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Edibly Fit

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In This Issue Pick Up Schedule Green Fact / Green Tip Jewish Food News Spotlight Recipe

Pick Up Schedule Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday,

June 3 June 10 June 17 June 24 July 1 July 8 July 15 July 22 July 29

Green Fact We are proud to support a local farm, Isabelle Farm, and to be a part of the larger green food movement. Why eat locally grown foods? When you buy direct from local farmers, your dollars stay within your community and strengthen the local economy. Did you know that from field to fork the average American dinner travels 1500 miles! CSAs are an alternative to the global corporate model of food systems, enabling us to redevelop a relationship with the farmer and encourage a return of quality control to the consumer and the producer respectively.

Green Tip

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Instead of harsh chemical sprays, get those windows and mirrors crystal clear with a simple solution of white vinegar, newspaper and a little elbow grease. You'll also save money and the hassle of needing to stock more cleaning supplies. Mix 2 tablespoons of white

We are so excited to begin the JCC CSA Edibly Fit! Our first rd

pick-up date is June 3 at the JCC and it will take place between 5-7 p.m. outside the lower (MACC) entrance. Look for the Isabelle Farm sign. You will need to bring 1-2 boxes / bags big enough for your large or small share. NOTE: The first 10 people to pick-up will be given a FREE, re-usable canvas market tote to take their fresh veggies home in. Just another way we can help you go GREEN. You will be receiving your Edibly Fit CSA Newsletter every other week, which will include important information including drop off dates, holiday dates, green tips, recipes, Jewish Food News and volunteer scheduling.

Spotlight Isabelle Farm What better way to kick off the Edibly Fit newsletter than by spotlighting one of our partners in the new JCC CSA program, our farm! Isabelle Farm is a locally owned, family run Certified Organic farm that grows more than 100 varieties of produce on 50 plus acres in Boulder County. Isabelle Farm is owned and operated by Jason and Natalie Condon, who both come from farming backgrounds and always dreamed of owning land where they could grow produce and raise animals sustainably. In 2004, their dream became a reality, and they have been growing produce and flowers organically in East Boulder County since 2005. Jason's family has been farming in Boulder County since 1859. He grew up on the family farm. For six years, during and after high school Jason worked on a large conventional hay/wheat/corn and cattle farm in Boulder County. After high school, Jason was a full-time, year-round farm employee who

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Edibly Fit

sprays, get those windows and mirrors crystal clear with a simple solution of white vinegar, newspaper and a little elbow grease. You'll also save money and the hassle of needing to stock more cleaning supplies. Mix 2 tablespoons of white vinegar with a gallon of water, and dispense into a used spray bottle. Squirt on, then scrub with a newspaper, not paper towels, which cause streaking.

Jewish Food News The Jewish Food Education Network, JFEN, provides access to cutting edge curricula on Jews, food, and contemporary life as well as other benefits for educators. JCC staff, as JFEN members, were able to attend the 2009 Food Conference for free and brought back knowledge we will share through these newsletters! For 3,000 years, Jewish tradition has grappled with what is fit- kosher- for us to eat. Today, questions about food have become increasingly more complicated as we come up against changing nutritional news, the use of chemical pesticides, and industrial farming. Health issues such as obesity and environmental damage are intrinsically connected to our personal and national food choices. Hazon has created a network to help educators and individuals address these topics through a Jewish lens: JFEN-Jewish Food Education Network. 2 of 3

JFEN is being used in Jewish day schools, synagogues, at camps, and at home. Check out our local Boulder, CO

come from farming backgrounds and always dreamed of owning land where they could grow produce and raise animals https://ui.constantcontact.com/visualeditor/visual_editor_previe... sustainably. In 2004, their dream became a reality, and they have been growing produce and flowers organically in East Boulder County since 2005. Jason's family has been farming in Boulder County since 1859. He grew up on the family farm. For six years, during and after high school Jason worked on a large conventional hay/wheat/corn and cattle farm in Boulder County. After high school, Jason was a full-time, year-round farm employee who dealt with all aspects of the farm (planting, cultivating, irrigating, cutting, baling). From the time Natalie was 5 years old, she spent summers in Switzerland, working with her cousins on their dairy farm. Those summers on the farm are Natalie's fondest childhood memories, and she still returns to visit.

Inspiration Lisa Tanguma Our first Inspiration piece introduces you to Lisa Tanguma. Lisa wears a lot of hats at our JCC /S&F Community Center. Better known as the "Starbucks Girl" because very seldom will you see her without one in her hand, she wears the titles of Pilates Coordinator, Personal Trainer, Pilates Instructor and Group Exercise Instructor (voted best by the Denver Post), coordinator of JCC's Run the Republic /Fight for Air fundraiser and now coordinator of our newest program, Edibly Fit CSA (Community Supported Agriculture). Last year she celebrated a decade of service to the JCC. "It was a great honor to be asked by the JCC to coordinate Edibly Fit", said Lisa, "It is right in line with my personal philosophy that physical wellness includes what you put into your body as fuel, not just how often you exercise. Creating and coordinating programs or events is my specialty and I love doing it. I have a Green vision for the JCC and surrounding community that includes environmentalism, sustainability and conservation", explains Lisa. "Edibly Fit may only be a baby step, but each step brings us closer to fulfilling the Hazon vision. Our goal is to transform the way we look at food over the next six years, so that by September 2015 - at the end of the next shmita (sabbatical) year in the Jewish tradition, we will be demonstrably weaving commitments to sustainability into the fabric of Jewish life in the Denver community. Thank you, Lisa, for adding Edibly Fit coordinator to your already abundant JCC resume.

Recipe: Pan Fried Corona Beans & Kale Sent in by Jen Channen (CSA Volunteer) Be sure to wash the kale well, so you don't end up with grit in your beans. You can use dried beans that you cook yourself, and would highly recommend using them over canned beans - they

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Edibly Fit

educators and individuals address these topics through a Jewish lens: JFEN-Jewish Food Education Network. JFEN is being used in Jewish day schools, synagogues, at camps, and at home. Check out our local Boulder, CO chapter. For information on the Jewish Food Education Network visit www.hazon.org.

Recipe:

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Pan Fried Corona Beans & Kale Sent in by Jen Channen (CSA Volunteer) Be sure to wash the kale well, so you don't end up with grit in your beans. You can use dried beans that you cook yourself, and would highly recommend using them over canned beans - they brown up better and are less likely to go to mush. I used giant corona beans, but you could use runner cannellini, or something similar. I like the white beans because they take on a lot of color in the pan. Alternate recipe - I'm confident you could do this preparation with gnocchi (don't boil the gnocchi first) in place of the beans. Ingredients: 1/2 bunch / 6 oz / 170 g dino kale or lacinato kale, remove stems 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2-3 big handfuls of cooked large white beans (see head notes) 1/4 teaspoon fine grain seasalt 1/3 cup / 1 1/2 oz / 45 g walnuts, lightly toasted 1 clove garlic, minced 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg Scant 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice Zest of 1 lemon 1/3 cup / 1/2 oz / 15 g freshly grated Parmesan cheese Finely chop the kale, wash it, and shake off as much water as you can. Set aside. Heat the olive oil over medium-high heat in the widest skillet you own. Add the beans in a single layer. Stir to coat the beans, then let them sit long enough to brown on one side, about 3 or 4 minutes, before turning to brown the other side, also about 3 or 4 minutes. The beans should be golden and a bit crunchy on the outside. Add the kale and salt to the pan and cook for less than a minute, just long enough for the kale to lose a bit of its structure. Stir in the walnuts and garlic, wait 10 seconds, then stir in the nutmeg. Wait ten seconds and stir in the lemon juice and zest. Remove from heat and serve dusted with Parmesan cheese. Have a recipe you want to share? Send it to Lisa Tanguma at ltanguma@jccdenver.org.

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