Page 1

THE

SUMMER 2017

VINE

NEW BLOOD

MEET YOUR NEW MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE PAGE 10

AFRICAN SUCCESS

PASSIONFRUIT ROCKS IN KENYA PAGE 8

CHEMICAL PERMITS SUMMARY FREE POSTER INSIDE! PAGE 12–13 www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au


SPECIALISING IN

Passionfruit, Pawpaw, Bananas & Limes P PROFESSIONALISM P MARKETING P COMMUNICATION P LOGISTICS

P TRADE TERMS P QUALITY PRODUCT P FOOD SAFETY P PERSONAL CONTACT

CONTACT

BRISBANE

SYDNEY

P: 07 3379 1041

P: 07 9763 1323

Railing No. 5 Block C Brisbane Markets

Stand 189/190 B Shed Sydney Markets

Sean Russell Aidan Hutton 0418 158 331 0419 700 278 sean@jetipper.com.au aidan@jetipper.com.au

EXCELLENCE IN QUALITY FRESH FOODS & SERVICE | WWW.JETIPPER.COM.AU


MEET THE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE PRESIDENT Tina McPherson 15 Zinks Road, Bundaberg QLD 4670 07 4159 3001 | 0428 415 930 tina@tinaberries.com.au

VICE-PRESIDENT Jane Richter 160 Judds Road, Glass House Mountains QLD 4518 07 5438 7662 | 0431 700 258 jane@chorizotrading.com

INDUSTRY SERVICES MANAGER Margie Milgate 21 Turramurra Road, Tarragindi QLD 4121 0439 596 174 admin@passionfruitaustralia.org.au www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au Please contact Margie for any administration or membership queries.

CONTENTS 02 PRESIDENTS REPORT 03 STRATEGIC INVESTMENT PLAN — INVESTING FOR OUR FUTURE

04 REGIONAL ROUND-UP 07 CHECK OUT YOUR NEW WEBSITE 08 SPOTLIGHT ON KENYA — PART 1 10 YOUR NEW MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 12 PULL OUT & KEEP — CURRENT CHEMICAL PERMITS

14 TWEED VARIETIES — ROYALTY SCHEME 16 GROWER PROFILE: ANTON & MARCIA STRETCH

MEMBER Aidan Hutton Sydney Markets, Shed B Stand 189/190 Homebush West NSW 2129 0419 700 278 aidan@jetipper.com.au

MEMBER

22 PASSIONFRUIT GETTING EXPORT ATTENTION

23

Jim Gordon P.O. Box 119, Yandina QLD 4561 07 5446 7536 | 0403 185 961 jill_88@msn.com

MEMBER Anton Stretch 70 Alfs Pinch Road, Beerwah QLD 4519 0433 632 251 stretcho000@hotmail.com

MEMBER Ian Constable 260 Boyds Lane, Dulguigan NSW 2484 02 6672 6826 | 0428 181 246 ianconstable11@bigpond.com

FULL COVERAGE OF THE REGIONAL FIELD DAY & AGM 13 OCTOBER 2017

DISCLAIMER The advice and opinions in the articles published in The Passion Vine are essentially those of contributors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Passionfruit Australian Incorporated or the Editor. The advice is at the reader’s own risk, and no responsibility is accepted for the accuracy of the material presented. Inclusion of an advertisement in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of the product, company or service by Passionfruit Australia Incorporated or the Editor. Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited (Hort Innovation) makes no representations and expressly disclaims all warranties (to the extent permitted by law) about the accuracy, completeness, or currency of information in The Passion Vine. Reliance on any information provided by Hort Innovation is entirely at your own risk. Hort Innovation is not responsible for, and will not be liable for, any loss, damage, claim, expense, cost (including legal costs) or other liability arising in any way, including from

17

any Hort Innovation or other person’s negligence or otherwise from your use or non-use of The Passion Vine or from reliance on information contained in the material or that Hort Innovation provides to you by any other means. Copyright © Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited 2017 Copyright subsists in The Passion Vine. Horticulture Innovation Australia Limited (Hort Innovation) owns the copyright, other than as permitted under the Copyright ACT 1968 (Cth). The Passion Vine (in part or as a whole) cannot be reproduced, published, communicated or adapted without the prior written consent of Hort Innovation. Any request or enquiry to use The Passion Vine should be addressed to: Communications Manager, Hort Innovation Level 8, 1 Chifley Square, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia E: communications@horticulture.com.au | P: 02 8295 2300

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

1


PRESIDENT'S REPORT Dear Readers,

November is indeed an industrious month on our farm and I suspect is a time when everyone seems to be getting things in order for the coming summer months. We are still planting at our place, as are many Bundaberg growers, an activity that will hopefully end in the very near future, but one that has been hindered by the big October wet that the Bundaberg region experienced! At the same time I am aware that this week several North Queensland growers are finishing up their season. How fortunate we are that passionfruit choose different times of year to be abundant in different regions….for the most part! Sadly 2017 hasn’t seen the weather gods working in everyone’s favour. Debbie wreaked havoc early in the year and was followed by what was one of the most devastatingly dry periods many of us have experienced in a long time; the warmest, driest winter for decades is how it has been described by the media. Passionfruit are a challenging crop at the best of times, but really unpredictable weather certainly has all growers second-guessing their decisions and their planning. Fortunately, in the R&D and Marketing space many exciting things have happened for both the passionfruit industry and the association over the past few months! The Regional Field Day and AGM in Brisbane in October was an opportunity to showcase these projects, catch up with growers and others along the supply chain and get some insights into what is happening in our industry specifically and in the broader world of horticulture. For full reports from the day see PAGE 17. Early in the day we were treated to a tour of the markets by Fresh Centre Brisbane Markets. It was a great chance to see the market in operation aand, being lead by the crew from Fresh Centre, put a different perspective on the view of the market. Lots of the ins-and-outs and nitty-gritty logistics were explained, described and interpreted for us! Presentations after breakfast included Andrew Young from Brisbane Markets, a real eye opening view of the world of a retailer from Joe Carbone of Feast on Fruit in Morningside Central and finally Trevor Brewer discussing pricing and dispute resolution in the markets. Brisbane Golf Club offered a really fabulous venue and a change from our usual on-farm or small town hall style. It was a great choice for lunch and the forum which included presentations from Hort Innovation’s Brad Mills, our new industry relationship manager and Kelly McGuiness, our Hort Innovation marketing assistant. Jane Richter ran us through the Communications Project, funded by Hort Innovation and delivered by PAI. This project is a great opportunity for us to connect with all our growers, both purples and panamas and really be sure that information about all aspects of the industry is getting out to the coalface where it needs to be. I am excited about the opportunities it offers us to engage as an industry and to become a cohesive force. The Regional Field Days will offer a real opportunity for growers to get together in each growing area. We will be surveying all of you soon to identify the topics to be addressed so we are delivering what you as growers want to learn about at each of the Regional Field Days in the next four years. Make sure you check out the new website – this will be built upon continuously and will provide a central place for all your passionfruit needs as it grows. The national breeding project with SCU is making great strides and we were grateful to Peter Bundock for his presentation at the Regional Field Day. Visit the PROJECT HUB on the new website for the latest project news. 2

www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au

We are grateful to our sponsors, Austsafe Super represented by Stacey Watson and Bruce Waltisbuhl, and Perma-Log, represented by John Robinson and Rowan Carnes. Their ongoing support of our industry is much appreciated. Export options were discussed by Dominic Jenkin of AHEA and we are fortunate to now have two export projects occurring. The first is a Griffith University Passionfruit Export Plan grant ‘Develop an export opportunity analysis and export plan for the Australian Passionfruit industry’. Find more detail on PAGE 22. The second is a Hort Innovation funded project being delivered by McKINNA et al who have been engaged by Hort Innovation to develop an Export Strategy for Tropical Fruit (banana, persimmon, papaya, lime, lychee and passionfruit); with a focus on export development opportunities. These projects may overlap a little in what they deliver, but together they will offer some practical steps a clear strategy for us in the export space, one I believe we have to enter to address some of the shortcomings of our industry. Growcom’s Rachel McKenzie enlightened us with a thorough overview of the Hort Code of Conduct and the Fair Farms Initiative. It was excellent to receive the two perspectives about the Hort Code from the Brisbane Markets and then from Growcom from the point of view of a grower. The AGM was held and two new members of the management committee were elected, Anton Stretch, a grower from the Beerwah area, and Aidan Hutton from JE Tipper in Sydney. We are very fortunate to have these new talented and experienced committee members who bring energy, skills, direction and enthusiasm to the association. It augurs well for exciting and advancing times ahead in the passionfruit industry. We are extremely grateful to those who have dedicated their time to the committee over the last few years and we sincerely thank Keith Paxton and Sean Russell for their many years of service to the industry. Fortunately they are not lost to us….they are just a phone call away. In addition to the breeding and export focus, backed up by a thorough communications project, I believe we have to address two areas in the coming short to medium term. They are the low number of nurseries servicing our industry and the post-harvest handling of our fruit. More to follow on these topics in the coming months. I firmly believe in the work this organisation does to improve and promote our industry and it’s an honour to represent the sector. I am very optimistic about what the future holds for the passionfruit industry and feel we are really well placed, for the first time in a couple of years, to really take advantage of opportunities that are coming our way and to make some big strides forward!

Thank you for your continuing support and be sure to let us know as a management committee what we can do better to serve the industry. Best wishes for a safe and prosperous summer!

Tina


WHAT IS HAPPENING NOW TO SUPPORT THE FUTURE OF OUR INDUSTRY?

— Potential im pact of this plan is $ Based on a n est total invest imated ment of $ from 2017 to 2021 —

9.7m

1.84m

Australian Passionfruit

STRATEGIC INVESTMENT PLAN 2017–2021

The SIP has been developed in consultation with the passionfruit industry using funds from the Hort Innovation Passionfruit Fund. This plan represents the roadmap for the future development of the industry. This plan drives investment decision-making by Hort Innovation who invest levy funds on behalf of the industry.

_______________________

_______________________

_______________________

_______________________

_______________________

GROW SALES DEMAND

GROW FRUIT QUALITY

BE IN THE KNOW

GROW SALES RETURNS

FARM YOUR BEST

Increase domestic demand and export opportunities that maintain price stability

Improve retail quality of passionfruit to match consumer expectations

Provide access to relevant and timely data that improves industry wide decision-making

Improve pest and disease management and the development of new varieties that increase grower productivity and profitability

Improve farm and industry sustainability from identifying and adopting best practices

__________________________________________________

_______________________

MARKETING CAMPAIGN ‘Add a splash of passion’ New research & New campaign

PF16003: PASSIONFRUIT COMMUNICATION PROGRAM New website

__________________________________________________ PF16000: PASSIONFRUIT INDUSTRY MINOR USE PROGRAM

PAGE 9

Export projects PAGE 22

PAGE 7

PAGE 12 & 13

_______________________ PF15000: NATIONAL PASSIONFRUIT BREEDING PROGRAM PAGE 11

LEVY – HOW MUCH MONEY HAS BEEN COLLECTED & HOW HAS IT BEEN SPENT? CURRENT FINANCIAL OPERATING STATEMENT JULY 2016–JUNE 2017 OPENING BALANCE

+ GROWER LEVIES + COMMONWEALTH FUNDS + INTEREST - PROJECT INVESTMENT - OTHER COSTS - CONTRIBUTION TO ACROSS-INDUSTRY ACTIVITY - LEVY COLLECTION COSTS = CLOSING BALANCE

R&D 242,679

MARKETING 97,224

TOTAL ($) 339,903

263,734*

122,873

386,607

213,010

98,622

311,633

61,481

16,457

77,938

5,963

9,037

9,037

18,075

216,921

95,980

312,902

*Remember levy money invested in R&D attracts additional Commonwealth Government funding For more details, please visit www.horticulture.com.au/grower-focus/passionfruit/

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

3


REGIONAL ROUND UP DARWIN FAR NORTH QLD

(Mareeba, Daintree, Cooktown)

WIDE BAY (Bundaberg)

SOUTH EAST QLD

(Gympie to Glass House Mtns)

NORTHERN NSW

PERTH

(Tweed Valley)

W E AT H E R WATC H AUGUST

SEPTEMEBER

OCTOBER

Rainfall has been non-existent across all growing regions with only FNQ receiving any rain - just 3.8mm for the month.

Bundaberg received no rain at all for the second month running, following two very low rainfall months.

Dry gave way to extreme wet with Bundaberg Aero recording 238.8mm on one day - Tuesday 3rd October.

Daytime temperatures have also been above average across all areas, contributing further to the big dry.

Southern growing regions remained very dry with limited rainfall. Only parts of FNQ received any relief with 21mm recorded at Mareeba for the month and 125mm at Innisfail, but only 1.4mm at Cooktown.

Large rain periods were recorded across other areas; Murwillambah received more than double normal rainfall and both the Sunshine Coast and Mareeba nearly five times the expected average.

RAINFALL OUTLOOK

| DEC–FEB 2018

CHANCE OF EXCEEDING THE MEDIAN RAINFALL

CLIMATE OUTLOOK OVERVIEW (Issued 16 November 2017)

www.bom.gov.au/climate © Commonwealth of Australia 2017, Australian Bureau of Meteorology

4

www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au

Chance of exceeding the median rainfall (%)

— Australia's major climate drivers remain neutral — For the three months December to February, most of the country has just a 50% chance of being wetter than average — The rainfall outlook for summer shows northeast NSW and regions surrounding the Gulf of Carpentaria are likely to be drier than average. Elsewhere across the country, there is no strong signal showing wetter or drier conditions for summer.

LONG TERM AVERAGE – MEAN RAINFALL (mm) WEATHER STATIONS

DEC

JAN

FEB

Mareeba

89.1

212.5

232.9

Bundaberg

128.0

175.0

156.1

Sunshine Coast Airport

143.1

149.3

186.2

Murwillumbah

169.1

211.5

225.2


GROWER REPORTS FAR NORTH QLD The growing season in North Queensland will come to a close in December/January for growers that have a twelve-month re-plant period. Looking back over the growing year, the weather has not been favourable for passionfruit. Mareeba and Tableland areas experienced temperature differences of 25 degrees between night and day. This may be the reason for smaller than usual fruit set, the diurnal temperatures also affected the fruit set of shepherd avocados. Recent rainfalls of 100mm coupled with high winds and hail has damaged different crops across the Tablelands region. My best thoughts go to those growers. The rain, in general, was well received alleviating the high water use from Tinaroo Irrigation Scheme. This increased water allocation by 10%. A Lakeland Downs grower experienced the difficult climatic conditions and summed up his season as below average growing conditions. In finishing, I would like to credit Jane, Margie and others on the new look and informative magazine (great work to all).

Brian Westwood, Mareeba

FAR NORTH QLD

(Mareeba, Daintree, Cooktown)

AUG SEP OCT

Mareeba (station 031210)

MEAN (mm)

3.8 [7.9]

21.0 [4.9]

65.6 [12.6]

MEAN DAYS >1mm

1 [1.2]

4 [1.2]

6 [2.5]

MEAN (MAX ºC)

27.5 28.9 30.3 [26.3] [28.8] [30.5]

MEAN (MIN ºC)

14.4 15.1 18.1 [13.8] [15.5] [17.3]

BUNDABERG Hello everyone. In the last two months Bundaberg has encountered the extremes of weather that can be very demoralising. Up to late September we were experiencing one of the driest periods in recent history, to then in October receive about three quarters of our annual rainfall in a two-week period, 600 to 700mm of rain! Our creek was running higher than the 2013 floods and the vines are showing the stress of having wet feet for too long. Then on the afternoon of the Melbourne Cup, parts of Bundy were victims of a severe 1 in 10-year storm. On the north side of town, the wind tore the tops out of large trees, 1000’s of mature Macadamia were snapped off at ground level, two semi-trailers were blown onto their sides, a shipping container was rolled about 5 times, cane bins were blown over onto their sides from rail tracks, winds unroofed houses and smashed sheds. Unfortunately, I am aware of a couple of Passionfruit growers who were in the storm’s path and have received massive damage to vines & infrastructure, (very sad). On a brighter note, the Misty Gems have continued picking slowly throughout the good money and a good summer crop has set. The Pandora’s also have set and should be ready in January. Funnily enough our water allocations have been increased back up to 100%. So, here’s hoping the next report is full of good news. Thanks.

WIDE BAY

(Bundaberg)

Bundaberg (station 039128)

AUG SEP OCT

MEAN (mm)

0 9.0 558.2 [33.4] [36.0] [68.6]

MEAN DAYS >1mm

0 [3.5]

0 [2.9]

11 [5.0]

MEAN (MAX ºC)

25.6 27.9 27.4 [23.2] [25.6] [27.0]

MEAN (MIN ºC)

11.0 13.8 18.9 [10.7] [13.7] [16.5]

Peter Griffiths, Bundaberg

SUNSHINE COAST I hope everyone is well and not having too tough a time with the weather. In the Sunshine Coast area we have fared reasonably well compared with other regions. The dams are the fullest they have been in 6 or 7 years and while the rain has affected the quality of some of the early season fruit, I think it will do more good than harm in the long run. Most of us are still planting here, but we should be finished by the second week in November. There is a bit of a shortfall in plant numbers, but the nurseries have done their best in difficult conditions. I wouldn't swap places for quids. The difficultiy in propagating the Sweethearts is highlighting the need for new varieties which are not only good for growers, but also economical for the nurseries to produce. Hopefully we'll soon get serious with the picking. It's time to start making money instead of just spending it. Locally, some growers have had fruit for a while with others just starting, and the quality has been variable. With the summer coming on fast, let’s hope we can all avoid any damaging weather. There's been more than enough of that for one year. I'd like to thank our new committee membersAidan and Anton - for their willingness to help our association move forward. They are taking the place of Keith Paxton and Sean Russell who have both made exceptional contributions to the Passionfruit Industry over many years. I'm sure the industry appreciates your efforts and it's good to know you'll be on hand to help and advise any time we need your expertise. Best wishes and good luck for the summer season.

Jim Gordon, Yandina

Sunshine Coast Airport (station 040861)

AUG SEP OCT

MEAN (mm)

0.8 3.0 320.4 [77.2] [55.5] [70.1]

MEAN DAYS >1mm

0 [5.3]

MEAN (MAX ºC) MEAN (MIN ºC)

2 [5.5]

8 [7.2]

24.4 26.9 26.4 [22.2] [24.4] [25.6] 9.7 [9.9]

12.8 18.2 [12.9] [15.5]

NORTHERN NSW

(Tweed Valley)

TWEED AREA Hello All! Spring started with a dry September which was not ideal after the hail storm we received in August. For October, we had regular rainfall and warm conditions which led to a great planting season. Very little irrigating was required for the new vines to get away. Fruit wise a quiet Christmas is in store due to the August hail with some good fruit set on the 12 month-old vines, but very little on the 24 month-old ones. At the start of November at Newrybar we had another hail storm come through, but luckily, we were on the edge of it this time. We lost tips on around 1/3 of our new vines, but the older vines had minimal damage. Only a couple of hundred metres up the road got hit hard so it was very nervewracking watching the storm come up. Unfortunately, the Smiths from Brooklet were hit hard which was devastating for them after also being hit in the August storm. Since then we have had very cool and wet conditions with max temps in the low 20s with the same forecast for the next week. It’s very unusual Spring weather (I’m wearing a jumper to work in the mornings!). Although I don’t like the heat and humidity, we definitely need some. I haven’t spoken to any of the other Tweed growers, but I’d expect some good crops to be hanging. All the best.

Nick & Nerida Hornery, Newrybar

SOUTH EAST QLD

(Gympie to Glass House Mtns)

Murwillumbah (station 058158)

AUG

SEP

MEAN (mm)

1.8 [54.1]

2.0 215.6 [40.5] [102.9]

MEAN DAYS >1mm

1 [5.2]

1 [5.3]

13 [8.1]

MEAN (MAX ºC)

24.6 [22.5]

28.2 [25.1]

26.7 [26.4]

MEAN (MIN ºC)

7.2 [8.8]

10.4 [11.5]

17.4 [14.1]

OCT

Figures in [ ] are long term historical averages. All weather data from www.bom.gov.au Thank you to Brian, Peter, Jim & Nick for their reports.

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

5


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t 07 4159 7394

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M: 0418 294 645 E: tony@topclassfruit.com.au

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M: 0417 166 29 E: brooke@topclassfruit.com.au Sydney: Shed B103, Sydney Markets P: 02 9746 3786 - Brisbane: Unit A21, Rocklea Markets P: 07 3278 6188

Our professional team are dedicated and focused every single day on selling your fruit. 6

www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au


Welcome to your

NEW WEBSITE The new website is a strategic levy investment under the Hort Innovation Passionfruit Fund. For ease of access, the site is split into simple clusters of information. Each of these areas will grow over time so make sure you check in frequently.

W NEOK! LO

http://www.passionfruitaustralia.com/

LOGIN

HOME

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NEWS & EVENTS

SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER

CONTACT

WELCOME TO PASSIONFRUIT AUSTRALIA

Passionfruit Australia is the peak industry body representing Australian Passionfruit growers LEARN MORE

LEARN ABOUT PASSIONFRUIT

MEMBERSHIP

YOUR LEVY FUNDS AT WORK

LEARN MORE

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GROW FRUIT

SELL FRUIT

PROJECT HUB

NEWS & MEDIA

A one-stop centre for all you need to know about growing passionfruit; over time this will become a reference centre full of best practice guides and useful resources

This is where you’ll find the information you need to know about selling passionfruit commercially in Australia.

Read about the latest developments in all our current R&D projects, look at the project reference documents and find out the contact details for the Project Delivery Partners.

Looking for an old edition of The Passion Vine?

—— Find out more about the strategic investment plan for our industry

—— Profiles of major retailers like Woolworths, Aldi & Coles

—— Meet other growers and learn about why they grow passionfruit —— Details about the nurseries supplying new plants —— Find helpful resources like the Growing guide and field guide

—— Major market agents who trade in passionfruit

—— What is the passionfruit statutory levy and how is it collected? —— Horticulture Produce Agreements – what are they and what you need to do to make sure yours is compliant and works for you

—— R&D Project list tells you what projects are currently in progress —— Detailed information and all the latest updates on our major R&D projects —— Coming soon, a library of reference documents from PAI history including previous research reports

Deleted the latest newsletter and want to find another copy? Find all of this in this section including: —— photo galleries from PAI events and Regional Field Days —— back editions of The Passion Vine —— recent e-newsletters

—— What’s happening in our latest marketing campaign?

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

7


ETHIOPIA

UGANDA

THE VIEW FROM OVER THERE:

KENYA

EQUATOR

SPOTLIGHT ON Kenya, East Africa

NAIROBI

TANZANIA

Copyright © Free Vector Maps.com

FAST FACTS

BY JANE RICHTER

•  Bi-sected by the

It is believed that passionfruit was introduced into Kenya in the 1920s as a fruit crop to be processed into juice. As a fruit native to southern Brazil, passionfruit is well suited to the semi-tropical regions of Kenya’s highlands area. Passionfruit farming is currently seen as one of the most profitable horticulture crops in Kenya. Strong demand exists for both the fresh fruit and the juice from processed fruit due to a large urban population who are moving away from soft drinks to juice based alternatives. As the industry develops, fruit produced in Kenya is finding its way into major export markets like the UK, the Netherlands and UAE, following in the wake of Kenya’s significant vegetable export industry. Other significant exporters of passionfruit include Brazil, Colombia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

PESTS & DISEASE Kenyan farmers face most of the same pest and disease challenges that are found here in Australia. Major disease concerns are Fusarium wilt, Brown spot, blight, die back and woodiness virus with pests like mites, mealy bugs, thrips and fruit fly commonplace.

Equator in East Africa •  13 times smaller than Australia •  48.5m people •  73.5% of population live rurally •  48% of all land is used for agriculture •  Kenyan highlands are one of the most fertile agricultural areas in Africa •  Passionfruit is the 3rd most produced fruit crop after bananas & mangoes

VARIETIES PURPLE PASSIONFRUIT

YELLOW PASSIONFRUIT

SWEET PASSIONFRUIT

GIANT PASSIONFRUIT

BANANA PASSIONFRUIT

Passiflora edulis —— most common varietal type in Kenya —— consumed domestically and exported —— thrives in cooler climes at 1200-1800m above sea level —— colour changes from light green to purple when ripe —— ripe fruit drops to the ground

Passiflora edulis var flavicarpa —— latest craze in Kenya —— more vigorous and better adapted to tropical lowlands —— more acidic than purples —— larger than purple, turns yellow at maturity and drops to the ground —— high resistance to soil borne pathogens make it ideal rootstock

Passiflora ligularis

Passiflora quadrangularis —— requires tropical climate —— grows best from sea-level up to 1700m —— grows to a length of 30m —— fruits turn from green to yellow when mature —— eaten fresh and visually resembles a vegetable marrow

Passiflora mollissima —— better suited to tropical elevations above 1700m —— vigorous vine – will grow to lengths of up to 30m —— when ripe, changes colour from green to yellow —— fruit should be eaten fresh —— not a commercial variety

8

www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au

—— ideal for cooler climates with elevations of over 1500m —— excellent flavour —— when ripe, it changes colour from blue to orange-brown —— aromatic pulp has a whitish colour —— enclosed by a hard shell so transports it well without damage

Sources: CIA Factbook, World Bank 2017, Passionfruitguide.com, Nickly Kipkorir, Wikimedia.


HORT INNOVATION

MARKETING UPDATE BY JANE RICHTER & KELLY MCGUINESS

Following a very successful campaign with #finishthedish in 2016/17, the team at Hort Innovation recently undertook some consumer research to assist with the planning and execution of the next three years of marketing investment using the Passionfruit marketing levy, currently set at 50% of the total levy money collected. RECIPES & PHOTOS

WEBSITE UPDATES

SOCIAL MEDIA & PR

Add a splash of passion CAMPAIGN

NEW SIGNAGE & POINT-OF-SALE

RETAILER EDUCATION

IN-STORE DEMONSTRATIONS

_________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

What did Consumers say?

New campaign 'add a splash of passion'

 3% bought NO passionfruit 3 in the last year —— Confidence with passionfruit = higher quantity purchased —— Most people love the taste – just not sure how to use them —— 57% buy passionfruit on impulse only —— 85% of buyers agree passionfruit is a great way to finish a dish —— A snack positioning won’t work for passionfruit with its current pricing structure

The new campaign will focus on two consumer audiences:

——

MORE CONFIDENT COOKS (8% OF THE MARKET) SPORADIC BUYERS (59% OF THE MARKET) The key communication objectives will be to: —— grab

consumer buying attention when there are heavy fruit flushes

—— communicate the taste-colour-health benefits —— educate retail about handling & displays of fruit —— build consumer confidence with selecting fruit —— inspire both confident cooks & sporadic buyers to purchase

The campaign theme ‘add a splash of passion’ will run for three years with expansion in Year 2 to include an event at the Sydney Royal Easter Show, a media event bringing food writers to a farm and more direct engagement with consumers in retail stores. For more information about the new campaign or any ideas that you have for marketing opportunities, please contact Kelly McGuiness at Hort Innovation Kelly.McGuinness@horticulture.com.au

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

9


GET TO YOUR KNOW COMMITTEE MEMBERS Tina McPherson, Bundaberg Tina McPherson and her husband Bruce purchased their passionfruit farm in Bundaberg, Queensland in 2008. After a history of growing strawberries, as well as dairy farming in New Zealand, it was time for a sea change to Tina’s native Queensland and they’ve never looked back. Tina produces approximately 150 tonnes of passionfruit a year, with harvest taking place all year round with the exception of March and November. This makes the farm amongst one of the larger passionfruit producers in Australia. As President of Passionfruit Australia Inc., Tina is wholeheartedly dedicated to the longevity of the Australian passionfruit industry. “I am committed to improving growers’ productivity to ensure they remain innovative and competitive,” said Tina. “We have an enthusiastic, diverse group of growers, who want to stay engaged and involved in every aspect of the industry. I think the future looks bright for Aussie passionfruit.”

Jane Richter, Glass House Mountains Jane & her husband John started their passionfruit farm from scratch on 24 acres in the Sunshine Coast hinterland at Glass House Mountains back in 2014. Both are from a traditional corporate background – John as a specialist in the Oil & Gas industry and Jane as a marketing professional mainly in food & beverage industries. The farm now hosts approximately 4,000 vines with further new paddocks to be developed in the coming years. Jane has taken on the role of Vice-President this year to assist Tina and share the load that comes with running an association. “I want to be able to bring my corporate skills to the team to help us get the most out of the levy investments made on our behalf by Hort Innovation. I spent 20 years in corporate communications activities, so it was a natural fit for me to offer to pitch for the new Communications Programme too,” says Jane.

Anton Stretch, Beerwah

Farming is a late career change for the Stretch’s having bought Passiondale in 2014 from Ray & Rita Lee. The farm is a boutique operation with capacity for 1200 vines all planted in an overhead configuration. Marcia is a qualified nurse and Anton has had careers in both the Air Force and with the Australian Customs Service before settling down to the quieter life that farming represents. Anton says “I’m looking forward to getting to know more fellow growers and being a part of the Management Committee is a great way for us to learn a lot more about an industry we’ve already grown to love.”

Aidan Hutton, JE Tipper, Sydney Aidan is responsible for sales of all tropical fruit lines in the company’s busy Sydney Market facility. He also manages Tipper’s Sydney operation and, aided by his experienced team of great staff, services customers to ensure quality fruit is delivered on time and to specification. Don’t be fooled by his boyish looks – Aidan has already notched up some serious time in the Sydney markets both with JE Tipper and another wholesaler prior to his current role. “Getting involved with the Management Committee is a great way for me to invest in the future of an industry that I am dedicating my working life to. If I could say one thing I think it would be that we need to work together more to make the industry grow and be stronger – other growers are not really your competitor. There is so much untapped demand out there for passionfruit – we just need to unlock it.”

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www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au


Jim Gordon, Yandina Jim & Jill have been growing Passionfruit for 33 years now on their farm in the Sunshine Coast hinterland at Yandina with wonderful views to Mt Ninderry. The farm is currently home to about 8,000 Sweetheart passionfruit vines, but they have tried their hand at a few other crops in the past like strawberries, citrus, tomatoes and plums. Not many people would know that to become a farmer Jim gave up a promising teaching career and the secure pay, great superannuation and long holidays that go with it! The farm is a partnership with Jill doing most of the packing and all of the book work, whereas Jim manages the growing side of the farm, with its constant spraying, mowing & weed management. Jim has been a committed member of the association for many years, and brings a great deal of passionfruit knowledge and common sense to the team.

Ian Constable, Dulguigan Over 25 years ago, Ian and his brother David first planted passionfruit on their farm in northern NSW where they had previously grown lady finger bananas. They started small and have grown over time to have 10,000 Sweetheart vines all on traditional trellis. Like many growers, Ian has a few beef cattle too who seem to enjoy eating up all the reject fruit. Although Ian is excited by the challenges that growing passionfruit brings, he does get a little tired of the relentless jobs like spraying and mowing – who wouldn’t after 25 years? Ian has been a key part of the industry association development, all the way back to the original group of growers who fought hard to form the Australian Passionfruit Industry Association (APIA) which later became Passionfruit Australia Inc. He remains a strong supporter of the industry and brings a great deal of experience to the management committee as well as ensuring the growers in NSW continue to have a strong voice.

ARE YOU A GROWER WHO HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN BREEDING PASSIONFRUIT? BY PETER BUNDOCK, SOUTHERN CROSS UNIVERSITY, LISMORE The National Passionfruit Breeding Program is making use of an assortment of passionfruit lines and varieties for crossing and in comparison trials. We would like to ensure that we are not using plant material for which there is a claim to ownership by someone else. If you have released passionfruit vines for use by others that you have bred in the past then please visit our webpage which lists all the lines and varieties we are making use of in the program. If you have any claim to ownership of the listed varieties, please let me know. Please visit http://www.cropstoredb.org/pfruit.php and check the varieties listed. To propose any changes, contact Peter.Bundock@scu.edu.au in writing outlining the plant material, its name or identifier, the location of the material and the nature of your ownership claim before 31st December 2017. If no claims are received, the National Passionfruit Breeding Program will proceed on the basis that all material is in the public domain and that the project participants have full freedom to operate using all available material. Visit the Project Hub – PF15000 National Passionfruit Breeding Program – on the new Passionfruit Australia website for more information. The National Passionfruit Breeding Program (PF15000) is funded by Hort Innovation, using the passionfruit research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Hort Innovation is the grower owned, not-for-profit research and development corporation for Australian horticulture.

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

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12

Passionvine Mite & Two-spotted Mite

Anthracnose & Septoria spot Various Fruit Fly Species Passionvine Mite & Two-spotted Mite

PER14665

PER12781

PER84247

PER84258

CHEMICAL

ABAMECTIN

CABRIO

DIMETHOATE

FENBUTATIN OXIDE

(VENDEX MITICIDE)

(PYRACLOSTROBIN)

PEST/ DISEASE USE

PERMIT NO.

CURRENT AT NOVEMBER 2017

MAX USE 2 x SEASON EHD 7 DAYS

Where biological control of two – spotted mite is being practiced – 20 mL product per 100 L water

EHD 7 DAYS

EHD 1 DAY

MAX USE 3 x SEASON

EHD 1 DAY

EARLIEST HARVEST DATE (EHD) WITHHOLDING PERIOD (WHP)

40 mL product per 100 L water

Follow instructions on the label attached to the product

40 mL per 100 L or 50 g per 100 L

36 g/L Abamectin – Apply 25 mL Product per 100 L water

18 g/L Abamectin – Apply 50 mL product per 100 L water

APPLICATION RATE

CHEMICAL PERMITS FOR PASSIONFRUIT

20/06/2021

06/03/2019

30/06/2018

31/10/2020

PERMIT EXPIRY DATE


Passionvine Mite & Two-spotted Mite Phytophthora Blight

Queensland Fruit fly (Bactrocera tryon)

PER14662

PER14552

PER12450 Version 6

PETROLEUM OIL & PARAFFINIC OIL

PHOSPHOROUS ACID

TRICHLORFON

(CROP CARE TORQUE MITICIDE)

All efforts have been made to provide the most current, complete and accurate information on these permits, however we recommend that you confirm the details at the APVMA website portal: https://portal.apvma.gov.au/permits

Repeat sprays: 125 mL per 100 L

First spray: 250 mL per 100 L

EHD 7 DAYS

MAX USE 4 X SEASON

NO WHP*

MAX USE 4 x PER CROP

NO WHP*

31/01/2021

30/06/2019

30/06/2020

30/09/2018

A ‘non-performance’ is an unintended or unexpected effect on plants, plant products, animals, human beings or the environment, including injury, sensitivity reactions or lack of efficacy associated with the use of an agricultural chemical product(s) when used according to label (or permit) directions.

AGRI-FOS 625: 625 g/L product: 160-195 mL per 100 L water

SPRAYPHOS 620: 620 g/L product: 160-195 mL per 100 L water

AGRI-FOS 600: 600 g/L product: 165-200 mL per 100 L water

AGRI-FOS SUPA 400: 400 g/L product: 250-300 mL per 100 L water

500 mL – 1 L per 100 L water (0.5-1% diluent) MAX USE 6 x SEASON

NO WHP*

450 g/L products: 8 – 12 mL/L 680 g/kg products: 5.3 – 8 g/L

MAX USE 1 x MONTH

3.6 – 5.4 glyphosate/L water

If you believe you have had a non-performance or an adverse experience following use under a Minor Use Permit, please report it using form “Non-Performance form for Horticulture Pesticides”- available in the GROW FRUIT section of www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au and return it to Hort Innovation: jodie.pedrana@horticulture.com.au

Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Ceratitis capitata)

Grass & Broadleaf Weeds

PER14421

GLYPHOSATE

* when used as directed

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

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TWEED VARIETIES— PLANT BREEDING PAYMENT SCHEME

How do you pay your royalties for Tweed varieties? STEP 1

Last edition, we provided an update on the Passionfruit Australia Plant Royalty Scheme for grafted varieties and confirmed that from 1st July 2017, Passionfruit Australia would not be seeking royalty payments on the purchases of new plants covered by the scheme. The royalty scheme still applies for all Tweed varieties; Tango, Flamenco, Gem and Pearl for the work put in by David Peasley in breeding these varieties. The royalty (plant breeding payment) payable is $1 per plant. A 50% discount applies until 30th September 2020 if you were a contributing member of the Northern Rivers Passionfruit Growers Group (NRPGG) who assisted in this breeding project.

Upon receipt of your plants from the nursery, send an email to peasleyhort@bigpond.com with the variety name, quantity of plants involved and your full farm invoicing details including Trading Name and ABN.

STEP 2

In your email, confirm if you were a member of NRPGG to establish the levy amount payable.

Please remember that for growers who choose to plant the Tweed varieties, the royalty system operates on an honesty basis — please continue to support the industry by paying the royalties (plant breeding payments) due on a timely basis. Thank you.

STEP 3

Peasley Horticultural Services will send you an invoice for the payment due.

STEP 4 Please pay promptly.

CORRECT WEIGHT – HOW DO YOU MEASURE UP? BY MARGIE MILGATE Correct Weight is a term we often hear when we attend a race meeting. This is the term used when a jockey is weighed at the end of a race to see if they are matching the weight designated for the horse they were riding. Correct Weight is also required in the marketplace. Some months ago, Sydney Markets were visited by officials from the National Measurement Institute, a division of the Australian Government’s Department of Industry, Innovation & Science. Their role is to make sure that we all “measure up” and for fresh produce this means to ensure any packaged goods being sold contain the amount stated on the label. Passionfruit are approved by the Secretary of the Department for sale by piece count.

Check List for Correct Weight:

ü Piece count must be correct on every box ü All pre-packed fruit and vegetables must be clearly



marked with the name and street address of the packer

û û

Post office box, locked bag, telephone number, website or email alone is not acceptable as an identifier of the packer



Fines may apply if details are incorrect

So, remember when you are packing – please make sure you are doing what counts for your business!

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www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au


FAIR FARMS INITIATIVE SUPPORTS BOTH GROWERS & FARM WORKERS BY GROWCOM With the treatment of farm workers in the national media spotlight and an increased focus on the protection of vulnerable employees in Australia’s Fair Work laws, now – more than ever – growers must ensure their employment practices are up to scratch. Employment matters and industrial relations laws are highly complex – so it can be challenging for farm business owners to be sure their employment systems and practices comply with all legal requirements. Growcom’s Fair Farms Initiative is a national project, funded by the Fair Work Ombudsman, that supports growers with the tools and knowledge to implement good employment practices and achieve full compliance with workplace relations laws – and demonstrate this to customers and the wider community. While the majority of growers aim to do the right thing, sadly the actions of a few tarnish the reputation of the industry as a whole. This increases the risk of losing workers to other industries – or even other travel destinations.

The Fair Farms Initiative aims to ensure that workers are treated fairly while they are employed in horticultural farms and pack houses. OVER THE NEXT FOUR YEARS, THE FAIR FARMS INITIATIVE WILL DELIVER: —— Assistance to growers in all states to conduct a confidential risk assessment of their current employment practices, using Growcom’s Hort360 Workplace Relations module. This process steps growers through all aspects of their legal requirements and industry standards and identifies areas for improvement. —— T  he development, under Freshcare, of a voluntary third-party audited certification – enabling growers to demonstrate to their customers that their employment practices are fair and meet legal requirements. —— An information campaign, including regional seminars and articles in industry magazines to inform growers of their risks, obligations and solutions and to target significant matters of non-compliance. The campaign will also aim to raise awareness amongst farm workers of their rights and entitlements. —— Development of a pathway to qualifications in Human Resources for interested growers. —— An annual award to showcase excellence in employment practices in the Australian horticulture industry. The inaugural award will be held at HortConnections 2018 in Brisbane. Growcom and Freshcare will work closely with state and national horticulture industry groups, retailers and supply chain stakeholders to ensure the Initiative meets the needs of all industry members. For information, contact Jane Muller at Growcom jmuller@growcom.com.au

LEVY FAST FACTS Do you understand how your levy works for you? —— 40c is collected per 18 litre box at the point of sale from the producer —— you will normally see this as a deduction made by your wholesale agent —— 50% of the levy collected is invested directly into marketing activities designed to grow demand for passionfruit —— 50% is invested into R&D projects by Hort Innovation with additional funding from the Commonwealth Government —— Hort Innovation is the grower owned, not-for-profit research and development corporation for Australian horticulture —— it is FREE for all levy payers to become members of Hort Innovation so join today at http://horticulture.com.au/membership-application-form THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

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GROWER PROFILE:

MEET THE STRETCHS BY JANE RICHTER

Anton & Marcia Stretch purchased Passiondale from Ray & Rita Lee at Beerwah in the Sunshine Coast Hinterland in 2014. The farm is a boutique husband-and-wife operation and so far has focussed on smaller volume, very high quality fruit all from overhead trellis frames. They have 1200 vines currently, but are experimenting with some changes to their infrastructure that will take them up to about 2000 – all Sweetheart variety. Anton and Marcia have three adult children who are spread all over Australia. They do visit often and like to lend a hand when they can. James is particularly useful being a successful entrepreneur who has brilliant ideas that he shares with his parents whenever he’s in their part of the world. Their two girls get drafted in as slave labour whenever they fly in from the far-flung parts of Australia where they currently live.

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www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au

So what do you love about growing passionfruit?

What surprising fact would few people know about you?

“It’s the marvel of the plants themselves – lush, cool green leaves with stunning flowers that respond so well to the love that we lavish upon them,” says Anton. As new growers, the pair accept they may have made the odd blunder (who hasn’t?!), but it’s the way the vines seem to be able to flourish even in the face of some unconventional treatment that makes this pair love passionfruit farming.

“We were movie stars once! Says Marcia. Yes – believe it or not they had their first and last starring roles in the film ‘Keys to Freedom’ alongside Omar Shariff and Jane Seymour. For the full story, buy Anton a Coopers at the next Passionfruit Australia get together and he’ll tell all…

And the not so good bits? “It breaks my heart when I go out to pick the fruit and the sun has already burnt it – its gone from priceless to worthless in such a short space of time,” says Marcia. Marcia also dislikes pulling out the old vines to make way for new plants, “it just feels like such a negative thing to do after all the time spent trying to get the buggers to thrive!”

ANTON'S TOP TIPS:

“Read the manual, keep the field guide always to hand & don’t be shy about asking fellow growers in your area for tips that might help you”


EVENT

NEWS

REGIONAL FIELD DAY FRIDAY 13 OCTOBER

600,000 MT

Regional Field Days are part of the Australian Passionfruit Industry Communications Programme (PF16003) funded by Hort Innovation, using the passionfruit research and development levy and contributions from the Australian Government. Hort Innovation is the grower owned, not-for-profit research and development corporation for Australian horticulture. It was a lovely morning as growers and industry supporters gathered at the Fresh Centre at Brisbane Markets to start a jam-packed day of discovery and discussion. Start time was 6.30am and the day was Friday 13th October 2017. After all the planning it was great to get underway. After a short welcome from President Tina McPherson it was time to get down to business. Representatives from the Brisbane Markets - Vanessa Kennedy and Luke Lesson - greeted everyone and gave an induction briefing. Enclosed shoes were the order of the day. Hi-Vis vests were distributed as safety procedures were provided on what to watch out for in the busy market place. This was peak trading time. Fork lifts were moving produce around the complex and everyone needed to watch out!

BRISBANE MARKET STATS

$1.3 billion

Everyone moved out to get a good look at the main trading floors, see the produce on display and talk with agents at their stands. The Brisbane Markets have been on this site at Rocklea since 1964, and it is the main fruit and vegetable wholesale operation in Queensland. Getting this up-close market experience was welcomed by all who were involved on the day. Everyone could see and hear from these market experts about how the whole system operated and what was needed to gain your sale.

MARKET DISCUSSIONS Back at the Fresh Centre everyone enjoyed a wonderful breakfast delivered by Andrea Nicolaou and her great team at The Café Brisbane Markets. This gourmet feast was kindly sponsored by JE Tipper and we thank them most sincerely for this fantastic contribution to the day.

Passionfruit Australia Treasurer and JE Tipper principal Sean Russell then acted as the facilitator for some great discussion on the marketing of passionfruit from the professionals in their fields Andrew Young, the CEO at Brisbane Markets, was first in line. He provided an overview of the markets, their operations and future developments planned at the site. It continues to grow and innovate. Now providing a wide range of services to the primary wholesalers including state of the art cooling and unloading facilities. Wholesalers in turn receive produce from over 7,000 fruit and vegetable growers from around Australia and sell and distribute product to more than 1,000 retailers and food service businesses. One topic that was mentioned by Andrew was the Horticulture Code of Conduct. This Federal legislation is now in force and growers need to be aware that they need to comply with this code. The objectives of the Horticulture Code of Conduct are to regulate trade between Growers and Traders and to provide fair and equitable dispute resolution procedures.

Image courtesy of GROWCOM

To ensure Code compliance, growers need to: —— Understand that Traders and Growers are required to have a Horticulture Produce Agreement (HPA) in place —— Review, negotiate and accept the terms of HPA’s with all Traders which you do business with; and —— Note that acceptance can be in writing or by way of an email, fax or text message. Information sheets on these HPA’s as well as other market information were provided on the day. For more information on what you need to do to ensure you are compliant with the new code see PAGE 21. Brisbane Greengrocer Joe Carbone from Feast on Fruit at Morningside Central held the audience captive as he gave some powerful insights on marketing passionfruit to consumers. Joe’s main theme was that his sales come from providing products with flavour to his customers. He advised that you need to be authentic in your offering to gain repeat sales – and this came about by focusing on flavour. He told how he sought out this product by walking the Brisbane Markets, going out back into cold rooms and would keep looking until he found what he wanted. Hear more from Joe on PAGE 21. THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

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Next to join us was Aidan Hutton from JE Tipper in Sydney Markets. Aidan gave a position from an agent’s view of the passionfruit supply chain. Aidan agreed that consistency and flavour were the biggest thing for selling passionfruit. He believed the industry needed to push the sampling and tasting to get the product eaten and drive repeat sales. Aidan believes there is plenty of room for growth with chain stores. He also praised the work of the Independent retailers in handling the product well and showing real care in how the fruit is displayed!

’Supermarket produce managers need more education on handling, marketing and display. They focus on shrinkage and can be wary of lines they believe are high shrinkage’ This points to the need for effective cold chain management along the supply chain, so retailers receive good performing fruit. Aidan believed a challenge was the high price at retail level and this should be a focus for the industry. Sean Russell joined the market agent discussion by highlighting how communication was so important. He also believes we can grow the consumption of passionfruit here in Australia. He stated how a single greengrocer like Joe could sell 60 boxes of passionfruit a week, whereas a major retailer with all their outlets in Queensland was only taking 600 boxes. He reiterated his message that there is a need to work together, and if we can grow a good product we can take the market further.

PASSIONFRUIT LEVY PROJECTS ON DISPLAY The Regional Field Day program then moved to the Tennyson Room at the Brisbane Golf Club situated next to the Brisbane Markets site. The first session of presentations was chaired by President Tina McPherson and included an update from the passionfruit levy program run by Hort Innovation. Hort Innovation staff on hand were Brad Mills — our new Passionfruit Industry Relationships Manager — and Kelly McGuinness who is our Marketing Program Manager. They were joined by Peter Bundock from Southern Cross University who is managing the National Passionfruit Breeding Program.

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www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au

They record pricing against over 4000 product descriptions, with 44 in use for passionfruit products alone. Price data they collect is published in some newspapers and provides a yardstick to what is happening in the markets on a daily basis. All data is available on a user-pays basis. They also offer support to growers in relation to disputes over quality by offering an independent assessment service.

If anyone is interested in purchasing data from the any of the eastern markets, or would like information about quality assessment services please visit www.marketinfo.com.au

Trevor Brewer. Image courtesy of GROWCOM Long-time market reporter Trevor Brewer then joined the discussion. Trevor has worked in the Brisbane Markets for over 40 years. Initially he was the Fruit & Vegetable inspector with DPI and became a senior market reporter. He then founded and ran Market Information Services, Ausmarket Consultants and Brisbane Market Surveyors. These businesses were designed to address industry’s needs in the absence of government involvement. In providing some background Trevor noted that in 1992 his daily market price reports covered 2-4 pages. They are now over 9 pages long with many new crops and varieties, and the need now to provide pricing on pre-packed products as well.

Finally, in this section, Jane Richter provided a spirited presentation on the new Passionfruit Industry Communications Program and what it will be setting out to achieve in the next four years. Growers will have already noted the revamped Passion Vine, and the timing of these will now become seasonal to fit in better with growing conditions. The website is going to be updated, monthly e-newsletters are to be introduced as well as Regional Field Days and research forums. These will focus on identifying and delivering information, research and extension activities that will assist growers to “operate at the top of their game”.

Jane stated that it was “an exciting time to be a passionfruit grower”

Amanda Green, FreshTest Co-ordinator, then provided a summary of the FreshTest program. It was an initiative of Fresh Markets Australia and provides a low cost chemical residue and microbial testing service for wholesalers and their growers in all central markets. The tests are confidential and are used to verify Food Safety and Quality Assurance systems. Does your produce pass the test? These presentations were then followed by a question and answer session, which captured the interest generated by these wide-ranging discussions.

A big thank you goes out to the team at Brisbane Markets, Sean Russell & Aidan Hutton from JE Tipper, Joe Carbone, Trevor Brewer and Amanda Green for providing excellent presentations.

Look out for a survey heading your way soon where you can nominate the topic areas that you would like to be covered in the Regional Field Day Program like Soil Health, for example.

ARE YOU A MEMBER OF HORT INNOVATION? Please remember paying a levy does not automatically make you a member of Hort Innovation. Brad reminded attendees that you can get involved and have a say on how your investments are funded by becoming a member today— better yet it is FREE to join if you are a levy-payer. Further information is available at http://horticulture.com. au/membership-application-form


SPONSOR SUPPORT

L-R: Bruce Waltisbuhl and Stacey Watson Image courtesy of GROWCOM

Before lunch we gave our key sponsors a chance to provide us with an update. Stacey Watson from AustSafe Super noted how their fund is solely focused on supporting rural and regional Australia. It can help growers meet their employee and their own superannuation needs, including reporting tools to meet government requirements.

John Robinson and Rowan Carnes from Perma-Log Timbers were noted for their interest in all the information being presented on the day. John said he welcomed the chance to support the industry at this annual event and asked growers to talk with them about their needs regarding their renewable plantation timber products.

www.austsafe.com.au

www.permalogtimbers.com.au

PASSIONFRUIT AUSTRALIAN INC (PAI)

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

President Tina McPherson opened the meeting and welcomed all in attendance. She noted that although there were not as many growers present as hoped, she was heartened that this was not from disinterest, as we had received many noted apologies for missing the event. Tina stated that the committee would to look to find a better time for growers to attend next year. Tina presented her Presidents report. Major items covered were:

Open discussion was then held on the following topics:

—— A thank you to the Committee for their work and support over the past year

—— Keith Paxton gave an update on chemicals and some new permit registrations. He also noted some areas that new registrations are being sought – pull out & keep the current CHEMICAL PERMITS FOR PASSIONFRUIT on PAGES 12 & 13.

—— She believes the new communication project will be a game changer for the industry —— Discussion on the Commercialisation Plan as part of the Breeding Program. Please read the article by Peter Bundock on this topic on PAGE 11 —— The cessation of the collection of plant royalties on plant varieties —— An update on the Supply Chain and Data Collection project being managed by Hort Innovation —— A thank you to Jane Richter who has successfully applied for and gained support for projects outside the traditional levy funded activities

—— Research into Rutherglen Bug and how to handle could be addressed at the regional field days and research forums —— Robotics is another project proposal that Jane is working on with the University of the Sunshine Coast and Professor Helen Fairweather. Discussion also held on the use of drones for pest control and to provide better crop surveying capability.

Election of Office Bearers then took place and the new management committee comprises: —— Tina McPherson — President —— Jane Richter — Vice-President —— Jim Gordon — Committee —— Aidan Hutton — Committee —— Anton Stretch — Committee —— Ian Constable — Committee. Election for the positions of Secretary and Treasurer will take place at the first meeting of the new Management Committee being held on 22nd November 2017 in Brisbane Tina McPherson. Image courtesy of GROWCOM

—— Thank you to retiring members of the Committee Keith Paxton and Sean Russell who have given great service to the industry —— A great thank you to members for their continued support in driving the industry forward Treasurer Sean Russell then presented the Financial Report. The meeting also confirmed the appointment of current auditor Jennifer P Muenzel for the coming financial year. Copies of the Financial Report are available on request for any member of Passionfruit Australia Inc. from:

admin@passionfruitaustralia.org.au

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

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PASSIONFRUIT INDUSTRY UPDATE Secretary of Passionfruit Australia and Sunshine Coast grower Jim Gordon then chaired the final session of the day focused on providing information on the critical policy, program and emerging projects within the passionfruit industry. Rachel Mackenzie who is the Chief Advocate at Growcom commenced by updating the industry on the Fair Farms Initiative. This is a program funded by the Australian Government through the Fair Work Ombudsman’s Community Engagement Fund and is designed to help growers understand their obligations in employing staff and ensure their workers are treated fairly on fruit, vegetable and nut farms. The goal is to have good growers rewarded and bad employers weeded out of the industry. For more information on this program see PAGE 15.

Growcom will be running workshops around the country and growers are urged to attend when in their regions. Growcom is also working with Freshcare to develop a voluntary third party audited certification scheme that growers can adopt to demonstrate to their customers that they are doing the right thing. Check the Upcoming Events section on the inside back cover of this magazine or visit www.growcom.com.au for more information. Rachel also updated the audience on the Horticulture Code of Conduct. One aspect of HPA’s that are causing concern is the definition of the term “delivery”. Growcom is currently seeking advice from the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) on this matter and more advice will follow in the coming months to ensure you have the right HPA in place with your traders.

Export was the next topic on the agenda. Dominic Jenkin who is the CEO of the Australian Horticultural Exporters Association provided an overview of exporting – giving out information on the “Paths to Market for Horticulture Exports”. Jane Richter then provided everyone with the good news that through her connections with Griffith University an export plan for the passionfruit industry is to be developed. Growers who may be interested in exporting will be asked to attend regional workshops to assist in the development of the plan. Details will be out soon. The meeting congratulated Jane on another great initiative for the industry. For more information on both export projects see PAGE 22.

SOME KEY TAKE-HOME MESSAGES OF THE DAY — Flavour & eating quality is the key to long term sales and growth for the passionfruit industry — Communication is vital along the supply chain — Horticulture Produce Agreements need to be in place between growers and all their traders and it is important that you negotiate the terms of that (HPA) – don’t just sign up to whatever you are sent without proper review of the terms

— Growers and levy payers who want to know more about what is happening with Hort Innovation need to apply to become members – it is FREE to join

— The future is in sharing and being co-operative

MANY THANKS There are always many people that need to be thanked regarding their help in putting on such a full program. Our first thanks go to Sean Russell who originally suggested the Brisbane Markets and the Brisbane Golf Club as venues for this year’s AGM and Regional Field Day at an earlier Passionfruit Australia Committee meeting. Vanessa Kennedy was the helpful go-between at Brisbane Markets and set up the market visits and worked on the provision of the Training Rooms at the Fresh Centre for our use. Lauren Carr was our coordinator at the Brisbane Golf Club. Our gracious sponsors were J E Tipper, AustSafe Super and Perma-Log Timbers. Without their input we would not have been able to provide such a well facilitated program. We thank them many times over. To the presenters, who provided great information and insights for the industry to take hold of and work with over the coming months and years. We appreciated the work you put into the information you have provided the passionfruit industry. We also note the great work Growcom Fruit and Vegetable photographer Sam Allen-Ankins did in covering the event. Photos are a great reminder about what transpired on the day. To the attendees. It was great to see the discussions and debates happening throughout the day between growers and key supporters. We hope you made the best of your day! To everyone, many thanks

Margie Milgate 20

— PASSIONFRUIT INDUSTRY SERVICES MANAGER

www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au


FEAST ON FRUIT –

JOE CARBONE Since 1999, Feast on Fruit has been providing fresh fruit, vegetables, deli items and gourmet products to customers in the local community of Morningside in inner Brisbane. Sourced daily from the local Rocklea Markets by owners Joe, Sergio and John, the produce found at Feast on Fruit has been hand-selected and is marketed as ‘ready to eat’. As a long-standing retailer in the local community, the business relies heavily on repeat business to stay competitive, particularly in an environment where large supermarkets have become dominant in the last 20 years. Joe recently attended the Regional Field Day at Brisbane Markets and provided some great insights into what he looks for when he buys fruit each day at Rocklea. “Number one for me is the taste. Its got to be sweet, juicy and full of flavour. When I’m buying I taste everything – it doesn’t matter how good it looks if my customers won’t be satisfied with how it eats,” Joe emphasised.

Image courtesy of GROWCOM

To get repeat business, the fruit has to eat well and has to meet the consumers’ expectations for flavour and sweetness. As he said, Joe samples the fruit he is buying and will walk away if the product he is being offered just isn’t up to scratch. And he’s not alone in taking this approach.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR PASSIONFRUIT GROWERS? Although as an industry we have focussed heavily on visual quality indicators, getting the size right and trying to minimise surface blemish, if the fruit doesn’t taste good then consumers simply won’t come back in a hurry and repurchase. Recent market research insights from the team at Hort Innovation have told us that 57% of passionfruit purchases are made on impulse, and if the consumer is disappointed by the eating experience, how likely are they to buy again in a hurry?

WHAT CAN WE DO DIFFERENTLY AS PASSIONFRUIT GROWERS? We can add eating quality to the top of our quality control measures on farm. We can focus on the correct nutrition at the right time to assist with flavour development and we can add a regular testing regime to our procedures for picking and grading using tools like a refractometer to assess brix levels (sugar content) in the fruit. Check out the GROW FRUIT section of the new website for more information about assessing brix levels in your fruit.

Important information for Fruit and Vegetable Growers HORT CODE FACTS

immediate requirementis forin Growers agree to the The Federal Government’s new Horticulture The Code of Conduct forceis toNOW and terms of a Horticulture Produce Agreement (HPA) with each Federal Government’s theThe transition period ends 1 April 2018 Trader they do business with. The term “Trader” is defined

new Horticulture Code of in the Code and includes: isintonow in force. —— AllConduct Growers must enter a Horticulture Produce Agreement (HPA) with any Trader BEFORE selling produce

What do you need to do immediately? • any other Grower who you may sell produce to for subsequent on-sale to a third party;

• any pack house or grower cooperative which buys and markets your —— This applies even if you have been dealing with the same Trader for years where that business is a separate entity to the Grower; The Code contains requirements forsigned fruit and vegetablefrom both produce, —— The HPA must be in writing and have acceptance parties • other “off-Market” Wholesalers who market your produce; and Growers and Traders (Wholesalers). Allhave fruit to and vegetable —— You can negotiate the terms, you do not sign if you are not in agreement, or if the terms are unfair • Market Wholesalers who receive your produce and sell it as either an agent growers should act now to ensure that you and your —— Records must be kept for 6 years or merchant. wholesaler complies with the Code, so that you benefit The Code applies to transactions between all parties who meet the definition the Code can FAILURE provide. TO COMPLY COULD INCUR DIDfrom YOUwhat KNOW THAT A PENALTY TOapply $63,000 – in a Central of being a Trader or a Grower. ItOF doesUP not just to Wholesalers

APPLICABLE TO BOTH TRADERS AND GROWERS? DON’T Market. DELAY, SORT OUT YOUR HPA TODAY!

It is therefore important that Growers engage with all Traders they are doing business with and that you move immediately to agree to the terms of a Code obligationscompliant please HPA. check out these resources:

For the full details of your Visit www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au and see the SELL FRUIT section https://www.accc.gov.au/business/industry-codes/horticulture-code-of-conduct

Objectives of the Code

The objectives of the Horticulture Code of Conduct are to regulate trade between Growers and Traders and to provide fair and equitable dispute resolution procedures.

Central Market Wholesalers are seeking your cooperation The Central Market Wholesaling sector has been proactive in developing THE VINE | SUMMER standard form Terms of Trade and PASSION HPA documents.

2017

These documents have been developed by Solicitors to be compliant with the Code and have been reviewed by the ACCC.

Market Wholesalers are currently customising these

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DOUBLE WHAMMY EXPORT PLANS A small grant has been awarded to the team from the Agribusiness research stream at Griffith University by the Commonwealth Government under the Project Assisting Small Exporters (PASE) funding scheme to investigate export capability, willingness and capacity within the Australian Passionfruit industry. The team is led by Associate Professor Robin Roberts, who is strongly involved in research and teaching in the areas of product innovation in food value chains and international business. Joining her on the team is Dr Deborah Delaney who brings expertise in international finance and investment decision-making. The project will hold a series of regional focus-group style workshops during December and January across the major growing regions and all passionfruit growers are invited to participate. Full details of the locations and timing will be communicated shortly. Following the workshops, a draft plan will be written and then a smaller selection of industry stakeholders will review and refine the plan with the team. The final step will be a presentation of the plan and recommended next steps to the industry in mid-2018.

L-R: Associate Professor Robin Roberts and Dr Deborah Delaney

At the same time, Hort Innovation has commissioned the team at McKinna et al to produce an export plan across a number of tropical fruit industries including bananas, lychees, persimmons, limes, passionfruit and papaya. The project, MT17002 – Tropical Fruit Export Strategy, will be developed through engaging with Hort Innovation, industry representative bodies, federal and state governments and other stakeholders, to collate information and undertake supporting analysis, to clearly identify market access goals and objectives for the tropical industries. This will include, but not be limited to, the identification and prioritisation of key export markets and key export commodities into those markets, market access priorities ranked across the industry, maintaining or improving current market access and relevant protocols, developing new export markets where market access is available and growing current export markets. The strategy should outline the long term strategic export objectives for each industry as well as shorter term market/commodity specific objectives. McKinna et al have a proven track record in delivering this type of project; they have recently completed an exhaustive study for Hort Innovation: VG15052 Vegetable Industry Export Strategy using funds from the Vegetables levy and funds from the Australian Government.

Let’s talk about your industry

Meet the passionfruit industry Relationship Manager and see how he can support you. Bradley is keen to chat with you. He is your link to the latest R&D and marketing developments and how these can help your business grow. It’s easy to request a phone call – just go to the ‘Contact Me’ form at horticulture.com.au/contact-me. Alternatively, call 02 8295 2300 or email membership@horticulture.com.au and let us know you would like Bradley to call you.

Bradley Mills Relationship Manager Hort Innovation

22

www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au

horticulture.com.au


Grab a cuppa, put your feet up & enjoy!

SPOT THE DIFFERENCE

There are

10 differences between these two pictures!

Passiflora facts Passiflora edulis made it onto the

Global Invasive Species Database in 2010 due to its ability to survive and spread!

CUT OUT AND KEEP ME

There are over 450 different species of passion flowers. The benefits of passion fruit flowers are widely known: in antiquity, the Aztecs used them for their relaxing effects thanks to a substance called passiflorine, a natural tranquilliser.

mecolourin!

WORD SEARCH

AUSSIE TRIVIA-TIME WHO MADE THE 1ST FLIGHT ACROSS THE PACIFIC FROM CALIFORNIA TO BRISBANE IN 1928? WHAT IS A QUANDONG? WHO WAS BORN IN HOBART IN 1909 FOUND FAME IN HOLLYWOOD WITH HIS ROMANTIC SWASHBUCKLER ROLES? THE BEEHIVE CORNER IS A LANDMARK IN WHICH CITY CENTRE? HOW MANY MILLION MEAT PIES DO AUSSIES CONSUME ON AVERAGE PER YEAR?

*** ALL ANSWERS OVERLEAF ***

THE PASSION VINE | SUMMER 2017

23


GRILLED CHICKEN SALAD

with hot-passion sauce SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE DRESSING

METHOD

Splash of olive oil

1/3 cup fresh passionfruit pulp

1. Preheat a barbecue plate or char-grill on medium heat. Brush with oil to grease. Add the chicken & cook for 5 minutes each side or until cooked through.

2 large chicken breast fillets, halved lengthways 150g mixed salad & herb leaves including Coriander 2 medium ripe mangoes, cut into chunks 200g cherry tomatoes, halved 1 large avocado, flesh coarsely chopped

2 teaspoons fresh lime juice

1 small fresh red chilli, thinly sliced

2. Toss the salad herbs & leaves, mango chunks, tomatoes & avocado together and spread on a large serving platter. Season with salt & pepper. Combine the passionfruit pulp, lime juice, olive oil & chilli in a small bowl.

(include the seeds for extra heat)

3. Slice the chicken & pile on top of the salad. Drizzle over the hot passion dressing & serve.

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

AJÍ DE MARACUYÁ or hot-passion sauce is a dressing from Ecuador often eaten on chicken empanadas or with grilled fish.

SERVE & ENJOY! Original photo by Ive Erhard

How many million meat pies do Aussies consume on average per year? 250 MILLION – THAT’S MORE THAN 10 PIES FOR EVERY MAN, WOMAN & CHILD CURRENTLY LIVING IN AUSTRALIA! The Beehive Corner is a landmark in which city centre? ADELAIDE Who was born in Hobart in 1909 & found fame in Hollywood with his romantic swashbuckler roles? ERROL FLYNN

10 differences between these two pictures

SPOT THE DIFFERENCE

WORD SEARCH

AUSSIE TRIVIA-TIME

www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au

There are

Who made the first flight across the Pacific from California to Brisbane in 1928? CHARLES KINGSFORD SMITH

24

CUT OUT AND KEEP ME

What is a quandong? A FRUIT

ANSWERS

For more delicious passionfruit recipes Visit www.aussiepassionfruit.com.au


GET INVOLVED

UPCOMING EVENTS

Passionfruit Australia Inc. (PAI) is the peak industry body representing passionfruit growers in Australia

2017

HOW TO JOIN PASSIONFRUIT AUSTRALIA

DECEMBER

BECOMING A MEMBER GIVES YOU:

—  Access to projects funded by PAI or through competitive grants which provide funds outside of the existing levy system — Grower alerts about immediate threats to your business from weather or pest events provided by our Management Committee

—  Representation by an industry body who has your interests as its only priority

MEMBERSHIP RATES | 2017/18 New Grower Member: Renewal Grower Member: New Associate Member: Renewal Associate Member:

$253 $198 $297 $242

Farm Business Management Training Workshop – Goondiwindi (growcom.com.au)

Farm Business Management Training Workshop – Dalby 7-8 (growcom.com.au) Freshcare Food Safety & Quality V4 – Townsville (growcom.com.au)

Associate Members receive a 20% discount on advertising packages which include more than one advertising insertion.

HOW TO JOIN HORT INNOVATION IT IS FREE TO JOIN AND BECOMING A MEMBER GIVES YOU:

—  Free access to Hort Innovation Final Reports —  A monthly e-newsletter, Growing Innovation —  Direct invitations to participate in industry events, as well as Hort Innovation consultations and forums

—  The opportunity to exercise voting rights at Hort Innovation’s Annual General Meeting Please remember paying a levy does not automatically make you a member of Hort Innovation. If you haven’t become a member, then now is your opportunity. To join, visit www.horticulture.com.au/membership-application-form

7

Farm to restaurant Dinner Bowen 10 (bowengumlugrowers.com.au) Export Plan Workshops

Membership runs from July 1st to June 30th each year, irrespective of the date joined. Membership lapses if renewal not paid within three months of the start of the fiscal year.

5-6

TBC

2018 JANUARY Export Plan Workshops

TBC

FEBRUARY Workplace Essentials Workshops QAWN Mackay 6 QAWN Bowen 7 QAWN Charters Towers 8 QAWN Kingaroy 20 QAWN Chinchilla 21 To register, visit: www.growcom.com.au/wes

JUNE Hort Connections – Brisbane 18-20 Passionfruit Research Forum – Brisbane 21

“Everything great was accomplished by fools who dreamed." EMILY DANA

Regional Field Day Program for 2018-19 TBC


BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

FUNDED BY:

www.passionfruitaustralia.org.au

The Passion Vine summer 2017  
The Passion Vine summer 2017  

The quarterly magazine for the Australian Passionfruit Industry. The production of this magazine has been funded by Hort Innovation, using t...

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