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Edibly Fit - News Bites

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In This Issue Pick Up Schedule Green Tip Inspiration - Jason McKendrick CSA News and Events

Pick Up Schedule at the JCC 5:00-7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Tuesday, Tuesday, Tuesday,

September September September September

CSA News and Events Your Opinion Counts! 7* 14* 21* 28*

NOTE: *Due to the Jewish Holidays the JCC Edibly Fit CSA Pickup will change the day from Thursdays to Tuesdays for the month of September. Please note the pick up dates now and mark your calendars so that you do not miss your fresh, delicious veggies!

Green Tip

You will soon be receiving a short survey concerning the Edibly Fit program. Please take the time to fill out the survey so that we are able to plan for our programming in 2011.

Spotlight MM Local Owned and operated by Jim Mills and Ben Mustin, MM Local provides a great way for you to eat fresh and local year round. MM local offers Western Slope Peaches, Front Range Tomatoes and High Desert Peppers, grown organically by local famers, including our CSA partner Isabelle Farms. In a few weeks, you will be receiving an eblast with details on this opportunity.

Exchange CDs, DVDs and books instead of buying. Now you can avoid purchasing new products without forfeiting your entertainment needs. Visit www.swapacd.com, www.swapadvd.com and www.paperbackswap.com for access to thousands of CDs, books and DVDs. (Courtesy of Josh Dorfman's Tips for Going Green on a Budget).

Inspiration Elizabeth Scott 1 of 3

Elizabeth Scott, a member of the JCC and the Edibly Fit CSA is an inspiration to us all.

Jewish Food News Rosh HaShanah Foods Rosh HaShanah is the Jewish New Year. Over the centuries it has become associated with many food customs, for instance, eating sweet food to symbolize our hopes for a "Sweet New Year." Honey (Apples and Honey) Biblical texts often mention "honey" as the sweetener of choice though some historians believe that the honey referenced in the Bible was actually a sort of fruit paste. Real honey was, of course, available but much more difficult to acquire! Honey represented good living and wealth. On the first night of Rosh Hashanah, we dip challah into honey and say the blessing over the challah. Then we dip apple slices into honey and say a prayer asking God for a sweet year. Slices of apple dipped in honey are often served to Jewish children either at home or in religious school - as a special Rosh 9/21/10 11:20 AM HaShanah snack. After apples and honey, round loaves of challah are the most


Budget). Edibly Fit - News Bites

Inspiration Elizabeth Scott Elizabeth Scott, a member of the JCC and the Edibly Fit CSA is an inspiration to us all. Elizabeth is one of, if not the most consistent volunteer of the CSA program. She is extremely passionate about the program, and when it was offered she wanted to take advantage and get involved. She believes strongly in eating locally and supporting the local economy. "Let's eat what is grown here instead of importing it - when you do that you open up the possibility of quality and avoiding toxic chemicals of modern agriculture." Elizabeth was fortunate to have an eye opening experience into local eating while in Africa. In the villages the people were forced to eat what was grown on site, and they were too poor to engage in modern farming practices. The environment there was not as toxic and she had never eaten or felt healthier. Being too poor for modern agriculture has an "unintended benefit" in her eyes, the people ate healthier because that was what they could afford and what was available.

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Elizabeth also as another reason for eating healthy, and that is her health. Having MS means that Elizabeth is forced to take medication to slow down her disease. With a body forced to metabolize medication, Elizabeth feels it is important to limit toxins and not add more stress on her organs. Joining a CSA gave Elizabeth

represented good living and wealth. https://ui.constantcontact.com/visualeditor/visual_editor_previe... On the first night of Rosh Hashanah, we dip challah into honey and say the blessing over the challah. Then we dip apple slices into honey and say a prayer asking God for a sweet year. Slices of apple dipped in honey are often served to Jewish children either at home or in religious school - as a special Rosh HaShanah snack. After apples and honey, round loaves of challah are the most recognizable food symbol of Rosh HaShanah. Challah is a kind of braided egg bread that is traditionally served by Jews on Shabbat. During Rosh HaShanah, however, the loaves are shaped into spirals or rounds symbolizing the continuity of Creation. Sometimes raisins or honey are added to the recipe in order to make the resulting loaves extra sweet. Many Jewish households make honey cakes on Rosh HaShanah as another way to symbolically express their wishes for a Sweet New Year. Often people will use a recipe that has been passed down through the generations. Honey cake can be made with a variety of spices, though autumnal spices (cloves, cinnamon, allspice) are especially popular. Different recipes call for the use of coffee, tea, orange juice or even rum to add an additional dimension of flavor. On the second night of Rosh Hashanah, we eat a "new fruit" meaning, a fruit that has recently come into season but that we have not yet had the opportunity to eat. When we eat this new fruit, we say the shehechiyanublessing thanking God for keeping us alive and bringing us to this season. This ritual reminds us to appreciate the fruits of the earth and being alive to enjoy them. A pomegranate is often used as this new fruit. In the Bible, the Land of Israel is praised for its pomegranates. It is also said that this fruit contains 613 seeds just as there are 613 mitzvot. Another reason given for blessing and eating pomegranate on Rosh HaShanah is that we wish that our good deeds in the ensuing year will be as plentiful as the seeds of the pomegranate. Fish Rosh HaShanah literally means "head of the year" in Hebrew. For this reason in some Jewish communities it is traditional to eat the head of a fish during the Rosh HaShanah holiday meal. Fish is also eaten because it is an ancient symbol of fertility and abundance.

Recipe Honey Baked Apples Honey Baked Apples for the high holidays. Serves 6 Prep Time: 15 Min Cook Time: 1 Hr Ready In: 1 Hr 15 Min Ingredients

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to take medication to slow down Edibly Fit - News Bitesher disease. With a body forced to metabolize medication, Elizabeth feels it is important to limit toxins and not add more stress on her organs. Joining a CSA gave Elizabeth a chance to tackle a few issues at once - she was able to address her health while also sticking by her beliefs of helping the environment, supporting local, and providing fair wages.

Recipe https://ui.constantcontact.com/visualeditor/visual_editor_previe... Honey Baked Apples Honey Baked Apples for the high holidays. Serves 6 Prep Time: 15 Min Cook Time: 1 Hr Ready In: 1 Hr 15 Min Ingredients * 6 green apples * 1 1/2 cups fresh cranberries * 2 1/4 cups water * 3/4 cup packed brown sugar * 3 tablespoons honey * 6 scoops vanilla ice cream Directions 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). 2. Core the apples, and remove the peel from the top third of each one. Place them in a baking dish, and fill the core holes with as many cranberries as you can fit. 3. Meanwhile, stir together the water, brown sugar and honey in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally to dissolve the sugar and honey if necessary. Once it comes to a boil, pour the mixture over the apples. 4. Bake for 1 hour in the preheated oven, basting with the juices every 15 to 20 minutes. Serve with vanilla ice cream.

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Edibly Fit News Bites - Sept 2, 2010  

Edibly Fit News Bites - Sept 2, 2010

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