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Kalispell, MT | Jackson hole, wy | Bend, OR | Monterey, CA

priceless: please take one July | August 2010

Steamboat Springs

Colorado Operated by SkyWest Airlines

magazine


Eureka/Arcata, C alifornia

rnia o f i l a C , y t i Crescent C

Redmond/Bend, Oregon


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igan h c i M , k c o /Hanc n o t h g u o H

A change in perspective


July | August 2010

contents Kalispell, MT Glacier National Park Turns 100

Page 6 | While much of this spectacular landscape remains as it was when President Taft created the park in 1910, the namesake glaciers are diminishing. The opportunity to observe those remaining is just one of many reasons to visit.

20 | America’s Best Places

Bend, OR

24 | America’s Best Places

Monterey, CA

26 | O’Hare Outbound

Jackson, WY

29 | Art Watch

Sharing Jackson’s Joys Page 10 | In any season, Jackson Hole is a place of great beauty and Western adventure. Now, through the efforts of Teton Adaptive Sports and a supportive community, people of all abilities can enjoy the mountain town’s adventures.

30 | Economic Good News

34 | Budget-Friendly Vacations

36 | America’s Best Events

Steamboat Springs, CO Summer Fun in Ski Town USA Page 16 | Summer in Steamboat Springs was the original top tourist-draw. The season remains an extraordinary time to visit a mountain town that combines an acclaimed resort and an authentic Western community for the best of all worlds.

38 | It’s Our Journey, Too

40 | Crossword Puzzle

42 | Behind the Scenes

This edition’s cover features Aspen Shadows, a 14” x 11” oil on canvas by Steamboat Springs artist Phil Wright. Learn more about the artist and his work on page 29.

44 | Route Map

45 | About Our Aircraft

46 | Airport Maps

Web Extras! If you like this magazine you will love our new affiliate-website www.americasbestplaces.com. operated by SkyWest Airlines

Steamboat: Larry Pierce

On The Cover


Go!

P U B L I C AT I O N S I N C O R P O R A T E D

ramblings and recommends

Carry on! More About Bagging the Roller Bag

president Kelly D. Coles editor in chief Colleen Birch Maile colleen@gopubinc.com art director Janie W. Budell janie@gopubinc.com copy editor Bethany Maile proof readers Anna Bierman Tatro Becky MacDonald | Quincy Budell contributors Tony Banning | Amanda Bjerke | Tara Galen Paula Hewson | Wes Horrocks | Lou Jurassic Jason Long | Connie Naylor

director sales and marketing Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com

advertising managers MT, OR, UT, WA, WY, Canada: Wendy Rivers l 406-586-0439 wndyrivers@theglobal.net CO, NV, Northern and Central CA: Susan Vernier Garcia l 970-927-9599 susan@gopubinc.com for all other locations call: Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com SkyWest Magazine corporate office 208-333-9990 l fax: 208-333-9991 205 N. 10th St., Suite B100, Boise, ID 83702 email: info@skywestmagazine.com www.skywestmagazine.com SkyWest Airlines 444 S. River Rd., St. George, UT 84790 435-634-3000 l email: info@skywest.com SkyWest Airlines Stock Symbol: SKYW

SkyWest Magazine (ISSN 1527-4152) is published bimonthly by Go! Publications, Inc. for United Express operated by SkyWest Airlines. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to SkyWest Magazine are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or of SkyWest Airlines. Acceptance of advertisements does not imply official endorsement of the products or services concerned. While every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of content, no responsibility can be taken for any errors and/or omissions. No part of this SkyWest Magazine may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher. © 2010 Go! Publications Inc. All rights reserved.

Copies available for $6 each.

This magazine assumes no responsibility for the safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, artwork or other material. This magazine does not reply to queries without SASE.

Dear Reader:

Last issue I encouraged readers to consider alternatives to roller-bags. Actually that’s an understatement. I made a passionate plea for abandoning what I consider to be bulky and hazardous space wasters. (Am I the only traveler who has been tripped up, cut off or had my ankles bruised while dodging a parade of wheels? When commandeered by toddlers they’re especially dangerous!) For the past 13 years I’ve traveled with one 10” x 13” x 8.5” tote and a computer case. I want the world to join my own private minimalist movement. I’ve heard from a lot of folks. Some want my bag. Some want to challenge my bag’s abilities. They can’t believe I can pack a week’s worth of living in something with a surface area smaller than a medium flat-rate USPS box. One manufacturer sent along what may be, for some, a viable alternative. The Ativa Mobilit Carry-On Workmate is a nice little cube-like creation. It’s got handy compartments for technological must-haves that didn’t even exist when my bag was made. It boasts a deep interior space where a savvy packer can stash a lot of clothes. The drawback? At 17” x 14.25” x 8.5” it won’t slide under an airplane seat. It might even be a challenge to hoist it overhead. And, it still has those weighty handle and wheels. My favorite letter came from Zygmunt Dembek, PhD. The frequent traveler also eschews roller bags. He writes: My trusted green heavy-duty backpack (18” x 12”, with front pockets) travels daily with me everywhere, and is used as a laptop and note-carrier during the workweek. It is versatile enough to fit a large range of items, and is available (sans an integrated hydration system) in Army Post Exchanges for $90.

My favorite travel bag measures a mere 10” x 13” x 8.5” and holds two dresses, three slacks, two T-shirts, seven tops, a skirt, nightgown, shoes, workout and beach clothes and enough undies and toiletries for a week on the road.

His bag offers one internal compartment and two external zippered pouches. It too takes up more room than my trusty little tote. However, any backpack seems a reasonable alternative to roller bags. Dembeck also shared some worthwhile tips for navigating security screening. 1. Take enough bins to accommodate your needs so you’re not interrupting the line to grab more. 2. Place valuables, including watches and heavy jewelry in a purse or bag before security screening. Don’t plop them into a bin. 3. Once through screening, double-check to make sure you’ve got all your belongings. 4. Wear slip on shoes! During summer when business and pleasure travelers mingle, his ideas are especially well taken. So are backpacks! Happy Skies,

CJ

Colleen “CJ” Birch Maile Editor in Chief

PS. Remember we’re all in this together. During the peak summer travel season, look for opportunities to lend a hand especially to families with young children. Schlepping strollers, car seats and toddlers is never easy. Exercise a little patience and a lot of good will. You’ll feel great doing so.

For reprints of articles in this issue of SkyWest Magazine, please call 208-333-9990. Visit us on our website at www.skywestmagazine.com.


Welcome Aboard

Global Access Begins Locally Dear Passenger: Today’s vocabulary is full of words like globalization, international business and worldwide economies. At the same time, Americans have gained a new appreciation for the value of local—local grocery co-ops, local charities and the vital local air service that connects our customers to the world. At SkyWest Airlines, we recognize that global access begins with your local air service. We come from humble beginnings, and though the SkyWest team has grown to nearly 11,000 aviation professionals serving 157 cities in 38 states, six Canadian provinces and two Mexican cities, we still think of each other as family. Our employees are also locals in many of the cities we serve; from San Francisco, California to Muskegon, Michigan, we’re a part of the communities where we live and work. And by providing safe, reliable and exceptional air service as United Express, our job is to give you access to thousands of destinations worldwide. SkyWest is pleased to partner with one of the world’s premier airlines. Along with the same exceptional customer service you expect during any United flight, you also have access to United’s Mileage Plus program onboard this flight. That means premier perks, privileges and miles available through United’s award-winning frequent flyer program. Mileage Plus members earn miles onboard this or any United Express, United or Star Alliance flight, and by purchasing products or services from more than 100 participating partners in over 10,000 locations worldwide. In short, you’re hard-pressed to find better when it comes to customer satisfaction and the many privileges associated with worldwide service. SkyWest United Express customers can fly not only to the plentiful gems in SkyWest Country—from Jackson Hole, Wyoming, to Monterey, California to Duluth, Minnesota—they also gain access to United’s global route network of more than 800 cities in more than 139 countries. At SkyWest Airlines, global access from your local airport is our business. We take pride in bringing our customers the world. I welcome you aboard and invite you to sit back, relax and enjoy your flight aboard United Express, operated by SkyWest Airlines.

Welcome Aboard!

Russell “Chip” Childs President and COO SkyWest Airlines


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The Crown of the Continent Turns 100 by Amanda Bjerke

T

he Crown of the Continent comes by its nickname honestly. Glacier National Park hugs the Canadian border and holds within its boundaries a royal trove of natural wonders. More than a million acres contain hundreds of lakes and waterfalls amid terrain ranging from arid plains to soaring mountains and arctic tundra. There are thousands of plant species, hundreds of animal types and, of course, glaciers. While flora and fauna are much as they were when President Taft created the park in 1910, the glaciers are diminishing. The opportunity to observe those remaining is a good enough cause to visit Glacier during its centennial year. The myriad other reasons include spectacular and rare wildlife—mountain goats, grizzly bear, bighorn sheep, mountain lion; jaw-dropping scenery and outdoor experiences that are as educational as they are exhilarating. A trip to this Big Sky paradise is also an unfiltered encounter with history—the chance to take in a timeless landscape. Pondering the past is inevitable when encountering vestiges of tourism’s trailblazers. Railroad tycoons saw the commercial potential of this place when it was still a National Forest preserve. The railroad dubbed the area America’s Switzerland, and within five years of the park’s dedication, three Swiss-themed lodges opened in the Grand European style. The Glacier Park Hotel in East Glacier, The Many Glacier Hotel on the shores of Swiftcurrent Lake, and the Prince of Wales Hotel just across the Canadian line in Waterton Lakes National Park all continue to welcome guests. The small Granite Park chalet, another remnant of the railroad era, remains in Glacier’s backcountry and is accessible only by trail. In its earliest days, trails were Glacier’s thoroughfares. A visit to the park often meant traveling by train and stagecoach. Access to some of

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The Many Glacier Hotel opened in 1915 and still welcomes guests.

the more spectacular sights also required a boat ride, and visitors typically hiked or rode horseback around Glacier. America’s nascent love affair with the automobile quickly changed all that. Motorists soon were forgoing the trains and instead bumping along game routes and cow paths to access the park. In 1921 construction began Mountain goats abound throughout on a car-friendly road connecting the park. the east and west portions of Glacier over the Continental Divide. Originally named the Transmountain Highway, it opened in 1933 and quickly adopted the name of the nearby Going to the Sun Mountain. One flawless June morning my husband Jim and I made the scenic drive from Kalispell and were roaming around the West Entrance Visitor Center a tad overwhelmed with the enormity of


Continental Divide

Look closely! A Model T chugs along Going to the Sun Road circa 1933.

1933 image: George Grant

View Avalanche Creek Gorge from the Cedars Nature Trail off Going to the Sun Road.

Glacier possibilities. A park worker advised us to use our limited time by crossing Going to the Sun Road. Sounded good to me. There’s romance and more than a hint of excitement in the name of Glacier’s only east-west connector. Who wouldn’t want to travel to the sun? (Besides Icarus, that is.) The steep, narrow passageway lives up to its title. Climbing northeastward in the morning light feels like you’re leaving our atmosphere behind. Sure there’s traffic and the going is slow, but the wide open sky, soaring peaks and adrenaline rush that accompany the trek make you want to take it easy. It’s advisable to devote the better part of a day to this 50-mile one-way trip. You’ll want to stop a lot, especially if you’re the driver. My husband, our wheelman, had only a few white knuckle moments—once when he was craning his neck to see a mountain goat mamma and her babies, another time when a tottering cabover camper

veered toward the center line. A few times the proximity of the drop-off made my stomach knot. I reminded myself that thousands of motorists have safely made the drive—some in Model Ts! With a nod to the Centennial and an awareness that not all drivers are comfortable navigating a summit of almost 7,000 feet, Glacier offers a jaunty alternative. Modernized 1930s convertible buses painted a spiffy red are a chance to sit back and let experienced drivers handle the road and explain the sites. My husband seemed a tad envious of those pampered passengers especially when we hit the intermittent road construction sites. I reminded him that there’s a lot of flexibility built into the do-it-yourself route. Photo ops and informative markers line the way. You’ll want to stop and read all about Jackson Glacier, one of the park’s 20-or-so still-active glaciers. Lake McDonald is breathtaking, and the view from Logan’s Pass makes it clear why the Continental Divide is known as the Backbone of America. The mountain ranges unfold infinitely. There are several trailheads along the road. This is a place that begs to be explored up close and personal. From the Logan Pass Visitor’s Center, we wandered through a meadow, dotted 7

skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |


with snow. Wildflowers poked through sweet, high mountain grass. Despite the throngs “going to the sun,” there was quiet, peace, and a sense that this place will always hold eternal treasures. n

To commemorate Glacier Park’s Centennial C.W. Guthrie, a Missoula author and noted Montana historian has penned Glacier National Park The First 100 Years, a fast paced, definitive history of the park. Published by Missoula’s Farcountry Press, it also contains lavish photography worthy of any coffee table.

The Grinnell Lake Trail begins near the Many Glacier Hotel and gradually climbs more than 1,600 feet over the course of six miles. It offers many superb views.

DID YOU KNOW? *Glacier and Watertown Lakes National Park in Canada became the world’s first joint, international peace park in 1932. *It’s easy to access Glacier National Park with SkyWest Service to Kalispell 33 miles away.

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Montana’s Flathead Valley. Gateway to Glacier National Park. Imagine no crowds, with abundant recreational and cultural activities. Contact us for a free Travel Guide. nie Sexton photo

Travel Montana/Don

The Northwest HoneyFest, in historic Stevensville from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sat., Sept. 11, 2010, is a celebration of the honeybee in Montana. Please join us for a day of fun, beekeeping education, honey tasting, music, “bee” art & craft vendors and more.

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America’sB est Places

Sharing Jackson’s Joys

J

ackson, Wyoming sits in the shadow of the Grand Teton Mountain Range in a valley so scenic it’s long been a favored getaway for captains of industry, political titans and Hollywood elite. Average folks visit too. Each summer, droves of tourists ramble through the quaint Old West downtown, fish in the area’s blue ribbon streams, pedal along the many mountain bike trails and raft the rivers surrounding the town. In any season, Jackson is a place of great beauty and Western adventure. Now, through the efforts of community members like Kurt Henry, people of all abilities can readily access its wonders and thrill at its adventures. Henry is director of Teton Adaptive Sports, Wyoming’s only chapter of Disabled Sports USA. It’s a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping a variety of people—from children with cognitive disorders to wounded war veterans—enjoy Jackson Hole. As such, it reflects the spirit of

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by Tony Banning

community cooperation that permeates this small town. Jackson may be peppered with glitzy second-homes and upscale restaurants and retailers but it is still a close-knit, neighborly community. Henry explained that Teton Adaptive Sports started five years ago as an extension of the adaptive ski program that has existed at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort since the 1980s. “The ski programs [at Jackson Hole and Grand Targhee Ski Resort in nearby Driggs, Idaho] are all in-house,” Henry said. “They coordinate everything.” The former ski bum, who was one of the first Jackson instructors to work with the disabled, said, “Our initial goal was to support the programs at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort and Grand Targhee.

3 Track Skier: Amos Callenberger

With People of All Abilities


This kayak is paddled with pedal power.

Sit skier: Hannah Hardaway

Adaptive Steep and Deep Camp at Jackson Hole.

We had three primary objectives in the beginning, and they all had to do with raising money. We needed to help buy equipment, pay for instructor training and fund scholarships. “We can do some amazing things if we have the right equipment. I’ve had people on a ski hill who have had spinal chord injuries and couldn’t do more than move their heads, and now they’re skiing. That’s really cool, but it’s also very expensive and you can’t really expect the ski resorts to provide all the funding. “Of course we have to have instructors who know how to operate the adaptive gear which can be quite complicated. We also want these experiences to be affordable for locals, of course, but also for our visitors. In the summers especially we have a lot of regular, working folks coming through Jackson on their way to Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks. We wanted to help everyone enjoy what we get to enjoy all the time.”

People of all abilities can enjoy Jackson’s scenic wonders with assistance from Teton Adaptive Sports.

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America’sB est Places

Park. “We’ve had great support from the park,” he said. “They have given us a special-use permit for String Lake. It has shallow water and is the warmest lake around here. It’s cool for these guys to get in a raft or kayak. Out on the lake you can let them row and take charge of the boat.” This summer TAS also debuts a climbing series. “Ryan Burke, our summer program manager, was certified by the American Mountain Association to do that. He’ll be doing some gym climbing and also taking participants onto some outdoor climbing sites. “

This summer Teton Adaptive Sports offers opportunities for people of all abilities to canoe in both Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks.

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This custom watercraft seat provides extra support and stability. Here, a stroke survivor uses it.

Adaptive athletes also have a chance to learn to fly-fish while exploring Yellowstone National Park from a kayak. The four-day wilderness adventure begins August 30. Throughout the season, TAS organizes hikes and overnight stays at a yurt in Rock Springs Canyon. Like most of the scheduled adaptive activities, these trips require reservations and space is limited. “Anyone is welcome to take part in what we’re doing as space allows. There’s no charge for any of our events or activities,” Henry said. “We are also happy to customize things for folks who are coming to town. If they’re visiting Jackson at a time that doesn’t fit in with one of our scheduled activities, we’ll do our best to put something together just for them as much as our time and the resources allow. Most of all, we want to get the word out about this great opportunity for people of all ages and abilities to enjoy what Jackson has to offer.” Visit www.tetonadaptivesports.com for more information. n

Rafters: Kurt Henry Canoers: Teton Adaftive sports

Two years ago, Henry’s organization set about expanding its services to include summer sports— camping, canoeing, rafting, cycling and hiking. He enlisted the services—and basic equipment—of others in the community, and for the first time Teton Adaptive Sports began organizing its own outdoor adventures. “That’s one of the great things about being in a place like Jackson. The locals all know each other. I was pretty apprehensive about moving out on to water activities. Skiing is dangerous. Water sports are dangerous times ten. I went to Aaron Pruzan at Rendezvous River Sports for help. We’ve known each other for years. He taught my son to kayak. I told him I had to make sure we had some expert training. Aaron went to the American Canoe Association. They have an adaptive part to what they do. So with a very generous grant from the Community Foundation of Jackson, we were able to send an instructor to that organization’s training sessions and also buy an adaptive seat that stabilizes someone in a raft, kayak or canoe. We didn’t have to buy any boats. Aaron was generous to loan us all we need.” Henry pointed out that the majority of Jackson rafting outfits take people with special needs down scenic trips and whitewater as well. “They are pretty comfortable with what they’re doing.” The rafting companies do charge for their services. However, as a nonprofit, Teton Adaptive Sports (TAS) offers free summer adventures including time on the water. This summer the roster of activities includes a bike rally, camping trips, scenic river floats and at least two Paddle Days in Grand Teton National


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Attention Art Lovers

J

by Tara Galen

ackson Hole’s astonishing beauty begs to be immortalized. Landscape painters have been attempting to capture the Tetons’ grandeur ever since the government sent a covey of artists to document the wonders of this region in the mid-1800s. The love affair continues today.

Pretend you’re at one of VRI’s luxurious Lake Tahoe resorts. Golf. Swimming. Shopping. Sound fun? Visit one of VRI’s fully-furnished vacation condos/suites, many with full or partial kitchens, living rooms, hot tubs and more.

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The National Museum of Wildlife Art hugs the National Elk Refuge on the north side of town and adds a special dimension to any Jackson visit. There are more than 5,000 pieces in its impressive holdings including rare works by Thomas Moran, Albert Bierstadt and other early artistic Jackson visitors. The ADA-compliant building includes 14 galleries, an experiential children’s area and a café. Constructed of natural rough-hewn stone, the 51,000-square-foot facility blends seamlessly with its environment and affords lovely views. It’s also easy to own a depiction of Jackson’s beauty. More than a dozen Jackson Hole galleries represent a wide range of artists. Work depicting wildlife and the West dominate their offerings. Throughout the year, special events also focus on Jackson’s artistic side. The Jackson Hole Arts Fair, a family-friendly attraction draws a wide range of artists and artisans twice each summer. Painters, photographers, toymakers, graphic artists, glass blowers and more set up in Miller Park. This year’s events, held July 16 through 18 and August 20 through 22, also serve up an abundance of food and hands-on fun. Each September Jackson Hole is home to one of the West’s premier cultural attractions—The Fall Arts Festival. Ten days of activity center around a juried art show that attracts the nation’s finest Western and wildlife artists. Events range from quick-draw plein air competitions to historic ranch tours, a Taste of the Tetons food fair and a showcase for Western interior design and fashion. A cowboy jubilee concert and art gallery brunch are also featured. Save the date for an event that reflects the best of Jackson Hole, Wyoming. This year’s festival will be held September 9 through the 19th. n

Museum: Ed Riddell

The National Museum of Wildlife Art


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America’sB est Places

Summer in Steamboat Springs, Colorado by Lou Jurassic

F

irst things first. Before I tell you about the summer wonders of a place best known as Ski Town USA, let’s get something straight. There’s no paddle wheeler plying a river or lake anywhere near Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Never has been. This picturesque mountain hamlet takes its name from a longdefunct hot spring that made a loud hissy noise sort of like a steamboat.

The area’s therapeutic springs first enticed summer visitors in the early 1900s. Back then, the winters were too daunting for much leisurely activity. Skiing wasn’t a sport; it was a primary mode of winter transportation. (When you get upwards of 300 inches of snow each year it’s hard to get around otherwise.) By 1913, townsfolk built a ski jump to amuse themselves. The Olympic training ground and Olympians came later and remain Steamboat’s primary claim to fame. For now, forget about all that deep, white powder and think about the lush green high country summer that follows the snow. Summer in Steamboat was the original top-draw, and the season remains an extraordinary time to visit a mountain town that somehow manages to offer all kinds of A-list recreation without losing a sense of small town normalcy. Steamboat’s unique personality means the best of both worlds for Julie Molema and her husband Peter who moved to Steamboat two years ago. Peter’s job as art director of a San Diego-based magazine allows them to live where they like and Julie admits they looked at some “pretty dreamy places— Park City, Aspen, Vail” before settling on the little town just three-hours northwest of Denver.

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DownTown: Larry Pierce Julie Molema: Peter Molema

Julie Molema loves hiking to Rabbit Ears Pass shown in the background.

“My husband really likes a resort atmosphere and I am more of the small town girl. I like a place to feel authentic. In Steamboat we both got what we wanted.” The couple lives in Steamboat’s Brooklyn neighborhood. “It was originally a separate town that was actually the Red Light District,” Julie Molema explained. “Now it’s right in the heart of town. We’re right next to the Rodeo Grounds and Howelson, the friendly little ski hill with the ski jump. The big resort is about two miles away. We can pretty much walk wherever we want to go.” Their affinity for walking first drew them to Steamboat, a community renown for its easy access to wide-open spaces. “There is an amazing trail system on Howelson Hill right in town and some really great hikes on the outskirts. We spend every weekend exploring a new Steamboat Springs’ downtown place. Spring Creek trailhead is right on the edge of town. The hike to Fish Creek Falls starts just three miles from Steamboat and the falls are amazing. There are trails all over the Steamboat Ski Area, too. Rabbit Ears Pass is a bit of a drive southeast of town, but we love going up there because there are some

wonderful backcountry hikes in the area. We especially like to go to Dumont Lake where there’s a good chance we’ll run into sheepherders and their dogs tending flocks. There are also a lot of hikes into natural hot springs,” she continued. “These are hikes most anyone can do. Even toward the top of Rabbit Ears where it does get steep at the very end, we’ve had family members with little kids make it. It’s sort of the thing to do: to stand between the ‘ears’ and get your picture taken.” Mountain bikers also find trails to love around Steamboat. So do horseback riders. The community prides itself on its cowboy attitude and the rodeo grounds near the Molemas’ home stay busy with events every Friday and Saturday night from June 18 to August 21. “There’s always something going on in the summertime,” Julie Molema said. “We were surprised at the number of art galleries, restaurants and music options. The Strings Music Festival goes on through the end of August. It’s got performances in the pavilion all through the week and on Thursdays they put on free concerts at the Yampa River Botanic Park.”

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Dining: Corey Kopischke River: Steamboat Springs Chamber Resort Association photo by David Theimann

Steamboat Springs, population just about 10,000, is home to more than 100 bars and restaurants. This is the place to taste authentic Western offerings such as elk, buffalo and Rocky Mountain oysters (the remnants of the process that turns a bull calf into a steer—tastes like fried chicken). There is also a wide variety of ethnic and specialty options including Italian and Mexican restaurants and Sushi bars.

The river runs right through Steamboat’s heart and is a focal point for all kinds of summer fun. “Sometimes it’s hard to walk down Main or Yampa streets because there are so many people on the sidewalk carrying their tubes,” Julie Molema laughed. “It’s almost as much fun to watch the river as it is to raft it,” she said. “We like to go to the Boathouse Pub. It’s a great burger-and-beer place right on the

The Yampa River, a favorite of fishermen and kayakers, becomes a tuber’s nirvana in downtown Steamboat Springs. As summer progresses, the water slows to offer an exceptional way to spend an easy afternoon. Tubes are available from a variety of rental shops.

river. They’ve got two decks facing the water and Howelson Hill. We’ll watch the rafters and kayakers in summer and the ski jumpers in winter. Sometimes it’s nice just to sit and watch life unfold here. The beauty of Steamboat is that if you want to be busy, you can always find something to do. If you want a little peace and quiet, that’s easy to come by as well. We really did find the best of all worlds,” she said. n

Hh Thinking of Steamboat real estate? I only work for buyers. Douglas N. Labor

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skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |


America’sB est Places | Bend, OR

5 Reasons Central Oregon is Mantastic!

by Jason Long

L

ooking for a male bonding experience that won’t break the bank or scrimp on excitement? Think Central Oregon. Easy to access with SkyWest service to Redmond/ Bend, this juniper-scented stretch of high desert serves up near-perfect summers and plenty of activity. Here are five reasons it’s a sure bet for a great guy-getaway.

1. Get Your Game On. Central Oregon is golf mecca. The sun shines more than 300 days out of every year. The terrain is gorgeous and varied. More than 30 courses offer plenty of options for every skill level and pocketbook. Combine your playing time with some spectator status and plan your trip around a tournament. A major championship on The Champions Tour (formerly the PGA Seniors), The JELD-WEN Tradition takes place August 16 through 22 and attracts big names to Sunriver’s Crosswater Club just outside of Bend. The same club hosts the West’s largest amateur tourney, the Pacific Amateur August 30 through September 4. 2. Cowboy Up. When the local lumber industry declined, Sisters, Oregon reinvented itself by emphasizing its Old West roots. Just walking the wooden sidewalks of this kitschy Western town makes you swagger. To feel like John Wayne, check out a local guest

ranch or book a trail ride with an outfitter. From working the herd with honest-to-gosh top-hands to simply exploring on a guided ride, your time in the saddle will be well spent. 3. Take to the Water. The Deschutes and Metolius rivers offer blue-ribbon fly-fishing for everything from the elusive Redside Trout to fighting Steelhead. Area waters also include crystal clear lakes and rippling streams. There’s plenty of white-water rafting to boot. Expert guides can help you maximize your experience. 4. Eat, Drink, Be Merry. There are lots of good restaurants in Central Oregon. (The Blacksmith, a local top-pick, has been favorably reviewed in The New York Times.) Plan on eating well, but be advised, it’s the potent potables that really set this place apart. Haven’t got any hard data here, but I bet this place has more microbrews and small-batch distilled drink per capita than anywhere else in the nation. Bendistillery makes a bevy of award-winning beverages—Crater Lake Vodka, Cascade Mountain Gin, Cofia Hazelnut Espresso Vodka and Manama, a pepper-infused vodka. Continued on page 22

20 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express


So many things to do. So many sunny days to do them.

Skiing. Golfing. Hiking. Biking. Fly-fishing. White water rafting. Whatever you and your family are into, you’ll find it in Central Oregon. Blessed with 300 sunny days a year, Central Oregon is renowned for its outdoor recreation. And like any world-class destination, it has the resorts, gourmet dining, and indulgent day spas to back it up. Get more adventure for your money. And go on the Greatest Vacation on Earth. Get our free 84-page Official Visitors Guide by calling 800-800-8334 or go to VisitCentralOregon.com for more information.

everything under the sun.


McMenamins in Bend’s old St. Francis School

5. Unwind at a SpA. Admit it. After a day of outdoor adventure a little pampering is pretty sweet. Treat yourself to a massage, maybe even a facial. Soothing spas dot the Central Oregon map. Several resorts— Sunriver in the community of

Sage Springs Club and Spa at Sunriver

the same name and Five Rivers in Sisters come to mind—have on-site facilities. Other hotels can hook you up with one of the many day spas in the area. Pick and choose from this recreation roster to tailor a trip that’s just right for you and your friends. Ask about special packages that fit your idea of fun. Then head for the high desert. One word of warning—this place is habit forming. Bet you’ll be back to ski in winter. Didn’t I tell you? Mount Bachelor is just up the road. n Spa: Sunriver Resort McMenamins: Liz Devine

There are a bunch of microbrew-eries—a half-dozen at least. Deschutes Brewery founded in 1988 serves up locally inspired products like Black Butte Porter and Cascade Ale. It should be on every beerlover’s itinerary. McMenamins, a Portland-based outfit that blankets the state, is noteworthy for its Bend location—a former Catholic school.

Sunset at Mount Bachelor

Discover an urban oasis in the middle of the great outdoors. Located in the heart of downtown, The Oxford Hotel is Bend’s only boutique hotel, with 59 stylish suites and amenities that will satisfy every whim. Come, experience a side of Bend

ENJOY THE BOUTIQUE SIDE

you’ve never seen before.

Special introductory rates for stays through 12/31/2010 starting at just $139 per night plus tax.

P. James Nugent, M.D.

Book online–use promotion code SKYWEST Subject to availability–Black out dates apply Richard Blanks, M.D.

Laura Duncan, N.P.

Ask about golfing Pronghorn 22 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

Christine Helsby, N.P.

Russell Biggers, D.P.T.


Waiting for a flight? SEE thE SightS. Take a FREE shuttle and a tour of historic Temple Square—in less than two hours. Pickups at Terminal 1 (door 1), Terminal 2 (door 12).

When you come to Utah, be sure to visit

TEMPLE SQUARE in the heart of Salt Lake City Tours are available in more than 30 languages

Many venues to choose from, and all are free

© Busath.com

Your tour group can:

Listen

to the glorious music of the famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir, rehearsing and performing in the Tabernacle on Temple Square. They also perform in the 21,000-seat Conference Center. See visittemplesquare.com for details.

Discover

your roots in the FamilySearch Center, where helpful volunteers can assist in retrieving family history information from the world’s largest repository of genealogical records.

Meander

through two upscale visitors’ centers that include the Christus statue by Danish sculptor Thorvaldsen. Visit the interactive map of ancient Jerusalem (kids love it!) and much more.

For information on these and many other fascinating venues on Temple Square, go to visittemplesquare.com, lds.org/placestovisit, or call 1-800-537-9703. © IRI. PD50021647


America’sB est Places | Monterey, CA

Scott Campbell’s In-Depth Photography by Connie Naylor

M

onterey photographer Scott Campbell takes swimming with the fishes to a dramatically deeper level. This former member of the US Free Diving team can reach depths of 200 feet without the aid of SCUBA gear. Impossible? Not for a man who has held his breath for an incredible seven minutes. Campbell, now retired from the team, once held the US record for static apnea diving and was ranked number two in the world in the sport. He remains a fearless guest of the underwater world.

Campbell had already established himself as an accomplished commercial photographer before becoming a competitive free diver. Now he believes his underwater abilities enhance his art, enabling him to capture intimate black-and-white portraits of ocean denizens—sharks, tuna, rays and more. “It’s a natural fit,” he said. “Free diving is about being quiet and introspective. That makes the animals underwater comfortable and approachable. The language of the ocean is body language. We are as large as most sharks. So initially there’s a certain amount of posturing because you can’t hide your fear. After a while you simply don’t put out fear. “Diving the way I do allows me to be more ‘one’ with the water and in tune with the environment than if I were blowing bubbles and chugging around with a big apparatus on my back. It’s like flying but

24 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

in a different medium. I hope people will see my work as fine art that can bring them closer to the emotional sides of these animals. What I do transcends typical stock underwater photography.” Campbell and his unobtrusive camera have plied the waters of the world. Some of his most impressive—and dangerous—work takes place in the open ocean. “When you’re in that deep blue water without the aid of any landmarks, you’re very aware that you’re part of the food chain. There’s an


The perfecT sTay doing everyThing under The sun. From $199/night Just steps from everything Monterey has to offer, experience an unforgettable stay at the Monterey Marriott. Take advantage of our Discover Monterey Package: • Deluxe Guest Room • 15% OFF hotel’s food and beverage • Kids 12 and under eat free (1 per paid adult) • Discounted Greens fees, Activity ticket discounts and reduced Spa rates 350 Calle Principal at Del Monte Blvd. Monterey, CA 93940 Phone 831.649.4234, MarriottMonterey.com

images: Scott Campbell

Package and rate based on availability. Rate does not include tax. Other restrictions may apply.

extra level of anxiety that has to be overcome. Animals can sense your fear level. You have to train yourself to exude calmness, to be OK with sharks and manta rays.” Monterey with its laid-back lifestyle and easy access to the ocean makes the perfect hometown for Campbell. He continues to pursue commercial photography as well as his underwater work. “Living on a peninsula offers really rich opportunities for diving,” he said. The next time you visit the world-class Monterey Bay Aquarium and crowd close to the glass for a better glimpse of sealife, think of Campbell and hold your breath. Then, imagine the possibilities. n

CHAMPIONS

O

ne of the NCAA elite, the golf program at CSU Monterey Bay is part of the sport’s storied local tradition. It also exemplifies the university’s commitment to excellence in both athletics and academics.

Visit CSUMB.EDU/give and OtterAthletics.com.

Proud past. Amazing Future. 25

skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |


With more than 122 regularly scheduled departures each day, SkyWest United Express connects Chicago with an abundance of dynamic communities. Here’s insight into some special places just one outbound flight from O’Hare and some Chicagoland attractions, too.

| Chicago, IL

The True Story of George Ferris’s Wheel Chicago’s Navy Pier packs a lot of entertainment into its 50-acre site. Features include a bevy of museums, the Chicago Shakespeare Theater, launch sites for numerous boat tours and enough food and fun to rival the busiest midway. In the center of it all, the 150-foot tall Navy Pier Ferris wheel offers a bird’s eye view of the world and a chance to relax above the stress of modern life. As an exact reproduction of the world’s first attraction of its kind, this wheel also is a glimpse into a little-known slice of Americana. The first wheel, created for Chicago’s World Columbian Exposition of 1893 by engineering

The first Ferris wheel towered over Chicago’s World Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.

up-and-comer George Ferris, was America’s answer to the Eiffel Tower. Its 36 cars were each 24 feet long, 10 feet tall and 13 feet wide. At the wheel’s pinnacle, passengers could see all of Chicago and the distant farmland of Wisconsin and Illinois. Bedecked with 3,000 of Edison’s new incandescent lights, the engineering marvel quickly became the event’s focal point. It turned with nary a

We Visit the Internet.

26 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express


Book cover: ©2009 American Society of Civil Engineers

hitch until November when the exposition closed. Investors then floated bonds to move the wheel to Chicago’s Lincoln Park. However, patrons failed to materialize. Unlike Paris’s lasting landmark, the Chicago feat met an inglorious and somewhat mysterious end. The former superstar fell into disrepair, lost money, and in 1904 was advertised for sale as scrap metal. Instead of wrecking the wheel, its new owner sought to regain the attraction’s fortunes and shipped it off to St. Louis. There, it was resurrected for that city’s own World’s Fair. However, it never regained its original status and by 1906 was considered an eyesore and dynamited.

No one is sure what happened to the fragments. Theories hold that they were buried in St. Louis or turned into scrap. Fate was equally unkind to inventor George Ferris who didn’t live to see his wheel’s demise. He died penniless and unheralded in 1896 at the age of 37. None of his papers or plans survived. No one knows where his remains are buried. A fascinating new book, Circles in the Sky: The Life and Times of George Ferris, details the inventor’s saga. Written by structural engineer Richard Weingardt and published by the American Society of Civil Engineers, it makes an interesting summer read and will give Navy Pier visitors a fresh appreciation for what has become an iconic amusement attraction—in Chicago and throughout the world. n

We Live in Magazines. Let SkyWest Magazine tell your story - we spotlight communities who rely on SkyWest United Express service. Our magazine is placed in front of more than 15 million travelers per year. That’s huge exposure. Our readers enjoy learning about communities and what they have to offer: Events | Celebrations | People | Businesses | Environment | Recreation | Health Care | Economic Development | Education | Entertainment | History | Lifestyle Google and Twitter may have arrived, but magazines are engaging, and lasting, and always find their way into homes - and hearts. Contact us today to learn more. Editorial ideas: contact Kelly Coles, kelly@gopubinc.com Press Releases can be sent to: Colleen Maile, colleen@gopubinc.com Advertising opportunities: contact Teena Wright, teena@gopubinc.com

www.skywestmagazine.com | 208-333-9990 skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

27


O’hare Outbound

| Great Lakes Region

Tall Ships by Paula Hewson

Come Sail Away! Tall-masted sailing ships first connected the hemispheres and launched our nation. They continue to embody romance, adventure and beauty. Wind power makes them eco-friendly too. This summer, five SkyWest destinations welcome a unique armada of the vintage vessels during the Great Lakes United Tall Ships Challenge Series. Cleveland, Ohio; Bay City, Michigan near Saginaw; Duluth, Minnesota; Green Bay, Wisconsin and Chicago, Illinois are all part of an event jointly presented by The American Sail Training Association and Great Lakes United, an organization dedicated to protecting the Great Lakes ecosystem. The celebration of our maritime heritage emphasizes education and will bring a total of 20 tall ships from as far away as Germany to the world’s largest body of fresh water. Participating ships vary from port to port. They include schooners and brigantines, brigs and barques. Each has a story. Most are replicas or re-creations operated by non-profits. They serve as touchstones of history and reminders of environmental responsibility. Some are famous. MGM built the HMS Bounty replica in 1960 for Marlon Brando’s movie Mutiny on the Bounty. The Freedom Schooner Amistad is a re-creation of the 1839 ship immortalized in Steven Spielberg’s Amistad and is dedicated to civil rights education.

HMS Bounty celebrates her 50th anniversary during her 2010 Great Lakes voyage.

The Roseway, a Grand Banks fishing schooner built in 1925, is the oldest featured ship. It will carry student ambassadors on the voyage between Bay City and Duluth. The S/V Denis Sullivan is the newest. The Milwaukee-based ship serves as a floating classroom. Completed in 2000, it took more than nine years to build and was created with a team of almost 1,000 volunteers working under the direction of shipwrights. The three-masted, wooden schooner serves as a major Milwaukee summer attraction. It’s the flagship of both the state of Wisconsin and the Duluth, Minnesota United Nations Environment Program. July 29 to August 1 Like Milwaukee, Bay City on Saginaw Bay possesses an ongoing commitment Green Bay, Wisconsin to sharing the tall-ship mystique with August 12 to August 15 the public. It owns and operates two topside schooners, Appledore IV and Bay City, Michigan Appledore V. Both provide a variety of July 15 to July 18 sail-away cruises during the Bay City portion of the sailing series. The fun wraps up August 24 through Chicago, Illinois 29 in Chicago where all twenty ships will August 24 to August 29 Cleveland, Ohio be docked stern to stern for a distance of July 7 to July 11 almost a mile along Navy Pier. Nautical themes dominate other pier attractions during the six-day finale. n 28 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

HMS Bounty: HMS Bounty Orgainzation LLC

SkyWest Destinations Welcome Tall Ships


Art Watch

| Steamboat Springs, CO

Phil Wright: Katsura Kawano

Phil Wright Paints an Inspiring Landscape Phil Wright, the artist responsible for this issue’s cover, moved to Steamboat Springs eight years ago, last September. “It was the first time I’d been here in the fall. The whole valley was lit up golden with all the Aspen,” he said. The shimmering trees continue to fascinate the native Midwesterner. The painting gracing this magazine’s cover, Aspen Shadows, was created from a field study of one of Wright’s favorite groves. Plein-air opportunities are among Wright’s favorite things about his adopted hometown. “There’s a saying that you come for the skiing and stay for the summers. That’s a truism. I love the summers even more than the winters, now,” he said. Like many Steamboat Springs residents, Wright first came to town to ski. At the time, he was living in Japan, working for Ford Motor Company and immersed in the corporate life. When it came time to retire, Steamboat made his short list. “We looked at other ski areas—Aspen, Vail, Snowmass, but the thing about Steamboat is that it’s a real town. You have miners and cowboys and a sense of community. When we asked people why they live here we always got the same answer. ‘It’s the people. The friendly people.’ You also have a resort and all those qualities that make it more desirable than other small towns.” Steamboat’s scenic beauty provides the artist with ample subject matter. He typically does field studies and either completes the work in his studio or uses it as the basis for a larger piece. He is the featured artist at The Artist Gallery of Steamboat this July. For more information, visit www.philwrightstudio.com. n

Aspen Glitter, 16” X 20”, oil on linen

Ouray Ranch, 11” X 14”, oil on linen

Look What Your Money Buys Now! Aspen, Colorado

$3,900,000

3,408 sq ft 4 BR/4BA, 2 car garage. Sophisticated living with fireplaces, outdoor entertaining & ideal location Tracy & Bubba Eggleston, Morris & Fyrwald Sotheby’s Realty 970-309-9291 bubbaegg@yahoo.com

Bend, Oregon

$849,900

4,029 sq ft, 0.260 Acre Lot - 4 BR/4 BA 4+ Car Garage, Stunning Quality Home Gorgeous Views Becky Breeze, Becky Breeze & Company Real Estate 541-408-1107 BBreeze@BendCable.com

Bozeman, Montana $280,000 2BR to 4BR with 2 car Townhomes. Minutes to skiing seconds to golf, culture and downtown. Walter Rivers, ERA Landmark 406-556-5043 walter@eralandmark.com

Helena, Alabama

$459,900

Over 4,000 sq ft, 5 BR/4.5 BA Private estate, pond, pool, great schools Paul A DeCarlo, RE/MAX Southern Homes 205-677-8463 paul@pauldecarlo.com

Hulett, Wyoming $495,000 43 Acres, 2080 sq ft, 3 BR/3 BA log home, garage Fantastic Devil’s Tower Views Mike Fraley, Pfister Land Company, LLC 307-684-5201 info@pfisterlandco.com

McCall, Idaho $599,950 4.25 acres bare land zoned for 5+ units per acre Incredible downtown location Rick McGraw, Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group 208-880-8889 rickmcgraw@qwest.net

Santa Barbara, California

$3,750,000

3,200-4,600 sq ft, 2BR/3.5 BA Unparalleled living center of vibrant downtown Tim Walsh, Village Properties 805-455-5833 tim@villagesite.com

Tucson, Arizona

$510,000

2,612 sq ft, 4BR/den/2 BA/3 car, .59 acres Santa Fe Charm near Golf & Hiking! Diane Raynor Aune, Coldwell Banker Res. Brokerage 520-977-0226, rainydi@gmail.com

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

29


America’sB est Places

Economic Good News Life is short. Spend it where you want to be. The scope of technology and far reach of air travel make it easier than ever to live where you like and work where you want. All along the SkyWest route map you’ll discover great communities long on lifestyle and ripe with economic opportunities. Whether you’re launching a new idea, looking to relocate an existing business or just want a fresh start, consider some of America’s Best Places to make things happen.

| Chico, CA

Where Innovation and Creativity Merge Chico isn’t just a place . . . it’s a lifestyle! A place where innovation and creativity have merged. A gem tucked just far enough away from the chaos of big city living, yet close enough to see the Golden Gate before brunch if you want to. Chico is a great place to call home and a haven for innovation and entrepreneurship. Ideally located in the middle of the West Coast market, Chico has the business resources you need to assist with expansion, start-up or relocation. Chico has a high-quality workforce with opportunities for applied research and technology transfer with California State University, Chico. No matter what your needs, Chico’s diverse network of business assistance resources will help you through the relocation or start-up process. Agencies such as the Chico Chamber of Commerce and the city’s Economic Development Department are available to work with you every step of the way. Visit www.chicoeconomicdevelopment.com to learn more about the area and our available commercial properties. n 800-852-8570 chicochamber.com 30 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express


| Nebraska

Possibilities Truly are Endless in Nebraska What do you seek? Short, relaxing commutes? Dedicated, hardworking employees who’ll give you everything you ask and more? Wide open space or beautiful metro skylines—all pollution free? Comfortable safe places in which to raise families? Nebraska serves it up just as you ordered! Nebraska has earned many national awards and rankings during the past few years, along with growing notice from national and international media, and interest from top location consultants nationwide. Among these: 2nd “Best Job Market for Job Creation”, Gallup Organization “Job Creation Index”, 2010 3rd “Lowest Cost of Doing Business”, Milken Institute, Cost of Doing Business, 2007 4th “Best State for Jobs”, CareerBuilder.com, 2008 4th “Lowest Average Travel Time to Work”, U.S. Bureau of the Census From aerospace and aviation companies to Yahoo!, businesses considering new and expanding locations discover that Nebraska offers tremendous advantages: outstanding employees; low unemployment, abundant, low-cost electricity, water, and other industry-specific amenities; excellent geographic location for any industry. Nebraska also is THE place for raising families given its extremely affordable cost of living; excellent health care and education systems; low crime; clean environment; and variety of fun recreational, cultural and historical attractions. n

800-426-6505 www.neded.org

| Santa Maria, CA

Santa Maria Means Business! Santa Maria is located on California’s Central Coast, midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles. With a near-perfect climate, central location, and close proximity to beaches, wineries and other attractions, the Santa Maria Valley has an exceptional quality of life. For a company looking to expand or relocate, Santa Maria is a very compelling option. A pro-business environment makes the City of Santa Maria stand out from most other California areas. This region is home to a diverse industrial and manufacturing base, with plenty of room to expand and grow. The Santa Maria Economic Development Commission, a department of the Santa Maria Valley Chamber of Commerce, works with the City of Santa Maria, local employers, and community leaders in education, business, and government to create an environment that welcomes new companies and creates greater opportunities for economic development. We will work with you every step of the way. Contact the Santa Maria Economic Development Commission today for additional information, and consider moving or expanding your company to Santa Maria, California! n

800-331-3779, ext 817 www.santamariaedc.com

skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

31


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| Springfield, MO

Economic Development Opportunities Abound Springfield (metro pop. 430,900) boasts a vibrant healthcare sector, a wealth of higher education institutions including Missouri State University, and is the corporate home of Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World, O’Reilly Auto Parts, Jack Henry & Associates and BKD, LLP. Economic development opportunities abound. Located 80 feet below the surface, Springfield Underground is a security-controlled facility oblivious to outside conditions and houses data centers, food processors, coldstorage warehouses and distribution centers. With over three million square feet (and growing), the Underground offers development sites as well as available buildings. Partnership Industrial Center West, a 400-acre master-planned industrial park, offers cost-effective, development-ready sites with utilities, roads, and permits in place. Located within an Enhanced Enterprise Zone, the park is adjacent to I-44 and the Springfield-Branson National Airport. Of special interest to prospective manufacturers is a 51-acre site certified by the Missouri Department of Economic Development. Located in downtown Springfield, Jordan Valley Innovation Center, a high-tech research facility owned by Missouri State University, is complete with clean rooms, nano-lasers and super computers. The collaboration between the university and the private sector fosters a unique model for intellectual property that allows research to reach commercialization faster and more efficiently. n

800-879-7504 www.business4springfield.com

| Tri-Cities, wa

Golf Aerial: Kim Fetrow, ImageWorks

Where Business, Profitability, and Innovation Thrive Wine, water, and fun in the sun are a way of life in the Tri-Cities. With over 300 days of sunshine a year, the Tri-Cities are a year-round outdoor paradise with a perfect blend of metropolitan sophistication and small town charm. Located in southeast Washington the major communities are Kennewick, Pasco, Richland, and West Richland. Boasting exceptional weather, the opportunities in the Tri-Cities for year-round, outdoor recreational activities are endless. Named the Second Best City for New Jobs by Forbes Magazine, the Tri-Cities offer a highly educated market, quality lifestyle, affordable housing, superior schools and outstanding medical facilities. The Tri-Cities offer business growth opportunities in food processing, manufacturing, and research and development. Home to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Washington State University’s Bioproducts, Sciences and Engineering Laboratory, INFINIA, and GCL Solar, the Tri-Cities is a leader in innovative technologies. Through partnerships with local employers, civic leaders, educational leaders, cultural and business leaders, the Tri-Cities are committed to offering an economy where business, profitability, and innovation thrive. To learn more, contact the Tri-City Development Council. n 800-874-2489 www.tridec.org skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

33


Fun!

Budget-Friendly

W

hether you’re looking for a mountaintop experience, adrenaline-pumping adventure or a touch of Old World charm, it’s easy to enjoy a great getaway without busting the budget. In the midst of our economic recovery, resorts, lodges and even outfitters and guides are luring guests with low prices and stellar package deals. If you’re ready to be impressed by exceptional service and amazing quality check out these options for fabulous—and economical—adventures.

Cascade Raft and Kayak, Idaho

Since 1985, Cascade Raft and Kayak has been providing a comfortable level of whitewater rafting fun on the Payette River in Idaho for adventure seekers of all ages and budgets. It brings together families and friends one splash at a time. Choose from a mellow half-day float or a full day packed with raging Class IV whitewater thrills. The spectacular scenery, professional staff, and beautiful setting promise to create a cherished memory for all, only one hour from Boise. 800-292-7238 - www.cascaderaft.com

BUDGET FRIENDLY…

You bet! Buy 2 nights get 1 free, summer chairlift rides with lodging and more!

PHOTO: JAN RUNGE

GunnisonCrestedButte.com · 800.323.2453

34 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express


The Porches of Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Life at the porches… where the best of Old World craftsmanship and elegance meet the art of comfortable living. Discover a place like no other! Experience excellence with a genuine smile in our 20-acre private neighborhood at the base of the mountain. Offering Whole and Fractional Ownership in our 3,000 to 5,000+ sq. ft homes, available now for immediate occupancy. Amazing vacation rentals! 866-992-0600 - www.theporches.com

Solvang, California

PLAY & STAY in SOLVANG this Summer! Get away to California’s “Little Denmark” only 35 miles from Santa Barbara and enjoy live, professional productions under the stars at Solvang Festival Theater—including West Side Story! Discover value-priced overnight theater packages located within easy walking distance in this quaint European-style village. PLUS, register to WIN 2 tickets to a PLAY and an overnight STAY. 800-GO-SOLVANG - www.SolvangUSA.com

Business Profile

High Lonesome Ranch-Exactly as Wild as You Want The High Lonesome Ranch sits in a fertile valley on the Western Slope of the Colorado Rockies. On your way in to the ranch you’ll pass wild horses, elk, mule deer, pheasant, and bald eagles. The ranch headquarters and cookhouse are built from an authentic, pioneer homestead, complete with a long porch, hitching post and tin roof. Choose from horseback riding, hiking, mountain biking, nature tours, massage therapy, whitewater rafting trips, wild horse tours, golf, winery tours, or sporting clays shooting. All guides are patient instructors, and the ranch is well-suited for families, sportsmen or business groups. The flyfishing enthusiast will enjoy trout fishing on the spring creek ponds at the High Lonesome Ranch as well as the 7 miles of the White River. Breakfast is always hot and hearty, a perfect way to begin an active day. Enjoy a cup of the High Lonesome Ranch’s special blend of roasted signature coffee. Dinner at the ranch is a casual affair, and our executive chef brings culinary mastery and innovative contemporary ranch cuisine to the table. Enjoy wood-fired cowboy rib eye with red chile steak butter or an oak-roasted pheasant breast with habanero-peach chutney. 970-283-9420 | www.thehighlonesomeranch.com skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

35


America’sB est Events

|July/August 2010 RAPID CITY, SD | JULY 1 – OCTOBER 11 Legends in Light is an inspiring multimedia presentation set against the Crazy Horse Memorial just 30 miles from SkyWest service to Rapid City and a mere eight miles from Mount Rushmore.

CHICAGO IL | JULY 1 – SEPTEMBER 30 Sanctuary: Flight of the Majestic Monarch presented by the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum traces the butterflies’ migration from Canada through the Midwest to the mountains of Michoacán, Mexico.

TRAVERSE CITY, MI | JULY 3 – 10 The National Cherry Festival pays homage to Michigan’s best-loved produce with arts and crafts and a bushel of family-fun including a performance by the Blue Angels.

CRESTED BUTTE, CO | JULY 3 – AUGUST 5 The 2010 Crested Butte Music Festival offers something for everyone with more than 100 performers representing genres ranging from opera and symphonic performance to bluegrass and jazz.

PARK CITY, UT | JULY 8 – 11

Photo by Jessica Lowry

Whitefish, MT | July/August Be surprised. Be entertained. Be inspired! Alpine Theatre Project, professional theatre in the heart of downtown Whitefish. 2010 season includes: Hair July 9-31 and Rodgers & Hammerstein’s A Grand Night for Singing August 12-22.

The Park City Food and Wine Classic gathers master winemakers and culinary greats to an event with an outdoorsy twist. Events include a mountain biking/food seminar and a chance to hike, fish or ride horseback.

MILWAUKEE, WI | JULY 10 – SEPTEMBER 6 Evel Knievel, an exclusive exhibit at the Harley-Davidson Museum is the first-ever retrospective of the daredevil’s life. Artifacts include costumes and the SkyCycle used to jump the Snake River Canyon.

For tickets or information: 406-862-SHOW or alpinetheatreproject.org

COSTA MESA, CA | JULY 16 – AUGUST 15 The Orange County Fair celebrates its 120th anniversary with a decade-by-decade look at summer’s best-loved local tradition. Action sports, concerts, competitions, contests, a food alley and midway are part of the festivities.

Sun Valley, ID | August 13 - 15 42nd Sun Valley Center Arts & Crafts Festival This nationally ranked outdoor, juried exhibition is one of Sun Valley’s favorite events. Award-winning artists present their unique, handmade fine arts and crafts. Music and a kids art-making area all three days. Atkinson Park in Ketchum. Free admission. 208-726-9491

www.sunvalleycenter.org

DEBEQUE, CO | JULY 14 – 18 Wine on the Fly combines world-class Colorado flyfishing with a chance to taste exquisite California wines during this three-day High Lonesome Ranch event on the Rockies’ gorgeous Western Slope.

SAN DIEGO, CA | JULY 21 – SEPTEMBER 8 Del Mar’s Horse Racing Season opens with a fashion forward crowd and glamorous Kentucky Derby-esque vibe. The summer calendar includes big-name concerts and festivals as well as races.

EL PASO, TX | ONGOING WEEKENDS – AUGUST 14 Viva! El Paso, a musical extravaganza now in its 32nd season, details four centuries of El Paso life. It’s performed every Friday and Saturday night at the scenic amphitheater in McKelligon Canyon Park.

GILROY, CA | JULY 23 – 25 Gilroy Garlic Festival includes cooking demonstrations by the likes of Top Chef’s Fabio Viviani, a garlic showdown and tasty treats including garlic ice cream and other garlic-flavored delights!

PORTLAND, OR | JULY 2 – 5 The Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival attracts more than 100,000 blues fans to the largest festival of its kind west of the Mississippi. Held adjacent to the lovely Willamette River in the shadow of Mount Hood it offers four stages worth of music.

36 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO | AUGUST 5 – 8 The Steamboat Wine Festival, combines fine food and exceptional wine with the areas rugged beauty. Highlights of the broad calendar of events include Winemaker for a Day and chocolate and wine pairings.


STURGIS, SD | AUGUST 9 – 15

CHARLESTON, SC | AUGUST 27 – 29

The Motorcycle Rally so famous it goes by one name— Sturgis—celebrates its 70th anniversary this year and is expected to attract upward of a half-million attendees.

The Original Charleston Beach Music and Shag Festival honors a dance that’s been a coastal legend since the 1930s. Salute jitterbug with a southern drawl during this upbeat weekend.

JUNCTION CITY, OR | AUGUST 12 - 15 The Scandinavian Festival celebrates this community’s Nordic heritage and transforms downtown into a charming Old World village. Access the fun with SkyWest service to Eugene, 20 minutes away.

WHITEFISH, MT | AUGUST 13 - 15 Centennial Huckleberry Days salutes Northwest Montana’s favorite fruit with more than 130 artists and a dozen food vendors plus activities focused on the succulent huckleberry.

DENVER, CO | AUGUST 14 – 15 The Mile High Music Festival brings top acts including Dave Matthews Band, Jack Johnson, Steve Miller Band and Weezer to The Fields at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park just nine miles from downtown.

PALISADE, CO | AUGUST 19 – 22 Palisade Peach Festival, now in its 42nd year celebrates this delectable crop with live music, more than 100 vendors and what may be the world’s best peach pies, cobblers and other culinary sensations.

WAUSAU, WI | AUGUST 20 - 21 Big Bull Falls Blues Fest held at Fern Island Park creates an intimate environment for blues fans to enjoy national and local acts and plenty of refreshments.

BIRMINGHAM, AL | AUGUST 20 – 21 Stokin’ the Fire BBQ Competition and Music Festival held at Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark brings together aficionados of the thrill of the grill ranging from backyard practitioners to pro teams.

SYRACUSE, NY | AUGUST 26 – SEPTEMBER 8 Great New York State Fair heralds traditional agriculture and livestock achievements, rocks a bustling midway and presents Grandstand star power including Rascal Flatts, Rihanna and Aerosmith.

SUPERIOR, WI | AUGUST 27 – 28 Lake Superior Dragon Boat Festival is a family-friendly event that merges a carnival atmosphere with racing dragon boats—40-foot-long watercraft propelled by 20 racers paddling to the beat of a drum. Access the festival with SkyWest service to Duluth just across the tip of the lake.

ASPEN, CO | August 6 ARTCRUSH

Over 350 art collectors, wine connoisseurs, artists, art world guests, celebrities, and business leaders come together to celebrate the Aspen Art Museum’s annual summer benefit gala. Rare wines, incredible auction lots, a sumptuous dinner, and the 2010 Aspen Award for Art presentation to artist Marilyn Minter. Details and reservations: 970-925-8050 or www.aspenartmuseum.org

Sun Valley, ID | SeptEMBER 17 - 19 The Sun Valley Spiritual Film Festival The Sun Valley Spiritual Film Festival is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the exploration of the human spirit through the medium of film and discourse. Our films are a distillation of unforgettable stories about lives well lived, and universal messages of faith, hope, love, forgiveness and meaning. Film is the vehicle we have chosen to raise the level of discourse about what it means to be human. www.svspiritualfilmfestival.org

St. George, UT | October 4 – 16 Huntsman World Senior Games This October join over 9,500 athletes ages 50+ in St. George, Utah for the largest annual international Olympicstyle sporting event in the world for athletes 50 and over. With 27 sports to choose from, you’re bound to find one for you. Get details at www.seniorgames.net.

skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

37


It’s Our Journey, Too

Captain Scott Carr Makes Helping Others a Family Effort by Wes Horrocks

S

38 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

Scott Carr with sons Brandon and Charlie; “Central Supply” in Peru; A child waits for eye surgery

The commitment to serve is actually a family phenomenon. Carr got involved with the medical missions thanks to his parents. His mother, Maria, a native Peruvian, spends countless hours recruiting the volunteer doctors and medical personnel who assist with each trip, and even more time collecting the hundreds of pounds of medical supplies that must be shipped to Peru. “Her level of commitment and organization amazes all of us,” Carr said. But she isn’t the only one dedicated to helping. “My father, David, who is a retired pilot, does a lot of translating for the medical teams. He has even been in the operating room during surgery,” explained Carr. This year approximately 150 people will make the trip to Peru, ultimately benefiting thousands more. Though he modestly notes his contributions are small, Carr’s efforts are noticed by many of his SkyWest co-workers. Dozens want to know how they can start helping with medical missions. “We usually get so many people that want to help that some are turned away,” said Carr. It’s not a surprising response considering SkyWest’s emphasis on service. The company encourages its 10,000 aviation professionals to participate in worthy charitable projects ranging from organized fundraisers to personal favorite causes. Scott Carr and his family exemplify these efforts. n Wes Horrocks is SkyWest Airlines’ corporate communications coordinator.

Images: Jennifer Carr Mono_Ve Photographics

pending two weeks in a South American country filled with ancient ruins, towering mountains and 1,800 miles of coastline may sound like the perfect vacation, but for SkyWest Canadair Regional Jet Captain Scott Carr and his family, a visit to Peru is all about service. For more than a decade, Carr has been able to travel to South America to serve bi-annual medical missions. “It’s hard not to walk away and think, ‘Man I hit the lottery being born where I was born,’” he said. The California native who now lives in Park City, Utah and is based in Salt Lake City hopes that these trips will also be a positive influence on his four children. “I hope they go forward and try to make a difference,” said Carr. No medical mission is ever the same, which can make it a challenging experience. Depending on the doctors and other professionals who volunteer, the clinics may offer open heart surgeries, well-child checkups or classes for local physicians on new procedures and techniques. Lacking any specialized medical skills, Carr usually spends his time hauling equipment, translating for non-Spanish speakers and teaching about basic hygiene in local orphanages. Ensuring that patients get to the clinic is also tricky. Most find out about the free services through word of mouth, because telephone, internet and television services are not always available. Other patients simply show up hoping to find the care they need. For volunteers like Carr, just traveling to the clinic usually makes for a memorable mission. Services are normally organized outside of urban areas to ensure the treatment gets to the people who need it most. Some physicians have had to travel by plane, bus and boat to get to a remote town or village. During one trip, volunteers were nearly stranded when the local airline they were using went out of business days before their scheduled flight. Organizers were eventually able to rebook all of the tickets. Despite the obstacles, volunteers are happy to share their talents. “The extreme poverty is hard to forget. It feels fourth world sometimes,” said Carr. “But when you talk to people in another country, you realize there are bright, intelligent people all over the place.”


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COTTONWOOD GRILLE: Inspired Northwest cuisine in an authentic Idaho setting. Serving local food with a global perspective and featuring an award-winning wine list. Celebrating ten years in business, Cottonwood Grille is offering $10 anniversary share plates, wine flights and more. Come and see us on the Boise River! 208-333-9800 cottonwoodgrille.com

Welcome to Medford, Oregon, the center of the thriving Rogue Valley. Savor award-winning artisan cheeses, chocolates, specialty foods, and nationally recognized wines. Enjoy great Northwest dining, eclectic shopping, and an endless list of activities and events. Get outside with fly-fishing, rafting and jet boating on the Rogue River, championship golf courses and Crater Lake National Park. 800-469-6307 www.visitmedford.org

Golfing, Hiking, RV’ing, National Parks and Much More! Kane County, UT averages over 320 days of sunshine each year. That’s 320 days of sunshine and outdoor adventure waiting for you! www.thegrandcanyons.com

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VACATION HOME available as nightly/weekly rental. 3 BR, 2 BA, sleeps 6-9. Ideal location on a quiet street in Ketchum. Walking distance to everything. 4 blocks from center of town and a one minute drive to River Run Ski Lodge and the new Gondola! Hot tub, pool table, ping pong, drum set and more. $250/nt or $1,500/wk. Holiday rentals available at $400/nt or $2,500/wk. 208-861-5232 or visit www.skywestmagazine/ketchumhome.com

Relax, Explore, Create on the Southern Oregon Coast. Pacific Reef’s #1 Rated Ocean Front Rooms is an ideal location to explore pristine beaches, take scenic drives, awe the Redwoods, jet boat the Rogue River or golf Bandon Dunes. Ask for “Skywest Offer.”

To advertise in this section, call Teena Wright 208-333-9990

800-808-7263

www.pacificreefresort.com

skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

39


crossword

Solution on page 44. 1

2

3

4

14

Summer Fun! Answers to clues in bold face all relate to summer fun.

17

18

22

SPRINGS, CO

| HELENA, MT

| TUCSON, AZ

at the Little Nell. December 31, 2009.

Does not include

listings from Residences

Offices in Aspen,

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All sales, January

Sales

| 970.925.6060 Basalt & Carbondale

.COM ASPENSKIHOMES

OPERATED BY

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SKYWEST AIRLINES

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40 | skyWest Magazine JULY/AUGUST 2010 united express

69 74

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85

81 Vein like deposit 82 Campfire treat 83 Wapiti 84 Free from bias 85 Improve 86 Washington’s bills DOWN 1 Choreographer Bob 2 Inwardly (poetic) 3 Raises children 4 Annoy 5 Twist 6 Mournful poem 7 Mineral bubble 8 Donkey 9 Flying team 10 Flexible 11 Theater passage 12 Hawaiian flowers 13 Fun in the ___ 18 Skirt worn by ballerinas 21 Consumed 23 Idaho’s Lake ____ Oreille 27 Reverence for God 28 Momentarily 30 Blood clot 31 Author Truman

86

33 Sailor 35 Naught 36 Communications satellite 37 Intolerant person 39 Swarthy 41 Toothed wheels 42 Pertaining to eye’s iris 44 Male swan 46 Atomic mass unit (acronym) 48 Former Russian rulers 51 Snow runner 52 Monetary unit of Albania 56 Laziness (old poetic term) 58 Strikes 60 Thin layer of wood 63 Satisfy fully 65 Verily (archaic) 66 Industrious insect 67 Great blue, boat-billed or grey 69 Republic on Arabian Peninsula 70 Labors 72 Russian assembly 73 Undercover drug cop 75 Egypt’s river 76 Santa’s pal 77 Smallest Indian state 78 Campfire residue 79 Harper or An

SkyWest Magazine’s

million affluent passengers.

208-333-9990 x106 | teena@gopubinc.com

*A special profile section in our Jan/Feb 2011 edition

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For more information contact:

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ONE PLEASE TAKE PRICELESS: 2010 MARCH | APRIL

for gave medals estate sales,

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ACROSS 1 _______works 4 Japanese art of arranging flowers 10 Friends 14 Singletons 15 Backyard cookers 16 Stead 17 Narrow strip of wood 19 Leg joints 20 Dried grape 22 Thick sweet liquid 24 Soviet secret police 25 The number system with base 8 26 Pace 29 Go back on one’s word 32 Amount of antigen required for a specific result 34 Sea eagle 36 1950s heartthrob Hunter 38 Lifeless 40 Hawaiian honeycreeper 41 Quantity of computer storage 43 Heroic 45 Summer vacation option 46 Santa Monica landmark theater 47 Emblem 49 Letters 50 Stake 51 Abilities 53 Official language of Pakistan 54 9th letter of the Hebrew alphabet 55 Former running back Barber 57 Affirmative 59 Bro counterpart 61 Flat circular plate 62 Kringle or Kross 64 Annul 68 Remain 71 Add Property 72 Lair 74 Shorthand writing for short 76 Wading birds 78 Pertaining to the ear 80 Islamic chieftain

5


skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

41


behind the scenes

Aircraft Safety Comes First at SkyWest Airlines

“Safety First” is more than a mission statement at SkyWest Airlines; it’s a way of life. SkyWest’s impeccable safety record spans more than 35 years, beginning with the highest caliber of trained professionals and extending to a proven fleet of aircraft. The People: Each day, thousands of SkyWest employees are responsible for the safety of hundreds of thousands of passengers. SkyWest’s experienced mechanics, pilots, flight attendants and ground personnel have the know-how and ability to keep their passengers safe. In the Flight Deck: You also have the comfort of knowing you’re flying with some of the most experienced and thoroughly trained pilots the airline industry has to offer. It takes years of training and experience to become a commercial airline pilot, and many come to SkyWest well prepared averaging 1,500 to 2,000 hours of flight time. However, their training has just begun. Before they ever fly a passenger flight, SkyWest spends approximately $30,000 on their training which is geared towards safety. This is a two-month process beginning with three weeks of ground school followed by 50 hours of flight simulator training. The final stage of their training is called the Initial Operating Experience, during which they actually fly one of SkyWest’s aircraft accompanied by a qualified check airman instructor for another 50 hours. All pilots continue their training with mandatory recurrent simulator training for captains every six months and for first officers, every year. Additionally, each year both captains and first officers must participate in a two-day training session similar to ground school. All pilots are also required to undergo a comprehensive medical examination testing their vision and overall physical and mental well-being to determine if they are fit to fly for SkyWest. Captains do this every six months; first officers annually. In the Cabin: At SkyWest, a flight attendant’s first responsibility is your safety. Like pilots, SkyWest’s in-flight team undergoes comprehensive training before they take to the skies. Each SkyWest flight attendant must complete an intense three-week training program emphasizing onboard safety and security. They are well-versed in emergency procedures, evacuation protocol and passenger service. While at SkyWest, flight 42 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

attendants continue their training throughout the year and are required to recertify in First Aid and CPR annually. On the Ramp: SkyWest stresses safety not only in the air, but also on the ground. SkyWest trains its customer service personnel for two weeks, both in the classroom and on the job in ground safety issues. These agents become specialists in aircraft weight and balance. They know the best way to load and unload hundreds of pounds of cargo and luggage without damaging the luggage, cargo, the aircraft or injuring themselves. They are also trained to operate the various ground equipment and park the aircraft once it arrives at the gate. This navigation can often be challenging in airports with busy ramps. In colder climates, they must learn how to properly de-ice an aircraft allowing for a safe take-off and flight. Under the Wing: For every hour one of SkyWest’s aircraft spends in flight, one of their mechanics spends two hours servicing that aircraft. SkyWest maintains a strict maintenance schedule and undoubtedly, an experienced SkyWest mechanic has recently inspected or serviced the aircraft carrying you. All mechanics come to SkyWest with extensive training, including three years of A&P (Airframe and Power) training and certification. Also, every two years SkyWest mechanics undergo three weeks of mandatory training. Each day, all of SkyWest’s aircraft are given attention by a mechanic. Every third day, each plane receives standard service. On the fifth day, a more thorough service and inspection is conducted. Extensive maintenance is scheduled every 54 days with a major inspection every 540 days. Flight Control: This department consists of aircraft dispatchers, system controllers and customer service coordinators located in the Operational Control Center at SkyWest’s headquarters in St. George, Utah. All play an integral role in the airline’s operations. SkyWest dispatch personnel undergo six weeks of intensive training courses, learning in-depth aircraft systems, meteorology and flight planning to become certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Upon arrival at SkyWest, their training continues with three weeks of classes followed by an average of eight weeks of on-the-job training, culminating with a two-day competency check.


The dispatchers are responsible for preparing the flight release, including fuel planning, route selection, Federal Aviation Regulation compliance and weather analysis, as well as monitoring flights to ensure safety. Before each aircraft leaves the runway, dispatchers and captains share responsibility for the safety of the flight. The system controllers are responsible for all coordination, cancellation, delaying and reflow of SkyWest flights. They ensure optimum coverage of and adherence to flight schedules, economics and utilization of the operation. The customer service coordinators assist the controllers, working closely with the stations to maintain a customer service advocacy, always keeping the passenger in mind. These highly trained individuals work with the rest of the SkyWest team to provide a safe flying experience with incomparable service and quality.

The Safety Department: SkyWest has a department wholly dedicated to the operational safety of the airline. Its team monitors all aspects of safety and ensures that the highest standard of safety is maintained. The safety department coordinates with all the departments involved with ground and flight operations and acts as a compliance liaison between the airline and the Department of Transportation and Federal Aviation Administration. It is also responsible for the safety and well-being of all employees and equipment at the airline. The safety department conducts internal safety audits and evaluations of all operational departments. Additionally, SkyWest’s safety department voluntarily participates in the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP); a reporting program for pilots, flight attendants and dispatchers to flag potential safety concerns. n

Business Profile

Gamma Knife – a revolution in neurosurgery Fresno may not be well-known as a tourist destination, but world-class technology like the Gamma Knife—available at Saint Agnes Medical Center—has put Valley health care on the map. Saint Agnes, a 436-bed acute care medical center in the heart of the San Joaquin Valley, is proud to be one of only 200 institutions worldwide, including Johns Hopkins Hospital, Mayo Clinic, and UCSF Medical Center, using Gamma Knife; and is among a select handful using the newest and most precise version—the Perfexion. Considered the “gold standard” in radiosurgery, Gamma Knife is the most effective noninvasive treatment available for brain tumors and other abnormalities in the brain and upper neck previously considered inaccessible or inoperable. Contrary to its name, Gamma Knife does not use a knife at all. There are no scalpels

involved and no incisions made. Instead, 192 highly focused beams of radiation—delivered in a single high-dose—converge on the specific area where the tumor or abnormality resides. With the help of a computer and the latest imaging technology, physicians can identify the exact spot with pinpoint accuracy. This promising alternative to traditional surgery offers superior outcomes, fewer complications and quicker recovery times, giving Valley residents one more reason to be proud of the community they call home. For more information about Gamma Knife, call: 1-800-ST-AGNES | www.samc.com. skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express |

43


Route Map

Edmonton

Saskatoon Calgary Winnipeg Regina

Vancouver Kalispell

Victoria

Minot

Spokane

Great Falls

Moses Lake

Seattle/Tacoma

Pasco/Richland/ Kennewick

Missoula

Bismarck

Helena

Houghton/Hancock

Fargo Duluth

Quebec

Billings

Bozeman

Ottawa

Portland Cody Idaho Falls Jackson Hole

Redmond/Bend

Eugene

Boise

North Bend Medford

Gillette

Eau Claire

Rapid City Sioux Falls

Cedar Rapids Des Moines

Crescent City Eureka/Arcata

Rock Springs Hayden/Steamboat Springs

Redding

Salt Lake City

Chico Reno Grand Junction

Sacramento Oakland San Francisco Modesto San Jose Fresno Monterey

Eagle County

Montrose

Moline

Omaha

Lincoln

Peoria

Denver

Kansas City

Aspen

Springfield

Colorado Springs Gunnison Wichita

White Plains Akron Allentown Columbus Pittsburgh Dayton Cincinnati Washington, DC Charleston Louisville Fort Wayne

Lexington

Springfield Paducah

Las Vegas

Tulsa

BakersfieldInyokern

Northwest Arkansas

Oklahoma City

Albuquerque

Norfolk Nashville

Memphis

Knoxville Asheville

Huntsville

Little Rock

Birmingham

Dallas El Paso

Syracuse

Indianapolis

Durango

San Luis Obispo Santa Maria Santa Barbara Burbank Ontario Oxnard Los Angeles Palm Springs Phoenix Orange County Carlsbad Imperial/El Centro Yuma Tucson San Diego

Muskegon Saginaw London Grand Rapids Lansing Milwaukee Detroit South Bend Cleveland Chicago

Madison

Casper

Klamath Falls

Wausau Traverse City Green Bay Appleton

Midland

Austin San Antonio

United - Regional Jet

Houston

United - Turbo Prop Seasonal Time Zones

Pacific

Mountain

Central

Eastern

Atlantic

8:00

9:00 (Arizona does not observe Daylight Savings)

10:00

11:00

NOON

EFFECTIVE June 2010 (may not reflect recent service updates)

RubesÂŽ

By Leigh Rubin

SKYWEST AIRLINES CURRENT ROUTE MAP JUNE 2010 (updated monthly, may not reflect recent service updates)

F O S S E

I N L Y C A P O T E

T E L S T A R E

R E A R S B I G O T

P A E G R L O D F A I

E

I K E B G R I L L T K N E E U P K G B T E P Y U N I T E D E A D C T R A V O Y R B S K I T I K I V D I S K E A L H N N E X D E T S A U E S S M R E N H A

A N A S I S R A O C T B R E R N E I I W I E L F T L L S Y E A H K R I H S T E N S R A L O R E S N C E

Solution to Crossword on page 40. For more of Leigh Rubin’s humor check out his new, 2010 Rubes Zoo in a Box daily desk calendar, available at your favorite neighborhood or online bookstore, visit www.rubescartoons.com or call 800-850-9453.

44 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

P L I A N T

A I S L E

G A E M A U R S S A Y T E E M E O N

L S E U I N G E M I B R O I L D U I S C W N O I R L K E S


about your aircraft

The Aircraft Lavatory

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SkyWest has safely been flying the EMB 120, commonly CRJ700 referred to as the “workhorse” of the regional airline industry, since 1986. Don’t be fooled by the propellers you see; the same technology that powers jet aircraft actually powers the EMB 120 as well. Like jet engines, the EMB 120 is powered by a gas turbine design, allowing for the superior reliability and power that jet engines enjoy. The EMB 120 is also economically sound, allowing it to serve communities that may not support jet service. Additionally, the EMB 120 possesses state-of-the-art technology allowing for maximum passenger safety. Each SkyWest EMB 120 is equipped with a Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS). GPWS is a warning system designed to alert pilots when the aircraft is not in landing configuration or is getting too close to the ground. GPWS detects terrain ahead of and below the aircraft and warns pilots when there’s an obstruction ahead. Each EMB 120 also has an onboard Global Positioning System (GPS), which uses satellites to calculate an aircraft’s position on the earth’s surface. Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems (TCAS) are also included for your safety. A more advanced radar system, TCAS in the flight deck is similar in theory to the equipment used in air traffic control towers to detect the position of all aircraft in the area.

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While SkyWest’s employees are truly what set the airline apart, the equipment used also plays a significant role in passenger safety. SkyWest’s fleet of 280 regional aircraft is CRJ200 one of the industry’s newest. The average age of an aircraft is under seven years. The fleet consists of three different airCRJ200 craft types: the 30-passenger Embraer 120 Brasilia (EMB 120), the Bombardier Canadair Regional Jet 200 LR (CRJ200), and the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the Canadair Regional Jet 700 ER (CRJ700).

CRJ AIRCRAFT SkyWest has operated the 50-passenger CRJ200 since 1994. And in 2004, SkyWest welcomed the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the nearly identical 66-passenger CRJ700, with a two-class cabin and United’s explusSM service. The CRJ200 and CRJ700 offer a balance of the best economics in their class and outstanding performance with the Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics Systems. This onboard technology allows pilots to better observe the flying environment. Both regional jets have the ability to monitor performance of aircraft systems as well as track nearby aircraft and terrain clearances. The aircraft are also equipped with a weather Galley Lavatory radar system which helps pilots see potentially treacherous CRJ200long before it is encountered. weather Passengers can rest easy knowing that the technology on1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 board SkyWest’s aircraftMain provides for a safer, smoother flying Entrance experience for both passenger and pilot. That’s safety first! n Emergency Exits

Emergency Exit

Galley

Lavatory

Emergency Exits

Galley

CRJ700

CRJ200

Emergency Exits

Galley

Main Entrance

5

6

7

8

9 10 1 1

12 13

Galley

1

Lavatory

Emergency Exits

2

3

Main Entrance

4

5

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9 10 1 1

12 13

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Emergency Exits

4

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3 16 4 17 5 6 12 13 142 15

7

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9

Emergency Exit

UNITED FIRST

CRJ700

6

Emergency Exit

Main Entrance

Emergency Exit

5

Main Entrance

A

Emergency Exit

1

EMBUNITED 120ECONOMY PLUS

UNITED ECONOMY

Lavatory

Emergency Exits

1 Main Entrance

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9 10 1 1

12

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Galley Main Entrance

11

A

(FORWARD GALLEY)

A

Galley

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B C D

4

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2

A B

1

200

Lavatory

Lavatory

Emergency Exits

C D

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Lavatory

Emergency Exits

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Emergency Exit

skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express | Emergency Exits

Lavatory

45


United Red Carpet Club United First International Lounge

Airport Maps

United Arrivals Suite International Arrivals Suite

Denver (DEN) Concourse C US Airways

Inter-Terminal Shuttle Bus Stop

United Arrivals Suite

United Easy Check-in

International Arrivals Suite

Medical Center

Concourse B Power Charging Station

57 39

37

77

Inter-Terminal Shuttle Bus Stop

57

49

38

36

26

50

35

Portland (PDX)

United Easy Check-in

H

60

Medical Center 81

Concourse A Air Canada Continental TLufthansa ERMINAL

Power Charging Station

United First International Lounge

United Premier Check-In

25

16

United Premier Check-In

United Red Carpet Club

PDX

28

15

United Gate Area

41

80

91 92

CONCOURSE E

3

TERMINAL 2 Air Canada Air New Zealand

TERMINAL 1 US Airways 12

C

E1 D

E2 E3 E4 E5

4B TERMINAL WEST

E6

TERMINAL EAST

B

E7

Ticket Lobby

A E

Parking

Los Angeles (LAX)

United Gate Areas United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

SEA 71A

67A

64

TERMINAL 4 TERMINAL 3

TERMINAL 5 TERMINAL 2 Air Canada Air New Zealand

Seattle (sea)

72

75A 69A

80

70A

68B

88

76

TERMINAL 6 Continental

TERMINAL 7

TERMINAL 8

N11 Main Terminal

TERMINAL 1 US Airways 12

N1

way

N8 Ro

N7

NORTH SATELLITE

ay

w

Ro

ad

Parking

ad

SOUTH SATELLITE

N15 N16

N10 N9

D

A

4B

TOM BRADLEY I N T E R N AT I O N A L TERMINAL Lufthansa Thai Airways ANA Singapore Asiana Swiss

N12 N13 N14

C

B

N6

N2 N3

NORTH SATELLITE 71A

67A

69A

TERMINAL 5

United Gate Areas

72

75A

TERMINAL 4

80

70A

64

68B

United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

88

76

TERMINAL 6 Continental

TERMINAL 7

TERMINAL 8

San Francisco (SFO)

Chicago/O’Hare (ORD) F14

Concourse F US Airways

F11

F10 F6

E3

TERMINAL TWO

C1

Concourse E Air Canada

F4

C8

Concourse C

E1

C17 B6

Pedestrian Tunnel B9

F14

F6

E3

C1

Concourse E Air Canada

C8

Concourse C

E1

C17

TERMINAL THREE

B6

B14

C18

B1 C19

Pedestrian Tunnel

Elevated Airpor t Transit System (ATS) B9

C24

C32

TERMINAL ONE

Concourse B Continental Lufthansa

88

80

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81

76A

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International Terminal Secure Connector

73

C32

C9 C16

F1

C24

TERMINAL ONE

F10

F4

Concourse E Air Canada

71

C19

Elevated Airport Transit System (ATS)

TERMINAL TWO

78A

C18

B1

F11

79

C16 F1

Concourse F US Airways

TERMINAL 3

Concourse F

C9

B18

Concourse G United Air New Zealand ANA Lufthansa Singapore

B14

TERMINAL FIVE International Arrivals

Concourse B Continental Lufthansa

B18

Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.

Concourse M

Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.

46 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

TERMINAL 1

B22

B22

Concourse A Asiana

Concourse B Continental US Airways


MOBILE BOARDING PASS

SCAN AT SECURITY AND GATE

Wireless check-in. Paperless boarding pass. Introducing United mobile check-in and boarding pass. Now you can check in on the go, and have your boarding pass sent directly to your phone for select itineraries. Just enter mobile.united.com into your browser to check in for your flight, and to get your mobile boarding pass, complete with instructions on how to use it at the airport. To learn more visit united.com/mobileservices .

Mobile check-in is currently available for any United - or United Express -operated flight within the U.S., Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands. Mobile boarding passes are currently available for customers with seat assignments on flights departing select airports on United®- and United Express®-operated itineraries within the United States, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. ©2010 United Air Lines, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ®

®


Travel Challenge

Test Your Travel Smarts

The Best of Elmo 2, is a collection of the Sesame Street star’s most popular moments and features big name talent including Adam Sandler, India.Arie, Feist, David Beckham and the Goo Goo Dolls. The Last Station, from Director Michael Hoffman, tells the story of Leo Tolstoy’s last year of life and nabbed Oscar nominations for its stars Helen Mirren and Christopher Plummer. By the way, Hoffman lives in one of SkyWest’s most popular regional destinations—Boise, Idaho. To enter go to www.americasbestplaces.com and register the correct answer to this Travel Challenge. While you’re at the site, share your own experiences at www.americasbestplaces.com. This contest runs July 1 through August 30, 2010. It is not open to employees of the airline or this magazine, members of their families or previous winners and is limited to residents of the United States. Void where prohibited. For complete rules, visit www.americasbestplaces.com. n 48 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2010 united express

Good Night Moon: Scholastic Storybook Treasures

Correctly identify this place and enter a random drawing (to be held August 31) to win a copy of a recently released DVD. This edition’s offerings: Good Night Moon and Other Stories, presents an assortment of beloved children’s stories that do more than keep little ones intrigued. Part of a new, sign language-enhanced line from Scholastic; the videos present learning opportunities for children of all abilities.

The Best of Elmo 2: Warner Home Entertainment

Need a hint? Located on public land it’s easy to get to with convenient SkyWest air service to a destination featured in this magazine. Still not sure? The area draws skiers in the winter and tourists all through the summer. They come to enjoy art, culture and the Great Outdoors. While you’re contemplating the possibilities think about all that regional air service adds to life. Easy access to mid-sized cities and small-resort markets leads to all sorts of extraordinary adventures. Exploring new places does more than make memories. It also makes us smarter. Your travel savvy can also earn you a recently released movie. See details below:

The Last Station: Sony Home Entertainment

Can you identify this idyllic location?


TOM

IL. AVA

CUS

TOM

IL. AVA

CUS


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This prime spot is a 6,000 sq. ft. lot on one of the best corners in the desirable West End. Incredible and rare opportunity for a developer or end-user within walking distance to downtown. $4,200,000 $3,800,000

Five-bedroom home with dramatic back yard waterfall, endless views from elevated patios, and only 5-minutes to downtown. Stunning great room, easy and liveable floorplan, and access to skier shuttles. Ideal for entertaining friends and family. $6,249,000

The Residences at the Little Nell, St. Regis Club, Ritz-Carlton Club and Hyatt Grand Aspen offer extensive vacation ownership options. Membership provides access to these exclusive Aspen properties as well as access to other coveted destinations. Starting at $129,000

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Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates, Inc. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each office is independently owned and operated, except offices owned and operated by NRT Incorporated.


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