Issuu on Google+

Jefferson County Public Schools

May 2012 October 2012

Middle and high school application period starts soon Applications will be accepted online this year (page 3)

Visit the JCPS showcases (page 2) Test scores may go down before they go up (page 7)

www.jcpsky.net Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer Offering Equal Educational Opportunities


Visit the JCPS showcases The Middle and High School Showcase will be held Fri., Oct. 26, from 3 to 7 p.m., and Sat., Oct. 27, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Elementary School Showcase will be held Sat., Nov. 17, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Both showcases will be held at the Kentucky International Convention Center. Representatives from schools and many Jefferson County Public School (JCPS) District offices will be available to answer your questions.

“We believe the showcases offer the best source of information for parents making a decision about schools,” says Bernadette Hamilton, JCPS director of Optional, Magnet, and Advance Programs. “In many instances, students participating in optional and magnet programs or magnet schools will be on hand to talk with you and your child,” Hamilton says, “and key employees will be on hand to answer school assignment and transportation questions.”

Get a free copy of Choices at the JCPS showcases. The guidebooks also are available on the Showcase of Schools page on the JCPS Web site. 2

The application period for JCPS middle and high schools is Mon., Oct. 29, through Fri., Jan. 11. See the next page for details on the application process and information on middle schools. High school information starts on page four. The application period for JCPS elementary schools is Mon., Nov. 19, through Fri., Jan. 11. Watch for more information in the next issue of Parent Connection.


Middle and high school application period begins Oct. 29 Mon., Oct. 29, through Fri., Jan. 11, is the application period for middle and high school magnet programs, optional programs, magnet schools, and high school open enrollment for the 2013-14 school year. You will be able to complete the JCPS online application during this period. It will be available on the district’s Web site and at registration centers throughout the

district. For more information, visit the Web site during the application period or contact your child’s school. You also can get more information from the JCPS Parent Assistance Center at 485-6250 or 485-6771—or from the district’s Optional, Magnet, and Advance Programs Office at 485-3323.

Middle schoolers have many magnet school and program choices Middle school magnet programs let students explore their favorite subjects in depth. The following programs accept applications from students throughout the district, and transportation is provided for most Jefferson County addresses. • Highland: International Studies • Noe: Gifted and Talented, and Visual and Performing Arts • Thomas Jefferson: Communications • Farnsley, Meyzeek, and Newburg: Mathematics/Science/Technology (MST)—Students are assigned to one of the three schools based on their address. • Westport: Montessori Program • Beginning with the 201314 school year, the Academy @ Shawnee will offer

a Middle School Magnet Program that provides aviation experiences. JCPS also offers magnet middle schools and programs that provide specialized learning environments: • Barret, Jefferson County Traditional, and Johnson are traditional magnet schools. Students are as-

signed to one of them based on their home address. • The Brown School offers self-directed learning in a kindergarten through grade-twelve environment. • Olmsted Academy North is an all-boys school. (continued on next page)

3


• Olmsted Academy South is an all-girls school. • Western Middle is a Visual and Performing Arts Magnet School. Some JCPS middle schools offer optional programs. As in a magnet school or program, a student who is accepted into an optional program becomes a full-

time student of the school that offers it, and he or she attends the school for all classes—not just the optional program classes. But, unlike magnet programs, transportation is provided for optional program students only if they live in the attendance area of the school that offers it.

• Crosby: Liberal Arts Academy • Highland: Fine Art • Lassiter: Environmental Education • Moore Traditional: Environmental and Life Science • Stuart: Health Careers

Five-Star high schools Courses at most JCPS high schools are organized around one of five Professional Career Theme Programs that offer advanced college and career preparation. Classes go far beyond lectures. Students participate in hands-on, realworld projects in and out of the classroom. Local companies, community organizations, colleges, and universities partner with JCPS schools to support these programs, so students get expert advice from professionals in the field. Many courses offer college credit as well as job shadowing, mentoring, professional certification, co-ops, internships, or apprenticeships. Students graduate with the kind of diploma that gets noticed— a credentialed diploma representing dual-credit courses, authentic experiences, and industry certifications. JCPS provides transportation for most students who are accepted into one of these programs within the 4

network that serves their attendance area. Don’t know which network your child lives in? Call Demographics at 485-3050 or use the SchoolFinder on the JCPS Web site. Human Services, Education, and International Studies This theme offers courses for students who want to prepare for a legal career, learn the art of teaching, or explore the world. Students who take Human Services courses study the law, government, and social issues. Service-learning projects give students real-world skills and experiences that make their résumés stand out. JCPS education students learn the foundations of teaching and gain experience by working with elementary and middle school students. Education students also learn about colleges and universities where they can continue their studies and career preparation after high school.

Students who take international studies classes develop an in-depth understanding of the global community. They learn a world language, and they work with government agencies and international organizations. Through the International Baccalaureate (IB) Program at Atherton High, students can earn an IB Diploma that is recognized for university admission at schools around the world. Fairdale High is now offering the University of Cambridge International Examinations Program, which gives students the opportunity to earn an (continued on next page)


international diploma and college credit. Schools: Network 1: Fairdale, Network 2: Seneca, Network 3: Atherton Engineering (Aerospace/ Architecture/Manufacturing and Construction) JCPS engineering students build problem-solving skills and master a range of tools and technologies (the same tools and technologies that today’s professionals use). Students receive a broad introduction to the field by exploring real-world problems. They study historical engineering achievements ranging from the Egyptian pyramids to the U.S. highway system to the Ohio River locks and dams. Courses are also available for students who want to focus on aviation, manufacturing, energy transmission, or construction. Schools: Network 1: Iroquois, Network 2: Jeffersontown, Network 3: The Academy @ Shawnee Communication, Media, and the Arts Communication skills are

Moore Traditional School students practice their medical skills.

in demand across occupations. Courses at JCPS high schools are available in public speaking, radio and television production, stage and costume design, print media, graphic arts, and performing arts. Students work in well-equipped, state-of-the-art studios. They get many chances to practice their craft and show off their skills. Whether they’re painting murals, acting on stage, creating digital art, writing a short story or novel, editing news articles, anchoring a broadcast, or directing a film, students receive both solid academic instruction and practical experience. Schools: Network 1: Pleasure Ridge Park, Network 2: Fern Creek Traditional, Network 3: Ballard Medicine, Health, and the Environment JCPS health-care students learn about a range of possible careers and develop basic skills in each medical field. Courses provide preparation for both an entry-level job and additional study in college. Mentoring,

real-world health-care environments, job-shadowing experiences, and internships show students how the pros do it. Many students earn professional health-care certification before they graduate from high school. Career opportunities for environmental experts are expanding rapidly. JCPS environmental students investigate the world in the classroom, the lab, and the field. They explore current issues and study possible solutions to environmental problems. Schools: Network 1: Valley, Network 2: Moore Traditional School, Network 3: Waggener Business and Information Technology JCPS business students learn how to create and run a company. Both business and information technology students learn how to use technology to manage business operations. Courses are available in banking, finance, business applications, marketing, accounting, computer repair, networking, Web design, geographic information systems, and programming. Many of these courses offer both industry certification and college credit. Schools: Network 1: Doss High, Network 2: Southern High, Network 3: Eastern High

5


YPAS students perform the world premiere of a composition for percussion ensemble.

Districtwide magnet high schools The following magnet schools and programs accept applications from students throughout the JCPS District. Transportation is provided for most students. • The Academy @ Shawnee offers the Aerospace: Flight School Program and the Aerospace: Aviation Maintenance Technology Program. • The Brown School is a self-directed learning school that serves kindergarten through

6

grade-twelve students. Transportation is not provided for Brown School students. • Butler Traditional High and Louisville Male High offer traditional education. • Central High School Magnet Career Academy (MCA) offers business, technology, law, health care, and veterinary magnet programs. • DuPont Manual High offers communications, visual arts, college prep,

and math/science/technology programs. • Western High offers the Early College Program and the Culinary Arts Program. • The Youth Performing Arts School (YPAS) offers dance, theatre, musical theatre, design and production (technical theatre), vocal music, instrumental music (band and orchestra), and piano programs.


Test scores may go down before they go up Many JCPS students took some tough tests at the end of the last school year. These tests were more challenging than usual because they were based on new standards in math and English/language arts. Standards determine what students learn in each grade. For example, according to state math standards, sixth graders should learn how to divide fractions and solve such word problems as “How wide is a rectangular strip of land with a length of 3⁄4 mile and an area of 1⁄2 square mile?” Why do we have new standards? Because in 2009, the

Kentucky General Assembly passed legislation that mandated new, more rigorous academic standards and tests. Two years later, Kentucky became the first of 46 states to adopt the Common Core State Standards in math and English/language arts. (Science and social studies standards are still being developed). The math and English/ language arts Common Core State Standards were adopted as the Kentucky Core Academic Standards (KCAS). Teachers began implementing them during the last school year. These

Visit www.raisethebarlouisville.com for more information on academic standards and test scores.

standards are not about memorizing facts or just learning formulas. They’re about developing a deeper understanding of concepts. They will help students prepare for college and careers. And because they’re benchmarked with international academic standards, they’ll help students succeed in the global economy. But because the state has a new scoring system, results of tests based on the new standards should not be compared with the results of tests under the old system. According to Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) initial estimates, Proficiency rates could be up to 37 points lower at some grade levels under the new scoring system. Scores should go up as students become more comfortable with the standards, as teachers start using new instructional strategies, and as JCPS implements its new Strategic Plan: Vision 2015.

7


Kindergarten skill assessments help teachers tailor education All JCPS students who entered kindergarten for the first time this year have participated in the BRIGANCE Kindergarten Screen. It measures the skills that students develop before they start kindergarten. Five developmental areas are screened: language skills, academic skills, self-help and social-emotional skills, finemotor skills, and gross-motor skills. Certified teachers administer the screenings, which take 10 to 15 minutes for each student. Teachers ask the kindergarteners to complete several physical and cognitive tasks, including identifing such body parts as their

elbows, standing on one foot for ten seconds, recognizing colors and shapes, drawing a person, printing their name, counting to 30, and readring uppercase letters. Parents complete a survey to provide information about their child’s self-help and socialemotional skills and behaviors. Many JCPS schools provided results of the screenings and a chance to discuss them at Parent-Teacher Conferences earlier this month. The results included one of three overall readiness levels: Ready with Supports, Ready, or Ready with Enrichments. The results are helping teachers tailor instruction

for each student, and they’re helping parents decide which skills they should work on at home with their children. Educators also will use the results to improve early childhood programs. JCPS was one of 107 Kentucky school districts that participated during this pilot year of the kindergarten screening program, which collected baseline data as part of the Kentucky Readiness Initiative. The screening will be implemented for kindergarteners at all public schools throughout the state during the next school year.

Kerrick Elementary teacher Kerri Gray works with kindergartener Avery Wilson.

8


“Everyone falls down. Winners get back up.” Paralympic medalist inspires students and staff Bonnie St. John is known for her inspirational messages. In fact, one of them was printed on a Starbucks coffee cup: “I was ahead in the slalom, but in the second run, everyone fell on a dangerous spot. I was beaten by a woman who got up faster than I did. I learned that people fall down, winners get up, and gold medal winners just get up faster.” The first African-American to win ski-racing medals in the Winter Paralympics, St. John visited Central High to talk to students and JCPS staff about the importance of getting right back up when life knocks you down—a strategy that helped her win three medals at the 1984 Paralympics in Innsbruck, Austria. She earned a bronze in slalom, a bronze in giant slalom, and a silver for overall performance. St. John is known for her academic achievements too. She graduated with honors from Harvard University and received a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford. She was appointed to the White House National Economic Council, and NBC Nightly News once selected her as one of the five most inspiring women in America.

She also has been featured on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and CNN—and in People magazine, The New York Times, and Essence. A few hours before the start of the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, St. John inspired JCPS students and staff by relating her struggles to learn to walk again after her leg was amputated at age 5. She said a nurse helped her build the strength “to get through the hard stuff—the painful stuff—to a better place.”

picked myself up and fell over the other way.” After three days of “crashing into things,” she began to gain control. She told the Central High students that the keys to accomplishment in anything are “practice, perseverance, and surrounding yourself with positive people.”

As a teenager, riding a skateboard on the first day of school at Burke Mountain Academy in Vermont, St. John broke her remaining leg. When she got out of her cast six weeks later, she broke her artificial leg. She sent it to be repaired, and it was lost in the mail for several weeks. When she first started to learn to ski, “I fell over,” St. John says. “I 9


Are you as smart as a JCPS high school junior? The answers to the sixthgrade math questions in the last issue of Parent Connection are 1: D, 2: A, 3: C. To review the questions, click here and select the September issue in the archive. The first parents to send the correct answers last month were Angela McNulty (parent of a student at Moore Traditional School), Shayla Price (Byck Elementary), Kristil Dalrymple (Greathouse/Shryock Traditional Elementary), Amy Le (Hartstern Elementary), George Polur (Field Elementary), and Chandra Belton (the Academy @ Shawnee). Editor’s note: Because the correct answer for question one was inadvertently omitted from the choices in the printed edition of the newsletter, only responses for questions two and three were considered for the September quiz. This month, Parent Connection offers a quiz with some challenging eleventh grade science questions. (If you have a child in high school and want him or her to help you, that’s okay.) The first three parents who send the correct answers to the newsletter office via email and the first three who send the answers via regular mail will receive a free JCPS T-shirt. Please include 10

the name of your child’s (or grandchild’s) school. Click here to send the answers via e-mail. The regular mailing address is Thomas Pack, Communications and Publications North, C. B. Young Jr. Service Center, Building 4, 3001 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, KY 40209. You don’t need to write the questions or answers. Just send the question numbers and the letters for your answers. Or you may cut out this quiz and mail it. 1. The force of gravity on the surface of the moon is about one-sixth the force of gravity on the surface of Earth. Which describes the relationship of mass and weight of an object on the moon compared to that on Earth? A. Both mass and weight are greater on the moon. B. Both mass and weight are less on the moon. C. Mass is the same, but weight is less on the moon. D. Weight is the same, but mass is less on the moon. 2. At standard pressure and room temperature, water (H2O) is a liquid and carbon dioxide (CO2) is a gas. Water and car-

bon dioxide exist in different states because A. CO2 molecules have a greater mass. B. The bonds are stronger in CO2 molecules. C. H2O molecules have a larger diameter. D. The forces are greater between H2O molecules.

3. A jet will create a sonic boom as it exceeds the speed of sound. Jean watched a jet as it flew over her head and across the sky. The jet exceeded the speed of sound as it approached her. When did Jean most likely hear the sonic boom? A. At the exact same time the jet passed overhead B. At the exact same time the jet exceeded the speed of sound C. After the jet had passed over her head and was moving away from her D. After the jet exceeded the speed of sound but before it passed over her head


Freshmen get a million dollar promise Community leaders have made a $1 million promise to the freshman class at Western High. Now the payday depends on the performance of the 267 students. A partnership between Western, the Rotary Club of Louisville, and Jefferson Community & Technical College (JCTC) is a new effort to raise expectations and help students attend college tuition-free. The Louisville Rotary Promise Scholars Program will provide two free years at JCTC for Western students who graduate in 2016 with at least a 2.5 grade point average (GPA), a good behavior record, and at least a 90 percent school attendance record.

“You do your part, and you have a two-year college scholarship in your pocket,” said Stuart Alexander, president of the Rotary Club of Louisville. The Scholars Program will allow the students to earn professional certification or an associate’s degree on the way to a career or additional education. At least $1 million has already been raised to fund the program, and an additional $3 million is being raised to expand it to three other schools. Western High has already experienced the benefits of partnering with JCTC through Early College, a districtwide magnet program that lets students

earn college credits in high school. (See pages four through six for information on high school magnet programs.) Now, Western has its largest freshman class in recent history. The students signed their names on a large banner that read: “I am doing my part to keep the promise.” Students who are meeting the program’s criteria will be featured on school posters at the end of each trimester. “Everything you do today, tomorrow, and the day after will determine your future,” says Western High Principal David Mike. “I see nothing but great things from this Class of 2016.” 11


Middle schooler earns national Arthur Ashe art award

Jasmine Standard, a student at Johnson Traditional Middle, was one of 14 national winners in the Arthur Ashe Essay and Art Contest. It received 1,810 submissions from students throughout the United States. Jasmine received a threeday, two-night, all-expenses-paid trip to New York for her and a family member. The trip included a Broadway play, a tour of New

York, and attendance at the Arthur Ashe Kids Day Celebration as well as 2012 U.S. Open Tennis Tournament events. Jasmine was formally recognized at a special luncheon held in the winners’ honor. To enter the contest, students had to write an essay or create a work of art that answered the question “If Arthur Ashe were alive today, what do you think would give him hope?” Jasmine created artwork that showed students with A+ report cards. Jasmine is a member of the Rising Stars of Kentucky Tennis Program, which is a National Junior Tennis and Learning chapter based at Newburg’s Petersburg Park. National Junior Tennis and Learning is a network of more than 660 nonprofit youth development organizations.

12

By Claire Dzan

Two students win national PTA awards

Crosby Middle student Claire Dzan and Meyzeek Middle student Sofia Devenuto were the only local students to win national honors in the 2012 PTA Reflections Program, which recognizes student achievement in the arts. The theme of the competition was “Diversity Means ....” Students could submit entries in any of several categories, including literature, music, photography, dance, and video. Both Claire and Sofia submitted photographs. They were among the 125 entries from Kentucky students that received an award on the state level. Of those, 24 entries were submitted to the national com-


By Sofia DeVenuto petition, including 8 from the Louisville area. Claire earned a national Award of Excellence. Sofia, who was a Brandeis Elementary student when she entered the contest, received a National Award of Merit. For more information, on the Reflections Program, visit www.pta.org/2032.asp

Parent relations specialist honored at White House

Sharon Whitworth, JCPS parent relations specialist and 15th District PTA advocate, was among 150 PTA members from across the country invited to visit the

White House in August, and she was one of 12 parents honored as a Champion of Change. Whitworth has been a PTA advocate for all children for more than 36 years. She served as the 15th District PTA president from 1987 to 1989 and Kentucky PTA president from 1993 to 1996. She currently serves as the Kentucky PTA legislative commissioner, working for issues that affect children in Kentucky and nationwide. Whitworth has worked as a JCPS parent relations specialist for the past 23 years,

encouraging parents to be involved in their children’s education. She has two sons who attended public schools and five grandchildren currently attending public schools. The Champions of Change program was created to honor parents doing great work in their communities. It gives them the chance to talk with administration officials and other PTA members throughout the nation. Contact the Parent Connection editor, Thomas Pack, at 485-6315 or at thomas.pack@jefferson. kyschools.us.

Mark your calendar Oct. 1–31: Advance Program testing

Nov. 3: SAT testing

Oct. 14: College and Career Expo (www .collegeandcareerexpo.com) Oct. 20: PSAT testing

Nov. 5: No school for students—Professional Development (PD)/Parent-Teacher Conference Day (Some schools may not hold conferences on this day. Contact your child's school for more information.)

Oct. 23–31: Red Ribbon Week

Nov. 6: No school—Election Day

Oct. 26–27: Middle and High School Showcase

Nov. 17: Elementary School Showcase

Oct. 17: PSAT testing

Oct. 27: ACT testing Oct. 29–Jan. 11: Middle and high school application period

Nov. 19–Jan. 11: Elementary school application period Nov. 21–23: Thanksgiving Break 13


JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

School Calendar for Parents 2012-13

First and Last Days for Students

AUGUST MON TUE

8/21, 6/5*

*6/5 will be the last day of school unless there are days to be made up. Inclement weather may alter the school calendar, grading periods, and report card distribution dates. See below for more information on Make-Up Days.

First and Last Days for Teachers (No School for Students) ................................8/17, 6/6

No School for Students Labor Day ................................................................9/3 Election Day ...........................................................11/6 Thanksgiving Break ...................................11/21–11/23 Winter Break .................................................12/21–1/4 Martin Luther King Jr. Day .....................................1/21 Spring Break .....................................................4/1–4/5 Memorial Day.........................................................5/27 Professional-Development Days ..10/5, 10/8, 11/5, 1/4, 2/25, 3/1, 5/3

Make-Up Days for Students In case of inclement weather or other emergencies, missed school days will be made up in the following order: 2/25, 2/26*, 2/27*, 2/28*, 3/1, 6/6, 6/7, 6/10, 6/11, 6/12, 6/13, 6/14 *If 2/26, 2/27, and 2/28 are not used as Make-Up Days, schools may choose to offer remediation/enrichment activities for some students. If no activities are scheduled, students will not attend school on these days.

Parent-Teacher Conferences Parent-teacher conferences may be scheduled on the following dates: 10/8, 11/5, 1/4, 3/1

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

WED THU

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

WED THU

FRI

SEPTEMBER MON TUE

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

WED THU

FRI

OCTOBER MON TUE

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

WED THU

FRI

NOVEMBER MON TUE

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

WED THU

FRI

7 14 21 28

DECEMBER MON TUE

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

FRI

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

www.jcpsky.net

JANUARY MON TUE

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

WED THU

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

WED THU

FRI

FEBRUARY MON TUE

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

MARCH

MON TUE

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

APRIL

MON TUE

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

MAY

MON TUE

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

JUNE

MON TUE

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

FRI

3 10 17 24 31

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

WED THU

1 8 15 22

FRI

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

WED THU

FRI

6 13 20 27 3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

WED THU

FRI

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 10 17 24 31

WED THU

FRI

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer Offering Equal Educational Opportunities


Oct. 12 Parent Connection