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Central Coast, CA | Aspen, CO | Ski Destinations | Fall Getaways

priceless: please take one September | October 2010

an artful Good Time in Paducah, Kentucky

Operated by SkyWest Airlines

magazine


San Luis Obispo

San Francisco

Eugene

Portland

Los Angeles

Bakersfield

Photo by Chris Huot

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A change in perspective

Chicago


September | October 2010

contents San Luis Obispo County, CA Fall in Love with the SLO Life Page 6 | Halfway between the snarl of SoCal and the Bay Area’s bustle, the SLO life lures visitors looking for an encounter with Old California charm and lots of easy-going fun.

26 | America’s Best Places Jackson Hole, WY

28 | America’s Best Places Chippewa Valley, WI

Aspen, CO

30 | Fall Getaways

Insiders Share Autumn Advice Page 12 | In autumn when prices drop and colors change Aspen locals still enjoy a bevy of adventures. Champion skier Chris Davenport and artist Tania Dibbs share a local perspective on this four-season resort community.

32 | Ski Destinations

36 | America’s Best Events

Humboldt, CA AWE-some Adventure Page 16 | An encounter with giant redwoods— the planet’s largest living things—should be on every “bucket list” and Humboldt State Park with its camping and recreation options is a great place to make it happen.

38 | It’s Our Journey, Too

40 | Crossword Puzzle

42 | Behind the Scenes

44 | Route Map

Page 20 | Ten years ago, Paducah, known mostly as home to the National Quilt Museum, began luring established artists to its neglected LowerTown neighborhood. The phenomenal result is among many reasons to visit this engaging river town.

45 | About Our Aircraft

46 | Airport Maps

On the Cover Paducah, Kentucky artist William Renzulli created the painting, Distant Hills, a 60” x 48” acrylic on canvas. It represents an amalgam of Kentucky landscapes. The foreground is based on a photo taken in Livingston County just east of Paducah’s McCracken County. The distant mountains reflect those in far eastern Kentucky. To learn more read the story on page 20.

48 | Last Word

Humboldt: Courtesy of Save the Redwoods League

For an Artful Good Time

Paducah: 2008 ALLEN FREEMAN

Paducah, KY

Web Extras! If you like this magazine you will love our new affiliate-website www.americasbestplaces.com. operated by SkyWest Airlines


Go!

P U B L I C AT I O N S

ramblings and recommends

Good Works!

I N C O R P O R A T E D

Dear Reader: president Kelly D. Coles editor in chief Colleen Birch Maile colleen@gopubinc.com art director Janie W. Budell janie@gopubinc.com copy editor Bethany Maile proof readers Anna Bierman Tatro Becky MacDonald | Quincy Budell contributors Amanda Bjerke | Hudson Hackman | Wes Horrocks Lou Jurassic | Rand Mor | Connie Naylor

director sales and marketing Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com

advertising managers MT, OR, UT, WA, WY, Canada: Wendy Rivers l 406-586-0439 wndyrivers@theglobal.net CO, NV, Northern and Central CA: Susan Vernier Garcia l 970-927-9599 susan@gopubinc.com for all other locations call: Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com SkyWest Magazine corporate office 208-333-9990 l fax: 208-333-9991 205 N. 10th St., Suite B100, Boise, ID 83702 email: info@skywestmagazine.com www.skywestmagazine.com

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SkyWest Airlines 444 S. River Rd., St. George, UT 84790 435-634-3000 l email: info@skywest.com SkyWest Airlines Stock Symbol: SKYW

SkyWest Magazine (ISSN 1527-4152) is published bimonthly by Go! Publications, Inc. for United Express operated by SkyWest Airlines. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to SkyWest Magazine are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or of SkyWest Airlines. Acceptance of advertisements does not imply official endorsement of the products or services concerned. While every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of content, no responsibility can be taken for any errors and/or omissions. No part of this SkyWest Magazine may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher. © 2010 Go! Publications Inc. All rights reserved.

Copies available for $6 each.

This magazine assumes no responsibility for the safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, artwork or other material. This magazine does not reply to queries without SASE.

I know we’ve got a ways to go before Thanksgiving turns our collective attention toward an attitude of gratitude, but I don’t want to wait to publicly thank reader Glennda Abbey for making my world a lot nicer. A military wife who’s spent the last five years living in El Paso, Texas, Glennda was on her way home to Billings, Montana when she read about my quest to replace my much loved travel tote. Frequent fliers will recall that I’ve been lamenting the eminent demise of a bag no longer in production. For the past 13 years, I’ve been cramming a week’s worth of living into the 10” x 13” x 8.5” Ricardo of Beverly Hills Renegade. I dreaded the day when its sides finally ruptured. (I also ranted about the public’s love affair with rollerbags. But I’ve said enough about that!) Like me, Glennda had obtained a Renegade as part of a set of matched luggage. A rollerbag aficionado, she’d rarely used her tote. It was in excellent shape, so she packed it up and sent it to me. How nice is that? Her kind gesture made me think about other people who see needs—large and small— and step up to meet them. One of those people is Monterey, California’s Linda Ford. For several months, I’ve been shuffling her info around on my desk. Unlike most of our stories, hers is not about the fun things to see and do along the SkyWest route map. It doesn’t tell readers of a community winning awards for its extraordinary lifestyle or thriving business environment. But it does fit this magazine’s mandate to share good news about the people and places SkyWest Airlines serves. As president and CEO of the Natividad Medical Foundation, Linda Ford became concerned about the growing number of working but still poor women with fibroid tumors and prolapsed uteruses who receive a diagnosis requiring costly surgery and then never see their doctor again. To help needy, uninsured

Some of the women who have purchased the Onyx Fund necklace to help uninsured working women obtain needed surgeries gather around fund creator and jewelry designer Linda Ford (back left). To learn more visit theonyxfund.com.

women receive critical care she created the Onyx Fund. It’s named for Onix, a woman who had been a full-time housekeeper in Carmel, California for nine years when she was told she needed surgery to remove massive fibroid tumors. Without insurance and unable to qualify for assistance, Onix ignored the diagnosis and kept working even though she was in severe pain. Four years passed before her condition became so debilitating that she again sought medical help. It took her an added six months to save and borrow the down payment for her surgery. Ford, a jewelry designer, was so moved by the plight of Onix and other “disappearing patients” that she created a special onyx necklace that sells for $125. One hundred dollars of the purchase price goes to fund surgeries. The community embraced her idea and in just 30 days the Onyx Fund raised $30,000. Those monies will help a dozen women receive surgery. The fund hopes to raise more than $1 million to assist countless others. Linda Ford and Glennda Abbott both inspire me to look for ways to make other people happy. I hope they motivate you as well. I am convinced that we can all do good somehow, some way today. Air travel poses plenty of opportunities to lend a hand to your fellow passengers. If all you can share is a smile that’s enough. I have a feeling you’ll figure out how to do much more. Then tell me about your experiences. I’ll share some of the most heart warming in the next issue. Happy Skies,

CJ

Colleen Birch Maile Editor in Chief

For reprints of articles in this issue of SkyWest Magazine, please call 208-333-9990. Visit us on our website at www.skywestmagazine.com.


Welcome Aboard

People Make a Difference Dear Passenger: You’re opening my favorite edition of this magazine. Not because it’s better than the rest, (I think every issue is great), but because it’s on planes during September and October. That means one thing to me: football season, my favorite time of year. While SkyWest Magazine is more likely to give you a local’s insight into a great SkyWest destination than a run-down on college match-ups, I know that you’ll find something refreshing and different in these pages. In that regard this publication is a lot like the airline you’re flying. You might be heading to a game, traveling on business or flying for a myriad of other reasons. But whatever your purpose it’s good to know that you are much safer than you would be if you’d taken the highway and you’ll get to wherever you’re going more quickly on an airplane. Still, after you’ve packed your liquids in a clear plastic bag, removed your shoes and passed through an X-ray machine, you may be wondering if you made the right choice. At SkyWest Airlines we recognize that we all face a myriad of challenges when we fly. We also recognize that we’re part of the solution. We know that the companies that survive and thrive through good and bad times are those that create value for their customers—those that do things better. One of the greatest things about our SkyWest people is that everywhere I go employees are asking how they can do a little bit better for our customers and our company. Their attitudes make a big difference in our company. That positive difference is the result of the enthusiasm that I encounter every day. I see it in a parts person who comes to me with a more cost-effective agreement and the pilot who talks with me as I ride in the cockpit jump seat about ways he thinks we can improve a program and the gate agent who takes the time to share fresh ideas. SkyWest people care about each other and their customers. They continue to innovate and execute and make progress and improve upon things we know we already do well. That kind of focus, particularly in today’s environment, is unmatched and critical to what we’re doing. You won’t find it anywhere else. With their high level of personal ownership and responsibility, it is clear that our more than 10,000 SkyWest team members want to take care of you, our valued customer, in a way that exceeds your expectations. We’re passengers too and we understand that what we do and how we do it makes a difference in your day. So whether you’re connecting through a hub or on your way home, SkyWest’s people want to make your travel experience a good one. On behalf of all our dedicated employees, I’m pleased to welcome you aboard United Express operated by SkyWest Airlines. Sit back, relax and enjoy your flight.

Welcome Aboard!

Russell “Chip” Childs President and COO SkyWest Airlines


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Fall In

love with

SLO

I

by Amanda Bjerke

always thought they called San Luis Obispo County S-L-O, because the full name takes so long to say. Little did I know the acronym serves as a spot-on-accurate description of a place that serves up every iconic California experience— without the white-knuckle frenzy that marks SoCal or the Bay Area. Life really is easier here. Maybe SLO’s location—halfway between San Fran and LA—saved it from urban sprawl. Maybe it was just too pretty to pave over. Whatever the reason, this vast and varied landscape retains wide-open vistas and an Old California attitude. Visitors of all ages and interests find something to love here. More than a dozen little towns stretch from the ocean to the Santa Lucia Mountains. Each retains a unique character and presents plenty of things to see and do. Together they pack enough entertainment wallop for a week or more of fun. Dig for clams in Pismo Beach, (the Clam Capital of the World). Bicycle through rolling vineyards in the

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Edna Valley or around Paso Robles (SLO possesses two distinct wine countries). Paso, as the locals refer to it, is a town known as much for water as it is for wine because it’s also the site of a healing mineral spring. It’s been attracting tourists for more than a century. In the old days, they came by stagecoach. Today, the Old West traditions live on at a bevy of Paso guest ranches. A rural landscape reflects SLO’s deep agricultural roots. The Santa Lucia Foothills are an ideal place to saddle up and ride into the sunset. You can also amble through the dozens of art galleries that dot the county map. Be sure to take in the quaint, albeit eclectic charm of Cambria— a Victorian-village-sort of beach town with ample reminders of its mining camp past. Charter a fishing boat out of Morro Bay. Get behind the wheel and take to the back roads. Ramble up Highway 1; cross inland along Highway 46; be prepared to stop, point and shoot. Photo opportunities are


everywhere, all the time. The hospitable climate makes SLO a great place to unwind in any season. But autumn, when the summer tourists depart and the locals celebrate their best traditions, remains my favorite. There’s something magical about fall. Deciduous grapevines cast the hillsides in purple and gold and clean, clear air produces especially vivid ocean sunsets. So whether you’re a Californian in need of a weekend getaway or a world traveler longing for a no-hassle retreat, here are some top picks for easy-going autumn fun.

1. The “Other” California Wine Country: Vineyards were first planted in SLO more than a century ago. Now more than 200 make their home in the area. While most offer tours and tastings year round, the harvest really makes the good times roll with special festivals and events. The Paso Robles Harvest Wine Weekend (October 15 – 17 this year), for example, typically includes a chance to jump feet-first into a two-ton grape stomp, as well as more sedate activities such as blending seminars and pairing classes. 2. San Simeon State Park: Thirty-five miles west of Paso Robles via Highway 46 and just north of Cambria, the over-the-top opulence of Randolph Hearst’s castle always elicits oohs and ahs. Last winter the park initiated its first ever opportunities for self-guided tours of the 90,000 square foot property. (The main house spans more than 60,000 square feet all by itself and includes entire rooms brought from Europe.) Now, visitors can stroll the palatial grounds and wander through the lavish

home at their own pace. The self-guided opportunities begin after the guided tours conclude (usually late afternoon) and last until sunset.

3. Piedras Blancas Beach: Just four miles north of Hearst’s grand display of excess, quiet prevails for much of autumn. This is a great spot to walk an often-windswept beach, take in the solitary view and watch the shorebirds. In late October, the serenity evaporates as the elephant seals begin their annual trek from open waters. By December their numbers swell to more than 10,000. Males fill the air with raucous mating calls. Visitors crowd the area to watch as the big guys battle for territory, Alpha male status and the right to a harem. Females return each winter to give birth to pups conceived the year before, and the beach teems with life until spring when crashing surf and gull cries again dominate Piedras Blancas.

4. Morro Bay: This historic fishing village takes its name from the landmark “morro,” or volcanic outcropping, that marks the harbor and provides fodder for photographers. Don’t even think about hiking up the landmark. It’s the nesting ground of protected Peregrine falcons and decidedly off limits. Instead, rent a kayak and paddle to the Morro Sand Dunes where you’ll get to see a wealth of birdlife. Book a charter fishing trip and land your own “catch of the day.” Or just relax in one of the many eateries serving fresh-off-the-dock seafood. skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

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5. Pismo Beach: Oceano Dunes State Park, just three miles south of Pismo Beach, is the only place in California where you can drive on the beach. Passenger cars can cruise along the northern stretch of compressed sand while off-road vehicle operators enjoy the entire 5.5 miles of beachfront, plus more than 1,500 acres of sand dunes. Fourwheel drive vehicles are recommended if you choose to drive right up to a beachfront campsite. Horseback riding, fishing and surfing are all part of Pismo’s recreation menu. In a more literal sense, so are clams—especially in October. The annual Clam Festival, held October 16 – 17 this year, celebrates the city’s favorite crustacean with a parade, music and, of course, a clambake. All winter long, visitors to Pismo can add butterfly watching to the lengthy list of things to do. Monarchs begin returning to the state’s most densely populated butterfly habitat in October and remain until February. Thousands cling to the eucalyptus grove just south of town. Their shimmering wings resemble quaking autumn leaves in hues of orange and gold. 6. San Luis Obispo: The county’s largest city and namesake is the site of the historic mission that first brought Europeans to the area. The Mission San Luis Obispo Tolosa, established in 1772, was the fifth in Father Junipero Serra’s chain of California settlements. Its main structure, notable for both its unique architecture and small size, was completed in 1794. It remains open to visitors and continues to function as a parish church. Today the city that has grown 8 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

up around it benefits immensely from its status as home to California Polytechnic State University. There’s a great performing arts center, a cool art deco theater, The Fremont, and plenty of community culture. The weekly Farmer’s Market showcases the surrounding area’s thriving ag’ scene. The city’s location, midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles, caused it to be chosen as the location of the world’s first lodging aimed at motorcar travelers. That original mo-tel, The Milestone, was constructed in 1925. Only a remnant remains today as a tourist-attraction nod to the past. It’s located on Monterey Street next to the Highway 101 entrance ramp. I only mention the Milestone because SLO remains home to what is arguably the kitschiest, quirkiest lodging in North America— the bubblegum pink Madonna Inn. More than 100 rooms boast themes ranging from Jungle Rock to Caveman. Even if you can’t spend the night just stop in for lunch and take a peek at the restrooms— especially the men’s where a rocky waterfall dominates the urinal.

7. Artists’ Studio Tours: SLO scenery ranks high as a reason to take your time getting to know this part of California. Its natural beauty lures artists pursuing a variety of genres. Each October more than 200 painters, sculptors, photographers and other creative types open their workplaces to the public. The event spans three weekends. Studios in the northern part of the county are open October 9 – 10. South county artists welcome visitors October 16 – 17 and all studios are open for a countywide encore October 23 – 24. This annual showcase presents a chance to see how the local artists work, and also to take home a visual reminder of how great things can be when you live the SLO life. n

Vinyeard © 2009 San Luis Obispo VCB

Morro Bay State Park also features a fascinating natural history museum, colorful marina and an 18-hole public golf course.


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Morro Bay is California’s most visited state park. Oceano Dunes, near Pismo Beach, is the only California State Park where you can drive on the beach. San Luis Obispo lays claim to fame as site of the world’s first motel. Wine grapes are the leading crop in SLO. Broccoli, strawberries, cattle and lettuce round out the top five SLO crops. (Yum! No wonder the restaurants serve such fresh fare!)

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The Piedras Blancas Lighthouse is open for tours each Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from October 2 – 30. They depart from the former Piedras Blancas Motel, a mile and onehalf north of the light station at 9:45 in the morning. There is a fee. n

Cambria © 2009 San Luis Obispo VCB

The charming village of Cambria, shown here, is also the sight of an annual scarecrow and harvest festival (October 9 – 10 this year.) Just one more reason to slow down and enjoy the SLO life.


S E P 2 7 — O C T 3 2 0 1 0 50 TOP NATIONALLY RANKED ARTISTS PAINT THE BEST OF THE CALIFORNIA CENTRAL COAST LANDSCAPE // Located in downtown San Luis Obispo’s historic mission plaza, the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art is the premier contemporary visual arts venue on the California Central Coast. Emphasizing exhibitions by contemporary California ar tists, the Museum also offers art classes for children and adults, lectures, films, trips, concerts and art events.

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Aspen Insiders’ Autumn Advice

By Connie Naylor

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rich and famous is not our town anymore. This is a town of progressive, forward thinking, adventuresome people.” An adventuresome spirit brought artist and gallery owner Tania Dibbs to Aspen when she too was fresh out of college. “I had degrees in biology and art from the University of Virginia. I was trying to get my head around becoming an artist as opposed to being a doctor or lawyer, as was expected of

Chris Davenport: Christian Pondella www.christianpondella.com

C

hris Davenport knows mountains. The two-time world champion free skier has conquered the slopes of seven continents and created an enduring buzz by skiing all 54 of Colorado’s 14,000 ft. peaks in one year. Featured in more than 35 ski films, he’s also an ESPN ski commentator and guides uber-adventure treks to places like Antarctica. The man who could live anywhere has called Aspen home for the past 18 years. The reasons extend far beyond its world-class winter sports. “I guess you could say fate brought me to Aspen. I came to the University of Colorado where I was a ski racer,” Davenport, a New Hampshire native, said. “I moved to Aspen upon graduation, got a job at Snowmass working in the race department putting on races and events. I had plenty of free time to ski for myself and a good job that kept me on the mountain every day. I began competitive free skiing where you ski the most difficult terrain in front of judges and was fortunate to become a sponsored athlete. Now I take people all over the world so they can share my joy of skiing. Honestly, I could live anywhere, we have that kind of freedom, but I think I stay in Aspen because it is so much more than a skiers’ town.” Aspen, he said, is “like a city in a small package. It’s not just a skiers’ town or an artists’ town or an outdoorsmen’s town. There’s a thriving art and music scene and great schools. That said, these mountains are amazing. There is great skiing and climbing and hiking and mountaineering and all the outdoor sports that I live and breathe every day. My wife and I have three boys and it’s a great place to raise a family. The notion that Aspen is just for the


Biker in Aspen Grove: Art Burrows Tiana Dibbs: © 2009 Tania Dibbs

someone who grew up where I did, outside of Washington D.C. I just knew I had to be here.” In order to live where she liked, Dibbs worked as a ski instructor and lived for a time in a converted tool shed. “An art career can take a long time to build. I had my first show in 1993, five years after I got here,” she explained and credited the support of locals with much of her success. “People are so supportive,” she said. “It’s like they are really happy to see someone achieve her goals. It’s so nice to be in a town that’s really the best of both worlds. Here we have people with a great appreciation for art and culture who also love an active lifestyle. There couldn’t be a better combination.” That active lifestyle keeps people on the mountains throughout autumn. “It’s a great time for mountain biking or hiking,” Dibbs said. “From a visual perspective, autumn is almost surreal; the light is much as it is right before an eclipse. There’s a great deal of contrast. Because of the altitude and the angle of the sun the light is amazing, the sky is an amazing shade of blue. In fall it’s nice to go up to Independence Pass or hike up to Cathedral Lake. And, it’s fun in town, too. The restaurants also have great deals with their fixed price menus. It’s just a great time to be here.” Chris Davenport agrees. He typically packs up the family and travels to South America in August for ski season beneath the equator but always tries to be home in autumn. “September and October are my two favorite months,” he said. “Of course I love July and the winter, but the fall is the best. You’ve got all the trees changing so it’s incredibly beautiful. The days are warm, the nights cool, and you can smell winter in the air. There’s that anticipation that ski season is coming. People are excited. Our small mountain town gets quite busy in summer and winter, but in fall it’s a nice, easy pace. You always see people you know and there’s parking everywhere.”

Dibbs added that September offers a full roster of special events. “In October, things slow down because there are fewer people, but it’s truly a fourseason resort area, now. There’s a lot going on.” “Fall is great,” she said then paused and added, “but in any season it’s a wonderful place to be. Wherever I travel, I am always so happy to come back here. Aspen is more beautiful than wherever you’ve been. Everything is better here. Better restaurants, better scenery, better recreation, better people and for me better opportunities. I am sure I sell more art in Aspen than I would if I were in New York. Even in the recession we are still in business because there is simply no place better than Aspen.” n

Tania Dibbs’ painting Sorcerer, 48” x 36” oil on canvas

skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

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ASPEN AUTUMN FUN SEPTEMBER 3 – 5 JAZZ ASPEN SNOWMASS LABOR DAY FESTIVAL brings world-class musicians to its main stage and up-and-comers to two added stages. Exotic food, drinks and crafts add to the good times. SEPTEMBER 16 – 19 ANNUAL HOT AIR BALLOON FESTIVAL, held at neighboring Snowmass, fills the sky with one of the nation’s highest-altitude balloon events. A nightglow, barbecue and free concert are part of the fun. SEPTEMBER 16 – 19 THE 7908 ASPEN SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL is among the most intimate events of its kind. Fans get an upclose opportunity to hear legendary artists as well as talented newcomers in an event produced by songwriting hall-of-fame member John Oates and the Wheeler Opera House.

P. James Nugent, M.D.

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Richard Blanks, M.D.

Laura Duncan, N.P.

Christine Helsby, N.P.

Russell Biggers, D.P.T.


SEPTEMBER 29 – OCTOBER 3 ASPEN FILMFEST is a feast of film amid Aspen’s vibrant fall colors. The event emphasizes independent productions from around the world and presents the work of established artists as well as new filmmakers.

SEPTEMBER 18 THE SNOWMASS WINE FESTIVAL brings together extraordinary wines from around the world and the amazing offerings of Aspen’s top, local chefs. Added features include a silent auction benefiting local charities and live music. SEPTEMBER 26 THE WAPIYAPI CLASSIC brings seven-time Tour de France Champion Lance Armstrong to Aspen for a charity ride benefiting Wapiyapi, a non-profit organization providing hope and support to families affected by childhood cancer.

OCTOBER 7 – 12 JOHN DENVER WEEK celebrates the life and music of the late Rocky Mountain legend. Events range from free programs produced by the Sierra Club to tribute performances featuring members of Denver’s original band.

HOMETOWN HITS: For fine dining both our locals, independent of each other, recommended Cache Cache, 205 South Mill Street, a restaurant Davenport describes as “wonderful, provincial French cuisine with lots of local ingredients.”

why I fly Aspen “The Aspen Airport is the easiest and the friendliest way to get in and out of town. We just drive down the hill and we’re off to so many different places.” JILL ST. JOHN AND ROBERT WAGNER LONG-TIME ASPEN LOCALS

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America’sB est Places

The Redwood Coast: AWE-some Adventure By Lou Jurassic

“The Redwoods, once seen, leave a mark or create a vision that stays with you always . . . It’s not only their unbelievable stature, nor the color which seems to shift and vary under your eyes, no, they are not like any trees we know, they are ambassadors from another time.” John Steinbeck

A

visit to California’s northern coast, that remote stretch between San Francisco and the Oregon state line, renders the term “awesome” utterly inadequate. One of the most over-used words in our modern lexicon can’t begin to describe the level of wonder inspired by the world’s largest redwood forest. You simply have to be there to understand the grand dichotomy of the experience. The vibrancy of the planet’s oldest living things sparks an acute awareness of your surroundings—the cedar-scented air, the clearrunning streams, the abundance of birdlife and, of course, the enormous trees. Even the undergrowth—ferns and bushes, mostly—are denser, taller, and more impressive than those in any other woods. Sensory overload sets in. At the same time the level of peace and tranquility is palpable. No wonder an encounter with these ancient groves ranks high on so many “bucket lists.” In addition to offering a fresh perspective of where we fit into this universe, the trees provide a tangible link to the past. Redwoods date to prehistoric times and many of the California coastal trees have been standing for 2,000 years. The exact trees that inspired Steinbeck’s words render me nearly speechless today. Just try to wrap your head around all the historic events that have occurred in more than two millennia! These groves prompt all kinds of pondering. You can spend a lifetime getting to know the superstars of the redwood world. Humboldt Redwoods State Park, just 45 miles from United Express service to Eureka, California, is a wonderful place to start. Begin your tour at the visitors’ center where you’ll be dazzled by redwood facts and figures. The park’s 53,000 acres includes more than 17,000 acres of pristine, old growth redwoods and many lumunaries of the redwood world. A drive 16 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

along the Avenue of the Giants offers the best way to become quickly acquainted with some of its most impressive residents. This 32-mile road celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. When Highway 101 was created to provide a fast and direct route to San Francisco, a segment of the old road, built in 1880 for stagecoaches and wagons, was preserved. The resulting drive passes through many forests that have never been harvested. To fully appreciate the experience, pick up a guide book at the visitors’ center. It offers info about the trees and the small towns settled in their midst. Plan to take your time. You’ll want to drive very slowly and stop often. Be sure to pull over for the Rockefeller Forest, so named because John D. Rockefeller, Jr. toured the area and promptly gave the Save the Redwoods League $1 million to buy its 10,000 acres. This land is believed to be the finest specimen of old growth trees in the world. The public has been enjoying its wonders since 1921. They include

Coast redwoods are the tallest known tree species in the world.

Mature coast redwoods average more than 150 feet in height; the tallest exceed 350 feet.


Individual trees in Humboldt Redwoods State Park have been standing for more than 2,200 years.

Images: Save The Redwoods League

Visitors drive along the Avenue of the Giants.

As a species it is estimated that the redwoods have been on earth for more than 100-million years.

The Dyerville Giant fell in 1991. Prone it is two-stories tall.

many special attractions, such as an arboreal skyscraper estimated to be more than 2,200 years old and the aptly named Immortal Tree. Though not the oldest or tallest of the coast redwoods, it may be the most resilient. It bears the battle scars of 950 years of living. A logger’s ax remains stuck in its trunk; numerous lightning strikes left enduring scars and destroyed its top 45 feet (it’s still more than 250 feet tall); floodwaters have discolored its bark, and during recorded history numerous forest fires ravaged its surroundings. Miraculously the tree survives. Less resilient was the Dyerville Giant. The 370-foot, 500-ton behemoth was estimated to have been more than 2,000 years old when it fell in 1991. Wet ground, a case of root rot and the chainreaction collapse of smaller nearby trees prompted its demise. The Giant’s toppled carcass now extends almost 400 feet in length; the uprooted base still stands as high as a two-story house. It’s located in the Founders Grove, a forest that is also home to the 346-foot Founders Tree. Both are accessed by an easy half-mile hike. The avenue is so amazing you may need to be reminded that a visit to the Redwood Coast is much more than a drive through a park. An abundance of recreation is made all-the-more stimulating because of the phenomenal backdrop. There are 250 campsites in Humboldt Redwoods State Park’s three campgrounds and they are rarely crowded. A fourth is reserved for horsemen. More than 100 miles of trails meander through an expanse so enormous you never feel crowded or rushed. The Eel River runs adjacent to the Avenue of the Giants and provides fishing and swimming opportunities. Small towns still dot the forest. Historic Ferndale is especially notable. Well-preserved Victorian buildings give visitors a glimpse of yesteryear. The town was founded in 1850, and if that seems like a long time ago, consider how it stacks up against the redwoods—our living link to a very distant past. United Express, operated by SkyWest, provides easy access to a redwood adventure. Get to Humboldt Redwoods State Park via air service to Eureka, California, just 45 miles to the north. For more of the big trees, consider a trip to Redwoods National Park with direct service from San Francisco to Crescent City. The airport is just four miles from the park. skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

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Coast redwood bark is often more than a foot thick and is resilient when confronted with fire.

The world’s first “motor home” was built in 1917 when California native and redwoods enthusiast Charles Kellogg carved a “home” from a piece of fallen redwood and had it mounted on a new four-wheel-drive Nash Quad truck. He drove it around America, criss-crossing the country four times to raise concern about the rampant logging of the magnificent trees. Dubbed the Travel Log, Kellogg’s home on wheels brought awareness of the giant redwoods to people who had no idea such trees existed. The Travel Log remains on display at the Humboldt Redwoods Park Visitor Center.

Coast redwoods are susceptible to high winds and flooding. More than 70% of existing redwoods are not protected from land use conversion or aggressive forestry. Much of the work today is in the second-growth forest. Ruskin said the Save the Redwoods League works with private owners to responsibly manage the land. It’s also involved in reforestation, conservation, and research into the effects of climate change on the big trees and the planet. n

Hartley Ruskin, executive director of the Save the Redwoods League, knows that his organization cannot rest on its laurels—impressive as they may be. “The parks that we so enjoy, like Humboldt Redwoods, were created by people who believed that there was a higher and better use for these forests than to supply railroad ties and roofing shingles,” he said. “By individuals joining together, whether they were giving a dollar or in the case of Rockefeller, a million dollars, our organization was able to set aside more than 180,000 acres and establish the 62 parks and reserves that inspire countless visitors.” However, the work is not finished according to Ruskin. “The trees are very resilient and yet they are very fragile. We know that they can be felled quickly and rapidly. They are timeless and yet we, as people, have the power to either protect or destroy them. An important part of the redwoods story is the story of people coming together to protect the places they care about.”

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There are only 24 albino redwoods in the world. Six are located in Humboldt Redwoods State Park. (BTW, they’re really a parasite. Because they tap into the host trees for sustenance, they lack chlorophyll.)

Images: Save The Redwoods League

To learn more visit www.savetheredwoods.org.


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America’sB est Places

Paducah, Kentucky

For an ARTful Good Time By Colleen Birch Maile

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Ike and Charlotte Erwin were the first artists to buy into the LowerTown renaissance. They’re shown here with one of the fine, artisan books Ike produces. This work often features marbled papers and fabric art created by Charlotte.

just on fire. So was the mayor, Albert Jones. When you spoke with them they could deliver the dream and help you see that this program was not only possible it was destined for success.” Barone, who now consults with other communities attempting to replicate Paducah’s renaissance, placed ads in national arts magazines. The city established relocation incentives. The homegrown, privately held Paducah Bank and Trust Company took a risk, making loans based more on potential than appraisals. In 2002, the Erwins took possession of a house that they’d long admired for its possibilities. The 1898 structure featured a charming wrap-around porch and turret room but was in disrepair. Despite the rigors of renovation, Ike maintains the process was not difficult. “The city made it easy for us to believe in this. The bank made it easy. Soon artists were coming from all over the country

Images courtesy Paducah Visitors Bureau

ife is a dream come true for Paducah artists Charlotte and Ike Erwin. The couple live and work in a renovated 5,000-square foot, brick, Queen Anne home in a spiffy historic district. Hibiscus bloom in the garden. Neighbors are friendly. Fine dining and downtown shops are within walking distance. So is the local performing arts center where Broadway touring companies and big-name acts stop on their way to Memphis or St. Louis. Life is so good it’s hard to believe that ten years ago the couple contemplated leaving this charming river town. Ike, an artisan bookbinder who grew up in Paducah, recalled, “Nothing was happening for us. There were other artists here but we were a scattered group of individuals making our own way.” Charlotte, a nationally recognized multi-media artist, had closed her Working Artists Studio and Mocha Lisa Coffee Bar. Ike explained that the studio “had been an opportunity for artists just out of college to come and have a place to work and show their art. But it just wasn’t paying the rent. So we downsized and started a frame shop. We thought about moving. Then we heard rumblings about an artist relocation program.” The rumblings turned to reality and in August 2000 the Paducah Artist Relocation Project was born. The goal: to transform Paducah’s neglected LowerTown neighborhood into a haven for accomplished artists. The Erwins were the first to buy in. Ike explained, “The people behind the program—Mark Barone, an artist who lived in LowerTown and could see its potential, and Tom Barnett, the city manager at the time—were not from here. They didn’t have the mindset that ‘this is the way things are and will always be.’ They were


Painting: William Renzulli

Caryl: Paducah Visitors Bureau and Bryerpatch Studio

Cover artist William Renzulli produced a series of posters commemorating historic Paducah buildings such as the ones shown here.

and we realized that we were building a place where artists belonged.” Today, that sense of community runs deep according to William Renzulli, a Maryland physician and self-taught painter who moved to LowerTown shortly after the Erwins. Renzulli whose painting is featured on this edition’s cover, spent his working life combining art and medicine before giving up his Maryland practice to make the move. “We bought a shell of a house, gutted by fire,” he said. “There were no windows, no doors. I am sure my wife’s friends had a contract out on my life when they saw the photos.” In Maryland, the Renzullis

William Renzulli and one of his whippets enjoy the casual atmosphere in his Paducah studio.

lived on 18 acres at the head of the Chesapeake Bay. “It was beautiful but I was looking for more of a community. When I got to Paducah I was just in awe of the energy everyone had for this project but I still don’t know that any of us, in the beginning, thought it could take off like it did. The first year there were eight of us, the next year 16; it just kept growing.”

Internationally acclaimed textile artist Caryl Bryer Fallert was well acquainted with Paducah as the site of the National Quilt Museum before making the move to LowerTown.

Now 50 working artists, all with national reputations, live and work in LowerTown, including Caryl Bryer Fallert, an internationally known fine-art quilter with a book-length roster of awards to her credit. The self proclaimed, life-long nomad also lauded the ease of her relocation process. “The city was in charge and it had someone whose job it was to work with us. He put me in his pickup and drove me all around LowerTown showing me properties. He introduced me to the banker who introduced me to the lawyer who introduced me to the accountant. Everyone was so enthusiastic.” Bryer Fallert did not need to be sold on Paducah. She’s been coming to the American Quilters Society’s annual show just a few blocks from LowerTown since 1984. The event is held at skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

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The National Quilt Museum in Paducah is home to an impressive, permanent collection of fine art quilts including Birds of a Different Color by Paducah LowerTown resident Caryl Bryer Fallert, the only three-time winner of the coveted American Quilters Society Best of Show, Purchase Award. The background quilt is Air Show by Jonathan Shannon.

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Luther F. Carson Four Rivers performing arts center

year. Paducah has a long-standing cultural base. If they didn’t care about the arts here before we all arrived, we never would have been invited.” Renzulli agrees that the lifestyle is “exceptional beyond imagining. My day is my own. I might work as hard as I did as a doctor but I can set the psychological tone. I have a nice porch. I cook a lot of pasta. We’ve served more people dinner in this house than we did in the past 20 years [elsewhere].” However, he acknowledged that Paducah’s status as a viable arts market remains to be seen. “You certainly have to sell yourself here just like anywhere else. Some artists live here and do the show circuits; some supplement their income with workshops or framing; some market through other galleries, but for us all Paducah is a great place to live.” n

Quilts: ©Caryl Bryer Fallert

the impressive National Quilt Museum. Proximity to that facility solidified her decision to make the move. “We had lived in a Chicago suburb for 27 years while I traveled the world as a quilting instructor and United Airlines flight attendant. And while I knew who my neighbors were in Chicago, there wasn’t a sense of community. My husband wanted to retire and put down roots some place warmer, and he also wanted to have a place in the country. I realized that if you’re going to have a gallery and put on workshops, then you need to be in a place that has other attractions. In Paducah there are lots of antique shops and boutiques and the [Luther F. Carson Four Rivers] performing arts center. I have traveled all over the world my whole adult life and Paducah’s restaurants are world-class. There are no chains in Paducah. As a businessperson, being adjacent to the quilt museum and having all the other attractions made a lot of sense. My husband found a farm he loved just 45 minutes from LowerTown. So all our needs were met. Unfortunately, my husband died a year-and-a-half after we made the move.” Bryer Fallert moved to her LowerTown studio and whole-heartedly embraced small town life. “Especially having lost my life partner, it’s wonderful to be part of a community that is like family. We get together for potlucks and openings. There is so much to do. I can walk to a nice restaurant and a Broadway show at the Carson Center. The art museum is downtown, and there’s a great movie theater that hosts an international film festival every

Images: courtesy Paducah Visitors Bureau

Caryl Bryer Fallert created Feather Flower #2 for the World Series of Quilting Challenge Alzheimer’s Art Quilt Initiative.

This close-up of the quilt’s detail shows the intricacy of Bryer Fallert’s work. The quilt was made as part of an effort to raise funds for Alzheimer’s research and is the second in a series of original abstract floral forms that borrow design elements from the award-winning artist’s Feather Study series of quilts. Bryer Fallert also designed the fabric.


If You Go: Plan Ahead. Most Paducah galleries and many restaurants are closed on Sundays and Mondays making Fridays and Saturdays the best days to visit. The Second Saturday of the month is recommended. That’s when all the artists open their studios. Quilters will want to be in Paducah during the National Quilt Show, April 27 – 30 next year. More than 30,000 quilters attend— doubling the town’s population. LowerTown is both home and workspace for 50 artists. If you happen to visit Paducah when their galleries are closed simply ring the bell. If someone is home you’ll likely get a personalized tour. If no one answers, phone the artist and schedule an appointment. LowerTown is long on hospitality.

Before and after images: Paducah Renaissance Alliance

Paducah’s rich history comes to life in a series of more than 50 murals adorning the seawall along the Ohio River. It depicts topics ranging from Native American life to steamboats and river barges. Paducah’s location at the confluence of the Tennessee and Ohio rivers continues to influence the community. The murals will be retained as part of a new riverfront project and marina.

Before and after. The LowerTown Artists’ Relocation project’s transformation of structures such as the one shown here has received numerous awards including the American Planning Association Award for a Special Community Initiative and the James C. Howland Award for Urban Enrichment.

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Paducah: Paducah is a small town with a big reach. While its population hovers around 30,000 the city serves as a hub for more than 200,000 residents of western Kentucky and southern Illinois. It is also a major transportation center and is home to several barge and shipping companies. The Artist Relocation Project stabilized the once troubled LowerTown neighborhood and is currently administered by the quasi-governmental Paducah Renaissance Alliance. While a few available properties remain, the city now applies its “outside the box” attitude to other projects. A more traditional neighborhood renewal program is underway in the Fountain Avenue district. A “Business Concierge” position was created to assist companies or entrepreneurs contemplating expansion or relocation. A $50-million riverfront project starts this fall with a

new promenade and marina. Plans are in the works for a hotel to supplement the community’s ample supply of bed and breakfast inns. There’s also a grand effort underway to build on Paducah’s waterway heritage. “I didn’t know it until I moved here, but Paducah sits at the confluence of four rivers—the Ohio, Tennessee, Clarks and Cumberland. It’s the only place on the planet where that happens,” Caryl Bryer Fallert explained.

n t e i t v a e e m r e C M ov

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Buildings: Paducah Visitors Bureau

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America’sB est Places | Jackson, Wyoming

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t’s a rare and wonderful thing when gorgeous combines with livable. Consider Jackson, Wyoming. For a long, long time this spectacular valley was impossible to settle. A year-round ranching community didn’t spring up until the 19th century was well on the wane. Its few rugged inhabitants were used to making do with little help from outsiders until John D. Rockefeller Jr. hit town in the 1920s. He pushed for the establishment of Grand Teton National Park, and soon the world found its way to Wyoming. A ski resort followed and by the end of the 20th century Jackson boasted one of America’s trendiest zip codes. Funny thing: while Jackson’s lifestyle evolved, its fashion sense did not. At the dawn of the new millennium, chi-chi Jackson vacationers still dressed a lot like the hard-working locals who wrangled horses and labored at the glitzy second homes. Work clothes were the order of the day. That all changed one momentous evening in 2003, when twin brothers on a ski holiday looked around Jackson’s Shady Lady Saloon and wondered why there wasn’t an alternate dress code—something that reflected the modern mountain lifestyle. “That’s how the idea for Mountain Khakis came about,” Noah Robertson explained. The Jackson resident is now the global brand manager for the company. “There was a real need for a ‘bottomsdown’ kind of outdoor clothing business,” he said. The twins, Jason and Scott Perry, had a family background in apparel. Robertson worked for another manufacturer of outdoor clothing when the fledgling Mountain Khakis company hired him to help with sales. It was an easy assignment. “There was a very real need for a durable lifestyle pant—something that could be worn to go fishing or hiking or to the office for a more casual look.

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by Hudson Hackman

Mountain Khakis are extremely durable but they have a softer hand; they drape well, the fabric is double woven. They look great and absolutely fit aspects of the mountain or outdoors lifestyle,” he said. Consumers agree, according to Robertson. “The original product is so classic it immediately appealed to men of all ages. We’ve been able to build on that.” The company now offers a women’s line as well as accessories, including t-shirts and hats. Last year Inc. Magazine named it one of America’s fastest growing companies. Three of its styles were ranked among the top ten best-selling pants in the outdoor industry according to a survey conducted by Leisure Trends Group. The Perry brothers attracted a talented group of partners before leaving the rapidly growing company. Mountain Khakis operations now dot the map from Wyoming to Colorado to North Carolina. Robertson, a Boston native who found his way to Jackson via Portland, Oregon, is pleased that his position remains in the Tetons. While Jackson’s sartorial look may have evolved, Robertson explained that the town remains close-knit and neighborly. “In the old days, Jackson’s people were united by their focus on ranching. Now, the focus has shifted to the great outdoors, but the sense of unity hasn’t changed. We have all the wonderful opportunities that living in the Tetons presents. It’s convenient to enjoy fishing, skiing, or mountain biking—outdoor activities that forge bonds between people. But, in my opinion, having a safe, friendly, family-oriented community is also a major Jackson asset, one that is often overlooked.” Jackson, Robertson said, is much like the pants it inspired—rugged, good looking, and the epitome of life in today’s mountain west. n

Pants: Mountain Khakis

A Sartorial Inspiration


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America’sB est Places | Chippewa Valley, WI

Wisconsin Wine

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ook out the window of an Eau Claire-bound flight as it approaches the airport. You’ll see the expected lakes, rivers, farmland and wooded hills. Then, on the right side, a different kind of cultivated landscape emerges. It looks like something out of California’s Napa Valley. Yes, indeed, it is a vineyard. Grapes that manage to mature in the course of a 156-day growing season are just one of the Chippewa Valley’s unexpected treasures. The collection of towns—Eau Claire, Chippewa Falls, Menominee—in this west-central Wisconsin valley just 100 miles east of Minneapolis are united by a can-do attitude and an enviable lifestyle. Tom Kell, a partner in the River Bend Winery, understands the benefits of life here. The valley native spent much of his childhood in Milwaukee but returned to Chippewa Falls after college. He worked in the family’s corrugated container business here for 30 years. When it sold to a larger company he chose to stay in his hometown. “My wife Pam and I have traveled all over the country and around the world, but there’s no place I’d rather live. When I am home I can sit and look out over the lake [Lake Wissota, a 6,000-acre body 28 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

By Rand Mor

of water created by the damming of the Chippewa River]. It’s beautiful and peaceful. When I was working at our company my commute was maybe 12 minutes. I would be upset if I had to wait for two cars ahead of me at a stop sign. It’s a very easy lifestyle, but we still have plenty of activities. There are so many small towns around here, and they all seem to have events and festivals. There’s so much on the calendar you can’t possibly do it all. We have good restaurants and plenty of shopping and of course the brewery [Leinenkugel] and two wineries. [Autumn Harvest Winery, an offshoot of a family-owned orchard, makes 11 differnt wines from apples and grapes.] And we have this beautiful environment.” Jeff Darley agrees. He is a member of the executive leadership team of the Darley Company, a manufacturer of fire trucks, pumps and other equipment for the fire, emergency and defense industries. It serves a market spanning more than 100 countries. Even though the firm is based in the Chicago area, he chooses to live in Chippewa Falls where the Darley Company production facilities employ more than 200 people—a workforce Darley credits with being “honest, trustworthy, intelligent, knowledgeable and absolutely dedicated to their place of employment.”

Grapes and vineyard: Steve Baker

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In addition to the business advantages of the Chippewa Valley, Darley lauds the recreation opportunities. “I love the outdoors life,” he said. “Hunting, fishing, boating on the lake. Most of the family chose to stay in Chicago and I do travel there several times a month, but I am very happy to live where I do. It’s the best of all worlds. Airport travel is very efficient. There are no lines, no congestion. It’s easy to get to Chicago, and from there we can get direct international flights to our global markets such as Beijing. When our international clients come to visit it’s nice to be able to take them to see the production plant and it’s very easy to do that. Many of them have never seen snow. So if it’s winter we try to get them out on the lake ice fishing. In the summer we go boating. There’s a lot to do here.” n Did You Know? * The world’s first supercomputer was developed in Chippewa Falls by native son Seymour Cray. His accomplishments and those of other Chippewa Valley innovators are presented at the Museum of Industry and Technology.

Cyclists and landscape: Visit Eau Claire

* Those grapes are special. Tom Kell explained that the vineyard produces four varieties of specially formulated cold-weather grapes developed by the University of Minnesota to grow in cooler climates like that of the Chippewa Valley. The Frontenac, for example, can produce grapes after a winter with temperatures as low as -30 F. The cold-weather varieties form the basis for all of River Bend’s wines. * Leinenkugel calls this valley home. Revered in the upper Midwest since 1867, the artisan beer has been available in many major markets since 2006. It’s still made here. Brewery tours are a highlight of any visit. * This is a cyclist’s paradise. More than 50 miles of bicycle trails cross the wooded hills, marshes and farmland of the Chippewa Valley. It’s possible to ride all day without ever dodging an automobile.

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Fall Getaways

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hen leaves start to change color so does the vibe of many a resort community. Crowds thin, prices plummet, and it’s easier to nab a great table at a fine restaurant or wend your way along an uncongested trail or road. For those who are able to indulge in an off-season getaway, fall presents an abundance of adventure especially in the West. On the sunset side of the Mississippi daytime temperatures remain delightful and the “skies are not cloudy all day.” Mountains beckon, so do beaches, spas and cities. To help plan your perfect autumn escape, consider these terrific SkyWest destinations.

Aspen Meadows Resort Aspen Meadows Resort - Adventure Seekers Package: Combine a spacious suite at the Aspen Meadows Resort in Aspen’s historic west end with your choice of adventure! Blazing Adventures offers your selection of Sunset Dinner Tour, Downhill Bicycle Tour, 4-Wheel Drive Excursion, Wilderness Hiking Excursion, or half-day Rafting Adventure. Rates start at $136 per person, per night, dbl occ; This package is valid through 10/09/2010. Call now to make your reservation. 800-452-4240 | www.dolce-aspen-hotel.com

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Brown Palace Resort Denver’s enviable escape. You need not travel far to arrive at a fabulous destination. Escape to The Brown Palace Hotel and Spa and experience Denver in a whole new light. The best seasonal events by day, and downtown Denver’s legendary historic hotel by night. Choose now from a variety of weekday and weekend packages, starting at just $149 per night. Featuring King Tut, Romance, Spa and Cultural packages. 800-321-2599 | BrownPalace.com

Pismo Lighthouse Suites Surf’s up in Pismo Beach! The Pismo Lighthouse Suites has partnered with the ESB Surf School for an awesome package for two that includes an overnight stay in a spacious two-room/two bath suite, two hour group surfing lesson with surfboards, wetsuits, souvenir t-shirt from the Billabong Surf Camp and surfing essentials. Whether you’re learning to surf for the first time, or experienced and looking to pick up tips from a pro, you’ll have a bodacious time while catching the curls with your Pismo Beach Billabong Surf Camp Package. 800-245-2411 | www.PismoLighthouseSuites.com/Skywest

Sycamore Mineral Springs Resort Voted one of the “Top 10 Mineral Springs Destination Resorts and Spas” by Spa Magazine and Spa Finder Magazine—the Resort is located on 125 acres on the beautiful Central Coast. Two miles to Avila Beach; near San Luis Obispo, 200 wineries, and quaint communities. Guests enjoy private balcony hot tubs, mind-body classes, hiking, the renowned Spa & Wellness Center, and wine country dining at our Gardens of Avila Restaurant.

800-234-5831 | sycamoresprings.com

SLO Wine Weekend Escape to San Luis Obispo’s (SLO) Wine Country for a weekend like no other. Join us as we celebrate the fruits of our labor at our 20th Annual Harvest Celebration in Avila Beach, November 5 – 7. This weekend features the ultimate beach party with our grand wine tasting event which includes live and silent auctions, live music, and over 60 wineries and restaurants showcasing all SLO County has to offer. For more information visit us at: www.slowine.com

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Ski

You will Feel Better When You Do

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here’s nothing like a little time on the steep and deep to chase away the stress of life in the lowlands. Playing in the drifts makes us all feel like kids again and, the truth is, no matter your age or ability there’s a mountaintop experience sure to deliver exercise that’s as easy as it is fun. Inexpensive lessons and top-notch rental equipment mean even novices can take to the slopes. For those less inclined to exertion there’s a ton of other options—spa treatments, Nordic skiing, sleigh rides, fine dining and retail therapy are all part of a ski holiday. So what are you waiting for? Now’s the time to plan the perfect mountain top experience. Here are a few recommended resorts—all served by SkyWest Airlines.

Aspen/Snowmass, CO

The Power of Four – Snowmass, Aspen Mountain, Aspen Highlands, Buttermilk

When it comes to winter destinations, Aspen/Snowmass offers the most exciting escape in the world! Over the last seven years, we’ve been working hard so you can play hard. Eleven new lifts. Two new gondolas. The Treehouse, a new Kids’ Adventure Center. Three new restaurants. Two new superpipes plus a new 12-foot learning pipe at Snowmass. Also new this season, attach a credit card to your season pass and never carry cash on the mountain again. In-resort charge plus direct-to-lift and hands-free gate access gives you the ultimate hassle-free experience! That’s a lot of new in seven years. Combine that with the four mountains and a variety of bumps, bowls, chutes and cruisers spread across 5,300 acres of terrain—Aspen/Snowmass has more mountain fun for everyone. COME LIVE IT AT ASPEN/SNOWMASS. The Perfect Storm Package – Buy Four, Get More! Buy four and get even more with the Perfect Storm of deals! Save almost anywhere you go in the resort with our deals card—even on ski and snowboard school—plus buy four, get five on lift tickets, lodging and equipment rentals. It’s the perfect combination of lodging and in-resort offers. Kids Ski and Stay Free in March and April A package of lodging, lifts and laughter—plus an amazing lineup of music and events mean fun for parents too! The Treehouse Kids’ Adventure Center and ski and snowboard school let kids of all ages experience industry-leading instruction and care. Kids ages 7-12 ski and stay free with purchase of lodging and comparable adult ticket four+ days. Kids ages 7-12 also rent free with purchase of comparable adult rental four + days. Purchase a one-day adult lesson and receive a child lesson FREE ages 7-12. Kids ages 6 & under always ski/ride for FREE at Aspen/Snowmass! Tickets: 877-282-7736 | Lodging: 877-250-8708 | www.aspensnowmass.com/deals 32 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express


Big Sky, MT The Biggest Skiing in America Defined in Big Sky, Montana. Big Sky Resort is the Biggest Skiing in America with neighboring resort Moonlight Basin, offering more than 5,500 acres of terrain and 4,350 feet of vertical drop over three mountains and a variety of terrain for all levels. Located in southwest Montana, just down the road from Yellowstone National Park, Big Sky offers world-class terrain, uncrowded slopes and a family-friendly Mountain Village. Through Big Sky Central Reservations choose from over 750 rooms, suites and condominiums ranging from slopeside luxury hotel rooms to mountain log homes offering ski in/ski out access. Off the slopes, enjoy fabulous dining options, live music; Basecamp activities including Zipline, High Ropes, Bungee Trampoline, Snowshoeing and the Tube Park. Enjoy the Solace Spa for the ultimate in relaxation or browse through our retail shops in the Mountain Village. Hone your ski or snowboard skills with the assistance of talented international instructors at the Big Sky Snowsports School. With 400 inches of annual snowfall and a lack of lift lines, once you visit you’ll never want to leave. It’s easy to get to Big Sky with direct flights from 12 cities, including Salt Lake City, San Francisco, Denver, Chicago and Los Angeles, among others. Big Sky Resort, America’s Biggest Skiing. 800-548-4486 | www.bigskyresort.com

Gunnison-Crested Butte, CO Some of the most beautiful places on earth are lesser known and undisturbed. There’s a special sense of wonder that goes along with discovering a place like this. You feel somehow it belongs to you. You take that place with you, even when you leave. Gunnison-Crested Butte is like that. It’s a breathtakingly beautiful, luxuriously civilized place that has fortunately remained very much the same over time. Here you will find genuinely friendly and helpful locals and towns so authentic, it’s like taking a step back in time. Crested Butte Mountain Resort is known for Colorado’s best grooming, diverse terrain and off-piste skiing. And, the longest lines you’ll see are behind your skis! A true destination resort, unlike many of Colorado’s “day tripper” ski resorts, Crested Butte attracts visitors who like to come for a longer visit and get to know the place. Winter also brings such delights as snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, dog sledding and snowmobiling in glistening forests and magnificent back country. Getting here is easy. Leaving is much harder. Fly into the GunnisonCrested Butte Regional Airport this ski season, November 24, 2010 through April 3, 2011. Visit our website for flight, lodging and package information. Experience Colorado’s true colors and inspire your passion for whatever you wish! Lodging Phone: 800-323-2453 | Snow Report Phone: 970-349-2323 | www.gunnisoncrestedbutte.com skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

33


Sun Valley, ID This winter Sun Valley Resort marks its 75th ski season! If you’ve never been, this is the winter to turn your skis toward the legend. What to expect? Unspoiled mountain terrain boasting world-class alpine and Nordic skiing, snowboarding, new terrain parks, a new gondola, ice skating, sleigh rides, the finest on-mountain dining on the planet, the Northwest’s most beautiful Nordic Center and luxurious clubhouse, fine dining and fun dining, friendly folks, lots of sunshine and exciting nightlife. And, Sun Valley is your place if: You like uncrowded slopes, more lift capacity per skier per hour than any other ski area anywhere, making lasting memories, discovering new terrain parks and Lunar Eclipse Rail Jams, and an authentic vacation destination you and your family will want to return to year after year. We even have a “day off” program so you can enjoy a variety of wintertime pleasures off the mountain with our exclusive Lift Ticket Exchange Program. To find out about early and late season ski packages, special 75th season events, kids ski and stay free programs and pre-holiday packages please call. 800-786-8259 | www.sunvalley.com

Osprey at Beaver Creek, A RockResort The Osprey offers travelers alpine-chic sophistication and unparalleled personalized services set against a spectacular Rocky Mountain backdrop. Located in the heart of Beaver Creek’s world-class resort village and just steps from its renowned ski slopes, The Osprey is the closest hotel to a chairlift in North America and the perfect setting for an unforgettable mountain vacation. The Osprey offers 45 oversized accommodations, including two luxuriously spacious penthouse suites. Each guest room features elegant furnishings, chic décor and the finest linens. Additional lavish touches include plush robes, flat-screen TVs with DVD players, MP3 player docking stations, customized pre-stocked refreshment centers and high-speed Internet access. Select rooms offer steam showers, fireplaces and other superior amenities. 34 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

Stay 4 nights and receive the holiday night for free! When your stay is 4 nights or longer and you stay over the holiday, enjoy the Holiday night on us. Valid any dates touching Thanksgiving, Christmas, Martin Luther King Day, Presidents’ Day or St. Patrick’s Day. Lodging at any Beaver Creek Resort Property. Must stay 4 nights or longer including the night of the holiday. some blackout dates / restrictions may apply. To make a reservation, call 800.752.7920


Black Tie Delivery Ski Rentals

Servicing 35 Resorts

It’s time to truly relax on your next ski vacation. Are you tired of waiting in long lines at crowded ski rental shops? Frustrated with having to pay too much for quality service? Don’t you wish there was an easier way to rent your ski and snowboard equipment? Black Tie Ski Rentals is North America’s premier ski rental delivery service, providing a hassle-free way to rent by bringing the rental shop right to your door. Black Tie’s focus on value, quality and convenience keeps customers coming back year after year. • You choose the time, you choose the place! • Great for families, groups, and skiers of all abilities! • Wide variety of the newest skis and snowboards! • Slope-side service is available throughout your trip! • Free delivery and pick up! Sit back, relax, and let Black Tie Ski Rentals redefine your next ski vacation. Alpine Meadows | Aspen Snowmass | Beaver Creek | Big Sky | Breckenridge | The Canyons Crested Butte | Deer Valley | Keystone | Mammoth | NorthStar | South Lake Tahoe Park City | Squaw Valley | Steamboat | Vail | Telluride | Whistler | Winter Park

800-821-4754 | www.blacktieskis.com

Business Profile

Gamma Knife – a revolution in neurosurgery Fresno may not be well-known as a tourist destination, but world-class technology like the Gamma Knife—available at Saint Agnes Medical Center—has put Valley health care on the map. Saint Agnes, a 436-bed acute care medical center in the heart of the San Joaquin Valley, is proud to be one of only 200 institutions worldwide, including Johns Hopkins Hospital, Mayo Clinic, and UCSF Medical Center, using Gamma Knife; and is among a select handful using the newest and most precise version—the Perfexion. Considered the “gold standard” in radiosurgery, Gamma Knife is the most effective noninvasive treatment available for brain tumors and other abnormalities in the brain and upper neck previously considered inaccessible or inoperable. Contrary to its name, Gamma Knife does not use a knife at all. There are no scalpels

involved and no incisions made. Instead, 192 highly focused beams of radiation—delivered in a single high-dose—converge on the specific area where the tumor or abnormality resides. With the help of a computer and the latest imaging technology, physicians can identify the exact spot with pinpoint accuracy. This promising alternative to traditional surgery offers superior outcomes, fewer complications and quicker recovery times, giving Valley residents one more reason to be proud of the community they call home. For more information about Gamma Knife, call: 1-800-ST-AGNES | www.samc.com. skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

35


America’sB est Events

|September/October 2010 DENVER, CO | ONGOING – JANUARY 9

CRESTED BUTTE, CO | SEPTEMBER 11

Tutankhamun, the Golden King and the Great Pharaohs presents more than 100 objects spanning 2,000 years of ancient Egyptian history at the Denver Art Museum. The special exhibit marks the first Colorado presentation of the boy king.

Fall Festival of Beers and Chili Cook-Off ushers in autumn with unlimited tastes of chili and local brews. Live music and a fun run are all part of the celebration at the base of Crested Butte Mountain Resort Ski Area.

BOISE, ID | ONGOING – JANUARY 9 Light Show at the Discovery Center of Idaho challenges visitors’ perceptions of light with interactive exhibits that allow manipulation of lights and produce an amazing array of sights, colors and sounds.

MONTEREY, CA | SEPTEMBER 17 – 19 Monterey Jazz Festival, the world’s longest-running annual event of its kind, celebrates its 53rd season with more than 500 artists performing on eight stages spread over the 20-acre Monterey Fairground.

PORTLAND, OR | SEPTEMBER 18 – 19 WEST YELLOWSTONE, MT | SEPT. 18 - 28 Yellowstone Fall Fever Cool, comfortable nights and “hot” activities by day. Watch bugling bull elk battle for their harems. Fight a feisty trout in blue-ribbon streams. Boat on Hebgen Lake or bike in the annual Old Faithful Cycle Tour. Find your own adventure during Yellowstone’s “secret season.” Fall rates and lodging packages available. www.yellowstonedestination.com

Fifth Annual Pirate Festival sets sail for piratical fun and family adventure under the historic St. John’s Bridge in Cathedral Park and also helps support the Oregon Maritime Museum and the nautical heritage of the Columbia River Basin.

DULUTH, MN | OCTOBER 1 – 31, Thursdays through Saturdays Haunted Ship Tours aboard the historic ore ship The William S. Irwin are sure to conjure up a chill or two as visitors negotiate a maze of darkened hallways from the engine room into the very belly of the beast.

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA | OCTOBER 1 - 3 Heartland Country Corn Maze in Harrisburg, just ten miles from Sioux Falls, covers more than 11 acres with an intricate rendering of a dinosaur carved among the maturing corn.

Octoberfest in the Amana Colonies, just 15 minutes south of Cedar Rapids, is as authentic as it gets outside of Bavaria. Non-stop entertainment complements Germanstyle food and brew. Games include log-sawing and brat-eating competitions.

MOAB, UT | SEPTEMBER 2 – 13

MADISON, WI | OCTOBER 2 – 3

The Moab Music Festival, in its 18th season, continues to celebrate music in concert with the stunning red-rock landscape of Southeast Utah. Access this broad-based series with United Express service by SkyWest Airlines to Grand Junction, Colorado.

The Fall Heritage Festival in quaint Mount Horeb, 26 miles west of Madison, honors the community’s Norwegian heritage with crafters, buggy rides, exhibitions, food and demonstrations of yesteryear’s arts, crafts and implements.

JACKSON, WY | SEPTEMBER 9 – 19

LOS ANGELES, CA | OCTOBER 2 – MARCH 6

SIOUX FALLS, SD | ONGOING – OCTOBER 24

Fall Arts Festival, one of the West’s leading cultural events, attracts the nation’s finest Western and wildlife artists and offers acivities ranging from a quick-draw plein air competition to a food fair and interior design and fashion showcases.

European Dress in Detail, 1700—1915, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s new Resnick Pavilion, features 160 selections from the facility’s recently acquired major collection of European men’s, women’s, and children’s dress and accessories.

STEVENSVILLE, MT | SEPTEMBER 11

ALBUQUERQUE, NM | OCTOBER 2 – 10

The Northwest HoneyFest in this historic town celebrates the honeybee with a day of fun-filled education, honey tasting, music, and bee arts and crafts vendors. BEEing there is easy with United Express service by SkyWest Airlines to nearby Missoula.

The International Balloon Fiesta ranks among the world’s finest spectacles of its kind. Hundreds of balloonists flock to a stunning landscape noted for ideal ballooning conditions. A wealth of activity surrounds their gathering.

36 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express


ASPEN, CO | July 30 – Oct. 3

The Aspen Art Museum presents the first one-person museum exhibition of 2010 Jane and Marc Nathanson Distinguished Artist in Residence Marlo Pascual. The New York-based artist combines glamorous photographs, found objects and theatrical lighting within elegant installations to create brooding, psychologically charged work. 970-925-8050 or aspenartmuseum.org Image: Marlo Pascual, Untitled, 2009. Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York.

EUGENE, OR | OCTOBER 8 – 10 Clay Fest brings together more than 70 ceramic artists from throughout the Northwest for a celebration of the art form. In addition to the show and sale, clay demonstrations and the children’s Clay Discovery Zone make this entertainment for all ages.

RAPID CITY, SD | OCTOBER 8 – 10 Black Hills Pow Wow and Art Expo brings together hundreds of Native Americans including more than 500 dancers representing approximately 60 tribes competing in song and dance contests at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center.

SUN VALLEY, ID | OCTOBER 8 – 10 The Trailing of the Sheep Festival salutes the region’s heritage with sheep-dog trials, shearing demonstrations, wool workshops and a downtown Ketchum parade of hundreds of sheep. Access the fun with United Express service by SkyWest Airlines to Boise.

SYRACUSE, NY | OCTOBER 13 – 17 The Syracuse International Film Festival brings a variety of entertainment to venues all around town. Highlights include a script-writing workshop, a world-premiere, the acclaimed Silent Film and Cool Jazz presentation and special appearances by actor and comedian Vincent Pastore of The Sopranos.

PHOENIX, AZ | OCTOBER 15 – NOVEMBER 21

RENO, NV | OCTOBER 9 – 10 The Eldorado Great Italian Festival, now in its 29th year, offers a frenzy of pasta, grape stomping, bocce ball, gelato eating contests, spaghetti sauce cook-offs and free live entertainment from the mother country. È così buono.

TUCSON, AZ | OCTOBER 16 Frank Lloyd Wright and the Southwest at the Arizona Historical Society gives insight into the famed architect’s love affair with Arizona. Instructor Arnold Roy of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture presents.

HALF MOON BAY, CA | OCTOBER 16 – 17 The 40th Annual Art and Pumpkin Festival celebrates autumn’s splendor in the self-proclaimed World Pumpkin Capital. The community, accessed by SkyWest service to San Francisco, pays homage to the great gourd with pumpkin contests, carving demos and more.

TULSA, OK | OCTOBER 21 – 24 OctoberFest offers a world of activity including Das Jugenzeldt (the Children’s Tent), Der Kunst Market (a vendor’s fair offering authentic steins, stained glass and novelties), a carnival, beer gardens and a food tent.

ASHEVILLE, NC | OCTOBER 23 Serpentine Howl-O-Ween at the Western North Carolina Nature Center is a day of family fun with entertainment, food, crafts and a costume contest.

AUSTIN, TX | OCTOBER 30 Viva la Vida, presented by the Mexic-Arte Museum, the official Mexican-American fine art museum of Texas, celebrates the Day of the Dead with a street festival and procession through downtown Austin.

CLEVELAND, OH | OCTOBER 31 Haunted Cleveland Ghost Tours combines fact-filled historical encounters with visits to some of the city’s most macabre sites. Chilling details of notorious crimes cast a new light on C-town. A haunted hayride adds to this season’s atmosphere.

Cowboy Artists of America Sale and Exhibition sponsored by the Phoenix Art Museum and Men’s Art Council pulls out all the stops for a grand celebration of the 45th annual sale October 16 with a preview October 15 and an ongoing show.

GILLETTE, WY | OCTOBER 15 – 17 Snaffle Bit Futurity, sponsored by the Wyoming Reined Cowhorse Association, is a treat for horse lovers as highly trained working cow horses and their riders take to the arena and exhibit their skills.

skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

37


It’s Our Journey, Too

Tammy Hines: Going the Distance for the Cure By Wes Horrocks

SkyWest CRJ Captain Tammy Hines, shown on the left, walked more than 60 miles to benefit the Susan G. Komen fund last year. Now she considers herself “addicted” to helping with this and other charitable causes.

W

hen her friend first brought up the subject of a charity walk, Tammy Hines, a Tucson-based SkyWest Airlines CRJ Captain, really wanted to decline. She couldn’t picture herself walking for three days for any reason. However, her friend, Halle, (who requested we not publish her last name), is a breast cancer survivor and the walk, The Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure, raises money to support breast cancer research. “I couldn’t say no,” Hines explained. Halle was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008 and needed surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments to fight the disease. Flash forward one year: Halle was doing remarkably well, living cancer free, and she and Hines were heading to Phoenix for the 60 mile, three-day walk. “I had held a lot of bake sales to raise the minimum $2,300 donation and was walking all over the place to get ready [for the 2009 walk],” said Hines. “I had never done anything like that before. I was asking everyone I knew and some that I didn’t know for money.” She was one of more than 1,700 people supporting the Phoenix event. Step by step, Hines discovered that she loved participating. She now considers herself an addict. “After we finished, I immediately signed up to do it again this year,” Hines said.

The three-day celebration is physically and emotionally grueling for participants. Everyone starts in a group and walks about 20 miles each day for three days along a course shaped like a pink cancer ribbon. At night they all camp together sharing stories, listening to speakers and enjoying live entertainment. Hines said, “You can’t help but be inspired.” Among the highlights of Hines’ experience was her encounter with a teenager who has never known anyone with cancer or had any other personal experiences with the disease that affects millions of people every year. The 16-year-old girl was walking because she felt it was the right thing to do. Hines agrees and encourages others to join the cause. “A lot of people I talk to feel like they have to really be in shape to do something like this. My message is that anyone can do it,” said Hines. “In fact, the walk has frequent rest stops and a van that picks up walkers who need a break.” For the 2010 walk, Hines got creative with her fundraising. In addition to monetary donations, she asked for items she could auction on eBay to raise more funds. When this article was completed, Hines had nearly raised $2,300 for this year’s November Susan G. Koman 3-Day for the Cure and is also working on a $4,000 minimum donation to participate in the Nation’s Triathlon—an event benefiting the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. She said that her co-workers at SkyWest have been very generous, especially in supporting her bake sales. That willingness to help is a common trait shared by many of the nearly 11,000 SkyWest aviation professionals working around the country. Hines is hopeful her newfound passion will spread as more people join her in these events. “It reminds you that a small group can get together and do something big,” she said. Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure has raised nearly $500 million since 2003, helping to pay for vital global breast cancer research and local community programs supporting education, screening and treatment. n

Wes Horrocks is SkyWest Airlines’ Corporate Communications Coordinator 38 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express


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Relax, Explore, Create on the Southern Oregon Coast. Pacific Reef’s #1 Rated Ocean Front Rooms are an ideal location to explore pristine beaches, take scenic drives, awe the Redwoods, jet boat the Rogue River or golf Bandon Dunes. Ask for “SkyWest Offer.” 800-808-7263

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SOUTHERN UTAH

MEDFORD, OREGON

Golfing, Hiking, RV’ing, National Parks and Much More! Kane County, UT averages over 320 days of sunshine each year. That’s 320 days of sunshine and outdoor adventure waiting for you! www.thegrandcanyons.com

Welcome to Medford, Oregon, the center of the thriving Rogue Valley. Savor award-winning artisan cheeses, chocolates, specialty foods, and nationally recognized wines. Enjoy great Northwest dining, eclectic shopping, and an endless list of activities and events. Get outside with fly-fishing, rafting and jet boating on the Rogue River, championship golf courses and Crater Lake National Park. 800-469-6307 www.visitmedford.org

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VACATION HOME available as nightly/weekly rental. 3 BR, 2 BA, sleeps 6-9. Ideal location on a quiet street in Ketchum. Walking distance to everything. 4 blocks from center of town and a one minute drive to River Run Ski Lodge and the new Gondola! Hot tub, pool table, ping pong, drum set and more. $250/nt or $1,500/wk. Holiday rentals available at $400/nt or $2,500/wk. 208-861-5232 or visit www.skywestmagazine/ketchumhome.com

To advertise in this section, call Teena Wright 208-333-9990 COTTONWOOD GRILLE: Inspired Northwest cuisine in an authentic Idaho setting. Serving local food with a global perspective and featuring an award-winning wine list. Celebrating ten years in business, Cottonwood Grille is offering $10 anniversary share plates, wine flights and more. Come and see us on the Boise River! 208-333-9800 cottonwoodgrille.com skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

39


crossword

Inspiring Autumn Poetic luminaries ranging from William Blake to Robert Frost found inspiration in what John Keats termed the “season of mists and fruitfulness.” Pop culture is also full of tributes to fall. See how much you know about autumn’s artistic influence. Answers to bold face clues all pertain to allusions to fall.

Solution on page 44. 1

2

3

14

40 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

5

6

7

8

9

17

18

22

23

31 36

20 24

32

28 33

38 44

34 39

35 40

41

51

60 64

65

42

46 48

50 56

58 62

66

67 72 78

81

53

57

61

77

49

52

71

84

30

45

55

13

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29

47

54

12

25

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37

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16 19

26

76

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43

ACROSS 1 Green Day’s _____ Me Up When September Ends 4 Gloss 10 Lyric poems 14 Hasten 15 Wound 16 Extra benefit 17 Paradise 19 Chemically inactive gas 20 Place for beehives 22 Trembling poplar 24 Inquire of 25 Pilfer 26 Filmy layer 29 Alice’s “Mad” acquaintance 32 Leg joint 34 Sea eagle 36 1966 tune by the Happenings, ____You in September 38 Narrative of heroic exploits 40 Hearing organs 41 State of drowsy contentment 43 Russian mountain range 45 Plain White Ts, A______ September 46 Massive wild ox 47 Cover with wax 49 Killer whale 50 Home movie 51 Kaput 53 Indonesian resort island 54 Abstract being 55 Former German Chancellor Helmut 57 Low in pitch 59 Element Sn 61 ABC’s 2007-2009 drama, October ____ 62 Stringed instrument 64 Oozed 68 Charts 71 Adored 72 Leg 74 Tie 76 Roof timber 78 Courtyard 80 Central part 81 Way out

4

59 63

68 73

69 74

79

75 80

82 85

82 Time allowed for payment of a foreign debt 83 Extinct flightless bird 84 Repudiate 85 Waterflea 86 Diplomacy DOWN 1 Mosquito bite 2 Helps 3 Retains 4 Annoy 5 Adrift 6 Wash lightly 7 Small recess 8 Tavern 9 Scottish shrub 10 Narcotic 1 1 Distributed cards 12 Sin 13 Jake Gylenhall movie October ___ 18 Keeps one’s head and shoulders together 21 Seed of a legume 23 Roman Catholic sisters 27 Repasts 28 Erin 30 Chorus 31 In this 33 Self-esteem

70

83 86

35 Denial 36 Favorable achievement 37 Merits 39 ______ momentum (overall quality in physics) 41 Unit for measuring gold 42 Greek geometrician 44 Robert E or Bruce 46 Lump 48 Music hall 51 17th letter of the Greek alphabet 52 Snakelike fish 56 Commanded 58 Egyptian deity 60 Haphazard markings 63 Heroic 65 Like Santa’s pals 66 Adam’s gal 67 1945 John Wayne movie set in the Philippines 69 Mouth-like opening 70 Defraud 72 Deep wound 73 Prefix for small 75 Denizen of the Nile for short 76 Tom Clancy novel The Hunt for ___ October 77 Chopping tool 78 Young dog 79 Wood sorrel


Waiting for a flight? SEE thE SightS. Take a FREE shuttle and a tour of historic Temple Square—in less than two hours. Pickups at Terminal 1 (door 1), Terminal 2 (door 12).

When you come to Utah, be sure to visit

TEMPLE SQUARE in the heart of Salt Lake City Tours are available in more than 30 languages

Many venues to choose from, and all are free

© Busath.com

Your tour group can:

Listen

to the glorious music of the famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir, rehearsing and performing in the Tabernacle on Temple Square. They also perform in the 21,000-seat Conference Center. See visittemplesquare.com for details.

Discover

your roots in the FamilySearch Center, where helpful volunteers can assist in retrieving family history information from the world’s largest repository of genealogical records.

Meander

through two upscale visitors’ centers that include the Christus statue by Danish sculptor Thorvaldsen. Visit the interactive map of ancient Jerusalem (kids love it!) and much more.

For information on these and many other fascinating venues on Temple Square, go to visittemplesquare.com, lds.org/placestovisit, or call 1-800-537-9703. © IRI. PD50021647

skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

41


behind the scenes

Aircraft Safety Comes First at SkyWest Airlines

“Safety First” is more than a mission statement at SkyWest Airlines; it’s a way of life. SkyWest’s impeccable safety record spans more than 35 years, beginning with the highest caliber of trained professionals and extending to a proven fleet of aircraft. The People: Each day, thousands of SkyWest employees are responsible for the safety of hundreds of thousands of passengers. SkyWest’s experienced mechanics, pilots, flight attendants and ground personnel have the know-how and ability to keep their passengers safe. In the Flight Deck: You also have the comfort of knowing you’re flying with some of the most experienced and thoroughly trained pilots the airline industry has to offer. It takes years of training and experience to become a commercial airline pilot, and many come to SkyWest well prepared averaging 1,500 to 2,000 hours of flight time. However, their training has just begun. Before they ever fly a passenger flight, SkyWest spends approximately $30,000 on their training which is geared towards safety. This is a two-month process beginning with three weeks of ground school followed by 50 hours of flight simulator training. The final stage of their training is called the Initial Operating Experience, during which they actually fly one of SkyWest’s aircraft accompanied by a qualified check airman instructor for another 50 hours. All pilots continue their training with mandatory recurrent simulator training for captains every six months and for first officers, every year. Additionally, each year both captains and first officers must participate in a two-day training session similar to ground school. All pilots are also required to undergo a comprehensive medical examination testing their vision and overall physical and mental well-being to determine if they are fit to fly for SkyWest. Captains do this every six months; first officers annually. In the Cabin: At SkyWest, a flight attendant’s first responsibility is your safety. Like pilots, SkyWest’s in-flight team undergoes comprehensive training before they take to the skies. Each SkyWest flight attendant must complete an intense three-week training program emphasizing onboard safety and security. They are well-versed in emergency procedures, evacuation protocol and passenger service. While at SkyWest, flight 42 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

attendants continue their training throughout the year and are required to recertify in First Aid and CPR annually. On the Ramp: SkyWest stresses safety not only in the air, but also on the ground. SkyWest trains its customer service personnel for two weeks, both in the classroom and on the job in ground safety issues. These agents become specialists in aircraft weight and balance. They know the best way to load and unload hundreds of pounds of cargo and luggage without damaging the luggage, cargo, the aircraft or injuring themselves. They are also trained to operate the various ground equipment and park the aircraft once it arrives at the gate. This navigation can often be challenging in airports with busy ramps. In colder climates, they must learn how to properly de-ice an aircraft allowing for a safe take-off and flight. Under the Wing: For every hour one of SkyWest’s aircraft spends in flight, one of their mechanics spends two hours servicing that aircraft. SkyWest maintains a strict maintenance schedule and undoubtedly, an experienced SkyWest mechanic has recently inspected or serviced the aircraft carrying you. All mechanics come to SkyWest with extensive training, including three years of A&P (Airframe and Power) training and certification. Also, every two years SkyWest mechanics undergo three weeks of mandatory training. Each day, all of SkyWest’s aircraft are given attention by a mechanic. Every third day, each plane receives standard service. On the fifth day, a more thorough service and inspection is conducted. Extensive maintenance is scheduled every 54 days with a major inspection every 540 days. Flight Control: This department consists of aircraft dispatchers, system controllers and customer service coordinators located in the Operational Control Center at SkyWest’s headquarters in St. George, Utah. All play an integral role in the airline’s operations. SkyWest dispatch personnel undergo six weeks of intensive training courses, learning in-depth aircraft systems, meteorology and flight planning to become certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Upon arrival at SkyWest, their training continues with three weeks of classes followed by an average of eight weeks of on-the-job training, culminating with a two-day competency check.


The dispatchers are responsible for preparing the flight release, including fuel planning, route selection, Federal Aviation Regulation compliance and weather analysis, as well as monitoring flights to ensure safety. Before each aircraft leaves the runway, dispatchers and captains share responsibility for the safety of the flight. The system controllers are responsible for all coordination, cancellation, delaying and reflow of SkyWest flights. They ensure optimum coverage of and adherence to flight schedules, economics and utilization of the operation. The customer service coordinators assist the controllers, working closely with the stations to maintain a customer service advocacy, always keeping the passenger in mind. These highly trained individuals work with the rest of the SkyWest team to provide a safe flying experience with incomparable service and quality.

The Safety Department: SkyWest has a department wholly dedicated to the operational safety of the airline. Its team monitors all aspects of safety and ensures that the highest standard of safety is maintained. The safety department coordinates with all the departments involved with ground and flight operations and acts as a compliance liaison between the airline and the Department of Transportation and Federal Aviation Administration. It is also responsible for the safety and well-being of all employees and equipment at the airline. The safety department conducts internal safety audits and evaluations of all operational departments. Additionally, SkyWest’s safety department voluntarily participates in the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP); a reporting program for pilots, flight attendants and dispatchers to flag potential safety concerns. n

Coming soon . . .

SkyWest Magazine’s

Annual College and University Feature

Showcase your institution to over

2.5 million affluent and sophisticated travelers. www.skywestmagazine.com This special section will run in our January/February 2011 edition. Space is limited. Call now for more information Teena Wright

208-333-9990 x106 | teena@gopubinc.com skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express |

43


Route Map

Edmonton

Saskatoon Calgary Winnipeg Regina

Vancouver Kalispell

Victoria

Minot

Spokane

Seattle/Tacoma Pasco/Richland/ Kennewick

Great Falls Missoula

Bismarck

Helena

Houghton/Hancock

Fargo Duluth

Quebec

Billings

Bozeman

Ottawa

Portland Cody Idaho Falls Jackson Hole

Redmond/Bend

Eugene

Boise

North Bend Medford

Gillette

Eau Claire

Rapid City Sioux Falls

Cedar Rapids Des Moines

Crescent City Eureka/Arcata

Rock Springs Hayden/Steamboat Springs

Redding

Salt Lake City

Chico Reno

Moline

Omaha

Lincoln

Denver

Colorado Springs Gunnison

Montrose

Wichita

Durango

Tulsa

BakersfieldInyokern

San Luis Obispo Santa Maria Santa Barbara

Albuquerque

Lexington

Northwest Arkansas

Norfolk Nashville

Memphis

Knoxville Asheville

Huntsville

Little Rock

Atlanta Birmingham

Dallas El Paso

Fort Wayne

Springfield

Oklahoma City

Burbank Ontario Los Angeles Palm Springs Phoenix Orange County Carlsbad Imperial/El Centro Yuma Tucson San Diego

Peoria

Paducah

Las Vegas

Syracuse

White Plains Akron Allentown Columbus Pittsburgh Indianapolis Dayton Springfield Cincinnati Washington, DC Charleston Louisville

Kansas City

Aspen

Grand Junction

Sacramento Oakland San Francisco Modesto San Jose Fresno Monterey

Eagle County

Muskegon Saginaw London Grand Rapids Lansing Milwaukee Detroit South Bend Cleveland Chicago

Madison

Casper

Klamath Falls

Wausau Traverse City Green Bay Appleton

Midland

Austin San Antonio

United - Regional Jet

New Orleans

Houston

United - Turbo Prop Seasonal Time Zones

Pacific

Mountain

Central

Eastern

Atlantic

8:00

9:00 (Arizona does not observe Daylight Savings)

10:00

11:00

NOON

EFFECTIVE August 2010 (may not reflect recent service updates)

Rubes®

By Leigh Rubin

SKYWEST AIRLINES CURRENT ROUTE MAP AUGUST 2010 (updated monthly, may not reflect recent service updates)

W H E A L

A I D S H E R E I N

S U C C E S S E

K E E P S E A R N S

E L R A F E X I D E N

E

V A R N L E S I O N X E N O E N A S K C U M E K N E E E S A G A L L O N E E S G E R U I K O H L S R O A D P E D R O V E D G T E R P A T E U S Y D A P H

I S H N E N A P S T E I H A R N E E A R S L Y A O N E D D E E P L U T B M A A M H T I O A N C E N I A

Solution to Crossword on page 40 For more of Leigh’s humor check out his brand new best of Rubes® collection, The Wild and Twisted World of Rubes, available at your favorite neighborhood or online bookstore, and be sure to visit www.rubescartoons.com.

44 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

O P I A T E

D E A L T

K G A O R B A T E P S I T C O M T A

E S R K R Y E R E E F U R C A L I I N D C C H R E O A C T


about your aircraft

The Aircraft Lavatory

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SkyWest has safely been flying the EMB 120, commonly CRJ700 referred to as the “workhorse” of the regional airline industry, since 1986. Don’t be fooled by the propellers you see; the same technology that powers jet aircraft actually powers the EMB 120 as well. Like jet engines, the EMB 120 is powered by a gas turbine design, allowing for the superior reliability and power that jet engines enjoy. The EMB 120 is also economically sound, allowing it to serve communities that may not support jet service. Additionally, the EMB 120 possesses state-of-the-art technology allowing for maximum passenger safety. Each SkyWest EMB 120 is equipped with a Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS). GPWS is a warning system designed to alert pilots when the aircraft is not in landing configuration or is getting too close to the ground. GPWS detects terrain ahead of and below the aircraft and warns pilots when there’s an obstruction ahead. Each EMB 120 also has an onboard Global Positioning System (GPS), which uses satellites to calculate an aircraft’s position on the earth’s surface. Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems (TCAS) are also included for your safety. A more advanced radar system, TCAS in the flight deck is similar in theory to the equipment used in air traffic control towers to detect the position of all aircraft in the area.

Emergency Exits

B C

CRJ700

EMB 120 AIRCRAFT

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While SkyWest’s employees are truly what set the airline apart, the equipment used also plays a significant role in passenger safety. SkyWest’s fleet of 280 regional aircraft is CRJ200 one of the industry’s newest. The average age of an aircraft is under seven years. The fleet consists of three different airCRJ200 craft types: the 30-passenger Embraer 120 Brasilia (EMB 120), the Bombardier Canadair Regional Jet 200 LR (CRJ200), and the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the Canadair Regional Jet 700 ER (CRJ700).

CRJ AIRCRAFT SkyWest has operated the 50-passenger CRJ200 since 1994. And in 2004, SkyWest welcomed the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the nearly identical 66-passenger CRJ700, with a two-class cabin and United’s explusSM service. The CRJ200 and CRJ700 offer a balance of the best economics in their class and outstanding performance with the Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics Systems. This onboard technology allows pilots to better observe the flying environment. Both regional jets have the ability to monitor performance of aircraft systems as well as track nearby aircraft and terrain clearances. The aircraft are also equipped with a weather Galley Lavatory radar system which helps pilots see potentially treacherous CRJ200long before it is encountered. weather Passengers can rest easy knowing that the technology on1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 board SkyWest’s aircraftMain provides for a safer, smoother flying Entrance experience for both passenger and pilot. That’s safety first! n Emergency Exits

Emergency Exit

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CRJ700

CRJ200

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UNITED FIRST

CRJ700

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EMBUNITED 120ECONOMY PLUS

UNITED ECONOMY

Lavatory

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2

3

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9 10 1 1

12

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2

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200

Lavatory

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Galley

Lavatory

Emergency Exits

Emergency Exit

Emergency Exit

skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express | Emergency Exits

Lavatory

45


United Red Carpet Club United First International Lounge

Airport Maps

United Arrivals Suite International Arrivals Suite

Denver (DEN) Concourse C US Airways

Inter-Terminal Shuttle Bus Stop

United Arrivals Suite

United Easy Check-in

International Arrivals Suite

Medical Center

Concourse B Power Charging Station

57 39

37

77

Inter-Terminal Shuttle Bus Stop

57

49

38

36

26

50

35

Portland (PDX)

United Easy Check-in

H

60

Medical Center 81

Concourse A Air Canada Continental TLufthansa ERMINAL

Power Charging Station

United First International Lounge

United Premier Check-In

25

16

United Premier Check-In

United Red Carpet Club

PDX

28

15

United Gate Area

41

80

91 92

CONCOURSE E

3

TERMINAL 2 Air Canada Air New Zealand

TERMINAL 1 US Airways 12

C

E1 D

E2 E3 E4 E5

4B TERMINAL WEST

E6

TERMINAL EAST

B

E7

Ticket Lobby

A E

Parking

Los Angeles (LAX)

United Gate Areas United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

SEA 71A

67A

64

TERMINAL 4 TERMINAL 3

TERMINAL 5 TERMINAL 2 Air Canada Air New Zealand

Seattle (sea)

72

75A 69A

80

70A

68B

88

76

TERMINAL 6 Continental

TERMINAL 7

TERMINAL 8

N11 Main Terminal

TERMINAL 1 US Airways 12

N1

way

N8 Ro

N7

NORTH SATELLITE

ay

w

Ro

ad

Parking

ad

SOUTH SATELLITE

N15 N16

N10 N9

D

A

4B

TOM BRADLEY I N T E R N AT I O N A L TERMINAL Lufthansa Thai Airways ANA Singapore Asiana Swiss

N12 N13 N14

C

B

N6

N2 N3

NORTH SATELLITE 71A

67A

69A

TERMINAL 5

United Gate Areas

72

75A

TERMINAL 4

80

70A

64

68B

United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

88

76

TERMINAL 6 Continental

TERMINAL 7

TERMINAL 8

San Francisco (SFO)

Chicago/O’Hare (ORD) F14

Concourse F US Airways

F11

F10 F6

E3

TERMINAL TWO

C1

Concourse E Air Canada

F4

C8

TERMINAL 3 Concourse C

C9 C16

F1

E1

C17

Pedestrian Tunnel B9

F14 F11

F4 E3

TERMINAL TWO

C1

Concourse E Air Canada

C8

C17

TERMINAL THREE

B6

B14

C18

B1 C19

Pedestrian Tunnel

Elevated Airpor t Transit System (ATS) B9

C24

C32

TERMINAL ONE

81

Concourse B Continental Lufthansa

International Terminal Secure Connector

73

C32

Concourse C

E1

89

76A

72

C24

C9 C16

F1

80

Concourse E Air Canada

71

TERMINAL ONE

F10 F6

88

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C19

Elevated Airport Transit System (ATS) Concourse F US Airways

79

C18

B1 B6

Concourse F

B18

Concourse G United Air New Zealand ANA Lufthansa Singapore

B14

TERMINAL FIVE International Arrivals

Concourse B Continental Lufthansa

TERMINAL 1

B18

B22

B22

Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.

Concourse M

Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.

46 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

Concourse A Asiana

Concourse B Continental US Airways


MOBILE BOARDING PASS

SCAN AT SECURITY AND GATE

Wireless check-in. Paperless boarding pass. Introducing United mobile check-in and boarding pass. Now you can check in on the go, and have your boarding pass sent directly to your phone for select itineraries. Just enter mobile.united.com into your browser to check in for your flight, and to get your mobile boarding pass, complete with instructions on how to use it at the airport. To learn more visit united.com/mobileservices .

Mobile check-in is currently available for any United - or United Express -operated flight within the U.S., Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands. Mobile boarding passes are currently available for customers with seat assignments on flights departing select airports on United - and United Express -operated itineraries within the United States, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. ©2010 United Air Lines, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ®

®

®

®


Last Word

Boulder, Colorado’s John McVey: Musician With a Message

Q. How do you define this album? A. Well, it’s a genre-hopper. There’s a range of things happening on it. It’s hard to fit what I do into one category. I guess it’s just safe to say that it’s acoustic-guitar based. I guess it could be compared to Shawn Colvin or Jonatha Brooke. Q. You are donating $2 from the sale of each CD to Kids Food Basket in Grand Rapids, Michigan. How did that happen? Is Grand Rapids your hometown? A. No. I was born in Princeton, New Jersey, but from 1998 to 2003 I was part of a tremendous fundraising effort started by Grand Rapids philanthropist John Wheeler. He’d pay for the artists to come in and put on a show, then every bit of money that came in the door went straight to the charity Kids Food Basket. He could have just written a check directly to the charity. That would have been easy. Putting on events is a lot of work, but those concerts did more than raise money. They raised awareness. That’s what I’m trying to do, too.” Q. What’s the most important point you want to make about this charity? A. That the need is great and it’s not limited to Grand Rapids, Michigan. In 2008, in America, 16.7- million children lived in poverty. I can’t image that things got better in 2009. Grand Rapids is particularly hard hit. There’s one school where 80% of the kids are below the poverty line. This organization is so well run and so effective. There are

3,000 volunteers working to help kids and their families get food. If a kid shows up at school or the park in summer, they get a lunch for themselves and whoever else in their family needs one. It’s brilliant. I think if it can work so well in Grand Rapids, it can work in other communities, too. I’m hoping it will spread. Q. Any specific travel advice? A. I get to airports early. I like to walk around and I like to be unfettered. That’s why I check my bag. That said, it is a good idea to loosen the guitar’s strings. The pressure in the baggage area can put undue pressure on the strings. Once I’ve done that I just relax about everything. I’ve never had anything bad happen. I guess I just keep trusting that will continue. Q. You live in Boulder where the nearest airport is in Denver. Is that a problem? A. No, not really. I kind of love DIA (Denver International Airport). I’ve never had a problem there, never ever had a problem sending guitars into baggage compartments. I’m pretty good at packing. I use one bag for everything and I always check my bag. I don’t like it when people try to over stuff the bins. It all seems so unnecessary. I’d just like to see everyone relax a bit. It’s good for all of us.

Hometown Hint: When McVey squires out-of-towners around his adopted hometown, Matteo’s restaurant in the historic Boulder Dam Hotel is high on his list of places to go. “It’s kind of continental with a twist,” he said. “They really know how to present and serve exceptional food, and the wine list is great.” In autumn he also enjoys showing off Colorado’s landscape. “Boulder has done an exceptional job of maintaining open space. So there are great hikes and bike rides looking right up at the Flat Irons. Even going for a drive along the Peak-to-Peak Highway is incredible.” n

To check out the new album visit www.johnmcvey.com. 48 | skyWest Magazine September/October 2010 united express

John McVey: Mary Lynn Gillaspie

A

ward-winning musician John McVey knows the rigors of the vagabond lifestyle. His career once included 150 to 200 performances each year and carried him across the nation and around the globe. Then a funny thing happened on the way up the rock-star ladder. McVey fell in love with the Rocky Mountains and decided to settle down in the West. He now lives in Boulder, Colorado where his work as a producer and engineer at Coupe Studios affords plenty of time to enjoy a phenomenal lifestyle that still includes making music. He typically spends evenings in the studio, days in the great outdoors and recently released his third CD aptly titled Unpredictable. As he prepares to launch a promotional tour, McVey shares his thoughts on travel, music and why he’s just as interested in raising awareness about feeding hungry school kids as he is in promoting his work.


TOM

IL. AVA

CUS

TOM

IL. AVA

CUS


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SkyWest Magazine September/October 2010 issue  

In Fligit magazine for United Express operated by SkyWest Airlines

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