers a curated selection of edible products as well, including smallbatch chocolates from Fruition Chocolates, in Shokan, handcrafted syrups and bitters from More Good, in Beacon, and premium whole-leaf teas from China and Taiwan selected by Asian cuisine authority Corinne Trang, a frequent instructor who plans to do monthly tea tastings at the shop with traditional Chinese porcelain tasting cups. The pièce de résistance, however, is what McKay happily describes as a kitchen “to die for,” the result of a collaboration with Carrie Bono, of Rhinebeck Kitchen

We thought bluecashew had to have a kitchen where people learn how to make the most of what they have.

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and Bath. Replete with Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances, the kitchen is used for cooking demos and by Lindsey Hutton, an aspiring baker who comes by the store to practice. (Nutley and McKay supply her ingredients and she shares her sweets with the customers.) The kitchen also is the site of a highly popular and successful series of cooking classes led by local and celebrity chefs and cookbook authors. Agnes Devereux, of The Village Tearoom in New Paltz, led a Taste of Ireland class that included Cheddar Cheese & Ale Soup, made with ale from Kingston native Michael Barcone’s West Kill Brewing. Other recent workshops have included Classic Cocktail Hour Appetizers with private chef Phyllis Segura, and a Raclette Party with Tia Keenan, author of Melt,

Stretch & Sizzle: The Art of Cooking Cheese (Universe, 2018; $35 hardcover). In collaboration with Cornell Cooperative Extension, classes in knife skills, canning, dehydrating and food preservation (“the technical stuff”) also are offered. In the works is a cooking club that capitalizes on the participants’ creativity by changing and modifying recipes. Nutley calls it “sort of crowd-sourcing the recipe.” “Canning and preserving to me [are] generational things that your mother or your grandmother taught you,” McKay says. “It never happened in my family. We got tomatoes and we froze them. We froze everything. When I had a garden, I didn’t know what to do with all this extra stuff. So we thought bluecashew had to have a kitchen where people learn how to make the most of what they have. We’re surrounded by the most amazing produce—there’s absolutely no reason you should buy a jar of tomato sauce that’s traveled across the country and is full of chemicals when you can make your own from beautiful, local Hudson Valley tomatoes.” While they’ve bitten off a lot since relocating, early reaction to bluecashew from the people of Kingston has been warm and welcoming. “People are reaching out, buying us cookies and bottles of champagne,” Nutley recounts. “The first day we opened the store—while we were still unpacking—a customer from High Falls came in to say how glad he is that we’re back.”   bluecashew Kitchen Homestead 37 N Front St, Kingston (845) 514-2300; bluecashew.com

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CANTERBURY BROOK INN ZAGAT RATED “EXTRAORDINARY”

Swiss Continental Cuisine $19.95 3-Course Dinner Tues–Thur Seasonal Fare • Catering Available 331 Main Street, Cornwall NY (845) 534-9658 canterburybrookinnrestaurant.com HANS AND KIM BAUMANN, HOSTS

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L O C A L LY G R O W N

where have all the farmers gone? by keith stewart

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PHOTO BY ETHAN HARRISON


O

        ld farmers never die. They just hoe away.” So said the message in a birthday card sent me by a former employee. On the front was a cartoon-like rendition of a stooped old man with a hoe, working his way down an endlessly long row. It was a bit absurd but it made me laugh, especially since it did contain a grain of truth. I’m an old farmer and I still do a little hoeing now and then. I’ve been talking about retirement for a decade but haven’t quite gotten around to it yet. Perhaps it’s because working the land is more like a vocation than a job and it connects me to something bigger and more enduring than myself. I’m not alone. The average age of farmers and ranchers in the U.S. is 58, making us among the country’s oldest workers; a third of those farming today are 65 or older (USDA Census of Agriculture, 2012). I’ll be 75 in March. You don’t have to be an agricultural policy wonk to wonder who will be around to operate the nation’s farms a decade or so from now.

Farmers are nearly twice as likely to die on the job as are police officers. But there’s more going on here than just a bunch of oldies clinging to the land and their way of life. Conventional agriculture (large-scale monoculture and factory farming) produces much of the food we consume. This kind of farming, though, holds little allure for young people these days. It’s just another business—and a dicey, unglamorous and sometimes dangerous one at that (farmers are nearly twice as likely to die on the job as police officers). More troubling than the risk to life and limb are erratic and extreme weather, shifting trade policies, unstable markets, ever-higher costs of feed, fertilizer, pesticides and equipment (these days, a John Deere combine can set you back $500,000). Any one of these items (or a combination of them) can turn a farm’s bottom line from black to red in a hurry, which is a major reason why conventional farming is becoming a tough sell. The other side of the story, however, might be characterized as the modern equivalent of the back-to-the-land movement of the 1960s. This time, though, it’s not rebellious hippies and counter-culture dropouts looking to escape the middle-class

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“The more milk I produce,” one dairy farmer recently declared, “the more money I lose.” rat race in search of utopia (with the added enticements of free love and drugs): Today’s crop of aspiring, nonconventional farmers are thoughtful, focused and informed. Many are driven by a sincere wish to build a better food system, lead meaningful lives and help heal an ailing planet, one small farm at a time. Most enjoy the sun’s warmth on their shoulders and the visceral pleasure of fertile soil crumbling through their fingers. These new (though not necessarily young) farmers tend to be content with small to mid-size operations. They favor diversification over monoculture and often incorporate multiple crops and livestock into their farm plans. Many eschew chemical pesticides and fertilizer, preferring to use organic and/or sustainable practices. Instead of selling wholesale and exporting across the country or the globe, they target local economies through retail outlets, farmers’ markets, roadside stands, CSAs and restaurants. An increasing number of people want what they have to offer. Here in the Hudson Valley there’s no shortage of farmers of this sort. Over the past 30 years they have fueled a remarkable agricultural renaissance, driven partly by the valley’s proximity to New York City and the city’s growing appetite for high-quality, local food. The valley has become the source of choice for fresh produce, meats, cheeses and, recently, an impressive menu of brewed, fermented and distilled beverages. World-class restaurants throughout the valley draw visitors from far and wide; tourism and agritourism are on the rise, giving a boost to local economies and making many Hudson Valley towns and rural communities increasingly attractive places to visit and live. But there’s a dark cloud on the horizon. Notwithstanding this burst of agricultural energy, most Hudson Valley farm owners and operators are not young—like farmers and ranchers elsewhere, many are entering their golden years, if they are not already in them. The looming uncertainty is what will become of their farms when they’re gone. Certainly, a growing number of people in their twenties, thirties and forties are eager to learn what it takes to become farmers, and some gain experience and knowledge by working on established farms.

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However, experienced or not, most would-be farmers face one major obstacle: the cost of land in today’s market. Because of its proximity to New York City, residential and commercial development pressure in the Hudson Valley has made buying a farm here—or even finding suitable land—more difficult than it was even ten years ago. To prosper, farmers need deep, well-drained soil on moderately level ground—exactly the kind of land developers want, too. Steep slopes and rocky or wooded terrain with shallow or poorly drained soil are fine for wildlife and recreation but costly to build on and ill-suited to most types of agriculture. It’s a rare individual who goes into farming expecting to get rich (and few do). For most, today’s high land prices (not to mention start-up costs) present an almost insurmountable hurdle. In the competition between farmers and developers, the developers usually win. The Hudson Valley already has lost more than half its good farmland to development; most of what’s left and available is priced for residential subdivisions or commercial use. Few retiring farmers want to see McMansions or strip malls sprout up on the land they’ve poured their lives into. The majority would prefer that their farms remain productive open fields and pasture. However, when they or their heirs put the farm up for sale, they expect (and deserve) to receive full market value. For farm families, land often is their main (sometimes their only) asset. Nowhere is this more true than in the dairy business. Over the last few decades, the winds of fortune and the economics of industrial dairy farming have ruthlessly battered small and medium-size dairy farmers in the Hudson Valley (and the entire Northeast, for that matter). Perennially low milk prices in other parts of the country, as well as foreign competition, have made it hard for most dairy farmers in this region to stay afloat—the price they receive for their milk is often below their production costs. “The more milk I produce,” one dairy farmer recently declared, “the more money I lose.” In the current environment, many dairy farmers have no choice but to give up their life’s work and sell their cows (most go to slaughter) and their land. This past December,


in fact, six of the remaining 40 dairy farms in Orange County announced they were closing operations. If the Hudson Valley is to keep its remaining farms and enjoy the bounty they offer, safeguarding productive land and keeping it available and affordable for the next generation of farmers will be key. One way this can be achieved is through conservation easements, also known as sale of development rights. This is a voluntary, binding legal agreement between a landowner and an outside party (usually a land trust, non-profit or government entity) that places restrictions on future use of a specific property. In most cases, conservation easements disallow or severely restrict additional development or subdivision, and they apply not only to the current owners of a property but to all future owners, as well. Because land protected by a conservation easement can no longer be developed, its value usually drops significantly, making it more affordable for start-up farmers or those looking to expand operations. Landowners who place a conservation easement on their property receive monetary compensation to make up for its diminished market value. In other words, most conservation easements cost money, which may come from federal, state or local farmland preservation funds, from taxes on real estate transactions or from land trusts or groups like Scenic Hudson and The Open Space Institute, whose mission is to preserve farmland and open space. (Full disclosure: We have a conservation easement on our farm through the Orange County Land Trust. In its 25-year history, OCLT has protected more than 6,000 acres. See “Going, going, saved,” by Jeff Storey, Valley Table 80, Sept-Nov 2017.) In some instances, wealthy, conservation-oriented landowners may place restrictive easements on their farmland without receiving monetary compensation, though federal and state tax laws usually allow for deductions against income in these cases. To benefit a working farm, it is essential that a conservation easement stipulate that the property in question remain in “productive agriculture.” An easement that simply allows an individual to get a bargain price on land that he or she intends to turn into a private estate or weekend hobby farm does not achieve this goal. New York City has expended much energy and capital to protect its watershed, with good reason: Its population of about nine million people depends on a reliable supply of

potable water. But New Yorkers also need and want access to high quality, fresh food, particularly as climate change and extreme weather events impact many of the nation’s traditional food-producing areas. The Hudson Valley (as well as parts of New Jersey, Pennsylvania and other nearby states) has long supplied the city with a significant portion of its local food diet; the loss of what productive land remains within 100 miles of the city would have devastating consequences on that supply chain. All of which reinforces the fact that our reinvigorated Hudson Valley is under threat. If the progressive loss of the valley’s working rural landscape continues unabated, it will impoverish the area both aesthetically and economically. Quality of life will likely deteriorate, while property taxes will rise. (Farms place far fewer demands on municipal budgets than land converted to residential use—they require just 37 cents in services for every tax dollar they pay.) Those who live in the valley will have decreasing access to the cornucopia of local food we have become accustomed to. New York City’s extensive network of farmers’ markets (operated by GrowNYC’s hugely successful Greenmarket program) that has flourished over the past four decades and enriched the city tremendously, will inevitably wither as farmer attrition takes its toll. All New Yorkers will notice the loss. The next generation of farmers, priced out of the market, will look elsewhere to fulfill the dream of a life on the land and their desire to be part of a vibrant, local economy and food system. Thankfully, there is no law of man or nature that dictates such a future. So long as we have the knowledge and the resolve, it is possible to stem exurban sprawl and preserve our diverse rural base. For its future prosperity, the Hudson Valley must make farmland protection a high priority. Well-drafted conservation easements are one means to this end. It is also incumbent on New York City’s government, endowed foundations and charitable institutions to recognize the threat of development and allocate resources to help protect the city’s precious but shrinking foodshed. There are no needs more essential to human welfare than good, fresh, clean food and water. Let’s hope the day never comes when we must ask ourselves, Where have all the farmers gone?  

There are no needs more essential to human welfare than good, fresh, clean food and water. march

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Year round dining

H AN

with a view

Weddings · Rehearsal Dinners · Birthdays Bridal / Baby Showers · Business Luncheons · OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK · www.thegreensatcopake.com | 518.325.0019 Copake Country Club | 44 Golf Course Road, Craryville, NY

HUDSON’S RIBS & FISH 1099 Route 9, Fishkill, NY 845-297-5002 hudsonsribsandfish.com

A L ITTL E B IT O F NEW ENGLAND IN TH E H U D S O N VA L L EY 72

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ISTORIC LANDMARK

Lunch · Dinner · Sunday Brunch Overnight Accommodations

Located on the Hudson River. Open year round. 2 Main Street, Cold Spring, NY 845-265-9355 | hudsonhouseinn.com

For Reservations (845) 757-1011


Spins Hudson is the largest entertainment venue on the Hudson. This is 40,000 square feet of intense adventure including aerial ropes course, two story laser tag arena and more! A unique destination overlooking the scenic Charles Point Marina offering exceptional dining, event space, and satellite brewery. 5 John Walsh Blvd. Peekskill, NY 10566 (914) 930-7920

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I N D E X T O A DV E R T I S E R S

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3 8 North Broadway / 845.353.1200 / 8northbroadway.com

38 Meyer’s Olde Dutch / 845.440.6900 / meyersoldedutch.com

16 Baja 328 / 845.838.BAJA / baja328.com

60 McEnroe Organic Farm / 518.789.4191 / mcenroeorganicfarm.com

16 Beacon Natural Market / 845.838.1288 / beaconnaturalmarket.com

14 Mother Earth’s / motherearthstorehouse.com

67 Black Dirt Distillery / 845.258.6020 / blackdirtdistillery.com

75 N&S Supply / nssupply.com

1 Buttermilk Falls / 845.795.1310 / buttermilkfallsinn.com 67 Canterbury Brook Inn / 845.534.9658 / canterburybrookinnrestaurant.com 3 City Perch Kitchen + Bar / 914.348.7003 / cityperch.com

14 Niche / 212.777.2101 / nichemodern.com 15 Nina / 845.344.6800 / nina-restaurant.com 38 North Plank Road Tavern / 845.562.5031 / northplankroadtavern.com

62 Clock Tower Grill / 845.582.0574 / clocktowergrill.com

C2 NYCe BLU / nyceblu.com

C4 Cosimo’s / cosimosrestaurantgroup.com

37 New York State Grown and Certified / certified.ny.gov

15 Craft 47 / 845.360.5253 / craft47.com

30 Pamal Broadcasting / pamal.com

31, 47 Culinary Institute of America / 845.471.6608 / ciarestaurants.com

38 Paula’s Public House / 845.454.7821 / paulaspublichouse.com

C3 Daily Planet Diner / 845.452.0110 / dailyplanetdiner.com

16 Red Barn Produce / 845.691.7428 / redbarnproduceny.com

32 Dutchess Tourism / 845.463.4000 / dutchesstourism.com

C3 Red Line Diner / 845.765.8401 / dineatredline.com

67 Exposures Gallery / 845.469.9382 / exposures.com

24 Resorts World Catskills / 833.586.9358 / rwcatskills.com

29 Factoria / 914.788.4555 / factoriacp.com

4 Restaurant 1915 / 845.786.2731 / visitbearmountain.com

59 Fishkill Farms / 845.897.4377 / fishkillfarms.com

39 Risotto Restaurant / 914.769.6000 / risotto-restaurant.com

67 Gino’s Restaurant / 845.297.8061 / ginoswappingers.com

35 Rockland County Tourism / explorerocklandny.com

57 Glorie Farm Winery / 845.236.3265 / gloriewine.com

79 The Roundhouse / 845.765.8369 / roundhousebeacon.com

72 The Greens at Copake Country Club / 518.352.0019 / copakecountryclub.com

39 Shawangunk Wine Trail / gunkswine.com

59 Hawthorne Valley Farm / 518.672.7500 / hawthornevalleyfarm.org

57 Sisters Hill CSA / 845.868.7048 / sistershillfarm.org

1 Henry’s at the Farm / 845.795.1500 / buttermilkfallsinn.com/henrys 72 Hudson House River Inn / 845.265.9355 / hudsonhouseinn.com

73 Spins Hudson / 914.930.7920 / spinshudson.com 57 Stoutridge Vineyard / 845.236.7620 / stoutridge.com

23 Hudson Valley Agribusiness Development Corporation / 518.432.5360 / hvadc.org

38 Sunflower Natural Foods Market / 845.679.5361 / sunflowernatural.com

60 Hudson Valley CSA Coalition / hudsonvalleycsa.org

C3 Table Talk Diner / 845.849.2839 / tabletalkdiner.com

60 Hudson Valley Fresh / 845.226.3065 / hudsonvalleyfresh.com

79 Terrapin Restaurant / 845.876.3330 / terrapinrestaurant.com

72 Hudson's Ribs and Fish / 845.297.5002 / hudsonsribsandfish.com

33 Ulster County Tourism / 800.342.5826 / ulstercountyalive.com

72 Jaeger Haus / 845.757.1011 / jaegerhaustivoli.com

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60 Lowland Farm / 845.461.3459 / lowlandfarm.com

61 Adams Fairacre Farms / adamsfarms.com

7 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery / 845.876.6208 / warrenkitchentools.com

59 Jones Farm / 845.534.4445 / jonesfarminc.com

35 Westchester County Tourism / VisitWestchesterNY.com

75 Leo’s Ristorante & Bar / leospizzeria.com

23 Whitecliff Vineyard / whitecliffwine.com

2 Lola’s Café / 845.255.6555 / 845.471.8555 / lolascafeandcatering.com

75 Wildfire Grill / 845.457.3770 / wildfireny.com

2 Lolita's / 845.452.8100 / lolitaspizza.com

15 Williams Lumber & Home Center / 845.876.WOOD / williamslumber.com

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D I R E C T O RY ART EXPOSURES GALLERY 1357 Kings Hwy, Sugar Loaf (845) 469-9382; exposures.com Beautiful art for fine homes, corporate offices and healthcare spaces from internationally recognized and the Hudson Valley’s pre-eminent landscape photographer, Nick Zungoli. NEWBURGH ART SUPPLY 5 Grand St, Newburgh (845) 561-5552; newburghartsupply.com Mon-Thur 10-6; Fri 11-7; Sat 10-6; Closed Sun See, feel and experience quality art materials in one of Newburgh's restored landmarks in the heart of the Washington Market neighborhood. Your local source for essential creative supplies for the student, professional and enthusiast. Newly renovated and stocked!

LOLA'S CAFE & CATERING lolascafeandcatering.com Voted top caterer by Wedding Wire for 9 years in a row. Brilliant food. Stunning venues. Impeccable service. DINERS DAILY PLANET 1202 Rt 55, Lagrangeville (845) 452-0110; dailyplanetdiner.com RED LINE DINER 588 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 765-8401; dineatredline.com TABLE TALK DINER 2519 South Rd (Rt 9), Poughkeepsie (845) 849-2839; tabletalkdiner.com FA S H I O N

BAKERIES THE ALTERNATIVE BAKER 407 Main St, Rosendale (845) 658–3355; lemoncakes.com Thu-Mon from 7 am; closed Tue-Wed Twenty years of small-batch, scratch, homemade all-butter baked goods. We offer gluten-free and allergy-friendly options, plus made-to-order sandwiches. Vegan vegetable soups in season, hot mulled New York cider, JB Peel coffees and Harney teas, hot and cold artisanal drinks, and our award-winning Belgium hot chocolate and other seasonal drinks. Special-occasion cakes and desserts. Unique wedding cakes. All ”Worth a detour”—(NY Times). CASINOS RESORTS WORLD CATSKILLS 888 Resorts World Drive, Monticello (833) 586-9358; rwcatskills.com Casino resort destination in the heart of New York’s Catskill region. Featuring an 18-story all-suite hotel and a casino and entertainment complex. Offers more than ten bar and restaurant experiences, including Cellaio Steak created by celebrity chef Scott Conant. C AT E R I N G TERRAPIN RESTAURANT CATERING & EVENTS 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 889-8831; terrapincatering.com Enjoy the same high-quality ingredients and service that you know at Terrapin Restaurant anywhere in the Hudson Valley. Catering events of all types and sizes, Terrapin prepares custom menus for every event, using local, organic ingredients whenever possible. Contact Catering Director Hugh Piney.

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NYCE BLU nyceblu.com NYCe BLU produces creatively designed, and expertly crafted, high quality, sculpted leather handbags; using the finest materials and the highest attention to detail. Carry the vibrance of New York City everywhere you go. HOME N&S SUPPLY, INC. 205 Old Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 896-6291; nssupply.com Your one-stop resource for all plumbing, heating and HVAC needs, including specialty products designed and manufactured to meet your lifestyle needs; the latest innovative products, including cutting-edge bathroom technology from remote flushing toilets to hands-free faucets. Six locations: Fishkill, Brewster, Kingston, Catskill, Hudson and Danbury. NICHE (212) 777-2101 nichemodern.com Handmade Luxury Lighting. Designed in Beacon, NY. WILLIAMS LUMBER 6760 Rt 9, Rhinebeck; (845) 876-9663 34 Blommer Rd, Tannersvile; (518) 589-5200 2424 Rt 44, Pleasant Valley; (845) 605-3520 908 Rt 82, Hopewell Junction; (845) 221-2751 9-11 E Market St, Red Hook; (845) 758-5615 317 Kyserike Rd, High Falls; (845) 687-7676 3679 Rt 9, Hudson; (518) 851-3641 4246 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park; (845) 698-1004 williamslumber.com The largest independent home center in the area.

KITCHEN WARREN KITCHEN & CUTLERY 6934 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-6208; warrenkitchentools.com Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30; Sun 11–4:30 The Hudson Valley’s complete source for professional kitchen knives and tools, commercial quality cookware, bakeware, pocketknives and woodcarving tools. We stock the largest selection of name-brand cutlery in the region at prices well below retail. Knife sets, knife blocks and carving boards. Professional knife sharpening while you wait. MARKETS ADAMS FAIRACRE FARMS 1560 Ulster Ave, Kingston; (845) 336-6300 1240 Rt 300, Newburgh; (845) 569-0303 765 Dutchess Tnpk, Poughkeepsie; (845) 454-4330 160 Old Post Rd, Wappinger; (845) 632-9955 adamsfarms.com Open daily A family-owned farm market/garden center. A cornucopia of fresh produce, meats, fish, deli, and prepared foods. Featuring Hudson Valley products, a great selection of the best local cheese, meat, produce and more. TASTENY STORE AT TODD HILL Taconic State Parkway, Lagrange; Located 10 miles north of I-84 and 1 mile south of Rt 55 (845) 849-0247; ccedutchess.org Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat 8-6; Fri 8-8; Sun 9-7; Closed Tue An asset along the Taconic State Parkway, find a vast array of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. N AT U R A L F O O D S BEACON NATURAL MARKET 348 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1288; beaconnaturalmarket.com Mon–Sat 9–7; Sun 10–5 Lighting the way for a healthier world. Featuring organic prepared foods, deli and juice bar, organic and regional produce, meats and cheeses. Open since 2005, proprietors L.T. and Kitty Sherpa are dedicated to serving the Hudson Valley with a complete selection of products that are good for you and good for the planet, including an extensive alternative health department. Nutritionist on staff. Catering available. MOTHER EARTH’S 300 Kings Mall Ct, Kingston; (845) 336-5541 249 Main St, Saugerties; (845) 246-9614 1955 South Rd, Poughkeepsie; (845) 296-1069 motherearthstorehouse.com Open daily


Offering the finest natural foods, bulk spices, herbs, vitamins, supplements and organic produce. The valley’s best organic, hot and cold takeout at our Kingston and Poughkeepsie locations. SUNFLOWER NATURAL MARKET 75 Mill Hill Rd, Woodstock (845) 679-5361 24 Garden St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-0798 sunflowernatural.com Mon–Fri 8–9; Sat 9–9; Sun 10–7 The area’s most complete natural foods market, featuring certified organic produce, organic milk, cheeses and eggs, a wide range of bulk organic grains and nuts, non-irradiated herbs and spices, plus vitamins, homeopathic and body care products. R E S TAU R A N T S 8 NORTH BROADWAY 8 N Broadway, Nyack (845) 353-1200; 8northbroadway.com Mon-Sat 12-10; Sun 12-9 With a menu inspired by locally sourced seafood, beef, lamb, poultry and organic produce, this seasonal restaurant reflects the freshest ingredients from the Hudson Valley. BAJA 328 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-BAJA; baja328.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11–10, Fri–Sat 11–11, Sun noon–8 Main Street’s newest hot spot, Baja 328 offers the finest authentic Southwestern food couples with 110-plus tequilas, the largest selection in the area. CANTERBURY BROOK INN 331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Dinner Tue–Thu 5–9; Fri–Sat 5–9:30 Hosts Hans and Kim Baumann offer fine Swiss continental cuisine featuring veal, duck, chicken, Schnitzel, pasta, filet mignon, fresh fish and much more. Enjoy a fabulous dessert while sipping a frothing cappuccino or espresso. We specialize in both on- and off-premise catering. Outdoor brookside dining. Reservations suggested. CITY PERCH KITCHEN + BAR 1 Livingstone Ave, Dobbs Ferry (914) 348-7003; cityperch.com Seasonal American dining meets handcrafted garden-to-glass cocktails and a boutique wine list. Featuring an open kitchen, raw seafood bar and brick oven pizza. CLOCK TOWER GRILL KITCHEN & BAR 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–9, Fri noon–11; dinner Sat 5–11, Sun 3–9

Set in a renovated barn, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated; the menu “rustic American” with many ingredients drawn from area farms. COSIMO’S RESTAURANT GROUP Cosimo’s On Union 1217 Rt 300, Newburgh; (845) 567-1556; fax (845) 567-9246 Cosimo’s Middletown 620 Rt 211 East, Middletown; (845) 692-3242 Cosimo’s Poughkeepsie 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie; (845) 485-7172 Cosimo’s Woodbury Rt 32, Central Valley; (845) 928-5222 cosimosrestaurantgroup.com Lunch & dinner daily Casual trattoria-style dining with some of the world’s best wines. Old-style Italian cuisine with a New World twist. Daily specials, pasta, fish and meat dishes. Distinctive cocktail lounges, a unique wine cellar for private dinner parties and beautiful catering facilities. CRAFT 47 47 W. Main St, Goshen (845) 360-5253; craft47.com Lunch & Dinner Tue-Thu noon-10; Fri-Sat noonmidnight; Sun noon-10 Kickback, relax and sample the best of the Hudson Valley at Craft 47. We offer small-plate American tapas, craft wine and 12 craft beers on tap, with even more in the cooler. THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA 1946 Campus Dr (off Rt 9), Hyde Park The premier culinary college offers exceptional global cuisine in its award-winning restaurants: American Bounty Restaurant (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com The Bocuse Restaurant (845) 451-1012; bocuserestaurant.com Reimagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques. Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici (845) 451-1013; ristorantecaterinademedici.com The Apple Pie Bakery Café (845) 905-4500; applepiebakerycafe.com GINO’S RESTAURANT 1671 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-8061; ginoswappingers.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9; Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 1–9 Serving the Hudson Valley since 1984. Traditional southern Italian cuisine in a casual environment. Only the freshest ingredients used to prepare your favorite veal, chicken, seafood and pasta dishes. Catering on- and off-premise. THE GREENS AT COPAKE COUNTRY CLUB 44 Golf Course Rd, Copake Lake (518) 352-0019; copakecountryclub.com Mon–Thu 11–8:30; Fri & Sat 11–9:30; Sun 11–8; Brunch until 2:30; Dinner nightly from 5 Dine overlooking the stunning 160-acre golf course nestled in the foothills of the Berkshire and Catskill Mountains.

HENRY’S AT BUTTERMILK FALLS 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; henrysatbuttermilk.com Lunch Fri–Sat 11:30–3; Dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Brunch Sun 11–3 Local comes alive at this bucolic Inn & Spa, where the main ingredients are sourced from local producers and purveyors. An inventive menu features a fresh selection of large and small plates from casual burger and fries to refined New American dishes. Enjoy a pre-dinner stroll through the organic gardens and orchards or a drink overlooking the Hudson River and sweeping lawns. Al fresco dining available. HUDSONS RIBS & FISH 1099 Route 9, Fishkill (845) 297-5002; hudsonsribsandfish.com Dinner nightly. Sunday brunch. A little bite of New England in the Hudson Valley. HUDSON HOUSE RIVER INN 2 Main Street, Cold Spring (845) 265-9355; hudsonhouseinn.com Lunch, Dinner, Sunday Brunch A charming, historic inn and restaurant overlooking Storm King Mountain and the Hudson River. JAEGER HAUS 5084 NY-9G, Tivoli (845) 757-1011; jaegerhaustivoli.com Wed, Thu 5-9; Fri 5-9:30; Sat 12-9:30; Sun 12-9 Closed Mon, Tue The restaurant serves a modern interpretation of German classics in a casual environment. The international beer and wine list features both German and local selections. Conveniently located on Route 9G in Tivoli with indoor and outdoor seating available in the restaurant and biergarten. LEO’S RISTORANTE Rt 9D, Wappingers Falls (845) 838-3446 22 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-3446 1433 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 564-3446 leospizzeria.com Lunch & dinner Mon–Sat 11–10; Sun 2–9 A family favorite since 1981, Leo’s offers traditional classic Italian dishes, pizza, hot/cold subs, pasta, veal, chicken and appetizers. Daily specials and catering for all occasions whether in our location or yours. Great food served in a comfortable and relaxed atmosphere. LOLA’S CAFÉ 49 Main St, New Paltz (845)255-6555 Mon–Thu 11–9; Fri– Sat 11–10; Sun 11–8 131 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845)471-8555 Mon–Fri 10–5; Sat 10–4 lolascafeandcatering.com. Poughkeepsie’s hottest lunch spot is now New Paltz’s newest lunch and dinner spot. Fast and friendly vibe. Great food, Generous portions

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abound. One of the Hudson Valley’s leading gourmet catering companies. LOLITA’S 129 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845) 452-8100’ lolitaspizza.com Tue-Thu, Sun 11:30-9; Fri-Sat 11:30-10 Located under the Walkway, the 50-seat eatery specializes in wood-fired Neapolitan-style pizza, fresh pasta made in-house, as well as a Wine Spectator award winning wine list, local craft beers and specialty cocktails based off of what is available at the local farmers’ market. MEYER’S OLDE DUTCH 184 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-6900; meyersoldedutch.com Sun–Thurs 11:30–9; Fri–Sat 11:30–12 Fun and casual, modern take on the classic burger joint with locally sourced loaded burgers, killer crispy chicken sandwich, house made veggie burgers and a full bar. NINA 27 W. Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Lunch Mon-Sat 11:30-2:30; Dinner Mon-Sun from 5; Brunch Sun 9:30-2 New York City-trained chef Franz Brendle brings an elegant flair to classic American cuisine. Features include filet mignon Roquefort, shrimp asparagus risotto and seafood specials. Nice selection of wines in various price ranges. Friendly staff, cozy décor. Hearty Sunday Brunch. NORTH PLANK ROAD TAVERN 30 Plank Rd, Newburgh (845) 562-5031; northplankroadtavern.com Dinner Tues-Thurs 3-9; Fri-Sat 3-10; Sun 3-9 New American restaurant in operation since 1801, using locally sourced ingredients to produce a fine dining experience. Originally built as a hotel along a plank road, The Tavern has a rich historical significance and an old-world atmosphere. PAULA’S PUBLIC HOUSE 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-7821; paulaspublichouse.com Mon & Tue 4–11; Wed & Thu 11–11; Fri & Sat 11–1; Sun 12–6 An inviting gastro pub sporting a cozy and friendly environment complemented by the warmth of a fireplace and a rustic ambiance. Paula’s offers lunch, supper and late-night fare and features live music, open mic and karaoke nights. RESTAURANT 1915 AT BEAR MOUNTAIN INN 55 Hessian Drive, Bear Mountain (845) 786-2731 ext. 1915; visitbearmountain.com Mon, Tues 11–8; Wed–Sun 11–9; Sunday Brunch 11–3 Located at the historic Bear Mountain Inn, enjoy a seasonal menu in a beautiful lodge setting.

THE ROUNDHOUSE 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com Lunch & dinner Wed–Sat 11:30–Close; Sun Brunch 11–3; Lunch 3–8 Set in a historic textile mill transformed into boutique hotel, the restaurant serves elegant, locally inspired American fare and offers a wellcurated list of craft beers, cocktails and wines. The main dining room, lounge and seasonal patio all overlook Beacon Falls. TERRAPIN RESTAURANT & RED BISTRO 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Lunch & dinner daily 11:30–midnight; dining room daily 5–9pm From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle here. From elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh and dynamic: dishes to delight body and soul. Choose fine dining in Terrapin’s dining room or casual fare in Red Bistro & Bar. From good burgers and quesadillas to wild salmon and local filet mignon. Terrapin’s local organic and authentic menu satisfies all. WILDFIRE GRILL 74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–3; Sun noon–3; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Fri & Sat 5–10 Eclectic is the buzzword at this popular local eatery, where patrons can feast on a predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences in a rustic Victorian setting. XAVIAR’S RESTAURANT GROUP Chef-owner Peter Kelly offers his signature service and exceptional cuisine. Critics agree: Dining in the valley will never be the same. Restaurant X & Bully Boy Bar 117 North Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30– 10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5–11, Sun 5–8; brunch Sun seating 1pm X2O Xaviars on the Hudson 71 Water Grant Way, Yonkers (914) 965-1111 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2; dinner Tue–Fri 5:30–10, Sat 5–10, Sun 5–9; brunch Sun noon–2 T R AV E L DUTCHESS TOURISM (845) 463-4000; dutchesstourism.com ORANGE COUNTY TOURISM (845) 615-3860; orangetourism.org ROCKLAND COUNTY TOURISM (845) 364-2170;bexplorerocklandny.com ULSTER COUNTY TOURISM (845) 340-3566; ulstercountyalive.com WESTCHESTER COUNTY TOURISM (800) 833-9282; visitwestchesterny.com

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WHOLESALE RED BARN PRODUCE 217 Upper North Rd, Highland (845) 691-7428 Full-service, family owned and operated wholesaler servicing restaurants and institutions with a complete selection of fruits and vegetables for 20 years. A proud distributor of local, New York, high-quality produce at competitive prices emphasizing reliable and personal service. Pickup or delivery available to Dutchess, Columbia, Ulster and Orange counties. WINERIES GLORIE FARM WINERY 40 Mountain Rd, Marlboro (845) 236-3265; gloriewine.com Near the top of Mt. Zion Mountain with spectacular views of the Hudson, this boutiquestyle winery produces award-winning wines—a mix of red, white and fruit wines, dry, semi-dry and sweet, European varietals and hybrids as well as blends. SHAWANGUNK WINE TRAIL (845) 256-8456; (845) 291-1927; gunkswine.com Nestled between the Shawangunks and the Hudson River, just 60 miles north of NYC is a trail of 14 family-owned wineries from New Paltz to Warwick. The wineries offer tours and tastings amidst scenic beauty. A complete listing of wineries and events is available on our website. STOUTRIDGE VINEYARD & DISTILLERY 10 Ann Kaley Ln, Marlboro (845) 236-7620; stoutridge.com Many of our wines and spirits are locally grown, and all are from New York fruits and grains. Our wines are sold exclusively at the winery. Enjoy an authentic taste of the Hudson Valley at our winery, distillery and grounds. WARWICK VALLEY WINERY & DISTILLERY 114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-4858; wvwinery.com Daily 11–6 for tastings Food & Wine magazine calls our draft cider “clean, vibrant” with a “sweet finish.” We produce wine for every occasion: Chardonnay, Riesling, Harvest Moon, Black Dirt Blush and Red, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Noir. As the Valley’s first distillery, we produce a line of fine brandies and liqueurs. Bakery Café serves lunch and fresh breads on weekends. WHITECLIFF VINEYARD 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner (845) 255-4613; whitecliffwine.com Daily 11:30–5:30; Sat til 6 One of the valley’s largest vineyards boasts beautiful views of the Shawangunk Ridge. Owner/wine maker Michael Migliore produces award-winning wines from European vinifera varietals such as Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc and Riesling, as well as new hybrids. Visit our friendly tasting room. Winery tours by appointment, special events.


two moods. one sensibility. a delightfully unique dining experience in rhinebeck.

restaurant | bistro | bar 845-876-3330 www.terrapinrestaurant.com

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LAST CALL

Crème de la crème

In the world of food photography, shooting in a live commercial kitchen can be a nightmare—the lighting is uneven and inconsistent, the space often is confined, there’s always too much clutter and everyone moves much too quickly. Somehow, everything came together into a Norman Rockwell-like composition for one instant while David Handschuh was shooting at Jean-Georges in New York last year, and he got the shot. It just doesn’t get much better than this. Regular readers of The Valley Table will recognize Handschuh’s byline—he did the story on Adams Fairacre Farms in this issue, in fact. To see more of his work, visit davidhandschuh.com.

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PHOTO BY DAVID HANDSCHUH


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Cosimos.com NEWBURGH (845) 567-1556

CENTRAL VALLEY (845) 928-5222

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MIDDLETOWN (845) 692-3242

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