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AN UNCONVENTIONAL OASIS S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O R T 2 0 1 9


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TABLE OF CONTENTS LETTER FROM THE CEO

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INTRODUC TION

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COST SAVING THROUGH ENERGY REDUC TION

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BUILDING A ROOFTOP SOLAR FARM

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CONSERVING MORE ENERGY

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NEW LIGHTING

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING RO OMS

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WEATHER STRIPPING

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RODENT CONTROL

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PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE

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WA STE DIVER SION

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WATER CONSUMPTION

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CATERING GREEN

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PROMOTING RESULTS

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REDUCING PAPER

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STUDYING A LIVING LABORATORY

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● CO OLER RO OFTOP ● A WILDLIFE PARADISE

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HARVESTING HONEY

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REACHING OUT TO STAKEHOLDER S

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ENGAGING EMPLOYEES

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RELOCATING OUR TRUCKS

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CONSTRUC TING THE FARM

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EXECUTIVE STAFF AND BOARD OF DIREC TOR S

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CONCLUSION

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Letter from the CEO Two years ago, we issued our first Sustainability Report, a document designed to summarize all of the recent sustainable changes throughout the building. For us, it was a groundbreaking achievement that symbolized the rebirth of the Javits Center as an organization with a mission to not only support the local economy but improve the environment for all of the living things around us. In our second biennial report, we are proud to convey the progress made since 2017, building upon our initial successes and and explore new paths toward a more sustainable future for our employees, customers and neighbors. Amongst many other projects, we have broken ground on a new expansion at the north end of the campus, turned our energy conservation efforts into a cost-saving model and harvested more honey from our rooftop bee hives than anyone could have ever imagined. This remarkable work has already paved the way for upcoming projects that we believe will push the boundaries of sustainability in New York City and beyond. As part of our $1 billion expansion project, we are constructing a four-level truck marshaling facility that will not only accelerate our operations but significantly improve the quality of life for the residents of our West Side neighborhood, allowing more residents — and businesses — to move here without disruption. This new 633,000-square foot truck marshaling facility will house all event-related trucks delivering and retrieving materials for events throughout the year. That amounts to about 20,000 trucks a year no longer using nearby streets, improving pedestrian safety and traffic flow while reducing carbon pollution. This comes at a critical

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time for the West Side as the Hudson Yards development rapidly progresses and millions of more visitors come to our neighborhood. Under the expansion, we are also planning for the construction of a one-acre rooftop farm that will build upon the success of our 6.75-acre green roof, one of the largest of its kind in the United States. We expect the farm, which will be managed by local rooftop farming specialists, Brooklyn Grange, will grow up to 40,000 pounds of fruits and vegetables a year and serve our kitchens, creating a true roof-to-table experience. We also hope to provide excess produce to local charities, part of our JavitsCares program — a new initiative designed to focus our efforts on working with customers and business partners to encourage donations as part of overall event operations. Creating economic impact is the primary function of a convention center. Yet there are other ways that such a large facility can support the community, and our sustainability program is one of them. We have reduced our impact on our neighbors and added to their quality of life — from lowering temperatures around the building to creating a bird sanctuary on our rooftop. But our work has just begun, and in the following pages, you will read about the exciting work to come. Today, we are more than just a convention center. We are a community partner as well, adding to the vibrancy, vitality and sustainability of the greatest city in the world.

Sincerely,

PRESIDENT AND CEO Alan Steel


Introduction As the Javits Center was nearing the end of a building-wide renovation in 2013, the facility implemented a sustainability program to maximize the potential of the upgrades implemented throughout the campus. From new energy-efficient Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) units to high-performance, birdfriendly glass, the new sustainability program was designed to set a new standard among event venues, evaluate the overall impact of the renovation and explore innovative ways to conserve energy and improve the quality of life in the neighborhood. Our initial goals included the creation of a sustainability policy for the organization, ensuring that the Javits Center complied with all New York State sustainability reporting requirements. As a LEED Silver Certified building, our first Sustainability Report was produced in 2017, showcasing the effects of the renovation and the results of partnerships with various institutions and universities conducting research on the 6.75 acre green roof. However, beyond the new policies and procedures, the sustainability program has enabled the convention center to emerge as a leader in sustainability and cutting-edge practices. Javits Center staff have consulted with various government agencies, convention center management teams, event managers, exhibitors, elected officials and community leaders, providing critical insight and guidance on how to implement sustainable strategies and produce tangible results. From guests at the annual American Institute of

Architects Conference on Architecture to Lis Cuesta Peraza, the First Lady of Cuba, our employees provide building tours, detailing the challenges and achievements of our sustainability efforts. Javits Center representatives have been invited to numerous events in order to share our experiences and our vision for the future of the facility in the years ahead. In this second Sustainability Report, we celebrate the successes of our sustainability program and highlight our recent accomplishments, including ground-breaking research, reductions in energy consumption and watermonitoring controls. We also outline plans to build on this substantial progress as part of the ongoing expansion project. Sustainability has no boundaries, and our sustainability program contributes to the well-being of the entire community — beyond the footprint of the building. Birds hatched from eggs on our rooftop have traveled across the country, more than 1,500 miles to Louisiana and Florida. Honey bees thriving on our rooftop have pollinated plants throughout the community, allowing us to harvest more than 2,000 ounces of honey this past year. And the green roof has lowered the temperature in the immediate area around the convention center by nearly 2 degrees — a remarkable achievement by any measure. This report is designed to record our progress, chart the exciting steps ahead and serve as an inspiration to other building management teams — close to home and far away.


COST SAVING THROUGH ENERGY REDUCTION Since 2014, the Javits Center has been working with an energy broker, NuEnergen, to participate in three distinct demand response programs. As a result, we have generated more than $1.7 million in additional savings.

$1.7 Million

Amount of Savings Generated Through Demand Response Enrollment

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The Javits Center is tied into an aging electrical grid, and it is imperative that every electrical customer reduces consumption during days where there is high electrical demand. Days of high demand are often during the summer cooling degree days (CDD) when many consumers are using air conditioning. When the grid is under duress, it triggers a demand response event — a voluntary reduction of energy for which users are compensated for every kWh reduced below their pre-determined enrollment goal. As a large facility, a minor reduction in consumption can have a major impact on grid power demand and lead to additional cost savings. The Javits Center is in enrolled in the New York Independent Systems Operator (NYISO) Special Case Resource

Program, the Con Edison Commercial Systems Release Program (CSRP) and the Distribution Load Relief Program (DLRP). Careful analysis of enrollment levels for all three programs and careful real-time consumption monitoring through the Building Management System (BMS) has led to the success of the demand response program. Trained engineers follow a graphical depiction of consumption in comparison to the goal levels. When consumption rises, engineers manage mechanical systems through the BMS to operate at lower levels, subsequently using less energy and helping achieve enrollment goals. The savings from these demand response programs are then channeled into other sustainability programs at the Javits Center with no negative impact on our customers.


In the summer of 2018, the Javits Center became the largest generator of demand response revenue for a single event in New York State, saving approximately $530,000 — proving the profitability of such an energy conservation program. In December 2019, the Javits Center will commission a 12.5 MW generator system, able to power the facility for six days — completely off the grid — in the event of an emergency. As a designated FEMA

(Federal Emergency Management Agency) building, it is essential to be able to provide shelter in an emergency situation, and this new system will allow the Javits Center to provide critical services as necessary. Once the generators are commissioned, the Javits Center will be able to have a greater impact with greater savings, helping our neighbors through a reduced energy demand. Facility Management staff will work with NuEnergen on enrollment and oil pricing for the generators and market rate analysis of oil and commodities will optimize savings. With the new generators online, the Javits Center could become the largest singlebuilding demand response generator in New York State.

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BUILDING A ROOFTOP SOLAR FARM The Javits Center and the New York Power Authority have selected Siemens, a technology company and infrastructure provider with nearly 4,000 employees across New York State, as the developer to design and install up to 1.4 megawatts of solar renewable energy on the green rooftop of the iconic convention center. As New York City’s largest rooftop solar generation project to date, this historic effort will offset the building’s electric load and directly support Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Green New Deal, a nationleading clean energy and jobs agenda for 100 percent carbon-free electricity in New York by 2040 and a ramp up for 70 percent of electricity to come from renewable energy by 2030. Siemens was selected in the New York Power Authority’s competitive bid process and has begun final designs and permitting for the rooftop project. The project is estimated to offset more than 1.3 million pounds of carbon emissions each year, equivalent to removing 262 cars from the road.

This effort will support the goal for 70 percent of the state’s electricity to come from renewable sources by 2030. As part of the project, more than 4,000 solar panels will be constructed over the HVAC units on the Javits Center’s green roof so as not to impact plants on the building’s rooftop. An additional streetlevel solar array also will be constructed on 11th Avenue. Each panel will be affixed to the concrete pad below the unit, allowing doors to open and maintenance to be conducted. The custom designs will provide enough structural support for the solar canopy and are necessary to accommodate the unique conditions associated with the site. NYPA provides low-cost electricity to governmental agencies, municipal electric systems, rural electric cooperatives, manufacturers and investor-owned utilities for resale without profit to retail customers across New York State. By partnering with NYPA on this project, the solar array is being submitted as part of the ConEdison Non-Wires Solutions portfolio. Non-Wires Solutions is a program intended to encourage consumers in the mid-town West neighborhood to install permanent projects that reduce the strain on the 42nd Street electrical grid.

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4K Number of Solar Panels to be Installed on Green Roof

CONSERVING MORE ENERGY Energy-saving projects have helped the Javits Center move closer to the goals outlined in New York State’s Executive Order 88 and Executive Order 166. According to Executive Order 88, “by April 1, 2020, all Affected State Entities shall collectively reduce the average EUI in State-owned and managed buildings by at least 20% from a baseline of the average EUI of such buildings for State fiscal year 2010/2011.” This is a particularly difficult goal for the Javits Center, since the convention center’s mission is to increase occupancy and thereby generate economic activity for New York.

Increased occupancy often comes with increased consumption, but due to energy-saving measures, the building’s consumption has remained flat. The variables influencing kWh are heating degree days and cooling degree days. Therefore, our engineers are managing energy for optimal performance during events through the placement of temperature sensors and the continuous upgrades to the building management system. According to Executive Order 166, “it is the policy of the State of New York to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030, and 80% by 2050 from 1990 levels, across all emitting activities of the economy. Therefore, all actions of all Affected State Entities shall be reasonably consistent with the policies stated herein, and of those expressed in the 2015 State Energy Plan, to achieve such objectives.” To achieve these goals, our energy initiatives will pave the way for kWh reduction, reducing greenhouse gases and aiding the State in its environmental and sustainability goals. At the Javits Center, waste and electric consumption are two major contributing factors to greenhouse gas emissions. With the planned 12.5 megawatt generator plant to be commissioned in December 2019 and the 3.2 megawatt solar array, the facility will reduce 11.2 metric tons of CO2e (carbon dioxide equivalent).

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12.5

Amount of Megawatts to be Produced by New Generator System New Lighting Lighting upgrades have been in progress since 2015. To accelerate this process, the Javits Center has engaged a company that specializes in recommending energy-efficient lighting products to conduct a new lighting audit. The goal is for these products to be fitted with technology that allows the individual fixtures to be controlled through a computer dashboard. In the event of a demand response event, this computer dashboard can be set to meet demand response goals for an individual hall. The first series of lighting tied into this control system was in the organization’s executive conference room. The goal is to be able to replicate this usability and customize settings in exhibit halls based on the various room configurations during an event. With the new control system, rooms can be pre-set, making the transition between room uses easier for customers and employees. In 2019, Javits Center management has plans to re-design the ceiling in several exhibit halls to house new LED fixtures to reduce the energy consumption. These fixtures would also tie into the control system and provide the same level of functionality and data as the other lighting tied into the system.

Mechanical Engineering Rooms There are seven Mechanical Engineering Rooms (MER) servicing the Javits Center, and these rooms house the air handling units and fans for the HVAC equipment. In 2018, plans were developed to conduct a full renovation of these rooms and replace infrastructure and mechanical equipment. This renovation, which is scheduled to be completed in 2019, will lead to a reduction of energy with the installation of more efficient equipment.

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Weather Stripping In order to conserve more energy, installation of weather stripping around exterior doors began in 2018. Due to the busy event schedule, there are limited timeframes to perform this work, which is expected to be completed in 2019. This project will help to reduce the workload of the HVAC equipment and complement the installation of 17 high-speed roll-up doors at all major hall entrances leading to the loading docks. These doors better control interior air temperatures during an event’s move-in and move-out periods and reduce overall energy consumption. The roll-up doors, which remain closed until a person or vehicle approaches them, also help to deter pigeons and insects from entering the building, improving the user experience inside the convention center.

Rodent Control As the busiest convention center in the United States, our loading docks are constantly buzzing with activity when trucks load and unload event-related materials. In such an area, rodent control is a top priority, and Javits Center staff have introduced several feral cats to serve an effective deterrent. In 2018, we hosted four cats, but to ensure that that the colony of cats does not grow, our employees engage with local trap, neuter, release organizations to spay and neuter any cat that enters the colony. This will prevent the colony from exceeding the number necessary for rodent control.

Preventive Maintenance

Proper operation of machinery reduces overall energy costs and helps to mitigate the need for new equipment to be purchased, potentially saving millions of dollars.

Javits Center staff have implemented an EMaintenance program, a paperless process that allows foremen to schedule routine maintenance through an easy-to-use computer software program. As part of the new software, foremen are alerted when maintenance is due on various equipment, and these alerts reduce the risk of mechanical issues and breakdowns. In 2018, members of the Facilities Management team began installing vibration sensors in mechanical equipment. These sensors send alerts to registered users when there is unusual activity in various machines, and these alerts are promptly investigated and corrected. Proper operation of machinery reduces overall energy costs and helps mitigate the need for new equipment to be purchased, potentially saving millions of dollars. In conjunction with the vibration sensors, engineers are trained in thermographic imaging, which is used to determine if there are hot spots in mechanical equipment, an indication of an issue and/or loss of efficiency. Preventive maintenance will remain a focus in 2019 as engineers work to enhance the efficiency and prolong the lifespan of our mechanical equipment. With 24 escalators and 12 elevators throughout the building, it is critical to ensure proper operation at all times. In line with the other systems of the building, the escalators and elevators are being monitored by LiftNet software. LiftNet allows all units to be monitored on a computer so engineers can determine which ones need to be serviced and track usage details. Better monitoring of the elevators will help to determine when the devices should be in use and the types of events that utilize them the most. It also will help operations staff schedule maintenance if a particular device is out of service.

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Waste Diversion In 2018, the Javits Center focused its efforts on diverting waste from the landfill. This includes working closely with event managers to create sustainability plans, establishing pre-planning recycling strategies for events and identifying large specialized recycling pick-ups of materials in storage. In 2017 and 2018, the diversion rate was near 40%. Many of our customers are heavily focused on recycling practices, but many more have become interested in donating reusable items after their event. Shipping costs are often expensive for exhibitors, and as a result, many items are left behind after exhibits are deconstructed. Therefore, the Javits Center launched a new program called JavitsCares, specifically designed to coordinate with our customers and ensure such items can be donated to a local charity or worthy cause. Items available for donation range from event to event, but can include food, bedding, furniture, fabric, toys and even toothbrushes. For example, local non-profit organization Material for the Arts worked with events at the Javits Center to secure more than four tons of donated material in 2018. Materials are reused in the making of stage sets and costumes. This is a remarkable effort and has benefitted the arts community throughout New York City.

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Number of Feral Cats Serving as Rodent Deterrents on Loading Docks. In the fall of 2018, Javits Center employees cleaned out back-of-house storage areas. These materials were largely made of metal — filing cabinets, old lighting, some construction materials and cables — and as a result, 22,279 pounds of mixed metal was diverted from the landfill. Another notable donation is the Toy Industry Foundation’s Toy Bank donation after the annual Toy Fair event.

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Every year, our staff works with event producers to collect toys post-show and deliver them to underprivileged children. In 2017, nearly 55,000 toys were collected, the largest number in the history of the event. A nationwide non-profit organization, the Court Appointed Special Advocates, which supports caring for neglected and abused children, received toys for distribution, as well as other local charity organizations. Among our food-focused events, the Summer Fancy Food Show and the New York Produce Show and Conference, also have made tremendous donations in recent years. The Summer Fancy Food Show is a full-building event dedicated to the latest trends in food, and following its conclusion, exhibitors work with non-profit organization City Harvest to donate this gourmet fare to local food pantries. In 2017, 101,161 pounds of food (51 tons) were donated, and after the 2018 event, 91,778 pounds (46 tons) of food were donated. In 2018, the New York Produce Show, the largest produce-buying event in North America, donated 50,400 pounds (25 tons) of healthy food to City Harvest, which serves local food banks. Our staff is proud to work with the event organizers to coordinate these efforts and ensure that this food is not wasted.


In 2019, Javits Center staff will continue to improve the diversion rate with a number of new procedures and equipment, including:

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Diverting pallets from the landfill in order to improve greenhouse gas emissions. At the end of 2018, Javits Center staff started this process, resulting in more than 400 pallets omitted from the landfill. Exploring ways to engage customers in a carpet-recycling program through the use of an onsite carpet-recycling and baling machine. Specialized recycling efforts through partnerships with a third-party waste hauler that can pick up most recyclable goods on demand; New training for cleaning staff to learn about advanced recycling techniques. In 2019, cleaners will be able to recycle polyethylene and Visqueen, two packaging materials used in large quantities on the show floor; and New waste bins will be installed to encourage more recycling in the public areas occupied by customers and visitors.

Water Consumption Water is a difficult commodity to control at the Javits Center. Different events have disparate water needs, and consumption is primarily dependent on occupancy. To monitor and reduce consumption, sensors have been installed on faucets and toilets, and low-flow shower heads were purchased. In addition, improvements to the roof’s irrigation system and a new leak detection program will help reduce consumption throughout the building. Leak sensors detect and alert members of the Facilities Management team in the event of a leak. Real-time monitoring of leaks allows for them to be fixed expeditiously, reducing the amount of wasted water. The software installed within these sensors provides monitoring and reporting capabilities. The ability to create reports in real time and chart historical consumption supplies valuable data for determining areas that are heavily trafficked and in need of water system upgrades. This new leak detection system will be tied into the Building Management System (BMS) for optimal efficiency. In Fall 2018, the existing drip irrigation system on the green roof was upgraded with the addition of rain sensors and BACNet (Building Automation and Control Networks) capabilities. The rain sensors help to refine the irrigation needs on the roof, and BACNet allows the system to be included in the BMS. Prior to the installation of rain sensors, the irrigation system was set to operate according to a pre-determined schedule. Rain sensors can be set to trigger the irrigation system when they reach a minimum moisture level. This will allow for water to be consumed only on an “as needed” basis. Information provided by the irrigation system upgrade will further improve roof management. Cooling tower meters have been installed to monitor how much water is evaporated versus released into the sanitary sewer system. Because the sewer system in New York City is a dual system, which receives effluent discharge and runoff, overtaxing the system could lead to flooding in the event of heavy rain. By monitoring the cooling towers, the Javits Center has received approximately $100,000 in credits to the building’s water bill. Meters will continue to monitor water evaporation into the future, resulting in continuing bill credits as long as the evaporated water quantity is more than the released water. These credits come through the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, which has initiated this monitoring program to improve resiliency in the five boroughs.

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CATERING GREEN 50K Number of Compostable Straws Used at the Convention Center by 2019

The Javits Center has taken significant steps to advance the sustainability of our catering program in conjunction with our caterer, Centerplate. In November 2018, we switched to a new compostable straw from EcoProducts in all areas of the convention center. These straws are made from PLA, a plant-based plastic that is comprised of 100% renewable resources. They meet ASTM and BPI standards for composability, which means that they can be industrially composted to be converted into bioenergy once public composting receptacles are made available by the Javits Center. As of March 2019, more than 50,000 of these PLA straws have been used during day-to-day operations. In our 2019 menu, one of the major changes was the removal of one-time use plastics, such as drinks from boxed lunches and assorted sandwich displays. For example, we experienced a 13% reduction in single-use Dasani plastic water bottles during Toy Fair 2019 compared to the previous year’s event. Our catering staff also have received increased training in food waste and recovery. In September 2018, line cooks, sous chefs, porters, sales managers and purchasing managers all attended the training sessions. As a result, a system was created to track organic waste collection in each area of the building and kitchen spaces to begin analyzing patterns to inform future decision making. From these efforts, between October 23 and the end of 2018, 38,222 pounds of organic waste was sorted and measured. In the months and years ahead, we will continue to increase our focus on reducing food waste with the hiring of a new employee dedicated to enhancing such operations.

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PROMOTING RESULTS The Javits Center is living proof of the environmental impact of sustainable building, and we believe we have a duty to communicate the significant changes that our staff have seen over the past five years. We understand local property owners remain cautious when considering sustainable improvements. We are proud to offer our results as a way to illustrate what smart and sustainable construction can accomplish — for all those who may be affected. One of the ways we communicate our work is through our robust social media channels, which feature a steady stream of photographs, videos, news articles and updates about our sustainability program and its effects on the building and the surrounding environment. From snapshots of the green roof to local students on a building tour, these posts generate a tremendous amount of activity, and we hope they provide a little inspiration as well. Here are some of the most liked posts in the past year:

“So cool! We’re going to sign up!”

Hard work from our #JavitsCenter employees keeps our #greenroof looking pretty

From sunset to 2am tonight (the eve of @theclimategroup’s 10th #ClimateWeekNYC) #javitscenter will light green to amplify the need for climate action with @nycgo & @nycgo_press! Look out for the lights tonight!

Have we mentioned our #greenroof?

Yesterday, it was time to harvest the honey at the Javits Center and we teamed up to get the job done! We’re so proud of the bee hives on our green roof and grateful to our beekeeper and team

“A 27th bird species has been identified on our green roof”

Yesterday, NYPD’s beekeepping team (who knew?) paid a visit to our #greenroof. This team is dedicated to handling swarms in the city & finding new homes for honeybees!

“With fully functioning beehives and a garden that will provide its restaurant with seasonal vegetables, the Javits Center is proving that going green is the way of the future ”

— blueprint.cbre.com

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REDUCING PAPER The Javits Center has employed technological advances, including the aforementioned Building Management System, to reduce the organization’s reliability on paper-based processes. In 2018, the Javits Center launched Jake, a new online portal that allows customers to order our services from their own desktop or mobile device. The new digital system eliminates the need for paper and has accelerated operations throughout the organization. Under another new program called OneJavits, we are implementing a new payroll system that allows paperless pay stubs, reducing the need to print paystubs and GHG emissions by requiring them to be mailed, if not picked up. To manage hundreds of internal construction and maintenance projects, the Facilities Management team employs Procore software, which allows documents, emails, timelines and budgets to be uploaded to the site’s digital folders, eliminating the need for printed files. Access can be provided to multiple people for individual projects. This new process offers access to multiple people for individual projects and helps to organize information without having to use physical prints of designs or filing cabinets. In 2019, Building Information Modeling (BIM) of the existing Javits Center will be completed, allowing users to see the integration of mechanical systems through this computer-based model. By reviewing this model, staff can better determine how different systems can impact others and how the inefficiency of one system can affect another system.

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$100K Amount of Credit Received for Water Bill Due to Monitoring

STUDYING A LIVING LABORATORY

Since the installation of the 6.75-acre green roof in 2014, the Javits Center has partnered with a number of research and educational institutions to study and evaluate the effects of the roof on the building and the community. These partnerships have produced some amazing results, proving that green building can have a positive impact on the environment — from a surge of area wildlife to lower neighborhood temperatures. In 2018, the Javits Center launched a new partnership with Columbia University by providing a research site for a capstone class led by Dr. Stuart Gaffin, a Research Scientist at the Center for Climate Systems Research. The study was designed to determine how the renovation of the High Line and the installation of the green roof at the Javits Center has had an impact on the ecosystem of the surrounding community. Students at Columbia University used Landsat neighborhood mapping to evaluate neighborhood conditions over time. The data was taken from 1986, when the Javits Center opened, through 2014 when the green roof installation and the renovation of the High Line was completed. The results of their findings will help inform future neighborhood studies, especially those being conducted by Drexel University at the Javits Center in 2019. As part of the project, Columbia University was also able to develop a map of the green roof with clickable layers so researchers could use the proximity of various points (gull nests, drains, lysimeters, flumes, etc.) to determine the influence one variable may have on other studies. Mapping was performed through geocaching and developed via CAD (ComputerAided Design). As part of the outreach component of the study, students prepared a twosided brochure card with facts about the green roof for distribution to roof tour guests. Research entities that have conducted studies on the green roof include:

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A Cooler Rooftop Drexel University deployed the first research team on the green roof in 2012. At that time, full installation of the green roof on the south side of the building was not completed, allowing researchers to collect readings regarding temperature change inside the building both before and after the project’s completion. As a result, researchers found:

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The exterior surface of the green roof is, on average, 31% cooler than the black membrane roof that preceded it; The green roof reduces heat flux into the building by about 46% compared to the black membrane roof that preceded it; The green roof reduces the maximum intensity of the heat island in that section of Manhattan by about 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit; On average, 77% of an average rainfall event is retained on the green roof; The green roof appears to be more than 18 times as cost-effective than a subsurface cistern would be for managing an equivalent volume of stormwater in Midtown; and Between 42-50% of incoming solar radiation is used to evapotranspire water off of the green roof. This is the same quantity of water that would be required to cool 210 studio apartments in New York City.

In 2018, the Drexel University contract was extended to continue and expand the services being provided. In addition to measuring storm water runoff quantities, wind speed and temperature, Drexel University will be researching the air quality around the green roof,

storm water runoff quality and how to maximize the HVAC units’ efficiency by influencing temperature of intake air through irrigation. Research in these areas is integral to understanding the full impact of green roofs on surrounding environments and how to maximize the potential of the green roof. Drexel University will continue to partner with Cooper Union on this research. In the expanded scope of work for Drexel University, a series of EnviMet modeling

is included, and these models will depict neighborhood conditions and the impact on the green roof as the area continues to develop — with new skyscrapers being constructed as part of the Hudson Yards development. These models will help to demonstrate research into the value of green roofs in developing neighborhoods and help Javits Center staff develop updated maintenance schedules for the green roof as new, adjacent buildings change existing conditions.

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A Wildlife Sanctuary

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Number of Bird Nests Identified on the Green Roof in 2018

New York City Audubon is continuing to study how the avian community, as well as bats and arthropods, utilize the green roof. Four new bird species were identified in 2018 — including the House Finch, Dark-eyed Junco, Eastern Bluebird and Red-tailed Hawk — making it a total of 29 species observed in five years. These birds have been observed utilizing the roof in various ways, including foraging, nesting, fly-overs and perching. Researchers identified 21 of the 29 bird species in 2018, including flycatchers (Eastern Phoebe and Eastern Kingbird) that were abundant on the roof in the fall season, similar to previous years. More bird species were identified in 2018 than any other previous year. The continued presence of flycatchers in the fall indicates that the green roof may be suitable as a fall stopover habitat as these birds migrate. From May to October, 458 bat passes were recorded over 151 days, signifying a continued robust presence of bats on the green roof. A total of five bat species have been observed since 2014. In 2018, more than 100 Herring Gull nests were identified on the green roof during mating season — a significant increase over previous years. Although the abundance of bird nests were welcomed, they presented some challenges for staff members. During hatching season, parent seagulls are very protective, and maintenance crews were forced to wear protective headgear as a precaution and avoid certain areas for a temporary period of time. In 2019, Javits Center staff will be working with New York City Audubon to create a gull management plan mitigating the number and location of the nests. To expand their observation capabilities, New York City Audubon researchers launched a pilot study in 2018 that employs camera traps to identify cryptic species on the green roof. Two camera traps were deployed in October — one directed at the American Kestrel nest box on the north section of the roof, and the other directed at the honey bee hives on the south section of the roof. The north roof camera directed at the nest box (a potential perch) recorded at least four bird species, a previously unobserved bird behavior and one bat species. According to their studies, New York City Audubon researchers have noted an increased presence of moths, as well as the presence of ants for the first time. They are studying whether the increased moth activity would lead to more bat activity since moths are a primary food source for them. New bat microphones were installed on the roof in 2018, and New York City Audubon will be analyzing data from the equipment to confirm if, in fact, more moths lead to more bats. Ants were not initially identified in the arthropod species inhabiting the sedum mats. These insects could have arrived on the roof through several different means, including attaching themselves to birds or traveling from the vegetated medians on the West Side Highway.

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Barnard College has been conducting a study on the roof pertaining to the fungal and microbial communities on a sedum roof compared to those with more varied plant species. According to their findings so far, the sedum roof has less fungal diversity, but the bacteria diversity is unaffected by plant type. The type of fungus on the roof also could influence the roof’s response to environmental stressors (heat, drought, etc.). The presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonies indicates a better stress response. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are found in higher concentrations on roofs with varied plant variety. Studies like this are crucial to the scientific and green roof communities in maximizing green roof ecosystem services.

These birds have been observed utilizing the roof in various ways, including foraging, nesting, fly-overs and perching.

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Susan B. Elbin, Ph.D., Director of Conservation and Science at the New York City Audubon, and a colleague tend to baby chicks hatched from eggs on the green roof.

The translucent, fritted glass along the Javits Center’s facade have virtually eliminated bird collisions, allowing a wildlife sanctuary to thrive on the rooftop.

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More than 100 bird nests were identified on the green roof in 2018. Birds hatched on our green roof have flown as far away as Canada and Florida.

The green roof is comprised of sedum, a low-lying rock plant that was grown in Syracuse, NY.

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2,500

Number of Ounces Harvested from Rooftop Bee Hives

HARVESTING HONEY More than 2,500 ounces of honey was harvested from rooftop bee hives at the Javits Center in 2018 — 10 times the amount from the initial harvest in 2017. The significant increase in honey is due to a number of factors. It is not uncommon for apiaries to lose hives during the first year of hive establishment, and based on this information, the Javits Center ordered two extra packages of bees to begin the 2018 season. However, the three existing hives survived, and the Javits Center kicked off 2018 with five bee hives. Although there were doubts that the existing forage could support the extra bees, rain in the early spring created lush sedum and plenty of forage. As a result, Javits Center staff was able to perform an early harvest in conjunction with our local beekeeper, Liane Newton, of nycbeekeeping.org. This honey was considered “sedum” honey, since primarily, all of the foraging was from the roof. This honey was very light in color and was extracted, bottled and labeled by Javits Center employees. Following the summer harvest, two more harvests took place — an incredible feat for all those involved including the Javits Center’s own engineers who became certified beekeepers, and more importantly, the bees. In 2019, our staff intends on maintaining the number of hives based on the expected available forage.

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1.9 Number of Fahrenheit Degrees Lowered As a Result of Green Roof

REACHING OUT TO STAKEHOLDERS For the past five years, the number of green roof tours for the general public, customers and other stakeholders has steadily increased — due to increased awareness and publicity. In 2018, staff provided more than 500 tours to universities, non-profit organizations, event producers, exhibitors, government agencies, event attendees and employees, as well as members of the public from across the country and the world. Opening up the green roof to guided tours has helped promote the story of sustainability and educate other sectors of the community about the benefits of green roof installation. Throughout the year, several universities and colleges hold classes at the Javits Center and tour the roof, including Fordham University, New York University, Columbia University, The New School and the Fashion Institute of Technology. These classes offered a wide range in scope, such as urban psychology, green design, green roof ecology and sustainable development through urban ecology. To further support our community, we also launched the Javits Juniors Scholarship Program, which provides college scholarships to local high school students in coordination with the Marian B. and Jacob K. Javits Foundation, the New York City Department of Education and the Fund for Public Schools. In 2019, three major event producers, Emerald Expositions, Informa and Reed Exhibitions, each contributed to the program, allowing the creation of five $5,000 college scholarships. Due to the success of our community outreach efforts, representatives from the Javits Center have been asked to deliver remarks at several conferences and events and provide dozens of informal presentations about sustainability, including:

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The American Institute of Architects (AIA) held their annual conference at the Javits Center in 2018, and one of the education sessions focused on the environmental benefits resulting from the 2009-2014 renovation of the Javits Center; and The Denver chapter of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) invited our Senior Vice President of Facilities Management Kenneth Sanchez and Energy and Sustainability Manager Rebecca Marshall to deliver a keynote address at an event focused on green roof legislation recently enacted for buildings in the Colorado city.


At the CitiesAlive conference in Brooklyn in 2018, Javits Center President and CEO Alan Steel served as the keynote speaker and discussed the benefits — and challenges — of creating a sustainability program. The event itself focused on the importance of resiliency and green building among our country’s infrastructure. Javits Center staff continues to participate in the Green Roof Researchers Alliance (GRRA), a consortium of scientists, policy advocates, researchers, analysts and others with interests in green roofs who are collecting, aggregating and analyzing green roof data in New York City. Because our

green roof is so vast and open to research, the GRRA has utilized much of the data collected on the site and extrapolated the results to other sites in the city. The first GRRA conference was held in the summer of 2018 where Mr. Steel was the keynote speaker. He stressed the need to communicate the importance of green roofs and green roof science to people outside of the scientific community. In 2018, Mr. Steel was asked to be Chairman of the NYC & Company Sustainable Tourism Committee, which is comprised of NYC & Company members interested in promoting New York City as a sustainable tourist destination.

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1 Number of Acres of New Rooftop Farm Being Built As Part of Expansion

ENGAGING EMPLOYEES Creating a sustainable building cannot be achieved without the commitment of our employees, and Javits Center management has encouraged employees to participate in green-focused events and activities designed to boost morale, foster a stronger sense of community and increase the sustainability of our operations. In 2018, five employees volunteered to help extract, bottle and label honey harvested from our bee hives. Stations were created in our first-floor kitchen, and hundreds of jars were produced. We have named the honey, Jacob’s Honey, in honor of our namesake, the late Senator from New York, Jacob K. Javits. In 2018, we also held an Earth Day contest, which asked employees a series of sustainability questions, and those who submitted the correct answers were treated to a luncheon and a tour of the green roof including the bee hives. Sustainability has been incorporated into many aspects of the Javits Center’s operations, including its marketing materials. In recent years, the Javits Center has produced reusable bags, coffee mugs, cups and thermoses for employees and customers. All these items reinforce the need to reduce waste and not purchase single-use items.

Creating a sustainable building cannot be achieved without the commitment of our employees.

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RELOCATING OUR TRUCKS A new truck marshaling facility being constructed as part of our ongoing expansion project will have a dramatic impact on the West Side neighborhood. By relocating more than 20,000 trucks off local streets, the facility will ease congestion on area streets and make it easier for pedestrians to explore the rapidly growing neighborhood. The massive, 4-level facility will reduce noise pollution and carbon emissions outside of the Javits Center and speed up operations inside the convention center by allowing trucks to unload and load materials in a more efficient manner. With the addition of 27 loading docks, move-in and move-out operations — key to the success of any convention center — will become more seamless, event after event, and create room on the calendar for more events. For example, a three-day move-in operation for a large trade show may be reduced to two days since trucks will no longer have to find parking on nearby streets and travel to the Javits Center when an empty loading dock becomes available. The construction of this facility is essential as the Hudson Yards development — across the street from the Javits Center — will attract millions of visitors, including new residents and businesses, to the area. Construction will be completed in 2021.

By relocating more than 20,000 trucks off local streets, the facility will ease congestion on area streets.

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91,778 Number of Pounds of Food Donated by Summer Fancy Food Show in 2018

CONSTRUCTING THE FARM Building on the success of the Javits Center’s sustainability program, a new rooftop working farm will be constructed as part of the convention center’s ongoing expansion project at the north end of the campus.

This one-acre farm will be the largest rooftop farm in Manhattan and is expected to produce more than 40,000 pounds of fruits and vegetables a year, creating a true roofto-table experience for New Yorkers. A diverse array of crops, including carrots, cucumbers, herbs, salad greens and tomatoes, will be grown and incorporated into the millions of meals prepared each year at the convention center. As a result, visitors from around the world will be able to get a taste of the agricultural and culinary traditions of the New York State. Following an extensive Request for Proposals process, Brooklyn Grange LLC, a rooftop farming company specializing in urban farming, was selected to manage this unique farm once completed. The rooftop farm area will consist of a working farm, a grove of fruiting trees and a raised herb garden, as well as designated pathways that allow visitors to explore and experience the various aspects of the farm. Members of Brooklyn Grange will work with the convention center’s caterer to determine the crop mix, season after season, and farming operations will be conducted according to organic practices in 18-inch deep compostbased soil designed specifically for green roofs.

Brooklyn Grange employees tend to their own rooftop farm in the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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EXECUTIVE STAFF ALAN STEEL

President and Chief Executive Officer

BRADLEY SICILIANO Chief Operating Officer

DOREEN GUERIN

Senior Vice President, Sales and Marketing

CHRISTINE MCMAHON

Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Labor Solutions

MELANIE MCMANUS

KENNETH SANCHEZ

TIMOTHY GABURUNGYI

Chief Sustainability Officer and Senior Vice President, Facilities Management

Vice President, Technology Solutions

MARK S. SIMS

Vice President, Guest Experience

Senior Vice President, Chief Information Officer

T O N Y S C L A FA N I

MARIAM KARIM

MICHAEL RUBERRY

Vice President, Set-Up and Event Solutions

Senior Vice President, Chief Communications Officer

KENNETH DIXON

Vice President, Security and Safety Solutions

Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

BOARD OF DIRECTORS H E N R Y R . S I LV E R M A N Chairman

ROBERT S. AZEKE HUGH L. CAREY II JOHN LEE COMPTON FRED DIXON CHRISTINE FERER RONALD GOLDSTOCK

E D WA R D P. K A N E

MARK SCHIENBERG

STEVEN C. KOPPEL

J O S E P H E . S P I N N AT O

G A R Y L AV I N E

GEORGE TSUNIS

ANDREW M. MURSTEIN BRIAN O’DWYER LEE H. PERLMAN

EDITORS : Senior Vice President and Chief Communications Officer Tony Sclafani Former Energy and Sustainability Manager Rebecca Marshall Report Design by reitdesign

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Printed on Recyclable Paper


THANK YOU Thank you to all those who have contributed to the success of our sustainability program. Without the insight, guidance and support of these individuals and organizations, these remarkable results would be not be possible. We would like to thank Bruce Fowle, Susan Elbin, Franco Montalto, Joe Cataldo, Rick Brown, Frank Neufeld, Tamara Reed, Adriana Fargelli, Rebecca Marshall and Indira Turney, as well as:

For more information, contact Energy and Sustainability Manager Jacqueline Tran at jtran@javitscenter.com or Sustainability Specialist William Cosgarea at wcosgarea@javitscenter.com.


Conclusion Our journey toward sustainability has just begun. In the past five years, we have made some tremendous progress with a thriving green roof, a robust energy-tracking system and a dedicated staff searching for innovative methods to improve the quality of life for our entire community, including those with wings and those without. We have incorporated sustainability into our value system as an organization, and therefore, the idea of sustainability is considered with every decision we make. As we have focused on increasing our energy efficiency, we have become more efficient as a workforce — in how we operate and maintain the convention center. From using thermal imaging cameras to monitor equipment to tracking neighborhood temperatures so we can lower our own energy demand, these smart, yet simple, methods prove that a sustainable strategy can be cost effective in ways many building owners have yet to realize. But the more we succeed, the more we recognize we have not achieved all that is possible. In the months and years to come, we plan on installing solar panels atop the HVAC units on our existing green roof, one of the largest flat roofs in the five boroughs. The expansion project, including the rooftop farm and truck marshaling facility, is expected to secure a minimum of LEED Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. These exciting new efforts will allow us to explore the next frontier of green building and determine how truly sustainable the Javits Center can be. As a self-sustaining organization without any taxpayer subsidies for day-to-day operations, we are mindful of our annual maintenance costs and the expenses associated with upgrading equipment and materials throughout such a large facility. But as we have developed new methods to conserve energy, we have been able to reduce costs and implement energy-efficient upgrades with the savings from those efforts. Simply put, the more sustainable we are, the more sustainable we can become. And that’s where we are headed.


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Profile for Javits Center

Javits Center - 2019 Sustainability Report  

Javits Center - 2019 Sustainability Report