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Cruise: U.S. and International Trends

Clear Seas: Marine Spatial Planning

Technology: Alfa Laval — The Separation Experts

BC SHIPPING Commercial Marine News for Canada’s West Coast.

Volume 8 Issue 3

www.bcshippingnews.com

NEWS April 2018

Industry Insight A renewed call for a strong voice for cruise in B.C.

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BC SHIPPING

CONTENTS April 2018 Volume 8 Issue 3

NEWS

Cover Story 38

7

EDITOR’S NOTE

8

IN BRIEF

12

INDUSTRY INSIGHT

By Jane McIvor

16

Industry traffic and news briefs Energizing the industry Mary-Ann Isinger, President, Cruise Industry Association of B.C. As Manager, Port Operations for Holland America Group, Isinger is well-suited to reinvigorate support for suppliers to B.C.’s cruise industry.

19

19

B.C. CRUISE UPDATE Excitement builds for 2018 season

Alfa Laval — the separation experts

45

CLEAR SEAS

48

LEGAL AFFAIRS

50

BOOK REVIEW

52

GREEN MARINE

24 TECHNOLOGY

Thordon marks 20-year milestone for shaft bearings on cruise ships

25

2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE

33

U.S. CRUISE

Arrival and departure times for cruise ships vising Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle U.S. Pacific Coast cruise outlook By Darryl Anderson

On the leading edge of everything By Captain Stephen Brown

42 TECHNOLOGY

HISTORY LESSON

Profile: Dr. Joost Schokkenbroek New Executive Director gets ready to spice things up

INTERNATIONAL CRUISE

Marine Spatial Planning By Peter Ellis Farley Mowat’s story By Glen Krueger Canada’s Arctic A Guide to Adventure Through the Northwest Passage By Captain Ken Burton GreenTech 2018 Delegates will have plenty to see, do and learn at this year’s conference

25

12

On the cover: Holland America’s Zuiderdam at Canada Place (photo: BC Shipping News); above: the Disney Wonder (photo: David Price); right: the Carnival Legend at Ogden Point (photo: BC Shipping News); left: Mary-Ann Isinger (photo: BC Shipping News)

April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 5


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April 2018 Volume 8/Issue 3

BC Shipping News is as much a business journal as it is a forum for the industry. With informative, educational and entertaining articles, BCSN is a vehicle for discussion on local, national and international maritime issues.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Photo: Dave Roels

I

A new energy for B.C.’s cruise industry

was very excited to hear the news that the Cruise Industry Association of British Columbia (CIABC) had been resurrected following a few years of dormancy. I had flashbacks to onboard luncheons, cruise appreciation receptions at Seatrade and a camradery that defined the very essence of the industry in B.C. CIABC will always hold a special place in my heart. Having managed the association for over 10 years before starting BC Shipping News, what struck me most about it was the way members would think nothing of helping each other out when needed. Whether it was to provide an introduction to a key cruise line representative, assist with an onboard job or provide a solution for a logistics issue, there was a bond between CIABC

members that isn’t typically experienced between competitors. Given the significance of the cruise industry to B.C.’s economy — $2.2 billion in direct and indirect ecomic impacts and over 15,000 jobs in 2016 — the reinvigoration of CIABC comes at a time when growth continues to present opportunities for more businesses to get involved. In listening to Mary-Ann Isinger, President, CIABC, and Steve Hnatko, Treasurer, the goals being set for the future reflect that same aspiration that defined the association in the past — to create a community within the local industry that goes beyond simply an association in name only. To help Mary-Ann, Steve and the Board of Directors (and yes, of course George Kowalski from Vancouver Shipyards and

founding member of CIABC remains on the Board!), BC Shipping News encourages you to participate! Whether you’re a government representative (any level), a marine chandlery, a port, a service supplier or a tourism operator, there is a place for you at CIABC. The spirit of CIABC is exactly as it always was — a vehicle of support for members while focused on the bigger picture. As Mary-Ann noted in our interview, “a rising tide floats all boats.” I look forward to reporting on CIABC activities in the coming years and providing as much support as they need to ensure success. And yes, BCSN will be joining. I hope you do, too. Visit www.ciabc.ca for information. — Jane McIvor

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INDUSTRY TRAFFIC

Lloyd’s Register teams up with Hanseaticsoft for efficient ship management processes

H

anseaticsoft’s innovative cloudbased ship management software, Cloud Fleet Manager, brings efficiency to shipping companies’ process management, delivering reliable teamwork worldwide, digitalization of vessel audits in real-time on tablet or smartphone, and intuitive handling of all applications. The shipping sector is subject to complex process management with numerous tasks arising both on shore and on board vessels with multiple teams involved. Shipping companies are often confronted with the problem that information doesn’t exist uniformly or is incomplete. This leads to even simple information processes taking up a lot of valuable time. Employees of shipping companies, external agencies and crews on the high seas need to work in an interconnected way to exchange data in real-time, enabling the management of all processes efficiently and reliably. By offering a single,

web-based source of information for all employees as well as the crews at sea and external partners, Cloud Fleet Manager not only ensures that everybody can work on reliable and consistent data, but even extra work, like the requesting and forwarding of information, can be drastically reduced. The software suite comprises of more than 25 applications, among others: Purchase, Inspections & Audits, Schedule & Agents, Crewing, Charter, Risk Assessment and Maintenance. Cloud Fleet Manager centralizes data and makes it available to all involved parties on their browser, regardless of time or location. The interface of the cloud-based solution is designed to be easy to use and can be handled intuitively by every employee. Distinctive icons and colour coding support the clear design and help to flag urgent actions and to set priorities. Managing Director of Hanseaticsoft GmbH, Alexander Buchmann said: “The

cloud is being embraced by some of the world’s leading shipping companies who are taking advantage of increasingly affordable and accessible cloud platforms to implement smarter, faster and more effective processes. Having up-to-date and reliable information available in real time supports better decision making, helps companies reduce costs, increase the return on investment and drive economies of scale, from a single ship to the entire fleet.” David Barrow, Lloyd’s Register, Director, Innovation, Marketing and Sales, Marine and Offshore said: “We will be working closely with Hanseaticsoft this year to support our clients on their digital journey. Hanseaticsoft is one of the major players in the industry, offering innovative technology solutions and fresh perspectives that significantly improve business performance and we are pleased to be able to offer their services to our clients.”

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NEWS BRIEFS

Sharing lessons learned and best practices

T

he CLEAN PACIFIC Conference & Exhibition happens June 20-21 in Portland, Oregon. CLEAN PACIFIC takes place at the Oregon Convention Center and is a must-attend event for those involved in spill prevention and response for oil and hazardous materials in the marine and inland environment. CLEAN PACIFIC brings together stakeholders in spill prevention and response from government, environmental, emergency planning, and emergency response industries to share lessons learned, hear best practices and view new products and services. The goal of CLEAN PACIFIC is to deliver a valuable event that covers the most pressing issues in the Western United States and Canada and offers ample time for attendees to network and cultivate the relationships that are crucial to a successful response. Starting on Wednesday, June 20, four concurrent tracks will take place: Prevention, Case Studies, Planning and Preparedness, and Response and Recovery.

Over a two-day period, each track will hold multiple educational sessions led by spill prevention and response experts.

Sessions on Wednesday, June 20:

• Derelict and abandoned vessel prevention • Better, faster, newer: Innovations in creating and updating Geographic Response Plans • Emerging technology • Prevention of groundings • Creating realistic exercises to improve emergency management team response capabilities • Applied response technologies • Prevention and early interdiction response • Volunteer management • Surveillance and visualization

Sessions on Thursday, June 21:

• Natural disasters — how prepared are we really? • Regulated community challenges — changing focus of federal preemption

• Wildlife response issues • Oil spill and HAZMAT case studies • Transboundary issues — mounting a successful response • Funding the response • Risk assessments as a tool for preventing spills • Communications: Who’s doing it? • Environmental restoration and recovery promotion The CLEAN PACIFIC exhibit hall will feature 50+ exhibitors showcasing their products and services for spill prevention and response operations. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with all of the exhibitors to discuss their unique products and services over a twoday period. Subscribers of BC Shipping News receive a $50 registration discount to attend CLEAN PACIFIC. Use VIP code BCNEWS in online registration. For information on registration, session descriptions and a list of exhibitors, visit www.cleanpacific.org.

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April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 9


NEWS BRIEFS

New CFO announced for Seaspan Shipyards

S

easpan Shipyards (Seaspan) is pleased to announce the appointment of Christof Brass as Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Christof brings over 20 years of experience successfully delivering large, complex programs for multinational companies. With an extensive background in strategic financial planning and analysis, Christof will help drive the continued success and improvement of Seaspan. “As a leader with experience in transforming international finance teams, Christof has all of the skills that we were looking for to lead the financial components of our business,” said Brian Carter, President and CEO – Seaspan Shipyards.

“We are pleased to welcome him to Seaspan as our company continues to grow and look forward to the contributions he will make.” Christof is a highly accomplished finance executive who will provide the leadership and guidance necessary to build a strong, integrated and efficient finance team. In addition, his industry background — which includes contributing to the profitable growth of aerospace and defence programs at Airbus Group — is valuable as Seaspan continues to develop the systems and processes required to deliver on its commitments to the Government of Canada as part of the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

“ C h r i s t of will be an integral member of our Executive Leadership Team in the newly created role of CFO. He will play a key role in our efforts to deliver on commitments for our customers and ensure the long-term success of our business,” said Carter. Christof’s expertise includes leading diverse teams of finance professionals, business planning and analysis, largescale capital project delivery, accounting and auditing, financial performance management, investor relations, as well as business partnering and successfully managing rapid growth.

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NEWS BRIEFS

Kongsberg Digital advances ‘simulation as a service’ with BCIT

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ongsberg Digital has signed the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) as a pilotcustomer for the cloud-based application of the sophisticated K-Sim simulation technology. BCIT will be among the first to offer simulation as a service by integrating K-Sim with the new Kognifai digital platform, to enable its students to train anytime and anywhere. Initially, Kongsberg Digital will focus on enabling students at BCIT’s School of Energy to use the K-Sim Engine Thermal Power Plant (TPP) simulator for industrial/utilities engineers, by giving them access through their own devices. However, the train anytime and anywhere strategy is already set to improve and extend the use of simulation in power engineering training. In addition to the K-Sim Engine TPP, the first maritime engine room simulators will soon be running in the Kognifai cloud environment, extending the K-Sim

product offering from traditional classroom and full-mission simulators to include self-study training where students can use their own computers to access high-quality, simulation-based courses. With cloud-based training, instructors can assign exercises to students who can complete them anytime and anywhere. The training provider can complement traditional simulator training in the centre with training beyond physical confines and opening hours. The benefits of cloud-based training using high-quality simulators that are easily accessed and managed by instructors and students through a web portal, are numerous. Through integration of the K-Sim platform with Kognifai, Kongsberg Digital focuses on convenience and ease of use for all users to ensure that students have a more complete and flexible platform to reach their training objectives. Additionally, as the solution is provided as

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT Energizing the industry

CIABC renews its call for a strong voice for cruise in B.C.

A return to its roots

“CIABC represents those businesses in British Columbia that make this industry work,” said Isinger in a recent interview with BC Shipping News. “It has always been an inclusive association for anyone involved in the local cruise industry and its mandate has never changed since Day One: to foster the economic growth of the B.C. cruise industry and to enhance business opportunities for its members.” Having been involved with CIABC during its formative years, Isinger can attest to the consistency of messaging. “Our core activities have always involved creating a link to cruise line representatives 12 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

Photo: BC Shipping News

M

ary-Ann Isinger is wearing two hats these days. As Manager, Port Operations for Holland America Group, her experience with over 100 ports around the world provides a unique perspective — one that is put to good use in her role as President, Cruise Industry Association of B.C. (CIABC). Since CIABC was established in 1986, both it and the local cruise industry it represents have seen many changes: the opening of Canada Place, one of the world’s top-rated cruise terminals; the pre-911 days where one could simply walk on board a ship without so much as a glance from staff; the post-911 days where security added a new layer to logistics; the ebbs and flows of traffic — peaks in the late 1990s, dips in the early 2000s and stellar growth in the past 10 years, especially for Vancouver and Victoria. Through it all, in one form or another, CIABC has been there. Now, a new chapter in the association’s history is unfolding. Isinger, along with Treasurer Steve Hnatko, General Manager, West Coast Agencies (citing only one of the roles he plays in the Tidal Transportation family of companies), and a Board of Directors who represent the many sectors impacted by the fortunes of cruise, are breathing new life into CIABC and, at the same time, reinvigorating B.C.’s cruise industry.

Mary-Ann Isinger, President, Cruise Industry Association of B.C. (Manager, Port Operations, Holland America Group) with Steve Hnatko, Treasurer, CIABC (General Manager, West Coast Agencies).

...at its peak in the mid-2000s, CIABC’s membership reflected the many businesses and services that were needed to provide a smooth experience for lines visiting B.C.’s West Coast. — for example, organizing a presence at the Seatrade Cruise Convention in Florida, networking events like onboard luncheons, membership directories and capabilities guides. These initiatives gave members an opportunity not only to build relationships with cruise line representatives but to also come together as a community and support one another.” Indeed, at its peak in the mid-2000s, CIABC’s membership reflected the many businesses and services that were needed to provide a smooth experience for lines visiting B.C.’s West Coast. A victim of its own success, volunteers within the association found less and less time to focus on growing the industry as an ever-increasing workload took their attention. By 2012, the association saw an opportunity to more effectively represent members through a closer collaboration with

Cruise BC, a destination marketing association with a funding model that provided greater opportunities to promote the province’s appeal and capabilities directly to cruise lines. For the next few years, CIABC and Cruise BC jointly organized a B.C. Pavilion at Seatrade, hosted events and provided a platform for promotion of B.C.’s industry. When Cruise BC ceased operations, the local industry found itself without a central hub. While Cruise Lines International Association — North West and Canada (CLIA-NWC) has always been there to provide that crucial link to the cruise lines, local businesses have been challenged in finding a community of support amongst themselves. Enter CIABC 2.0 — a re-energized nonprofit association with an eager board who wants to regain the strength that comes


INDUSTRY INSIGHT Photo: Jane McIvor/CIABC archives

from a cohesive industry. “As port operations manager, I see how much behindthe-scenes activity it takes to ensure smooth operations for a cruise vessel visit,” Isinger said. “Working with appointed agents in each port, we deal with things like customs and security, immigration, fuel bunkering, provisioning, port regulations, and medical affairs for crew — if one person doesn’t show up or doesn’t do their job, it impacts on the entire chain. And we’re only as strong as our weakest link.” It’s for this reason that Isinger sees the need to create a network of support. Isinger isn’t the only one who feels the industry can only get stronger through re-establishing CIABC. She and Hnatko, along with founding director George Kowalski (Vancouver Shipyards), returning directors Peter Lehmann, Vice President (Envirosystems), Michael Waddington (Clean Air Services) and James Collins (Tymac Launch Services Ltd.), have been meeting over the past six months to restore the association to its former glory. Supported by Joan D’Angola, CIABC’s office manager, the team has been working

Familiar faces: George Kowalski (far left), Mary-Ann Isinger (third from left) and Brian Ellis (second from right) at Seatrade in 2005, are spearheading the return of CIABC. hard to lay the foundation that CIABC previously enjoyed. Having been with the association since 1986, Kowalski’s experience both with CIABC’s activities and the local cruise industry are extensive. His position as Manager, International Marketing and

Harbour Repair for Vancouver Shipyards means he is the go-to guy for many of the cruise line representatives when they are in need of service on Canada’s West Coast. “With someone as knowledgeable and as connected as George on the Board, CIABC members are able to seek out his

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT advice on potential new business opportunities,” said Isinger. Another familiar industry face who is lending his guidance and expertise is Brian Ellis, recently retired from Holland America Group but still very much a part of the cruise industry.

Building a community

Estimates from the most recent CLIANWC economic impact study (2016) show the cruise industry as having a $2.2-billion direct and indirect economic impact in British Columbia. The study further noted that 15,000 direct and indirect jobs

“Having a central spot for members without the expense of a full booth and full-time staffing was of great value for many smaller businesses...” rely on the cruise sector in B.C. with total wages and salaries amounting to some $712 million. Those numbers aren’t lost on CIABC directors. Recognizing the significance of the cruise industry to British Columbia, “there’s very much a role for CIABC to play in becoming a central hub for the local industry,” said Steve Hnatko as he outlined some of the initiatives being planned for

the coming months. “There are a number of projects we’d like to see implemented over the next year — for example, a fresh website, newsletters and networking events to start but also address some of the important issues that come up every year just before the cruise season starts. There are always new regulations or new procedures and we see a lot of value in hosting sessions where experts can provide updates.

One of CIABC’s major annual initiatives was organizing Canada’s West Coast Pavilion at the Seatrade Cruise Convention. Images above illustrate the additional exposure that participants gained by being part of a larger group (photos: Jane McIvor/CIABC archives). 14 — BC Shipping News — April 2018


INDUSTRY INSIGHT “Another initiative we would like to see come back is the shared presence at Seatrade,” he continued. “Having a central spot for members without the expense of a full booth and full-time staffing was of great value for many smaller businesses that couldn’t have a presence on the trade show floor. This is something we’re hoping to have organized in time for the 2019 show.” Another idea that reflects the current needs of members includes using the association as a resource for employment opportunities. “We see a lot of value in establishing a mentor or apprenticeship program and connecting local training institutes with members. This provides an excellent opportunity for members to gain access to new employees as well as have students gain hands-on experience in the industry.” Both Isinger and Hnatko believe the association can play a key role beyond providing a network for local industry players. Having named the Mission to Seafarers as the benefactor of funds raised through networking events, one of the goals for the refreshed association is to provide support for crew from visiting cruise ships. “Activities like shoebox campaigns (boxes with basic necessities) not only provide support to seafarers but have a way of strengthening the local industry in the process,” said Isinger, further noting that seafarer centres play an important role in acting as a “glue” for the local industry.

Call to action

The next steps for CIABC’s board will ultimately define the success of the association moving forward. Hnatko noted that, in these formative months, it will be very important to engage old and new members alike and ask them to identify those issues that are most important to them as well as suggest ways CIABC can help to address those issues.

“Using Tymac as an example, we are always trying to find ways to better communicate with government, ports, cruise lines and suppliers on the sensitivities around environmental stewardship,” he said. “CIABC provides that conduit to help everyone understand local regulations and ensure that operations can move ahead without issue.” As noted previously, CIABC has always been an inclusive association and, when asked about potential members, Hnatko and Isinger started listing off the various sectors involved in the industry that would benefit from a closer relationship. From the local fish supplier or chandlery on through to shipyards, shipping agents, marine service and supplies providers, stevedores, tourism services, governments, port authorities and even the cruise lines themselves will all be invited to join. In addition, they both see building relationships with other marine associations and non-profit organizations as critical to forging a true sense of community. “Take the Vancouver Maritime Museum, for example,” said Isinger. “There are ways we can be of benefit to each other — we can provide a source of visitors by promoting the museum to passengers and they are able to tell the industry’s story through exhibits.” Listening to the needs of members, finding ways to address their issues and providing support is just one side of the social contract, noted Isinger. “CIABC will need industry support through participation,” she said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be reaching out to all sectors and potential members and we’d like to encourage everyone to get behind us and show their support of the association.” To get in touch with any of CIABC’s directors or learn more about membership, contact Joan D’Angola at info@ ciabc.ca (604-619-9699). BCSN

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PROFILE

New Executive Director gets ready to spice things up

Background

Prior to taking on his current position, Dr. Joost Schokkenbroek was the Chief Curator for the Dutch National Maritime Museum. He started his museum career at the Kendall Whaling Museum in Sharon, Massachusetts, U.S. After three years, he and his wife moved to Amsterdam in January 1991. In 2008, Schokkenbroek obtained his PhD in maritime history at Leiden University. In addition to numerous board positions (for example, past Secretary-General and President, Netherlands Association for Maritime History; past President, Netherlands Association for Vexillology; and a Director on the board of the Directie der Oostersche Handel en Reederijen, one of the oldest Dutch maritime funds related to the maritime historical connections between the Netherlands and the Baltic region), Dr. Schokkenbroek was a professor at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam as well as Chair of Maritime History and Maritime Heritage. And if the above is not enough to impress, he has published numerous works on whaling history, the admiralties in the 17th and 18th centuries, the Dutch East and West India Companies, maritime art

16 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

Photo: Kurt von Hahn/Vancouver Maritime Museum

S

ince arriving in Vancouver to fill the role of Executive Director at the Vancouver Maritime Museum (VMM) in July 2017, Dr. Joost Schokkenbroek has been enamoured with the city, its residents and, of course, its maritime museum. “Everyone I’ve met is so open, so generous with their time and ideas,” he said in an interview with BC Shipping News. “And there’s so much enthusiasm. It’s a wonderful stimulus.” Seeing great potential for the future of the museum, Schokkenbroek has embarked on a strategy that promises to bring a renewed vibrancy, not only to the museum, but to the surrounding area at Vanier Park. And with that renewed vibrancy, he believes we’ll see a revitalized passion for the City’s iconic collection of maritime artifacts.

Dr. Joost Schokkenbroek is bringing a renewed sense of vitality to the VMM with his forward-looking plans.

Seeing great potential for future of the museum, Schokkenbroek has embarked on a strategy that promises to bring a renewed vibrancy, not only to the museum, but to the surrounding area at Vanier Park. and artefacts, and on the maritime history between the Netherlands and the Baltic. Additional works published focus on artefacts, museum collections and material culture in general and their importance as sources for historical research. In due course, Schokkenbroek wants to connect the Vancouver Maritime Museum with universities to set up courses in maritime history, material culture and museum studies. His experience in Amsterdam was that, for academia and museums, the mutual benefits are substantial. Just to mention one of many: students can do their research in museum collections, and museums can benefit from the results of their endeavours in exhibits.

The task at hand

Schokkenbroek’s first priority upon arrival at the VMM was the internal organization of the museum. “After lengthy

conversations with staff to get an understanding of their skills,” he said, “I realized there was some significant talent here and they have some very creative ideas for the museum. I want to stimulate that — I tell them to dazzle me with their wildest ideas.” At the same time, Schokkenbroek began building relationships with government representatives, other local museum and cultural directors and, of course, key players in the local maritime industry. While the results have been very positive — for example, the recent shared “Into the Arctic” exhibit between the museum and the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, as well as the Princess Sophia exhibit from the Maritime Museum of BC that will be on display at the VMM in April — Schokkenbroek is holding off on reaching out further, including to international institutions, until his house is in order.


VANCOUVER MARITIME MUSEUM Photo: Duncan MacLeod /Vancouver Maritime Museum

One of Schokkenbroek’s main priorities is to find more storage fo the museum’s extensive collection. “We’re making great progress,” he said. “Our education programs are very popular, the number of visitors is increasing (especially since we expanded our hours to seven days a week) and we have exhibits that are refreshed more frequently. So when it comes to some of these basic museum activities like exhibits, education and research, we’re doing quite well.” So, what’s missing? While Schokkenbroek feels the museum is gaining a higher level of credibility and professionalism, he has turned his attention to the state of the museum’s collections and management of those collections. “Bottom line, we need more storage space and we need more staff to help get the collections in order. Right now, we only have one curator and one librarian and archivist — so two positions for a collection that includes upwards of 40,000 artifacts, 100,000 photos, dozens if not hundreds of archives and about 14,000 books. While these two staff members are very bright and very hardworking, there’s only so much they can do in a day.” Noting backlogs with registration, digitization and proper storage conditions, Schokkenbroek is holding off on reaching out to his peers around the world until the collection is in order. “That’s very important because we must be able to say to our constituency that we work together worldwide with other museums in providing loans, in putting exhibitions together, and in organizing conferences,” he said, estimating that another two assistants would be a good start.

But there are limitations, especially with a building that is located on a flood plain. “We have been advised of the likelihood of frequent flooding so we are looking into options for other locations. In reality, I think we’ll be here for a number of years still so we have to balance our needs now with those of the future,” Schokkenbroek said, noting the paradox of the excellent location of the VMM but the limits posed by that location and the building itself. “To really present the gems we have and the richness of the programs, as well as highlighting our signature piece, the National

John M. Horton, Marine Artist Paintings and limited edition prints for corporate offices, retirement gifts and marine art collections

Forward planning

Schokkenbroek has already developed a business plan for moving forward but much depends on whether additional funding can be found. “For the collections backlog and getting it to a level where we can reach out to other museums would take three or four years. An estimated total of $2 million spread out over four years should suffice to create better storage, have the complete collection digitized, registered and accessible via the museum’s website. If we can find 10 parties willing to spend $50,000 for four years we’re there,” he said. “I’d also like to create more of a link between the museum and Heritage Harbour. There are some wonderful assets here and great opportunities to build on them to provide more awareness for the VMM as well as create new revenue streams.”

“Vancouver Bound” This specially commissioned painting features the tanker MT Kirkeholmen heading for Vancouver on one of her regular north bound transits.

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www.johnhorton.ca (604) 943-4399 / john@johnhorton.ca April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 17


VANCOUVER MARITIME MUSEUM

Photo: Kurt von Hahn/Vancouver Maritime Museum

Potentially, some readers of BC Shipping News may hold the keys to spaces the museum can use for [storage].

Schokkenbroek gets ready to select the winner of the VMM’s Grand Prize Raffle with Chair of the Board of Trustees, Peter Bernard, and Catherine Butler, Director of Development. Heritage Site St. Roch, we need three to four times the space we currently have — at least double the space for St. Roch alone,” he said. “We’re exploring all options at this point.” In the meantime, Schokkenbroek sees great potential in expanding on the present location as well as sharing exhibits. “There is no coffee shop between the Boathouse complex at

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Sunset Beach and Granville Island. I would love to explore the opportunity to set up a small coffee shop (of the type you find in Canada, not those in Amsterdam) here that would serve as a gathering place and draw people toward the VMM. And there are more opportunities to share exhibits. In meeting with the Director of Vancouver Civic Theatres, she noted the amount of underutilized space they have so there is a great opportunity to work together.” Schokkenbroek has also reached out to the executive directors of Vanier Park institutions as well as the Seaforth Highlanders. “I would love for us to create a cultural festival once a year,” he said. “I believe the City needs this — a cultural hub, not just for residents but for the millions of tourists that visit. And I would love to get the area close to Heritage Harbour dredged to be able to create a maritime festival, ideally with larger sailing vessels visiting.”

The importance of partnerships

Schokkenbroek emphasized that many of his plans will require close collaboration with key partners, including greater outreach to current and potential sponsors. “We have received such significant support from industry partners like Teekay, Seaspan and the Port of Vancouver,” he said, adding that he would like to find more opportunities to collaborate with these organizations as well as others in the industry. To do that, Schokkenbroek believes there are a lot of opportunities to reach out to local residents. The museum should become more community-based. “Many residents have told me that they have visited the museum only two or three times — once, as part of a school field trip when they were young; again when they brought their own child here; and for some, when they have brought their grandchildren. There’s a common sentiment that the museum might be an interesting gem but we need to find ways to spice things up.” With ideas like creating a patio where there is an opportunity to sit and enjoy a coffee while taking in the surroundings, offering the space for rent for other events, or even holding social events for people to meet and network, Schokkenbroek brings with him a fresh, creative approach that promises to lead to a reinvigoration of the museum and the surrounding area. But first, the priorities — more staff, more storage and more funding. “I would love to find some good storage space close by. That’s a big priority. Potentially, some readers of BC Shipping News may hold the keys to spaces the museum can use for this important purpose. Our assets are our collections and it’s very important to have them organized. Without a collection, you’re not a museum — and the VMM has the potential to be so much more than just a museum. It should become a meeting place where people living in this great city or visiting it as tourists have a wonderful time experiencing hospitality, quietness, great views over English Bay and — yes, of course — fabulous displays and stories in the museum. BCSN


B.C. CRUISE UPDATE

Excitement builds for 2018 season

W

ith 2018 set to be a record year for B.C.’s West Coast cruise season, the buzz of anticipation is already underway. The big news for this season is the inaugural visit of the Norwegian Bliss. With over 4,000 passengers, it is the largest vessel by far to ever sail in the Alaska cruise theatre. And while technically not an update for 2018, we’re excited to hear news of Port Alberni’s return to the cruise market with visits from Holland America Line in 2019. Here’s how the season is shaping up for B.C.’s ports:

Port of Vancouver will see another year of strong growth in cruise traffic in 2018

The Port of Vancouver is expecting to welcome nearly 900,000 passengers through Canada Place on more than 240 vessel calls from 14 different cruise lines in 2018. This represents eight per cent growth over 2017, which brought 842,928 passengers on 237 vessel calls to Vancouver. Highlights of the 2018 season include several calls from new vessels, such as seven homeported calls from Windstar Cruises’ Star Legend and a repositioning call from the Norwegian Bliss. The Norwegian Bliss will be the biggest vessel to berth in Vancouver, and one of the largest ships deployed in the Alaska market. The port will also reach an important milestone as it welcomes its 25 millionth cruise passenger at its iconic Canada Place cruise terminal early in the season. Canada Place has been a leading homeport for Alaska cruises for more than 30 years. Ships of various sizes call at Canada Place, offering passengers the full-spectrum of choice from mass market to luxury options. Boasting an award-winning and fullservice cruise terminal, Vancouver is the only homeport offering one-way and round-trip cruises through the scenic Inside Passage, a stunning coastal route that runs along the West Coast of British Columbia. Flying to or from Anchorage, passengers can enjoy the “full Alaska experience” on ships sailing one-way Alaska itineraries.

Photo courtesy: Port of Vancouver

Vancouver’s Canada Place will welcome nearly 900,000 passengers this year. A number of initiatives continue to enhance the flow and overall guest experience at Canada Place. These include a new wayfinding and signage program, reconfiguration of terminal space designed to expand passenger processing, and a reconfiguration of the ground transportation area designed to improve vehicle and pedestrian flows. In addition, gangways, camels and fendering systems will be upgraded for every berth in the next two years. Additional space will continue to be leased from the nearby Convention Centre during

the cruise season to increase passenger embarkation space. Welcoming hundreds of thousands of passengers each season, Vancouver is a very popular destination for cruise travel and cruise continues to be an important and growing sector at the port. The Vancouver cruise industry stimulates on average nearly $3 million in direct economic activity for each vessel that visits Canada Place, and the 2016 cruise season directly generated nearly 7,000 jobs across Canada, $300 million in wages, and contributed $840 million to the national GDP.

April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 19


B.C. CRUISE UPDATE

Photo: BC Shipping News

The Carnival Legend will be a frequent visitor to Victoria’s Ogden Point again in 2018.

Upward trend for Victoria’s cruise business continues

Following a seven-per cent increase in ship calls in 2017 over 2016, Jill Sawyer, Communications Manager, Greater Victoria Harbour Authority, advised that yet another increase is on the books for 2018. “Ogden Point will welcome 247 cruise ship calls to Ogden Point this

year,” she said. “That is another three per cent increase, and 2019 will continue the upward trend.” She also noted that passenger numbers would surpass 600,000 (another record) with crew numbers adding another 261,000. The big news for Victoria in 2018 is the inaugural call of the Norwegian Bliss on June 1. She will be the largest cruise

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ship to call at Victoria and the West Coast of Canada and will be a regular caller through the rest of the season. Sawyer described improvements to infrastructure at the Ogden Point Cruise Terminal over the past year, including improved signage and way finding, improved exits and traffic flow through customs, and upgraded data lines between the two locations for Canada Customs (Pier A and Pier B). “We are also undertaking construction of a longer mooring dolphin at Ogden Point to prepare for the arrival of the Ovation of the Seas in 2019, a Quantum Class vessel, and we’re very excited to be welcoming Cunard’s Queen Elizabeth in 2019 as well,” she said. Returning vessels for the 2018 include the Explorer of the Seas, the Ruby Princess as well as the Emerald Princess — each carrying over 3,000 passengers and 1,000 crew. Smaller, boutique and “pocket” cruise lines, including Oceania Cruises’ Regatta, have been making more frequent visits to Victoria over the past few years, a trend that’s expected to continue as Pacific Northwest and Alaska itineraries grow in popularity. “The cruise lines we work with love Victoria as a destination,” says Ian Robertson, CEO of the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority. “This higher number of ship calls reflects a growing interest in our city not just during the peak summer season, but in the shoulder months of late spring and early fall as well.” During the 2017 season, GVHA greeted the seven millionth cruise ship passenger to


Photo courtesy: David Mailloux/Nanaimo Port Authority

B.C. CRUISE UPDATE

Nanaimo’s “White Glove Service” is proving popular with passengers. visit the city since the Ogden Point cruise terminal began as a cruise destination in 1978. The passenger arrived on Royal Caribbean’s Explorer of the Seas in June. Under GVHA’s stewardship, cruise tourism at Ogden Point has grown from 110 ship calls carrying 161,000 passengers in 2002 to the record number of 247 cruise ships and 600,776 passengers expected during the 2018 season. “This growth in cruise tourism has become an important economic driver for the capital region,” Sawyer said. Last year, GVHA introduced a new tool for cruise industry partners to give them real-time updates for arrival and departure schedules on victoriacruise.ca. The innovation resulted in smoother operations and, as more suppliers become aware of its capabilities, expectations are high for 2018. Another initiative that was established at the end of the 2017 season was the formation of Pacific Northwest Transportation Services, a joint venture between ground transportation providers CVS Tours and The Wilson’s Group. The new company will be working with GVHA to make the Ogden Point bus fleet greener, cleaner and quieter. Sawyer further noted that she was looking forward to working with port agent West Coast Agencies in what will be their second year at Ogden Point. WCA represents Holland America, Princess Cruises and Seabourn when they call on Victoria.

Nothing but the best for cruise visitors to Nanaimo

Nanaimo Port Authority is looking forward to two visits from Royal Caribbean’s Explorer of the Seas in 2018, one of the biggest cruise ships scheduled to visit North America’s West Coast this season. She will be in port twice — once on May 16 and again on September 19. Along with the Star Princess on April 9, Nanaimo’s numbers for 2018 will be very similar to 2017 (10,366 passengers and 4,450 crew members). Looking back over the last few seasons, Communications Director David Mailloux noted that Nanaimo has had great success in terms of passenger response to shore excursions. “We continue to prove that we can handle large ships and passenger reaction is exceptional. Passengers always tell us that if more people knew more about this area, there would be a variety of choices for passengers to book a cruise to Central Vancouver Island.” Indeed, Nanaimo has a reputation for going out of their way to accommodate passengers. “We have been told by people in

“We continue to prove that we can handle large ships and passenger reaction is exceptional...” the cruise industry that our hospitality is “White Glove Service” from the moment the ship arrives, for passengers and for our overall operations including security,” Mailloux said, citing examples like transporting challenged-walkers from the ship to the terminal in golf carts where they can clear customs, or having local tourism counsellors on hand to make recommendations based on a passenger’s description of their ideal day, and volunteer ambassadors are set up in tents and with identifiable t-shirts along shuttle routes to answer questions for passengers looking for something specific or requiring directions or suggestions. And always mindful of the needs of the crew, free Wi-Fi is available while in port. Crew can also hop on the continuously looping shuttle at no-charge to enjoy their visit to the community. When asked about the kinds of shore excursions available, Mailloux was pleased to point out that professional tour operators have developed a buffet of interesting and diverse activities for all ages ranging from wine tours, urban historical walks, waterfall nature treks, craft brewery tours, old-growth forest tours, a steam train ride, plus much more. “New tours are in development to showcase the iconic elements one would find in Central Vancouver Island,” said Mailloux, “including some that are upscale and representative of the area as a preferred travel destination.”

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Email: clia-nwc@clia-nwc.com * Twitter: @CLIA_NWC April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 21


B.C. CRUISE UPDATE

Photo courtesy: Prince Rupert Port Authority

Cruise passengers to Prince Rupert will be able to enjoy the Atlin promenade project — an enhancement to waterfront access.

Prince Rupert has experienced success in becoming a desirable port of call for luxury lines... With over 15 years of consistently exceptional service to cruise lines, Mailloux pointed out that the City of Nanaimo looks forward to the cruise season each year and is a great partner in providing a memorable experience for each passenger. “Our cruise community is professionally trained in customer service, composed of hard-working volunteers who are knowledgeable and genuinely concerned that passengers are impressed, experience what they want and seriously consider coming back.” He went on to say that: “Our hospitality standard is “White Glove” at minimum with well-trained local people who are bursting with pride for their community and region.”

Prince Rupert proving popular with luxury liners

“We are looking forward to building upon the overwhelming success of the 2017 season,” said Brian Friesen, Director of Trade Development and Communications. 2018 is shaping up to be another successful season for the Port of Prince Rupert. With 25 calls and 12,600 passengers, 2018 is just slightly below the activity seen last year — which was double from the year before. “This year we are seeing the vessel calls hold at the same, with a slight decrease in passenger numbers due to the reduced number of larger vessels that we saw in 2017.” The Port of Prince Rupert is currently undergoing construction on a promenade project which will connect the Northland Cruise Terminal to the Atlin Terminal, located in the popular Cow Bay district. “The Atlin promenade project is yet another great example of the Port of Prince Rupert’s continued efforts to enhance the community’s year-round waterfront access, while also addressing the traffic flows of passengers during the cruise season,” said Friesen. Construction will be complete in time for

22 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

the first vessel call of the 2018, giving passengers more opportunities to take in the beautiful harbour vistas. Friesen also gave insight into Prince Rupert’s rising popularity with “luxury liners.” In providing insights into trends, he noted that Prince Rupert has positioned itself in the market as a full service port focusing on luxury cruise lines. Prince Rupert has experienced success in becoming a desirable port of call for luxury lines, which tend to operate vessels in the 200-to-900 passenger range. “This year, like last year, we will see vessels from lines like Oceania, Regent, Seabourn, Crystal, Silversea, Ponant, and Windstar,” he said. “These are all very high-end, niche expedition cruises that have come to appreciate the unique offerings available in Prince Rupert and the surrounding area.” Indeed, Windstar Cruises is bringing the Star Legend to Prince Rupert five times this year. “They are returning to Alaska for the first time in 20 years,” Friesen said. “We’re very pleased to be included in the itinerary and promise passengers an experience they will never forget.”

Port Alberni to host cruise ships again in 2019

The Port Alberni Port Authority (PAPA) and West Coast Agencies are pleased to announce the return of cruise ships to Port Alberni in 2019. Currently, Holland America Line (HAL) is scheduled to return to Port Alberni May 25, June 15 and July 6 in 2019. Port Alberni last hosted a cruise ship in May 2013, also a HAL vessel. While feedback from passengers, crew and the company itself was extremely positive about their experience with Port Alberni, market conditions did not allow for a return until now. However, the Port, in partnership with the City of Port Alberni, remained connected to the company and within the industry to ensure the community was known as a welcoming and great cruise destination. Steve Hnatko, General Manager of Cruise Operations for West Coast Agencies sees great growth opportunity for the cruise business in Port Alberni. “Port Alberni’s experience hosting cruise


B.C. CRUISE UPDATE Photo courtesy: Port Alberni Port Authority

ships and cruise passengers from other destinations, such as Nanaimo, is very wellknown and highly regarded in the industry. Passengers are once again seeking new destinations that offer a warm welcome and an authentic experience. Port Alberni stands out as this type of destination.” The Port and City have partnered in the past to work with the community to show off its heritage and culture to cruise passengers. “We believe that, as a community, we continue to grow and evolve and we are looking at working with First Nations, Chamber of Commerce, local industry and marine enhancement groups and the Heritage Network, to name but a few, to develop potential new shore excursions that can educate and entertain cruise passengers about what our community does very well,” said PAPA Director of Public Relations and Business Development, Dave McCormick. The City’s Economic Development Manager, Pat Deakin, emphasized that, “as partnering organizations and as a community, we have steadfastly believed in the potential of the cruise ship industry

Port Alberni is eager to welcome back Holland America Line in 2019. in the Alberni Valley. We remained confident that we have a unique offer that is attractive to visitors. We continue to rise to the top of different desirable destination lists, such as the recent Best Places

For Millennials To Visit. We look forward to working with the many different groups in the community to do what we do best – be the warm, welcoming hosts who create lasting, positive memories!”

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TECHNOLOGY

Thordon marks 20-year milestone for shaft bearings on cruise ships

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his May will mark 20 years since Thordon Bearings’ water-lubricated propeller shaft bearings were first installed onboard Princess Cruises’ Grand Princess and Disney Cruise Line’s Disney Magic. Since those very first installations, the sector has become a major proponent of the conventional water-lubricated propeller shaft design, with 32 ocean-going cruiseships currently operating the Thordon system and 11 more on order. Commenting on the sector’s adoption of the technology, Thordon Bearings’ President and Chief Executive Officer Terry McGowan, said: “Environmental protection is, of course, high on the list of priorities for cruise ship owners, but system reliability, reduced operational expenditure and maintenance are other key factors influencing the purchasing decision. “During their years of continuous service, neither Grand Princess nor Disney Magic, or for that matter, any other cruise ship operating Thordon’s water-lubricated propeller shaft

24 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

systems, have experienced downtime, cancellations or changes to cruise itineraries due to bearing failure.” While the original bearings on the Grand Princess were replaced like-for-like during a major refit in December 2016 — after 18.5 years of continuous service — the Disney ship continues to operate with the original polymer bearings to A Thordon COMPAC bearing with this day. single key design. Andy Wright, Fleet Operations Director, Technical Operations, Princess Cruises, said: “During the vessel’s scheduled drydocking in 2013, class surveyors found the COMPAC bearings to be still fit for purpose but recommended changing them at the next drydocking in 2019. We decided to replace all four bearings in 2016 during Grand’s extensive refit at the Vigor floating dock in Portland, Oregon. Adding insight to the case for seawater-lubricated propeller shafts is Richard Vie, FREng, CEng, CMarEng, FIMarEST, a former Vice-President, Technical Development and Quality Assurance, within Carnival Corp’s Corporate Shipbuilding Division, and who was involved in the design of the Grand Princess and subsequent Princess cruiseships. “There is a raft of reasons behind the cruise sector’s adoption of the technology. When we built Grand Princess the risks we were addressing were unscheduled drydockings (there were not many drydocks that could accommodate a ship of this size at the time) and oil pollution. The cost benefit analysis included, as best we could, the expected lifetime of the bearings and I believe we assumed one replacement throughout the life of the ship. Even with this cost figured in, the benefit [of the water-lubricated conventional shaft system] was still overwhelming.” Craig Carter, Thordon’s Director of Marketing and Customer Service, said: “The success of these installations after 20 years of service verifies the long-term reliability and performance of seawater-lubricated shafts. None of the bearings we have installed have required replacement due to wear, no shafts have been withdrawn and no corrosion issues have occurred. This is why it is the most reliable and pollution-free propulsion design for the cruise industry. Its reliability is unmatched in cruise ship operation.” Since those first installations, Thordon has supplied its waterlubricated bearing system to most of the major cruise lines. Of the 17 cruiseships in the Princess fleet, 13 operate with the Thordon system as will three new builds. All the cruiseships in the Seabourn, Disney and Viking fleets have the arrangement, while other operators using conventional Thordon seawater lubricated bearing systems include MSC Cruises, P&O Cruises, Oceania, and Regent Seven Seas.


2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE

Photo courtesy Greater Victoria Harbour Authority

Greater Victoria Harbour Authority (Ogden Point) Date Apr 11, Wed Apr 20, Fri May 01, Tue May 04, Fri May 04, Fri May 05, Sat May 08, Tue May 09, Wed May 10, Thu May 11, Fri May 12, Sat May 12, Sat May 14, Mon May 14, Mon May 17, Thu May 17, Thu May 18, Fri May 18, Fri May 19, Sat May 19, Sat May 20, Sun May 20, Sun May 21, Mon May 24, Thu May 24, Thu

Vessel WESTERDAM NORWEGIAN SUN ISLAND PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM RUBY PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL CORAL PRINCESS EURODAM CELEBRITY SOLSTICE RUBY PRINCESS EMERALD PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL GRAND PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS DISNEY WONDER ZAANDAM CARNIVAL LEGEND GRAND PRINCESS EXPLORER OF THE SEAS

Pier North B South B South B North B South B North B South B North B North B South B South B North B South B North B South B North B North B South B North B South B South B North B North B North B South B

Arr Dep 1300 2300 0700 1600 0800 2300 1300 2300 1900 2359 1800 2359 0800 2300 0800 2359 0900 1800 1900 2359 0800 2300 1800 2359 0700 1400 1930 2359 0800 1700 1800 2359 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 0900 1815 1300 2300 1930 2359 0700 1400 0900 1800

Date May 24, Thu May 25, Fri May 25, Fri May 26, Sat May 26, Sat May 26, Sat May 26, Sat May 28, Mon May 30, Wed May 31, Thu May 31, Thu Jun 01, Fri Jun 01, Fri Jun 01, Fri Jun 02, Sat Jun 02, Sat Jun 02, Sat Jun 02, Sat Jun 03, Sun Jun 03, Sun Jun 03, Sun Jun 03, Sun Jun 04, Mon Jun 07, Thu Jun 07, Thu

Vessel CELEBRITY SOLSTICE EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS CELEBRITY INFINITY AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND SILVER EXPLORER EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS CRYSTAL SYMPHONY AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS GRAND PRINCESS SOJOURN NORWEGIAN JEWEL ZAANDAM CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE

Pier North B North B South B South B North B South A South B North B North B South B North B South A North B South B North B North B South A South B South B South A North B South B North B South B North B

Arr Dep 1730 2359 1800 2330 1900 2359 0700 1800 1300 2300 1800 2359 1900 2359 1930 2359 0700 1700 0900 1800 1730 2359 0800 1700 1800 2330 1900 2359 0800 1800 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 0700 1330 0800 2300 1200 2359 1300 2300 1930 2359 0900 1800 1730 2359

Date Jun 08, Fri Jun 08, Fri Jun 08, Fri Jun 09, Sat Jun 09, Sat Jun 09, Sat Jun 11, Mon Jun 11, Mon Jun 13, Wed Jun 14, Thu Jun 14, Thu Jun 15, Fri Jun 15, Fri Jun 15, Fri Jun 16, Sat Jun 16, Sat Jun 16, Sat Jun 17, Sun Jun 18, Mon Jun 20, Wed Jun 21, Thu Jun 21, Thu Jun 22, Fri Jun 22, Fri Jun 22, Fri

Vessel NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS REGATTA CARNIVAL LEGEND GRAND PRINCESS EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS ZAANDAM CARNIVAL LEGEND SILVER SHADOW EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS

Pier South A North B South B North B South A South B South B North B South B South B North B South A North B South B North B South A South B North B North B South B South B North B South A North B South B

Arr Dep 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2359 1930 2359 0700 1400 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2300 1930 2359 1300 2359 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359

VESSEL GUIDE Celebrity Cruises

Carnival Cruise Line

www.celebritycruises.com

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Carnival Legend Inaugural cruise - 2002 Refurbished - 2014 LOA - 963’ / Beam - 105.6’ Draft - 25.5’ Tonnage - 88,500 Passenger Decks - 12 Total staterooms - 1,062 Passenger capacity - 2,124 Total crew - 930

Celebrity Infinity Inaugural cruise - 2001 Refurbished - 2015 LOA - 965’ / Beam - 105’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 91,000 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 1,085 Passenger capacity - 2,170 Total crew - 999

Celebrity Millennium Inaugural cruise - 2000 Refurbished - 2016 LOA - 965’ / Beam - 105’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 90,963 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 1,079 Passenger capacity - 2,138 Total crew - 950 - 1,000

Celebrity Solstice Inaugural cruise - 2008 Refurbished - 2016 LOA - 1,041’ / Beam - 121’ Draft - 27’ Tonnage - 122,000 Passenger Decks - 13 Total staterooms - 1,426 Passenger capacity - 2,850 Total crew - 1,250 April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 25


2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE Greater Victoria Harbour Authority (Ogden Point) Date Jun 23, Sat Jun 23, Sat Jun 23, Sat Jun 23, Sat Jun 25, Mon Jun 28, Thu Jun 28, Thu Jun 28, Thu Jun 29, Fri Jun 29, Fri Jun 29, Fri Jun 29, Fri Jun 30, Sat Jun 30, Sat Jun 30, Sat Jul 01, Sun Jul 02, Mon Jul 03, Tue Jul 05, Thu Jul 05, Thu Jul 06, Fri Jul 06, Fri Jul 06, Fri Jul 07, Sat Jul 07, Sat Jul 07, Sat Jul 07, Sat Jul 09, Mon Jul 10, Tue Jul 10, Tue Jul 11, Wed Jul 12, Thu Jul 12, Thu Jul 13, Fri Jul 13, Fri Jul 13, Fri Jul 13, Fri Jul 14, Sat Jul 14, Sat Jul 14, Sat Jul 15, Sun Jul 16, Mon Jul 19, Thu Jul 19, Thu Jul 20, Fri

Vessel GRAND PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL AMSTERDAM EMERALD PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS REGATTA CELEBRITY SOLSTICE SEVEN SEAS MARINER NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS ZAANDAM CARNIVAL LEGEND GRAND PRINCESS EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS CRYSTAL SYMPHONY AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND CRYSTAL SYMPHONY SEVEN SEAS MARINER SILVER SHADOW EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE GRAND PRINCESS NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL AMSTERDAM EMERALD PRINCESS ZAANDAM CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS

Pier South B South A North B South B North B South B South A North B South B South A North B South B North B South A South B North B North B South B South B North B South A North B South B South B North B South A South B North B South B North B South B South B North B South B South A North B South B South A North B South B North B North B South B North B South A

Arr Dep 0700 1400 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1930 2359 0900 1800 1300 2359 1730 2359 0800 1800 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2300 1930 2359 0700 1400 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 0700 1800 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1930 2359 0700 2200 1300 2359 1300 2359 0900 1800 1730 2359 0700 1400 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2300 1930 2359 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200

Date Jul 20, Fri Jul 20, Fri Jul 21, Sat Jul 21, Sat Jul 21, Sat Jul 22, Sun Jul 23, Mon Jul 23, Mon Jul 26, Thu Jul 26, Thu Jul 27, Fri Jul 27, Fri Jul 27, Fri Jul 28, Sat Jul 28, Sat Jul 28, Sat Jul 29, Sun Jul 30, Mon Aug 01, Wed Aug 02, Thu Aug 02, Thu Aug 02, Thu Aug 03, Fri Aug 03, Fri Aug 03, Fri Aug 04, Sat Aug 04, Sat Aug 04, Sat Aug 06, Mon Aug 09, Thu Aug 09, Thu Aug 10, Fri Aug 10, Fri Aug 10, Fri Aug 11, Sat Aug 11, Sat Aug 11, Sat Aug 12, Sun Aug 13, Mon Aug 16, Thu Aug 16, Thu Aug 17, Fri Aug 17, Fri Aug 17, Fri Aug 18, Sat

Vessel EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS REGATTA GRAND PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS ZAANDAM CARNIVAL LEGEND REGATTA GRAND PRINCESS EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL AMSTERDAM EMERALD PRINCESS ZAANDAM CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS AMSTERDAM

Pier North B South B North B South A South B South B South B North B South B North B South A North B South B South A North B South B North B North B South B North B South B North B South A North B South B North B South A South B North B South B North B South A North B South B South A North B South B North B North B South B North B South A North B South B North B

Arr Dep 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2359 0700 1400 1930 2359 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2300 1930 2359 1300 2359 0700 1400 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1930 2359 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2300 1930 2359 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359

Date Aug 18, Sat Aug 18, Sat Aug 20, Mon Aug 22, Wed Aug 23, Thu Aug 23, Thu Aug 24, Fri Aug 24, Fri Aug 24, Fri Aug 25, Sat Aug 25, Sat Aug 25, Sat Aug 26, Sun Aug 26, Sun Aug 27, Mon Aug 30, Thu Aug 30, Thu Aug 31, Fri Aug 31, Fri Aug 31, Fri Sep 01, Sat Sep 01, Sat Sep 01, Sat Sep 01, Sat Sep 04, Tue Sep 06, Thu Sep 06, Thu Sep 06, Thu Sep 07, Fri Sep 07, Fri Sep 07, Fri Sep 07, Fri Sep 08, Sat Sep 08, Sat Sep 08, Sat Sep 09, Sun Sep 11, Tue Sep 11, Tue Sep 13, Thu Sep 13, Thu Sep 13, Thu Sep 14, Fri Sep 14, Fri Sep 14, Fri Sep 15, Sat

Vessel NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND GRAND PRINCESS EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EMERALD PRINCESS ZAANDAM REGATTA CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS GRAND PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL AMSTERDAM EMERALD PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND EXPLORER OF THE SEAS REGATTA CELEBRITY SOLSTICE SILVER EXPLORER NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL AMSTERDAM EMERALD PRINCESS ZAANDAM GRAND PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER CORAL PRINCESS EXPLORER OF THE SEAS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS EMERALD PRINCESS

Pier South A South B North B South B South B North B South A North B South B North B South A South B North B South B North B South B North B South A North B South B South B South A North B South B North B South B South A North B South B South A North B South B South A North B South B North B South B North B North B South B North B South A North B South B South B

Arr Dep 1800 2359 1900 2359 1930 2359 0700 1400 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2300 1300 2359 1930 2359 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 0700 1400 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1000 2200 0900 1800 1300 2359 1730 2359 0630 1830 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1900 2359 1300 2300 0700 1400 0800 2300 0700 1600 0900 1800 1730 2359 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1900 2359

VESSEL GUIDE Crystal Cruises www.crystalcruises.com

Crystal Symphony Inaugural cruise - 1995 Refurbished - 2009 / 2012 LOA - 781’ / Beam - 99’ Draft - 24.9’ Tonnage - 51,044 Passenger Decks - 8 Total staterooms - 461 Passenger capacity - 922 Total crew - 545 26 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

Disney Cruise Line www.disneycruise.com

Disney Wonder Inaugural cruise - 1999 Refurbished - 2016 LOA - 964’ / Beam - 106’ Draft - 25.3’ Tonnage - 83,000 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 875 Passenger capacity - 1,754 Total crew - 950

Linblad Expeditions www.expeditions.com

National Geographic Sea Bird Inaugural cruise - 1982 LOA - 164’ / Beam - 32.8’ Draft - 10.8’ Tonnage - 630 Passenger Decks - 3 Total staterooms - 31 Passenger capacity - 62

National Geographic Sea Lion Inaugural cruise - 2001 LOA - 164’ / Beam - 32.8’ Draft - 10.8’ Tonnage - 630 Passenger Decks - 3 Total staterooms - 31 Passenger capacity - 62


2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE Prince Rupert

Greater Victoria Harbour Authority (Ogden Point) Date Sep 15, Sat Sep 15, Sat Sep 16, Sun Sep 16, Sun Sep 19, Wed Sep 20, Thu Sep 20, Thu Sep 20, Thu Sep 21, Fri Sep 21, Fri Sep 21, Fri Sep 21, Fri Sep 22, Sat Sep 22, Sat Sep 22, Sat Sep 23, Sun Sep 24, Mon Sep 26, Wed Sep 27, Thu Sep 28, Fri Sep 28, Fri Sep 28, Fri Sep 28, Fri

Vessel AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL STAR PRINCESS REGATTA SEVEN SEAS MARINER EXPLORER OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS CELEBRITY SOLSTICE GRAND PRINCESS NORWEGIAN BLISS EURODAM RUBY PRINCESS EMERALD PRINCESS AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN PEARL ZAANDAM AMSTERDAM REGATTA EXPLORER OF THE SEAS GRAND PRINCESS RUBY PRINCESS STAR PRINCESS NORWEGIAN BLISS

Pier North B South A South B North B South B South B South A North B South B South A North B South B South B North B South A North B North B South B South B North B South A South B South A

Arr Dep 1800 2359 1800 2359 0700 1400 1300 2359 1200 1900 1000 1800 1200 1900 1400 2200 0700 1400 1600 2200 1800 2330 1900 2359 1700 2359 1800 2359 1800 2359 1300 2300 0800 2300 1200 2359 1000 1800 0700 1400 1100 1800 1200 1900 1800 2200

Date Sep 28, Fri Sep 29, Sat Sep 30, Sun Oct 01, Mon Oct 03, Wed Oct 04, Thu Oct 05, Fri Oct 05, Fri Oct 06, Sat Oct 09, Tue Oct 12, Fri Oct 14, Sun Oct 25, Thu

Vessel EURODAM NORWEGIAN PEARL EURODAM NORWEGIAN BLISS LE SOLEAL EXPLORER OF THE SEAS REGATTA STAR PRINCESS NORWEGIAN PEARL SOJOURN GRAND PRINCESS RUBY PRINCESS GRAND PRINCESS

Pier North B North B North B South A South B South B North B South B North B North B South B South B South B

Arr Dep 1830 2330 1800 2359 0800 2300 0800 1600 0700 1300 1000 1800 0830 1700 1200 2200 1800 2359 0800 1800 0700 1400 0700 1400 0700 1400

Nanaimo

(Cruise Welcome Centre) Date Apr 09, Mon May 06, Sun May 07, Mon May 16, Wed Sep 19, Wed

Vessel STAR PRINCESS NG SEA BIRD NG SEA LION EXPLORER OF THE SEAS EXPLORER OF THE SEAS

Arr Dep 1200 2200 N/A N/A N/A N/A 0700 1700 0800 1800

(Northland Terminal) Date May 16, Wed May 29, Tue May 31, Thu Jun 13, Wed Jun 17, Sun Jun 24, Sun Jul 4, Wed Jul 5, Thu Jul 8, Sun Jul 9, Mon Jul 11, Wed Jul 22, Sun Aug 3, Friday Aug 7, Tue Aug 14, Tue Aug 16, Thu Aug 28, Tue Aug 28, Tue Sep 2, Sun Sep 22, Sat Sep 29, Sat Oct 4, Thu

Photo courtesy Nanaimo Port Authority

Vessel RADIANCE OF THE SEAS STAR LEGEND REGATTA SOJOURN REGATTA STAR LEGEND REGATTA CRYSTAL SYMPHONY SEVEN SEAS MARINER SOJOURN REGATTA STAR LEGEND SOJOURN REGATTA REGATTA STAR LEGEND STAR LEGEND (at anchor) SOJOURN SILVER EXPLORER SOJOURN LE SOLEAL SOJOURN

Arr Dep 0700 1700 0600 1400 1100 2000 0800 1800 1030 1730 0600 1200 1100 2000 1300 1900 1100 2000 0800 1800 1100 2000 0600 1400 0800 1800 1100 2000 1100 2000 0600 1200 0600 1400 0800 1800 0800 1800 0800 1800 1430 0500 + 1 0800 1800

Photo: Lonnie Wishart

VESSEL GUIDE Holland America Line www.hollandamerica.com

Amsterdam Inaugural cruise - 2000 Refurbished - 2015 LOA - 780’ / Beam - 105.8’ Draft - 27’ Tonnage - 62,735 Passenger Decks - 10 Total staterooms - 690 Passenger capacity - 1,380 Total crew - 615

Eurodam Inaugural cruise - 2008 Refurbished - 2015 LOA - 936’ / Beam - 105.8’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 86,273 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 1,052 Passenger capacity - 2,104 Total crew - 876

Nieuw Amsterdam Inaugural cruise - 2010 Refurbished - 2016 LOA - 936’ / Beam - 105.8’ Draft - 24’ Tonnage - 86,700 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 1,053 Passenger capacity - 2,106 Total crew - 929

Noordam Inaugural cruise - 2006 Refurbished - 2016 LOA - 936’ / Beam - 105.8’ Draft - 24’ Tonnage - 82,318 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 959 Passenger capacity - 1,924 Total crew - 800 April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 27


2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE

Port of Vancouver (Canada Place) Date Apr 10, Tue Apr 12, Thu Apr 25, Wed Apr 27, Fri Apr 29, Sun Apr 30, Mon May 01, Tue May 02, Wed May 05, Sat May 05, Sat May 06, Sun May 06, Sun May 06, Sun May 07, Mon May 09, Wed May 09, Wed May 09, Wed May 10, Thu May 11, Fri May 11, Fri May 12, Sat May 12, Sat

Vessel STAR PRINCESS WESTERDAM STAR PRINCESS RUBY PRINCESS WESTERDAM EMERALD PRINCESS CARNIVAL LEGEND ISLAND PRINCESS STAR PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM WESTERDAM NOORDAM ZAANDAM EURODAM CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM ISLAND PRINCESS CELEBRITY MILLENIUM CELEBRITY SOLSTICE EURODAM STAR PRINCESS NOORDAM

Berth Arr Dep East 0730 1630 West 0700 1600 East 0730 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0730 1630 East 0800 1600 East 0730 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1630 West 0700 1900 West 1100 2000 East 0700 1630 North 0800 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1700 East 0700 1700 West 0800 2359 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1630

Date May 12, Sat May 13, Sun May 13, Sun May 13, Sun May 13, Sun May 16, Wed May 16, Wed May 16, Wed May 18, Fri May 19, Sat May 19, Sat May 20, Sun May 21, Mon May 23, Wed May 23, Wed May 25, Fri May 26, Sat May 26, Sat May 27, Sun May 27, Sun May 28, Mon May 30, Wed

Vessel NIEUW AMSTERDAM RADIANCE OF THE SEAS SILVER EXPLORER WESTERDAM EMERALD PRINCESS ISLAND PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM NOORDAM DISNEY WONDER CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM STAR PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY WESTERDAM DISNEY WONDER ISLAND PRINCESS

Berth Arr Dep West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1800 North 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1800 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630

Date May 30, Wed May 30, Wed May 31, Thu May 31, Thu Jun 01, Fri Jun 02, Sat Jun 02, Sat Jun 02, Sat Jun 02, Sat Jun 03, Sun Jun 03, Sun Jun 03, Sun Jun 04, Mon Jun 04, Mon Jun 04, Mon Jun 06, Wed Jun 06, Wed Jun 08, Fri Jun 09, Sat Jun 09, Sat Jun 10, Sun Jun 10, Sun

Vessel SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM WINDSTAR STAR LEGEND SILVER SHADOW RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS SILVER EXPLORER REGATTA NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY CRYSTAL SYMPHONY NOORDAM NORWEGIAN JEWEL SEABOURN SOJOURN DISNEY WONDER CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM STAR PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY WESTERDAM

Berth Arr Dep North 0700 1800 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1700 North 0800 1800 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0600 1700 North 0700 1700 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1800 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1600 North 0700 1700 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630

VESSEL GUIDE

Westerdam Inaugural cruise - 2004 Refurbished - 2010 LOA - 936’ / Beam - 105.8’ Draft - 24’ Tonnage - 82,348 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 958 Passenger capacity - 1,916 Total crew - 817 28 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

Holland America Line

Oceania Cruises

www.hollandamerica.com

www.oceaniacruises.com

Volendam Inaugural cruise - 1999 Refurbished - 2011 (2017) LOA - 781’ / Beam - 105.8’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 61,214 Passenger Decks - 10 Total staterooms - 716 Passenger capacity - 1,432 Total crew - 615

Zaandam Inaugural cruise - 2000 Refurbished - 2010 (2017) LOA - 781’ / Beam - 105.8’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 61,396 Passenger Decks - 10 Total staterooms - 716 Passenger capacity - 1,432 Total crew - 615

Regatta Inaugural cruise - 1998 Refurbished - 2011 LOA - 593.7’ / Beam - 83.5’ Draft - 19.5’ Tonnage - 30,277 Passenger Decks - 9 Total staterooms - 342 Passenger capacity - 684 Total crew - 400


2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE

Port of Vancouver (Canada Place) Date Jun 11, Mon Jun 11, Mon Jun 12, Sat Jun 13, Wed Jun 13, Wed Jun 13, Wed Jun 14, Thu Jun 14, Thu Jun 15, Fri Jun 16, Sat Jun 16, Sat Jun 16, Sat Jun 17, Sun Jun 17, Sun Jun 17, Sun Jun 18, Mon Jun 20, Wed Jun 20, Wed Jun 21, Thu Jun 22, Fri Jun 23, Sat Jun 23, Sat

Vessel DISNEY WONDER NORWEGIAN JEWEL REGATTA ISLAND PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM SEVEN SEAS MARINER SILVER SHADOW RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS SEABOURN SOJOURN NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY CRYSTAL SYMPHONY NOORDAM DISNEY WONDER CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM SILVER SHADOW CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM STAR PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM

Berth Arr Dep West 0545 1700 East 0800 1600 East 0700 1900 East 0700 1630 North 0700 2359 West 0700 1630 North 0700 1700 North 0800 1700 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1700 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1700 West 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 North 0700 1700 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630

Date Jun 24, Sun Jun 24, Sun Jun 24, Sun Jun 25, Mon Jun 25, Mon Jun 26, Tue Jun 27, Wed Jun 27, Wed Jun 27, Wed Jun 28, Thu Jun 29, Fri Jun 30, Sat Jun 30, Sat Jun 30, Sat Jul 01, Sun Jul 01, Sun Jul 02, Mon Jul 04, Wed Jul 04, Wed Jul 05, Thu Jul 06, Fri Jul 07, Sat

Vessel CELEBRITY INFINITY CRYSTAL SYMPHONY WESTERDAM NORWEGIAN JEWEL DISNEY WONDER WINDSTAR STAR LEGEND ISLAND PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM WINDSTAR STAR LEGEND RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY NOORDAM DISNEY WONDER CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM SILVER SHADOW CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM STAR PRINCESS

Berth Arr Dep East 0700 1630 North 0600 1800 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1600 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1600 East 0700 1630 North 0700 2359 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1600 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0600 1700 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 North 0800 1800 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630

Date Jul 07, Sat Jul 08, Sun Jul 08, Sun Jul 08, Sun Jul 09, Mon Jul 09, Mon Jul 09, Mon Jul 11, Wed Jul 11, Wed Jul 11, Wed Jul 12, Thu Jul 12, Thu Jul 12, Thu Jul 13, Fri Jul 14, Sat Jul 14, Sat Jul 15, Sun Jul 15, Sun Jul 18, Wed Jul 18, Wed Jul 18, Wed Jul 20, Fri

Vessel NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY CRYSTAL SYMPHONY WESTERDAM NORWEGIAN JEWEL CRYSTAL SYMPHONY DISNEY WONDER ISLAND PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM WINDSTAR STAR LEGEND SILVER SHADOW SEABOURN SOJOURN RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY NOORDAM CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM DISNEY WONDER CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM

Berth Arr Dep West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0700 2359 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1600 North 0001 1800 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1800 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1600 North 0700 1800 West 0700 1700 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630

VESSEL GUIDE Norwegian Cruise Line www.ncl.com

Norwegian Bliss Inaugural cruise - 2018 LOA - 1,069.2’ / Beam - 136.2’ Draft - 29.53’ Tonnage - 167,800 Passenger Decks - 20 Total staterooms - 2,038 Passenger capacity - 4,000 Total crew - 2,100

Norwegian Jewel Inaugural cruise - 2005 Refurbished - 2014 LOA - 965’ / Beam - 125’ Draft - 27’ Tonnage - 93,502 Passenger Decks - 12 Total staterooms - 1,188 Passenger capacity - 2,376 Total crew - 1,069

Norwegian Pearl

Norwegian Sun

Inaugural cruise - 2006 Refurbished - 2013 LOA - 965’ / Beam - 125’ Draft - 27’ Tonnage - 93,530 Passenger Decks - 12 Total staterooms - 1,195 Passenger capacity - 2,394 Total crew - 1,072

Inaugural cruise - 2001 Refurbished - 2016 LOA - 848’ / Beam - 123.1’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 78,309 Passenger Decks - 10 Total staterooms - 968 Passenger capacity - 1,936 Total crew - 906 April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 29


2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE Port of Vancouver (Canada Place)

Cruise Guide Information provided is current at time of printing. For updated information, please visit: Greater Victoria Harbour Authority: www.victoriaharbour.org Nanaimo: www.npa.ca Prince Rupert: www.rupertport.com Vancouver: www.portvancouver.com Port Alberni: www.papa.ca Seattle: www.portseattle.org To find out more about the cruise industry in the Pacific Northwest, we recommend:

Cruise Lines International Association – North West and Canada (www.clia-nwc.com) Cruise Industry Association of B.C. (www.ciabc.ca)

Date Jul 21, Sat Jul 21, Sat Jul 22, Sun Jul 22, Sun Jul 23, Mon Jul 23, Mon Jul 24, Tue Jul 25, Wed Jul 25, Wed Jul 25, Wed Jul 27, Fri Jul 28, Sat Jul 28, Sat Jul 29, Sun Jul 29, Sun Jul 30, Mon Aug 01, Wed Aug 01, Wed Aug 03, Fri Aug 04, Sat Aug 04, Sat Aug 05, Sun Aug 05, Sun

Vessel STAR PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY WESTERDAM NORWEGIAN JEWEL DISNEY WONDER WINDSTAR STAR LEGEND ISLAND PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY NOORDAM DISNEY WONDER CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM STAR PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY WESTERDAM

Berth Arr Dep East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1600 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1600 East 0700 1630 North 0700 2359 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630

Date Aug 06, Mon Aug 06, Mon Aug 06, Mon Aug 08, Wed Aug 08, Wed Aug 08, Wed Aug 09, Thu Aug 10, Fri Aug 11, Sat Aug 11, Sat Aug 12, Sun Aug 12, Sun Aug 13, Mon Aug 15, Wed Aug 15, Wed Aug 17, Fri Aug 18, Sat Aug 18, Sat Aug 18, Sat Aug 19, Sun Aug 19, Sun Aug 20, Mon Aug 20, Mon

Vessel NORWEGIAN JEWEL SEABOURN SOJOURN DISNEY WONDER ISLAND PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM SILVER SHADOW RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY NOORDAM DISNEY WONDER CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM STAR PRINCESS WINDSTAR STAR LEGEND NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY WESTERDAM NORWEGIAN JEWEL DISNEY WONDER

Berth Arr Dep East 0800 1600 North 0700 1700 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1800 West 0700 1630 North 0800 1800 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1600 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1600 West 0545 1700

VESSEL GUIDE Ponant Cruises

Princess Cruises www.princess.com

Grand Princess

Island Princess

Inaugural cruise - 1998 Refurbished - 2016 LOA - 949’ / Beam - 118’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 107,517 Passenger Decks - 14 Total staterooms - 1,301 Passenger capacity - 2,600 Total crew - 1,150

Inaugural cruise - 2003 Refurbished - 2015 LOA - 964’ / Beam - 122’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 92,000 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 987 Passenger capacity - 2,220 Total crew - 900

Star Princess Inaugural cruise - 2002 Refurbished - 2011 LOA - 951’ / Beam - 118’ Draft - 27.7’ Tonnage - 108,977 Passenger Decks - 14 Total staterooms - 1,297 Passenger capacity - 2,600 Total crew - 1,100

Coral Princess Inaugural cruise - 2003 Refurbished - 2016 LOA - 965’ / Beam - 106’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 91,627 Passenger Decks - 11 Total staterooms - 1,000 Passenger capacity - 2,000 Total crew - 895

www.en.ponant.com

Ruby Princess Inaugural cruise - 2008 Refurbished - 2015 LOA - 951’ / Beam - 118’ Draft - 26’ Tonnage - 113,561 Passenger Decks - 15 Total staterooms - 1,542 Passenger capacity - 3,080 Total crew - 1,200

Le Soléal Inaugural cruise - 2013 LOA - 466’ / Draft - 16’ / Beam - 59’ Tonnage - 10,944 Passenger Decks - 6 Total staterooms - 132 Passenger capacity - 264 Total crew - 139

Emerald Princess

Golden Princess

Inaugural cruise - 2007 Refurbished - 2015 LOA - 951’ / Beam - 118’ Draft - 26.2’ Tonnage - 113,561 Passenger Decks - 15 Total staterooms - 1,539 Passenger capacity - 3,080 Total crew - 1,200

Inaugural cruise - 2001 Refurbished - 2015 LOA - 950’ / Beam - 118’ Draft - 29’ Tonnage - 108,8t65 Passenger Decks - 13 Total staterooms - 1,539 Passenger capacity - 2,600 Total crew - 1,100


2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE Date Aug 22, Wed Aug 22, Wed Aug 22, Wed Aug 23, Thu Aug 24, Fri Aug 25, Sat Aug 25, Sat Aug 26, Sun Aug 26, Sun Aug 27, Mon Aug 28, Tue Aug 29, Wed Aug 29, Wed Aug 30, Thu Aug 31, Fri Aug 31, Fri Sep 01, Sat Sep 01, Sat Sep 02, Sun Sep 02, Sun Sep 03, Mon Sep 03, Mon Sep 05, Wed

Vessel ISLAND PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM SILVER SHADOW RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY NOORDAM DISNEY WONDER CARNIVAL SPLENDOR CORAL PRINCESS VOLENDAM WINDSTAR STAR LEGEND CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM SEABOURN SOJOURN STAR PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM CELEBRITY INFINITY WESTERDAM NORWEGIAN JEWEL DISNEY WONDER ISLAND PRINCESS

Berth Arr Dep East 0700 1630 North 0700 1700 West 0700 1630 North 0800 1800 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1600 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1600 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630

Date Sep 05, Wed Sep 06, Thu Sep 06, Thu Sep 07, Fri Sep 08, Sat Sep 08, Sat Sep 09, Sun Sep 10, Mon Sep 12, Wed Sep 12, Wed Sep 12, Wed Sep 13, Thu Sep 14, Fri Sep 15, Sat Sep 15, Sat Sep 16, Sun Sep 17, Mon Sep 17, Mon Sep 19, Wed Sep 19, Wed Sep 21, Fri Sep 22, Sat Sep 22, Sat

Vessel VOLENDAM SILVER EXPLORER SILVER SHADOW RADIANCE OF THE SEAS GOLDEN PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM NOORDAM DISNEY WONDER CORAL PRINCESS SEVEN SEAS MARINER VOLENDAM CARNIVAL LEGEND CELEBRITY MILLENNIUM STAR PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM WESTERDAM NORWEGIAN JEWEL REGATTA ISLAND PRINCESS VOLENDAM CELEBRITY SOLSTICE CORAL PRINCESS NIEUW AMSTERDAM

Berth Arr Dep West 0700 1630 East 0730 1800 North 0800 1800 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0545 1700 East 0700 1630 North 0600 1800 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1700 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1600 North 0700 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1700 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630

Date Sep 23, Sun Sep 23, Sun Sep 24, Mon Sep 25, Tue Sep 25, Tue Sep 25, Tue Sep 26, Wed Sep 27, Thu Sep 27, Thu Sep 29, Sat Sep 30, Sun Sep 30, Sun Sep 30, Sun Oct 01, Mon Oct 01, Mon Oct 01, Mon Oct 02, Tue Oct 04, Thu Oct 07, Sun Oct 11, Thu Oct 14, Sun Oct 17, Wed Oct 19, Fri

Vessel WESTERDAM NOORDAM EMERALD PRINCESS AMSTERDAM SEABOURN SOJOURN ZAANDAM VOLENDAM GRAND PRINCESS REGATTA NIEUW AMSTERDAM NORWEGIAN BLISS WESTERDAM NOORDAM NORWEGIAN BLISS NORWEGIAN PEARL EURODAM LE SOLEAL EMERALD PRINCESS SEABOURN SOJOURN GRAND PRINCESS RUBY PRINCESS EURODAM EMERALD PRINCESS

Berth Arr Dep East 0700 1630 West 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1700 West 0700 1700 West 0700 1700 East 0900 2200 North 0700 1800 West 0700 1700 East 0330 2359 North 0700 1630 West 0700 1600 East 0001 0400 East 0800 1700 West 0700 1630 East 0800 1800 East 0700 1630 North 0700 1700 East 0800 2200 East 0700 1630 West 0700 1700 East 0700 1630

VESSEL GUIDE Regent Seven Seas

Royal Caribbean

Seabourn

www.rssc.com

www.royalcaribbean.com

www.seabourn.com

Seven Seas Mariner Inaugural cruise - 2001 Refurbished - 2014 (2017) LOA - 709’ / Beam - 93’ Draft - 21’ Tonnage - 48,075 Passenger Decks - 8 Total staterooms - 350 Passenger capacity - 700 Total crew - 445

Explorer of the Seas Inaugural cruise - 2000 Refurbished - 2015 LOA - 1,025’ / Beam - 157.5’ Draft - 29’ Tonnage - 138,000 Passenger Decks - 15 Total staterooms - 2,014 Passenger capacity - 4,029 Total crew - 1,180

Silversea Cruises www.silversea.com

Silver Explorer Inaugural cruise - 1989 Refurbished - 2017 LOA - 354.4’ / Beam - 51.2’ Draft - 22.8’ / Tonnage - 6,072 Passenger Decks - 5 Total staterooms - 66 Passenger capacity - 144 Total crew - 118

Silver Shadow Inaugural cruise - 2000 Refurbished - 2011 LOA - 610’ / Beam - 81.8’ Draft - 19.8’ / Tonnage - 28,258 Passenger Decks - 7 Total staterooms - 194 Passenger capacity - 382 Total crew - 302

Radiance of the Seas Inaugural cruise - 2001 Refurbished - 2006 LOA - 962’ / Beam - 106’ Draft - 28’ Tonnage - 90,090 Passenger Decks - 12 Total staterooms - 1,056 Passenger capacity - 2,501 Total crew - 859

Sojourn Inaugural cruise - 2010 LOA - 650’ / Beam - 84’ Draft - 21’ Tonnage - 32,000 Passenger Decks - 8 Total staterooms - 225 Passenger capacity - 450 Total crew - 330

Windstar www.abouttheworld.com

Star Legend Inaugural cruise - 1992 LOA - 440’ / Beam - 63’ Draft - 16.5’ Tonnage - 43,188 Passenger Decks - 6 Total staterooms - 106 Passenger capacity - 212 Total crew - 153

Fostering the economic growth of B.C.’s cruise industry. To join, contact: info@ciabc.ca

www.ciabc.ca April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 31


2018 CRUISE SCHEDULE

Port of Seattle (Pier 91 / Pier 66) Date Vessel Pier Apr 19, Thu NORWEGIAN SUN 66 Apr 28, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Apr 29, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 May 5, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 May 6, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 May 7, Mon ZAANDAM 91 May 8, Tue EURODAM 91 May 12, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 May 12, Sat EURODAM 91 May 13, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 May 14, Mon EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 May 15, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 May 18, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 May 18, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 May 19, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 May 19, Sat EURODAM 91 May 20, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 May 20, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 May 21, Mon ZAANDAM 91 May 22, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 May 25, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 May 25, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 May 25, Fri CELEBRITY INFINITY 66 May 26, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 May 26, Sat EURODAM 91 May 26, Sat NORWEGIAN JEWEL 66 May 27, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 May 27, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 May 27, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 May 29, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 May 30, Wed NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jun 1, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jun 1, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Jun 2, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jun 2, Sat EURODAM 91 Jun 2, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jun 3, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jun 3, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jun 3, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jun 4, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Jun 5, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Jun 8, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Jun 8, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jun 9, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jun 9, Sat EURODAM 91 Jun 9, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jun 10, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jun 10, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jun 10, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jun 12, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Jun 15, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Jun 15, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jun 16, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 32 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

Date Vessel Pier Jun 16, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jun 16, Sat EURODAM 91 Jun 17, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jun 17, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jun 17, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jun 18, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Jun 19, Tue REGATTA 66 Jun 19, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Jun 22, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Jun 22, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jun 23, Sat EURODAM 91 Jun 23, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jun 23, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jun 24, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jun 24, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jun 24, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jun 26, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Jun 27, Wed STAR LEGEND 66 Jun 29, Fri REGATTA 66 Jun 29, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jun 29, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Jun 30, Sat EURODAM 91 Jun 30, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jun 30, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jul 1, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jul 1, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jul 1, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jul 2, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Jul 3, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Jul 6, Fri REGATTA 66 Jul 6, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jul 6, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Jul 7, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jul 7, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jul 7, Sat EURODAM 91 Jul 8, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jul 8, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jul 8, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jul 10, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Jul 11, Wed CRYSTAL SYMPHONY 66 Jul 13, Fri REGATTA 66 Jul 13, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jul 13, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Jul 14, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jul 14, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jul 14, Sat EURODAM 91 Jul 15, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jul 15, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jul 15, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jul 16, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Jul 17, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Jul 20, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jul 20, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91

Date Vessel Pier Jul 21, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jul 21, Sat EURODAM 91 Jul 21, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jul 22, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jul 22, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jul 22, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jul 23, Mon REGATTA 66 Jul 24, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Jul 27, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Jul 27, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Jul 28, Sat EURODAM 91 Jul 28, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Jul 28, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Jul 29, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Jul 29, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Jul 29, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Jul 30, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Jul 31, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Aug 2, Thu REGATTA 66 Aug 3, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Aug 3, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Aug 4, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Aug 4, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Aug 4, Sat EURODAM 91 Aug 5, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Aug 5, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Aug 5, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Aug 7, Tue OCEAN DREAM 66 Aug 7, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Aug 9, Thu REGATTA 66 Aug 10, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Aug 10, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Aug 11, Sat EURODAM 91 Aug 11, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Aug 11, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Aug 12, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Aug 12, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Aug 12, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Aug 13, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Aug 14, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Aug 16, Thu REGATTA 66 Aug 17, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Aug 17, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Aug 18, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Aug 18, Sat EURODAM 91 Aug 18, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Aug 19, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Aug 19, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Aug 19, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Aug 21, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Aug 24, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Aug 24, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Aug 25, Sat EURODAM 91

Date Vessel Pier Aug 25, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Aug 25, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Aug 26, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Aug 26, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Aug 26, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Aug 27, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Aug 27, Mon REGATTA 66 Aug 28, Tue CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Aug 31, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Aug 31, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Sep 1, Sat EURODAM 91 Sep 1, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Sep 1, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Sep 2, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Sep 2, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Sep 2, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Sep 3, Mon CELEBRITY INFINITY 66 Sep 5, Wed CARNIVAL LEGEND 91 Sep 7, Fri REGATTA 66 Sep 7, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Sep 7, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Sep 8, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Sep 8, Sat EURODAM 91 Sep 8, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Sep 9, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Sep 9, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Sep 9, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Sep 10, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Sep 14, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Sep 14, Fri CELEBRITY SOLSTICE 91 Sep 15, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Sep 15, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Sep 15, Sat EURODAM 91 Sep 16, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Sep 16, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Sep 16, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Sep 17, Mon EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Sep 21, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Sep 22, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Sep 22, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Sep 22, Sat EURODAM 91 Sep 23, Sun AMSTERDAM 91 Sep 23, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Sep 23, Sun EMERALD PRINCESS 91 Sep 24, Mon ZAANDAM 91 Sep 26, Wed GRAND PRINCESS 91 Sep 28, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Sep 29, Sat NORWEGIAN BLISS 66 Sep 29, Sat RUBY PRINCESS 91 Sep 30, Sun NORWEGIAN PEARL 66 Sep 30, Sun NIEUW AMSTERDAM 91 Oct 5, Fri EXPLORER OF THE SEAS 91 Oct 8, Mon SEABOURN SOJOURN 66


U.S. CRUISE TRENDS

U.S. Pacific Coast cruise outlook By Darryl Anderson Managing Director, Wave Point Consulting

G

iven the important interrelationships that British Columbia’s cruise sector has with United States Pacific Coast ports, this article will explore big ship, small vessel and port developments driving growth in the sector.

Alaska

Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) Alaska notes that after incredible growth between 1997 and 2008, several cruise ships left the Alaska market following the passage of an initiative that significantly increased operating costs. Consequently, Alaska’s cruise market share fell well behind that of the Caribbean, Mediterranean, Europe/West Mediterranean, China, Australia/New Zealand/Pacific and Asia. In 2017, 33 ships made 488 calls to Alaska, carrying just over one million passengers — however, it took a decade for the volume of Alaskan cruise traffic to surpass previous peak levels. CLIA reports that North American travellers are now tending to gravitate toward Western Hemisphere destinations

... the Alaskan market is currently seeing significant growth with cruise lines deploying ever bigger ships to serve Alaska. and that the Alaskan market is currently seeing significant growth with cruise lines deploying ever bigger ships to serve Alaska. The result will be anticipated record-breaking 2018 and 2019 cruise seasons. The arrival of the first mega-ship — the 167,880-gross-ton, 4,000-passenger Norwegian Bliss — will be Alaska’s first ultra-large new-build and the biggest cruise ship to visit the state so far. Princess Cruises will expand their passenger volume by nearly 20 per cent by adding a seventh vessel to the Alaskan market in 2018. In 2019, Princess will also join the trend of sending their largest ships to Alaska when the 141,000GT, 3,560-passenger Royal Princess will be deployed into the region. Royal Caribbean International, which previously held the Alaskan market big ship title (with the 137,308GT, 3,286-passenger Explorer of the Seas) will take the lead again in 2019 when it relocates the three-year-old 168,666GT, 4,180-passenger

Ovation of the Seas to Alaska. Royal Caribbean had previously positioned this ship year-round in China and Australia. Celebrity Cruises, Royal Caribbean’s sister brand, also has a significant commitment to the Alaska cruise theatre. The company announced it will replace the smaller 2,170-passenger Celebrity Infinity with the 2,850-passenger Celebrity Eclipse in 2019. Beginning each May and continuing through September, Alaskan itineraries consist primarily of two routes: roundtrip through Southeast Alaska’s Inside Passage, primarily from Seattle and Vancouver; and trips that focus on the Gulf of Alaska, beginning or ending in Anchorage, primarily via the Southcentral Alaska port cities of Seward and Whittier. As a result, Alaska’s top five cruise ports (Juneau, Ketchikan, Skagway, Glacier Bay, Sitka) accounted for 83 per cent of the cruise ship visits to the state, with 19 other communities accounting for a 17 per

The Grand Princess and the Disney Wonder stop in for a visit to Juneau, Alaska. April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 33


U.S. CRUISE TRENDS earlier itineraries by highlighting advantages of better weather and fewer crowds in April. Homeporting in Alaska brings some financial benefits to the homeport communities and allows the company to begin cruises in April. The small cruise vessel market has shown growth since its ebb in 2011 and Alaska is positioned to benefit from global interest in small ship experiences. Passenger capacity rebounded to 16,900 passengers during the 2015 season with 2016 seeing similar numbers. Small vessel operators active in the 2018 Alaska cruise theatre include Alaskan Dream Cruises, American Cruise Lines, The Boat Company, Fantasy Cruise – Small Ship Alaska, Lindblad Expeditions, Maple Leaf Adventure, Small Ship Alaska and UnCruise Adventures.

Washington and Oregon

Seattle’s Pier 66 and Pier 91 continue to service the Alaskan cruise market, with an expected 1,092,345 passengers in 2018, establishing a new record. cent market share of cruise ship visits in 2017. Mass consumer cruise tourism is important to the Alaskan economy since ship guests comprise 60 per cent of Alaska’s summer visitors, according to CLIA Alaska. With a concentration of cruise traffic at Alaska’s top five ports, state officials are working with stakeholders to address changes in the market that have impacted operators of smaller vessels. Britteny Cioni-Haywood, Division Director, Division of Economic Development State of Alaska in an email interview indicated that there had been a few changes to the small cruise vessel market since 2015. Highlights of the small cruise vessel fleet include: • Alaskan Dream Cruises added a vessel during summer 2016 to bring the Alaskan–based fleet total to five vessels. • UnCruise Adventures will return a seventh vessel to Alaska for 2018. 34 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

• Lindblad Expeditions added a third ship to its Southeast Alaskan itineraries after having only two ships in Alaska for more than 30 years. Ms. Cioni-Haywood suggests that the factors accounting for the renewed interest in small cruise ship itineraries in Alaska are the increased interest in small ship cruising and increasing interest in colder climate destinations and an earlier start to the sailing season. To tap into the increased interest in sailing in the Arctic, Lindblad Expeditions will place the National Geographic Orion on an Arctic itinerary for 2018. Although, not a small cruise vessel by Alaska visitor statistics definition (vessels less than 250 passengers), Crystal Cruises (1,000 passengers) will make its third sailing of the Northwest Passage in 2018. The earlier start to the sailing season is being led by UnCruise Adventures which has begun homeporting some of its vessels in Alaska instead of Seattle. UnCruise adventures has promoted the

With a new record, the Port of Seattle handled 1,071,594 revenue passengers through its cruise terminals in 2017. An estimated 1,092,345 passengers are expected in 2018. Seattle’s recently renovated cruise ship terminal is big-ship ready and the port is eagerly anticipating the arrival of the Norwegian Bliss this year. Ruby Princess will sail a brand new seven-day Northern California Coast voyage in 2018 with a roundtrip Seattle itinerary featuring stops in Monterey, Astoria, and late-evening stays in San Francisco and Victoria. The Port of Seattle has also been busy building its commercial capacity. The port invited stakeholders to a cruise connections event where tourism partners, suppliers and representatives from local attractions were invited to meet cruise line executives and other key industry players. Attendees were provided with an opportunity to learn about Seattle’s cruise sector and business prospects at this fullday event in January 2018 held at the Bell Harbor International Conference Center at Pier 66. With all the fanfare associated with the seasonal home-porting of the Norwegian Bliss in Seattle, it is possible to overlook developments in the small ship cruise market. American Cruise Lines announced that their ship, American Constellation, was on its way to Puget Sound in January 2018, to arrive in time for the upcoming


U.S. CRUISE TRENDS Pacific Northwest cruise season. The vessel’s inaugural 2017 season was on the East Coast. American Constellation will sail the three Puget Sound itineraries in March, April, May and early June 2018. The ship will then head to Alaska in late June through early September for Southeast Alaskan cruises and the longer Alaska Inside Passage itinerary. American Constellation will resume sailing in the Puget Sound in the fall of 2018 (late September through early November). The Port of Astoria is the first deepwater cruise ship port on the Columbia River. It is situated near the mouth of the majestic Columbia River. The Port serves a growing cruise ship port-of-call business. Bruce Conner, Cruise Marketing Director for the port stated that there will be 27 deep-sea cruise ships calls in 2018 including the maiden visit by the Disney Wonder. The Cruise Lines International Association’s 2018 Cruise Industry Outlook reports that river and small ship cruising continues to gain traction among travellers. The vast Columbia River is 4.5

San Francisco’s cruise diversification accounts for its current success. Nearly 60 per cent of the calls are full or partial turns, and 40 per cent are transit calls... miles wide and separates Oregon from neighboring Washington State. The river provides the opportunity for Astoria to tap into this growth trend with American Cruise Lines which offers Columbia River cruises. For the first time in 2018, round-trips from Portland will be offered. Itinerary highlights are the Columbia River Gorge, a national scenic area and the only navigable route through the Cascade Mountains.

California

The Port of San Francisco plays a critical role for Pacific Coast cruise traffic. Most cruise ships passing along the West Coast visit the city on their way to or from Alaska. Fifteen different cruise brands will visit San Francisco this year with maiden calls from Silver Explorer, Norwegian Bliss and Le Soleal.

The Port of San Francisco’s busiest months for cruise are May and September. The traffic pattern has been established for many years but passenger volume has recently been on an upward trend. “The port expects 77 ship calls and 270,000 guests in 2018,” said Michael Nerney, Assistant Deputy Director for the Port of San Francisco. Unlike their southern California cousins, cruise traffic at the Port of San Francisco has more than recovered from the depths of the recession. San Francisco’s cruise diversification accounts for its current success. Nearly 60 per cent of the calls are full or partial turns, and 40 per cent are transit calls, according to Nerney. Round-trip cruise itineraries include seven, 10 and 15-day durations. San Francisco’s year-round home port itineraries include Alaska, Coastal California, Mexico, and Hawaii.

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April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 35


U.S. CRUISE TRENDS

The Port of Long Beach’s cruise terminal recently underwent a multi-million-dollar redevelopment.

“The West Coast is an important market with vast growth potential and these initiatives further demonstrate the confidence in our future success in Long Beach.” Since 2013, the city is a year-round home port for the Grand Princess, and in 2018, the ship will make 35 home port calls. The relatively new James. R. Herman Cruise Terminal at Pier 27 in San Francisco is big ship cruise ready. According to Christopher Chase, Marketing Manager for the Port of Los Angeles, the cruise industry activity in California’s San Pedro Bay “has been on a bit of a roller coaster over the last decade.” Cruise traffic bottomed out in the 201213 period, rebounded somewhat in 2016, and is anticipated to start climbing again in the 2018 season. The fluctuating traffic levels largely stem from the lingering impacts of the 2008 recession, the reallocation of cruise ship capacity away from the Mexican Riviera, and the ability of cruise lines to adapt to the 2007, State of California’s Air Resources Board (ARB) regulations commonly referred to as the At-Berth Regulation. “The Port of Los Angeles is anticipating 113 vessel calls and 513,000 passengers this year and larger cruise vessels are appearing on the market,” said Chase. “For 36 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

example, the Norwegian Bliss will have seven visits to the Port of Los Angeles in 2018. It will become the biggest cruise ship ever to dock in Los Angeles.” Another large vessel on the horizon will be the Royal Princess’ debut on the Pacific Coast in 2019. It will be Princess Cruise Line’s largest ship ever to sail to Mexico from Los Angeles. The vessel will also sail for the first time along the California Coast from Los Angeles to Vancouver on a seven-day Pacific California Coast itinerary that includes stops at San Diego, Seattle and San Francisco. In addition, Princess will offer more sailings to Alaska roundtrip from Los Angeles with the Ruby Princess and Star Princess both sailing on a 12-day itinerary starting in April 2019. To help prepare for the larger ships, the Port of Los Angeles has increased the number of passenger screening lanes required to clear customs at the terminal. In February 2018, Carnival Cruise Line announced three significant initiatives designed to bolster its leadership position on the Pacific Coast: The re-opening of its 146,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art

Long Beach Cruise Terminal; a multimillion-dollar port development project in Mexico aimed at making Ensenada one of the Pacific Coast’s premier destinations; and the deployment of the Carnival Panorama to Long Beach in 2019, the first new Carnival ship based in Southern California in 20 years. The re-opening of the Long Beach terminal coincides with the arrival of the Carnival Splendor to Long Beach, which will operate seven-day cruises to Mexico and longer voyages to Alaska and Hawaii, representing a 40 per cent capacity increase on this route. The 113,300-ton Carnival Splendor is currently the largest ship based year-round in Southern California. During the February 2018 announcement, Carnival President Christine Duffy said, “The West Coast is an important market with vast growth potential and these initiatives further demonstrate the confidence in our future success in Long Beach.” In 2019, Carnival will make history when it deploys its third Vistaclass ship, the 3,960-passenger Carnival Panorama, on seven-day Mexican Riviera cruises from Long Beach, providing an exciting new sea-going vacation option to this vital and fast-growing market. Upgrades to the Long Beach Cruise Terminal will also enable larger ships


U.S. CRUISE TRENDS to use shore power. Not to be outdone, the Port of Los Angeles indicated that there will be a major update to the port’s shore power system, set to debut in 2018, that will provide more electricity for bigger ships, according to a Cruise Industry News report. In California, future cruise industry growth will be tied to cost-effective means of complying with environmental regulations. The purpose of California’s At-Berth Regulation is to reduce emissions from diesel auxiliary engines on container ships, passenger ships, and refrigerated-cargo ships while berthed at a California Port. A 2017 California Air Resource Board (CARB) advisory indicated that the California regulations require fleets complying under the Reduced Onboard Power Generation Option to satisfy higher requirements. Presently, fleets that comply under the Equivalent Emission Reduction Option pathway must reduce NOx and particulate matter by 70 per cent or more through the use of a CARB-approved technology. On January 1, 2020, the requirements under

the existing regulation increase to 80 per cent for power reduction and equivalent emission-reduction requirements.

Conclusion

Our tour of United States Pacific Coast cruise ports reveals that industry officials have been hard at work dealing with the changes that are occurring in the market place. The unilateral imposition of onerous taxes on the cruise industry in Alaska (a decade ago) had a negative ripple effect on the entire Pacific Northwest cruise industry. The length of time it has taken the Alaskan cruise theatre to recover and surpass peak passenger volumes serves as an important reminder of the damage that can be done to a shipping market when illconceived and badly timely government policies are implemented. The strong demand for Alaskan cruises and the presence of ultra-large cruise ships is expected to continue to shape the market over the next few seasons. CLIA Alaska reports that between 2015 and 2018 the average cruise ship tonnage will have expanded by 18 per cent and

capacity will have increased by about 14 per cent. California cruise port officials are no doubt optimistic that larger ships entering the Alaskan market will provide a symbiotic relationship and that, with a renewed interest, growth in the Mexican Riviera market will occur in the years ahead. A strengthening southern California marketplace, a diversified cruise mix in San Francisco, and the emergence of some smaller U.S. Pacific ports benefiting from the trends driving the cruise industry, suggests that there is more driving the growth in the United States cruise sector than simply complying with Jones Act cabotage requirements. Rather, environmental regulations may be the biggest factor helping drive the need for port cruise sector investment. Darryl Anderson is a strategy, trade development, logistics and transportation consultant. His blog Shipping Matters focuses exclusively on maritime transportation and policy issues. http://wavepointconsulting.ca/shipping-matters.

April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 37


INTERNATIONAL CRUISE TRENDS

On the leading edge of everything By Captain Stephen Brown West Pacific Marine

I

f we look back to as little as 30 years ago, taking a cruise was still a big deal. The number of ships was limited; itineraries were predictable; and onboard facilities traditional. With the demise of the great liners, some of which were converted to cruising in their sunset years, the industry recognized that purposedesigned cruise ships would be the only way to go if there was to be a serious effort to tap into the global leisure industry. With the number of ocean-going cruise ships now approaching 400 — and an additional 91, with a value of approximately $58 billion, scheduled for delivery by 2026 — it seems that nothing can hold the industry back. Now hosting some 25 million guests per annum, having a global economic impact of some US$117 billion and a growth of around 60 per cent in the past 10 years alone, the industry is in a confident mood. The industry is also well organized in terms of political advocacy as coordinated by Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) based in Washington,

This has resulted in levels of design, innovation, hospitality and marketing, the likes of which leaves most industries trailing in their wake. DC. As the world’s largest cruise industry trade association, CLIA has the task of providing a unified voice, not only on behalf of the cruise lines, but also the approximately 25,000 travel agency members that help to fill the ships. Individually however, the cruise lines are competing head to head for every guest and every dollar. This has resulted in levels of design, innovation, hospitality and marketing, the likes of which leaves most industries trailing in their wake. While sharing a ship with 5,400 other guests is not for everyone, Royal Caribbean International has made it an art form with their three Caribbean dedicated Oasis Class vessels, soon to be joined by a sister with a $1.4-million price tag, the Symphony of the Seas. While the number of Caribbean ports capable of handling

these vessels is limited, sceptics have been silenced as the company has applied itself to converting concept to reality since the Oasis of the Seas made her maiden voyage in December 2009. The slightly smaller Quantum Class vessels, with 4,200 guests, are equally successful but are trading internationally. As an example, the Ovation of the Seas is scheduled to join the growing fleet of large cruise ships serving the Alaska trade in 2019 after spending the southern summer in Australia and New Zealand, another rapidly growing cruise market where several cruise ships are now positioned year-round. Another notable trend is the rapidly growing sector of expedition cruises. These are expensive, but this is no deterrent for those with money and an appetite for adventure. As an example, the

Artist’s impression of the Celebrity Edge, complete with vertical bow and cantilevered platform. 38 — BC Shipping News — April 2018


INTERNATIONAL CRUISE TRENDS summer voyages of the Crystal Serenity through the Northwest Passage have not gone unnoticed by an industry seeking to offer a unique experience at the ends of the earth. With this objective in mind, 22 of the cruise ships currently on order are ice-strengthened. From a technical perspective, the cruise industry has always been at the cutting edge of development. In terms of innovation and design, current trends are externally evident in the impressive new 5,200-guest capacity MSC Seaside, currently enjoying her maiden season in the Caribbean. No effort is spared in combining onboard luxury with a labyrinth of waterslides and a limitless range of other leisure facilities in an attempt to suit the taste of every demographic. On modern vessels, for economy cruisers with inside cabins, there are “virtual balconies” — essentially floor-to-ceiling LCD TV screens which are linked to a camera mounted externally to ensure that you miss none of the scenery. To the surprise of many, naval architects have also been given licence to

resurrect the vertical bow design with Carnival Group subsidiary Aida Cruises, which primarily serves the German market, being the first to go down this road. The new design helps to improve fuel efficiency but to the purists, the early 20th century battleship bow is less than aesthetically pleasing. The first to adopt the vertical bow in the Royal Caribbean Cruises Group is the new Celebrity Edge class of vessels, the first of which is to debut later this year. The Celebrity Edge also dispenses with traditional balconies which are replaced by staterooms which extend to the side of the vessel and incorporate large sliding windows. Another unique feature is the incorporation of a 90MT cantilevered platform known as the “Magic Carpet” that doubles up as a dining area at sea and, when tendering, as a docking platform. This then leads to the question as to where all these new (and existing) cruise ships will trade. Significantly growing markets already being tapped lie in Asia, in particular China, but also Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, India and Sri

Lanka. Taking China alone, one study for potential guest numbers is around 80 million, perhaps a bit of a stretch but given the rapidly accumulating wealth of the Chinese middle class, every major cruise line is aiming to take a share of the action. Since the initial foray of Costa Cruises (on behalf of the Carnival Group) into China in 2006, and despite the recent Chinese economic boycott against South Korea, cruising from China has boomed and appears to have infinite potential for growth. By 2015, Costa Asia was ready to launch China’s first 46-day cruise to the South Pacific Islands on the Costa Atlantica from my old stomping ground, the Port of Tianjin. Consistent with China’s “Belt and Road” initiative, the cruise was promoted as an important milestone in cooperation between countries along the “road” in travel, business, culture, education and transportation. Today, the major cruise lines are far advanced in building joint ventures with Chinese mainland entities — one example being the Carnival Group which has partnered with the mainland-based


INTERNATIONAL CRUISE TRENDS Photo: icruise.com

The MSC Seaside spares no efforts in offering luxury. “China Merchants Group” to grow the cruise industry but also with China State Shipbuilding Corporation (CSSC) and the Italian specialist cruise ship builder Fincantieri. The objective is to lay the groundwork for the future ordering of new builds in China, a prospect not universally welcomed by many traditional cruise ship builders as it raises the prospect of a transfer of technology and expertise which will then be used to compete. Staying with the theme of destinations, the United Arab Emirates ports of Dubai and Abu Dhabi have also established themselves as both turn-round and destination ports. In 2006, Costa Cruises and AIDA Cruises began cruising within the Arabian Gulf, to India and beyond, with unexpected success. It should perhaps be mentioned that these destinations are not being served by older cruise ships that no longer meet the expectations of the American and European markets. On the contrary, these new markets are being developed using some of the most modern tonnage available as guests pour over their computer screens to find historically and culturally interesting new destinations to visit, all from the security of being based on a cruise ship with a multitude of tours to choose from at each destination. Indeed, the cruise lines have developed the marketing of lucrative shore excursions that cater to the depth of all pockets into an artform. Going back to the ships themselves, there appears to be no end to the imagination of naval architects and interior design professionals as they are let loose to build and fit-out vessels that will set them apart from the competition. No matter where you look, P&O, Princess, Disney, Genting/NCL, MSC, Royal Caribbean and Celebrity are but a few examples of 40 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

some of the most amazing interior innovations to hit the world’s oceans and thereby make the ship itself a memorable part of the cruise experience. Add to this, worldclass onboard entertainment, celebrity chefs, speciality restaurants, lectures in every subject you can imagine and onboard staff whose only purpose in life sometimes seems to be to keep you content. Impeccably maintained staterooms, lounges and open deck areas are today’s norm and then of course there is the gym and the spa. The gym is free as an antidote to the damage inflicted by the 24-hour buffet but the spa will liberate you of a few dollars when the ladies choose to pamper themselves with a little treat. Of course, the cashless onboard society makes spending really easy as everything goes on the identification card /security pass issued at embarkation — only to await the final day of reckoning. Obviously, an industry growing at a consistent five to six per cent a year attracts attention. The costs of entry are considerable but that has not deterred investment by private equity firms attracted not by the romance of the cruise industry but by a relatively safe annual average rate of return on investment of between six and eight per cent. The trend seems to be for such firms to leverage a window of up to 10 years to grow a privately owned cruise line before selling it or taking it public in order to return profits to investors. In this context, despite the considerable marketing skills of Richard Branson and his team, Bain Capital will be the majority shareholders in Virgin Voyages when it launches in 2020. Of interest, the vessels will be mid-sized at 110,000 GRT with capacity for 2,700 guests and will be the first in the industry to limit guests to a


INTERNATIONAL CRUISE TRENDS Photo source: cruisemapper.com

minimum of 18 years of age. The target market is said to be first-time cruisers as the industry seeks to reduce reliance on the baby-boomer generation. So, what are the challenges? Larger ships represent lower unit costs but also demand major port investments to service them. The use of tenders as a means of accessing smaller ports on a tight schedule is not always popular with guests, hence the innovative solution on the new Celebrity Edge. However, in common with the container industry, ports worldwide are struggling to justify the investment required to meet the aspirations of the cruise industry. This translates into many multi-purpose terminals being spring cleaned and security zoned to act as stop-gap cruise facilities with the “condition of the terminal” then being a main talking point among guests over dinner. The dilemma is well illustrated by the impressive new US$1 billion Hong Kong cruise terminal constructed on the site of the old Kai Tak Airport which was built only after much handwringing by the Hong Kong government. The operating model is typical of the emerging trend whereby the operator is required to pay the government an agreed rent for a fixed term plus a growing percentage of the operator’s gross receipts as variable rent. Thus far, the underutilized terminal is struggling — a fact which has not gone unnoticed by regional competitors faced with similar infrastructure investment decisions. A primary factor in Hong Kong is the distance from the city compared to the popular, but size-restricted, downtown cruise terminal in Kowloon. Another major challenge is that of fuel costs. The cruise industry is a master of micro-management in fuel consumption and port versus sea time, the more so since the advent of Emission Control Areas. Looking ahead to the 2020 fuel standards, the Carnival Group has made a major investment in Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems (scrubbers) but recent new builds are focused on LNG. Carnival is currently committed to build nine LNG-powered cruise ships across four of its nine global cruise brands with delivery dates between 2018 and 2023. In addition to its own brand, the three others are AIDA, Costa and P&O Cruises. For its part, MSC Cruises has

The Hong Kong Cruise Terminal — opened in 2013. four “World Class” 200,000GRT LNGfueled ships on order with STX France, Royal Caribbean has two “Icon Class” 200,000GRT LNG-fueled ships on order with the Meyer Werft yard in Papenburg, Germany, along with Disney which has three 135,000GRT LNG-fueled ships on order at the same yard. This trend is certain to accelerate across the sector. Whatever the challenges, it seems that only a major geo-political event can throw the cruise industry off course. There were dips after 9/11 and again when the global recession took hold in 2008/09 but this is an industry that knows how to bounce back and is set to continue its trajectory

of growth. If you haven’t tried it, I would recommend you doing so. It is good value and a relaxing way to vacation in whatever part of the world you choose. Captain Stephen Brown spent 21 years at sea where he served as Master for the last five years with Gearbulk Shipping. After coming ashore, he worked in various levels of operational management before going on to serve as Chamber of Shipping of BC Director (2000 to 2008) and President (2008 to 2016). Captain Brown is currently the owner of West Pacific Marine Ltd., Marine Consultancy. For more information, visit www.westpacificmarine.ca.

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TECHNOLOGY

Alfa Laval — the separation experts

R

ichard Thomas, Global Sales Manager, Marine & Diesel for Alfa Laval, recently toured the new build of a major cruise line at a European yard. The ship provides a perfect overview of Alfa Laval solutions for the marine industry. “Multi-effect fresh water generators, fuel separators, fuel conditioning systems, bilge separators, sludge dewatering, heat exchangers, steam boilers (with natural circulation), they’re all on there,” said Thomas. “It’s like a floating Alfa Laval showroom.” While cruise is certainly one of the most significant market segments for Alfa Laval’s marine sector because of their significant focus on environmental sustainability, the products are just as applicable industry-wide. From fishing vessels and yachts, to ferries, tankers, container ships and bulkers, the Alfa Laval name can usually be found affixed to many pieces of onboard equipment. Indeed, with over 2,500 patents, Alfa Laval’s reputation as the separation expert is deservedly earned.

Background

With a 28-year career at Alfa Laval, few are better suited than Thomas to describe the evolution and innovation that have defined the company’s 135-year history. Joining Alfa Laval following service at sea as a marine engineer cadet with Canadian Pacific Steamships, Thomas has always worked within the marine sector at the company. Following his position as Regional Business Manager, the last 10 years have seen him as the Global Sales Manager and point person for ship owner relationship management. Working with colleagues around the world (including Derek Gluschenko here in British Columbia), Thomas noted that Alfa Laval offices are inter-connected with all reporting back to the centralized headquarters in Sweden. Using Gluschenko as an example, he works across all three divisions of Alfa Laval — the Energy Division, the Food & Water Division and the Marine Division. Citing examples like Molson’s, West Coast Reduction, the Vancouver Convention Centre, BC Ferries, Seaspan and Teekay, Gluschenko explained that the core

42 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

Photo: BC Shipping News

Richard Thomas, Alfa Laval’s Global Sales Manager for Marine & Diesel, stands with local rep Derek Gluschenko during a recent visit to Vancouver.

Alfa Laval was established based on one single technology invented by founder Gustaf de Laval in 1877 — the centrifugal separator. technologies of heat transfer, separation and fluid handling are applicable throughout many different industries. Alfa Laval was established based on one single technology invented by founder Gustaf de Laval in 1877 — the centrifugal separator. “Essentially, the technology that applies to bilge water systems on cruise ships is the same as that used for separating cream,” said Gluschenko. “We’re removing solids from liquids and separating the different types of liquids.” Of course, a lot has changed since the first cream separator pumps were sold to dairy farms in Stockholm in the 1880s but the basic concept — a centrifuge bowl rotating inside a larger stationary container with denser liquids (and solids) accumulating at the periphery of the bowl and less dense liquid accumulating at the rotation axis — still applies. On the marine side, Alfa Laval celebrated its 100th year of supplying to the sector in 2017, starting with the U.S. Navy and the installation of an oil separator used to break water emulsions in lube oil on vessels driven by steam turbines. The

century has been marked by innovations in heat exchangers, freshwater generators, sterilization processing systems and fluid handling equipment.

The environmental revolution

Fast forward to the 1990s and, with more and more attention (and regulations) focused on environmental footprints and greater energy efficiencies, Alfa Laval’s product offerings increased significantly. “When I joined the company in 1989, we had five products on offer to the marine sector. Now we have 17,” said Thomas. “One of the first environmental products we offered was the bilge separator based on demand from the cruise industry.” In 2004, Alfa Laval established the Pure Thinking platform as the framework for marine environmental solutions — for example, the bilge separator product noted above, originally called Ecostream, was renamed to PureBilge as subsequent, improved versions were released. “Bilge was a big challenge but the industry was looking for a better solution,” said Thomas. “Cruise was the first to have a


TECHNOLOGY dynamic, high-speed separator solution as opposed to the static g-force provided by the typical coalescer technology.” The Pure Thinking platform has been extended to now include PureBallast, PureVent, PureDry and PureSOx as well as Pure NOx. • The ballast water treatment system, PureBallast 3.1, received U.S. Coast Guard type-approval (December 2016) and now also meets with International Maritime Organization G8 guidelines, making Alfa Laval the first to get certification. When asked to explain the difference between other UV-based treatment systems, Thomas noted that key to PureBallast 3.1 is the reactor’s UV lamps which are combined with specially designed lamp sleeves of synthetic quartz. “As well as optimizing the breadth of the wavelength spectrum, the sleeves have a high transmission efficiency that results in more UV light during disinfection. Combined with the flow-optimized design of the reactor interior, they ensure optimal UV dosage and low energy

consumption,” he said, noting that the evolution of the system was based on practical experience and customer feedback. “This dimming function that the third generation has means you can adjust the load based on environmental performance requirements.” • PureVent (currently at version 2.0) was developed specifically for use with marine diesel engines and power plant generators. It employs high-speed centrifugal separation to separate oil mist and other particles from the crankcase gas produced by these engines. The separated oil can then be re-circulated for use as a lubricant. Tests with PureVent show a cleaning efficiency as high as 99.99 per cent, unmatched by previous technologies. • PureDry is a fully automated, modular system designed to treat and recover valuable oils found in sludge on board ships and in power plants. The system separates the waste oil into three phases: cleaned oil, water and super-dry solids. The efficiency of the system in terms of drying up oily waste

streams means holding tank volumes for waste oil and wastewater can be reduced, thus freeing up valuable space on board a ship or in a power plant. • While Alfa Laval has over 40 years of marine scrubber experience, PureSOx now offers a complete SOx scrubber platform that allows for compliance using heavy fuel oils rather than more expensive alternatives within Emission Control Areas and the upcoming global sulphur cap that takes effect in 2020. PureSOx was launched in 2011 after the acquisition of Aalborg Industries, a world leader in boiler systems, thermal fluid systems, waste heat recovery systems and inert gas systems. “Before the acquisition, we worked closed with Aalborg for the water separators on the closed loop for scrubbers,” said Thomas. “The technology can be applied to numerous applications.” • PureNOx is the complete water treatment system for use in an Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) circuit where it cleans both the circulation water and the bleed-off water for overboard

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TECHNOLOGY Despite a basic technology that was invented over 100 years ago, Alfa Laval continues to evolve its products and systems. discharge. In another example of collaboration with industry, Thomas pointed out that Alfa Laval is working with MAN on their Tier III engines and is providing the WTU (water treatment unit), an important part of the EGR system for those engines. Over and above the increased activity Thomas is seeing from ship owners investigating scrubber technology as well as ballast water treatment systems, Alfa Laval is continuing to evolve its offerings to the marine and offshore markets. In 2013, they expanded into the LNG market by acquiring the Gas Combustion Unit which provides a reliable and safe way to handle

excess boil-off gas on LNG carriers and other vessels using LNG as a fuel. In 2014, they acquired Norwegian company Frank Mohn (also known as “Framo”), a leading manufacturer of submerged pumping systems. Thomas also reported that Alfa Laval has been involved in the supply of fuel supply systems with projects involving methanol as an alternative fuel.

The next 100 years

Despite a basic technology that was invented over 100 years ago, Alfa Laval continues to evolve its products and systems. “It’s more about operations around the machine,” said Thomas. “If you look

inside the high speed separators, for example, development of fluid dynamics has allowed for machines to get much smaller, more robust and much more efficient. We are continually improving — more separation per kilogram, for example, or automatically adjusting the flow in line with engine consumption to achieve energy savings (Flowsync).” And while the future isn’t so much focused on a complete revolution, Thomas continues to see more evolution and adaptation driven by customer demand. He was also quick to point out that Alfa Laval’s reputation as the separator experts attracts other companies that require solutions to separation challenges. “Aalborg is a good example of that. Before the acquisition, they had a separation need with their water treatment systems for scrubbers so we worked together to solve it.” Another area of growth for Alfa Laval is on the research and development side. In 2014, the Alfa Laval Test & Training Centre in Aalborg, Denmark was opened. Equipment, applications and process lines can be tested here on the scale of an ocean-going ship, including a two megawatt marine diesel engine in a full-size machine room simulation. Other issues — such as connectivity and automation — are continually being investigated. Thomas used the cruise ship industry and their fresh water production needs as another example where research continues to translate into energy savings. “Innovations in these areas impact on energy efficiency management and life cycle costs,” he said. And don’t forget one of the most important aspects of Alfa Laval’s operations, according to Thomas. “A big part of our marine organization is dedicated to a global service network to support onboard equipment,” he said. “As the leading supplier for these systems, it’s imperative for us to follow our customers’ needs and to collaborate at many different stages.” Indeed, Alfa Laval’s corporate mission statement sums up the mindset perfectly: “To optimize the performance of our customers’ processes” — which Thomas translates to “optimized vessel performance” in the marine industry. That said, it’s safe to assume that Alfa Laval will continue to be the separation experts. BCSN

44 — BC Shipping News — April 2018


CLEAR SEAS

Marine Spatial Planning By Peter Ellis, Executive Director Clear Seas Centre for Responsible Marine Shipping

T

he world around us is confronted daily by the challenge of how to manage sustainable growth. Local urban planners are faced with housing and affordability issues and a diminishing industrial land base, small business owners are working to identify strategies for growth that take into account sustainable best practices, and farmers look to a future where agricultural land is increasingly threatened by development. The fundamental question is how can we continue to grow and develop a vibrant economy that benefits all Canadians while safeguarding the environment and its ecosystems, and ensuring sustainability for future generations? In light of evolving climatic change and the Canadian public’s growing awareness of environmental issues, in part fuelled by greater instantaneous access to information via the Internet and social media, achieving the right balance of sustainable growth is a challenge faced by all sectors today.

Marine Spatial Planning in the Canadian context

Canada, along with other maritime nations, is grappling with these very challenges in the marine environment. Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) and the resulting common understanding of protocols governing the maritime space are critical components of our preparedness as we confront environmentally and economically-driven challenges. MSP has evolved from the view that past fragmentary approaches to managing the ocean are inadequate given the increasing number of demands and potential for conflict that may cause damage to the environment. It is a planning approach that emphasizes the holistic and promotes collaboration amongst users with divergent views. Gathering the perspectives of all users of the oceans and waterways will invariably reveal a shared vision: the need to

...how can we continue to grow and develop a vibrant economy that benefits all Canadians while safeguarding the environment and its ecosystems..? protect the environment while fostering growth (the “what”). Although the stakeholders involved may generally agree on the “what,” they offer very diverse perspectives on “how” this common vision is implemented. With the diversity of interests ranging from tourism, through fishing, conservation, subsea cabling, resource extraction and shipping, there are not only many perspectives to consider, but they often differ greatly, particularly where interests overlap geographically. MSP evolved to address the complexity of the issues and the need for consultation and collaboration.

The value of commercial marine shipping and MSP

To add to the complexity, all Canadians are ocean users — regardless of where they live — by depending on and benefiting daily from imports and exports, the goods and livelihood made possible by marine shipping. Ultimately, all Canadians have a vested interest in safe and sustainable marine shipping. Clear Seas’ report, The Value of Commercial Marine Shipping to Canada, underscores this reality. The study shed new light on the diverse ways that Canadians derive benefits from commercial marine shipping. Marine shipping plays an indispensable role in the Canadian economy — for example, transporting 20 per cent of all Canadian imports and exports by dollar value; providing a principal lifeline for essential goods to countless isolated coastal communities. The sector is responsible for a great deal of the economic growth that the MSP process strives to balance with environmental concerns.

The role of research in MSP

Historically, Canada has led a number of initiatives that brought us to the present day including the Oceans Act (1996) and the Oceans Strategy. Local, recent efforts such as the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area (PNCIMA) and the Marine Planning Partnership (MaPP) demonstrate that Canada is making progress. In early 2017, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, First Nations and the Province of B.C. signed the PNCIMA Plan, and the many partners will continue to work closely to implement the Plan and ensure a healthy, safe and prosperous ocean area. The MaPP initiative was formalized in November 2011 through a Letter of Intent between the Province of B.C. and 17 First Nations organizations. Four marine plans were signed in April 2015, a regional action framework was completed in May 2016 and plan implementation agreements were announced in August 2016. The MaPP initiative is notable also for the diversity of stakeholders involved and the number of marine uses, activities and values addressed. Many elements of the federal government’s Oceans Protection Plan have also focused attention on MSP and have at their core a principle of integrated management. These experiences have underscored that the dialogue is multidimensional and requires reliable data amongst other inputs. Considering this need for data, Clear Seas has advanced a number of projects designed to benefit the MSP dialogue. Clear Seas’ most recent publication, Vessel Drift and Response Analysis for Canada’s Pacific Coast, considers the risk that a ship which has become disabled due to engineering breakdown, collision April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 45


CLEAR SEAS

Reports commissioned by Clear Seas are providing valuable insights into issues for shipping. or other cause could drift aground on Canada’s Pacific Coast before help arrives. The tool used for this study was validated during Alaska’s efforts to establish International Maritime Organizationrecognized “Areas-to-be-Avoided” in the Aleutian Islands and it is regarded as a best practice in the area of MSP. A Zone-of-No-Save (ZONS) computer model developed by Nuka Research examines how the location and availability of Emergency Tow Vessels (ETVs) or rescue tugs might influence the potential for a disabled vessel to drift aground. The published analysis is meant to support decision makers charged with enhancing the safety of shipping to examine potential staging

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locations for rescue assets and identify best practices in vessel traffic routing. In the coming months, Clear Seas will publish two additional geospatial analyses — part of the broader Marine Transportation Corridors project — to complement this project. These two components include a multiyear marine traffic analysis using AIS data and the identification of sensitive coastal areas as companions to the first tranche of analysis. Once complete, the three geospatial deliverables will be layered and analyzed to identify areas where elevated risk from disabled vessels currently exists along the Pacific Coast. The outcome will be unique

tools that will serve to further deepen the discussion on marine transportation corridors across the country as the project then expands to examine other coastal jurisdictions. Additionally, Clear Seas is advancing, in partnership with Ocean Networks Canada, a quantitative and qualitative survey of commercial shipping traffic along the coastline of the Pacific region. Using Automatic Identification System (AIS) signals, the Real-Time Vessel Monitoring project will identify potential and observed risks and help to inform efforts currently underway to enhance safety and efficiency. Clear Seas is supportive of a comprehensive, collaborative and holistic approach to managing the emerging environmental challenges in the marine environment. While there are many inputs from many stakeholders, sustainable oceans management fundamentally requires the use of sound science and research. As an independent body, Clear Seas is positioned to contribute to a process that necessitates openness, collaboration and transparency and to support this dialogue with research products that examine issues of critical importance.

The Indigenous and northern context

Among the voices that are paramount to an effective MSP process are those of Canada’s Indigenous Peoples. With knowledge intrinsic to their communities and

46 — BC Shipping News — April 2018


CLEAR SEAS a shared cultural belief that the stewardship of natural resources is fundamental, Indigenous communities have in many cases led the way in integrated coastal management. The most recent example is the aforementioned MaPP process, an initiative between the Province of British Columbia and 17 member First Nations, which is unique given both the vast marine area covered and the process itself. As the Northwest Passage gradually opens, the marine shipping industry will undergo a new level of scrutiny in that region and attention will shift, rightly, to the unique ecological and cultural sensitivities of Canada’s Arctic. This shift is already underway and the focus has evolved from consideration of Atlantic, Central, Pacific, or Arctic concerns on an ad hoc basis, to a recognition that Canada as a maritime nation must address simultaneously and systematically issues in the Atlantic, Central, Pacific and Arctic regions, while respecting and considering local factors and conditions.

Striking that careful balance between our economy and the environment involves being fully aware of the risks and doing our best to mitigate them. Recently, in partnership with MEOPAR, Clear Seas has sponsored research to examine marine shipping traffic in the Northwest Passage. The project examines two sites to define shipping trends over the past 30 years, identify potential risks and make recommendations for establishing shipping routes and best practices. In essence, this type of study is well-suited to contribute to an MSP process.

The ongoing need for a sciencebased approach

Like all means of transportation, shipping has its risks. The key is to identify and manage them using evidence and evidencebased decisions, including the incorporation of Indigenous traditional knowledge. Striking that careful balance between our economy and the environment involves

being fully aware of the risks and doing our best to mitigate them. Taking into consideration cumulative impacts, multi-jurisdictional oversight and overlapping interests and uses, conflicts can and will still arise — making marine and coastal management an ongoing process that must continue to evolve, adapt and accommodate changes — whether those are in the environment or commercial activities. Once implemented, the effectiveness of MSP also requires monitoring and evaluation — and once again the need for data will be substantial. As the conversation continues and deepens on integrated oceans management, Clear Seas will continue to bring forward research and convene parties to discuss how best to sustain and advance progress.

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April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 47


LEGAL AFFAIRS

Farley Mowat’s story By Glen Krueger

A Vancouver Lawyer with Bernard LLP

F

arley Mowat stands as a great author in Canadian literature with a legacy of publications on the Canadian North and involvement in environmental causes. In the recent case of Town of Shelburn v The Ship Known as “Farley Mowat,” 2017 FC 1184, a long and winding story of another kind concluded. Our story focuses on a vessel which was a long-range, ice-class ship, suitable for traversing the Canadian North about which Mowat himself wrote so eloquently. Originally named the Johan Hjort, the vessel was built in the 1950s as a Norwegian fisheries and research/enforcement vessel. Over the following decades, the vessel would bear the names STM Ocean, Cam Vulcan, M Vulcan and Scandi Ocean. Enter a new character in our story: in 1996, the vessel was purchased by the marine conversation organization Sea Shepherd Conservation Society. The Society is controversial and has a long history of environmental activism. Sea Shepard operations have used tactics including scuttling and disabling of whaling vessels while at harbour, boarding of whaling vessels at sea and

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48 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

Then, the ironic twist of our story — the vessel, used for years in environmental activism, sank in June 2015. destruction of drift nets. Dashing rogue? Dangerous villain? That’s in the eye of the reader. In 2002, the Society renamed the vessel the Farley Mowat in honour of Mowat’s long history of environmental advocacy. As the Farley Mowat, the vessel travelled to Antarctica three times to intervene against whaling by Japanese vessels. The vessel was also involved in environmental activism off the coasts of the Galapagos Islands and Costa Rica. The vessel eventually returned to Canada and, on April 12, 2008, while protesting the seal hunt, the vessel was seized by the Canadian Coast Guard and the crew was arrested. The vessel was towed to Nova Scotia and impounded. Its captain and first officer were deported and later convicted of violating the Fisheries Act and marine mammal regulations. Is this the end of our story? What is to happen to our hero? The vessel was eventually purchased by a scrap dealer in 2013. In 2014, the vessel was moved to a berth in Shelburne. The new owner signed a Berthing Agreement on September 10, 2014. No berthing fees are ever paid. Then, the ironic twist of our story — the vessel, used for years in environmental activism, sank in June 2015. The coast guard responded and attempted to contain the pollution damage. Eventually over 2,000 litres of pollutants was removed from the hull. The cost? $500,000. For the Farley Mowat, that’s not the end of the indignities nor of the expenses. The Town of Shelburne, which operates the Shelburne Port Authority, commenced an action seeking the berthing fees, various costs and expenses, and removal of the vessel. In their Statement of Defence, the Defendants claimed that the berthing agreement was orally amended. This amendment was to the effect that the Port knew that the vessel was to be scrapped and that the proceeds of that operation would be used to pay the outstanding fees. They also claim that Shelburne prevented access to the vessel which led to the sinking and that Shelburne also interfered with the sale of the vessel’s engine. The Defendants went further still and brought a Counterclaim, claiming that Shelburne prevented the Defendants from maintaining the vessel. They sought $60,000 for damage to the engine and other equipment as result of the sinking. Unsurprisingly, Shelburne denied these allegations. In particular, Shelburne denied that there was an oral amendment to the Berthing Agreement; that it took possession or responsibility for


LEGAL AFFAIRS Photo source: Wikipedia

the vessel; or that damage to the vessel arose from anything other than failure of the Defendants to maintain the vessel. The judicial history of the case is long and winding, akin to a journey of one of the protagonists in Mowat’s novels. While it’s no Lost in the Barrens, it is a helpful example of how these kinds of cases proceed. On December 30, 2015, Justice Fothergill issued an Order which provided that the Defendants were to cause the vessel to be removed from the port at their own risk and expense. This didn’t happen. Shelburne next brought a motion in writing seeking an Order to show cause as to why the Defendants should not be held in contempt of Court. In Federal Court, this is a necessary next step to seeking contempt. To bring it in writing is unique though; usually such a motion is done by way of an attendance in Federal Court. A Show Cause Order was granted by Prothonotary Morneau that extended the deadline for removal by several weeks and required that, if removal did not occur, the Defendants were to appear before the Court to specifically Show Cause as to why they should not be held in contempt. Eventually, a contempt Order was granted by consent of the parties. The Defendant owner would eventually be arrested and imprisoned. Shelburne then filed a motion for summary judgment to which the Defendants failed to respond. Summary judgment is a tactic that appeals to litigants. They see it as a way to proceed with litigation in a manner that is relatively inexpensive. However, it has a strict test. Per Manitoba v. Canada (2015), 470 N.R. 187 (F.C.A.), the test for summary judgment is that there is no genuine issue for trial. It’s a high bar. It’s a risky move and simple failure of the Defendants to respond is no guarantee of success. However, based on the contractual terms of the Berthing Agreement, the Court found that there was an ongoing obligation of the Defendants to pay berthage and that there was no genuine issue for trial. In addition to the berthage fees, the Court also granted costs associated with clean-up and maintenance services. This was found based on a term in the Berthing Agreement which set out that the Defendants would be responsible for any loss or damage in connection with the use of the Premises and Terminal, including but not limited to any liability in respect of preventing or abating pollution originating from the vessel. The term was sufficiently broad for there to be no issue for trial relative to the interpretation and application of the term in the agreement. This is a good example of a small investment in drafting at the onset paying dividends in the future. Always seek legal advice when drafting a contract. Importantly, the Plaintiff still had to prove the case. They did so through sworn affidavits that included exhibits proving the amounts being claimed. The Court scrutinized the invoices of the Plaintiff and found instances where it would not allow claims based on issues such as double recovery and insufficient evidence. It was due to insufficient evidence that sought after interest was disallowed. Another moral of the story: always paper your costs. The Court declined to grant elevated costs or punitive damages despite the disregard of the Defendant Owner. The Defendant Owner was already found in contempt and sentenced. The Court was not persuaded that there should be any increased costs awarded. Even specified legal costs were discounted, as there

The Farley Mowat. were services such as drafting of media releases which the Court felt were not related to the lawsuit. The vessel was eventually removed from its berth in Shelburne to be turned to scrap. And so ends the long and winding journey of the Farley Mowat. The owner was imprisoned for a period; some of the previous crew were deported; the vessel itself now disappearing. However, all is not lost as the legacy lives on. In 2015, Sea Shepherd USA purchased a decommissioned US Coast Guard patrol boat. The vessel is christened the MY Farley Mowat. Glen Krueger is a Maritime Lawyer at Bernard LLP and can be reached at krueger@bernardllp.ca.

April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 49


THE ARCTIC Canada’s Arctic

A guide to adventure through the Northwest Passage

A

new book covering the Northwest Passage and emphasizing Canada’s Arctic is now in print. It has been published by Pacific Marine Publishing, the producer of a wide range of cruising guides for the Pacific Northwest. Titled Canada’s Arctic, it is a first-ofits-kind Arctic cruise guide that covers the area with informative details and outstanding illustrations. The author of the book, Ken Burton, is an Arctic veteran of over 20 years. He is a ship’s captain, past Executive Director of the Vancouver Maritime Museum and an Arctic visitor’s leader and historian. Burton is the first captain known to have circumnavigated North America in a non-ice-strengthened vessel in a continuous voyage  in  one season. He did so in the year 2000 in the RCMP patrol vessel Nadon, temporarily re-named St Roch II for the duration of the trip.   Burton has written a remarkable book and produced a large selection of photographs that will serve as a guide suitable for the travelling public, cruise ship passengers and those brave enough to challenge the Northwest Passage in a private vessel. The 224-page guide is loaded with reference maps, an amazing array of photographs, historic notes and antidotes. It takes the traveller on an adventure from Unalaska USA, through the Bering Sea, and into the Northwest Passage. It continues through Nunavut, in Canada’s Arctic, well into Baffin Bay

50 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

and to western Greenland. Along the way, small Arctic communities are explored, landings are made on remote wilderness coastlines and historically significant sites are visited, explored and described. Canada’s Arctic is beckoning those with an adventurous soul. Expedition passenger ships cruising into Canada’s Arctic have been increasing dramatically in the past few years. In 2015, 30 cruise ships carrying more than 4,000 people successfully challenged the Northwest Passage. In both 2016 and 2017, the 250-metre Crystal Serenity, with over 1,000 passengers on board, successfully transited the Northwest Passage and spent time in the Arctic.

All photos and layouts from Ken Burton’s book, Canada’s Arctic


BOOK REVIEW

Pages from Ken Burton’s newly released book showcasing Canada’s Arctic. The detailed list of all the critical sites contained in the book includes accurate location data for all stops, tips, hints, and advice on how to best visit and experience the Arctic in a safe, responsible and rewarding manner. For history buffs, the book contains the GPS coordinates of no less then 40 critical Sir John Franklin historic sites. This includes the location of HMS Terror, HMS Erebus as well as HMS Breadalbane. King William Island, Beechey Island and the surrounding area are described in detail along with supporting maps and photographs. Abandoned RCMP detachments and Hudson’s Bay posts are visited, and their role in the Arctic

put into appropriate historic perspective. Both the good and the bad are described and augmented with testimony harvested from the Qikiqtani Truth Commission’s reports and official RCMP records. Spectacular landscape and seascape photographs are presented along with unrivalled wildlife images of polar bears, muskox, Arctic fox, other wildlife and a wide range of flora discovered on the tundra. And….of course icebergs! Copies of the guide are available at book stores, marine stores and specialty outlets. For more information, see www.marineguides.com or contact boating@dccnet.com.

April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 51


GREEN MARINE GreenTech 2018

Delegates will have plenty to see, do and learn at this year’s conference By Julie Gedeon

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hearty welcome awaits the delegates of GreenTech 2018 this May 30 to June 1 in Vancouver, B.C. Green Marine’s membership and guests have eagerly been anticipated by the area’s maritime industry for this year’s conference. “While all our participants are always helpful when called upon, the number of Vancouver-area members that have approached us to see what they could do for GreenTech 2018 has been amazing,” says Manon Lanthier, Green Marine’s communications manager. “If we’d accepted all the tour offers, we wouldn’t have had any conference sessions.” Integrating feedback from Green Marine’s program committee, GreenTech’s agenda is based on further advancing the environmental excellence of Green Marine’s participants regarding existing priorities by sharing new knowledge, actual experience, precise strategies and emerging technologies. The first plenary session will highlight regional industry leaders, after which everyone will split up as usual into two groups with one focusing on biofouling prevention, while the other looks at ecological shoreline integration.

Giving seafarers a helping hand for over 160 years!

Get on Board with Us: www.flyingangel.ca 52 — BC Shipping News — April 2018

GreenTech’s agenda is based on further advancing the environmental excellence of Green Marine’s participants... An afternoon plenary will address several approaches to reducing underwater noise during vessel and port operations to minimize the effects on marine mammals. “We’re delighted to have Michael Jasny, Director of Marine Mammal Protection at the U.S. National Resources Defense Council and the Director of the Sonic Seas documentary, as one of our panelists,” Lanthier shares. Learning to live, work and prosper in harmony with adjacent communities is another key focus. “We have several panelists who’ll share how they’ve engaged local stakeholders and related pivotal information,” Lanthier says. “We’ll also look at how the maritime industry has the opportunity to be change leaders in collaborating with local communities to improve sustainability, as well as to minimize or at least maintain its footprint as business expands.” Always looking ahead, the conference will feature breakout sessions for ship owners and ports/terminals respectively to examine advancements in low carbon transportation. “The shipping of tomorrow as it exists now will be shared regarding zeroemission ferries and other impressive initiatives,” Lanthier says. For the first time, scientific researchers and non-governmental organizations have been invited to participate in a poster display of their latest environmental findings. The posters relate innovative research aimed at specifying and reducing the industry’s environmental impacts. “We sought a new way to showcase the research being done by some of our supporters, as well as experts and advocates who might be new to Green Marine,” Lanthier explains. “The idea is to provide fresh perspective on issues already being addressed by our membership.” The display complements the exhibition booths that will be occupied by Green Marine partners and supporters. “There’ll be a lot more to see and do in the exhibition space,” Lanthier says. “It’s a winning strategy for everyone.” Back to those offers for site visits… “We’re delighted that BC Ferries is organizing a bus tour of its Fleet Maintenance Unit which was Green Marine certified for the first time last year,” Lanthier says. “And the Port of Vancouver has organized a boat tour at GreenTech’s conclusion, which is always a great way to see a port’s facilities and network in a relaxed atmosphere.” Vancouver’s Marriott Pinnacle was chosen as GreenTech 2018’s ‘headquarters’ with its ideal downtown location near the port. “We’re two blocks from Canada Place,” Lanthier shares. The location, lineup and local warm reception all promise to make GreenTech 2018 a major success!


B.C.

April 2018 — BC Shipping News — 53


ADVERTISERS

Photo: Dave Roels

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Spill Prevention and Response for Oil and Hazardous Materials in the Marine and Inland Environment

JUNE 19-21 Conference Tracks Include:

2018

» Prevention » Case Studies » Planning and Preparedness

Oregon Convention Center

PORTLAND, OREGON

» Response and Recovery

Register with VIP code BCNEWS to receive a $50 discount to attend CLEAN PACIFIC!

www.cleanpacific.org


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BC Shipping News - April 2018  

BC Shipping News - Vol.8, Iss.3 - April 2018 Industry Insight: Energizing the Industry...Mary-Ann Isinger, President, Cruise Industry Associ...

BC Shipping News - April 2018  

BC Shipping News - Vol.8, Iss.3 - April 2018 Industry Insight: Energizing the Industry...Mary-Ann Isinger, President, Cruise Industry Associ...