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HIROOMI ITO 1999 - 2016


Published by JanKossen Contemporary Ltd

1st edition Š March 2016 All rights reserved Printed in Switzerland


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Nourish III: The Gift 2016 Mineral pigments, glue, charcoal, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 7.8 Ă— 15.7 inches / 20 Ă— 40 cm

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Content The art of Hiroomi Ito

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Understanding Japanese Aesthetics

11 - 19

Vision Test Taste Series

20 - 27

The Bowl Series

28 - 35

Unlimited Desire Series

36 - 57

The Chrysanthemum and

Left Kimuchi in harmony with Rice 2011 11.8 Ă— 11.8 inches /30 Ă— 30 cm Mineralpigments, glue, sumi, wheat starch paste, aluminium, roasted green tea, springwater on handmade Japanese paper

the Sword

58 - 65

Biography

66 - 67

Impressum

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Anomie: Whether I Believe In God, I Cannot Be Determined 2015 Mineral pigments, glue, charcoal, gold and silver leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 8 55.1 x 110.2 inches / 140 x 280 cm


The art of

Hiroomi Ito A

traditional master of Japanese painting, Hiroomi Ito belongs to a small group of Japanese artists who not only produce their own color pigments out of natural dyes, but makes the rice paper - the canvas – upon which the artwork is painted on. As a distinguished and admirable master of Japanese painting, Hiroomi Ito belongs to a small group of artists that still produce their own pigments and canvases, which they later use while creating the art pieces. Hiroomi uses color pigments that are produced out of natural dyes and minerals. For canvas, the artist makes his own fine rice paper. It is not unusual for Ito to use uncommon materials for the painting – some of the materials include gold and silver leaf, uncooked Japanese bread-like food paste, or roasted tea. Each of these ingredients that construct the image carry a specific symbol and meaning. The first impression of Ito’s work is that of classical painting. The artist uses materials and techniques that echoes the style of ancient Japan. However, Ito’s subject matter is

in fact a contemporary one; where the artist looks at Japan’s modern society and infrastructure, and how the culture of the family structure – the backbone of Japanese culture - has steadily disappeared; along with the pride associated to belonging to an old culture. Hiroomi Ito was born in 1970 in Tokyo, Japan. Interested in traditional Japanese culture and heritage, he studied at the seminal centre Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, and graduated in 1996 completing a BFA. Two years later, he received his MFA in the same field, again at the Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music. In 2002, Ito earned his PhD, with his dissertation titled Taste of Art, followed by solo exhibition under the same name. In 2001, Hiroomi Ito was awarded with the Prize of Nomura, for his work that later became his doctorate graduation thesis. Most of his artworks are being held in the collection of the Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music. The artist currently lives in Barcelona, Spain.

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The act of allowing matters take theri own course 1999 Japanese ceder, sumi, tapwater, mineral pigments, glue, iron rust, sunshine, rainwater 240 x 656 x 4cm

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Understanding

Japanese Aesthetics “I believe that beauty as conceived by the Japanese who share collective desires and memories lies in the acidic smell of soy sauce. Since the post-war era, the Japanese art scene attempted to conceal this taste of soy sauce by unabashedly mimicking the Western flavors. Precisely because they all sought to adapt to the Western style, the Japanese artists were considered less and less for their unique qualities… In order to spread the Japanese culture, we must not blindly imitate the Western taste but rather thicken the traditional Japanese flavors.” – Takashi Murakami (in his Theory of Art Enterprise)

T

o understand the art of Hiroomi Ito requires a journey within the Japanese psyche; an examination and basic understanding of the relevant and important concepts of aesthetics found within its culture. These ideas have arisen in the course of tradition, before aesthetics was formally established as a discipline: namely, mono no aware (the pathos of things), wabi (subdued, austere beauty), sabi (rustic patina), yūgen (mysterious profundity), iki (refined style), and kire (cutting). Two preliminary observations about the Japanese cultural tradition to begin with, is that classical Japanese philosophy understands the basic reality as constant change, or (to use a Buddhist expression) impermanence. The world of flux that presents itself to our senses is the only reality: there is no conception of some stable “Platonic” realm above or behind it. The arts in Japan have traditionally reflected this fun-

damental impermanence—sometimes lamenting but more often celebrating it. In the Japanese Buddhist tradition, awareness of the fundamental condition of existence is no cause for nihilistic despair, but rather a call to vital activity in the present moment and gratitude for another moment’s being granted to us. The second observation is that the arts in Japan have tended to be closely connected with Confucian practices of self-cultivation, as evidenced in the fact that they are often referred to as “ways [of living]”: chadō, the way of tea (tea ceremony), shōdō, the way of writing (calligraphy), and so forth. And since the scholar official in China was expected to be skilled in the “Six Arts”—ceremonial ritual, music, calligraphy, mathematics, archery, and charioteering—culture and the arts tend to be more closely connected with intellect and the life of the mind than in the western traditions.

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The food that is left, when I am content 2007 Mineral pigments, glue, silver leaf, sumi, chacoal, wheat starch, aluminium, roasted green tea, springwater 12 on handmade Japanese paper 140cm x 210 cm


To this day it is not unusual in Japan for the scholar to be a fine calligrapher and an accomplished poet in addition to possessing the pertinent intellectual abilities.

Mono no aware: the Pathos of Things The meaning of the phrase mono no aware is complex and has changed over time, but it basically refers to a “pathos” (aware) of “things” (mono), deriving from their transience. The sound of the Gion shōja bells echoes the impermanence of all things; the color of the sōla flowers reveals the truth that the prosperous must decline. The most frequently cited example of mono no aware in contemporary Japan is the traditional love of cherry blossoms, as manifested by the huge crowds of people that go out every year to view (and picnic under) the cherry trees. The blossoms of the Japanese cherry trees are intrinsically no more beautiful than those of, say, the pear or the apple tree: they are more highly valued because of their transience, since they usually begin to fall within a week of their first appearing. It is precisely the evanescence of their beauty that evokes the wistful feeling of mono no aware in the viewer.

Wabi: Simple, Austere Beauty It is in the art of tea, and the context of Zen, that the notion of wabi is most fully developed.

In the Nampōroku (1690), a record of sayings by the tea master Sen no Rikyū, we read: “In the small [tea] room, it is desirable for every utensil to be less than adequate. There are those who dislike a piece when it is even slightly damaged; such an attitude shows a complete lack of comprehension” (Hirota, 226). Implements with minor imperfections are often valued more highly, on the wabi aesthetic, than ones that are ostensibly perfect; and broken or cracked utensils, as long as they have been well repaired, more highly than the intact. The wabi aesthetic does not imply asceticism but rather moderation, as this passage from the Nampōroku demonstrates: “The meal for a gathering in a small room should be but a single soup and two or three dishes; sakè should also be served in moderation. Elaborate preparation of food for the wabi gathering is inappropriate” (Hirota, 227). The way of tea exemplifies this attitude toward life in the elegant simplicity of the tea house and the utensils, which contradicts any notion that beauty must entail magnificence and opulence.

Sabi: Rustic Patina The term sabi occurs often in the Manyōshū, where it has a connotation of desolateness (sabireru means “to become desolate”), and later on it seems to acquire the meaning of something that has aged well, grown rusty (another word pronounced sabi means “rust”), or has acquired a patina that makes it beautiful. Contrasting with the colorful beauty of the blossoms, the more subdued gracefulness of

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One side of daily life of Japan 3 : The act of allowing matters take their own course 2000 Japanese ceder, iron rust , sumi 240cm x 208cm x 4 cm

the cypress—no doubt older than the person seeing it but no less solitary—typifies the poetic mood of sabi. Tanizaki’s “In Praise of Shadows” frequently celebrates sabi. By contrast with Western taste, he writes of the Japanese sensibility: We do not dislike everything that shines, but we do prefer a pensive lustre to a shallow brilliance, a murky light that, whether in a stone or an artifact, bespeaks a sheen of antiquity. . . . We love things that bear the marks of grime, soot, and weather, and we love the colors and the sheen that call to mind the past that made them. (Tanizaki, 11–12) This is a significant existential consideration: the sheen of older things connects us with the past in ways that shiny products of modern technology simply cannot. And since older things

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tend to be made from natural materials, to deal with them helps us to realize our closest connections with the natural environment. Wood finished in glistening black lacquer is the very best, but even unfinished wood, as it darkens and the grain grows more subtle with the years, acquires an inexplicable power to calm and soothe. The ultimate, of course, is a wooden “morning glory” urinal filled with boughs of cedar: this is a delight to look at and allows not the slightest sound. (Tanizaki, 6) A more exalted exemplification of sabi is the exquisite Silver Pavilion at Ginkakuji in Kyoto. Even though the tea ceremony is said to have originated here, in a small sabi-saturated teahouse, the exterior of the pavilion was originally going to be covered in silver foil, in emulation of the Golden Pavilion (14th century) at Kinkakuji. Without ever having enjoyed a coating of silver, the Silver Pavilion is the epitome of sabi and one of the most graceful structures ever built. The contrast with the larger, and flashier Golden Pavilion, whose coating of gold leaf lends it a quite different (and distinctly un-sabi) kind of beauty, is instructive.

Iki: Refined Style The Structure of “Iki” (“Iki” no kōzō) by Kuki Shūzō (1888–1941) is arguably the most significant work in Japanese aesthetics from the twentieth century—and certainly one of the shortest. Iki, was central to Japanese aesthetic life during the previous two or three hundred years and derived from forms of erotic relations between men and geisha in the pleasure quarters of the big cities. No European word is capable of translating the


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Previous page: Color vision test: Taste of Vermilion and Shichimi togarashi 2003 Mineralpigments, glue, acrylic, gold leaf, sumi, wheat starch, aluminium, roasted green tea, tapwater on Korean paper 47.5 x 47.5 inches / 140x140cm

Opposite: Relationship of mutual trust : Inconsistency of Knowledge 2012 Mineralpigments, glue, acrylic, gold leaf, sumi, wheat starch, aluminium, roasted green tea, tapwater on Japaese paper 60cm x 90cm

richness of its meanings—unsurprisingly, since it emerged from a particular cultural context. The phenomenon of iki is related among a variety of seemingly contradictory aesthetic feelings such as sweet (amami) versus astringent (shibumi), flashy (hade) versus quiet (jimi), and crude (gehin) versus refined (jōhin). We see this in nature; willow trees and slow, steady rain exemplify iki; in the human body a slight relaxation, a voice of medium rather than high pitch, a face that is long rather than round, a certain tension and relaxation together of the

eyes, mouth, and cheeks, the hand curved or slightly bent back. Also iki is the wearing of thin fabric, makeup thinly applied, hair styled not too formally, with the aid of water rather than oil, and a décolletage designed to call attention to the nape of the neck laid bare. In the “free art” of design, parallel lines, and especially vertical stripes, are expressive of iki: almost all the other beautiful patterns developed by Japanese fabric arts, since they often involve curved lines, are un-iki. The only colors that embody iki are certain grays, browns, and blues. In architecture

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Miso Soup and the traditional Japanese landscape 2004 Mineralpigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi, wheat starch, aluminium, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper, 140 x 350cm

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the small (four-and-a-half mat) Zen teahouse is a paradigm of iki, especially insofar as it initiates an interplay between wood and bamboo. Lighting must be subdued: indirect daylight or else the kind of illumination provided by a paper lantern. The scales, melodies, and rhythms of various kinds of music are correspondingly iki, insofar as (alluding to Goethe, Schelling, and Schopenhauer)“Architecture is frozen music, and music as flowing architecture” (Nara, 41–51).

Kire: Cutting A distinctive notion in Japanese aesthetic discourse is that of the “cut” (kire) or, “cut-continuity” (kire-tsuzuki). The “cut” is a basic trope in Rinzai School of Zen Buddhism, especially as exemplified in the teachings of the Zen master Hakuin (1686–1769). For Hakuin the aim of “seeing into one’s own nature” can only be realized if one has “cut off the root of life”: “You must be prepared to let go your hold when hanging from a sheer precipice, to die and return again to life” (Hakuin, 133–35). The cut appears as a fundamental feature in the distinctively Japanese art of flower arrangement called ikebana. The term means literally “making flowers live”—a strange name, on first impression at least, for an art that begins by initiating their death. There is an exquisite essay by Nishitani Keiji on this marvelous art, in which organic life is cut off precisely in or-

der to let the true nature of the flower come to the fore (Nishitani, 23–7). There is something curiously deceptive, from the Buddhist viewpoint of the impermanence of all things, about plants, which, lacking locomotion and by sinking roots into the earth, assume an appearance of being especially “at home” wherever they are. In severing the flowers from their roots, Nishitani suggests, and placing them in an alcove (itself cut off from direct, as Tanizaki remarks), one is letting them show themselves as they truly are: as absolutely rootless as every other being in this world of radical impermanence. The most distinctively Japanese style of garden, the “dry landscape” (karesansui) garden, owes its existence to the landscape’s being “cut off” from the natural world beyond its borders. The epitome of this style is the rock garden at Ryōanji in Kyoto, where fifteen “mountain”-shaped rocks are set in beds of moss in a rectangular “sea” of white gravel.

Dr. Jasmin Kossenjans Curator ,JanKossen Contemporary New York and ArtePonte Switzerland Galleries

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Taste of Miso soup : To have a taste for natural rather than man-made things 2001 Japanese cedar wood, iron rust, gold leaf, sumi, tapwater, Japanese paper 240 x 240 x 4 cm

Vision Test Taste series 2000 - 2015

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Color vision test: Taste of Brown and Miso soup 2003 Mineralpigments, glue, acrylic, gold leaf, sumi, wheat starch, aluminium, roasted green tea, tapwater on Korean paper 140x140cm

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Color vision test: Taste of Green and Pine needles 2002 Mineralpigments, glue, acrylic, gold leaf, sumi, wheat starch, aluminium, roasted green tea, tapwater on Korean paper 47.5 x 47.5 inches /140x140cm

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Color vision test: Taste of Gold, Brown and Cloud and the Earth 2002 Mineralpigments, glue, acrylic, gold leaf, sumi, wheat starch, aluminium, roasted green tea, tapwater on Korean paper 140x140cm

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Color vision test: Taste of Taste of Blue and Bluefish 2003 Mineralpigments, glue, acrylic, gold leaf, sumi, wheat starch, aluminium, roasted green tea, tapwater on Korean paper 140x140cm

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Vision test: Salt 2015 Mineral pigments, glue, silver leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 47.5 x 47.5 inches / 120.6 x 120.6 cm

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Vision Test: Savory 2015 Mineral pigments, glue, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 47.5 x 47.5 inches / 120.6 x 120.6 cm

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2007 - 2011 The Bowl series

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Spicy Seafood Tofu Soup “Jjigae” : Korean Food cooked by a Japanese? 2007 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi,chacoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 140 x 140 cm


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Left: Tempura on Rice : my God dwells in a meal 2006 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi,chacoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper,140 x 140 cm Miso Soup : I inherited from my mother. 2006 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi,chacoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper,140 x 140 cm

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Miso Soup pattern 2: Thicken taste of Japan for art 2007 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper, 70 x 210cm

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Grilled Mackerel on Rice I 2006 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi, chacoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 70 x 70 cm

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Grilled Mackerel on rice II 2010 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi, chacoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

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2011-2015 In his series “Unlimited desire”, and “Plentiful” ; Ito uses symbolism in his compositions. Inspired by European 15th century still life paintings of the natural world, Ito depicts dishes typically found in Asia, as a reference to both devotional and secular images. The paintings communicate that the family head - or “lord of the home” as the center of the family, as an individual who is healthy, wealthy and has the strength to protect the family from any ill influences from the environment. Although the work uses a traditional style of painting,

the subject matter and content is distinctly contemporary. The gold represents the wealth of the owner, or “master of the home”. The steam generated by the cooking fire, represents the passion life, and the ability to have the strength to deliver “food on the table” – to provide well for the home. The choice of seafood symbolically demonstrates how the “master” has taste and is well educated, with the ability to choose well for the family.

Mother’s Soup 2015 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 55.1 x 55.1 inches / 140 cm x 140 cm

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God of Desire: Miso Soup 2011 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

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God of Desire: Tempura on Rice 2011 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

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God of Desire: Unjapanese Sushi I 2011 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

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God of Desire: Unjapanese Sushi II 2011 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

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Above: God of Desire: Flat fish Bento 2011 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 40 x 60 cm

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Right: Plentiful: Beyond satisfaction 2008-2011 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 140 x 140 cm


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Plentiful: Anticipation of desire 2012 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, charcoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

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Plentiful: I know this dish well 2012 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, charcoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

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Plentiful: I know what to expect 2012 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, charcoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

Right: Plentiful: He gives enough for us all 2012 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, charcoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 27.5 x 27.5 inches / 70 x70 cm


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Plentiful: Sushi Makeral 2012 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, charcoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 60 cm

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Plentiful: Forbidden Joys 2012 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, charcoal, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 30 x 30 cm

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Plentiful: Quiet Pleasure 2012 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 27.5 x 27.5 inches /70 x 70 cm

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Unlimited Desire: For me Alone 2009-2013 Mineral pigments, glue, gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 55.1 x 128.7 inches / 140 Ă— 327 cm

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The God of Desires 2009-2013 Mineral pigments, glue, silver and gold leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 27.5 x 165.3 inches / 70 x 420 cm

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Plentiful: Taste is Subjective 2011- 2015 Mineral pigments, glue, silver leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 23.6 x 23.6 inches / 60 x 60 cm

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Plentiful: Nothing is Lost 2011 - 2013 Mineral pigments, glue, silver leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 23.6 x 23.6 inches / 60 x 60 cm

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The Chrysanthemum and the Sword In his first solo show in the United Satates; The Chrysanthemum and the Sword, Ito asks himself why there is a dichotomy in the Japanese psyche; the refusal to accept ones cultural roots and whether the fusion between the traditional and modern has indeed resulted in a loss of “….the pride of being Japanese”.

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Detail Anomie: Whether I Believe In God, I Cannot Be Determined 2013 - 2015 Mineral pigments, glue, charcoal, gold and silver leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 55.1 x 110.2 inches / 140 x 280 cm


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Anomie: Whether I Believe In God, I Cannot Be Determined 2013 - 2015 Mineral pigments, glue, charcoal, gold and silver leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 55.1 x 110.2 inches / 140 x 280 cm

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Nourish I: The Gift 2016 Mineral pigments, glue, charcoal, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 11.8 Ă— 11.8 inches (30 Ă— 30 cm)

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Nourish II: The Gift 2016 Mineral pigments, glue, charcoal, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 11.8 Ă— 11.8 inches (30 Ă— 30 cm)

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Nourish IV: The Gift 2016 Mineral pigments, glue, charcoal, silver leaf, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 11.8 Ă— 23.6 inches (30 Ă— 60 cm)

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Nourish V: The Gift 2016 Mineral pigments, glue, charcoal, sumi, starch, roasted green tea, spring water on handmade Japanese paper 11.8 Ă— 23.6 inches (30 Ă— 60 cm)

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Biography Education 2002 Ph.D.,Graduate school of Fine Art, Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music (Doctoral dissertation ”Taste of Art) 1998 M.F.A in Japanese painting of Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music 1996 B.F.A in Japanese painting of Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music COLLECTION ING collection; Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music

Solo Exhibitions 2015 “The Chrysanthemum and the Sword” JanKossen Contemporary New York 2011 ”The dish which I cannot eat ”La CERVERINAD’ART, (Cervera, Spain) 2008 “The flavor of the art” Zenbu Gallery, (Barcelona, Spain) 2007 “Visualize the flavorful pleasure-painting - Fuji Gallery, (Osaka, Japan) 2006 “The flavor without the pleasure” Fuji Gallery, (Osaka, Japan) 2005 “The flavor of the art” Fuji Gallery, (Osaka, Japan) 2002 “Exhibition of Doctorate-Hiroomi Ito - Museum of Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music, (Tokyo, Japan) 2002 “Exhibition of Thesis doctorate-the flavor of the art - you Salt 2nd exhibition plant in students’ Residence, Tokyo National University of Fine Art and Music, (Tokyo, Japan)

Selected Group Exhibitions 2013 ZEIT-FOTO Collection “Magic Room of ZEIT” ,ZEIT FOTO SALON, (Tokyo,Japan) 2010 “Delicartessen09” Gallery Esther Montoriol, (Barcelona, Spain) 2007 “JAPANESE ARTISTS” Zunbu Gallery, (Barcelona, Spain) 2007 “Exhibition exchange of Japan and Korea-CROSSING Museum of Culture of Kyoto (Kyoto, Japan) 2006 “Exhibition exchange of Japan and Korea-CROSSING Changwon gallery, (Changwon, South Korea) 2002 art “Festival and Kanda knead” Matsuou, (Tokyo, Japan) 2000 “Like water that Museum of modern art of Toyoshina are there”, (Nagano, Japan) 1997 “Exhibition Juju” Gallery Yokohama gallery bellini, (Yokohama, Japan)

2000 “The landscape for the rain” O Gallery, (Tokyo, Japan) 1999 “A fragment of the daily” life Gallery Yokohama gallery bellini, (Yokohama, Japan) 1995 “Where a lot of people” live Gallery Aries, (Tokyo, Japan)

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Impressum Concept, Editing and realisation Jasmin Kossenjans DESIGN ContempoArtnews Ltd Photography Hiroomi Ito JanKossen Contemporary Ltd Text Hiroomi Ito Michael Choi Jasmin Kossenjans SPONSORED BY JanKossen Contemporary Ltd PRINT RUN 1200 No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form, or by no means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission of the publisher.

Published by JanKossen Contemporary Ltd www.jankossen.com 1st edition Š March 2016 All rights reserved Printed in Switzerland

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Hiroomi Ito: 1999 - 2016  

Contemporary artist Hiroomi Ito uses traditionalism in creating his artworks that bear a contemporary message

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