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TOGETHER, WE ARE HEALING THE WORLD

IMPACT REPORT

FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2020 a


Our donor family remains at the heart of The Foundation’s work. They are partners in the truest sense of the word: Everything we do emanates from them and makes possible all we achieve.

b


IN A YEAR LIKE NO OTHER,

$106 MILLION in grants were distributed by our donors to the Jewish community locally and nationally, to the community at large, and to Israel.

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TO OUR COMMUNITY

Our giving is always focused and intentional, although never more so than dictated by circumstances last year.

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During a year of enormous challenge, The Foundation remained steadfast in fulfilling its fundamental mission – to our donors, to the vital causes and programs we help sustain, and, most essentially, to the communities we serve. When the pandemic descended virtually out of nowhere, we responded swiftly. Our Center for Designed Philanthropy conducted extensive outreach with hundreds of people to assess vast needs across the nonprofit landscape, resulting in a full pivot to our giving. We channeled nearly all our 2020 institutional grantmaking – more than $8 million and the largest amount earmarked to a single cause – into what became our COVID-19 Response Grants. Our giving is always focused and intentional, although never more so than dictated by circumstances last year. In sum, we strategically awarded more than 50 grants in multiple phases to address immediate local needs – financial, food and housing insecurity, and access to healthcare – and to sustain hard-hit nonprofits doing important work in our community and Israel. We directed $2 million – 25 percent of the total – to The Jewish Federation, which our colleagues there disbursed to assist vulnerable populations and for Jewish day school scholarships and summer camperships. Our donor family remains at the heart of The Foundation’s work. They are partners in the truest sense of the word: Everything we do emanates from them and makes possible all we achieve. This is exemplified by the $106 million in grants recommended from their funds, many to COVID-19 relief causes.


Our strategic, multilayered response is indicative of The Foundation’s core strength in mobilizing to address urgent, fast-changing community needs. This is, moreover, a testament to our dedicated, hardworking management team and staff who labored tirelessly and remotely to ensure our efforts continued uninterrupted. The impact of Foundation funding has never been more immediate. Nonprofits whose causes and programs faced unprecedented adversity expressed deep appreciation for The Foundation’s support during their time of urgent need.

Evan Schlessinger Chair, Board of Trustees

We are fortunate as well to have the wise counsel of a deeply engaged Board of Trustees. Our distinguished leaders bring a vital range of skills and resources to our grantmaking and other important institutional matters, and their contributions proved profoundly valuable this past year. It is with similar gratitude that we express sincere thanks to Bill Feiler, who recently concluded four years as our Board chair. Bill’s commitment, steady-handed leadership, and sound counsel, particularly through the pandemic, were invaluable. He remains a trustee, and we will continue to benefit from his expertise.

Marvin I. Schotland President and Chief Executive Officer

Evan Schlessinger Chair, Board of Trustees

Marvin I. Schotland President and Chief Executive Officer

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OUR COVID-19 RESPONSE

When you open a fund with The Foundation, you also contribute to our institutional grantmaking, fueling high-impact philanthropy with the power to improve people’s lives.

When the pandemic hit in March 2020, we took a quick, deep breath, assessed the enormity of the situation, and realized it called for a wholesale reimagining of our grantmaking. We surveyed nonprofit professionals and other funders, both locally and in Israel, to understand the landscape and needs better, and then we dove in headfirst, allocating more than $8 million in the single most significant grant program we have ever undertaken. The Foundation’s COVID-19 Response Grants unfolded in three phases:

• Our immediate focus was on basic needs, and we granted $2.5 million toward efforts across our community to improve food security, housing, financial well-being, and access to healthcare.

• The next wave – $3.8 million in grants – sought to strengthen organizational stability for all segments of the Jewish community, from children to seniors, nonprofits assisting individuals with disabilities, day schools, and summer camps.

• We then allocated an additional $2 million in grants to organizations based in Israel. The breadth of our reach was directly attributable to our donors, our partners in charitable giving. When someone opens a fund with The Foundation, they also contribute to our institutional grantmaking, fueling high-impact philanthropy with the power to improve people’s lives. This was never more apparent than last year. During the pandemic, our remarkable donor family gave generously to COVID relief primarily through their Donor Advised Funds and Family Support Organizations. Working in tandem, we lifted up our community, weaving a web of steadfast support that enabled countless individuals and families to find safe harbor as they waited for better days ahead. 4


+ $8 MILLION COVID-19 SUPPORT AT A GLANCE

54 NONPROFITS Locally and in Israel

$2.5 MILLION for local emergency needs

$3.8 MILLION

for Jewish nonprofit sustainability, unanticipated needs, and day school and camp scholarships

$2 MILLION for Israel grants

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OUR 54 COVID-19 RESPONSE GRANTEES

These organizations provided urgently needed resources to hundreds of thousands of people suffering as a result of the pandemic locally and in Israel. The services included food for people who had just lost their jobs and were suddenly without income, emergency housing and protection for the homeless, personal protective equipment and support for hospitals and senior centers, and direct financial aid and service to many low-income families. In the following pages, you will learn about the seven highlighted organizations that are representative of our COVID-19 grantmaking.

30 Years After creates an engaged pipeline of young IranianAmerican Jewish leaders in Los Angeles through its targeted events, programming, and leadership fellowships. American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (Israel) works in 70 countries and focuses on economic opportunity, reducing poverty gaps, and improving the quality of life for all Israelis. Amutat Kaima (Israel) works to improve the lives of at-risk youth through a multifaceted approach, including organic farming, leadership development, vocational education, and community activities. Appleseeds Academy (Israel) aims to close the digital divide through technology programs, vocational training, and job placement. Atid Bamidbar (Israel) strives to promote a more inclusive Israeli society by connecting Jews of all backgrounds in the Negev and beyond with each other and with their Jewish heritage. BINA: The Jewish Movement for Social Change (Israel) seeks to strengthen Israel as a democratic, pluralistic, and just society through Jewish study, social action, and community building.

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Bet Tzedek is a nonprofit law firm that provides free, comprehensive legal assistance and representation, volunteer and court-based selfhelp services, and legal education to more than 90,000 people each year. Builders of Jewish Education is Los Angeles’s central coordinating resource for Jewish education, connecting thousands of families and children to a broad range of Jewish educational opportunities. Chai Lifeline is a leading international children’s health support network, providing social, emotional, and financial assistance to children with life-threatening and lifelong illnesses and their families. Chamah (Israel) assists individuals and families primarily from the Russian community through job placement, holiday food distribution, and Jewish identity programming. Children’s Institute offers highquality early education and youth programs, counseling services, parenting supports, workforce and community leadership development, and advocacy for community investment where it is needed most. Crossroads (Israel) provides crisis intervention and prevention programs for at-risk first- and second-generation immigrant teens in Israel.

Downtown Women’s Center serves and empowers women experiencing homelessness and formerly homeless women through housing, wellness, employment, and advocacy. Educating for Excellence (Israel) reduces socioeconomic inequality and fosters social mobility by creating opportunities for youth from underprivileged backgrounds. Friendship Circle provides Jewish children and young adults with special needs with a full range of social, recreational, educational, and Judaic experiences. Fuente Latina, Inc. engages and educates the US Latinx population about the Jewish world, Israel, and the Middle East through mainstream Spanish language platforms, including TV, radio, and print. Great Public Schools NOW invests in schools, organizations, and initiatives that catalyze excellence in public education, convene leaders, and uplift public understanding to advocate for great public schools. Gvahim (Israel) connects skilled new immigrants to the Israeli employment market and entrepreneurship ecosystem through training, mentorship, and networking. Hillel 818 provides students and young adults in the San Fernando Valley with Jewish education, social connections, mentorship, leadership skills, values, and community. See page 10

Hillel at UCLA builds Jewish UCLA students’ identities through Jewish life, learning, and connecting them with Israel. See page 10 Hillel – The Right to Choose (Israel) assists thousands of Yotzim (those who leave ultra-Orthodox communities) in integrating into wider Israeli society. Homeboy Industries aims to break the cycle of incarceration and violence by providing formerly incarcerated or gang-involved men and women with services and opportunities to reenter mainstream society. Honeymoon Israel Foundation organizes subsidized trips to Israel for Jewish newlyweds and helps them engage with their Jewish heritage and form new links to the community before, during, and after their trip. Hut HaMeshulash (Israel) provides Jewish identity programming, shelter, and support to at-risk youth and young adults in Jerusalem — including survivors of physical/sexual abuse, high school dropouts, and homeless youth — so they may reintegrate into society as confident and capable individuals. JQ International serves the Los Angeles Jewish LGBTQ+ community and sustains an inclusive and diverse Jewish community.

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OUR COVID-19 RESPONSE GRANTEES CONTINUED

JVS SoCal is a recognized regional leader in workforce development, offering a broad range of innovative programs and advocating on issues of public policy that impact the people it serves.

Jewish Graduate Student Initiative serves Jewish graduate students across Los Angeles’s major public and private institutions, including many law and medical programs, which may not have a local Hillel.

Jaffa Institute (Israel) works to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty by providing educational, nutritional, therapeutic, and social enrichment services to impoverished communities in Jaffa, South Tel Aviv, Bat Yam, and Bet Shemesh. See page 18

Koret Israel Economic Development Funds (Israel) creates employment opportunities and social equality for economically and socially marginalized populations in the private sector through its SME (small and medium enterprises) credit, and microfinance services.

Jewish Big Brothers Big Sisters of Los Angeles provides a myriad of programs, including mentorship, online support for teens, college assistance, and camp for Los Angeles’s Jewish and nonJewish youth. Jewish Family Service LA strengthens and preserves individual, family, and community life by providing a wide range of human services to people in the community at every stage of the life cycle. Jewish Free Loan Association provides interest-free loans on a nonsectarian basis to needy individuals and families for emergencies, education, developing small businesses, health care, and life cycle events.

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LA Family Housing helps families transition out of homelessness and poverty through a continuum of housing and supportive services. Latet (Israel) is the largest organization combating poverty and food insecurity in Israel, and provides monthly food assistance to low-income families and food and medical aid to Holocaust survivors. Los Angeles Jewish Home provides excellence in senior care reflective of Jewish values. See page 14 Los Angeles LGBT Center currently is the world’s largest nonprofit dedicated to serving the needs of the LGBTQ community, acting as a support system and lifeline for LGBTQ youth.


Los Angeles Regional Food Bank distributes food and supplies to more than 300,000 people every month. See page 16 Machshava Tova (Israel) offers underprivileged populations access to technology in a supportive and empowering environment by providing opportunities for training and creating new pathways in employment, increasing social inclusion, and minimizing social gaps in Israel. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Healthcare is a private nonprofit safety-net hospital dedicated to improving the health of the South Los Angeles community. See page 12 Moving Traditions engages and empowers teens across the gender spectrum, creating safe group spaces to foster self-discovery, challenge sexism, and inspire a commitment to Jewish life and learning. National Council of Jewish Women Los Angeles is committed to advancing economic justice for women and their families through direct service programs and policy advocacy. Olim Beyahad (Israel) increases the employment rate among Ethiopian Israeli university graduates by integrating them into the forefront of Israel’s workforce and providing equal employment opportunities.

Pico Union Project brings together different faiths and communities through its multi-faith cultural arts programming and provides spiritual programming, arts & culture, and volunteer opportunities for the LA Jewish community.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles convenes and leads the community on a broad range of Jewish social service, educational, civic, and humanitarian programs.

Project Angel Food cooks and delivers over 600,000 nutritious meals each year, free of charge, to the homes of people affected by life-threatening illnesses.

The Miracle Project provides individuals with autism and other disabilities with the tools to build communication, social skills, Jewish identity, community, and selfesteem through theatre, film, and expressive arts programs.

Sharsheret supports Jewish women and their families facing breast and ovarian cancer through culturally relevant individualized connections with networks of peers and health professionals.

Tomchei Shabbos (Touch of Kindness) aims to alleviate challenges facing families living an observant life in Greater Los Angeles, focusing on the Orthodox Jewish community.

Silverlake Independent Jewish Community Center creates community and provides an access point for young Jewish families and professionals living on the Eastside of Los Angeles.

USC Hillel is a support system and point of entry into Jewish life for young adults at USC. See page 10

Swipe Out Hunger addresses hunger among college students through practical and innovative solutions to campus hunger. theatre dybbuk engages a wide audience through contemporary theatrical productions inspired by Jewish traditions and leadership training for Jewish leaders and educators.

Unistream (Israel) narrows the socioeconomic gaps in Israel by training and mentoring highpotential youth and young adults from underserved communities and providing opportunities to realize their potential. Venice Family Clinic provides affordable healthcare for those who live in poverty through a network of clinic locations providing comprehensive healthcare services.

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TOGETHER, WE ARE ENHANCING STUDENT LIFE ON CAMPUS

Thanks to the emergency COVID-19 grant, we are able to focus on the well-being of Jewish Bruins at a time when they need us the most. Providing pastoral care, mental health resources, kosher meals, and a stable source of connection to Jewish life helps emerging adults feel less isolated and more engaged. Rabbi Aaron Lerner, Executive Director, Hillel at UCLA

USC Hillel is a support system and point of entry into Jewish life for young adults at USC. During COVID, its innovative mental health programming continued to ensure students had resources to connect and engage in Jewish life and receive emotional support throughout the pandemic. They also hosted weekly virtual programs like social justice initiatives, Jewish learning fellowships, and weekly Shabbat experiences. Hillel at UCLA is the center of Jewish life for one of the largest Jewish student bodies in the country. It has been an essential resource for connecting and engaging students during times of continued remote learning and social isolation. Funding supported mental health resources, kosher meals, and online programs that provided a stable connection to Jewish life throughout the pandemic. Hillel 818 serves Jewish students and young adults in the San Fernando Valley. Hillel 818 became an even more critical resource for the Los Angeles Jewish community as families impacted by the economic fallout of the pandemic sent their children to in-state schools. Funding supported programs addressing Jewish undergraduate students’ social, spiritual, and educational needs across local campuses, forming community through virtual programs, clubs, and Shabbat dinners.

3,315 STUDENTS

ENGAGED IN PROGRAMS 10


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TOGETHER, WE ARE ADVANCING ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Healthcare is a private nonprofit safety-net hospital dedicated to improving the health of the South Los Angeles community. The Foundation funded multiple COVID-19 response initiatives, including developing a bilingual virtual assistant, Mia, a powerful diagnostic tool that automated some of the hospital’s basic functions, enabling more people to be served daily. Funding also supported converting an entire floor into a COVID-19 intensive care unit and building an outpatient clinic where COVID-19 patients receive continuing support from their ICU medical team.

The Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles has always been known to lend a hand in difficult circumstances, and providing support during the pandemic has been no different. Their gift speaks to innovation and equity: themes that are threaded into the fabric of our work. Dyan Sublett, President

4,500

COVID-19 PATIENTS CARED FOR IN A SPECIALLY CONVERTED ICU UNIT 12


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TOGETHER, WE ARE PROTECTING OUR SENIORS Never has The Foundation’s generosity been more valued than during the unprecedented pandemic. It made a crucial difference in keeping residents active, while maintaining social distancing, by allowing us to purchase communications equipment such as cell phones, iPads, and other electronic devices – enabling us to provide a sense of normalcy during these extraordinary times. Dale Surowitz, CEO and President

Los Angeles Jewish Home provides excellence in senior care reflective of Jewish values. Funding supported staffing needs in the Factor Building Skilled Nursing Facility, which housed all residents who had tested positive for COVID-19 and required a separate staff to provide the long-term medical and rehabilitative therapies the patients needed. Funding also supported its Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) program, which enabled staff to bring resources to seniors who could not come into the facility for services due to COVID.

4,000+ VACCINES

ADMINISTERED TO RESIDENTS AND STAFF AS OF MARCH 2021 14


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TOGETHER, WE ARE FEEDING THE HUNGRY

Thanks to the generous support of The Foundation, we will be able to provide nutritious food to families, children, seniors, and individuals in our community, giving them hope during this difficult time.

LA Regional Food Bank distributes food and supplies to more than 300,000 people every month. Foundation support helped the organization utilize its Mobile Food Pantry vehicles for drive-through food distributions across Los Angeles County. Funding also supported efforts to supply several school systems, including LAUSD, with food kits to supplement the “Grab and Go” school lunch pickup programs to reach families struggling with food insecurity.

Michael Flood, President and CEO

4 MILLION POUNDS OF FOOD DISTRIBUTED WEEKLY

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TOGETHER, WE ARE BREAKING THE CYCLE OF POVERTY Jaffa Institute in Israel works to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty by providing educational, nutritional, therapeutic, and social enrichment services to impoverished communities in Jaffa, South Tel Aviv, Bat Yam, and Bet Shemesh. Funding supported the sustainability of 20+ programs, including after-school programs, English language classes, vocational training, counseling, and more, during a time of increased demand for services.

At-risk youth, families, the elderly, and Holocaust survivors need our help now more than ever. With the generous support of The Foundation, the Jaffa Institute was able to meet these increased nutritional and therapeutic needs in the South Tel Aviv region. David Portowicz, Founder

221,760 HOT MEALS PROVIDED 18


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TOGETHER, WE ARE ADDRESSING RACIAL EQUITY

The pandemic brought to light the inescapable inequities people of color face in almost every aspect of our society — healthcare, education, employment opportunities, and more. Additionally, the tragic deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and many others, and the summer of protests and civil unrest that followed, shined a spotlight on the pervasive systemic injustices acutely impacting Black Americans every day. As an organization committed to tikkun olam, repairing our broken world, it was important for The Foundation to acknowledge this directly through our grantmaking. After consulting with numerous prominent funders and experts in the field, in 2020 along with our COVID-19 Response Grants, The Foundation awarded grants totaling $325,000 to seven Black-led local organizations to address these inequities in multiple cause areas:

• • • • • • •

A New Way of Life Reentry Project African American Board Leadership Institute Anti-Recidivism Coalition Black Women for Wellness Jews of Color Initiative Los Angeles Brotherhood Crusade Social Justice Learning Institute

Funding supported health care for Black women and infants, job opportunities for at-risk youth and those exiting the justice system, access to quality education, and leadership opportunities for Black professionals. These nonprofits have received prior support from trusted funders and our donors, which helped inform our decision-making. Beyond that, we established criteria that included being Black-led, well-established, located in the communities they serve, and focused on providing direct services.

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This grant will support our work and continued efforts in equity and opportunity for formerly incarcerated people and their children. With The Foundation’s support, we expanded our housing services with two more safehouses during the pandemic for the women we serve. Susan Burton, Founder and Executive Director, A New Way of Life Reentry Project


A New Way of Life Reentry Project provides women exiting prison (primarily women of color) with a safe, welcoming, and structured place to stay, education and employment opportunities, case management, and legal services as they reenter the community.

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FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

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FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2020

YEAR AT A GLANCE TOTAL ASSETS $1.4 BILLION

$1.4B $1.3B

$1.2B

$162M

$1.5B $1.4B $1.3B

$1.2B

$1.2B

$1.1B

$291M

$1.0B

$1.1B $1B $900M

$280M

$800M $700M $600M $500M

$705M

$400M $300M $200M $100M

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

$0

All dollars in M are millions and in B are billions. Donor Advised Funds

Endowment Funds

Family Support Organizations

Agency Funds

• Donor Advised Funds constitute the largest pool, representing nearly 50% of all assets. This popular charitable tool requires a $5,000 minimum gift to begin. • Endowment Funds provide ongoing support to donors’ favorite causes, a specific field of interest, or The Foundation’s community grants and require a minimum of $25,000 to get started. • Family Support Organizations create a permanent legacy of family philanthropy, carried forward between generations, and require a minimum of $2.5 million to start. • Agency Funds are established by Jewish nonprofit agencies at The Foundation to manage their endowments and reserve funds.

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INVESTMENTS The Foundation’s endowments and agency funds are invested in the Common Investment Pool, a diversified portfolio with a long-term strategy of growth and preservation of capital. The Strategic Return Fund provides a similar long-term investment option for Donor Advised Funds of $50,000 or more. Both portfolios are overseen by our Investment Committee, a group of our lay leaders who are seasoned professionals managing portfolios worth billions of dollars. The Investment Committee relies on investment managers specializing in specific asset classes and works with an independent investment consultant, Canterbury Consulting, to regularly analyze market conditions and monitor the portfolios’ performance and risk.

COMMON INVESTMENT POOL DOMESTIC EQUITY

ALTERNATIVE INVESTMENTS

4%

33%

38%

$476M 25%

FIXED INCOME & CASH INTERNATIONAL EQUITY

RATES OF RETURN (%) as of 12/31/2020

1YR

3YR

5YR

7YR 10YR

CIP 13.0

8.3

9.0

6.6

SRF* 14.5

8.5

9.2

6.2

COMMON INVESTMENT POOL (CIP) STRATEGIC RETURN FUND (SRF) *Inception, October 2013

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7.2


TOTAL GRANTS

$116 MILLION FOUNDATION GRANTS $10 MILLION More than half of all Foundation grants By Field of Interest supported Human Services. Jewish causes remain the core focus of Foundation grantmaking By Sector, with 70% of grants designated for local and national Jewish nonprofits in 2020. Note that nearly all of The Foundation’s institutional grantmaking in 2020 was directed to pandemic relief.

FOUNDATION GRANTS * BY FIELD OF INTEREST HEALTH, SCIENCE, & ENVIRONMENT EDUCATION

5% 10%

14%

*Foundation Grants in 2020: COVID-19 Response Grants • Racial Equity Grants • Other Endowment Grants

52%

19% RELIGIOUS LIFE

HUMAN SERVICES ARTS, CULTURE, & CIVIC LIFE

FOUNDATION GRANTS * BY SECTOR

COMMUNITY AT LARGE

ISRAEL

6% 24%

70%

JEWISH - LOCAL & NATIONAL

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DONOR GRANTS $106 MILLION Donor Grants By Field of Interest were distributed nearly evenly in five areas: Health, Science & Environment; Human Services; Arts, Culture & Civic Life; Religious Life; and Education. Donors recommended nearly half of all grants to the Jewish community locally and nationally, almost one-third to the community at large, and close to one-quarter to Israel.

DONOR GRANTS BY FIELD OF INTEREST

HUMAN SERVICES

HEALTH, SCIENCE, & ENVIRONMENT

13%

23%

20% 23% 21% EDUCATION ARTS, CULTURE, & CIVIC LIFE RELIGIOUS LIFE

DONOR GRANTS BY SECTOR

JEWISH - LOCAL & NATIONAL

ISRAEL

23%

47%

30%

COMMUNITY AT LARGE

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CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Statement of Financial Position Assets Cash and investments Other assets Total assets Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities Net assets Total liabilities and net assets

12/31/2020

12/31/2019

$1,427,712,000

$1,327,204,000

10,754,000

11,973,000

$1, 438,466,000

$1, 339,177,000

$258,176,000

$246,914,000

1,180,290,000

1,092,263,000

$1, 438,466,000

$1, 339,177,000

2020

2019

$96,704,000

$108,352,000

108,369,000

155,111,000

205,073,000

263,463,000

109,411,000

132,670,000

7,635,000

8,273,000

117,046,000

140,943,000

88,027,000

122,520,000

1,092,263,000

969,743,000

$1,180,290,000

$1,092,263,000

Statement of Activities Revenue Contributions Other revenue Total revenue Expenses Grants Other expenses Total expenses Change in net assets Net assets at beginning of year Net assets at end of year

The Foundation is committed to being a faithful and efficient steward of assets on behalf of its many donors. The Foundation and its Board of Trustees work with an independent auditor, Moss Adams LLP, to ensure that management provides accurate and reliable financial information. The summarized financial reports above are unaudited and based on the 2020 audited financial statements, which can be found at www.jewishfoundationla.org/financials. In 2020, The Foundation’s operating expenses were approximately 0.5% of total assets, substantially lower than that of many community foundations. The Foundation has operated at or under budget every year for more than two decades, allowing it to invest additional dollars into the community. Learn more about The Foundation at www.jewishfoundationla.org.

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STAFF EXECUTIVE

Marvin I. Schotland President & CEO

Kate Martin Executive & Board Liaison

FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION

David Carroll Senior Vice President, Finance & Administration/CFO

Ellen Rosen Vice President and General Counsel

Ripsima Talverdian Controller

Daniel Maya Assistant Controller

DeWayne Nash General Ledger Accountant

Cynthia A. Jones Investment Accountant

June del Rosario Accountant/Payroll Specialist

Beverley Montgomery Office Manager

Iris M. Rodgers Foundation Secretary

GRANTS MANAGEMENT

Jaycee Greenblatt Grants Manager

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Sarina Raby Sr. Grants Management Associate


DEVELOPMENT

Dan Rothblatt Executive Vice President

Steve Gamer Vice President, Advancement

Natella Royzman Vice President, Charitable Gift Planning

Tamara Pickering Database and IT Support Manager

Georgina Baquet Database Coordinator & Events Manager

Heather Baroff Donor Stewardship Associate

Heather Glynn Development Assistant

Warren Fong

Sara Hahn

Senior Program Officer

Senior Program Officer

Charlotte Friedman Program Officer

CENTER FOR DESIGNED PHILANTHROPY

Naomi Strongin Vice President, Center for Designed Philanthropy

MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Lewis Groner

Janet Keller

Lily Reiner

Vice President,

Marketing &

Marketing &

Marketing &

Communications

Communications

Communications

Manager

Specialist

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LEADERSHIP

OFFICERS Evan Schlessinger Chair

Dan Rothblatt Executive Vice President

Marvin I. Schotland President & CEO

David Carroll Senior Vice President, Finance & Administration/CFO

Abby L.T. Feinman Vice President, Center for Designed Philanthropy Committee Co-Chair Marcia Weiner Mankoff Vice President, General Community Grants Committee Chair Harold J. Masor Vice President, Audit Committee Chair Scott H. Richland Vice President Mark N. Schwartz Vice President, Reimagine Grants Committee Chair Eugene Stein Vice President Adlai W. Wertman Vice President, Center for Designed Philanthropy Committee Co-Chair

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Steve Gamer Vice President, Advancement Lewis Groner Vice President, Marketing & Communications Ellen Rosen Vice President & General Counsel Natella Royzman Vice President, Charitable Gift Planning Naomi Strongin Vice President, Center for Designed Philanthropy Selwyn Gerber Secretary, Israel Grants Committee Chair Anthony Chanin Treasurer, Finance Committee Chair


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Martin S. Appel*

Debra Smalley

Jonathan M. Glaser

Lynn Bider

Michael G. Smooke

Glenn Golenberg

Anthony Chanin

Andrea Sonnenberg

Daniel V. Goodstein

Allan B. Cutrow*

Eugene Stein

Dorothy S. Goren

William R. Feiler*

Cathy Siegel Weiss* Investment Committee Co-Chair

Ronald M. Kabrins

Abby L.T. Feinman Lorin M. Fife* Mindy Freedman

Adlai W. Wertman *Past chair

Mitchell T. Kaplan Mark S. Karlan Martin L. Kozberg

Selwyn Gerber

Jewish Federation

Ronald L. Leibow

Bertrand I. Ginsberg

Albert Praw

Jeffrey L. Levine

Daniella Naim Kahen

Jay Sanderson

Jordan L. Lurie

Mark Lainer*

ADVISORY BOARD

Jeffrey Loeb Matthew Louchheim Marcia Weiner Mankoff Harold J. Masor Heidi Monkarsh Ari Moss Lawrence Rauch* Scott H. Richland Marc Rohatiner Karen Sandler Scott Sandler Evan Schlessinger Mark N. Schwartz

Francis S. Maas Todd M. Morgan

Kenneth A. August Leah Bishop

James A. Nathan, Investment Committee Co-Chair

George T. Caplan

Joyce R. Powell

Jonathan Cookler

Nathan Sandler

Sonia S. Cummings

Richard A. Schulman

Hugo D. de Castro

Richard S. Volpert

Cliff Einstein Marketing Committee Chair

Peter Weil

Max Factor, III Irwin S. Field Alan J. Gindi Herb Glaser

Barbi Weinberg Bruce F. Whizin Keenan L. Wolens Marilyn Ziering Raymond J. Zolekhian

Alexandra Shabtai Annette Shapiro* 31


JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF LOS ANGELES 6505 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD, SUITE 1200, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, 90048 www.jewishfoundationla.org

Profile for Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles

2020 Impact Report  

2020 Impact Report  

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