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THINGS you may or may not KNOW ABOUT OUR

FEDERATION CELEBRATING 110 YEARS OF MAKING HISTORY

2013 ANNUAL REPORT


Steve Hoffman and Reneé Chelm

Within the pages of this year’s Annual Report we celebrate 110 years of making history! We do this because of you. And people like you, who believe that together we can make a difference.

To our friends & neighbors 2

Celebrating 110 Years of Making History

When we started in 1903, our leadership was exemplary. They paved the way for today’s donors and volunteers to continue the legacy of working as a collective. We were the first Federation in the country to support day school education as a means to ensuring our Jewish future and launch an endowment fund as a safety net in times of crisis. We were one of the first to rally behind Ethiopian Jewry and help them make aliyah to Israel thirty years ago, and this year, the final 400 joined.

We made history then, and we are still making history today. Locally and globally, we are changing lives. We aspire to leave no community member behind, in Cleveland, Israel and 70 countries around the world. Thank you for your continued support. May we go from strength to strength. Sincerely,

Reneé Chelm Board Chair

Steve Hoffman President


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We are celebrating 110 years of making history! In 1903, we first opened our doors under the name The Federation of Jewish Charities of Cleveland when eight independent Jewish agencies unified their fundraising efforts to focus more attention on social and welfare initiatives.

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Today, we are one of the largest grant makers in the state of Ohio. This year alone, we made over 7,000 grants totaling over $150 million to Jewish and general causes.

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Our president, Stephen H. Hoffman, known internationally as one of the go-to people in Jewish communal service, celebrated 30 years at the helm this year.

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This year, Michael Siegal’s term as Board Chair in Cleveland ended, as he started his term as Board Chair for the Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA), our national system.

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Our current Board Chair is Reneé Chelm, who has worked as a volunteer leader for over fifteen years, locally and nationally. She was the first woman to hold the volunteer leadership position of General Campaign Chair and is the third woman to hold the position of Board Chair.

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Cleveland is known for producing top leadership. We were pioneers of Federation leadership training in 1953, setting the standard throughout the country. To date, our Mandel Symposia and Courses alone have trained well over a thousand community leaders.

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represented 40% of the total donor base, 40% of the Board of Trustees, and 43% of standing committee chair positions.

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We instituted Pathways to Leadership, an initiative that works to remove barriers for women and supports their leadership aspirations, benefitting the community as a whole. Each year, women’s engagement grows. Focused outreach efforts have resulted in an array of activities and events designed by women, for women. From mission trips to hands-on volunteer projects, our community’s women are inspiring others to take action.

Women’s professional mission participants Celebrating 110 Years of Making History 4

Volunteers at Chanukah in a Basket

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Volunteers came together to donate, wrap, and deliver gift baskets at the annual Chanukah in a Basket event, which garnered almost 2,000 gift donations for our Jewish community’s neediest kids.

In our recent population study, 19% of Jewish households reported they are living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. Through our volunteer and donor support, we aspire to leave no community member behind.

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OF ANY CITY. THERE MAY BE VOLUNTEERS AS GOOD, BUT THERE ARE NONE BETTER.” — STEVE HOFFMAN, FEDERATION PRESIDENT

THIS YEAR’S VOLUNTEER AWARD WINNERS ARE: Irene Zehman Volunteer Award: Dr. Karen Jaffe In a courageous fight against Parkinson’s Disease, Dr. Jaffe co-founded Shaking with Laughter, a charitable organization that funds Parkinson’s research, and serves as a member of the Patient Advisory Board of the Michael J. Fox Foundation. Gries Family Award: Gary Shamis Through key leadership roles, Shamis has been exemplary in his ability to build relationships that impact both the Jewish and general communities to better the world we all share.

Charles Eisenman Award, our highest civic honor: Tim & Sandy Wuliger Through their exceptional leadership, philanthropy and volunteer service, the Wuligers have made transformative contributions to our local and global Jewish and general community.

Bennett and Donna Yanowitz Leadership Award: Rabbi Hal Rudin-Luria An inspirational young leader, Rabbi Rudin-Luria shares his passion for Israel, the Jewish people and our community, both locally and nationally.

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Amb. Milton and Roslyn Z. Wolf Young Campaigner of the Year Award: Rachel Elizabeth Heiser A passionate young leader, Heiser’s volunteer service and commitment to the annual Campaign greatly enriches our local and global community.

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“Cleveland volunteers are the best

Ruby Bass Award: Suellen Kadis Through her deep commitment to the Women’s Campaign, Kadis’ tireless volunteer efforts in support of our Jewish community sets an example for all women.

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“WE CAN ACCOMPLISH FAR MORE BY WORKING TOGETHER THAN BY ACTING ALONE.” — TIM WULIGER The Wuligers

2013 Annual Report

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OUR JEWISH VOLUNTEER NETWORK

PEI volunteer tutors a student

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Celebrating 110 Years of Making History

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(JVN) offers access to Jewish and general volunteer opportunities throughout the community. This year, over 1,500 volunteers participated in programs related to hunger, poverty, and literacy.

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We partner with the Cleveland Food Bank to combat hunger. In five days, we served nearly 700 hot lunches to local school kids who may not have enough to eat when school is closed through our Winter Break Lunch Program.

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This year, we served over 100,000 meals to people in need of all ages. And, we provided over 13,000 seniors with food, medicine, and home care locally and globally.

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We connect with homebound elderly, who sometimes eat just one nutritious meal a day. Our volunteers deliver food and conversation to our most vulnerable population even when government programs do not. On holidays, our homebound elderly still receive a hot meal from a friendly face.

Public Education Initiative (PEI), our volunteer tutoring program, helps 300+ K – 12 students in eight Cleveland schools learn how to read each year. In 2013, we helped a total of 3,500 children learn to read through our mentorship programs at home and around the globe.


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In 1948, we became the first Federation in the country to fund a day school. It was the Hebrew Academy of Cleveland, which we still fund today, in addition to Agnon, Gross Schechter, and Fuchs Mizrachi.

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In 2013, more than 3,000 local students received financial aid to attend pre-school, day school or college. We also provide scholarships to families who cannot afford

JEWISH SUMMER CAMP.

“I CAN BE JEWISH AND PROUD, BECAUSE JUDAISM IS CELEBRATED AND BEING JEWISH IS FUN!” — MAX ALTER, ON HIS JEWISH SUMMER CAMP EXPERIENCE

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71% of national Jewish community young leaders attended Jewish overnight summer camp.

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Last year, a total of 6,700 young people got the chance to enjoy Jewish summer camp and make connections that last a lifetime, both locally and globally.

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We are connecting kids of all ages to traditional Jewish values through programs like Saltzman Youth Panel, 8th Night of Chanukah, and PJ Library®. From preschoolers to teens, our future leaders are getting an early start to learning about tzedakah and mitzvot. Max Alter with Sheri Gross 2013 Annual Report 7


30 Originally created as a safety net,

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Endowment Fund resources are used for the community’s benefit. For example, we support innovation, developing new ideas and ground-breaking programming.

8th Night of Chanukah Event

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gifts represent a commitment to the health and welfare of our Jewish community and provide security for future generations. This year, we launched the Create Your Jewish Legacy initiative, increasing the exposure of our charitable gift planning opportunities.

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In 1954, we became the first of all Federations in the country to create an Endowment Fund program. Today, we have one of the leading programs in North America.

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In times of crisis, resources are used to make emergency grants to assist victims of natural and economic disasters. We have provided close to $10 million in grants to offer humanitarian aid in the United States, Israel and around the world in the last four decades.

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In recent years, Israelis were under fire during Operation Pillar of Defense. Partnering with other Federations around the country, we sent $210,000 toward the total $5 million contributed by our national system, which provided respite to over 5,000 Israelis fleeing rocket attacks and needing relief in a time of terror.

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Celebrating 110 Years of Making History


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100% of proceeds from emergency fundraising go directly to relief efforts led by our national and international partners.

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Our Jewish communities are connected through a national system, JFNA, where our Cleveland Federation President, Steve Hoffman, was “on loan” for three years as CEO. During his tenure, he created the Secure Community Network (SCN), the first national non-profit dedicated to protecting the American Jewish community through homeland security initiatives. Paul Goldenberg is the SCN director, whose main function is to provide rapid information sharing in crisis situations and enhance security awareness at Jewish organizations and institutions to protect against terrorism and other threats. Locally, Jim Hartnett is the Federation’s Director of Security. A former FBI Special Agent, his job is to oversee the security of Cleveland’s Jewish institutions.

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This year, we hosted the first Annual Law Enforcement Executive Summit, convening experts from all government branches to discuss keeping our local Jewish community safe. We are building relationships, sharing information, and creating a culture of security throughout the community. The Summit included 12 area police chiefs, two Cleveland-based FBI Special Agents, and two Chief Deputies from the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Office.

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We help people in Cleveland, in any state across our nation, or any country around our world. When there is a crisis, you can count on us.

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Just this past year, three unforeseen natural disasters shook the lives of thousands at home and overseas. We were on the ground, providing emergency relief efforts and helping save lives. From our endowment fund and individual donations, we contributed nearly $65,000 to support victims of the typhoon in the Philippines, the flooding in Colorado, and the tornado in Oklahoma.

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When disaster strikes, we mobilize into action. Raise funds to provide relief. Offer humanitarian aide to alleviate hunger and hardship.

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Security Summit participants 2013 Annual Report

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We facilitated a visit from Israeli agriculturalist Zion Daco, from our sister city of Beit Shean, at the request of Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio). They visited urban farms in our region and discussed how his hothouse and energy-saving techniques can be adapted by local growers. Cleveland ranks #2 nationally in urban farming and gardening.

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Forty Cleveland-area urban farmers attended Daco’s presentation at the Cleveland Botanical Garden, hosted by the Congressional office of Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio), whose 11th District office has been instrumental in supporting programs aimed at urban farming.

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In 1951, the Jewish Welfare Federation merged with the Jewish Community Council to become the Jewish Community Federation. The Council did the work the

COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE

(CRC) does today, serving as the representative voice of the local Jewish community and working to repair the world through Jewish activism.

Zion Daco with Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur

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“YOU PLANT A SEED AND HOPE IT GROWS. IF WE CAN SHARE OUR RESULTS WITH EACH OTHER, WE ARE ALL GOING TO LIVE BETTER.”

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Celebrating 110 Years of Making History

— ZION DACO, ISRAELI AGRICULTURALIST


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(GRC) advocates for legislation that reflects our core Jewish values on issues such as strengthening the U.S./Israel relationship, providing adequate resources for our vulnerable seniors and more.

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Last year, we hosted an event to mark the 25th Anniversary of Summit Sunday in Washington, D.C. when 250,000 Americans gathered with the clarion call: Let My People Go! Cleveland was one of the first communities to support freeing Soviet Jews.

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We host one of the largest annual Jewish community-wide events: Yom Ha’zikaron, a day of remembrance, and Yom Ha’atzmaut, Israel’s Independence Day. Free and open to the public, the 2013 Yom Ha’atzmaut event drew a record-breaking 2,000+ people and featured international Israeli superstar David Broza to celebrate Israel’s 65th birthday.

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“AS A COMMUNITY WE ARE STRONGEST WHEN WE STAND TOGETHER. AS A PEOPLE, WE MUST NEVER STAY SILENT.” — WARREN L. WOLFSON, CRC CHAIR

We produced a magazine called Israel at 65 this year, with lots of fun facts about Israel. A few of our favorites are:

In its 65-year history, two Israeli Prime Ministers and one President have won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Israel produces 93% of the food it eats, requiring very few ingredients to be imported and helping them to be self-sustaining.

Relative to its population, Israel is the largest immigrant-absorbing nation on earth.

Over 140 countries have benefited from Israeli humanitarian aid.

Israel makes up only 2% of the population in the Middle East and is only 1/6 of 1% of the land mass.

2013 Annual Report

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We were first to help innovate and fund a program with the Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) called Parents and Children Together (PACT), a literacy program aimed at Ethiopian-Israeli children ages 6 months to 12 years.

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Ten years ago, Federation President Steve Hoffman was at the helm of helping over 20,000 Ethiopian Jews still remaining in Ethiopia, make aliyah to Israel. This year, with the help of the national federation system, JFNA, the last 400 Jewish Ethiopians immigrated to their homeland.

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REMARKABLE STORY

This of the Ethiopian people is also a story of helping an immigrant population assimilate into their new culture. We started wrap-around programming to support these families. Without intensive support, their children were at risk for becoming a permanent underclass.

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PACT teacher with students

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The PACT program closes the developmental and performance gap that separates the immigrant population from their peers.

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In total, over 4,000 Ethiopian-Israelis lives are getting better, because of one very special program. Since its inception, PACT has reduced the kindergarten repetition rate among EthiopianIsraeli children from 48% to 2%.

ISHA p Celebrating 110 Years of Making History


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We are the first to partner with the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) Education Corps to

IMPACT AND IMPROVE LIVES

for disadvantaged youth who should be starting army service, but are considered at-risk. Without it, their ability to succeed in Israeli society greatly diminishes.

The army-prep base Havat HaShomer is for young men and run exclusively by young women, because “they won’t hit a woman,” according to the documentary Yes, Miss Commander. We invite women commanders to Cleveland where they learn from our expert partners how to better work with at-risk youth.

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“I HELP CHILDREN AT-RISK BECAUSE I’VE BEEN THERE, IT’S MY STORY, AND I GOT A CHANCE TO CHANGE MY LIFE.”

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— MICHAEL BEN SHITRIT, HAVAT HASHOMER GRADUATE

Through our intervention and training for at-risk men and women, we have helped change more than 5,500 lives.

HELPING THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL TAKE CARE of

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themselves, and their health. The Israel Health Advancement for Women (ISHA) is a women’s health collaborative that provides pioneering solutions for marginalized and underserved women in Israel, from secular to religious to ultra-Orthodox to Arab.

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In just 10 years, 300,000+ women have benefitted from the ISHA project.

Our ISHA representative is a new member of the Ministry of Health Council on Women’s Health.

ISHA program participants 2013 Annual Report

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In addition to the work we do through our partner agencies, we invest in independent projects in Israel, and manage them through our

BEIT SHEAN IS CLEVELAND’S

OVERSEAS CONNECTIONS COMMITTEE (OCC).

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Brittany Kaback and Michael Feller

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Last year, we launched “I-Connect” a one-stop shop for Israel travel programs geared toward young people between the ages of approximately 18 to 30. One of the most familiar is Taglit-Birthright Israel, a free 10 day journey connecting young adults to their Jewish homeland and heritage. They experience well-known sites of Israel and explore spots off-the-beaten-path, like our sister city Beit Shean.

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This year, our sister city Beit Shean welcomed a new I-Connect program, the Jewish Agency’s Masa Israel Teaching Fellows (ITF); here, dedicated young adult volunteers transform how English is taught in periphery areas of Israel, where English is required to excel in University.

“ENGLISH IS THE LANGUAGE OF OPPORTUNITY FOR THE PEOPLE OF BEIT SHEAN.” 14

— KEVIN POLLACK, ITF PARTICIPANT

Celebrating 110 Years of Making History

To spur growth, we invest in a neighborhood revitalization and community development program called Bridge to the Future (BTF). Through skill building programs, we are helping turn Beit Shean into a tourist destination. This year, three women who are working on businesses to boost tourism in their native Beit Shean joined us in Cleveland to share their culinary expertise. In an exchange of cultural insight and exploration, we hosted Festival of Flavors, an event that garnered over 300 local attendees.


ELAND’S SISTER CITY IN ISRAEL.

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“THEY ENRICH OUR LIVES IN CLEVELAND AND WE OFFER TRAINING THEY CANNOT ACCESS WHERE THEY LIVE. IT’S A WONDERFUL RELATIONSHIP FOR EVERYONE.”

We bring Israeli arts and culture to Cleveland through our

CLEVELAND ISRAEL ARTS CONNECTION 62

working with the finest local arts organizations and institutions. In the past year, approximately 9,000 people from diverse backgrounds explored the beauty of Israel and Jewish life through dance, music, film, theater, visual art and literature.

Hanoch Piven (center) with Erica Hartman-Horvitz (L) and Roe Green (R)

— MICHAL SOCLOF, FESTIVAL OF FLAVORS EVENT CHAIR

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“ART PROVIDES A COMMON LANGUAGE SPOKEN BY EVERY CULTURE.”

Dinah Hadida and guests at Festival of Flavors

Our Mandel Building is home to the Roe Green Gallery, which showcases Israeli artists. The most recent exhibit, Piven World, introduced Clevelanders to world-renowned Israeli illustrator and caricature artist Hanoch Piven, who delighted audiences with interactive workshops.

— ERICA HARTMAN-HORVITZ AND ROE GREEN, CO-CHAIRS OF CLEVELAND ISRAEL ARTS CONNECTION 2013 Annual Report 2013 Annual Report

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is our sister city in Russia, where we work to renew Jewish life and build Jewish identity for its 100,000 Jewish residents. The vibrant Jewish community center, YESOD, which we helped build, has become a center for Jewish life, featuring Jewish education and family retreats. We recently pioneered a new effort, the first and only Capacity Building Project, to help St. Petersburg’s Jewish community become more self-sufficient. This year, volunteer and professional leaders from the Lehava Group joined us in Cleveland to learn how we collaborate, fundraise and plan for the Jewish future.

Participants of Mission to Warsaw, Krakow and Berlin

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When the Federation began in 1903, we raised a total of $35,072 from 685 donors to support local needs. In 1931, we established the first Annual Campaign to raise funds for both local and overseas needs. Today, we support people in Cleveland, Israel, and 70 countries

AROUND THE GLOBE.

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Partnering with the Federation to deliver the Torah, J. David Heller, our Campaign Chair, was one of the people who carried the gift to its new home during a mission. Clevelanders saw firsthand the renewal of Jewish life and culture in cities that had been decimated by the Holocaust.

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Warsaw was a thriving community of nearly 400,000 Jews before the Holocaust; today, it is a community of 20,000 and growing.

“THIS PROGRAM REALLY CHANGES YOUR LIFE.”

— MASHA SIMANOVICH, LEHAVA GROUP PARTICIPANT 16

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When Michael Schudrich, Chief Rabbi of Poland, came to Cleveland, he spoke of a great need for Torahs. Members of Young Israel were inspired to restore and donate one of their own.

Celebrating 110 Years of Making History


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“THAT’S WHAT CAMPAIGN IS ALL ABOUT: ONE JEW ASKING ANOTHER JEW TO HELP A THIRD JEW, WHETHER AROUND THE CORNER OR AROUND THE GLOBE. WE ARE ALL CONNECTED.” —J. DAVID HELLER, CAMPAIGN CHAIR

Campaign Closing Event

We are the only Jewish organization that considers the needs of our community as a whole and plans for its future. Our annual

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CAMPAIGN FOR JEWISH NEEDS raises funds to support our local and global community in the year ahead. When special needs arise, we raise the dollars necessary. This year, we raised an additional $3 million in special funding to support our aging Holocaust survivors locally.

Our model of fundraising was the inspiration for the United Way’s campaign. We have 100% staff participation in the United Way campaign and our own staff Campaign for Jewish Needs. We believe in what we do and we do it for our community, with our community.

WE ARE ONE!

Over 500 volunteers helped raise $29,609,410 from over 11,300 donors in support of the 2014 Campaign for Jewish Needs. Cleveland’s Campaign total per capita is among the highest in the country.

2013 Annual Report

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At the first ever YLD Big Event this year, over 300

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heard Alina Spaulding share her story of fleeing the Ukraine with her parents while her father was on the brink of death. The global Jewish community rallied around her, saved her father—saved them all. She spoke of how she now gives back: as a mother, a teacher, and a generous donor. And, that we should too.

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When we work together to benefit people like Alina and her family, we are writing a new ending to her family’s story. She is just one of tens of thousands who have been touched by the generosity of our community and our work.

Young Leadership Division (YLD) is making our world a better place. If you’re 21 – 45 and want to get involved, you can join us in:

Building networks of young Jewish professionals Raising money to change and save lives Helping our community grow and thrive

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FOR 110 YEARS, WE HAVE BEEN MAKING HISTORY AND WE ARE STILL MAKING HISTORY TODAY TO BENEFIT OUR COMMUNITY TOMORROW.

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YLD Big Event 18

Celebrating 110 Years of Making History


THANK todah YOU B EC AU S E O F YO U, T H I S WO R LD, O U R WO R LD, IS A B ET T ER P LACE.

Together with our 78

PARTNER AGENCIES

we are feeding the hungry, comforting the sick, caring for the elderly, educating youth, ensuring a Jewish future, bridging cultural divides and supporting Israel. Together, we do all of these things and more.

LOCALLY The Agnon School Akiva High School Bellefaire Jewish Children’s Bureau Cleveland Hillel Foundation Fuchs Mizrachi School Gross Schechter Day School Hebrew Academy of Cleveland Hebrew Shelter Home

Hillel at Kent State University* Jewish Education Center of Cleveland Jewish Family Service Association Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage* Mandel Jewish Community Center Menorah Park Center for Senior Living Montefiore *Candidacy status

AROUND THE GLOBE American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee Jewish Agency for Israel Jewish Federations of North America World ORT

2013 Annual Report

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The Jewish Federation of Cleveland’s endowment funds, donor advised funds and supporting foundations, combined with the annual Campaign for Jewish Needs and Centennial Initiative for Jewish Cleveland fundraising, make the Federation one of Ohio’s largest grantmaking organizations – with more than $153 million allocated from all sources in the 2013 fiscal year.

to our sponsors

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Platinum Sponsor

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TOTAL GRANTMAKING BY CATEGORY Federation and local beneficiary agencies and services 19.0% $29,162,539 Overseas Jewish agencies and services 9.6% $14,701,684

Gold Sponsors

Other agencies and services for Jewish purposes 51.4% $78,712,230 Northeast Ohio and educational organizations 14.5% $22,209,475 Charitable organizations outside Northeast Ohio 3.1% $4,816,874 National Jewish agencies 2.4% $3,636,415

Silver Sponsors

SOURCE OF GRANTS

75 YEARS

Supporting foundations* 59.0% Annual Campaign allocations 18.1% Donor advised funds* 18.4%

Bronze Sponsors

Endowment funds* 3.8% Centennial Initiative for Jewish Cleveland 0.7%

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Celebrating 110 Years of Making History

* Does not include grants to the Campaign for Jewish Needs


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Total Grantmaking from the Jewish Federation of Cleveland Local agencies and services The Agnon School Akiva High School Bellefaire Jewish Children’s Bureau Centrally Administered Funds (audit, insurance, retirement) Cleveland Hillel Foundation Fuchs Mizrachi School Fund for the Jewish Future (supports family and informal education, teacher training and Israel programs)* Gross Schechter Day School Hebrew Academy of Cleveland Hebrew Shelter Home (Independent Montefiore Shelter Home) Holocaust Survivor Initiative Jewish Federation of Cleveland (programs and services) Jewish Education Center of Cleveland JFSA - Jewish Family Service Association Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies Educational Foundation Mandel Jewish Community Center Menorah Park Center for Senior Living Montefiore

CAMPAIGN ALLOCATION 1

TOTAL

From the 2013 Campaign for Jewish Needs for fiscal year 7/1/13 - 6/30/14

OTHER FEDERATION SUPPORT

From donor advised and special purpose funds, supporting foundations, the Endowment Fund and Centennial Initiative for fiscal year 7/1/12 - 6/30/13

864,956 130,054 1,338,810 60,000 701,635 1,862,043 3,399,515 609,291 3,350,280 96,029 199,153 2,285,548 4,815,439 4,391,366 500,268 2,375,066 1,024,875 1,158,211

481,224 130,054 1,104,355 60,000 616,722 470,840 2,874,515 390,433 1,212,318 83,711 -1,402,774 1,118,460 2,546,810 500,000 1,895,980 413,040 336,372

383,732 -234,455 -84,913 1,391,203 525,000 218,858 2,137,962 12,318 199,153 882,774 3,696,979 1,844,556 268 479,086 611,835 821,839

29,162,539

15,637,608

13,524,931

11,849,216

8,428,852

3,420,364

2,852,468

2,852,468

--

14,701,684

11,281,320

3,420,364

110,335 81,850 1,335,866 17,624 127,259 6,000 2,100 1,757,743

57,000 54,500 42,000 10,000 84,759 6,000 2,100 474,700

53,335 27,350 1,293,866 7,624 42,500 --1,283,043

197,638

197,638

--

3,636,415

928,697

2,707,718

Other grants for Jewish purposes Includes local synagogues, local and national Jewish organizations meeting educational and humanitarian needs, and international organizations that serve Jewish communities in need.

78,712,230

--

78,712,230

Subtotal

78,712,230

--

78,712,230

Northeastern Ohio charitable and educational organizations serving the general community.

22,209,475

--

22,209,475

Subtotal

22,209,475

--

22,209,475

Charitable organizations outside Northeastern Ohio serving the general community.

4,816,874

--

4,816,874

Subtotal

4,816,874

--

4,816,874

153,239,217

27,847,625

Subtotal Overseas agencies and services Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) provides assistance to those in need and translates Jewish values into action on behalf of millions of Jews worldwide. Works in close partnership with the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI) and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC). Also supports Cleveland’s Partnership 2000 program in Beit Shean and the Valley of Springs, the Ronald S. Lauder JDC camp in Szarvas, Hungary, and summer camps for children in the former Soviet Union. Jewish Federation of Cleveland Overseas Programs, under the direction of the Overseas Connections Committee, links Jews in Cleveland with Jews around the world. Programs include: Parents and Children Together (PACT) for Ethiopian-Israelis; Israel Health Advancement for Women (ISHA), advancing women’s health in Israel; IDF Education Corps Projects and the Havat HaShomer army base for at-risk young men and women; Partnership 2000, connecting Jews in Cleveland and Beit Shean, Israel; Bridge to the Future, a community change organization in Beit Shean, Israel; Jordan/Cross-Border Initiative, connecting Jordanians and Israelis; and the Cleveland/St. Petersburg Partnership for community-building programs in St. Petersburg, Russia and Jewish identity programs in six towns in its periphery. Subtotal National agencies American Jewish Committee Anti-Defamation League B’nai B’rith/BBYO Hadassah Hillel at Kent State University Jewish Council for Public Affairs Jewish War Veterans National Alliance: Association of Jewish Family Services, Hillel Foundation for Jewish Campus Life, Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), JCC Association, Jewish Council for Public Affairs, Jewish Education Service of North America, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, National Conference on Soviet Jewry, and National Foundation for Jewish Culture Ohio Valley Hillel Consortium Subtotal

Grand Total * The Fund for the Jewish Future is a partnership of communal agencies, synagogues and schools that develops and implements programs to dramatically enhance our community’s Jewish educational system. The Fund is administered by the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland and received an allocation from the 2013 Campaign for Jewish Needs to support teacher training, enhanced technology, and educational opportunities for students, including those who have special needs. The Fund also provides local synagogues with more than $1 million in educational programs and services.

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125,391,592

Includes United Way Services (UWS) grant of $1,970,618. UWS supports Bellefaire, JFSA, Mandel JCC and the Federation. Includes Centennial Initiative grants. Includes grants to organizations that are also funded by the National Alliance of Jewish Federations of North America. Represents amount approved from the Federation Endowment Fund in a prior year for the Fund for the Jewish Future. From the annual Campaign after deducting fundraising cost of under 10 percent, one of the lowest overhead costs of any charitable organization in Ohio.

2013 Annual Report

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STAND

Federation Staff As of November 2013

2013 Board of Trustees

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Stephen H. Hoffman, President Administration Tami Caplan, Vice President Annie Becker Tammy Rubin Development Team Hedy Milgrom, Vice President Alan D. Gross, Vice President Shelley Milin Marcus, Assistant Vice President Abbie Levin, Assistant Vice President Todd Polikoff, Director Terry Amon Jessie Bruder Caroline Brunet R. Michael Cole Ellen Fishman Ann Garson Lisa Hacker Nancy Kaleal Matthew Kaliff Elizabeth Klein Joyce Lisiewski Linda McFarland Francesca Parente Williams Tal Rothstein Jennifer Schwarz Christine Sebrasky Janet Schwartz Shapiro Renée Tyler Carol Wolf Debra S. Yasinow Donor Service Operations Center Allison Levine, Director Rosie Brown Marcia Greenis Jill Jacobson Rima Melman Bela Mindlin Laura Steinberg

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Fiscal Barry Reis, Sr. Vice President & CFO Sheila Allenick, Director Annette Banks Larry Blaha Kari Blumenthal Heather Colbert-Eckert Debbie Duval Paul Feinberg Herzl Ginsburg Michelle Golan Laurie Hallal Nancy Hoffner Bonnie Huston Faye Matitia Sharon Newman Katie Palus Manya Smilovich Irina Temkin Elaine Thomas Howard Wolf Human Resources Development Mandel Center for Leadership Excellence Tami Caplan, Vice President Naomi Fein Diane Fistek Susan Kariv Information Systems Daniel Strom, Director Paul Gajowski Chris Jacobs Allen Roth Michael Walton Chris Weber International, Community and Government Relations Oren Baratz, Vice President Dayan Gross, Director Amy Kaplan, Director Julie Auerbach Mirit Balkan Clil Gross Ilanit Gerblich Kalir Debbie Klein Sally Levine Jackie Reed Susie Turiel

Celebrating Celebrating 110 110 Years Years of of Making Making History History

Marketing & Communications Dahlia Fisher, Director Amy Cummings Aaron Kaufman Mike Kostechak Sylvia Owen Allison Agin Solomon Rebecca Stolarsky Jennifer Stuart Lesch Bryan Thomas Ali Yares Operations Grant Fish Ron Hale Judy Joffe Kellie Mirabile Laura Sue Mirabile Planning, Allocations & Community Service Erika Rudin-Luria, Vice President Cathy Weiss, Director Karen Baker Shelley Fishbach Jayme Honigman Malki Karkowsky Pat Keating Sharon Levey Ellen Miller Lakshmi Eastman Nebel Barbara Rose Kelly Sperber Rubanenko Dana Scott Security James Hartnett, Director Walter Augustyn George Majernik David Moughan Paul Mazzola Charles Muckley Jim Ross Volunteer Center (PEI, JVN & Chaplaincy) Rabbi Akiva Feinstein Susan Hyman, Director Rabbi Alan Lettofsky Jessica Semel Jeanne Shatten Talya Sterling Rabbi Edward Sukol Rabbi Simcha Zevit

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

107

Board Chair, Reneé Chelm Vice Chairs: Gary L. Gross, J. David Heller, Judge Dan A. Polster, Beth Rosenberg, Enid Rosenberg Treasurer, Randall J. Korach • Associate Treasurer, Zev Weiss • President, Stephen H. Hoffman Executive Committee David F. Adler • Eric E. Bell • Beth Wain Brandon • Jeffrey S. Davis • Margaret Richards Frankel • Richard M. Glaser Gerald W. Goldberg • Robert Goldberg* • Bruce H. Goodman • Henry J. Goodman* • Harley I. Gross* • Michelle Hirsch Michael J. Horvitz • Richard Horvitz • Sara Hurand • Robert Mendy Klein • Nancy K. Levin • Morton L. Mandel* Albert B. Ratner* • Charles A. Ratner* • Betty Rosskamm* • Susan E. Rubin • Bradley A. Sherman Michael D. Siegal* • Erica G. Starrfield • Neil R. Waxman • Sally H. Wertheim* • Judy Klein Willensky Warren L. Wolfson • Sandra Wuliger • Timothy F. Wuliger* • Dara Yanowitz • Daniel N. Zelman

TRUSTEES Thomas W. Adler Trish Adler Vlad Agranovich Faye Bass Jules Belkin Rabbi Richard Block Barnett N. Bookatz Marc S. Byrnes Marilyn Baruch Cagin Lynne M. Cohen Nan Cohen Bruce Daskal Reuven D. Dessler Grant N. Dinner Leslie D. Dunn Barry Feldman Ronald A. Fisher Victor Gelb* Adrienne Goldberg Jordan A. Goldberg Larry P. Goldberg* Suri Goldman Francine M. Gordon Alan D. Gottlieb

Rabbi Melvin Granatstein Roe Green Andrea Kanter Grodin Rochelle Gross Rubin Guttman Michael J. Haas Rachel E. Heiser Kathy Wertheim Hexter Susan R. Hurwitz Amir Jaffa Lawrence M. Kadis Suellen Kadis Jeffrey M. Kahn Ira Kaplan Terri Kline S. Lee Kohrman* Jeffrey L. Korach Jennifer L. Korach Rabbi David Kosak Charlotte R. Kramer* Marc C. Krantz Marvin Krislov Andrew Lefkowitz Eliana LeVine

Keith Libman Irwin M. Lowenstein Larry A. Mack Louis J. Malcmacher Milton Maltz* Tamar Maltz* Barbara A. Mandel* Joseph C. Mandel* Martin H. Marcus Rabbi Sharon Y. Marcus Peter Meisel Susan Meisel David P. Miller Samuel H. Miller* David J. Millstone Stephen A. Monto Elmer I. Paull* Shari L. Perlmuter Roman Petroff Robert S. Reitman* Michael A. Ritter Carol Rivchun Peter Rzepka* Evie Safran*

EMERITUS TRUSTEES

Bradley J. Schlang Alvin A. Siegal Scott M. Simon Robert Silverman* z”l Michal Soclof James C. Spira David J. Strauss Jeanne Tobin Eric D. Wald Judith Weiss* Morry Weiss* Marcia J. Wexberg Adam L. Wieder Danielle J. Wild Steven Willensky Idelle K. Wolf Nancy G. Wolf William A. Wortzman Donna Yanowitz* Darrell A. Young Elissa W. Zegura * Trustee for Life

George N. Aronoff • Jordan C. Band • Richard Bogomolny • Morton G. Epstein • Leonard Fuchs • Peggy Garson Lois K. Goodman • Robert D. Gries • Aileen Kassen • N. Herschel Koblenz, z”l • Marvin L. Lader • Elaine Rocker Barbara S. Rosenthal • Edwin M. Roth • Gordon H. Safran • Lawrence C. Sherman, z”l • Harold S. Stern Norman Wain • Philip Wasserstrom • Jerome A. Weinberger

ALLOC Distribu Jewish oversea and lon and/or helps en for Jew efficien Mitchel Hedy K Yano Sara Hu Hedy K Educ Dara G. Servi Louis B Repla Judge D Liaiso

COMMU Studies Enid Ro Kerry C Bruce H Distre Randall Com Irwin M Kevin D

COMMU Implem Warren Nancy J

DEVELO Oversee Susan E Ellen E. Adam L Beth W Initia J. David Need Norman

ENDOW Recomm program Walter Hallie H Coun Harold Advis


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STANDING COMMITTEES ALLOCATIONS COMMITTEE Distributes resources from the Campaign for Jewish Needs, balancing local, national and overseas needs; helps to identify immediate and long-term issues which the community and/or individual agencies need to address; helps ensure that funds from the Campaign for Jewish Needs are used effectively and efficiently Mitchell C. Schneider, Chair Hedy Kangesser Adler, Sara Hurand, Dara G. Yanowitz, Vice-Chairs Sara Hurand, Subcommittee on Overseas Hedy Kangesser Adler, Subcommittee on Education Agencies Dara G. Yanowitz, Subcommittee on Human Services Louis Bloomfield, Capital Repair & Replacement Judge Dan A. Polster, National Agencies Liaison Team COMMUNITY PLANNING COMMITTEE Studies and plans for community needs Enid Rosenberg, Chair Kerry Chelm, Jewish Community Housing, Inc. Bruce H. Goodman, Task Force on Financial Distress Randall J. Korach, Older Adult Study Advisory Committee Irwin M. Lowenstein, Facilities Planning Kevin D. Margolis, Engagement Task Force COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE Implements public affairs agenda Warren L. Wolfson, Chair Nancy J. Glick, Bradley J. Schlang, Vice-Chairs DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Oversees all fundraising activities Susan E. Rubin, Chair Ellen E. Halfon, Professional Advisory Council Adam L. Wieder, Young Leadership Division Beth Wain Brandon, Women’s Philanthropy Initiative J. David Heller, 2013 Campaign for Jewish Needs General Chair Norman Wain, Silver Circle ENDOWMENT FUND COMMITTEE Recommends funding for community programming and emergency needs Walter S. Schwartz, Chair Hallie H. Abrams, Foundation Advisory Council Harold E. Friedman, Philanthropic Fund Advisory

108 FINANCE AND INVESTMENT COMMITTEE Manages investment of endowment and capital funds Gerald W. Goldberg, Chair Denise Farkas, Subcommittee on Charitable Trusts HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Provides guidance and oversight of the recruitment, development, and placement of qualified professional and lay leadership Bradley A. Sherman, Chair Stanley E. Wertheim, Gries Award Committee Susan Hurwitz, Gary S. Shamis, Mandel Course for Advanced Leadership Jeanne Tobin, Agency Leadership Roundtable Sally H. Wertheim, Mandel Foundation–HRD Joint Advisory Team MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE Establishes marketing agenda and oversees communications activities Erica G. Starrfield, Chair Charles A. Ratner, Annual Meeting OVERSEAS CONNECTIONS COMMITTEE Conceives and manages projects that connect Jews in Cleveland with Jews in Israel and around the world Neil R. Waxman, Chair Michal Soclof, Cleveland/Beit Shean Partnership Subcommittee Lynne M. Cohen, PACT (Parents and Children Together) Subcommittee William H. Heller, I-Connect Susan Meisel, IDF Education Corps Subcommittee Judge Dan A. Polster, Jordan Cross-Border Initiative Subcommittee Neil R. Waxman, Cleveland/St. Petersburg Partnership Nancy G. Wolf, ISHA (Israel Health Advancement for Women) Subcommittee Daniel N. Zelman, ONAD (Overseas Needs Assessment and Distribution) Subcommittee STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE Responsible for the creation, implementation, oversight and revision of the Strategic Plan Judy Klein Willensky, Chair

ADDITIONAL COMMITTEES

109

ADMINISTRATIVE Keith Libman, Chair AGNON-COLLEGE BUILDING OPERATIONS David J. Goodman, Chair AUDIT Richard M. Glaser, Chair AWARDS Reneé Chelm, Chair CASH Ronald A. Fisher, Chair CHARLES EISENMAN AWARD Reneé Chelm, Chair COMMISSION ON CEMETERY PRESERVATION David B. Orlean, President Ari H. Jaffe, Vice President EXECUTIVE Reneé Chelm, Chair GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Leslie D. Dunn, Chair JEWISH VOLUNTEER NETWORK Amy Wain Garnitz, Chair NOMINATING Harley I. Gross, Chair PUBLIC EDUCATION INITIATIVE Nancy J. Glick, Chair REAL ESTATE Steven Soclof, Chair RETIREMENT FUND Ronald S. Gross, Chair RISK MANAGEMENT Peter Meisel, Chair

2013

Committees The Jewish Federation of Cleveland’s activities are conducted by committees of volunteers in partnership with professional staff. Committee and subcommittee chairs are listed at left. Please contact them or the Federation for more information about participating in Federation activities or other volunteer opportunities at affiliated organizations. JEWISH FEDERATION OF CLEVELAND • Mandel Building 25701 Science Park Drive, Cleveland, Ohio 44122 phone: 216.593.2900 toll-free 888.467.1125 e-mail: info@jcfcleve.org fax: 216.593.2901 www.jewishcleveland.org

SECURITY Barnett N. Bookatz, Jeffrey S. Davis, Co-Chairs TECHNOLOGY Joseph B. Compton, Chair

2013 Annual Report

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Jewish Federation of Cleveland Mandel Building 25701 Science Park Drive Cleveland, Ohio 44122

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Jewish Federation of Cleveland - 2013 Annual Report  
Jewish Federation of Cleveland - 2013 Annual Report  

Celebrating 110 Years of Making History - 110 Things you may or may not know about our Federation

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