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JAYEON KIM s e l e c t e d

w o r k s


JAYEON KIM Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design Columbia University Bachelor of Architecture Seoul National University jk3542@columbia.edu +1 917 754 6222


table of contents

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02

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Mosaic House

Extraordinary Hotel

Share House for multi-households

GSAPP 2012

GSAPP 2012


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04

05

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Multi-Layered Station

Urban Cultural Material

the New Land

Material: Shadow of Light

Research Station in the Arctic

Busan Opera House

Building of Department of Architecture Renovation

wood / transparent / concrete

GSAPP 2013

Competition 2011

Seoul National University 2009

Seoul National University 2008


Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland SCALE STUDIO: A Polemical Exploration of Scale GSAPP MSAAD Fall 2012 Critic: Amale Andraos + Sam Deufax


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Location: Brooklyn, New York Program: Hotel Area:

20309.06 m2 (218604.89 sqf)

Period:

September. 2012 ~ December. 2012

Work:

Individual work


Alice in Wonderland Extraordinary Scale

EXTRAORDINARY The goal of this project is to make an ‘Extraordinary Scale Experiences’ in this hotel. These days, people tend to travel all around in order to experience something different with their daily life. And in terms of tourism, hotel is one big part of the travel experiences. However, hotels have almost same configuration wherever they are located in, and the spatial experiences are quite similar through the time. They are seeking the way to make more rooms as much as possible, and pursue the efficiency. They have standardized spaces. In this project, I wanted to make a hotel which different with typical hotel, and let people experience extraordinary scale. SURREAL EXPERIENCES I thought I can make the extrarodinary feelings by distorting the typical scale experiences of hotel. I could find out the strategies that make extraordinary feeling from the surrealistic method. So I took three strategies; distortion, exaggeration, and juxtaposition. This hotel can be like a fun house in the amusement park. In fun house, they distort and change the perception to sense the spaces. and people enjoy feeling this oddness.


Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do. So she was considering, in her own mind, whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up and picking the daisies, when suddenly a White Rabbit with pink eyes ran close by her. There was nothing so very remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so very much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!”; but, when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and, burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. The rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well. “Well!” thought Alice to herself. “After such a fall as this, I shall think nothing of tumbling downstairs! How brave they’ll all think me at home! Why, I wouldn’t say anything about it, even if I fell off the top of the house!” Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end? “I wonder how many miles I’ve fallen by this time?” she said aloud. “I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth. Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think—”

“yes, that’s about the right distance—but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to?”. Presently she began again. “I wonder if I shall fall right through the earth! How funny it’ll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downward! The antipathies, I think—” “but I shall have to ask them what the name of the country is, you know. Please, Ma’am, is this New Zealand? Or Australia?” “And what an ignorant little girl she’ll think me for asking! No, it’ll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.” Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. “Dinah’ll miss me very much to-night, I should think!” “I hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah, my dear! I wish you were down here with me! There are no mice in the air, I’m afraid, but you might catch a bat, and that’s very like a mouse, you know. But do cats eat bats, I wonder?” And here Alice began to get rather sleepy, and went on saying to herself, in a dreamy sort of way, “Do cats eat bats? Do cats eat bats?” and sometimes, “Do bats eat cats?” for, you see, as she couldn’t answer either question, it didn’t much matter which way she put it. She felt that she was dozing off, and had just begun to dream that she was walking hand in hand with Dinah, and was saying to her, very earnestly, “Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?” when suddenly, thump! thump! down she came upon a heap of sticks and dry leaves, and the fall was over. <Lewis Carrol, Alice’s Advantures in Wonderland>

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Jayeon Kim site model 13


“Where is the rabbit? Oh, it makes me dizzy.” When Alice was looking up, the rabbit was shown between the repetitive banisters.

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


4m

9m

1.5 m

9m

typical hotel plan

extraordinary components within a typical hotel configuration

Extraordinary Components The spaces can be felt more extraordinary when they meet with typical, ordinary hotel rooms.

conceptual section with components

Jayeon Kim

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“There you are, wait!” In that moment, the rabbit disappeared through the small pixelated shops.

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Architectural Components Transitional Components

doors

windows

walls

People should pass the transitional spaces or components in order to go from one space to another. People can experience the scale change during they are moving.

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“Oh, is there the ceiling in this room, I wonder.”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Column-like spaces for individual spa Jayeon Kim on scale. 19 make people feel odd feelings


“I thought this is an empty room, but there were a furnitures!”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Scale Strategies

Spatial Composition Components

vastness

compression/expansion

compression/expansion

compression/expansion

framing

view

expansion

compression

expansion

view

view

light light see through

view

view

view

view

expansion

expansion

light

light

light

expansion

expansion

expansion

poche

This scale strategies are used to make the spaces that make people feel extraordinary when they experience the hotel.

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“The pool seems so cool. Look, is that me?!”

“These columns are huge! Wait, they are not columns!”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


In the urban point of view, this hotel is not conforming to the urban grid. The building is rotated a little bit and it can be seen as an object inside the strict grid of the city and the landscape of the site. The small components can be seen as eccentric ingredients as well. Jayeon Kim 23


“What is the gigantic red thing up there? It seems like pressing me.”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


People face the bar when they pass through the narrow hallway heading to their room. Sudden change of the space size and atmosphere makes Jayeon Kim people confusing. 25


“Hey, there! Don’t go! I don’t know how to go there,”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Facade

Transitional Components

Extraordinariness can be shown on the Elevation as well. Within the regular grid of rooms, other components are interfering to make oddness inbetween. The grid system is not parellel to the floor system, so it also makes oddness in the urban point of view.

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“Hey, do you want to swin with me?” “Hmm, I’m so tired. I’d rather go to the room and take a nap for a while.”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Conceptual Section Transitional Components

circulation extraordinary components

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“Am I go into the room, or into the pool?”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Extraordinary Components

Within the Ordinary Rooms

spa

shop

spa cluster

spa cluster

room

restaurant

restaurant

room

room

lobby

lobby

hidden pool

fitness center

fitness center

People in this hotel can feel the clash between the Extraordinary Components and ordinary, regular rooms. And this clash can be enlarged when the guests face these moments unexpectedly.

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“Here is so dark. see, I’d better follow the light up there. Oh, there is a rabbit!”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


I made small extraordinary spaces that have specific scale strategies and combined into transparent and homogeneous box which represents the typical hotel shape.

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“This room is really spacious!”

“Hello, hello, is anybody up there?”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Jayeon 35 The mass of the bar penetrates the typical gridKim of the room.


“There is so many rooms, where is the rabbit?”

“Oh, you found me!”

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


JayeonofKim 37 model whole hotel


extraordinary moments of the hotel

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ALICE IN WONDERLAND


Jayeon Kim

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Location: New York Program: Share house Area:

344.96 m2 (3713.12 sqf)

Period:

May. 2012 ~ August. 2012

Work:

Individual work


Mosaic House GSAPP MSAAD Summer 2012 Critic: Sam Chermayeff + Johanna Meyer-Grohbr端gge

This project was started with the thinking about the boundary between public and private spaces. The goal is to define the degree of public and private spaces and design a share house in Brooklyn. I started with the Han-ok as a precedent, I focused on the traits of it, and apply it with modification in this house. This house is fully sharable, and flexible house that adapt to the changes through the time, and according to the residents.

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flexible / adaptable

share house

buffer space

how to utilize

This house is about flexible occupying and adapting to the changes.

People in this house share all the common areas. By doing this, Each cluster has their implied area that the room owner has. But basically all the house members can access all the area. User can utilize bigger area by sharing the public spaces. This blank spaces also can be occupied exlusively by modifiying their wall of rooms.

Each room has its own blank space as a buffer, and they can adjust the function of it. These blank spaces can be used as any functions, and this also can be the circulation of this house. Therefore, there is no waste of sapces for circulation. All the common areas can be not only the circulation, but also the room for activities.

All the basic units of this house are equal. This equal spaces give opportunity to utilize this house more various way.

There is no fixed unit or area in this house. The only rigid space is the rooms - private areas. And all the units can be occupied freely by the purpose of the users. Also, common areas can be defined with the people who take the rooms around the area.

People can take adjuscent rooms to make the cluster, or get detached rooms to define their areas differently.


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Flexible / Adaptable

Han-Ok: Korean Traditional Dwelling

Maru: Buffer Space This house have universal space called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Maruâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. This spaces are used as living, dining, and social area. And Maru is the buffer between private spaces, so this keeps privacy between private rooms. And this space takes a role of transition space. Maru belongs to no one, at the same time, belongs to everyone.

Urban Han-ok :Flexible Occupying There is no particular way to occupy this house. People can use spaces by their needs.

guest house

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MOSAIC HOUSE

shop

studio

cafe / restaurant

gallery


Flexible / Adaptable

Current Situations in New York City

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Common Apartment in NYC room living room

bath room kitchen

private area public area circulation

room

1980

1990

1995

2000

2005

2008

couple with children 30.9% couple with children 26.3%

couple without children 29.9% couple without children 29.8%

couple with children 25.5%

couple without children 28.9%

couple with children 24.1%

couple without children 28.7%

couple with children 22.9%

couple without children 28.3%

couple with children 21.6%

couple without children 28.4%

single parent 7.5% single parent 8.3% single parent 9.1%

single parent 8.9% single parent 9.1% single parent 9.0%

single household 22.7% single household 24.6% single household 25.0%

single household 25.5% single household 26.6% single household 27.5%

other 9.0% other 11.0% other 11.5% other 12.7% other 13.2% other 13.5%

Many poeple in New York City tend to share an apartment. They occupy their own room and share the common spaces. This can only serve minimum demand of spaces. They even modify the living room to the bedroom for lower the rent. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t share life in house. And this situation in NYC have an opportunity about share house in Brooklyn.

Change of Dwelling Type in US The percent of the married couple is decreasing, especially with children. And the percent of single parent and one-person households is increasing year after year. According to this research, the needs about the type of dwelling is changing as time passes. But the existing housing cannot adapt to the changing.

Required Spaces by Lifecycle Changing As life cycle changes, peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial status and spatial demand are also changes. But the usual houses has fixed units, so they cannot adjust their house to the life.

single

couple

couple with children

retired couple

financial status spatial demand

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Share House

Ratio of Private Area and Common Areas

Comparison Between Brooklyn and Manhattan

BROOKLYN

MANHATTAN

ratio of space (number)

ratio of space (number)

This shows the present status of typical sharing house in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

room : bathroom : kitchen : living 2.80 : 1.25 : 1 : 1

room : bathroom : kitchen : living 2.73 : 1.38 : 1 : 1

average room size = 175.40ft2 average rent = $906.61

average room size = 163.89ft2 average rent = $1472.40

Based on this research, I determined the ratio of public and private area in this residence.

# of bedroom

# of bathroom

# of kitchen

# of living room

average room size

average rent

Ration of Private Area and Common Areas Based on the research about the situation of New York City, I determined the ratio of public and private area. Common spaces can be shared with other residents. By doing so, people can use more spacious areas. room

private area

39.50% (32 / 81)

bathroom

common area

17.78% (14.4 / 81)

kitchen

common area

14.20% (11.5 / 81)

living/dining room common area

14.20% (11.5 / 81)

yard

common area

14.20% (11.5 / 81)

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MOSAIC HOUSE


Share House

Activities and Spaces

2

Classification of Activities The activities can be reorganized by its attributes such as private, flexible, fixed functions, and special features. And these activities are reassigned to the spaces by its characteristics.

room

1 residents can share books 2 they can run empty room as accomodation services 3 any people(artists, retired people, etc.) in this residence can run classes for people. By doing this, they can earn extra money and make community

sleeping working reading resting changing clothes

flexible functions

private room

eating talking playing drinking watching TV working

fixed functions

toilet

the room have fixed functions

shower / bath storage washing cooking

special features

barbecue place

they can get this programs by living together

communal yard

library 1

any programs can be planted here

pool pool table movie theater work room fitness room practice room hotel / guest house 2 classes 3

bath room / toilet

coffee shop bar

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2

Share House

Life Cycle and Interaction

Interaction Between the People by Life Cycle The active time of the people is different by the life cycle. Becuase of the time shift, people can share the common area more easily.

family

single single working people single working people regular life pattern relatively short staying time

single artists

housewife

working parents

preschoolers

teenagers

seniors

can share common interests share the space easily (short staying)

share the space easily (different life pattern)

can share common interests share the space easily (different life pattern)

housewife

easily sharable (different life pattern)

easily sharable (different life pattern)

can share common interests

working parents

easily sharable (short staying)

easily sharable (different life pattern)

easily sharable (different life pattern) caring their child

can share common interests easily sharable (short staying)

cannot share the space easily

cannot share the space easily

easily sharable caring

caring

can share common interests playing with each other easily sharable

easily sharable (short staying)

easily sharable (different life pattern)

cannot share easily caring

easily sharable (short staying)

cannot share easily caring

can share common interests cannot sharable easily

easily sharable (different life pattern)

cannot share easily (long staying)

cannot share easily (long staying) share the interests

easily sharable (different life pattern) caring their child

easily sharable high interaction: nannying

cannot share easily can share common (long staying) interests caring easily sharable high level of tolerance

irregular life pattern relatively long staying time

regular life pattern relatively long staying time

regular life pattern relatively short staying time

preschoolers irregular life pattern relatively long staying time

teenagers regular life pattern relatively short staying time

seniors irregular life pattern relatively long staying time

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single artists

MOSAIC HOUSE


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people

program

occupying time 0

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couple without children worker

single man architect

general architecture class

single woman artist

art class drawing class

single woman run a restaurant

cooking class sell foods

family

retired couple

daycare service management

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3

Buffer Space

Combinations of Spaces and Units

Combination of Unit This shows combination of units and how to occupy the blank spaces. When the door is closed, the public private spaces are separated clearly. And when the door is opened, the private spaces become semi-private spaces, and the public space become semi-public spaces.

basic unit

2 units

3 units

Unit Combination Types Difference of using the blank space by its relationship with other units

bedroom

kitchen

blank

blank

bathroom

toilet

private

(inside

common

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MOSAIC HOUSE

common

outside

common

The change of degree of private/ public


Buffer Space

as Special Features

3

Blank Space and Special Features Blank spaces can offer divers special features which could not afford to get when people do not share the common spaces. Usually, people do not go to other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s area, but with this special attributes attract people and make the community by doing activities together.

Special Features Distributed special programs attract people to come to utilize it. Even though the area have implied territoriality, people go to other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s area to use these programs. With this programs, people more interact with each other and this makes community.

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How to Utilize

The Way that people Using the Spaces

closed door: no interaction

meet during the day

occupy oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s space exclusively

share the common spaces

closed door: no interaction

division of spaces: donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disturb each other

define the area

meet each other during activities

interaction during activities

daycare: seniors - children

can be used as a gallery

can be used as a shop or restaurant

MOSAIC HOUSE


4

floor plan

section Jayeon Kim

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4

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How to Utilize

Time Based Changing of the House

MOSAIC HOUSE

Night Time

Afternoon

All the rooms are closed. People want to keep their privacy during night time.

This shows the situation that all doors are opened. At the afternoon, people can accept more openness.


4

Evening

Evening

In the early evening, some doors are opened, and some are closed.

Some doors are opened to define the cluster of each units. By doing this, people can make the boundary for their own group. For example, family, friends, etc.

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4

How to Utilize

Area Change by Occupying and Using

couple occupied each room

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MOSAIC HOUSE

single man room + studio

single woman room + studio

single woman room + shop


4 family need each room for family members

retired couple room

Occupied Rooms People can occupy the rooms by thier needs. It can be only one room, or multiple rooms. Also, they can occupy the adjacent rooms, or distant ones.

Implied Area Depending on the rooms that people occupied, the areas around rooms are utilized by the people who own the rooms.

Area Change by Exclusive Using Each room has modifiable door which can be open and occupy the public space. By opening this wall, they can utilize the blank space on their own. Also, they can control the degree of private and public with this door.

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4

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How to Utilize Model

MOSAIC HOUSE


Jayeon Kim

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4

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How to Utilize Model

MOSAIC HOUSE


Using Communal Spaces Each room has modifiable door which can be open and occupy the public space. In the communal spaces, residents can interact with each other.

Jayeon Kim

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Location: Anywhere in the Arctic Program: Research Station Area:

244.01 m2 (2626.50 sqf)

Period:

January. 2013 ~ May. 2013

Work:

Individual work


Multi-layered Station Color Studio: GSAPP MSAAD Spring 2013 Critic: Leslie Gill + Mike Jacobs

The main theme of this studio was color. Color is all around the world, but it is not considered as main concept of the architecture. In this semester, the Arctic - monochromatic environment - as the site, we designed a Field Research Station with individual color scheme. I studied on black and white/light as a color scheme and proposing the adaptable and changable research station.

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Information Hub

Research Station on the Ice and Climate Change

Information Hub This research station will be an information hub about the ice in the Arctic area. The information on the ice melting and forming from various sources such as satellites, buoys, researchers and Inuits is gathered to this station and spread to the people who need this information.

satellite

local people

buoy

researchers

research station

Inuits

sailors

researchers

Information Source

Water In order to make a building that can be adapt to the various climates, I focused on the character of the water. Water is the main constituent of the Arctic area, and also closely related to New York City as well. Water changes its states when it is related to the outside condition such as temperature, humidity, pressure, and so on. With this character, the skin of the building can be adjusted to the various condition. Also, the water can be worked as heat container. For example, when the water became ice, it releases heat to surroundings.

melting ice in the Arctic Š Paul Yarnall

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION

new york

gather the informations from the sources

distribute the informations

people who need the information


State of Ice and Water

Various Temperature Distribution

snow river and lake ice sea ice glaciers and ice caps frozen ground ice sheets

hour

Arctic

day

month

year

century

millennium

snow

ice

water

NYC

snow

ice

water

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snow atmosphere

glaciers

ice sheet ice shelf

frozen ground

sea ice ocean

continent

Temperature Variations and Water States Water changes its own state in relation to the condition of outside. The length of existing time and type of the ice varies by the condition and the location.

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Change of Ice

Ice Extent Chaging in Long Term and Short Term

2008 1998 1988 1978 March September

Drifting Buoy Moored Buoy Argo Float

diminution of ice extent in past several decades

variation of ice extent in one year

14.0

13.0

12.0

1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

diminution of ice extent

Ice Extent Chages Ice in the Arctic area is melting during several decades. This causes various issues not only in the Arctic area, but also to all around the earth. Not only that, Ice extent is greatly changing throughout a year. Since the satellite image is not high enough to see the accurate condition of the ice edge, it has to be measured on land. In order to do this, I am proposing the research station which is moving around the Arctic area to observe it.

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION


Condition of Arctic Region

Temperature Variations

Various Temperature Distribution

The climate around the Arctic area varies in several different places. For mobile research station, they should be able to adapt to the various conditions.

100ºF (37.78ºC)

32ºF (0ºC)

-80ºF (-62.22ºC) 1

100ºF (37.78ºC)

100ºF (37.78ºC)

32ºF (0ºC)

32ºF (0ºC)

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100ºF (37.78ºC)

32ºF (0ºC)

32ºF (0ºC)

-80ºF (-62.22ºC)

-80ºF (-62.22ºC)

-80ºF (-62.22ºC)

100ºF (37.78ºC)

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-80ºF (-62.22ºC)

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120ºF (48.89ºC) 100ºF (37.78ºC)

100ºF (37.78ºC)

100ºF (37.78ºC)

32ºF (0ºC)

80ºF (26.67ºC)

32ºF (0ºC)

60ºF (15.56ºC) 40ºF (4.44ºC) -80ºF (-62.22ºC)

-80ºF (-62.22ºC)

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32ºF (0ºC) 20ºF (-6.67ºC)

100ºF (37.78ºC)

0ºF (-17.78ºC) Point Barrow

-20ºF (-28.89ºC) Tiksi

32ºF (0ºC) Yakutsk

NP7

-40ºF (-40.00ºC)

North Pole e

-60ºF (-51.11ºC)

Isfjord

10˚C isotherm July

Murmansk

-80ºF (-62.22ºC)

-80ºF (-62.22ºC) 1

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Color Study

Black and White

Black and White Black and white are in the complementary relationship. They can be differentiated with the light, but not in sharp way. They co-exist at the same time. And they have series of degress between them. Š pihe from Flickr.com

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION


Sea Ice

Overlapping Layers

Š palscience.com

Sea Ice: Overlapping Layers With the color study, I focused on the sea ice in the Arctic area. The sea ice regulates the degree of the light into the sea by overlapping the thin layers.

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Skin System

Ice Frame

framework to control the water and ice

The skin of the building can be adjusted to the various environments by capturing the ice on surface.

icicles on frame

frost on the plane

frost on frame

frost in space

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION

study model of the frame


Sea Ice

Overlapping Layers

Sea Ice: Overlapping Layers With the color study, I focused on the sea ice in the Arctic area. The sea ice regulates the degree of the light into the sea by overlapping the thin layers.

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Configuration

Program Distribution with the Direction

NORTH

specimen storage

WEST

equipment storage

food storage

work space (for analysis)

EAST bathroom / toilet individual bedroom

work space (collecting area)

communal space (kitchen/ dining exercise)

greenhouse

SOUTH

wind direction temperature

Program Distribution From the North and North West, strong wind is coming, so the outer layers work as wind breaker and block the snow with the wind. People can approach from the south. Northern part of the station will have more thick layers and small openings, and Southern part is the opposite.

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION


Configuration

Program Distribution with Light and Temperature

greenhouse

work space (collecting area)

work space (for analysis)

communal space (kitchen/ dining exercise)

individual bedroom

communal space (bath/toilet)

specimen storage

food storage

equipment storage

warm

cold

dark

light

Program Distribution Since the arctic region has particular environment such as severe temperature and harsh light condition, I distributed the programs through the thermal and light condition. And the conditions of the spaces are regulated by the layers in between.

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Multiple Layers

Process of Changing Layers

layers

lifted water core

Multiple Layers Spaces are devided by multiple layers. These Spaces are getting darker and warmer as you go into the center of the station.

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION

Spiral Circulation Spaces are all connected by spiral circulation. The thermal and light condition is gradually changing.

Ascending Spaces In order to get the effect of convection, the spaces are going up.

Perforating Water Core Spaces are penetrated by the core that connect all the way through the research station.


Multiple layers Overlapped layers create different moments in the spaces, and it is constantly changing by the combination of the layers.

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Shadow Study Study Models

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION


shadow study with model

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Plans

1

Ground Plan

s = 1:300 (1/24”=1’-0”)

1st Floor Plan

s = 1:300 (1/24”=1’-0”)

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3

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4th Floor Plan

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s = 1:300 (1/24”=1’-0”)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

storage laboratory refrigerator for specimen office bedroom kitchen living room green house


4

3 2

2nd Floor Plan

s = 1:100 (1/8”=1’-0”)

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5

5 5

6

7

UP

3rd Floor Plan

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION

s = 1:100 (1/8”=1’-0”)


water core: Water core: delivers heat, light and water delivers heat, light and water Outer mesh: Outer mesh: capture the ice capture the ice greenhouse: Greenhouse: brightest and warmest space in brightest this stationand warmest space in this station

living area: Living area: bedroom, bathroom, kitchen andand bedroom, bathroom, kitchen dining area dining area

Structure: Structure: grab the facade and floors grab the facade and floors

office: Office: space for research and study space for research and study

research area: Research area: coldest area coldest area ice laborator, storage ice laboratory, storage

Storage and entrance: regulate the light and temperature storage and entrance: regulate light and temperature

circulation: Circulation: spiral and ascending spiral and ascending

multiple inner Multiple innerlayers: layers: regulate light and temperature regulate the light and temperature

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Heat Distribution by Convection The Air between the layers responses to the temperature around the spaces around. Heat is distributed by the air between the layers by convection and also through the perforating core. green house

shower room

office

laboratory

kitchen & living area

office

ice storage ice storage

ice laboratory

laboratory

air movement air temperature generator

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION

purifier

water tank


Changes of Water States State of the water is constantly changing as people going up and by the layers that the water meets. Also, it changes by the program.

green house

shower room

office

laboratory

kitchen & living area

office

ice storage ice laboratory

ice storage

laboratory

ice water generator

purifier

steam

water tank

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MULTI-LAYERED STATION


Changes of Building Envelope The outer meshes capture the ice and snow in winter, and it melts in summer. Therefore, the appearance is keep changing by the time of the season and outside condition.

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location: the North Port of Busan, Korea. program: Opera theater and additional facilities, Cultural programs, Hotel, Commercial, etc. area:

44885.3 m2

period:

June. 2011. ~ August. 2011.

work:

Group work, Team Leader


Urban Cultural Material: Busan Opera House International Competition for Opera House in Busan, Korea

The goal of this project is to design a opera house in Busan, which is representative port city of Korea. The citizens of Busan are longing for cultural facility, especially a opera house. Busan is clearly different from other cities. The infrastructure of the city is formed linearly, attached to the main street. The opera house will be placed at a former port. The scene of that place has been changed dramatically, and containers are replaced by fancy buildings. I designed an opera house that contains the vanishing memory of the city. Unlike other opera houses, this project uses containers that can be used as facilities by citizens. This opera house will be more easily accessed and friendly to citizens.


Enormous land is created off the shore of Busan. The Opera House will be built there. Many people may have come up with some specific images - the sleek opera house at the Sydney Harbor; the high-tech ones built in Oslo, Copenhagen, and Beijing; or the Palais Garnier in Paris. These opera houses act as, and are trying to be, landmarks, i.e. icons and representative images promoting the cities that they are located in. The fact that the city can accommodate world-class opera and such opera are willing to come to the city means that the scope of cultural activity for the resident expanded, and also that residents with sufficient economic capaity increased. However, in contrast to the vast amount of space and financial cost contributed to the opera house, the actual time and space utilized for the resident is coparably small. The opera house occupies the best open space in the city but ordinary people experience only the exterior space. The main space is hidden behind the stubborn skin, closed to the public. Each existing opera house provides the image of landmark, visually representing particular cities. Usually, little constraints are imposed on the shape of the opera house, and consequently the exuberant design became cliche since every opera house seeks originality through unique shape. The eccentric shape of the opera house can no longer effectively take us to the goal; building an landmark in the city. There lies the question. What can, and should be provided by the new opera house in Busan? Can it be the resource of giant culture space where the various cultural activities in the city can be accomodated, above the basic requirement of providint adequate building to run opera? Can it be an interactive landmark successfully representing the city of Busan and the activities occuring in, unlike the architectural sculptures that can be placed in any city without being too awkward? The beginning of the solution to unravel the entangled thread were the physical attributes and systems of the container port, existing at the project site. After finding programs and spaces that can be flexible through thorough research, we propose a system generating flexible space which can repond to situation, utilizing the port facilities and the modular system of shipping containers.

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Opera House: Closeness An Opera House is a symbol of a city and a significant cultural space. However, it sometimes doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow easy accessibility: a lobby and stages are only activated when performances are held, and spaces of back stage are always impossible to approach for visitors.

?

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Opera House: Openness and Flexibility Most spaces of Opera House except essential rehearsal rooms are opened to the public as a park. People can experience the process of making performances in multiple levels when they visit this in-between parks. Also, the parks increase the quality of light and other environmental factors for the rehearsal rooms. Using containers which can be easily found and used in Busan make it possible to accept changing demands of rooms by time.

Containers: System and Image The needs of flexible space for Opera House is corresponding to the modular system for harbor effectively, and containers are not only a modular system for making spaces but also routine scenes of Busan. The original purpose of this site was a Harbor. The functions of the harbor have been moving to new site, and consequently, sceneries of Busan have been changed continuously. Therefore, abandoned containers can be used to make unique urban views through containing local characters.

Logics of space arrangement Area of rehearsal places and stages takes most of the site area. In order to avoid this, we allocate courtyards between rehearsal rooms and stack the containers aroundcourtyards.

Arrangement of buildings Auditoriums are closer to shore that make visitors to enjoy the ocean view while they moving. Parks are near the city for the citizens to approach easily. Visitors can see the processes of preparing performances on the park. Main halls are located around the parks: the halls are consist of three. The cores of building are in the vicinity of courtyards: the cores offer functions that performance halls need. A container attached on a main auditorium is a museum which exhibits all performances they had. Spaces on the small auditoriums are for the storage of the containers: they are placed in various ways. Jayeon Kim

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FLEXIBLE COMPOSITION a new type of landmark

a

f

b

c

d

e

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building of opera house keep the abandoned container rental studio space for practice space for urban event urban-scale art work


Containers are useful architectural material to accommodate various needs. Each container can be composed into diverse shapes of space according to different events, and the composition of the containers creates a dividing layer between the background and open space. If you look from urban-scale, the Opera House itself is a canvas and the containers become instrument of architectural expression to complete the project. The view of the Opera House from the city will not be fixed but will vary according to given situations and events: this flexibility itself will be the new landmark. Jayeon Kim

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MODULAR SYSTEM OF SHIPPING CONTAINER

Modular system of shipping container: utilization of the space by module combination

1-40ft module Hotel room(single)

2-40ft module Hotel Room(double)

1-20ft module Hotel Room(single)

2-40ft module Hotel Room(deluxe)

1-40ft module Garden

1-40ft module: small-practice room, office, studio

2-40ft module: middle-practice room, office, studio

2-40ft module: middle-practice room, office, studio

3-40ft module: large-practice room, rehearsal room, studio

3-40ft module: large-practice room, rehearsal room, studio

1-20ft module: personal practice room

1-20ft module: personal practice room

2-20ft module: group practice room

2-20ft module: group practice room

3-20ft module: group practice room

The size of container module is the key factor in organizing the space in this Opera House. Common containers are 40ft or 20ft long and the dimensions of each are 2.4m x 12m x 2.6m and 2.4m x 6m x 2.6m. One 40ft container is adequate for a small studio. Since the long shape of containers can restrict efficient utilization of necessary space, combinations of container modules can create suitable space to accommodate certain programs with large space requirement.

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MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

Architectural devices generating the flexibility

The mechanical equipments used in the container port keep functioning at the Opera House. The mechanical equipments are placed after analysis on the working radius and movement, in order to install shipping containers anywhere in the site. These equipments are not just machines, but architectural devices generating the flexibility.

a. gentry crane

b. container crane

c. container vehicle

a

b

a

b

c

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2nd floor plan s = 1:1000 Jayeon Kim

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1st floor plan s = 1:1600

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Entrance Hall Foyer Auditorium Loading/Unloading Concert Hall Music Room Ensemble Patio Percussion Studio Sound Studio Computer Room Photograph/Video Studio


1st basement plan s = 1:1600

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Painting Studio Lounge Dance Studio Dressing Room Restroom Stage Rehearsal Stage Orchestra Pit Security Office Sound and Light Booth Administration Hotel Jayeon Kim

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PROGRAMS

Auditorium: This opera house has six auditoriums so that it allows actors and workers to practice their performances and to build stages. One of them is a rehearsal stage which is as big as real stage, therefore actors can practice their performances with same situation as a real one. Because the mass of auditorium has transparent faces, audience can enjoy the view of the sea and the whole city.

Division of Circulation: Each floor is divided into different purpose: the first floor is for performers and the second floor is for visitors. Courtyards from everywhere make visual communication and relationship through the window. A Circulation of the building is connected with each other through the cores, and those cores assume a role of undergirding main function of the Opera House when the containers are expanded.

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Hotel and Commercial Program: Actors and their family can accommodate this hotel. It locates a certain place where people can take a view of beautiful ocean and the Opera Theater. Also, this can serve the guest for the events such as movie festival. The corridor on the outer side of the Opera House can be used as passage and commercial facilities.


Rooms and Containers: This project gives much more open spaces to the public compare with other opera theaters. Therefore, insufficient practicing spaces can be served by the flexible use of containers. By doing so, the opera theater can be used by more citizens. In addition, the containers can accommodate not only practicing programs but also many different kinds of programs and events.

Landscape and Open space: The landscape expresses an expanding shape to the ocean, and it seems to be a mosaic drawing which is made up different types of trees and grass.

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South-East elevation of the opera theater

The South-Eastern elevation of the opera theater is made up of transparent material, so the public can observe the ocean view. Moreover, at the foyer, the audience can reach waterfront through the wide stairs. This stairs play diverse roles such as an observation platform, the seats of outside performances, and so on.

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North entrance from the waterfront

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Rehearsal room can be controlled the openings: public can enjoy rehearsals from courtyard

The rehearsal hall and practice halls have their own patio. These patios bring the light and air into the room and this gives a pleasant environment to the performers. Not only that, this patios let the public to see the rehearsal scenes which was the secret before.

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Added the hexahedral mass that similar to existing building and made the connecting mass. existing condition: the building 39

location:

Building #39, Seoul National University Campus, Seoul, Korea.

program: education, exhibition. area:

2816.60 m2

period:

September. 2009. ~ December. 2009.

work:

Individual work

planned condition: the building 39 + annex


THE NEW LAND

Renovation for the Building for Department of Architecture

Architectural Design Studio 5-2: Seoul National University fall 2010 critic: Suk Hoon, Sohn + Seung Hoy, Kim

This project was in the last semester, just before the graduation. Therefore, the task of this project was more practical, rather than experimental. The task of this project was to design the annex of the building #39-the building of the department of architecture of Seoul National University. The final goal was to draw a set of construction drawing. During this project, I motivated to think about the actual issues that occur during the construction process. Before this project, I often considered about the concept rather than actual matters, so I had chances to consider the substantive factors. And I went through the process that similar to the real construction process, so I had to resolve the problems occurred through this.


Plan, Section, and Elevation This shows the connection between building #39 and the annex. The elevation and section is drawn around the plan. As seen in the plan, the rectangular shape of building is connected by an atypical mass. The elevation shows the atypical mass connects the old building, new building and the earth. The section shows the part that the atypical mass meets the typical mass.

Contrast The two masses that make this project displays contrast.

Two Masses Each mass has totally different character. One is a typical mass which looks like an extension of the existing building. The other one is an atypical mass protuberating from the ground.

Free Plan and Standardized Plan Each mass contains contrasting programs, as the shape of the mass differs. The rectangular mass contains Professor’s rooms and critique rooms. And the space is fixed. On the other hand, The atypical mass contains relatively free programs, such as libraries, a café, and a lecture hall. A variety of events can be occurred in this mass.

Structure The structure is different too. The rectangular mass is standing firmly on the ground. It uses a typical column and girder system as a structure. However, the atypical mass is protuberating from the ground and connected to the old building. It provides a column-free space by using truss system, and looks like a floating mass. The structure is supported by the lecture hall’s wall, former building’s column and the rectangular buildings column.

Elevation The elevation differs, to give a sense of contrast. The rectangular mass is covered with repetitive curtain walls. Contrastively, the atypical mass is covered by irregular lumber, showing the contrast between to masses.

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THE NEW LAND


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Link The rectangular mass is standing firmly on the ground. It uses a typical column and girder system as a structure. Atypical mass passes through the rectangular one, and link between land and annex and building 39. The atypical mass also link the basement floor to second floor and the forth floor of building 39 by its ramp. Each mass contains contrasting programs, as the shape of the mass differs. The rectangular mass contains Professorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rooms and critique rooms. And the space is fixed. On the other hand, The atypical mass contains relatively free programs, such as libraries, a cafĂŠ, and a lecture hall. A variety of events can be occurred in this mass.

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THE NEW LAND


Second Floor Plan s = 1 : 300

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The New Land The new mass can be regarded as a new land. This ramp function as bridge to the land, and also function as a outdoor space for the students.

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THE NEW LAND


Third Floor Plan s = 1 : 300

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Second Basement Plan s = 1 : 700

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THE NEW LAND

First Basement Plan s = 1 : 700


First Floor Plan s = 1 : 700

Longitudinal Section s = 1 : 300

Site Plan s = 1 : 700

All floors linked by gradual ramp which included in atypical mass. Jayeon Kim

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Elevational Contrast Two masses have different material, texture and system. This emphasizes the contrast of two masses.

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THE NEW LAND


West Elevation s = 1 : 300

East Elevation s = 1 : 300

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Structure The rectangular mass is standing firmly on the ground. It uses a typical column and girder system as a structure. However, the atypical mass is protuberating from the ground and connected to the old building. It provides a column-free space by using truss system, and looks like a floating mass. The structure is supported by the lecture hallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wall, former buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s column and the rectangular buildings column. The structure of the atypical mass is steel frame truss, and this allows the floating structure.

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THE NEW LAND


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Section Detail Drawing

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THE NEW LAND


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THE NEW LAND


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location: none program: material study area: none period:

March. 2007. ~ June. 2007.

work:

group work


MATERIAL: SHADOW OF LIGHT Research on Architectural Material critic: Seung-Hoy, Kim

The task of this project was to study the materials freely. Given materials were wood, transparent material, and concrete. In this large category, the selection of specific material, and the way to expreesion were free. Through this material study, I focused on the ‘light’. The material can be used as a ‘spectrum(a tool that demonstrates the light)’ to show the lights, and the light through the material can be the shadow of light.


WOOD: Shadow of Light


Transparent Material


Concrete


JAYEON KIM Master of Science of Advanced Architectural Design Columbia University Bachelor of Architecture Seoul National University jk3542@columbia.edu +1 917 754 6222



Portfolio of Jayeon Kim