Page 1

T H E M AG A Z I N E O F H U D S O N VA L L E Y FA R M S , F O O D A N D C U I S I N E NUMBER 82   JUNE–AUGUST 2018   VALLEYTABLE.COM


2

the valley table

june

–

august

2018


We pride ourselves in providing excellent cars and service to the Hudson Valley Region.

Mercedes-Benz of Wappingers Falls

134 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590 MercedesBenzofWappingersFalls.com•845-298-0600

Sales Hours:

Service Hours:

Mon-Thurs: 9:00am-8:00pm Mon-Fri: 7:30am-6:00pm Fri-Sat: 9:00am-6:00pm Saturday: 7:30am-5:00pm Sunday: Closed Sunday: Closed

B

eauty. Function. Strength. Performance. You’ll find these values built into every Schrock cabinetry product. Together they make up our FourEver Quality Assurance. Durable, innovative organization to improve function in your room.

WILLIAMS

WilliamsLumber.com Lumber & 845-876-WOOD Home Centers SHOW *ROOMS

Rhinebeck* • Pleasant Valley* • Hudson* • Hopewell Junction • Tannersville • Red Hook • High Falls • Hyde Park june

august

2018

valleytable . com

3


Europe has never been closer. Fly nonstop to Ireland, Norway, and the UK. New York Stewart International Airport is proud to welcome Norwegian to its family of carriers which include Allegiant, American, Delta and JetBlue. Norwegian offers low fares, new planes and award-winning service. At Stewart, you will enjoy the sophistication of a large airport without all the fuss. Located in the Hudson Valley, Stewart is minutes off the NYS Thruway and features easy access parking located opposite the terminal. Getting to Stewart from midtown Manhattan is simple! Begin your vacation right away — jump on the Stewart Airport Express nonstop bus service departing from the Port Authority Bus Terminal and be there in just 90 minutes. Travel just doesn’t get any easier than flying out of Stewart.

Convenient. Easy. Hassle-Free.


number 82  june–august 2018

25 featured articles 23 vegan in the valley

Her vegetarian cookbooks have helped ease many into the discipline of vegetarian and vegan cuisine, so we sent Nava Atlas on a road trip this spring to sample what some of the valley’s growing number of vegan restaurants have to offer. Here’s a taste of what she tasted. by Nava Atlas

42 going with the flow

There are now more than 400 craft breweries in New York State—60 in the Hudson Valley—and a new one opens every three weeks. Here’s a look at the state of the craft in the region that may help you separate the hops from the barley, so to speak. by Bryan Miller

65 harvesting the sun

Economically speaking, farmers everywhere live pretty close to the bone, and despite long hours and hard work, most want to keep their land healthy and in production. Some have found a new crop to plant on the back 40 that may help. by Jeff Storey

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

5


number 82  june–august 2018

35

18

departments 8 Editor’s Letter 13 Good Stuff  Meat at the automat, new rosé wines, marshmallow shop, new cheeses, summer reading, rosé cider, letters, events and more

19 Openings  Enoteca AMA, Dutch Ale House, Newburgh Flour Shop 35 Up Close: Brian Arnoff of Kitchen Sink by David Handschuh 47 Eating by the Season: Poke? Okay! by Robin Cherry 53 Farms, Food and Markets: What’s in Season 54 Hudson Valley Farmers’ Markets 2018 61 Locally Grown: Land of the Long White Cloud by Keith Stewart 70 Index of Advertisers  72 Directory 80 Last Call: Bee Flight photo by David Handschuh Recipes 49 Tuna Poke (Jim Ely / Riverview) 49 Salmon & Avocado Poke (Waldy Malouf / CIA) 49 Hamachi Poke (Gerard Viverito / Apple Pie Bakery Cafe) 6

the valley table

june

august

2018

61


EDITORS LETTER

home is where the fun is This issue of The Valley Table is just plain fun. All you closet vegans out there can tag along with Nava Atlas as she samples the fare from some of the valley’s growing number of vegan restaurants. Then call Uber and let Bryan Miller tempt you with a draught or two of local beer while he reviews the state of the craft in the region. To help you with your hangover, there’s three versions of poke (of “about a billion,” says Robin Cherry) that may help brighten up your day or, if you wake up in Beacon, head over to Kitchen Sink, where, David Handschuh tells us, you can ease yourself back to reality with a heavy dose of real food—literally the way owner Brian Arnoff’s grandmother used to make it. If you still feel like traveling, join our resident farmer/writer Keith Stewart on an 8,000-mile journey back to his New Zealand roots, where he takes a look at the country’s agriculture—organic and “conventional”—as well as its expanding and lucrative meat industry. (You can eat all the kiwi fruit you can pick, but just don’t bother the hairy little critters that pass as birds down there.) Wait, there’s more. We’ve always promised to examine issues that affect the economics and politics of the food produced, processed and consumed in the Hudson Valley—the back stories, as they say on TV—and this issue is no exception. Jeff Storey looks at the boom in solar farms and their potential impact not only on the energy industry, but also on the region’s economy. Who would have thought that a seemingly benign energy source like solar power arrays, which produce relatively cheap electricity with no moving parts, no noise and no toxic emissions, could stir up an economic and political controversy that goes to the very heart of the region’s agricultural economy: Is farmland more valuable as a source of crops or as a source of energy, and who has the right to decide? Associated with the current boom in craft beer statewide is, of course, a fortune in state licenses and tax revenue. But there’s a concurrent economic incentive for local farmers to increase the acreage they devote to growing hops or barley in order to help brewers meet state mandates. In the Hudson Valley at least, demand still outstrips supply. And, not to let sleeping fish lie, even poke—a wildly popular raw fish “bowl” available in dizzying variety, has a more serious side: the state of our oceanic fishery and the growing threats posed by overfishing of some species, the devastating ecological damage caused by open-ocean fish farming, and the seemingly uncontrolled pollution from many sources worldwide. To eat or not to eat is more complicated than it seems. We have an embarrassment of riches here in the Hudson Valley—of resources, people, spirit. We hope you find the small sampling in this issue as compelling as it is delicious. —JN

Cover photo by Ethan Harrison

THE VALLEY TABLE THE MAGAZINE OF HUDSON VALLEY FARMS, FOOD AND CUISINE THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. 380 MAIN STREET, SUITE 202 BEACON, NY 12508 (845) 765-2600 valleytable.com hudsonvalleyrestaurantweek.com NUMBER 82 JUNE – AUGUST 2018 PUBLISHER Janet Crawshaw janetc@valleytable.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jerry Novesky jerryn@valleytable.com Managing Director Jennifer Bannan jennifer@valleytable.com Content Coordinator Lesley Rozycki Office Administrator Meghan Merry meghan@valleytable.com Graphic Design & Production Honest Creative Website Coordinator Nate Diedrick Interns Nicolette Muro Sydney Vacca Advertising Representatives Christopher Goodman Laura Lippman MCase Media sales@valleytable.com Contributors to this issue Evan Atlas Ethan Harrison Nava Atlas Bryan Miller Leslie Coons Bostian Barbara Reina Robin Cherry Keith Stewart David Handschuh Jeff Storey THE VALLEY TABLE is exclusively devoted to Hudson Valley agriculture, food and cuisine. We support sustainable agricultural practices and efforts to strengthen the links among regional producers, marketers, restaurateurs and consumers. We urge you to patronize businesses that feature Hudson Valley products and to support initiatives that benefit regional agriculture and related efforts. Letters to the editor regarding magazine content are welcome and will be published as space permits. Letters should be mailed to the address above, or emailed to editor@valleytable.com. To be considered for publication, letters must be signed. THE VALLEY TABLE is published four times a year (March, June, Sept and Dec). Distribution is free at selected sites throughout the Hudson Valley or by subscription. Subscriptions are $20 per year. To subscribe, mail a check or money order payable to The Valley Table, 380 Main St., Suite 202, Beacon, NY 12508 or visit valleytable.com. COPYRIGHT © 2018, THE VALLEY TABLE, INC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form, mechanical or electronic, without written permission of the publishers. Advertisements designed by The Valley Table are copyrighted and may not be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. ISSN 1257-8417

8

the valley table

june

august

2018


“BEST TACO & MARGARITA” 2017 TACO FEST

THE FINEST SOUTHWESTERN CUISINE

Paired with the Region’s Premiere Selection of Tequila

NOW OFFERING CATERING! www.baja328.com

10

the valley table

june

august

2018

328 Main Street, Beacon, NY 845.838.BAJA


june

–

august

2018

valleytable . com

11


adams fairacre farms

Fresh from Adams POUGHKEEPSIE

KINGSTON

NEWBURGH

WA P P I N G E R

Route 44 845-454-4330

Route 9W 845-336-6300

Route 300 845-569-0303

Route 9 845-632-9955

www.adamsfarms.com


GOOD STUFF

AT THE AUTOMAT

ALL MEAT, ALL DAY, ALL NIGHT It might seem unlikely that offering fresh-cut meat 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in quality-controlled vending machines would be the dream of a former vegan and vegetarian. But, as the owners of Applestone Meat Company, Joshua and Jessica Applestone made that dream come true. “It’s a creative industry—it’s the Wild West in some ways,” Joshua says. “I basically challenge myself every day to push boundaries, follow creative impulses and work to create spaces where people can explore food in unexpected ways.”
 The couple founded Fleisher’s Grass-Fed & Organic Meats in Kingston in 2004. After a successful 10-year run, out of which came an influential book, The Butcher’s Guide to Well-Raised Meat: How to Buy, Cut, and Cook Great Beef, Lamb, Pork, Poultry, and More (Clarkson Potter, 2011; $25 hardcover), the couple closed Fleisher’s. “I was doing a lot of thinking about where the sustainable food movement was headed,” Joshua says. “I realized accessibility is the [key to] making good food choices—the hours during which a store is open often define whether people have access to what’s inside. I wanted to open that up.” The vending machine idea grew from fond childhood memories of the Horn & Hardart Automat in New York City and his desire to create an alternative, low-price retail structure for quality meat. “I was thinking about the Automat and how much fun that was as a kid,” he says. “It really made a lot of sense. Once that model clicked, I saw

what it could do and I wanted it to be everywhere. [It] was such an unexpected hit that we really had to renegotiate our own goals and framework.” The Applestones opened their first self-serve meat vending machine outlet in Accord (Ulster County) in 2016, followed in 2017 by an expanded shop in Stone Ridge, where customers also can pick up online orders. The machines are stocked fresh daily, just like a butcher case. Food safety is ensured by refrigeration, reducedoxygen packaging, temperature controls, minimal handling, complete control of a local supply chain, and tight sanitation practices. Raw meat such as steaks and chops, and even ground meat, can remain in the machine for a week at maximum; processed goods, such as hot dogs, might stay for two weeks. “Everything we sell could actually safely stay in the machines–or your fridge–for a month, [but] we prefer a shorter shelf life for the sake of quality,” Applestone says. Pork and lamb are sourced from a pool of small, local farms; beef comes from Josef Meiller (Pine Plains). All Applestone meat is raised without hormones or antibiotics. The Applestones plan to expand their product line to include poultry, deli meats and other ready-to-eat products. Summer plans include a community “grill park” outside the Stone Ridge shop. “The ‘grill park’ at Stone Ridge is our top priority. We’re very eager to create [a] beautiful, public space for our community, where they can come and cook and eat together.” —BR

Applestone Meat Co. 3607 Main St (Rt 209), Stone Ridge
(845) 626-4444 Vending machines open 24/7; service window 11 – 6 4737 Rt 209, Accord
 Vending machines open 24/7 applestonemeat.com

photos by barbara reina

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

13


BE MORE THAN YOU CAN BEE

WHAT'S THE PLAN, MAN? Evan and Emily Watson’s journey into brewing began at a singlebarrel nanobrewery in Fishkill. Their beers grew popular, despite the fact that they were available only at local farmers’ markets. In 2014, the discovery of an old farm in Poughkeepsie and funding from a friend paved the way for Plan Bee Farm Brewery. The couple purchased the 25-acre farm in 2015 and began rebuilding its three-story barn. Three years later, the renovation goes on, but the beer already is flowing.

ROSÉ CHEEKS

CIDER, SLIGHTLY RED

The newly opened tasting room at the brewery features eight beers on tap, a guest tap for local cider and New York wine, and a selection of cheeses, popcorn and other snacks, all produced by local farmers. Plan Bee bottled beer also is available for purchase. The beer can be enjoyed inside the tasting room, but visitors are encouraged to explore the farm and apiary. “We want to offer an experience where visitors can taste, touch, and smell the ingredients we grow on the farm,” Emily says. —LR Plan Bee Farm Brewery 115 Under-hill Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 242-9562 planbeefarmbrewery.com

14

the valley table

june

august

2018

As summer’s unofficial wine, rosé has grown steadily in popularity. Its fans include Angry Orchard head cider maker Ryan Burk and his team, who experimented for years with elements of the wine’s flavor profile in a cider recipe. It wasn’t until they came across rare, red-fleshed apples called Amour Rouge (Red Love) in the French region of Brittany that they were satisfied they had the key to Angry Orchard Rosé Hard Cider. The colorful flesh

of the French apples that gives the cider its rosy hue is blended with six other apple varieties (including Gala, Fuji, Red Delicious, Golden Delicious and Granny Smith), along with a hint of hibiscus, to make the unique, aromatic cider. “We’re always playing around with recipes here at the cidery in Walden—Angry Orchard Rosé is an expression of the high-quality ingredient experimentation we do here,” Burk says. Although the rosé cider can be enjoyed on its own, it pairs well with cheeses such as gouda and feta, as well as hearty, flavorful cured meats like ham and prosciutto. Sprout Creek Farm’s Toussaint, a complex and peppery raw cows’ milk cheese, is a perfect mate for the sweeter notes of the rosé cider. Angry Orchard Rosé Cider is available at the orchard tasting room and at many wine and spirits outlets throughout the Hudson Valley and nationwide. —LR Angry Orchard 2241 Albany Post Rd, Walden (888) 845-3311 angryorchard.com


EVENTS

TRENDING

STOP AND SMELL THE ROSÉS Once considered a lightweight in the battle for consumer favor, rosé wines were habitually placed in the “casual summer wine” niche and taken about as seriously as sangria. In truth, however, the rich flavor profiles of many rosés pair well with a wide range of dishes—from lobster to grilled summer vegetables, even light beef and lamb dishes. These hot pink wines are quite capable of skirting what has generally been considered red-wine territory. As their popularity has grown, so has interest in local production. Tousey Winery, in Germantown (Columbia County), produces Rebellion Rosé, a popular, robust rosé that approaches a Pinot Noir profile. From Benmarl’s Fjord Vineyards in Marlboro (Ulster County) comes a dry, balanced Cabernet Franc rosé, and nearby Glorie Farm Winery just entered the rosé world with its own Cab Franc rosé.  Closer to the Shawangunk Ridge in Ulster County, Whitecliff Vineyard and Winery, in Gardiner, offers Dry Rosé (a Gamay Noir, Cayuga and Vidal Blanc blend). The clean, simple and straightforward rosé is a crowd pleaser with its melon and lemoncitrus overtones; it pairs well with a variety of summer dishes, including complex summer salads. A lot of time and capital has gone into the development of Whitecliff’s newest rosé. Six years ago, the winery planted Pinot Noir, Gamay Noir and Cabernet Franc on a new, six-acre vineyard bordering the Hudson River just below Olana, Frederic Edwin Church’s historic home and studio in Columbia County. The site, chosen because of its slope, soil and proximity to the river, has yielded its first vintage. A 2017 rosé of Pinot Noir (9 percent Pinot Noir; 3 percent Cab Franc) is the first estate wine from the new vineyard. A 2017 Cab Franc and a 2017 Gamay Noir commemorate not only the new vineyard but also Whitecliff’s twentieth anniversary.

The Pinot rosé, with its floral nose and deep citrus flavor, pairs well with grilled meats—pork, lamb and sausage—as well as harvest salads. It joins Whitecliff’s other rosés—Island Rosé (Cab Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah) with its hints of currant, berry and exotic fruit (try it with lobster or fish and salsa) and a cooler-weather Barrel Rosé (an estate blend of Pinot Noir and Cab Franc), aged in oak and good with a creamy pasta or even steak. If you haven’t yet tried any Hudson Valley rosés, or if you avoid rosés in general out of habit, you may be in for a surprise. They’re quite comfortable on either a dining or picnic table, and they pair well with the bounty of local meats and vegetables available from now into autumn.

Tousey Winery 1774 Route 9, Germantown (518) 567-5462 touseywinery.com Fjord Vineyards 251 Ridge Road, Milton (914) 874-4537 fjordvineyards.com Glorie Farm Winery 40 Mountain Road, Marlboro (845) 236-3265 gloriewine.com Whitecliff Vineyard and Winery 331 Mckinstry Road, Gardiner (845) 255-4613 whitecliffwine.com

WESTCHESTER WINE + FOOD FESTIVAL WESTCHESTER COUNTY June 5-10 Annual celebration of gourmet food, exceptional wines, beer, spirits, mouthwatering burgers, and award-winning chefs. More than 7,000 guests will sip, savor and enjoy the county’s finest plates and pours, mingle with Westchester’s top chefs, sommeliers, and specialty food purveyors.  winefood.westchestermagazine.com  BOUNTY OF THE HUDSON  ULSTER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS  June 16, 12-5pm A Bacchus celebration of wine and winemakers of the Hudson Valley. Local farm-to-table fare available. $37.40 oneday tasting ticket. $15.80 designated driver ticket.  bountyofthehudson.com  SUMMER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION STORM KING ART CENTER June 23, 5-10pm Spend the evening celebrating the start of summer at the world-class 500-acre sculpture park. Featuring cocktail reception, farm-to-table dinner with chef Michael Anthony of Gramercy Tavern and Shelley Boris of Fresh Company. Plus private tours of grounds and current exhibitions.  stormking.org  BEER, BOURBON & BACON  BARTON ORCHARDS, POUGHQUAG June 30, 2-6pm Hudson Valley breweries, distilleries and vendors serve up creative creations and “3-B” combinations. $55 general admission, $100 pre-sale VIP experience. Tickets online only. beerbourbonbacon.com  BAD SEED SAUSAGE & CIDER FEST  BAD SEED CIDERY, HIGHLAND  July 1, 1-5pm Try 20+ styles of small-batched hard cider paired with Hudson Valley Sausage Company sausages. Enjoy live music and tasty food. Tickets $30 in advance.  badseedhardcider.com  DECLARATION OF INTERDEPENDENCE  HAWTHORNE VALLEY FARM July 1, 6-9pm  A celebratory evening featuring dining and dancing at Hawthorne Valley, guest speakers, live entertainment, farm to table cuisine and a silent auction.  hawthornevalleyfarm.org

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

15


LETTERS

BOOKS

HEADS UP

HEAVY READING

To the Editor: I am upset about the article listed at the bottom of the Valley Table Newsletter by Jerry Novesky. It is once again an opportunity for someone to broadcast their personal opinions or dislikes or political agenda in a newsletter that clearly has nothing to do with hunting. This is The Valley Table—information, I thought, about food and restaurants and events in the Hudson Valley. I have personally been to Africa—a number of times. Has he? I have actually witnessed the meat from lawfully taken animals on a safari given to the local people. Has he? Perhaps it’s best to not use this newsletter as a forum to push through an agenda that not all your readers agree with, or submit information about a subject that he has not gotten the full scope of. There are many people who own farms in Africa who would have no income if it wasn’t for the legal hunting safaris. Actually, there would only be poaching and not one animal left in a short period of time. So the meat does get eaten, the “trophy” and the fees associated with it do benefit conservation, and the fees and salaries that all go into providing this hunter with a safari help the economy. Trust me—I have been there and I have many contacts that would be more than willing to give you the same information. Maybe the writing should be more about the Valley. Thanks.

About this time last year, Sy Montgomery’s book about a friendly laboratory octopus was so affecting it put calamari—fried or otherwise— off my dinner menu for good. Books about animal consciousness (Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel), emotions (How Animals Grieve), intelligence (Are Animals Smart Enough to know How Smart They Are?) or a bevy of other studies of “lesser” beings, as a genre tend to describe various traits of other species as they compare and relate to similar human traits, a fault-ridden method that saw its heyday through the 1960s. By and large, such studies conclude with humans at the top of the heap, still, while calling for, at the least, humane treatment of everything else prior to slaughter or research.

Joan LaSala via the Internet The author is referring to “Head Hunters,” the Editor’s Letter in The Valley Table 80 (Dec 2017–Feb 2018).

CORRECTION "Roses Are Red, Violets Are Edible," Valley Table 80 (Dec 2017-Feb 2018) omitted the credit for the historic post cards provided by Scott G. Cruikshank Collection, Rhinebeck Historical Society. We apologize for the omission.

16

the valley table

june

august

2018

Peter Godfrey-Smith’s Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness (Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 2016; $16, paperback), on the other hand, is a convincing, if ultimately incomplete, attempt to answer the question Do other species have consciousness? using philosophical rather than behavioral methodology. (This seems

fair, since the author is a distinguished professor of philosophy at CUNY.) Observing cephalopods (primarily octopus and giant cuttlefish) in the wild, Godfrey-Smith considers how human precepts might be interpreted according to their frame of reference. Along the way, he explores subjects as diverse and inexplicable as the logic of lifespans. While he doesn’t reach a conclusion, he does manage to redefine consciousness while citing Dewey and Hume rather than Darwin and Wilson. In a short concluding section on the state of the oceans and the role of humans as both the cause and cure of their precarious state, GodfreySmith likens the oceanic environment to a bee colony—complex in its dependencies, interrelationships and chemistry. Many bee experts point to a number of maladies, none of which singly would destroy a hive but whose combined effect triggers the devastating colony collapse disorder currently plaguing North American bee populations. Godfrey-Smith points to a similar situation in our oceans, where it’s not just overfishing that is depleting fish stocks. In fact, he claims, the entire oceanic ecosystem may well be on the verge of its own kind of colony collapse, the combined and cumulative result of overfishing, contamination, chemical imbalance, loss of habitat and atmospheric warming. “Dead zones”—areas of the ocean that are wholly and absolutely devoid of any oxygen or life—occur naturally from time to time but not with the frequency or scale they are now occurring. Should they presage a collapse of the oceans’ ecosystem parallel to colony collapse disorder, “catastrophic” is an inadequate term to describe the result. If contemplating the demise of our oceans or searching for clues to animal consciousness don’t exactly put you in the mood to enjoy a summer barbecue, you might try


EVENTS

Andrew Friedman’s Chefs, Drugs and Rock & Roll: How Food Lovers, Free Spirits, Misfits and Wanderers Created a New American Profession (Ecco, 2018; $27 hardcover), a look back at the days when chefs had free reign over their kitchens, when “politically correct” meant “in your face” and when some of today’s world-renowned chefs were learning their art while still waiting tables or making soup.

The American restaurant scene from the 1960s through the ‘80s set the stage and the ground rules for much of what we take for granted today. Friedman covers a lot of ground, with interviews of the chefs, critics, writers and other industry and media personnel involved in the genesis of the American restaurant scene’s distinctive East and West Coast cliques. It’s not as wild a ride as the title suggests—this is not Gonzo journalism—but it does include a lot of inside chatter and insight into what motivated many of the chefs to do, and become, what they are today. Any analysis of the American restaurant scene as it currently exists will need to reference these back stories—oh yeah, John Novi is in there, too.

At least one major character in Friedman’s book became a cause celebre to a greater degree than even she anticipated—Alice Waters and Chez Panisse became a leading force in the legitimization of commercial vegetarian cuisine, which is an apropos lead in to the next book. If we scratched off our eating list every animal or plant that raised an ethical, environmental or any other kind of warning flag, there’d be precious little left to eat. Grasses, maybe, and tree bark. Well, you’ll have to strike tree bark from the menu if you read Peter Wohlleben’s The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate (Greystone, 2016; $24 hardcover). It has long been known that when attacked by predatory insects, some plants release chemicals that, transported via wind, stimulate other plants (even different species) to initiate their own chemical or physical protective measures against a possible attack by the same predators. “Communication” or not, Wohlleben develops this thesis thoroughly and it makes for a fascinating, quirky read. So, to all vegans out there: The next time you’re tempted to eat a tree—don’t. —JN

HUDSON VALLEY HOT-AIR BALLOON FESTIVAL  BARTON ORCHARDS, POUGHQUAG July 6, 4-9:30pm; July 7, 12-9:30pm; July 8, 12-8pm A record 25 hot air balloons take to the skies for visitors to enjoy from the air or from the ground. $23 all access weekend pass. Advanced tickets $10. Children under 3 free. dcrcoc.org/balloonfestival HUDSON VALLEY SANGRIA FESTIVAL BENMARL WINERY, MARLBORO July 15, 12-6pm Dance in the summer with sangria and Flamenco. Sample six different types of homemade sangria, including a fresh strawberry mojito sangria. Music by the Cintron Brothers Flamenco Dancers and Flamenco dance lessons throughout the day. $25 general admission, nondrinkers/children $10. Kids 12 and under free.  benmarl.com BLUEBERRY FESTIVAL  OLD AUSTERLITZ July 29, 9am-4pm Fill up on one of summer’s tastiest treats. Local vendors whip up a variety of blueberry creations, accompanied by 19th century craft demonstrations and wares, antiques, live music and family-friendly entertainment. $7 admission fee. CASH, COUNTRY & WHISKEY WEEKEND  WARWICK VALLEY WINERY  August 11-12, 12-5pm Over 20 New York distilleries pour their finest whiskey, cocktails and spirits in conjunction with the winery’s ‘Cash and Country’ music festival. $15 general admission.  wvwinery.com  PUTNAM COUNTY WINE & FOOD FEST  WESTVIEW GOLF DRIVING RANGE  August 25-26, 11am A summer weekend showcasing New York wine, spirits and food, paired with two full days of activities and live music, plus arts and crafts and family-friendly entertainment. $27 tasting ticket, $10 designated driver ticket, $35 at the door.  putnamcountywinefest.com

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

17


MORE S’MORES, ANYONE?

STICKY IN BEACON Main Street in Beacon got a little sweeter—and a little stickier—now that Hudson Valley Marshmallow Company’s brick-and-mortar store has come to town. The confectionary company opened its own storefront in early May, and now, rather than waiting for an online order to be delivered, eager consumers can instantly satisfy all their sweet cravings in one stop. In addition to bags of flavored marshmallows (vanilla, chocolate, strawberry and salted caramel), the shop will offer a line of hot chocolates, special-edition marshmallows and other baked goods. Of course, visitors can indulge their decadence at the s’mores bar, or pick from any number of treats at the weigh-and-pay candy wall. Company owner Brendan McAlpine credits chef Danielle Falcon as the culinary force behind the creative sweet treats. “She is our resident creative genius/mad scientist and is constantly coming up with new, delicious and innovative takes on flavors,” he says.

Grab-and-go treats are the primary focus at the shop, but there is limited counter seating in front, “great for people watching,” McAlpine adds. —LR Hudson Valley Marshmallow Company 217 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-2703 hudsonvalleymarshmallow.com

SMILE, SAY NEW CHEESE

DOWN ON THE BIODYNAMIC FARM The Hudson Valley is known far and wide as a hub of world-class cheese production, and cheesemakers in the region have been busy throughout the spring season developing new cheeses to pair with that fresh summer salad or grilled meat. Newcomer Miracle Springs Farm in Ancram (Columbia County) has three new goat cheeses in the offing. Farm owners Jaimie Cloud, an educator and founder/president of the Cloud Institute for Sustainability Education,

18

the valley table

june

august

2018

and David Levine, cofounder/CEO of the American Sustainable Business Council, restored the historic 227acre farm, and a team of farmers (Raine Owens, Jeremy Spesard and Rene DeLeeuw) utilize biodynamic principles, rotational grazing and a host of other earth-friendly practices to produce the farm’s fruits, vegetables and cheese. Rory Chase, of Chaseholm Farm Creamery, oversees production of the farm’s cheeses, which currently include Simply Chevre (mild, soft and creamy—perfect for those new to goat cheese); Savory Chevre (with a bright, complex flavor from a Tellicherry peppercorn coating); and CamembertStyle (clean and buttery, with a

delicate mushroom flavor). Two new cheeses—a Morbier-style and Tommestyle cheese—are in development. The cheeses can be purchased online, at the farm store (opening the first Saturday in June), at local farmers’ markets (including Millerton, Amenia and Cornwall), as well as local markets, including Adams Fairacre Farms (Poughkeepsie), Peck's Market (Pine Plains), Millerton Fresh Market (Millerton), High Falls Food Co-op (High Falls), and Taft Farms (Great Barrington). —LR Miracle Springs Farm 709 County Rt 11, Ancram (518) 851-2500 miraclespringsfarm.com


OPENINGS

Enoteca AMA 297 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-2909 enotecaama.com Dutch Ale House 253 Main St, Saugerties (845) 247-2337 dutchalehouse.com The husband-wife team of Dallas and Ted Gilpin did what lots of people dream of doing—they purchased their favorite Friday-night hangout. The restored, 85-year-old Dutch Ale House in Saugerties reopened in March, its exposed brick walls and rich, dark wood bar providing the 82-seat space with all the warmth and hospitality expected of a traditional tavern. A new seasonal menu from chef Jonathan Botta, formerly of Harry & Ida’s, Colicchio & Sons and Ducks Eatery in New York, includes revamped versions of house favorites alongside new dishes highlighting local ingredients, farms and purveyors, including the Dutch sausage plate (with house-made, smoked kielbasa or bratwurst), the smoked chili burger (with smoked guajillo and ancho chili mayo), and house-made panna cotta for dessert. The bar’s 16 taps favor New York State beers (including Woodstock, West Kill, New Belgium and Sloop), and there’s a new cocktail program from Derek Williams, formerly of A Tavola Trattoria in New Paltz. Mon-Sat 11:30 – 11; Sun noon – 10

Enoteca AMA sits right across the street from the orange awnings of its sister restaurant, Beacon’s popular Café Amarcord. The 49-seat enoteca focuses on wood-fired pizzas, simple Italian fare and, of course, wine (there is a full bar and craft beer selection). The open industrial space gets splashes of color from the bright orange chairs and art by local artist Rob Penner. The centerpiece, though, is a Pavesi brick hearth oven, imported from Italy and finished at Forza Forni in Brewster. Owner Rifo Murtovic says he wanted to bring authentic al forno pizza to the area. The pizzas that emerge from the oven are fluffier, a little chewy and firekissed. Topped with a choice of imported Italian meats, hand-crushed San Marzano tomatoes, fire-roasted vegetables and rich fiore di latte mozzarella, the pizzas are “individual-sized,” but this is food meant to be shared. Start with caprino (fire-roasted plum tomatoes, herbs, goat cheese and EVOO), tonno crudo (tuna, Meyer lemon, capers, chili pepper and flaked salt), and move on to a selection of pizza or panini. The all-Italian wine list offers seven by the glass ($6 to $10). “The wines are all based on pizza,” Murtovic explains. “They had to be reasonable, not heavy, fruitier wines.” Think Nebbiolo, Dolcetto, Chianti. The heaviest (a Nero D’Avola) was selected for the meat and cheese platters. Mon, Wed, Thu noon – 10; Fri, Sat noon – 11; Sun noon – 9

dutch ale house photo : simply steph photography ; enoteca ama photo : kimberly coccagnia

Newburgh Flour Shop 109 Liberty St, Newburgh Liberty Street Bistro, a major contributor to the rejuvenation of the area near Washington’s Headquarters State Historic Site in the heart of Newburgh, isn’t what you’d call a takeout joint. But chef/ owner Michael Kelly found himself flooded with requests from customers who wanted to take something home with them—specifically a loaf of the house-made bread or a baguette. So Kelly built Flour Shop—a bakery—that will offer artisanal breads and pastries, house-made ice cream, and coffee from Toby’s Estate in Brooklyn. Kelly says the recipes for his bâtarde and Pullmanstyle loaves evolved from a recipe for a simple table bread he’s been using for years, adding that customers’ constant requests and lucky timing spurred him to open the shop, serendipitously right next door to the restaurant. “It makes sense for our organization, it makes sense for our community, and most importantly it offers another location for our team to grow,” Kelly stresses. “We’re not just concerned with running restaurants— we’re actively trying to foster a culture of professionalism, creativity, and pride in what we do for a living.” Wed – Sun 7 – 4 (subject to change)

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

19


AU T H E N T I C C R OAT IA N C U I S I N E . FARM TO TABLE | FRESH FISH & SEAFOOD DAILY | ORGANIC FARM RAISED MEATS ORGANIC WINES AVAILABLE | CRAFT COCKTAILS

D U B R O V N I K R E S TAU R A N T CALL FOR RESERVATIONS OR BOOK YOUR EVENT (914) 637-3777 721 MAIN STREET | NEW ROCHELLE 10801 | www.dubrovnikny.com

20

the valley table

june

–

august

2018


june

–

august

2018

valleytable . com

21


One of the most highly rated restaurants and wine bars in the Hudson Valley

Business Lunch Special

SELECT AND MENU SALAD AND ANY MENU PASTA FOR

$20

MONDAY - FRIDAY

22

the valley table

june

–

august

2018


Vegan Valley EGAN DINING HAS GONE FROM

text by nava atlas photos by evan atlas

being a niche specialty to a global trend, especially in the last few years. It wasn’t that long ago that, with the exception of some small “fringe” groups, the concept of “vegan” hadn’t yet entered the public consciousness, and certainly the word hadn’t yet entered the everyday culinary vocabulary. It was hard enough being a vegetarian back then, especially when dining out—options in many places were limited to how many alfalfa sprouts you wanted. Dining out as a committed vegan was nearly impossible. How things have changed. People now actually know and understand what a vegetarian (one who eats no meat products) or a vegan (no meat, no dairy or egg products or ingredients) is. The number of people identifying themselves as vegan or vegetarian seems to be growing exponentially, and the Hudson Valley is riding the crest of that wave for lots of good reasons. Plant-based diets go hand-in-hand with farm-to-table dining, and the valley is a national leader in that trend. Healthful

eating fuels the active, outdoor-minded folks who live here or are drawn to visit the region. And the growth and marketing of house-made specialty items and delicacies using locally sourced ingredients is well established throughout the valley and adds vibrancy and identity to our communities. The eight restaurants profiled here represent just a sampling of what’s available in the Hudson Valley. Each is unique, but they have a lot in common. Dietary restrictions, including true gluten-free preparation, are thoughtfully addressed. The vast majority of vegan restaurants source fresh (primarily organic) produce primarily from local farms that are committed to fair labor practices. A trait common to most owners and chefs is their compassion for animals and a belief that plant-based diets are better for the environment while being more healthful for humans than a meatbased diet. Finally, all agree that “vegan” food is simply food, as nature intended it: healthful, whole, fresh and, above all, delicious.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

23


Commissary! OPENED 2016

11 Church St, New Paltz (845) 633-8011

New Paltz residents are lucky: They can see double right in the heart of the village. Lagusta’s Luscious, opened in 2011 at 25 North Front Street, is where Lagusta Yearwood’s artful, Fair Trade vegan chocolates are made. Commissary! (the exclamation point is part of the name), just a couple of streets away, is its eat-in sister café, co-owned by Yearwood and Jacob Feinberg-Pyne. With its youthful vibe, Commissary! has a casual air of fun and inclusiveness. There’s Socialist Sliding Scale Soup and a Mitzvah Wall, where customers pay treats forward. The words “resistance is fertile,” writ large along the main counter, refer not only to Lagusta’s commitment to social justice, but to the changes everyone can make with conscientious food choices. Commissary! serves a sampling of the bonbons and truffles made in Lagusta’s sweets shop, along with an extensive menu of hot and cold specialty coffees, teas and chocolate drinks. Rich, homemade nut milks and nondairy whipped cream turn these standard beverages into something special. Vegans who thought they’d never eat a croissant again will rejoice over the two varieties of the flaky pastry made without dairy butter. Savory items have gradually been added to the menu, including a cheese and pickle plate featuring house-made pickles, local jam and Treeline vegan cheese from Kingston, served with Brooklyn-made crackers. Hearty soups are always available, as are daily specials like seitan stroganoff. “People in the Hudson Valley are passionate about food and ethics,” Lagusta says, “and we’ve found a great customer base here.”

24

the valley table

june

august

2018


Consciousfork OPENED 2012

14 Railroad Ave, Warwick (845) 988-5253; consciousfork.com The name of this café invokes the idea of making a conscious decision at the proverbial fork in the road. That’s just what owner Kim Gabelmann had to do some years ago when she opted out of a successful but stressful corporate career that was taking a toll on her health. A juice retreat changed her life, restored her well-being and set her on a new path at her own fork in the road. The café’s tagline—Nourishing the mind, body, and soil—speaks to this eatery’s connection to the nearby black dirt region of Pine Island. That dark, fertile farmland is where Gabelmann grows much of the produce used in the café in the heart of the Village of Warwick. It’s a warm and inviting space, with artwork by local artists on display. That same ethos permeates the Consciousfork kitchen, where chef

Kelly Hance prepares fresh and lively fare. Coconut, almond and hemp milks for smoothies are house made, as are the sauerkraut, kombucha and other fermented foods. All breads are baked on premises, and healthful, gluten-free sweets are part of the daily fare. Popular menu items include seasonal soups, generous sandwiches, avocado toast and fresh juices. “We love to grow our base of non-believers who become steady customers,” Gabelmann notes. Non-vegan men, especially, are skeptical at first, then surprised by the flavors and textures of the food. Gabelmann calls the top-selling Tex-Mex Bowl a “gateway” to vegan dining. “The guys love it!” she says. And yes, vegans can drink! Consciousfork serves beer, wine, cocktails muddled with fresh herbs, and juices spiked with spirits.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

25


The Garden Cafe OPENED 2015

6 Old Forge Rd, Woodstock (845) 679-3600; thegardencafewoodstock.com

“Working with a plant-based menu is clean, kind and creative,” says Lea Haas. So when she bought Garden Café on the Green in Woodstock in May 2015, she maintained its vegan traditions. By the fall of that year, the elegantly rustic eatery had more than doubled its space and emerged rebranded as Garden Café at Woodstock. “It’s a win-win—good for you, the planet and the animals,” Haas continues. “Our food is prepared with the best local and organic ingredients with the talent of chef Christine Moss and our fantastic team.” Signature dishes include no-noodle veggie lasagna (seasonal vegetables layered with flavorful, house-made marinara sauce and cashew ricotta) and a standout portobello panini (marinated mushrooms, caramelized onions, roasted red peppers and roasted garlic aioli). The silky-smooth 26

the valley table

june

august

2018

chocolate mousse is a sweet finale well worth saving room for. The café serves beer, organic wine, fresh juices, and tonics such as Immune Boost Tea (an infusion of fresh ginger, turmeric, lemon, cayenne and black pepper). “I like the challenge and creativity of cooking vegan,” Moss adds. “There are so many beautiful and distinct flavors in each vegetable, fruit and grain.” Her creative spirit is reflected in the wide-ranging menu inspired by what’s available from local farms and farm markets. Garden Café is a destination dining experience, especially during the warmer months, when meals can be enjoyed in the outdoor seating area. Haas credits the success of the café to the strong community following. It makes her feel good to hear diners say, “If I could eat here every day, I could be vegan.”


Good Choice Kitchen Vegan Café and Culinary Center OPENED FEBRUARY 2017

147 Main St, Ossining (914) 930-1591; goodchoicekitchen.com

When Good Choice Kitchen opened in early 2017, it was the culmination of years of planning. Owner/chef Laurie Gershgorn envisioned not just a dine-in café, but a multiuse culinary center offering catering, weekly meal plans customized to customers’ dietary needs, cooking classes, lectures, workshops, as well as art and music events. She’s fulfilled that vision admirably in a bright, colorful space that brings to the northern Westchester community of Ossining “a wide variety of healthy, delicious, sustainable alternatives that they can enjoy,” that will “turn them on to a feeling of well-being.” To that end, Good Choice serves hearty breakfasts, wraps and sandwiches, soups, fresh juices, smoothies and desserts. The farm-totable seasonal lunch/dinner menu is augmented with daily and weekly specials. Customer favorites include the avocado toast (taken to a whole new level with hummus and microgreens), spiced tempeh and seasonal vegetables with almond sauce (just one of many seasonal bowls), lentil tikki masala and kale salad. “Our cooking classes, lectures and discussions in the café motivate, empower and pique interest in this lifestyle,” Gershgorn suggests, adding that she believes more people are beginning to accept a plant-based diet as the route to better health. Good Choice Kitchen is seriously committed to serving clean, organic, seasonal, locally bio-farmed food. It all proves that you can have your vegan cake (or brownie, or cookie) and eat it, too.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

27


Karma Road OPENED 2007

11 Main St, New Paltz (845) 255-1099; karmaroad.net Jenn and Seth Branitz arrived in New Paltz with their two baby sons in the dead of winter of 2007. Both from Long Island and both experienced in the food business but knowing no one in New Paltz, the couple took a leap of faith and opened the doors to Karma Road in the bleak month of February. Their mission was, and remains, “to ease suffering for animals, humans and the planet with delicious, healthy, plant-based foods that everyone likes.” Karma Road pitches itself as an organic (rather than a vegan) café as a way to broaden the message. Karma’s centerpiece is its deli case, brimming with curried stews, fresh slaws and salads, roasted vegetables, greens, the “burger of the moment” and more, from which customers can build two popular specials—the Afforda-Bowl and the Flexa-Bowl. The ever-changing soups are another staple. “We sell gallons [of soup], even on the hottest summer days,” Seth says. The signature sweet potato biscuits pair perfectly with any soup of the day. Juices, smoothies and wheatgrass shots are part of Karma Road’s vibe. Outsized muffins and other baked goods loaded with goodfor-you ingredients are perfect for grab-and-go eating. Interest in plant-based fare has grown as people come to realize they don’t have to sacrifice flavor, texture or nutrition when choosing vegan foods. Karma Road’s healthful comfort food is the proof.

28

the valley table

june

august

2018


Pure City OPENED 2003

100 Main St, Pine Bush (845) 744-2153; purecityny.com

The business district of tiny Pine Bush is, to say the least, compact. It also has been home to Pure City—a thriving, award-winning, vegan Asian restaurant—for 15 years. With Asian art and objects and soft lighting, the serene eatery has long been a destination for vegetarians and vegans seeking a festive place to celebrate birthdays and other special occasions. Word of mouth has done its magic in creating a loyal following. The menu at Pure City features dishes using “mock meats” (mostly soy protein and seitan), along with traditional vegetarian Chinese tofu, vegetables and noodle specialties. As dedicated Buddhists, owners Ben and Lisa Chen practice the compassion and nonviolence at the heart of the teachings of their dharma master. Those beliefs are reflected in the menu, as well.

Many of Pure City’s entrées are Ben’s unique creations. Almost too pretty to eat, for example, mixed diced vegetables in taro is served in a crisp, edible bowl surrounded by thin ribbons of raw beet. Meat-eaters are particularly smitten with the veggie nuggets orange flavor and the Teriyaki veggie steak. Some customers become especially devoted to a particular dish. One gentleman has been continuously ordering Green Jade, a delectable combo of veggie “ham,” broccoli and enoki mushrooms, since the restaurant first opened. Pure City’s entrees go easy on the oil, leaving diners feeling sated but not stuffed. That way, there’s always some room left for the vegan ice cream or homemade vegan cheesecake—a sweet ending to a memorable meal.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

29


Végétalien
 OPENED AUGUST 2017

504 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1943; vegetalien.life

Kamel Jamal is a man who can’t stay still—and that’s been a good thing for the Beacon business district. Jamal is the force behind the River Valley Restaurant Group that owns Tito Santana Taqueria, Beacon Bread Company, Ziatoun, and the latest venture, Végétalien (vegan in French). This group also owns Angelina’s in Cold Spring, and will launch a food truck this summer. Customers’ requests for more vegan options at Tito Santana’s inspired Jamal to open a 100 percent plantbased eatery. “Vegan” seemed to be in the air, and Jamal, who also serves as chef in his establishments, likes to keep his diners happy. As a savvy entrepreneur, he sees the trend as having huge potential. Jamal credits his staff, including chef Elizabeth Teachout, and Ashley

30

the valley table

june

august

2018

Arrigo, who works the counter and makes juices, with “doing something they’re truly passionate about—putting their hearts into creating incredible vegan cuisine.” Compact and casual, with just a few tables, Végétalien is always bustling. Some of the more popular offerings include a classic vegan BLT (the “bacon” is cleverly made of rice wrappers); sizzling cheesy pizza, and an array of fresh juices and smoothies. Also on the menu are Buddha bowls, BBQ jackfruit tacos, vegan paninis, avocado toast and popular seasonal soups. The next time you do a gallery crawl or a Second Saturday in Beacon, you’d do well to fuel it with a meal at Végétalien.


WildFlower Café OPENED MARCH 2018

35 West Market St, Red Hook (845) 779-0770; wildflowercafeny.com

Billed as “Red Hook’s first burger bar,” WildFlower Café serves traditional burger bar fare—minus the meat and dairy. On the other hand, you can adopt a stray kitten after lunch. The space, previously occupied by Morgan’s Cat Café (a combination eatery and cat shelter) is now devoted strictly to food service, though diners are welcome to bring their lunch upstairs to the relocated, enlarged and redesigned shelter. (The shelter and the cats can be observed from behind glass panes.) Owners Bobbi Jo Forte and Martin Pucino believe that bringing accessible plant-based versions of familiar foods into the mainstream will ease people into a healthier lifestyle. The café’s Cheezburger and WildFlower Burger are made with “Beyond Burger”—a meat alternative that “has more protein than a beef burger” and “is literally leaving customers speechless,” according to Forte. Jumbo vegan franks and fish-less fillet specialties also are menu highlights. Want fries with that? WildFlower’s fries are baked, not deep fried, as are the onion rings. Wash everything down with a dairy‑free milkshake. For the “veg-curious”—those who want to taste what all the vegan fuss is about but aren’t quite ready to give up the meaty flavors and textures they’ve become accustomed to—WildFlower Café would be a good place to start. Have lunch, adopt a homeless pet, then visit the adjacent retail store that offers vegan handbags and other Fair Trade accessories and home goods.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

31


TO SEE IF YOU WILL BENEFIT VISIT

32

the valley table

june

–

august

2018

JACOBOWITZ.COM/BUSINESS360


Paulas’ House

Please check our website or Facebook for hours

PUBLIC

“Food is Love Served on a Plate” 2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie 845.454.7821 | paulaspublichouse.com june

august

2018

valleytable . com

33


• Café & Market • Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch & Dinner •Serving Fine Food, Beer & Wine • European & Local Groceries • Artisanal Cheese & Meat • Prepared Food • Specialty Gift Crates

Catering is Our Specialty Open 7 Days a Week

382 MAIN STREET • BEACON, NY • WWW.BEACONPANTRY.COM

34

the valley table

june

august

2018


UP CLOSE

brian arnoff of

kitchen sink text and photos by david handschuh

I

T ’ S E XAC T LY 1 3 9 STEPS FROM Meyer’s Olde Dutch, a new hamburger and cocktail joint near the west end of Beacon’s Main Street, across the street to Kitchen Sink, a 24-seat restaurant, opened in 2015, that’s become well known and well loved by locals for its blend of global flavors with family-centered “comfort” dishes. Both eateries are owned by Brian Arnoff, a Town of Poughkeepsie native who came to Beacon by way of Hyde Park, Boston, Italy and Washington, DC. Arnoff’s mission as a restaurateur is simple: “I want to serve delicious, affordable food that guests will want to return to week after week,” he says.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

35


Arnoff grew up religious—he went to Hebrew school, had a bar mitzvah and viewed Temple as family—and he credits his early religious practice for giving him a cultural source for many of his culinary creations. Every Jewish family has its balabusta (Yiddish for good homemaker and cook, derived from the term ba’alat babayit, meaning mistress of the house). The Arnoff family’s balabustas were his grandmothers. His mother’s mother, Davida, was known for her chopped liver and prime rib; his father’s mother, Phyllis, was known for her kreplach (dumplings). The matriarchs shared holiday duties, splitting the celebration of the holidays between the two homes. 

36

the valley table

june

august

2018

Admittedly a picky eater as a child, Arnoff says that pickiness disappeared when, as a 13-year-old, he vacationed in Italy with his grandparents. “I have a distinct memory of trying clams for the first time and how good they were,” he says. From then on, his interest in food and cooking blossomed; as a child, having full-time working parents meant he often cooked his own meals or readied dinner at home for the family. He went on to study hospitality at Boston University and wound up working with James Beard Award-winning chef Barbara Lynch, who trusted Arnoff with cooking for the opening of Sportello, her casual Italian restaurant


in Boston. His work there inspired a semester abroad at Apicius International School of Hospitality in Florence, where he learned the art of making handmade pasta and developed a deep appreciation for seasonal ingredients and regional cooking. It was “a totally different culinary experience than I found at home,” he admits. “Living in Italy was very eye opening. Between the culinary program and wandering the markets three or four days a week, I was immersed in food all the time.”  When his wife headed to grad school in Washington, DC, Arnoff went along and found himself at Michael Mina’s Bourbon Steak, a classic steakhouse in the Four Seasons Hotel. Then the food truck craze hit. Tourists and office workers alike began to flock to the mobile kitchens for affordable, quick and delicious meals. “I always wanted to be in business for myself,” Arnoff confides. “A restaurant is a lot of money and a lot of risk; a food truck was the perfect stepping stone.” With a little savings and a small loan, Arnoff’s CapMac food truck was born, and from that bright, cheesecolored Ford E250 box truck bubbled high-end macaroni and cheese, mainly for the students and residents in Georgetown. “We did a classic mac and cheese, a chicken parm-meatball dish, a beef Bolognese dish. [We] always had a few rotating mac and cheeses—a goat cheese mac and cheese, a Reuben mac and cheese with a Swiss cheese sauce and pastrami-and-rye bread crumble,” he recalls. Arnoff’s was the ninth licensed food truck in Washington, and CapMac received positive reviews. In a 2013 post in her Better than Ramen food blog, Ana Cvetkovic wrote, “CapMac is known for serving up gourmet macaroni dishes that please the palette and remind fans of mom’s cooking. CapMac definitely has a cult following.” His foray into mobile dining proved profitable and successful, but Arnoff still wanted to open a restaurant “where the food came from my own farm,” he says. “My grandfather always had a garden. I still remember when I planted a pumpkin seed, brought the plant home and mom and I planted it in grandpa’s garden.” Arnoff’s mother’s passion for farming “exploded” while he was working in Washington, and that, in turn, helped him determine the direction of his business. “‘Farm-to-table’ isn’t a catch phrase for us, it’s a reality,” he stresses. “We’ve stuck to that—we feature produce from our own family farm and work hard every day to get as many ingredients from the Hudson Valley as we possibly can.” No stranger to technology, Arnoff uses a farm-to-table app that allows chefs to instantly see what is available from local sources to assure he has access to the freshest products available. Truckload Farm and Orchard in Hyde Park, the family’s “micro farm,” encompasses only a half-acre of tilled soil, a greenhouse, an apiary and a deer fence. “We grow many ‘traditional’ garden-type items, like tomatoes, lettuce, cucumber and zucchini,” says Brian’s mother, Lisa. “However, we grow many varieties, especially types that you don’t find in the supermarket. I’ve grown as many as 14 different varieties of tomatoes and 20 different varieties of squash.”

‘Farm-to-table’ isn’t a catch phrase for us, it’s a reality.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

37


The little farm, in fact, annually produces more than 2,000 pounds of vegetables and nearly 100 pounds of honey. “Tomatoes are the most exciting,” Arnoff adds. “We grow exceptionally good tomatoes—there is nothing in the world better than a fresh tomato, right off the vine, still warm from the sun.” Kitchen Sink also sources produce from Migliorelli Farm (Tivoli), Wrights Farm (Gardiner), trout from the Beaverkill Trout Hatchery (Livingston Manor), shrimp from Eco Shrimp Garden (Newburgh) and wines from Whitecliff Vineyards (Gardiner). Arnoff emphasizes he is committed to supporting local farmers. “In the three years since we opened [Kitchen Sink], we’ve sourced local dairy, local produce, local meats, local grains. We regularly highlight local rye and corn flours, polenta, local breweries and wineries,” he says proudly. “We’re getting the highest quality ingredients from people we trust—and supporting our local community at the same time.” Arnoff says he still remembers the flavors from the kid’s table at Seder, and he readily admits that growing up Jewish had a significant effect on his culinary leanings. “I grew up eating a lot of traditional Jewish, Eastern European food— some of it comes from my family’s roots,” Arnoff admits. “The chopped liver I serve at Kitchen Sink is my grandma [Davida’s] recipe—[she] made it every year for Passover.” Some things never change: the borscht, the blintzes, the babka. The kreplach—crispy dumplings stuffed with braised brisket, onions and potatoes—have been on the menu since day one. On the other hand, it’s safe to say that the menu at Kitchen Sink is nothing if not eclectic. Chopped liver and duck leg mole coexist with spanakopita and fried chicken. The updated, modernized, localized and improved recipes have added a new perspective to some of those old tastes. Arnoff’s sweet-and-sour meatballs (in a sweetand-sour tomato sauce, served on a homemade potato-

38

the valley table

june

august

2018


and-onion knish) are an updated version of his grandpa’s meatballs (which were adapted from his mother’s recipe for stuffed cabbage). The chicken liver pâté, made with vermouth, sherry and wine reduction, comes served on a warm potato latke. (The pâté is smooth and creamy—far removed from the chunky chicken liver/hard-boiled eggs mixture now all-too common—it’s served piped onto a latke and topped with house-made apple mustard, looking not unlike a swirling, soft ice cream cone.) Regulars line up for Fried Chicken Monday—three pieces of chicken, cornbread, cole slaw, macaroni and cheese, garlic dill pickles and a brown butter sea salt cookie is the sole menu item available. It’ll set you back $15 for everything but a drink.  Beacon is a small Hudson Valley city that has grown a big reputation for excellent food, art, recreation and, well, for just being a nice place. “Beacon is a great town for food; the Dia [Art Foundation] draws tourists for art; there’s hiking and biking nearby,” Arnoff says. “Beacon has been cultivated as a great place to visit. I’m not sure what’s next, but I don’t see myself leaving any time soon. I love working with, cooking for and serving the people here.”  Kitchen Sink Food + Drink 157 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-0240; kitchensinkny.com Meyer’s Olde Dutch Food & Such 184 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-6900; meyersoldedutch.com

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

39


DRINK

by bryan miller

H

UTCH KUGEMAN, TALL AND BROAD, peers intently into a large steel kettle in which swirls an unappetizing greenish liquid with the uninviting name “wort.” This is essentially what’s left behind when malted barley is boiled and strained, before it’s fermented into beer. Observing from the sidelines on this day, talking beer talk, is brewer Scott Veltman, of Indian Ladder Farms Cidery and Brewery, in Altamont (Albany County). Kugeman and Veltman are working in a glistening, glass-enclosed brewery that sits on the Hudson River at the Culinary Institute of America, in Hyde Park, where students now study the science, technique, marketing (and quaffing) of craft beers. That the prestigious CIA, better known for its vinous education, has built a state-of-the-art brewery (with backing from Brooklyn Brewery) underscores the growing popularity and status of small-scale beer making in New York State, particularly in the Hudson Valley. The winding corridor along the Hudson River from lower Westchester to Albany could be dubbed the brewers’ Bordeaux.

42

the valley table

june

august

2018


“It’s really incredible,” says Kugeman, who has been making beer at small and medium-sized breweries for 16 years. “When I moved east in 2002, there were 38 craft breweries in New York State; we’ve just passed 400.” (The previous record was 396, in 1873.) The suds-crazed Hudson Valley is home to nearly 60 breweries turning out a kaleidoscopic array of both unique and classic beers: IPAs, porters, pale ales, stouts, sours, lagers, wild ales, Pilsners, saisons—and dozens that defy classification. In the youthful firmament of craft brewing, Kugeman is viewed as somewhat of an elder statesman. After two years as a high school teacher in North Carolina, he decided to pursue his passion for beer in Portland, Oregon, a hub of the burgeoning West Coast craft beer industry. He ran a brew pub there for three years, then rolled his kegs East, where he advanced through three highly regarded small companies: Ithaca Beer Company (Ithaca), Saranac Brewery (Utica) and the Adirondack Brewery (Lake George). Then, “When the chance to start a new brewery at the CIA came up, I jumped for it,” he recalls. Most Hudson Valley breweries are small, and most sell their wares within a 25-mile radius of the brewery. Even the valley’s largest—Captain Lawrence Brewing Company, in Elmsford (Westchester County)—has a distribution range one could cover on a bicycle. Consequently, many breweries have tap rooms and full-service restaurants, some quite stylish, adjacent to the tank room. A short list would include the Mill House Brewing Company, in Poughkeepsie, where rustic wood decor, beamed ceilings and an award-winning chef beckon serious eaters as well as serious drinkers. “The Hudson Valley is unique,” notes Paul Leone, executive director of the New York State Brewers Association. “It has everything going for it—the population is dense enough, there are lots of people who are curious about craft beer, it’s a relatively inexpensive place to do business compared to surrounding areas, and you already have the wine industry that brings in tourists.” Nonetheless, he adds, this does not mean all are profitable. For some, brewing is a labor of love, a lifestyle. Craft beer brewing is a collaborative sport. Brewers visit each other's plants, share technical notes, even hold

periodic seminars. On days he is not teaching students how to finesse the flavors in beer, Kugeman experiments with brews that, if successful, will find their way onto menus of the restaurants on campus. Today’s eccentric cast of trial ingredients comprises red chili peppers, guajillo peppers, lime zest, coriander and pink salt. “This one should come together without any one ingredient taking over,” Kugeman predicts. With the conviction of someone who has spent a lot of time around fermenting grains, he claims a two-out-of-three success rate. Like wine geeks, fervent craft beer drinkers always are looking for something new, and they’ll travel far to savor it. Consequently, brewers, like chefs, have to keep their menus creative, if not startling. Smaller breweries without large distribution demands tend to be the most daring. Rushing Duck Brewing Company, in Chester (Orange County), offers a spring brew called Bauli Saison, a new take on a classic Belgian beer jazzed up with white peppercorns, coriander and kaffir lime leaves.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

43


summer beer pairings Summertime is here and there's nothing like a refreshing cold beer. Here's just a sampling of what local craft breweries have to offer. These pair nicely with light summer fare.

BREWERY

BEER

CLASS PROJECT STAY SHARP SAISON BELGIAN FARMHOUSE ALE

Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Drive, Hyde Park (845) 452-9600 ciachef.edu

CUVÉE DE CASTLETON 8.4% ABV

Plan Bee Farm Brewery 115 Underhill Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 242-9562 planbeefarmbrewery.com

BARN BEER 5.5% ABV

Hudson Valley Brewery 2 Churchill St, Beacon (845) 218-9156 hvbrewery.com

VALLEY BEER 5% ABV

Newburgh Brewing Company 88 South Colden St, Newburgh (845) 569-2337 newburghbrewing.com

CHECKPOINT CHARLIE BERLINER WEISSE 3% ABV

Keegan Ales 20 Saint James St, Kingston (845) 331-2739 keeganales.com

the valley table

HEFEWEIZEN 5% ABV

june

august

2018

FOOD

FRUITY, LIGHT, MODERATELY TART

Seafood, roasted chicken with herbs, summer vegetable salad

COMPLEX, FRESH, FRUITY

Pasta salad, grilled summer vegetables, grilled chicken, salads with vinaigrette dressing

FRUITY, FAINTLY SMOKY, WITH LEMON AND PINE ACCENTS

Fresh cheese, fatty charcuterie, fruit

TART, BRIGHT, NUANCED

Sliced summer tomatoes with mozzarella and vinaigrette, roasted red pepper salad

LIGHT BODIED, REFRESHING WITH TART FINISH

Fish tacos, summer salad, lemon tart

HAZY, MEDIUM BODY, ACCENTS OF BANANA AND CLOVE

Shellfish (lobster and avocado salad; boiled blue crabs), beets and goat cheese salad

6.5% ABV

Captain Lawrence Brewing Company 444 Saw Mill River Rd, Elmsford (914) 741-2337 captainlawrencebrewing.com

44

FLAVOR


At Plan Bee Farm Brewery, near Poughkeepsie, owners Emily and Evan Watson are among the growing community of brewers committed to using 100 percent New Yorkgrown ingredients—”ground-to-glass” beers, as they say. Things literally are buzzing at the two-year-old brewery this summer—the yeast used for fermentation is cultivated from their own on-site honeycombs and bees. “Because we use only local ingredients, we are a little restricted as to what we can make,” Emily says. Still, Plan Bee produces a slew of brews, including Tulsi Blue (barrel-aged ale tinged with blueberries and basil) and Pitz (made with whole peaches, including the pits). For decades, New York State brewers had been hampered by Prohibition-era liquor laws that made it difficult and expensive to sell beer by the glass at the brewery. In addition to obtaining a state liquor license (with its notoriously long waiting process), owners were required to serve food. In 2012, a new state law allowed farm breweries that use a certain percentage of New York State products (mainly barley and hops) to operate without a liquor license and without having to serve food. The 2014 Craft Brewery Act extended the provisions to all breweries. Since then, the number of breweries in the state has risen by 50 percent. While the Hudson Valley craft beer business appears to be accelerating at Mach speed, some in the industry predict, to use a Wall Street euphemism, a “correction” is on the horizon. “We’re getting to the point where there are not enough people to consume all the beer,” observes Tommy Keegan, of Keegan Ales in Kingston, which produces 40 varieties of beer. “It’s very expensive to keep up, and the margins are not high.” Last year, in fact, seven local breweries closed. At the Brewers Association, Leone concurs. “New York State has recently seen the largest growth ever, with one brewery opening every five days,” he says, adding, “I would say that within a year there could be a dramatic slowdown.“ Craft beer trends in the Hudson Valley mirror those in greater New England, where the climate, geography and even taste preferences are similar. Because beer can be made and modified in a matter of weeks rather than years, variations are easier than for wine. Since beer is not pasteurized, its shelf life is only from weeks to several months. For decades, Americans preferred clear, light and minimally bitter craft beer. That eventually flipped to a preference for darker, more complex and bitter brews. About three years ago, tastes changed again, and the IPA craze was on. (IPA stands for India Pale Ale, historically favored on eighteenth-century trading ships sailing between England and India because its high hop content preserved the beer on long voyages. Today, an IPA could be loosely defined as almost anything that is hazy in the glass, bitter from extra hops, tart and high in alcohol.) “The IPA trend has been remarkable,” Kugeman says. “Just three years ago, if your beer was not crystal clear you’d think there was something wrong with it. Now it’s just the opposite.” Today, he explains, consumers are

drifting toward ”fruit-forward” brews, which helps explain the Polynesian buffet in the beer coolers: brews accented with lime, kaffir lime, papaya, mango, lychee, pineapple, lemon and more. As summer approaches, seasonal beers, sometimes called “saisons,” are proliferating. All share a light body and are relatively low in alcohol, but their flavors are all over the map: Some are flowery, others spicy; most are fruity, often tinged with a little spritz. Newburgh Brewing Company is known for its popular Checkpoint Charlie Berliner Weisse, which is light bodied and invigorating, with a sharp finish. Also coming on strong, particularly in the Hudson Valley, are sour ales. Said to be an archetype of modern beer, sours traditionally are made with wild yeast and a specific bacteria that yields a light, faintly puckery and complex character. “Sours offer the drinker a chance to experience flavors that are not typical beer flavors,” Scott Vaccaro, founder of Captain Lawrence Brewing, explains. “They can be infinitely complex and wine-like in character.” A sour may not be to everyone’s taste, but its partisans are loyal and vocal. As the industry flourishes, Kugeman says, ample job opportunities should arise in the Hudson Valley and beyond. Unless they don’t. v

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

45


EAT. LAUGH. LIVE. CLOCK TOWER GRILL

LUNCH & DINNER | 13 Craft Beers | Live Music Catering | Party Venue 512 Clock Tower Drive, Brewster, NY 10509 | (845) 582-0574 Stay in touch with special events and menus at CLOCKTOWERGRILL.COM

46

the valley table

june

august

2018




EATING BY THE SEASON

P

by robin cherry

O K E ( R H Y M E S W I T H O K AY ) I S A R A W, M A R I N AT E D fish salad similar to sashimi, fish tartare, fish carpaccio and Peruvian ceviche. Derived from the Hawaiian word meaning to cut crosswise into small pieces, poke is a ubiquitous side dish at native Hawaiian gatherings—sort of a supercool, tropical cousin to coleslaw at a rib roast. A hot, humid summer in the Hudson Valley would be a great time to become acquainted with this tropical favorite—it’s fresh, light, requires no cooking, and it can be customized about a billion different ways. Poke originated centuries ago when Hawaiian fisherman, hungry for a snack, cut some of their catch (usually reef fish) into small cubes and seasoned the raw flesh with crispy seaweed, crushed candlenuts and sea salt. Japanese immigrants introduced Hawaiians to deep-water fishing techniques by the early twentieth century, allowing ahi tuna (yellowfin) to supplant reef fish as the most popular choice for poke. The Japanese also replaced seaweed and candlenuts with soy sauce and sesame oil.

photo by leslie kenney / riverview restaurant

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

47


It’s fresh, light, requires no cooking, and it can be customized about a billion different ways.

While some Hawaiians still eat poke with seaweed and candlenuts, today, raw tuna with soy sauce, sesame oil, Maui white onions, scallions and chili peppers combine for the most popular version. Poke also may be made with octopus (raw, boiled or lightly grilled), salmon, mussels, crab or shellfish; there’s even a tofu version for vegetarians and vegans. In fact, contemporary poke may be mixed with almost anything, including avocado, pineapple, mushrooms, Sriracha sauce, fish roe, mango, wasabi, cilantro, kimchi, aioli—even truffle oil. Traditionally served as a standalone dish, mainland versions often are served in bowls over rice (known as—what else?—a poke bowl). The freshness of the fish is the top priority for successful poke—one good reason to be on intimate terms with a fishmonger. It’s also important to know the provenance of the catch—a lot of frozen tuna imported into the U.S. has been treated with carbon monoxide (CO)—a process known as “gassing fish”—so it will retain its red color. Though the FDA claims the practice is safe, Australia, Canada, Japan, Singapore and the European Union have banned CO-treated products. (Gassing preserves the fish’s color, but it doesn’t preserve flavor, texture, or the integrity of the flesh, and the process can be used to mask spoiled products.) Another major concern is that as ahi tuna gains popularity its population could drastically decrease because of overfishing (see sidebar). In Hawaii, poke often can be found in supermarkets (Foodland, for example, offers at least 13 varieties daily, and the food chain’s version has been voted Hawaii’s Best Poke eight years running.) If you can find the right ingredients, though, it’s easy and fun to make your own. Fresh fish is the most important ingredient, of course, and Al Cobb-Adams, owner of Da Poke Shack in Kailua-Kona, recommends using fatty fish— the fattier the better—to make the best-tasting poke. In addition to ahi, Cobb-Adams likes bluefin tuna, salmon and marlin. He also cautions against using anything frozen or farm-raised.

48

the valley table

june

august

2018

The size of the fish cubes that go into your poke depends on personal taste—people who love raw fish can handle big cubes; those unfamiliar with it or who are put off by a strong, fishy taste will likely prefer smaller cubes, which have a higher ratio of dressing to fish. Chef Gerard Viverito, Associate Professor in Culinary Arts at the CIA, where he teaches the Seafood Identification and Fabrication class, finds that any oily, firm fish works, though he prefers hamachi (amberjack, or Pacific yellowtail) because “its buttery texture and mild flavor pairs with anything.” He’s also been “playing around” with tank-raised steelhead grown in Greenport, which, he says, “takes to the preparation just as well.” To keep it interesting, Viverito recommends “fun” add-ins such as kimchi, shredded carrots, sliced cucumber, pickled ginger, crabmeat, furikake (a Japanese seasoning), dried seaweed and seaweed salad. The dish is gaining popularity at restaurants here, too. You could say (though we don’t recommend it) that poke is poking up throughout the valley. Inno Sushi (Mount Kisco) offers three signature poke bowls (the sashimi Bibim Bob includes salmon, tuna, carrots, cucumber, peppers, avocado and pepper sauce), and poke has been spotted at Heritage Food + Drink in Wappingers. The CIA’s Apple Pie Bakery Cafe’s new regional American menu features—you guessed it—tuna poke. At L’inizio (Ardsley), chef/owner Scott Fratangelo offered a beet poke on his Hudson Valley Restaurant Week menu. The beet cubes were a perfect substitute for tuna—so much so that “we ran a sliced version and called it sashimi,” Fratangelo says, acknowledging the almost infinite combinations poke inspires. “It’s more like a snack or a quick bite in a bowl. I do love it with most fish that you would eat raw; I also really love it with vegetables of all kinds, especially radishes,” he says. “Poke is really a dressing in my mind, so I actually apply it to everything and anything.”

photo by phil mansfield

/

the culinary institute of america


At Riverview Restaurant in Cold Spring, chef/owner Jim Ely has offered tuna poke as both a main course and a side dish for over a decade. He acknowledges that crafting the perfect poke isn’t a simple task. “It’s easy to miss the mark with a dish like this—the flavors and textures are so specific, one could possibly override another,” he notes. “We use avocados and mangos that are at the right stage of ripeness, we pick the best quality tuna, and the soy vinaigrette has to be just right and served with the perfect seaweed salad—not too soft or firm.” Once you become comfortable with poke—yours or someone else’s—it becomes a blank canvas ready for all sorts of ingredients and condiments. Numerous poke festivals and contests are now held along the West Coast, and at the 10th Annual Great Poke Contest in Hawaii (one of many such competitions on the Islands), three sisters created a Hawaii/South Carolina/Texas fusion poke that incorporated flavors from the three states—a crawfish-infused, Cajun egg roll, shrimp jambalaya poke topped with Cajun seasoning and remoulade. Girls gone wild, indeed.  v KNOW YOUR FISH California’s respected Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program (seafoodwatch.org) features downloadable, consumer-targeted, regional guides (and an iPhone app) with current information on aquatic species sustainability, as well as lists of what species to avoid purchasing because of overfishing or environment-damaging farming methods. Right now, Seafood Watch recommends avoiding ahi tuna that is longline-caught anywhere except in U.S. waters. (Longlines—a main fishing line to which shorter baited lines are attached—can catch and kill many unintended and/or endangered species.) For the time being, ahi caught by other methods are cleared. Another resource for concerned consumers is the Marine Stewardship Council (msc.org), the world’s leading certification and eco-labeling program for sustainable seafood.

photo by leslie kenney

salmon & avocado poke WALDY MALOUF APPLE PIE BAKERY CAFÉ

tuna poke JIM ELY RIVERVIEW RESTAURANT INGREDIENTS Poke 1 pound sushi-quality tuna (bluefin, never ahi), cut into bite-size cubes 1/4 cup soy vinaigrette (see recipe below) 1/4 cup chopped cilantro (optional) pinch furikake salt, finely ground pepper to taste 1 cup seaweed salad 1 mango cubed (ripe, but not mushy) 1 ripe avocado cubed Soy vinaigrette 1/4 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar 1/4 cup fish sauce (3 Crabs or Squid brands) 2 1/2 cups canola oil serves 4 METHOD Whisk all ingredients for soy vinaigrette together in a small bowl. Refrigerate until needed. 1. Place tuna chunks in a medium bowl, toss with chopped cilantro if using. 2. Add soy vinaigrette, mix gently. 3. Add a pinch or two of furikake. Add salt and pepper to taste. 4. Using a 1 1/2-inch diameter plastic or metal food tube (available at kitchen supply outlets), layer about 1/2 inch of each ingredient into the tube (in order, bottom to top): seaweed salad (can be switched with avocado for a different look); mango; tuna; avocado. Tamp down slightly to insure a nice cylinder when you remove the tube. 5. Place tubed poke on plate, gently lift off tube so cylinder stays upright. Splash with soy vinaigrette. Riverview Restaurant 45 Fair St, Cold Spring (845) 265-4778; riverviewny.com

INGREDIENTS 1 pound sashimi-grade salmon fillet, cut into small cubes 1/4 cup light soy sauce 1 teaspoon white sugar 2 teaspoon furikake or dried bonito 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 1/4 cup finely chopped red onion 1/4 cup chopped scallion half of an avocado, cubed same size as salmon freshly chopped cilantro for garnish serves 4 METHOD 1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Toss to coat well. 2. Cover tightly and chill for at least 1 hour. 3. Serve cold with white rice or toast. Garnish with chopped cilantro. Apple Pie Bakery Café The Culinary Institute of America 1946 Campus Dr, Hyde Park (845) 905-4500; applepiebakerycafe.com

hamachi poke GERARD VIVERITO CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA INGREDIENTS 1 pound sushi grade Hamachi, cut into 3/4‑inch cubes 1/4 cup ponzu sauce 1 teaspoon mirin 1 teaspoon sesame oil 3/4 teaspoon togarashi spice 1/3 cup thin-sliced green onions 1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds 2 cups arugula 1 cup diced watermelon serves 4 METHOD 1. In a medium-size bowl, combine hamachi, ponzu, mirin, sesame oil, togarashi, green onions and sesame seeds. (Once mixed with the oil, salad should be served immediately, or refrigerate covered for up to 2 hours. Stir to re-coat before serving.) 2. Place individual servings in bowls; add greens and poke to each bowl. 3. Top with cubed melon.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

49


Hudson Valley Chefs We're Local, We're Legendary

Over 200,000 customers dine out during Hudson Valley Restaurant Week. Join the region’s largest and most successful culinary event. Early registration is under way, visit: HudsonValleyRestaurantWeek.com or call: 845-765-2600

Fall HVRW: Oct 29 - Nov 11

50

the valley table

june

–

august

2018


CANTERBURY BROOK INN ZAGAT RATED “EXTRAORDINARY”

Authentic Swiss Authentic SwissCuisine Cusine $19.95 3-Course Dinner Tues–Thur Seasonal Fare Seasonal Fare 331 Main Street, Cornwall NY (845) 534-9658 www.canterburybrookinn.com HANS AND KIM BAUMANN, HOSTS RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED

Gourmet Gourmet Bakery Bakery specializing specializing in local, seasonal and in local, seasonal and gluten gluten free. free. Soup, salad and savory specials Soup, salad and savory specials daily. daily. Gourmet Bakery specializing inGourmet local, seasonal and gluten free. Bakery specializing Gourmet Bakery specializing Soup, salad and savory specials daily. Bakery specializing inGourmet local, seasonal and gluten free. in local, seasonal and gluten free. Soup, saladseasonal and savory daily. in local, and specials gluten free. Soup, salad and savory specials daily. Soup, salad and savory specials daily. june

august

2018

valleytable . com

51


Mo NOW th O er PE Ea N I rth N K ’s IN Ca GS fé TO & N! De li

Since

1978

Summer in the Hudson Valley just got SWEETER

AL FORNO PIZZA AS IT SHOULD BE A L L- I TA L I A N W I N E S G O U R M E T C H E E S E A N D M E AT P L AT T E R S S A L A D S A N D PA N I N I S

297 Main St, Beacon

52

the valley table

june

(845) 765-2909

august

2018

enotecaama.com

• Certified Organic Produce • Bulk Items • Body Care Products • Vitamins & Supplements • Homemade Desserts • Delicious Food


FA R M S , F O O D & M A R K E T S

source: nys department of agriculture

& markets

june

–

august

2018

valleytable . com

53


HUDSON VALLEY FARMERS' MARKETS 2018

Hudson Valley Farmers’ Markets

Natural, Local, Fresh, Premium Quality Dairy.

2018

COLUMBIA COUNTY Copake Hillsdale 9140 Rt 22 May 26–Oct 27; Sat 9–1 copakehillsdalefarmersmarket.com Hudson Farmers Market 6th St and Columbia May 5–Nov 17; Sat 9–1 hudsonfarmersmarketny.com Kinderhook Village Green corner Broad & Chatham St May 5–Oct 8; Sat 8:30–12:30 kinderhookfarmersmarket.com Valatie 1301 River St May 20–Sept 30; Sun 10-2 valatiefarmersmarket.com

DUTCHESS COUNTY Amenia 4988 Rt 22 Year-round; Sat 10–2 ameniafarmersmarket.com

info@hudsonvalleyfresh.com hudsonvalleyfresh.com

Arlington Vassar Alumni Lawn May 31–Oct 25; Thu 3–7 arlingtonhasit.org/happenings/farmers-market Beacon Veterans Pl between Main St and Henry May–Nov; Sun 10–3 beaconfarmersmarket.org Big Rock Community Farms 6031 Rt 82 Year-round; Mon-Thu 8am-7pm; Fri 8am-9pm; Sat-Sun 8am-7pm bigrockmarketny.com Fishkill Main St Plaza, 1004 Main St May 26–Oct 27; Thu 9–3 Hyde Park 4390 Rt 9 Jun 2–Oct 27; Sat 9–2 hydeparkfarmersmarket.org

54

the valley table

june

august

2018




FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS

SHOP FRESH

SHOP LOCAL

Millbrook 3263 Franklin Ave May 26–Oct 27; Sat 9–1 millbrooknyfarmersmarket.com Millerton 6 Duchess Ave May 5–Oct 27; Sat 9–1 millertonfarmersmarket.org Hudson Valley Farmers’ Market Greig Farm, 229 Pitcher Ln Year–round; Sat 10–3 greigfarm.com/hudson-valley-farmers-market.html

inG in

DALE 1 05 83

Sponsored by the Village of Scarsdale

Pawling Charles Colman Blvd Jun 16–Sep 29; Sat 9–1 pawlingfarmersmarket.org Poughkeepsie Waterfront Market 75 N Water St Jun 4-Oct; Mon 4-7:30 facebook.com/POKWaterfrontMarket

Sponsored by Peekskill’s Business Improvement District

Rhinebeck 61 E Market St May 13–Nov 20; Sun 10–2 rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com Taste NY Store at Todd Hill 4640 Taconic State Pkw N (Poughkeepsie) May-Oct; Fri 2–6 ccedutchess.org/taste-ny-at-todd-hill/todd-hillfarmers-market

GREENE COUNTY

Sponsored by the Woodbury Chamber of Commerce

Catskill Dutchman’s Landing Park Jun 15–Oct; Fri 4–7 catskillcommunitycenter.org/catskill-farmersmarket

ORANGE COUNTY Cornwall Town Hall lawn, 183 Main St May 23–Nov; Wed 11–5:30 cornwallny.gov/departments/farmers-market Florida 190 N Main St Jun 14–Oct 2; Tue 10–4 facebook.com/floridanyfarmersmarket Goshen Farmers Village Square; Main St and S Church May 20–Oct 28; Fri 10–5 goshennychamber.com Middletown Cottage St at Railroad Ave Jun 2–Oct 29; Sat 8–1 facebook.com/MiddletownFarmersMarket Monroe Commuter parking lot, Millpond Park Jun 5–Nov 13; Sun 9–2 villageofmonroe.org/farmersmarket.html

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

55


HUDSON VALLEY FARMERS' MARKETS 2018

Newburgh Edgewater Grill parking lot, 1 E Water St May 26-Sept 29; 8-noon Newburgh Mall Parking lot, 1401 Rt 300 Jul 7–Oct 30; Sat 11–2 facebook.com/newburghmall

Red wine. White wine. Dry wine. Sweet wine. Your wine.

Port Jervis Farmers Market Sq, corner Pike St and Hammond Jun 23–Oct 13; Sat 10–2 Pine Bush 62 Main St May 28–Oct 15; Sat 9–2 pinebushfarmersmarket.com

“We GROW Glorie Wine.”

Tuxedo Tuxedo Metro North station, 240 Rt 17 Jun 16–Oct 27; Sat 9–2 tuxedofarmersmarket.com

40 Mountain Rd. Marlboro, NY 12542 | 845.236.3265

gloriewine.com

Warwick Valley Parking lot, corner South and Bank St May 13-Nov 18; Sun 9–2 warwickvalleyfarmersmarket.org West Point Town of Highlands Municipal parking lot, West Point Highway Jun 17–Oct 28; Sun 9–2 facebook.com/West-Point-Town-of-HighlandsFarmers-Market-217461788363902/

PUTNAM COUNTY Brewster 15 Mount Ebo Rd S May–Oct; Sun 10–2, Wed 9–2 brewsterfarmersmarket.com Cold Spring Boscobel house and gardens, 1601 Rt 9D May 5–Nov; Sat 8:30–1:30 csfarmmarket.org Putnam Valley 729 Peekskill Hollow Rd Jun 29–Aug 31; Fri 3–6:30 putnamvalleyresidents.com

3074 Rte 9, Valatie, NY 12184 (518) 758-1776 • harvestspirits.com

ROCKLAND COUNTY Haverstraw Village Hall, 40 New Main St and Maple Ave Jun–Nov 19; Sun 9–1 Sterling Bank parking lot Jun–Nov 19; Wed 9-3 voh-ny.com/faq

“Biodynamic heaven!” ~ Sebastian B.

ANOTHER 5-STAR GOOGLE REVIEW!

Nyack Parking lot, Depew and S Broadway May–Nov; Thu 8–2 nyackchamber.org/category/farmers-market Piermont M&T Bank parking lot, 527 Piermont Ave Apr 22-Nov 18; Sun 9:30–3 facebook.com/DowntoEarthMarket

NEW: FRESH GROUND NUT BUTTERS | TAP KOMBUCHA | CRAFT BEER & HARD CIDER BIODYNAMIC CHEESE, YOGURT, RAW MILK | ORGANIC SOURDOUGH & YEASTED BREADS + MORE!!

Spring Valley Memorial Park, 1 Veterans Dr Jul 1–Nov 25; Wed 8:30–3

56

the valley table

june

O R G A N I C • B I O DY N A M I C ® • LO C A L • D E L I C I O U S O P E N D A I LY 7 : 3 0 A M - 7 P M • H V F S T O R E . O R G

august

2018


FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS

Visit our retail store in Central Valley, NY • Find us at a Farmers’ Market near you! Ask for us by name at your favorite restaurant!

Suffern Corner Orange Ave and Wayne May 7–Oct 29; Sat 8:30–1 suffernfarmersmarket.wordpress.com

SULLIVAN COUNTY Barryville 3385 Rt 97, behind River Market May 19–Oct 27; Sat 10–1 barryvillefarmersmarket.com

Fresh Seafood Arriving Daily • Wholesale & Retail Ask About Our Catering & Platters

Callicoon Callicoon Creek Park, Dorrer Dr May 1–Nov 13; Sun 11–2 sullivancountyfarmersmarkets.org Liberty Kansas St and Leonard May 7–Sept; Sat 7–noon historicdowntownliberty.org/farmers-market

#HudsonValleysFishMonger

HudsonValleySeafood.com • 30 Valley Ave • Central Valley, NY • 845-928-9678

“Baked & Grown, Just Like Home”

Rock Hill 223 Rock Hill Dr June 2–Sept 29; Sat 10–1 rockhillfarmersmarket.com Roscoe Niforatos Field, Rt 206 May 13–Oct 7; Sun 10–2 scva.net/business/roscoe-farmers-market

ULSTER COUNTY Ellenville Center St and Market Jun 3–Oct 28; Sun noon–4 facebook.com/barthels.farmmarket

Jones Farm & Country Store

Clearwaters Distinctive Gifts

Grandma Phoebe’s Kitchen

Clearwaters Gallery & Custom Framing

Homegrown Seasonal Produce Local & Gourmet Foods Homemade Baked Goods Fudge & Gift Baskets Breakfast & Lunch Cafe

Gardiner Gardiner Common May 30–Oct 31; Wed 3–6

Fine Gifts, Home Decor, Toys, Ladies Clothing & Accessories

Archival Framing

Artwork by Terri A. Clearwater

190 Angola Rd. Cornwall, NY 845-534-4445(P) • 845-534-4471(F) www.JonesFarmInc.com Mon & Wed - Fri: 8-6 • Sat & Sun: 8-5 Closed Tuesdays

Farm Market & Bakery Specialty Groceries Certified Organic Meats & Produce Daily Lunch Specials Family owned and organic since 1987

Organic Soils & Compost Visit our website for hours, events & specials at:

5409 Route 22 Millerton, NY 12546 518.789.4191

mcenroeorganicfarm.com

Kingston Wall St between Main St and John May 12–Nov 17; Sat 9–2 kingstonfarmersmarket.org Kingston YMCA Farm Project, 507 Broadway Jun 7-Nov 1; Thu 3:30-6 kingstonymcafarmproject.org Milton Cluett Schantz Park, 1801–1805 Rt 9W Jun 23–Oct 31; Sat 9–2 hhvfarmersmarket.com Rosendale 408 Main St behind Rosendale Theatre Jun–Oct; Sun 10–2 rosendalefarmersmarketny.com Saugerties 115 Main St May 26-Oct 31; Sat 10–2 saugertiesfarmersmarket.com Woodstock 6 Maple Ln May 30–Oct 17; Wed 3:30–dusk woodstockfarmfestival.com

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

57


HUDSON VALLEY FARMERS' MARKETS 2018

WESTCHESTER COUNTY

The New Corn Crib Greenhouse

Bronxville Stone Place at Paxton Ave May 13–Nov 18; Sat 8:30–1 bronxvillefarmersmarket.com

200 Salt Point Tnpk, Poughkeepsie | (845) 471-5956 | thenewcorncribgreenhouse.com

Starting May 18: Sun-Wed 9-5, Thurs-Sat 9-7

Cortlandt 2267 Crompond Rd Apr–Dec; daily 7am-close (call 917-739-0686 for closing time) cortlandtfarmmarket.com

Seasonal Favorites • Annuals • Perennials • Vegetables • Trees • Shrubs Gardening Supplies • Pottery • Fairy Garden Supplies • Gift Merchandise • And More! Bring your questions and ideas. One of our gardening experts can help.

Chappaqua Allen Pl Metro North Station May 12–Nov 18; Sat 8:30–1 chappaquafarmersmarket.org Croton-on-Hudson Municipal Plaza parking lot May-Nov, Sun 9–2 downtoearthmarkets.com

 Visit Our Facebook Page: New Corn Crib Greenhouse We Accept Credit Cards    

Hartsdale E Hartsdale Ave Metro North station Jun–Nov; Sat 8–4

Join us for our 27th season of Catskills foods and crafts from your favorite farmers and artisans.

Hastings 7 Maple Ave Jun 2–Nov; Sat 8:30–1:30 hastingsfarmersmarket.org

Thank you for buying local and see you at the Round Barn!

Irvington Main St school parking lot May–Nov 18; Sun 9–1:30 irvmkt.org

Saturdays from 9AM to 2PM Mid May to Mid October

Katonah John Jay Homestead, 400 Jay St May 12–Oct 27; Sat 10–2 johnjayhomestead.org

Round Barn of Halcottsville Route 30 4 miles North of Margaretville & Arkville

Katonah Muscoot Farm, 51 Rt 100 May 12–Oct 27; Sat 10–2 muscootfarm.org

(845) 586-3326 roundbarnmarket.org

Larchmont Chatsworth Ave Metro North parking deck Apr–Dec; Sat 8:30–1 downtoearthmarkets.com New Rochelle Huguenot Park in front of New Rochelle HS Jun–Nov; Fri 8:30–2:30 downtoearthmarkets.com New Rochelle Downtown 1 Library Plaza June 2–Oct27; Sat 9–2 newrochellegrandmarket.com Ossining Corner Spring St and Main May-December; Sat 8:30-1 downtoearthmarkets.com Peekskill Bank St between Park St and Main Apr 21–Nov 17; Sat 8–2 peekskillfarmersmarket.com

58

the valley table

june

august

2018


FARMS, FOOD & MARKETS

Pleasantville Memorial Plaza next to Metro North station April 7–Nov 17; Sat 8:30–1 pleasantvillefarmersmarket.org Pound Ridge 22 Westchester Ave Sat year-round; hours by appt (914) 764-3006 facebook.com/PoundRidgeOrganics Rye Theodore Fremd Ave parking lot May 21–Dec 3; Sun 8:30–2 downtoearthmarkets.com Scarsdale Boniface Circle Apr 5-Nov 15; Thu 11-5 South Salem 1202 Rt 35 Year-round; Sat 9-2 gossettbrothers.com/wp/farmers-market

Where New York Agriculture Tastes Delicious

Tarrytown/Sleepy Hollow Patriots Park, N Broadway May 26–Nov 22; Sat 8:30–2 tashfarmersmarket.org White Plains Court St between Martine Ave and Main St Apr 25–Sept 26; Wed 8–4 cityofwhiteplains.com

Mon, Wed, Thu and Sat: 8AM–6PM Fri: 8AM–8PM and Sun: 9AM–7PM, Closed Tue

Yonkers Historic site park across from Metro North train station Jun 2–Oct 27; Fri 10–4 groundworkhv.org

Outdoor Farmers' Market Fridays: May 25 - Oct 13, 2PM–6PM

Updates: valleytable.com

Taconic Pkwy, 10 miles north of I-84 1 mile south of Route 55

@TasteNYTaconic tastenytoddhill.com | 845-849-0247

Angus Beef, Poultry, Pork, Lamb, Turkeys

Naturally Raised Seasonal Produce

Visit our Farm Market 1697 Salt Point Turnpike • Salt Point, NY 12578 266-5042 or 266-3680

www.HahnFarm.com june

august

2018

valleytable . com

59


Whole sale fruit & Produce

Where quality rules, local comes first and taste matters 217 UPPER NORTH ROAD, HIGHLAND • 845.691.7428 • FAX 845.691.7468 60

the valley table

june

august

2018


L O C A L LY G R O W N

land long white cloud text and photos by keith stewart

june

–

august

2018

valleytable . com

61


I

GREW UP IN NEW ZEALAND, WHICH is about as far from New York as you can get, unless you’re a penguin coming up from Antarctica. When done with college, I eagerly set out to see the world—I assumed, as did those who knew me, that I’d return home once I’d had my fill of adventure in far-away lands. That was 52 years ago. As happens, one thing led to another and another, and gradually the places and people of my youth slipped into the past. Somewhere along the way, without much fanfare, I became an American citizen and, rather unexpectedly, a farmer. In February, my wife Flavia and I took a long-overdue trip to the land of my birth to revisit my two sisters, their families and a few remaining old friends. I also wanted to soak up as much of New Zealand’s personality and impressive landscape as I could—more than a vacation, our month-long trip was a pilgrimage of sorts, with a valedictory undertone. New Zealand’s indigenous Maori people called their home Aotearoa (The Land of the Long White Cloud). It’s a fitting name: The country is made up of two main, elongated islands oriented north-south, that stretch about a thousand miles. Both islands are dominated by high mountain ranges over which white clouds often lie. Modern New Zealand has become a very different place from the somewhat old-fashioned, largely Anglo/Irish/ Scottish middle-class British Commonwealth backwater I grew up in. Today, one gets the impression that it’s a vibrant young country on the move, culturally and ethnically diverse, pleasantly civilized, open-minded, quite tech-savvy and, above all, comfortable in its own skin. The new prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, is 37 years old. Meals in New Zealand used to be very much in the English mold: meat (usually lamb), potatoes and an overcooked vegetable. Spices were limited to salt and pepper. Today, even in mid-sized towns, you might have a choice of Indian, Chinese, Malaysian, Middle Eastern or other cuisine at any number of restaurants, all operated by recent immigrants from those parts of the world. As for “fast food,” the country now has its share of McDonald’s and KFCs, too. (If you must have fast food, the fish and chips are still the best. Or perhaps a hearty meat pie.) Agriculture remains the country’s dominant industry. There still are a lot of sheep (30 million of them, though that’s only half as many as there used to be), but now there are 6.5 million cows (many more than there used to be). New Zealand is the world’s largest exporter of dairy products, lamb and mutton. Beef, wine, wool, avocados, kiwi and other sub-tropical fruits also loom large on the country’s agricultural menu. All of them fuel economic growth.

62

the valley table

june

august

2018

It rarely snows in New Zealand, except in the mountains, and in most areas, adequate rainfall allows for year-round grazing of sheep and cattle. (If you ask someone if the meat on your plate is from grass-fed animals, a New Zealander will tell you disdainfully, “Everything’s grass-fed here.”) My sister lives in the Bay of Plenty, half-way up the Pacific coast of the North Island. The region features beautiful, sandy beaches and a sunny, warm climate that attracts tourists from all over the world. It is known for its geothermal energy and thriving agriculture and forestry industries. We stayed in a town called Te Puke, which promotes itself as the “Kiwi fruit capital of New Zealand.” Nationally, kiwi fruit (in my youth called Chinese gooseberries; some marketing genius came up with their current name) bring in the equivalent of $3 to $4 billion US annually. Most of them are shipped to China, Taiwan and Japan, though some make it to America. The roads in the Bay of Plenty wind through many miles of kiwi orchards, impressively trellised and protected—and weed-free. It was dismaying to see the numerous signs alerting the public to herbicide and pesticide spraying schedules, and it didn’t seem to be a coincidence that, in this otherwise photogenic and pristine environment, there were virtually no birds (or insects, for that matter).


It was the same story in some other parts of New Zealand. In the Marlboro area, we encountered vast plantings of glistening and spotless grapes—but nary a bird or bug to be found. No doubt, things are much the same in Southern California, in the Napa Valley and in the vast corn and soybean deserts of our Midwest, as well as in many other parts of the world that practice intensive, chemicaldependent monoculture. Apparently, export markets require flawless products, at least in appearance, and are unconcerned about the environmental costs and harmful effects spray residues can have. As a young, progressive country with a “cleanand-green” image, not to embrace a more environmentally friendly agricultural model seems like a lost opportunity. How far down this path can New Zealand and other chemically driven food-producing nations go without seriously (perhaps even permanently) degrading their soil, water and biotic base? There are some bright spots on the horizon, however. A small but growing number of New Zealand farmers recognize the need to reduce chemical use and take better care of their land. We visited a few of them. Graham Reid, an organic farmer near the Bay of Plenty, grows grapes, avocados, feijoas (an egg-shaped fruit with a creamy, jelly like flesh that tastes of guava, pineapple and strawberry) and tamarillos on some 25 acres. When we visited him, Reid had just discovered a mealy bug infestation in his almost-ready-to-harvest grapes. He was distraught, but as we chatted, he became philosophical (a temperamental necessity for organic growers). Reid also manages a small herd of beef cattle and offers a get-away-from-it-all glamping experience for

The organic movement in New Zealand is patchy at best, and in many instances woefully underdeveloped.

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

63


tourists. Glamping, we learned, is a newly coined term for “glamorous” or “luxury” camping. Billed as a “romantic retreat” for couples who like to hang out under canvas, Reid’s spacious tent accommodations feature “essential amenities” such as a generous bed, hammock for two, rustic furniture, barbecue pit, outdoor bathtub and ample privacy—and an assurance that no chemical pesticides are used on the grapes and avocados growing a few hundred feet away. (oldcoachoasisglamping.com) We then visited Jeneraytions Farm, an organic farm run by Ray and Jen Ridings, their son Grant, and his American wife, Jayme. The day we showed up, the Ridings were hosting a get-together and information-sharing session for a couple of dozen other organic dairy farmers, most of whom belong to the recently formed Organic Dairy Hub New Zealand cooperative. Dairy is big business in New Zealand. Fonterra, the country’s largest company, is a multinational dairy cooperative owned by some 10,000 New Zealand farmers. Fonterra’s focus is on conventional dairy farming, and it is responsible for 30 percent of the world’s dairy exports, with annual revenue in excess of $12 billion US. But all those cows take a toll on the land, and the enormous amount of manure produced inevitably finds its way into rural streams and rivers. The result is a growing water pollution problem. Because the company in recent years has become less willing to accommodate organic farmers (in many instances leaving them without milk contracts), the Organic Dairy Hub was formed to bypass Fonterra and build market channels for farmers committed to organic methods. It’s a small entity compared with Fonterra, but it is growing: In 2015, there were 80 organic dairy farms in the co-op; by 2017, the number had jumped to 145. While at Jeneraytions Farm, we learned about challenges facing farmers who have sworn off chemicals—things like animal health, pasture management, soil fertility—and how New Zealand farmers are facing those challenges. For example, though stocking rates (the number of cows allotted per acre) vary from farm to farm depending on soil and climactic conditions, rates on organic dairies are invariably lower than those on their conventional counterparts. Lower stocking rates means fewer cows, but it also means less water pollution and a lighter environmental footprint. In the Wairarapa region (an hour or so north of Wellington, the nation’s capital), we met with Jeremy Howden, a successful and long-time grower of organic vegetables. In 2015, Howden sold his business to the Canadian movie director James Cameron (Titanic, Aliens, Avatar, etc.), who has a strong interest in organic farming and has purchased several thousand acres in the Wairarapa. Howden believes the export and domestic markets for organic products from New Zealand have great, untapped potential, yet he also laments that the organic movement in New Zealand is patchy, at best, and in many instances woefully undeveloped. Almost all the best cropland, he says, is under chemical management. The country has

64

the valley table

june

august

2018

very few local farmers’ markets, and CSAs are virtually unknown. (In the city of Whanganui, where my father was born, we did find an open air market with a stand selling “organic garlic.”) Organic products that do exist are sold mostly through health food stores rather than supermarkets. Howden thinks what the country needs is “new blood” to usher in a more sustainable food system. He’s hoping for a little help from the government, which thus far has been unwilling to challenge the status quo. On the long flight back from Auckland to New York, there was much to digest. The land of my youth is still a remarkable place and it has come a long way in my lifetime. It is inclusive, practical, energetic and dynamic. It is also captive to a global, extractive model reminiscent of colonial times and characterized by intensive production and export of earth-based resources. This model produces wealth (at least for some) and a degree of well being, though it simultaneously undermines the land itself and its ecological underpinning. To sleep well at night, I have to believe that the Land of the Long White Cloud, like much of this precious planet, is waiting for a new, more holistic and life-affirming model to be born. 


by jeff storey photos by keith stewart

G R I C U LT U R E I S G E T T I N G A N A D D E D D I M E N S I O N

in the Hudson Valley as farmers gear up to harvest a new crop: power from the sun. “Solar farms”—arrays of photovoltaic cells designed to supply electricity for communities—are beginning to dot the landscape. These fields of solar panels, sited on leased farmland, provide income for farmers and potential savings on electric bills for some consumers, but there are concerns that solar farms could pose a threat to prime agricultural land if carelessly sited. “This may be broadening the definition of ‘farming,’ but it is farming—we’re just farming the sun,” Rich Winter, CEO of Delaware River Solar, told Ithaca.com in a 2017 interview. Simplifying the economics, he explained, “If a guy takes 10 acres for solar and farms the other 60 around it, that potentially [is] more productive than [planting] the 10 acres in hay or whatever they are growing.”

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

65


There is a real frustration that these projects are called ‘farms’ at all, particularly when they often result in farmland going out of production ...

66

the valley table

june

august

2018

In March, Delaware River Solar completed installation of New York State’s largest solar farm to date—9,800 panels with a 2.7 megawatt capacity—on Winter’s own land in Callicoon (Sullivan County). The project, already at full capacity, will reduce energy bills for 350 nearby households and small businesses, Winter says. In May, NRG Community Solar, an offshoot of NRG Energy, a Texas-based megacompany and one of the largest independent energy producers in the country, was ready to cut the ribbon for a 32-acre solar farm in the Orange County Town of Minisink. Its 16,000 panels will produce 5.29 megawatts of electricity. The company reportedly has six more solar farms under development in the region, at an average cost of $6 million each. The economics of the community solar model are plain, but not simple. The landowner receives lease payments from the solar farm developer for use of the land (usually 8 to 40 acres), and the electricity generated by the solar farm is delivered directly to an existing utility grid. Consumers who are linked to that grid can opt to pay a monthly fee (a “subscription”) to the solar farm and then receive credits on their electric bills based on the amount of their subscription, the amount of energy produced by the farm and their own energy usage. Subscribers are likely to see some reduction in their electric bill, though the monthly credits are variable and savings are not guaranteed. Developers are responsible for decommissioning the arrays when leases expire and returning the land to the condition they found it, presumably suitable for resumed farming. Though most solar companies lease land, Boston-based Nexamp, Inc., has purchased acreage in Orange and Dutchess


... but where they are wellsited to complement a farm operation, solar installations can be a real financial benefit to the farmer. —David Church Orange County Planning Commissioner

Counties for solar installations, according to Eric Misbach, Nexamp’s Manager of Community Solar Operations. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, which provides financial incentives and technical assistance to developers and communities through its NY-Sun program, lists 14 operational community solar projects around the state, with a combined capacity of 6.7 megawatts. An additional 256 projects, with a projected total capacity of 785 megawatts, are in the planning stages. NY-Sun director David Sandbank notes, “Over the next two years, we expect to see a significant portion of community solar projects that are currently being supported through NY-Sun to be completed.” Orange County leads the state with 33 solar farm proposals, a reflection of the amount of land near power lines available for rent, its proximity to New York City and its relatively high electric rates. There are 21 proposed projects in Ulster County, 20 in Sullivan, 11 in Dutchess and 7 in Greene. Central Hudson Gas and Electric, which services more than 300,000 customers in the central Hudson Valley from Coeymans (Albany County) to Highlands (Orange County) has received applications for 80 community solar projects. Orange and Rockland Utilities, which serves 305,000 electric customers, primarily in Rockland, western Orange and southern Sullivan Counties, is holding 64 applications. Community solar is a relatively new development in the expanding field of clean energy generation. Since July 2015, the state has allowed homeowners, renters, businesses and schools to share a single renewable energy source, stimulating interest in larger, community solar

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

67


projects. Utilizing current technology, about 6 acres of solar arrays will produce 1 megawatt. For comparison, a rooftop solar facility in Kingston operated by Heritage Solar and Ryan Insurance produces 166.5 kilowatts, or less than .2 megawatts. Jeff Irish, co-founder of Hudson Solar, in Rhinebeck, says that 75 percent of his potential customers for rooftop solar could not be accommodated due to the location of their house or the physical arrangement of their roof. He recently signed up 40 households, small businesses and residential tenants to partner in the purchase of the panels for a 214-kilowatt solar farm on a one-acre vacant field in Clermont owned by a local landscaper. Irish said that he prefers this type of smaller installation and is searching for additional sites. Most of the solar farm projects proposed for the Hudson Valley have a capacity of around two megawatts. But the state recently injected $1.4 billion into 26 utility-scale projects—22 of them large solar farms, including sites in Orange, Ulster, Columbia and Greene Counties. The projects are in part a response to a mandate set by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo that 50 percent of the state’s electricity should come from renewable energy sources by 2030. According to the US Department of Energy, current annual New York State usage is about 149 gigawatts; as of March 2018, solar generation had reached 1 gigawatt; NY-Sun promises 3 gigawatts by 2023. After the state’s approval of the community solar model, local farmers were flooded with lease offers, and local officials were caught by surprise. Some jurisdictions declared a moratorium on solar projects and rewrote zoning laws to facilitate the review of proposals. Objections were raised in some communities about the proximity of the panels to homes. Utilities, too, have had to make adjustments. “Too much generation can overload the wires and equipment, so there can be limitations on how many can be installed in any given area,” says Central Hudson spokesman John Maserjian. “We’re working with developers to help

68

the valley table

june

august

2018

identify areas that are most suitable, and we’re investing in our electric system so that we can better accommodate these systems.” Farmers have largely welcomed the opportunity to add to their incomes without increasing their costs, although some balk at calling the projects “farms.” Orrin Pierson, whose family has farmed land outside Middletown since 1790, said during a 2016 Mount Hope Town Board meeting (at which his now-under construction solar farm proposal was reviewed) that he wanted to “perpetuate” the land where he was born and raised and his parents were buried. “I am never going to have to sell any more land,” Pierson told the board. “I will be able to farm and the view around there will always be the same.” After an arduous review, Borrego Solar is constructing a 5.6-megawatt solar farm on 25 acres leased from Pierson. The system, with a life span of 25 to 40 years, will serve 1,200 customers. At Athanas Farm in Hyde Park, farmer Mike Athanas struggles to earn a profit from the sale of the fruits and vegetables he grows. He finished last year $5,000 in the red. “There’s no farm up here that’s living high on the hog,” he says. That’s why Athanas was happy to lease land he wasn’t tilling to Omni Navitas, a Boston-based solar energy development group, for two solar farms supplying 900 residential customers. Construction is scheduled to begin in the fall, and Omni Navitas is prospecting for sites for other projects in the region. Local planners, the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets and Scenic Hudson all have urged municipalities to discourage the placement of solar farms on valuable agricultural land. Orange County has estimated that 514 acres (out of a total of 88,000 acres of farmland) would be used by 33 solar projects it has reviewed. The Orange County Agriculture and Farmland Protection Board recently “strongly advised municipalities to avoid siting solar panels or solar ‘farms’ on soils that are designated prime agricultural soils or are of statewide significance... such solar facilities should be sited on soils less desirable


Delaware River Solar plans to experiment raising lambs at its Callicoon solar farm ... Cypress Creek Renewables has promised that all its solar farms will include habitat suitable for bees and other vital pollinators.

for production agriculture.” Montgomery farmer and Board Chair Jack Hoeffner noted, “Every farm has marginal ground” on which solar arrays can be installed. Proponents claim that solar arrays not only may be harmonious and consistent with agricultural uses, they may even enhance some farming practices. If the supporting poles are raised to the correct height and the panels are protected, for example, animals could continue to graze and live in the fields. Delaware River Solar plans to experiment raising lambs at its Callicoon solar farm, and the Piersons intend to use sheep to cut the grass under the array on their farm. Cypress Creek Renewables, which plans to install solar arrays throughout New York State to generate 750 megawatts at a cost of $500 million, has promised that all its solar farms will include habitat suitable for bees and other vital pollinators. The “pollinator friendly” Underhill solar farm near Poughkeepsie, currently under construction, is one of the first to incorporate the habitat, which scores 90 or better on a “pollinator-friendly scorecard” developed by the University of Vermont’s Gund Institute for Ecological Economics. A similar Cyprus Creek installation helps power the National Geographic Society’s headquarters in Thurmont, Maryland. Orange County Planning Commissioner David Church is cautiously optimistic about the future of solar farms in the region. “In my conversations with farmers and other interests, there is a real frustration that these projects are called ‘farms’ at all, particularly when they often result in farmland going out of production,” Church warns. “But where they are wellsited to complement a farm operation, solar installations can be a real financial benefit to the farmer.” “It’s a great deal,” Athanas says. “I feel like the Johnny Appleseed of solar power.” v june

august

2018

valleytable . com

69


I N D E X T O A DV E R T I S E R S

page

page

12 Adams Fairacre Farms / adamsfarms.com

57 Jones Farm / 845.534.4445 / jonesfarminc.com

32 Aroma Osteria / 845.298.6790 / aromaosteriarestaurant.com

73 Judelson, Giordano & Siegel, CPA, PC / 877.740.9500 / jgspc.com

10 Baja 328 / 845.838.BAJA / baja328.com

71 Leo’s Ristorante & Bar / leospizzeria.com

54 Beacon Farmers Market / 845.765.8440 / beaconfarmersmarket.org

11 Lola’s Café / 845.255.6555 / 845.471.8555 / lolascafeandcatering.com

50 Beacon Natural Market / 845.838.1288 / beaconnaturalmarket.com

59 Lowland Farm / 845.461.3459 / lowlandfarm.com

34 Beacon Pantry / 845.440.8923 / beaconpantry.com

57 McEnroe Organic Farm / 518.789.4191 / mcenroeorganicfarm.com

19 Black Dirt Distillery / 845.258.6020 / blackdirtdistillery.com 50 Boutique Wine & Spirits / 845.765.1555 / boutiquewsc.com 2 Brother’s Trattoria / 845.383.3300 / brotherstrattoria.com

3 Mercedes-Benz of Wappingers Falls / 845.298.0600 / mercedesbenzofwappingersfalls.com 33 Meyer’s Olde Dutch / 845.440.6900 / meyersoldedutch.com 77 Milea Estate Vineyard / 845.264.0403 / mileaestatevineyard.com

46 Buttermilk Falls / 845.795.1310 / buttermilkfallsinn.com

52 Mother Earth’s / motherearthstorehouse.com

52 Café Amarcord / 845.440.0050 / cafeamarcord.com

10 N&S Supply / nssupply.com

77 Caffe Macchiato / 845.565.4616 / 99libertystreet.com

C2-1 NRG Community Solar / 855.783.6112 / nrgcommunitysolar.com

51 Canterbury Brook Inn / 845.534.9658 / canterburybrookinn.com

58 New Corn Crib Greenhouse / 845.471.5956 / thenewcorncribgreenhouse.com

46 Clock Tower Grill / 845.582.0574 / clocktowergrill.com

60 Niche Modern / 212.777.2101 / nichemodern.com

C4 Cosimo’s / cosimosrestaurantgroup.com

34 Nina / 845.344.6800 / nina-restaurant.com

34 Craft 47 / 845.360.5253 / craft47.com 20 Creatives MX / creativesmx.com

40-41 Orange County Land Trust / 845.534.3690 / oclt.org 58 Pakatakan Farmers’ Market / 845.586.33.26 / roundbarnmarket.org

2 Culinary Institute of America / 845.471.6608 / ciarestaurants.com

21 Pamal Broadcasting / pamal.com

C3 Daily Planet Diner / 845.452.0110 / dailyplanetdiner.com

33 Paula’s Public House / 845.454.7821 / paulaspublichouse.com

51 Dottie Audrey’s / 845.915.3088 / dottieaudreys.com

59 Pawling Farmers Market / pawlingfarmersmarket.org

20 Dubrovnik / 914.637.3777 / dubrovnikny.com

77 Powerhouse Theater / 845.437.5907 / powerhouse.vassar.edu

51 Ella’s Bellas / 845.765.8502 / ellasbellasbeacon.com

60 Red Barn Produce / 845.691.7428 / redbarnproduceny.com

52 Enoteca AMA / 845.765.2909 / enotecaama.com

C3 Red Line Diner / 845.765.8401 / dineatredline.com

51 Exposures Gallery / 845.469.9382 / exposures.com

73 The Roundhouse / 845.765.8369 / roundhousebeacon.com

55 Fishkill Farms / 845.897.4377 / fishkillfarms.com

4 Stewart International Airport / swfny.com

73 Gino’s Restaurant / 845.297.8061 / ginoswappingers.com

77 Storm King Arts Center / stormkingsummersolstice.org

56 Glorie Farm Winery / 845.236.3265 / gloriewine.com

58 Stoutridge Vineyard / 845.236.7620 / stoutridge.com

71 The Greens at Copake Country Club / 518.352.0019 / copakecountryclub.com

79 Sunflower Natural Foods Market / 845.679.5361 / sunflowernatural.com

59 Hahn Farm / 845.266.3680 / hahnfarm.com

C3 Table Talk Diner / 845.849.2839 / tabletalkdiner.com

56 Harvest Spirits / 518.758.1776 / harvestspirits.com

59 TasteNY Store at Todd Hill / 845.849.0247 taste.ny.gov

56 Hawthorne Valley Farm / 518.672.7500 / hawthornevalleyfarm.org

71 Terrapin Restaurant / 845.876.3330 / terrapinrestaurant.com

22 Henry’s at the Farm / 845.795.1500 / buttermilkfallsinn.com/henrys

21 Ulster County Tourism / 800.342.5826 / ulstercountyalive.com

54 Hudson Valley Fresh / 845.226.3065 / hudsonvalleyfresh.com

55 Village Green Farmers Markest / villagegreenfarmersmarkets.com

57 Hudson Valley Seafood / 845. 928.9678 / hudsonvalleyseafood.com 7 Hudson Whiskey / hudsonwhiskey.com

9, 33 Warren Kitchen & Cutlery / 845.876.6208 / warrenkitchentools.com 59 Whitecliff Vineyard / 845.255.4613 / whitecliffwine.com

79 Hyde Park Brewing Company / 845.229.8277 / hydeparkbrewing.com

79 Wildfire Grill / 845.457.3770 / wildfireny.com

22 Il Barilotto / 845.897.4300 / ilbarilottorestaurant.com

79 WM Farmer & Sons / 518.828.1635 / wmfarmerandsons.com

32 Jacobowitz & Gubits / 866.993.7575 / jacobowitz.com

70

the valley table

june

august

2018

3 Williams Lumber & Home Center / 845.876.WOOD / williamslumber.com


NOW OFFERING

ONLINE ORDERING!

2017 HUDSON VALLEY PIZZA FEST: BEST OVERALL PIZZA WINNER

JOIN US! All You Can Eat Pasta Night Cornwall: Mondays Wappinger’s Falls: Tuesday Newburgh: Wednesday Wine & Dine Thursday Nights All Three Locations Sign up for Leo’s Loyalty Program and start saving!

Newburgh

Mon-Sat 11-9:30 | Sun 12-8 Newburgh Towne Center 1431 Route 300 (845) 564-3446

Wappinger’s Falls

Mon-Sat 11-10 | Sun 12-8 Stadium Plaza 1475 Route 9D (845) 838-3446

Cornwall

Mon-Sat 11-10 | Sun 2-9 Cornwall Plaza 23 Quaker Ave (845) 534-3446

Download the Leo’s App!  Find us on Facebook!

LEOSPIZZERIA.COM june

august

2018

valleytable . com

71


D I R E C T O RY ELLA’S BELLAS

AC C O M M O DAT I O N S

WILLIAM FARMER & SONS 20 S Front St, Hudson (518) 828-1635; wmfarmerandsons.com William Farmer & Sons renovated a historic boarding house in downtown Hudson and imbues it with a spirit of hospitality to provide a unique place to stay, a mercantile, a bar and a restaurant. “Stay happy. Enjoy craft cocktails and a gratifying meal.”

418–420 Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8502 Mon & Wed 8–5; Thu–Sat 8–7; Sun 9–4; closed Tue Ella’s Bellas believes that an indulgence should taste like an indulgence regardless of our dietary restrictions. We specialize in glutenfree products, but we promise you won’t know the difference.

NICHE BEER & BREWERIES

ART

HYDE PARK BREWING EXPOSURES GALLERY 1357 Kings Hwy, Sugar Loaf (845) 469-9382; exposures.com Beautiful art for fine homes, corporate offices and healthcare spaces from internationally recognized and the Hudson Valley’s preeminent landscape photographer, Nick Zungoli.

4076 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park (845) 229-8277; hydeparkbrewing.com Mon–Tue 4–10; Wed–Thu 11–10; Fri–Sat 11–12; Sun 11–9 “Anytime is a good time for a beer” at the Hyde Park Brewing Company. Offering a vast menu of fresh cuisine with an emphasis on seasonal, local, and fresh ingredients.

NEWBURGH ART SUPPLY 5 Grand St, Newburgh (845) 561-5552; newburghartsupply.com Mon-Thur 10-6; Fri 11-7; Sat 10-6; Closed Sun Experience quality art materials in a restored landmark in the heart of downtown Newburgh. Your local source for essential creative supplies for the student, professional and enthusiast. 10 years of service! Join us Sept. 29 & 30 for Newburgh Open Studios. BAKERIES

THE ALTERNATIVE BAKER 407 Main St, Rosendale (845) 658–3355; lemoncakes.com Sun, Mon, Thu 7–5; Fri & Sat 7–7:30; Closed Tue & Wed Celebrating 20 years of small-batch, 100 percent handmade all-butter baked goods. Offering gluten-free and allergy-friendly options, the bakery offers breakfast sandwiches; Harney Teas and JB Peel coffees (hot or iced); awardwinning Belgian hot chocolate (hot or frozen); a seasonally-changing dessert menu and special occasion cakes, including weddings and birthdays. “Worth a detour”—New York Times

C AT E R I N G

TERRAPIN RESTAURANT CATERING & EVENTS 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 889-8831; terrapincatering.com Enjoy the same high-quality ingredients and service that you know at Terrapin Restaurant anywhere in the Hudson Valley. Catering events of all types and sizes, Terrapin prepares custom menus for every event, using local, organic ingredients whenever possible. Contact Catering Director Hugh Piney. DINERS

DAILY PLANET 1202 Rt 55, Lagrangeville (845) 452-0110; dailyplanetdiner.com

588 Rt 9, Fishkill (845) 765-8401; dineatredline.com

the valley table

june

august

2018

WILLIAMS LUMBER 6760 Rt 9, Rhinebeck; (845) 876-9663 34 Blommer Rd, Tannersvile; (518) 589-5200 2424 Rt 44, Pleasant Valley; (845) 605-3520 908 Rt 82, Hopewell Junction; (845) 221-2751 9-11 E Market St, Red Hook; (845) 758-5615 317 Kyserike Rd, High Falls; (845) 687-7676 3679 Rt 9, Hudson; (518) 851-3641 4246 Albany Post Rd, Hyde Park; (845) 698-1004 williamslumber.com The largest independent home center in the area. KITCHEN

WARREN KITCHEN & CUTLERY 6934 Rt 9, Rhinebeck (845) 876-6208; warrenkitchentools.com Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30; Sun 11–4:30 The Hudson Valley’s complete source for professional kitchen knives and tools, commercial quality cookware, bakeware, pocketknives and woodcarving tools. We stock the largest selection of name-brand cutlery in the region at prices well below retail. Knife sets, knife blocks and carving boards. Professional knife sharpening while you wait. MARKETS

ADAMS FAIRACRE FARMS TABLE TALK DINER 2519 South Rd (Rt 9), Poughkeepsie (845) 849-2839; tabletalkdiner.com HOME

JP MCHALE PEST MANAGEMENT (800) 479-2284; nopests.com Serving commercial and residential customers for over 40 years.

N&S SUPPLY, INC. 205 Old Rt 9, Fishkill

72

(212) 777-2101 nichemodern.com Handmade Luxury Lighting. Designed in Beacon, NY.

RED LINE DINER

DOTTIE AUDREY’S BAKERY KITCHEN 549 Rt 17, Tuxedo Park (845) 915-3088; dottieaudreys.com Mon–Fri 7–6; Sat 8–6; Sun 8–4 A welcoming roadside eatery and bakery offering scratch-made, comfort food. Slowrise, freshly baked breads, scones, pastries. Breakfast, lunch, catering and prepared foods to go.

(845) 896-6291; nssupply.com Your one-stop resource for all plumbing, heating and HVAC needs, including specialty products designed and manufactured to meet your lifestyle needs; the latest innovative products, including cutting-edge bathroom technology from remote flushing toilets to hands-free faucets. Six locations: Fishkill, Brewster, Kingston, Catskill, Hudson and Danbury.

1560 Ulster Ave, Kingston; (845) 336-6300 1240 Rt 300, Newburgh; (845) 569-0303 765 Dutchess Tnpk, Poughkeepsie; (845) 454-4330 160 Old Post Rd, Wappinger; (845) 632-9955 adamsfarms.com Open daily A family-owned farm market/garden center. A cornucopia of fresh produce, meats, fish, deli, and prepared foods. Featuring Hudson Valley products, a great selection of the best local cheese, meat, produce and more.


june

–

august

2018

valleytable . com

73


BEACON PANTRY 382 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-8923; beaconpantry.com Market: Mon–Sat 9–8; Sun 9–6 Café: Mon–Wed 8–5; Thu–Sun 8–9 Providing artisan food and service to Beacon and beyond. Cut-to-order domestic and imported cheese and charcuterie; local, Italian and hard-to-find French pantry items; grassfed local meats and dairy. Stumptown coffee, unique chocolates, fine pastries and desserts. Serving European-style sandwiches and cheese plates. Tapas and dinner on weekends. Catering for any size event.

TASTENY STORE AT TODD HILL Taconic State Pkwy, Lagrange; Located 10 miles north of I-84 and 1 mile south of Rt 55 (845) 849-0247; ccedutchess.org Open Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat 10–7; Fri 10–8; Sun 11–7; closed Tue An asset along the Taconic State Parkway, find a vast array of foods and products grown or made in the Hudson Valley. Outdoor farmers’ market open Jun–Oct: Fri 3–7, Sun 2–6. N AT U R A L F O O D S

BEACON NATURAL MARKET 348 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-1288; beaconnaturalmarket.com Mon–Sat 9–7; Sun 10–5 Lighting the way for a healthier world. Featuring organic prepared foods, deli and juice bar, organic and regional produce, meats and cheeses. Open since 2005, proprietors L.T. and Kitty Sherpa are dedicated to serving the Hudson Valley with a complete selection of products that are good for you and good for the planet, including an extensive alternative health department. Nutritionist on staff. Catering available.

featuring certified organic produce, organic milk, cheeses and eggs, a wide range of bulk organic grains and nuts, non-irradiated herbs and spices, plus vitamins, homeopathic and body care products. R E S TAU R A N T S

CANTERBURY BROOK INN AROMA OSTERIA 114 Old Post Rd, Wappingers Falls (845) 298-6790; aromaosteriarestaurant.com Lunch Tue–Sat 11:30–2:30; dinner Tue–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11, Sun 4–9 Voted Best Italian Restaurant by Hudson Valley magazine; Poughkeepsie Journal awards four stars. A romantic, relaxed atmosphere with an elegant cocktail bar in a beautiful setting. Here, rustic Italian cuisine is served with a unique and extensive selection of Italian wines (many available by the glass). Catering for all occasions available on or off premises.

BAJA 328 328 Main St, Beacon (845) 838-BAJA; baja328.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11–10, Fri–Sat 11–11, Sun noon–8 Main Street’s newest hot spot, Baja 328 offers the finest authentic Southwestern food couples with 110-plus tequilas, the largest selection in the area.

BROTHER’S TRATTORIA 465 Main St, Beacon; (845) 838-3300 2540 Route 55, Poughquag; (845) 724-4700 brotherstrattoria.com Southern and northern Italian cuisines come together in this warm and friendly family restaurant. Choose casual dining in view of the pizza ovens, dine fireside in the lounge or choose the warm tones of the Tuscan dining room.

MOTHER EARTH’S

CAFÉ AMARCORD

300 Kings Mall Ct, Kingston; (845) 336-5541 249 Main St, Saugerties; (845) 246-9614 1955 South Rd, Poughkeepsie; (845) 296-1069 motherearthstorehouse.com Open daily Offering the finest natural foods, bulk spices, herbs, vitamins, supplements and organic produce. The valley’s best organic, hot and cold takeout at our Kingston and Poughkeepsie locations.

276 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-0050; cafeamarcord.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10; Fri–Sat noon– 11; Sun noon–9 Creative New American cuisine with Italian undertones, served in a warm atmosphere. Enjoy an artisanal cocktail at the onyx bar before having dinner in the bistro-style dining room or on our Main Street terrace. Bring colleagues for a casual lunch, or a date for a romantic night out.

SUNFLOWER NATURAL MARKET 75 Mill Hill Rd, Woodstock (845) 679-5361 24 Garden St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-0798 sunflowernatural.com Mon–Fri 8–9; Sat 9–9; Sun 10–7 The area’s most complete natural foods market,

74

the valley table

june

august

2018

offering an all-day breakfast and lunch along with a fair-trade coffee beverage selection. The menu focuses on seasonal items and chef/owner Jodi Cummings highlights several local farms and producers on the menu. All desserts and pastries are baked from scratch in-house.

CAFFE MACCHIATO 99 Liberty St, Newburgh (845) 565-4616; addressyourappetite.com Breakfast & lunch Tue–Fri 9–3, Sat–Sun 9–4; Dinner Fri & Sat 6-9 Located in the historic district of Newburgh, Caffe Macchiato is a European-style café

331 Main St, Cornwall (845) 534-9658; canterburybrookinn.com Dinner Tue–Thu 5–9; Fri–Sat 5–9:30 Hosts Hans and Kim Baumann offer fine Swiss continental cuisine featuring veal, duck, chicken, Schnitzel, pasta, filet mignon, fresh fish and much more. Enjoy a fabulous dessert while sipping a frothing cappuccino or espresso. We specialize in both on- and off-premise catering. Outdoor brookside dining. Reservations suggested.

CATHRYN’S 91 Main St, Cold Spring (845) 265-5582; tuscangrill.com Lunch & dinner Mon–Thu 12–9:30; Fri–Sat 12–10:30; Sun 12–9 Follow the red brick walk off Main Street through a landscaped garden into a romantic dining scene. Choose from an array of Northern Italian dishes such as pulled rabbit with fresh papardelle pasta, seedless grapes and grappa sauce; and grilled partridge with blackberries, pearl onions and pancetta with a red wine sauce. Reasonably priced wines. Small private party room.

CLOCK TOWER GRILL KITCHEN & BAR 512 Clock Tower Dr, Brewster (845) 582-0574; clocktowergrill.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–9, Fri noon–11; dinner Sat 5–11, Sun 3–9 Set in a renovated barn, the atmosphere is casual yet sophisticated; the menu “rustic American” with many ingredients drawn from area farms.

COSIMO’S RESTAURANT GROUP Cosimo’s On Union 1217 Rt 300, Newburgh; (845) 567-1556; fax (845) 567-9246

Cosimo’s Middletown 620 Rt 211 East, Middletown; (845) 692-3242

Cosimo’s Poughkeepsie 120 Delafield St, Poughkeepsie; (845) 485-7172

Cosimo’s Woodbury Rt 32, Central Valley; (845) 928-5222 cosimosrestaurantgroup.com Lunch & dinner daily Casual trattoria-style dining with some of the world’s best wines. Old-style Italian cuisine with a New World twist. Daily specials, pasta, fish and meat dishes. Distinctive cocktail lounges, a unique wine cellar for private dinner parties and beautiful catering facilities.


As we approach our 20th year in print, we want to thank the advertisers and sponsors that have made this publication possible. Because of their support, we are able to chronicle the region’s food traditions, innovations and agricultural heritage—bringing to light the issues our readers care most about.

Support our advertisers. Eat Local. Drink Local. Love What’s on Your Table. ValleyTable.com june

august

2018

valleytable . com

75


CRAFT 47 47 W Main St, Goshen (845) 360-5253; craft47.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu noon–10, Fri–Sat noon– midnight; Sun noon–10 Kick back, relax and sample the best of the Hudson Valley at Craft 47. We offer small-plate American tapas, craft wine and 12 craft beers on tap, with even more in the cooler.

THE CULINARY INSTITUTE OF AMERICA 1946 Campus Dr (off Rt 9), Hyde Park The premier culinary college offers exceptional global cuisine in its award-winning restaurants:

American Bounty Restaurant (845) 451-1011; americanbountyrestaurant.com

The Bocuse Restaurant (845) 451-1012; bocuserestaurant.com Reimagines classic French cuisine using modern techniques.

Ristorante Caterina de’ Medici (845) 451-1013; ristorantecaterinademedici.com

(914) 478-2800 ; harvesthudson.com Right on the Hudson River. Patio dining, outside bar, organic vegetable and herb garden, classy bar and lounge, view of the sunset over the Palisades and gourmet Italian cuisine worth writing home about.

HENRY’S AT BUTTERMILK FALLS 220 North Rd, Milton (845) 795-1500; henrysatbuttermilk.com Lunch Fri–Sat 11:30–3; Dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Brunch Sun 11–3 Local comes alive at this bucolic Inn & Spa, where the main ingredients are sourced from local producers and purveyors. An inventive menu features a fresh selection of large and small plates from casual burger and fries to refined New American dishes. Enjoy a predinner stroll through the organic gardens and orchards or a drink overlooking the Hudson River and sweeping lawns. Al fresco dining available.

gourmet catering companies.

MEYER’S OLDE DUTCH 184 Main St, Beacon (845) 440-6900; meyersoldedutch.com Sun–Thurs 11:30–9; Fri–Sat 11:30–12 Fun and casual, modern take on the classic burger joint with locally sourced loaded burgers, killer crispy chicken sandwich, house made veggie burgers and a full bar.

NINA 27 W. Main St, Middletown (845) 344-6800; nina-restaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–2:30; dinner Mon–Sun from 5; brunch Sun 9:30–2 New York City–trained chef Franz Brendle brings an elegant flair to classic American cuisine. Features include filet mignon Roquefort, shrimp asparagus risotto and seafood specials. Nice selection of wines in various price ranges. Friendly staff, cozy décor. Hearty Sun brunch.

The Apple Pie Bakery Café IL BARILOTTO

PAULA’S PUBLIC HOUSE

297 Main St., Beacon (845) 765-2909; enotecaama.com Mon–Thur noon–10; Fri–Sat noon–11; Sun noon–9 Pizza as it should be—al forno. All-Italian wines.

1113 Main St, Fishkill (845) 897-4300; ilbarilottorestaurant.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11–2:30; dinner Mon–Thu 5–10, Fri–Sat 5–11 Blending the old with the new, Eduardo Lauria, chef-owner of Aroma Osteria, transformed an historic brick building in the heart of Fishkill to a trattoria and wine bar. The fare is Italian peasant with a contemporary flair. The selection of regional wines from Italy—available by the glass or flight—is extensive. Catering on- and off-premises.

2186 New Hackensack Rd, Poughkeepsie (845) 454-7821; paulaspublichouse.com Mon & Tue 4–11; Wed & Thu 11–11; Fri & Sat 11–1; Sun 12–6 An inviting gastro pub sporting a cozy and friendly environment complemented by the warmth of a fireplace and a rustic ambiance. Paula’s offers lunch, supper and late-night fare and features live music, open mic and karaoke nights.

GINO’S RESTAURANT

LEO’S RISTORANTE

1671 Rt 9, Wappingers Falls (845) 297-8061; ginoswappingers.com Lunch & dinner Tue–Thu 11:30–9; Fri–Sat 11:30–10; Sun 1–9 Serving the Hudson Valley since 1984. Traditional southern Italian cuisine in a casual environment. Only the freshest ingredients used to prepare your favorite veal, chicken, seafood and pasta dishes. Catering on- and off-premise.

Rt 9D, Wappingers Falls (845) 838-3446 22 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-3446 1433 Rt 300, Newburgh (845) 564-3446 leospizzeria.com Lunch & dinner Mon–Sat 11–10; Sun 2–9 A family favorite since 1981, Leo’s offers traditional classic Italian dishes, pizza, hot/cold subs, pasta, veal, chicken and appetizers. Daily specials and catering for all occasions whether in our location or yours. Great food served in a comfortable and relaxed atmosphere.

(845) 905-4500; applepiebakerycafe.com

DUBROVNIK 721 Main St, New Rochelle (914) 637-3777; dubrovnikny.com Authentic Croatian cuisine with a farm-to-table, sea-to-table approach.

ENOTECA AMA

THE GREENS AT COPAKE COUNTRY CLUB 44 Golf Course Rd, Copake Lake (518) 352-0019; copakecountryclub.com Mon–Thu 11–8:30; Fri & Sat 11–9:30; Sun 11–8; Brunch until 2:30; Dinner nightly from 5 Dine overlooking the stunning 160-acre golf course nestled in the foothills of the Berkshire and Catskill Mountains.

HALF MOON 1 High St., Dobbs Ferry (914)-693-4131; harvest2000.com Montauk seafood, Hudson Valley farm to table, sunset views, raw bar and tiki bar.

HARVEST ON HUDSON 1 River St, Hastings-On-Hudson

76

the valley table

june

august

2018

LOLA’S CAFÉ 49 Main St, New Paltz (845)255-6555 Mon–Thu 11–9; Fri– Sat 11–10; Sun 11–8 131 Washington St, Poughkeepsie (845)471-8555 Mon–Fri 10–5; Sat 10–4 lolascafeandcatering.com. Poughkeepsie’s hottest lunch spot is now New Paltz’s newest lunch and dinner spot. Fast and friendly vibe. Great food, Generous portions abound. One of the Hudson Valley’s leading

THE ROUNDHOUSE 2 E Main St, Beacon (845) 765-8369; roundhousebeacon.com Lunch & dinner Wed–Sat 11:30–Close; Sun Brunch 11–3; Lunch 3–8 Set in a historic textile mill transformed into boutique hotel, the restaurant serves elegant, locally inspired American fare and offers a wellcurated list of craft beers, cocktails and wines. The main dining room, lounge and seasonal patio all overlook Beacon Falls.

TERRAPIN RESTAURANT & RED BISTRO 6426 Montgomery St, Rhinebeck (845) 876-3330; terrapinrestaurant.com Lunch & dinner daily 11:30–midnight; dining room daily 5–9pm From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle here. From elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh and dynamic: dishes to delight body and soul. Choose fine dining in Terrapin’s dining room or casual fare in Red Bistro & Bar. From good burgers and quesadillas to wild salmon and local filet mignon. Terrapin’s local organic and authentic menu satisfies all.

THE VILLAGE TEAROOM 10 Plattekill Ave, New Paltz (845) 255-3434; thevillagetearoom.com


Walter Garshagen

Catch Great New Theater on its way to the world

V A S S A R & N E W Y O R K S TA G E A N D F I L M P R E S E N T

POWERHOUSE THEATER J U N E 2 1 - J U LY 2 9 / O N T H E VA S S A R C A M P U S P O W E R H O U S E .VA S S A R . E D U / 8 4 5 - 4 3 7- 5 9 0 7

june

–

august

2018

valleytable . com

77


Breakast, lunch & dinner Tues–Sat 8–9, Sun 8–8 The Village Tea Room is a unique gathering place, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a variety of teas. Tantalizing cakes and cookies. Organic honey, pot pies and roast chicken. Zagat survey says “Irish ex-pat Agnes Devereux has a real winner.”

the problems and address the needs of your specific business.

WILDFIRE GRILL

ORANGE COUNTY TOURISM

74 Clinton St, Montgomery (845) 457-3770; wildfireny.com Lunch Mon–Sat 11:30–3; Sun noon–3; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9; Fri & Sat 5–10 Eclectic is the buzzword at this popular local eatery, where patrons can feast on a predominantly American menu with Asian, Mexican and Italian influences in a rustic Victorian setting.

(845) 615-3860; orangetourism.org

WINERIES

GLORIE FARM WINERY T R AV E L

DUTCHESS TOURISM (845) 463-4000; dutchesstourism.com

40 Mountain Rd, Marlboro (845) 236-3265; gloriewine.com Near the top of Mt. Zion Mountain with spectacular views of the Hudson, this boutiquestyle winery produces award-winning wines—a mix of red, white and fruit wines, dry, semi-dry and sweet, European varietals and hybrids as well as blends.

STEWART AIRPORT 1180 1st St, New Windsor, NY 12553 (845) 838-8200; swfny.com

ROCKLAND COUNTY TOURISM (845) 364-2170;bexplorerocklandny.com

MILEA ESTATE VINEYARD 40 Hollow Circle Road, Staatsburg (845) 264-0403; mileaestatevineyard.com In a beautiful country setting, the Hudson Valley’s newest winery captures the unique terroir with traditional winemaking.

ULSTER COUNTY TOURISM WOODY’S FARM TO TABLE

(845) 340-3566; ulstercountyalive.com

30 Quaker Ave, Cornwall (845) 534-1111; woodysfarmtotable.com Open Wed–Mon 11:30–8:30; closed Tue A “new old-fashioned” burger joint located in a restored 1910 building in picturesque Cornwall. Casual, family place offering fast, simple meals for people on the go using fresh, wholesome ingredients with a local emphasis.

XAVIAR’S RESTAURANT GROUP Chef-owner Peter Kelly offers his signature service and exceptional cuisine. Critics agree: Dining in the valley will never be the same.

Restaurant X & Bully Boy Bar 117 North Rt 303, Congers (845) 268-6555 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2:30; dinner Tue–Thu 5:30– 10, Fri 5:30–10:30, Sat 5–11, Sun 5–8; brunch Sun seating 1pm

X2O Xaviars on the Hudson

SERVICES

JACOBOWITZ AND GUBITS, LLP 158 Orange Ave, Walden (845) 778-2121; jacobowitz.com Mon–Thu 8:30–5:30 Expert legal services for restaurateurs includes business planning, succession planning, licenses and permits, employment, immigration, real estate, financing, contracts and taxation.

JUDELSON, GIORDANO & SIEGAL 633 Rt 211, East Middletown 3 Neptune Rd, Poughkeepsie (877) 740-9500; JGSPC.com More than an accounting firm, full business advisors. Our philosophy is one of collaborative effort, as we work along side you to solve

the valley table

june

(800) 833-9282; visitwestchesterny.com WHOLESALE

RED BARN PRODUCE 217 Upper North Rd, Highland (845) 691-7428 Full-service, family owned and operated wholesaler servicing restaurants and institutions with a complete selection of fruits and vegetables for 20 years. A proud distributor of local, New York, high-quality produce at competitive prices emphasizing reliable and personal service. Pick-up or delivery available to Dutchess, Columbia, Ulster and Orange counties.

august

2018

(845) 256-8456; (845) 291-1927; gunkswine.com Nestled between the Shawangunks and the Hudson River, just 60 miles north of NYC is a trail of 14 family-owned wineries from New Paltz to Warwick. The wineries offer tours and tastings amidst scenic beauty. A complete listing of wineries and events is available on our website.

STOUTRIDGE VINEYARD & DISTILLERY 10 Ann Kaley Ln, Marlboro (845) 236-7620; stoutridge.com Many of our wines and spirits are locally grown, and all are from New York fruits and grains. Our wines are sold exclusively at the winery. Enjoy an authentic taste of the Hudson Valley at our winery, distillery and grounds.

WARWICK VALLEY WINERY & DISTILLERY WINE & SPIRITS

71 Water Grant Way, Yonkers (914) 965-1111 Lunch Tue–Fri noon–2; dinner Tue–Fri 5:30–10, Sat 5–10, Sun 5–9; brunch Sun noon–2

78

WESTCHESTER COUNTY TOURISM

SHAWANGUNK WINE TRAIL

BOUTIQUE WINE & SPIRITS 18 Westage Dr, Suite 13, Fishkill (845) 765-1555; boutiquewsc.com Mon–Sat 10–7; Sun 12–6 Explore new grapes, new regions, new styles or new brands, or perhaps an entirely new category to you like mead or hard cider. Variety, as they say, is the spice of life!

114 Little York Rd, Warwick (845) 258-4858; wvwinery.com Daily 11–6 for tastings Food & Wine magazine calls our draft cider “clean, vibrant” with a “sweet finish.” We produce wine for every occasion: Chardonnay, Riesling, Harvest Moon, Black Dirt Blush and Red, Cabernet Franc, Pinot Noir. As the Valley’s first distillery, we produce a line of fine brandies and liqueurs. Bakery Café serves lunch and fresh breads on weekends.

MARTA’S VINEYARD 1955 South Rd Suite 3, Poughkeepsie (845) 218-9672; martasvine.com Open 7 days This new shop features favorites and wellknown producers of wines and spirits alongside a notable selection of organic and biodynamic wines. Each product is chosen by the owner, Marta, who holds internationally recognized certifications in wine and spirits. Check back for wine, spirits and cocktail classes. Fundraisers and events scheduled monthly.

WHITECLIFF VINEYARD 331 McKinstry Rd, Gardiner (845) 255-4613; whitecliffwine.com Daily 11:30–5:30; Sat til 6 One of the valley’s largest vineyards boasts beautiful views of the Shawangunk Ridge. Owner/wine maker Michael Migliore produces award-winning wines from European vinifera varietals such as Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc and Riesling, as well as new hybrids. Visit our friendly tasting room. Winery tours by appointment, special events.


ON TAP THIS SUMMER!

Fine Food • Great Beer • Live Music THE BEST

LMIUVSIEC!

for our y night g Company Wednesda win us EVERYa Hyde Park Brerunning! ue, Please join rs and and Rev r 12 yea Blues Jam ure for ove fixt

tio TheOPpaen! is

Craft Beers

Vegetarian Selections Summer Favorites

Located Across from the FDR Library and Museum

4076 Albany Post Road • Hyde Park, NY 845-229-TAPS (8277) www.hydeparkbrewing.com

june

august

2018

valleytable . com

79


LAST CALL

bee flight

AUGUST 18

N AT I O N A L H O N E Y B E E DAY About 70% of the world’s food supply depends on bees for pollination. Even small-scale, backyard beekeepers contribute essential pollination for growing fruits and vegetables.

photo by david handschuh 80

the valley table

june

–

august

2018


i

T

V

H

E C

EY

ntral V

VA L L

EXPERI

Ce

N

EN

E

SO

ie

F

D

keePs

E

s

H

U

Po

all e

ugh

it

n

s

of our loC at OF io VOR TH LA

l al

A Hudson Valley Family Tradition for 25 Years

y

id

dl

3 E 199

M

h

et

SINC

own • new

bu

r

g

Cosimos.com NEWBURGH (845) 567-1556

CENTRAL VALLEY (845) 928-5222

POUGHKEEPSIE (845) 485-7172

MIDDLETOWN (845) 692-3242

The Valley Table 82, Summer 2018  
New
Advertisement
Advertisement