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Grant Shumaker Jamison McNulty


Copyright 2012 Grant Shumaker and Jamison McNulty Comm 424: Campaign Planning Lincoln Motor Company est. 1917 The TradeMark Firm est.2012

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Executive Summary While the Lincoln Motor Company is a well known brand in this country, their current lineup of automobiles have not been promoted and emphasized nearly enough. The objective of this campaign is to bring more attention to this lineup of luxury cars. In order to do this, the campaign must raise awareness of not only the Lincoln brand itself, but also what the Lincoln Motor Company has to offer in terms of high performance vehicles. While it was clear from the research that was conducted that Lincoln manufactured a product that was heavily purchased by a population that exceed 55 years of age, the purpose of this campaign was to appeal to a younger audience of business professionals between the ages of 30-45. This was the only way in which Lincoln could recover from a 20 year long decline in sales. The media strategy that will be used will be one that is very consistent amongst the various media that have been selected including television, internet, magazines, radio and outdoor advertising. The strategy will include a pulsing media plan that will heighten GRPs in certain months to expose and maintain the message of the campaign. Television and Internet advertisement will be used the most during our campaign due to their immense popularity, especially amongst our target group. This campaign will promote the idea of “Drive Emancipated�, an idea that connects the notion of freedom, as it pertains to the overall driving experience of owning a car. Just like President Abraham Lincoln gave freedom to all those enslaved in this country, so will this lineup of automobiles give you the freedom to not just tolerate, but enjoy your ride. The campaign will show how the Lincoln brand is not only symbolically, but also technologically, moving into the future. This campaign placed an importance on the reach of the message due to the fact that the awareness of Lincoln’s current lineup is too low to compete with similar brands. With a high reach campaign, a message can be disseminated to a wide audience of Americans who are already aware of the Lincoln brand, but not necessarily aware of what vehicles it currently offers.

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Table of Contents

1.0 Situation Analysis...5 1.1 Product/ Service...............................................................................5 1.1.1 History...............................................................................5 1.1.2 Description of product line............................................5 1.1.3 Image/Attributes..............................................................5 1.1.4 Strategic Implications......................................................5 1.2 Product Class....................................................................................5 1.2.1 Market Overview.............................................................5 1.2.2 Geographic Distribution.................................................6 1.2.3 Cost/ Sales.........................................................................6 1.2.4 Demand Factors...............................................................6 1.2.5 Strategic Implications......................................................6 1.3 Competition......................................................................................7 1.3.1 Cadillac.............................................................................7 1.3.2 Lexus.................................................................................8 1.3.3 Mercedes – Benz.............................................................8 1.3.4 Strategic Implications......................................................8 1.4 The Consumer/ Target Profile........................................................8 1.5 Environment.....................................................................................8 2.0 SWOT Analysis.............................................................................................9 2.1 Strengths............................................................................................9 2.1.1 Brand Awareness.............................................................9 2.1.2 American Made...............................................................9 2.1.3 Luxurious Interior............................................................9 2.2 Weaknesses.......................................................................................9 2.2.1 Perceived as an “Old Person Car”..................................9 2.2.2 Lack of previous media exposure compared to competitors.....................................................................10 2.2.3 Limited product line.....................................................10 2.3 Opportunities.................................................................................10 2.3.1 Engage a younger generation.......................................10 2.3.2 Increased focus with close of Mercury.......................10 Lincoln | 3

2.4 Threats.............................................................................................11 2.4.1 Media saturation from an abundance of car advertisements...............................................................11 2.4.2 Competition from other more “classy” brands.........11 2.4.3 Car brands with more features....................................11 2.5 Actionable Set................................................................................11 3.0 Advertising and Marketing Communication Objectives......................12 3.1 Advertising Objective....................................................................12 3.1.1 Awareness of Brand.......................................................12 3.1.2 Change “Outdated” Perception...................................12 3.1.3 Enhance Luxury Features.............................................12 3.2 Marketing Objectives....................................................................12 3.2.1 Current Market Group..................................................12 3.2.2 Target Group..................................................................12 3.3 Media Objective.............................................................................12 4.0 Campaign Timeline....................................................................................13 5.0 Multi-Attribute Model (MAM): Message Design and Positioning Guidelines....................................................................................................14 5.1 Consumer Data Collection...........................................................14 5.1.1 First Survey: MAM Attribute survey..........................14 5.1.2 Second Goal and Structure..........................................14 5.1.3 Second Survey Results and Strategic Implications...14 5.1.4 Survey Distribution.......................................................14 5.2 Data Analysis..................................................................................15 5.2.1 Multi Attribute Analysis chart.....................................15 5.2.2 “Performance” Line-by-Line analysis.........................15 5.2.3 ”Style” Line-by-Line analysis.......................................15 5.2.4 ”Interior Design” Line-by-Line analysis.....................15 5.2.5 ”Price” Line-by-Line analysis.......................................16 5.2.6 ”Fuel Economy” Line-by-Line analysis......................16 5.2.7 Secondary “Performance” Line-by-Line analysis.....16 5.2.8 Secondary ”Style” Line-by-Line analysis...................16 5.2.9 Secondary ”Interior Design” Line-by-Line analysis16


5.2.10 Secondary ”Price” Line-by-Line analysis.................16 5.2.11 Secondary ”Fuel Economy” Line-by-Line analysis16 5.2.12 MAM-Model Strategic Implications........................17 6.0 Budget Allocations......................................................................................17 6.1 Overall Campaign Budget............................................................17 6.2 Contingency Budget......................................................................17 6.3 Media Vehicle Spending...............................................................17 6.3.1 Television........................................................................17 6.3.2 Internet............................................................................18 6.3.3 Magazine.........................................................................18 6.3.4 Radio...............................................................................18 6.3.5 Outdoor...........................................................................18 6.4 Budget Summary...............................................................18 7.0 Media Selection...........................................................................................19 7.1 Media Quintile Analysis...............................................................19 7.1.1 Television........................................................................19 7.1.2 Internet............................................................................19 7.1.3 Radio...............................................................................19 7.1.4 Outdoor...........................................................................19 7.1.5 Magazine.........................................................................20 7.2 Media Selection Analysis.................................................20 8.0 Creative Execution......................................................................................21 8.1 Introduction....................................................................................21 8.2 Performance, Style and Options..................................................21 8.3 Drive Emancipated........................................................................21 8.4 Message Strategy.............................................................................21 8.4.1 Television........................................................................21 8.4.1.1 Television Ad Rationale................................22 8.4.2 Print.................................................................................22 8.4.2.1 Print Ad Rationale.........................................22 8.4.3 Digital..............................................................................23 8.4.3.1 Banner Ad......................................................23 8.4.3.2 Facebook.........................................................23

8.4.3.3 Splash Page....................................................23 8.4.3.4 Digital Rationale............................................23 8.4.4 Radio................................................................................23 8.4.4.1 Radio Rationale.............................................24 8.4.5 Outdoor/Spot................................................................24 8.4.5.1 Outdoor/Spot Rationale...............................24 9.0 Media Plan...................................................................................................25 9.1 Introduction....................................................................................25 9.2 Campaign Media Strategy.............................................................25 9.3 Spot Market Selection....................................................................25 9.4 Year At A Glance............................................................................25 10.0 Campaign Evaluation...............................................................................26 10.1 T.O.M.A Survey............................................................................26 10.2 Media Mix Survey........................................................................26 10.3 Strategic Implications..................................................................26 11.0 References..................................................................................................27 12.0 Media Appendix........................................................................................28 12.1 Media Flowchart National..........................................................28 12.2 Media Flowchart Spot/Totals.....................................................29 12.3 Media Plan Year at a Glance.......................................................30 12.4 Spot Markets.................................................................................30 12.5 Simmons Data....................................................................31 & 32 13.0 Creative Appendix....................................................................................33 13.1 Television......................................................................................33 13.2 Print...............................................................................................34 13.3 Radio..............................................................................................34 13.4 Digital............................................................................................35 13.4.1 Banner...........................................................................35 13.4.2 Facebook.......................................................................35 13.4.3 Splash Page...................................................................36 13.5 Outdoor/Spot...............................................................................37 14.0 Group Evaluation......................................................................................38

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1.0 - Situation Analysis

The purpose of this Situation Analysis is to research and describe the current environment which surrounds our brand and the automobile industry in general. All information deemed important to the campaign will be organized in this analysis in one of several classifications. The information collected will include, but is not limited to, the demographic, economic, technological, political, social, cultural influences that may affect our brand and our campaign. Our main competitors will also be taken into account in this analysis in order to draw comparisons and see where our brand stacks up against them. In total, this Situation Analysis will provide the essential information needed to start the formation of a successful campaign.

1.1 Product/Service 1.1.1 History Lincoln was founded in 1917 in Detroit and has been producing economical and luxurious cars ever since. Owned by the Ford Motor Company, Lincoln Motors have had the backing of one of the leading manufacturers of automobiles since the year 1922. Throughout their history, Lincoln has been a brand that has produced cars that place importance on functionality and the overall driving experience. As a Brand, Lincoln emphasizes the importance of a person’s automobile, and by extension, the driving experience of each and every person that gets behind the wheel of one of their cars. 1.1.2 Description of product line The current line of Lincoln automobiles features two sedans, the MKZ and MKS, two crossover SUVs, the MKX and MKT, and one SUV, the Navigator. These cars range in price from 34,755 (MKZ) to 57,775 (Navigator). The MPG varies from car to car, with the sedans getting 18/27 city-highway while the SUVS getting anywhere from 17/26 to 14/20, depending on the model. Also, Lincoln offers a hybrid version of the MKZ Lincoln | 5

that can get up to 40 MPG. Each automobile in Lincoln’s product line offers a luxurious yet comfortable interior with state of the art technology built into the operation of the vehicle. 1.1.3 Image/ Attributes Lincoln automobiles have always been promoted as high quality and luxurious. Certain models, namely the Navigator, are marketed as more upscale models, with more features and a higher quality build, when compared to the lineup presented by Lincoln’s parent company, Ford Motors. With features like THX surround sound audio and heated seats and steering wheels, Lincoln puts an emphasis on comfort. 1.1.4 Strategic Implications Lincoln is already a well-established brand in United States and operates under one of the most well perceived car brands in the world, according to various brand perception surveys, Ford Motors(10). Even though they are established, they still have plenty of room to grow. Lincoln is not as popular amongst the younger generations of drivers who don’t see their cars are cutting edge. We will emphasize Lincoln’s dedication to modernizing their product lineup and competing with the highest quality of automobiles.

1.2 Product Class 1.2.1 Market Overview As a subsidiary to the Ford Motor Company, Lincoln’s positioning against other luxury car brands is not unique. Its major competitors Lexus and Cadillac are both subsidiaries of Toyota and General Motors respectively. These brands are the luxury models of their overall company and compete directly with Lincoln on their own merit. The popular brand Mercedes-Benz, is the luxury division of German based manufacturer Daimler AG, and is competitive against higher end Lincoln models. Ford’s other offshoot brand, Mercury, ceased production due to


the recession as well, leading to an increase in the models made by Lincoln. Ford intends to expand the number of models to compete with the growing luxury car markets in China and the US. (IBIS) 1.2.2 Geographic Distribution Lincoln boasts high sales across the country, but their most profitable markets lie in the Northeast and the South. These markets have the highest index among consumers who had recently acquired Lincoln cars, while the South has a majority of the population who had purchased a Lincoln new. (Simmons) Automobile manufacturing in America is heavily concentrated in the Great Lakes Area and California. Each of these areas contain between 10 to 20% of the manufacturing establishments in the United States. Southeastern states including North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida and Midwestern states like Texas and Arizona also contain large manufacturing concentrations, all ranging between 3 and 9% of the entire U.S. market. (IBIS) Domestic automakers like General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler, are located primarily in the Michigan and the Great Lakes area. The Southeastern region of the United States is populated more by Japanese-based manufacturers. These manufacturers, like Toyota, Honda, and Nissan are heavily concentrated in Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia. (IBIS) California makes the West another large player in the market by offering ample trade opportunities. Many smaller Japanese companies like Mazda, Kia, and Suzuki focus their production here. The market is expected to grow and shift with the introduction of electric cars. (IBIS) 1.2.3 Cost/Sales The MSRP of most sedans is between $25,000 and $48,000. The MSRP for crossovers is between $30,000 and $45,000. The SUV seems to have to highest MSRP amongst competitors, in the range of $60,000 and $70,000. Lincoln’s lineup fits into all of the price ranges except for SUVs,

which Lincoln offers at a lower price of $57,000. Since 1990, when Lincoln’s sales peaked, their overall sales have dropped 63%. Consumers in recent years have opted to buy more European cars instead of luxury American brands like Lincoln and Cadillac. 1.2.4 Demand factors As gas prices rise in the United States, energy efficient automobiles have become popular amongst American consumers who wish to purchase a vehicle with a higher MPG rating. Although consumers are concerned with the price of gas, research shows that they are still interested in the features offered by a luxury car brand. The vehicle that can combine high gas mileage with luxury features would be considered by consumers to be ideal. In the U.S., there has been a recent movement, known as the Made in America Movement (11), to influence consumers to buy American made products to support the economy. This is especially evident in the automobile industry where campaigns like Chrysler’s ‘Made in Detroit’ utilize the recent economic downturn to promote the importance of buying American made vehicles. Domestic automobile companies have been updating their product offerings to compete with the European and Asian car companies. 1.2.5 Strategic Implications As the automobile industry makes a comeback in the United States, the Big 3 car companies (Ford, General Motors and Chrysler) have seen a substantial growth in sales. Lincoln’s parent company, Ford, have seen profits of $6.6 million in previous years, which is their highest earnings in the previous 11 years. This increase in sales, similarly seen by GM and Chrysler, reflects a positive trend in recent years representing the recovery and growth of the American made automobile market. The geographic distribution of the Big 3 American automobile manufacturers is centered in the Midwest, with most automobile plants located in the state of Michigan. Due to this and Lincoln’s high sales in the

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Northeast, advertising can be focused in the Northeast most heavily while focusing less heavily on the secondary market found in the South.

1.3 Competition For the sake of comparing the differences in our brand of vehicles with our competitors, the following charts will illustrate the characteristics of models from each brand. The categories will be split into Sedans, Crossover/SUVs, and Full Size SUVs, for the purpose of comparing models of similar size and performance needs. The characteristics that have been chosen relate to the performance of the vehicles, seeing as performance was listed as the most important attribute on our Multi-Attribute Model conducted for this campaign. Background information for each of our top competitors are included in this section as well.

1.3.1 Cadillac Cadillac, like Lincoln, is a subsidiary of a larger American motor company, in this case General Motors. Cadillac offers a product line of 13 different automobiles compared to the 6 that Lincoln offers, so the potential consumer will have more options to pick from. Cadillac has made great strides in previous years in terms of advertising, changing the attitudes about their brand. In the past year, Cadillac has spent approximately $121,108,200 on advertising which is considerably more than Lincoln at $72,914,600. This advertising budget will have to be something to take into careful consideration. Cadillac has a current lineup of 13 vehicles, including 4 sedans, 2 coupes, 2 sport wagons, 1 crossover and 4 SUVs. Because they have more product offerings than Lincoln, consumers have more options to choose from. Lincoln | 7


1.3.2 Lexus Lexus is another luxury car brand that is a subsidiary of a larger automobile company, Toyota Motor Corporation. Lexus cars are based and produced in the country of Japan, but they are sold globally, with a heavy concentration in The United States. Lexus recently has released advertisements that stress their high-tech and high-style vehicles as well as initiatives that involve investing in entrepreneurs and innovative minds. 1.3.3 Mercedes-Benz Mercedes-Benz is the luxury vehicle of German based manufacturer Daimler AG. The brand began with what is often referred to as the first car patented in 1886. With Germany as the base, Mercedes are manufactured and sold globally. Daimler is also responsible for a line of Mercedes trucks and busses which are mostly used in Europe and Asia. Mercedes are known for their safety and quality, and rely on these aspects in their advertising as well. Using the “class” characteristic of their cars, Mercedes current campaign features vehicles being referred to as “A Class Ahead.” 1.3.4 Strategic implications As seen in the competition charts below, understanding how Lincoln compares to the competitors is important in developing the specific goals for this campaign. By viewing each brand side by side, it becomes easier to see each of their strengths and weaknesses. This is helpful information that will aid the process of developing creative strategies for this campaign. 1.4 The Consumer/Target Profile Lincoln is often perceived as an outdated car for an older generation. According to Simmons data, Lincoln owners are predominantly over the age of 55, indexing 249 for women and 313 for men for the over 65 age group. Women tended to be the stronger demographic of Lincoln consumers as well, indexing a 105 over the male index of 95. Lincoln

owners seem to be more on the upscale side of income, although as a luxury car this was expected. For women $30k seemed to be the base income level and indexes rose steadily as income increased. For men $30k a year was the base income level, with indexes increasing until a drop of in purchasing after the $75k mark. Education levels were also high among Lincoln buyers, with male buyers typically having college degrees and women having attended or finished graduate school. Lincoln buyers are also predominantly Caucasian indexing 115 against the almost non-existent African American or Hispanic markets. Our current market is college educated white men and women over the age of 55 who are making over $50k a year. This market is around 5,512,000 individuals who are already in a position to buy a Lincoln car. They are older and can afford to buy a luxury brand car and have status that a luxury car would match. The secondary market would be college educated multicultural men and women under 55 making over $75k a year. This market is made up of potential consumers whom data suggests Lincoln is not currently as popular with; however, their educational status allows them an annual income necessary to afford a luxury car. This market is made up of individuals who aspire to proclaim their status by owning a luxury car and may need to be reminded that Lincoln is one of the top luxury car brands. Our target market is the secondary market, a younger generation of consumers. To spread the Lincoln brand we need to raise our awareness among up and coming businessmen and women. 1.5 Environment Over the past decade, there has been a movement in the automobile industry to make the most fuel-efficient or “green” cars in response to consumer’s desires to “go green” and save money. The price of gasoline has risen 260% in the past decade, leading most consumers to become interested in purchasing a car that will cost them the least amount of money to fuel. We will keep this issue, as well as the current gasoline prices, in mind as our campaign goes through its life cycle.

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2.0 - SWOT Analysis

In order to properly organize all of the information collected during the Situation Analysis, a detailed SWOT Analysis necessary. This tool will help us organize our information into 4 categories: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (shortened to SWOT). The data that has been collected, known in the analysis as components, will be placed into one and only one of these categories, based on how that piece of information affects this campaign. The information that has been gathered can be classed as an influence that is internal or external, as well as positive or negative. Once everything has been organized into one of the four categories, the actionable sets must be found. In order to find the actionable sets, each component must be ranked on a scale of 1 to 3 in each of the following: potential damage for our weaknesses and threats, potential benefit from our strengths and opportunities, the relative cost of the component and the time frame in which the component must be addressed. Each component that has 7 points or higher is one that must be addressed in the campaign.

2.1 Strengths

The following factors are characteristics of our brand that we plan to promote to our advantage throughout the life of the campaign. 2.1.1 Brand Awareness: Lincoln benefits from high brand awareness in the marketplace. While it is not always the first luxury brand people think of, it is often mentioned when luxury cars are being referred to. Currently Lincoln could be seen as just another luxury car brand, but the fact that it is at least considered in the category of luxury cars is already a benefit for our campaign. This will be included in our actionable set due to its necessity in the attempt to attract more potential buyers. 2.1.2 American Made: The fact that Lincoln is a subsidiary of Ford Motors and an Lincoln | 9

American made car is very helpful to the brand. It allows Lincoln to position itself as a quality car in America where nationalism is still high. American products are still seen as solid products and this helps Lincolns image in the marketplace as being a quality car. 2.1.3 Luxurious interior: Car consumers are often sold on features rather than the actual performance of the vehicles they are looking at. In this regard Lincoln has an advantage because of the luxurious quality of the interior of its vehicles. Lincoln combines an array of advanced features with a comfortable and ergonomic interior to appeal to the interests of a broad range of consumers. This will be included in our actionable set because it helps set Lincoln apart from the other luxury car brands by defining specific features that only they can offer. Damage Benefit Cost Time Total Frame Brand Awareness 2 3 2 7 American Made 1 1 1 3 Luxurious Interior 3 2 2 7

2.2 Weaknesses

The following factors are characteristics of our brand that we wish to change or adjust to improve our perception over the life of our campaign. 2.2.1 Perceived as an “outdated� car: The Lincoln brand is often associated with an older generation of consumers and therefore does not appeal as much to younger consumers. This theory was supported by our Simmons data which suggested that the major purchasers of Lincoln vehicles are consumers over the age of 55. To increase Lincoln’s sales we will need to address how to present Lincoln as


a viable option for a younger generation. This is included in our actionable set because it is one of the major hurdles we must overcome to increase the range of consumers to which Lincoln appeals. 2.2.2 Lack of previous media exposure compared to competitors: While awareness of the brand is high, Lincoln does not have a high profile when it comes to advertising. Competing brands receive more media attention and are more prolific in their advertisements. To increase our sales we will need to overcome the media obstacle and cover a larger range of media more frequently. This is part of our actionable set because it is going to require a lot of attention to increase Lincoln’s presence in the media for our target consumers. 2.2.3 Limited product line: Lincoln’s model lineup only features a few models. This doesn’t give consumers a lot of options which is typically a draw for any company. This is a problem we feel can be dealt with by advertising and is not included in the actionable set because our competitors also feature similarly small model lineups, though larger than Lincoln’s.

“Outdated” Perception Lack of Media Exposure Limited Product Exposure

Damage

Benefit

Cost

3 2 1

-

3 3 1

Time Total Frame 3 9 2 7 1 3

2.3 Opportunities

The following factors are competitive issues that we wish to take advantage of to improve our competitive position over the life of the campaign. 2.3.1 Engage a younger generation: As previously stated, Lincoln is viewed as an outdated car brand this is something that we definitely want to change, making our brand appealing to a new generation of working professionals. This is a great opportunity for us to gain more consumers and have them become Lincoln drivers for the rest of their lives. This component will be included in our actionable set due to the high potential benefit as well as the time and money required to reach a new target group. 2.3.2 Increased focus with close of Mercury: With the closing of Lincoln’s partner brand, Mercury, our brand we receive much more time and focus. This gives our brand the opportunity to really shine and focus on promoting the current product lineup. All in all, more resources will be available to Lincoln after this closing.

Engage a Younger Generation Increased Focus with close of Mercury

Damage

Benefit

Cost

Total

3

Time Frame 3

-

3

-

2

1

2

5

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9


2.4 Threats

The following factors are competitive issues we need to offset or neutralize to improve our brand position over the life of the campaign. 2.4.1 Media saturation from an abundance of car advertisements: In today’s market, the car category is heavily advertised amongst all media. With our target group being bombarded with multiple car brands, it will be more difficult for our campaign to stand out in our target’s mind. In order to grab the attention of our target group, we will need to steer our campaign in a way that specifically appeals to their tastes and desires. 2.4.2 Competition from other more “classy” brands: In terms of our indirect competition, higher end car brands will definitely be included and taken into account. We realize that certain individuals in our target group are going to desire more expensive cars that are more appealing and offer better performance and style. In order to deal with this, we will have to express and emphasis the luxury qualities of our vehicles and the fact that they will be less expensive than these higher end brands. 2.4.3 Car brands with more features: Although the current lineup of Lincoln features an array of technological upgrades that contribute to the overall ease and comfort of use, we realize that there are other brands or automobiles that offer unique features that have the possibility of appealing to our target group.

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Media Saturation Competition from other more “classy” brands Car brands with more features

2.5 Actionable Set

Damage

Benefit

Cost

Total

2 3

Time Frame 2 2

2 2

-

1

-

2

2

5

6 7

After completing the SWOT analysis, we narrowed down the factors we were looking at into our actionable set. This group of Strengths, Opportunities, Weaknesses and Threats are the most important factors to consider when creating our campaign objectives and will allow us to better focus on the best way to set Lincoln as the most desired brand of luxury car. Lincoln already has a high Brand Awareness and with all of the standard features also sports a Luxurious Interior. These strengths can be used to help Lincoln with its opportunity to engage a younger generation of up and coming businessmen and women. Lincoln cars do not receive much media exposure and are often viewed as an outdated brand of car. Younger consumers may have difficulty connecting to the Lincoln brand and will need much more media exposure to warm up to Lincoln. The brand is also threatened by competition from higher end brands like Cadillac and Mercedes-Benz. These brands already have a name for themselves in the luxury car market and Lincoln needs to overcome their popularity to position itself as the best luxury car brand.


3.0 - Advertising and Marketing Communication Objectives

Before going on to the Strategies and Tactics of the campaign, clearly stated objectives must be formulated. In order for these objectives to be credible, they must be specific, measurable and achievable in the time frame of the campaign. Each of the following 5 components must be addressed in the campaign objectives: a variable, a way of measuring that variable, beginning and end values of the variable, the time frame in which this is taking place, and finally the target group that the campaign will be attempting to influence.

3.1 Advertising Objective: 3.1.1 Awareness of Brand The Lincoln brand is already one of the top luxury car brands out today, but knowledge of the brand is limited to a specific audience. Over the course of our campaign we aim to increase awareness of Lincoln from 20% to 50% as measured by Top Of Mind Awareness surveys (T.O.M.A.) in men and women ages 30-45 with an annual salary of $75,000 and above. 3.1.2 Change “Outdated” Perception According to Simmons data Lincoln’s primary consumers are over the age of 55, and in surveys consumers reported that the Lincoln brand was one that they thought past generations would have driven. This means that the Lincoln brand has an outdated perception which we must work to overcome. During the campaign we will position Lincoln as a luxury car for younger, up and coming businessmen and women. This positioning will give the Lincoln brand a new less outdated perception.

both interior and exterior. Through the campaign we will promote the added features Lincoln already offers, such as a superior sound system and built in dashboard navigation, to give it an edge over other luxury models lacking these features.

3.2 Marketing Objectives: 3.2.1 Current Market Group Maintain buying behaviors of our current target, consisting of both men and women over the age of 55 with an annual salary of $50,000 to $75,000. The campaign plan to measure these behaviors by evaluating product sales over the course of the campaign beginning January 1, 2013 and ending December 31, 2013. The campaign will increase the frequency for this target to maintain or increase future sales. 3.2.2 Target Group Increase awareness level of Lincoln from 20 to 50% as measured by T.O.M.A. for men and women between the ages of 30-45 with an annual salary of $75,000 and above during the campaign timeframe beginning on January 1, 2013 through December 31, 2013. The campaign will increase the reach of the brand for this target to help generate a new generation of consumers for the Lincoln brand. 3.3 Media Objective: Our media objective is split between the two demographics we are targeting with our campaign. For our Current Market we plan to increase the frequency to help increase sales among our strongest demographic. In the Target Group we plan to increase the reach to garner new consumers and increase our customer base.

3.1.3 Enhance Luxury Features Because Lincoln is considered a luxury car brand, consumers expect a higher level of comfort and a larger number of more advanced features,

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4.0 - CAMPAIGN TIMELINE

In order to track the campaign from beginning to end, a chart will be employed that shows the details of the brand awareness in each quarter of the campaign. Included in this timeline will be the level of our brand awareness, according to a Top Of Mind Awareness survey (TOMA). Also included will be minimum and maximum cut off values that will be employed in case the brand awareness level isn’t at least 5% away from what was projected. This is necessary so that we will know whether or not we need to employ a contingency plan, one that includes adjusting the amount of GRPs, or gross rating points. This timeline will allow us to carefully monitor the incremental success of the campaign. Legend Key for Timelines: Level: The anticipated goal for a given quarter. BM: A Benchmark or tool used to measure the success of a goal. Cutoff Min: The minimum percent of a goal at which a contingency plan will be put into effect to increase an objective in a given quarter. Cutoff Max: The maximum percent of a goal at which a contingency plan will be put into effect to decrease an objective in a given quarter.

Previous Campaign

Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 T0 T1 T2 T3 T4 Base Brand Awareness: Quarter One: Quarter Two: Quarter Three: Quarter Four: Level: 20% Level: 25% Level: 30% Level: 40% Level: 50% BM: TOMA BM: TOMA -survey BM: TOMA -survey BM: TOMA -survey BM: TOMA -survey awareness awareness awareness awareness Cutoff: (+/- 5%) Cutoff: (+/- 5%) Cutoff: (+/- 5%) Cutoff: (+/- 5%) Min: 23.75% Min: 28.5% Min: 38% Min: 47.5% Max: 26.25% Max: 31.5% Max: 42% Max: 52.5% Contingency: Adjust Contingency: Adjust Contingency: Adjust Contingency: Adjust GRP’s GRP’s GRP’s GRP’s

New Campaign

The campaign timeline shown above includes the entire year of our campaign from start to finish with benchmarks listed at each quarter. Over the course of the campaign we will increase the awareness of the Lincoln brand from 20 to 50%. To ensure that this goal is met we will use successive approximation, or raising awareness at an increased rate over time, throughout the campaign to evaluate our awareness and monitor whether or not we are reaching our goals. By using Top of Mind Awareness (T.O.M.A.) surveys we can evaluate where our frequency is at each benchmark and adjust the campaign accordingly. In case of an emergency our contingency plan is to adjust the number of GRP’s to help regulate awareness. To judge whether we will need to employ the contingency plan we will utilize a minimum and maximum cutoff for each quarter of 5-6%.

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5.0 - Multi-Attribute Model (MAM): Message Design and Positioning Guidelines

To find out which attributes of our brand and brand category are most important to address, the Multi-Attribute Model will be employed. The MAM will help with understanding the perceptions of our target group as they pertain to the product compared to its competitors. Two surveys will be used, the first being an attribute survey to find which attributes of our product are considered important by the target group. The most mentioned attributes will be selected and used in the second survey, which will compare the brands in the product category. These brands will be compared with each other based on how our target group ranks their attributes.

5.1 Consumer Data Collection 5.1.1 First Survey: MAM Attribute survey The first survey that was conducted for this campaign was a general brand and attribute survey. This survey was distributed using social media as well as email and personal interactions. The survey included just 2 questions. The first asked about what attributes or characteristics were most important to our survey takers if they were to buy a luxury car. Those participating in the survey were asked to list their top most important attributes. The second question asked participants to list as many brands as they could think of that they considered being in the luxury category. Both of these survey questions gave us crucial information needed to move forward with the MAM model. This information allowed for us to see which brands were in the forefront of our target audiences mind as well as what attributes they demanded when looking for a new luxury car. 5.1.2 Second Survey Goal and Structure After gathering data on the different attributes people valued in a car and choosing the top five we created a second survey to test the importance of these top attributes in a luxury car and how Lincoln and

its competitors performed on these attributes. The survey consisted of one page of 8 scale rating questions asking participants to rate how well they believed Lincoln, and its competitors performed on the five attributes found to be most important. Each question asked about a separate brand and asked respondents to rate the brand on a scale of one to ten for each of the five attributes. On the second page of the survey were 5 questions each asking the respondents to rate how important the five top attributes of a luxury car were to them. This was to decide how to rank the five attributes when evaluating the brands on them in the Multi-Attribute Model chart. 5.1.3 Second Survey Results and Strategic Implications The surveys allowed us to rank the five top attributes in terms of importance to the consumers starting with Performance (8.44), Style (8.34), Interior Design (8.20), Price (8.15), and finally Fuel Economy (8.05). It also allowed us to get the necessary information for completing the MAM chart. This chart allows us to see how Lincoln performs against other car brands in the luxury category and identify where our competition is the strongest. By Comparing how each of the cars performed on our five chosen attributes we were able to see where Lincoln stands against our top competitors and use this information to develop a more effective campaign strategy later on. 5.1.4 Survey Distribution Surveys were created online with the help of SurveyMonkey.com and were distributed electronically through various social media channels. The surveys were also presented to peers at the Pennsylvania State University on a computer platform to allow them to participate and respond as well. The lack of random sampling in these surveys means that the population found is one of convenience and data should be taken and used with that information in mind.

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5.2 Data Analysis 5.2.1 Multi Attribute Model Analysis chart

Analysis

the most part believes that out of all the brands listed, Mercedes performs the best. At the other end of the spectrum, we find Lincoln the farthest brand from the iconic or ideal brand. This will have to be an area that is heavily focused on, seeing as this is the most important attribute and Lincoln is perceived as the worst brand in terms of that attribute. Attention to this attribute will be necessary in increasing the overall awareness of the Lincoln brand and ultimately changing perceptions about the brand. 5.2.3 “Style” Line-by-Line analysis Style- The second line included in the MAM Analysis chart is style. In the category of luxury cars, it is to be expected that consumers are going to demand the car they deem the most stylish. This is because owning a luxury car isn’t just about getting from point A to point B, but about looking good in the process. From the chart, it is clear to see that again Mercedes is the closest brand to what is considered the iconic or ideal. Mercedes has stressed the style of their automobiles, so it would make sense that they are perceived as the most stylish amongst our target audience. Looking at the Lincoln brand, it again is the farthest brand away from the iconic or ideal brand. The stigma of an “outdated” car can explain why this attribute is rated so low for Lincoln. This stigma is something that must be dealt with immediately during the campaign so that the brand can move on stressing the strides made to develop the most stylish car possible.

5.2.2 “Performance” Line-by-Line analysis The first line included in the MAM analysis chart, as well as the top attribute of luxury cars, is performance. When consumers are purchasing a luxury brand car, performance is what is most important to them. The reason they are buying a luxury brand car over just any car brand is for the excellent construction and production that goes into creating a luxury car. From looking at the chart, the data shows that Mercedes is the closest brand to the iconic or ideal brand. This shows that our target audience for

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5.2.4 “Interior Design” Line-by-Line analysis The third line of the MAM chart shows the Interior Design attribute. Interior Design was relatively high among the attributes that consumers valued in a luxury car. Luxury cars are typically valued for their overall design and aesthetic, and for this reason Interior design placed highly as expected. However, all of the brands placed below the ideal. In this area Lincoln was perceived as one of the lowest in Interior Design with a rating of 6.16, trailing Mercedes-Benz’s rating of 7.42. Because it was the


only brand removed from the cluster and the lowest scoring, Lincoln’s interior design will be stressed in the campaign to help increase the overall perception of the brand. 5.2.5 “Price” Line-by-Line analysis The fourth line in the MAM chart shows the Price rating for luxury cars. Luxury cars are expected to be priced highly and so it was not surprising that this attribute did not place very highly. However, it was surprising that all of the cars fell below the ideal price desired by consumers. This is the only attribute which Lincoln received a more positive rating than Mercedes-Benz. Lincolns 5.39 greatly outscored Mercedes’ 4.71 in this attribute. Because of the similarities in price and its positive placement in regards to the other brands, the campaign will focus on the fact that the Lincoln brand offers the same luxury for a lower price. 5.2.6 “Fuel Economy” Line-by-Line analysis The final line in the MAM chart refers to Fuel Economy in luxury cars. Fuel Economy was the least important attribute among those polled and showed most of the brands bundled closely together in the ratings. Once again, all of the brands fell drastically short of the ideal Fuel Economy. Lincoln’s perception was the lowest at only 5.16; trailing Mercedes-Benz’s perception of second best with a score of 6.24. Despite being the second highest rated, Mercedes scored far below the ideal Fuel Economy suggested by consumers. Because of this Lincoln will need to put a lot of focus on its fuel economy, especially that of the hybrid MKZ model, during the campaign. 5.2.7 Secondary “Performance” Line-by-Line analysis For the highest rated attribute, performance, Cadillac ranked second highest in regards to the ideal level with a score of 7.74, compared to Lincoln’s 6.10. This shows once again that the perception of the other luxury car brands’ performance is much higher than that of Lincoln’s. In our campaign we need to stress Lincoln’s comparable performance statistics

as shown in the charts in Section 1.3. 5.2.8 Secondary “Style” Line-by-Line analysis For the second highest rated attribute, style, Cadillac once again ranked second highest to the ideal behind Mercedes-Benz with a score of 7.79, compared to Lincoln’s 6.03. This shows that throughout the campaign we also need to stress Lincoln’s focus and dedication to style, citing articles from their own website about the inspiration used in the design of their vehicles. 5.2.9 Secondary “Interior Design” Line-by-Line analysis For the third highest rated attribute, interior design, Cadillac ranked highest with a score of 7.89 compared to Lincoln’s 6.16. Lincoln offers the same interior features and technology as Cadillac and the other luxury car brands, and this shows that the campaign should also focus heavily on the features and interior options that the Lincoln brand options in all of their cars. Most importantly, the campaign should feature the interior options that Lincoln offers exclusively, like the THX II Certified Audio System standard in all models. 5.2.10 Secondary “Price” Line-by-Line analysis For the fourth rated attribute, price, Cadillac ranked highest compared to the ideal with a score of 5.50 compared to Lincoln’s second highest ranking of 5.39. Lincoln is already perceived as one of the best luxury car brands in terms of price, but we need to make sure to reiterate this point in the campaign and remind consumers that Lincoln offers the same luxury for less. 5.2.11 Secondary “Fuel Economy” Line-by-Line analysis For the fifth rated attribute, fuel economy, Cadillac ranked second lowest, right between Mercedes and Lincoln, with a score of 5.45, compared to Lincoln’s 5.16. This proves that we need to stress Lincoln’s already superior or comparable fuel economy in most models as shown by

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the charts in Section 1.3.

6.0 - Budget Allocations

5.2.12 MAM-Model Strategic Implications From the data found in the MAM-Model analysis our target currently perceives the Lincoln brand as the lowest in performance, style, interior design, and fuel economy. Throughout the campaign we will make the consumers aware of Lincoln’s already superior fuel economy, high performance ratings, focus on innovative style, and dedication to the highest quality interior options. We will also reinforce Lincoln’s perception of reasonable pricing among luxury brand cars. Lincoln already performs well statistically compared to its competitors, our goal will be to reveal to the consumers Lincoln’s actual level of quality, and correct their perceptions in Lincoln’s favor.

6.1 Overall Campaign Budget

Performance Style Fuel Economy Technology Price Utilize competitive performance statistics Highlight stylistic influences

Reveal superior fuel economy Hybrid option Hihglight Interior Options Reinforce low price

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The total amount of money that will be used for this campaign will be $120,000,000. This budget has been selected after viewing past years spending and finding that a total of $116,362,800 was spent in advertising in the past 12 months.(AdSpender) This previous budget also includes the past years spending on Lincoln’s sister company, Mercury which was previously discontinued. Therefore, Lincoln will receive this advertising money to bolster their campaign. The additional $3,617,200 will be used to not only add additional exposures to our target group but also gives the campaign a round number that will be more manageable in our calculations.

6.2 Contingency Budget

The contingency budget used in this campaign will be 10% of the overall campaign budget, or $12,000,000. This money will be used to buy additional GRPs during the quarterly evaluations of the campaign to supplement our media exposure as well as aid in adjusting our media mix if need. With this contingency, The total amount of money that will be spent on the media plan will be $108,000,000.

6.3 Media Vehicle Spending 6.3.1 Television Television will be the most utilized medium through out the campaign as it is the most used by our target group. The total budget for television spending will be $51,561,200 representing 48% of the total media plan spending. Television is the most important form of media that will be used for this campaign. Our television ads will set the stage for the rest of the campaign.


6.3.2 Internet After Television, the Internet will be our 2nd most utilized media during this campaign. We must adapt to the current trend in media usage which heavily favors the internet in terms of social media usage as well as research and everyday web browsing. The total amount of money that will be used for internet advertising will be $25,542,000, comprising 24% of the total media plan spending. 6.3.3 Magazine The Magazine budget for this campaign will be the 3rd largest amongst our media mix, a total of $20,004,900. This represents 19% of our media plan. Magazines will be used instead of newspapers in our campaign because we found it to be a more effective medium for the print advertisements. 6.3.4 Radio Radio will be used sparingly throughout our campaign. While it is not the most impact full media in terms of garnering attention to our campaign, there is still the promise of reaching a substantial percentage of the target group and add to their total exposures to our entire campaign. The total amount that will be spent on radio advertising during the campaign will be 5,912,700, representing 5% of the total media plan spending.

be used in each quarter. Televisions will be used debut the campaign as it is the focus of the campaign and demands the highest percentage of the total advertising dollars. Because we want the campaign to catch our target group’s attention immediately, we will focus a higher amount of GRPs in the first 2 months of the campaign. Internet will be used consistently throughout the campaign due to the fact that it is a medium that is heavily used and growing in demand and popularity amongst our target group. Magazines will be used consistently during the campaign, but there will be an in-depth selection as to which magazines are chosen to feature the print advertisements. The choice to feature our print ads in magazines instead of newspapers was based on the data we collected which included a lower readership amongst our target group for newspapers. Radio will be used in all quarters of the campaign to supplement the advertisements of other media that are exposed to our audience by eliciting their attention while they are actually driving their current car. Finally, Outdoor advertisements will be focused toward our spot markets primarily. We believe that these advertisements would be best in an urban/city setting with a large population per area. This way we can maximize exposures to these advertisements while reducing cost per exposure. Total Campaign Budget - ($108,000,000)

6.3.5 Outdoor The final medium that will be used during this campaign consists of outdoor advertising executions. $4,979,200 in total will be used on these outdoor advertisements, representing just under 5% of our total media plan spending. These outdoor execution will be heavily used in our spot markets, mostly in urban settings. Strategic Implications

Television Internet Magazine Radio Outdoor

6.4 Budget Summary

Throughout this campaign, all previously mentioned media will Lincoln | 18


7.0 - Media Selection 7.1 Media Quintile Analysis

A media quintile analysis is a tool used to measure the effectiveness of different media vehicles in their ability to reach the target audience. The quintile works by breaking data into five equal parts, each consisting of 20% of the audience. The top Quintile holds the top 20%, while the bottom quintile holds the lowest 20%. Each of the quintiles can be analyzed and weighted based on their standing in the analysis. Using the index values given in each of the quintiles, we can determine which of the media vehicles is best received by our target audience. In Simmons the target audience was labeled 30-45 and includes our entire target audience. To identify what media to put our budget into and where to spend the most we utilized a quintile analysis to ensure our reach was maximally effective. 7.1.1 Television The top media vehicle found by the Quintile Analysis for our target group was television, with the highest indexes in Prime Time and Early and Late Fringe Television slots. These indexes indicate that this is the media vehicle that will reach our target group most strongly and with the greatest frequency. Because of this we have decided to dedicate 48% of our media budget toward this vehicle to ensure we achieve the brand awareness that our campaign is working toward. Television is widely regarded as the most effective form of traditional media and is easy to use as a vehicle. This made it an automatic choice regardless of its high index in the quintile analysis. This vehicle is not new to any of our target audience and therefore establishes a base for the advertising campaign in our consumer’s minds. 7.1.2 Internet The second highest media found by the Quintile Analysis was Internet usage, both at home and at work. The high indexes in this media vehicle make it an essential media vehicle for our media campaign. Because Lincoln | 19

of the high index we have chosen to put 23% of our media budget into Internet advertising and spread the advertising between banner advertisements and ads placed on Facebook. Internet is still a relatively new media vehicle and is especially new to our target audience; however it is still a high indexing media. Despite its new status it has also been seen to be extremely successful in viral marketing campaigns such as the one used by Old Spice. While we are not creating a viral campaign, we do think that using the internet media vehicle will achieve higher brand awareness for Lincoln and help support the rest of the campaign. 7.1.3 Radio The next highest media found by the Quintile Analysis was radio, specifically during Drive Time. Radio had a high index but rated lower than Magazines which were not included in the quintile analysis but will be discussed later. Due to the relatively low cost of radio it became 6% of the budget, focused mainly in drive time but with some of the budget going to all day radio as well. Radio is an older medium and therefore already established in the minds of our consumers. It is also useful because the drive time advertising slot allows us to speak directly to the consumers about their driving experience and what it could be in a Lincoln. Despite these benefits, radio’s index of usage was lower than that of other vehicles and as such will make up much less of the campaign. 7.1.4 Outdoor Outdoor advertising had the lowest index of the media in the Quintile analysis and became the smallest portion of our campaign. The outdoor vehicle was focused in our spot markets and made up only 5% of the budget. Outdoor advertising is often difficult to manage and measure; therefore we have restricted it solely to our spot markets. We believe this


will give our campaign a chance to grow where the index of purchase was highest according to Simmons instead of focusing on trying to create a nationwide outdoor campaign due to the vehicles low reach. 7.1.5 Magazine Magazines were the only media vehicle that were not included in the quintile analysis due to a lack of data. Instead magazines were tested based on their readership index among consumers. Due to the high index of magazines, especially among women, 19% of the budget will be used in magazine spending. Magazines are also an established form of traditional media and therefore will help move the campaign to the print medium. Because Simmons showed magazines performing better with women than with men, most of our print media will be focused into women’s magazines while only a small portion will spread into general interest and men’s magazines.

be focused in the same time slots and outdoor advertising will be focused on engaging as many members of our target market as possible through an interactive street campaign.

1st Quintile Highest 20%

7.2 Media Selection Analysis

Using the results from the media quintile analysis in Simmons, the most effective media vehicles were able to be selected to help manage advertising spending and reduce excess budget usage in areas where higher spending is unnecessary. The media selection found from this method utilizes the highest polling media vehicles within the target audience to ensure maximum reach and frequency throughout the campaign and prevent misallocation of the budget. With this in mind our media selection will use a combination of national television, internet, magazine, and radio vehicles throughout the campaign. Television will be focused on Prime Time and Fringe slots, while radio will be mainly in Drive Time and Fringe hours. We will restrict internet to banner advertisements on websites popular with our target group and Facebook advertisements. Our magazine ads will focus on Women’s magazines but will also use some general interest and men’s. The remainder of the campaign will be focused in spot markets and will utilize television, radio, and outdoor advertising. Television and radio will

5th Quintile Lowest 20%

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8.0 - Creative Execution 8.1 Introduction

The following creative plan derives direction and inspiration from the results of our MAM analysis discussed earlier. The poor perception of Lincoln in most of the categories gave rise to a need to touch on multiple areas of Lincoln’s competitive attributes to help improve not only brand awareness but the overall perception of the Lincoln brand. The creative design also strives to keep Lincoln’s positive perception of price in mind so that consumers do not get the idea that the new and improved Lincoln brand has increased in cost as well.

8.2 Performance, Style, and Options

Lincolns perception compared to its major competitors in the attributes of performance, style, and interior options was poor by modest standards. Due to this negative perception, we have chosen to highlight these attributes exclusively in our advertisements to show consumers that Lincoln has evolved as a brand and does in fact offer the same quality as its competitors plus some. The strategy needed to focus on separating Lincoln not only from the other car brands but also from its past, however; due to the goal of keeping our current market group, we had to refrain from separating Lincoln from its past entirely. Because of this we have decided to position Lincoln as a brand that retains the quality it has always had in the past while still evolving and building upon that quality as it moves freely toward the future.

8.3 Drive Emancipated

The tagline for this campaign will be Drive Emancipated. This tagline will incorporate the idea of moving Lincoln forward as a brand, but will also hint at the idea of retaining the past, especially to our current market group who will be familiar with the idea of emancipation. The use of the word “Emancipation” will help connect the tagline and campaign

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to the Lincoln brand by drawing influence from the famous Emancipation Proclamation by President Abraham Lincoln, whom the brand is named after. The connection to President Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation will also help augment the idea of freedom the campaign will convey. The Lincoln brand is attempting to free itself from the negative perceptions that consumers have of it, as well as free itself from the ordinary. Our target group has worked its way up in the professional world very quickly and is able to afford some of the best luxury vehicles; however they do not wish to blend in since they have worked so hard to separate themselves already, so with our campaign we will show them how with Lincoln they will be able to break out and Drive Emancipated.

8.4 Message Strategy

The strategy for the campaign will be to create advertisements that will be appealing to the 30-45 year old professional audience and grab their attention. These ads should work together with the slogan to not only show how Lincoln can free our target from their everyday routine, but also how Lincoln can do so. In that respect we will show how Lincoln’s superior style, performance, and interior options allow them to free themselves from the status quo established by our competitors. The campaign will also use nostalgia tactics to help retain our current market of over 55 year old professionals. This group is near the end of their professional tenure and will be looking for an escape and a way to enjoy their soon to come retirement freedom. We want to show them that Lincoln is still the quality car it has always been, but that it is now even better than before and offers more features than the other cars they can afford in their retirement. 8.4.1 Television The television ad execution can be seen in the creative appendix, section 13.1. The television advertisement will highlight some of the interior options that Lincoln features as well as show how it will help our target group how Lincoln has separated itself from the other luxury car


brands. In the first scene a phonograph arm drops onto a record and starts playing a scratchy tune that sounds like it is from the 20’s. The word “Music” starts a narration about the evolution of sound over the decades. The camera will pan out for the next scene to show the phonograph is sitting in the passenger seat of an older car. This will engage our audience and introduce the idea of outdated technology in luxury cars. In the next scene the driver will look into the rearview mirror and see a Lincoln MKZ approaching from behind. At this point the music changes from a 20’s song to a blend of the old fashion music and new popular dance beats. The techno beat takes over as Parov Stelar’s popular song “Booty Swing” becomes evident. The old music is blended with dance beats popular reminiscent of the music our target group enjoys. As the volume increases, the camera cuts to the MKZ, following it for a moment before letting it drive by. The camera then cuts to a series of shots of speakers inside the car, changing to a new speaker in accordance with the bass beats of the song. This will highlight the speakers before the narration mentions them. The camera will cut to the dashboard of the car and slowly pull into the back seat while the narration begins talking about the THX II certified speakers that are standard in all Lincoln models. In the driver’s seat is a man in a black top hat. The camera cuts to the first car featured as the Lincoln MKZ drives past it quickly. The camera then takes an angle watching the car drive away and lowers to the ground. The top hat the man was wearing lands in front of the camera, having flown off and been left behind. The screen will fade black as the Lincoln Logo, Brand name, and the Drive Emancipated slogan fade onto the screen.

the THX II speakers, which are well known to our target as the speakers used by movie theaters, will make Lincoln seem like the more desirable brand. Finally the top hat which will be featured in all the ads represents another relic of the past. It starts off inside of the Lincoln, representing bringing Lincoln’s history of quality with it, but in the end it is left behind, representing how Lincoln has freed itself from the past to become a new brand of luxury car.

8.4.1.1 Television Ad Rationale This advertisement will use music that is popular with our target group and an exaggerated comparison to show how Lincoln automobiles offer options that make the competition seem old fashioned. The phonograph represents the sub standard technology found in Lincoln’s competitors and will resonate with our target group as something undesirable. The juxtaposition of the old car with the Lincoln MKZ and

8.4.2.1 Print Ad Rationale The print ad features a log cabin which is commonly seen as an extraneous amenity, or vacation spot. These items are only owned by those with excess money and are therefore considered luxury items. The headline suggests that even a luxury cabin can become uncomfortable, and then juxtaposes driving in a Lincoln, suggesting to our target group that driving a Lincoln never gets old. This is supported in the body copy. The top hat is

8.4.2 Print The print ad execution can be seen in the creative appendix, section 13.2. This ad will run in magazines and will feature the interior options that Lincoln offers as well as connect them to luxury and moving forward and staying free. The print ad will feature a log cabin in the forest , a common symbol of luxury, with the headline “The Cure to Cabin Fever”. A Lincoln MKX will be seen driving away from the cabin, suggesting that leaving the cabin in a Lincoln is even more luxurious and comfortable. In the corner of the ad a top hat and an axe will be resting on a stump. Below these the body copy will read “Lincoln knows that even the cabin in the woods grows stagnant once in awhile. When it does you can step outside and get some fresh air, or climb into a cabin that will never get old. The all new redesigned Lincoln MKX with standard Navigation System with Traffic and Travel Link was constructed to prevent you from ever getting stuck again. So chop down that musty door and cruise the unbeaten path.” Next to the body copy the Lincoln logo, brand name and the Drive Emancipated slogan will be visible.

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featured again in this ad where it is shown being left behind again. The axe and the stump with the hat suggest that it was recently worn, showing once again how Lincoln has brought its history with it, but moved on from there. 8.4.3 Digital The digital ad execution can be seen in the creative appendix, section 13.4. 8.4.3.1 Banner Ad The main digital ad will be a banner advertisement found on websites popular with our target group. The ad will feature a top hat against a background of parchment stained with ink, conjuring a connection with the past. The text on the advertisement will be “Dare to Drop the Hat”, challenging our target group to leave the past behind and free themselves. 8.4.3.2 Facebook We will also use Facebook sidebar advertising in our campaign. Our target group are already strong users of Facebook and as Facebook skews older will continue to be even heavier users. The sidebar advertisement will feature the same image as the banner advertisement, only the Lincoln Logo will be visible instead of the text. Beside the ad the text will read “Stuffy suits, choking ties, and those shoes that are a size too small. It’s time for you to step out of the past and into something a little more modern. Unbutton the suit, drop the hat, and live emancipated.” This will challenge our target group to free themselves from their work environment each day by stepping into a Lincoln automobile. 8.4.3.3 Splash Page Instead of directing the consumer to the Lincoln homepage, clicking on either the banner ad or the Facebook ad will open a new tab in the browser that leads the consumer to a splash page. The page will feature the text “Fourscore and Seven” referring not only to the opening words of the Gettysburg address, but also to the seven models Lincoln will have in

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their line up by 2015. A large top hat will be on screen and the seven Lincoln models will be sitting on the brim of the hat. The models that have yet to be released will be featured only in silhouette. When the user clicks on one of the cars it will grow larger and open a data box instead of taking the user to a new page. The data box will feature information about the car, including price, gas mileage, and special options. Each of these can be clicked on as well for more information that will open in another data box without closing the original. This will keep the user on one page and allow them to brose all the information about the available Lincoln models from one link. 8.4.3.4 Digital Rationale The advertisements featured in the digital ads will use the idea of freeing oneself from the past by way of text, daring the user to “drop the hat” in both, referring to leaving behind the top hat that will be the central visual tool in the campaign. The splash page will be used so that users do not leave the website they are already on, and so that it does not seem like a pop-up advertisement, which only opens in new windows. The splash page will also centralize and simplify accessing data on Lincoln models by keeping the user on one page the entire time. The “Fourscore and Seven” text on the page will serve to connect the page to the Lincoln campaign, and introduce the idea of the past. It’s featuring on a modern page will integrate the past and the present. 8.4.4 Radio The radio ad execution can be found in the creative appendix, section 13.3. The radio advertisement will feature an authoritative male voice beginning Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, but immediately the words will change to discuss how Lincoln is separating itself from its competitors. The music will change as an announcer takes over and explains how the Lincoln brand has separated itself from competitors by mentioning some of the features that the new lineup offers.


Television

8.4.4.1 Radio Rationale The radio ad will catch listeners’ attention with the famous opening line of the Gettysburg Address being altered. President Lincoln will connect the idea of change and freedom to the brand as he speaks. To sum it up, the music will evolve and a new narrator will explain the ways in which Lincoln can help free our target group from the status quo and help separate them from the rest. 8.4.5 Outdoor/Spot An example of the outdoor campaign can be found in the creative appendix, section 13.5. The outdoor spot market campaign will consist of going into our spot market cities and buying buggies in the horse drawn buggy services they offer or establishing our own horse drawn buggy tours. The buggies we buy will have their interiors refurbished in the style of Lincoln vehicle interiors. The interior will have all the features and options that a Lincoln vehicle would have, for the same price as a normal buggy ride. Customers will still be able to use these buggies to take tours, but now they will do so in luxury.

Radio

Outdoor Spot

8.4.5.1 Outdoor/Spot Rationale By fusing the old fashioned horse drawn buggies with modern Lincoln interiors we will create a sense of fusion between the past and present, showing how Lincoln has improved upon already quality systems. The tours will also free customers from the hustle and bustle of city life and allow them to escape into a more luxurious environment. The lack of a price increase also reiterates our low cost compared to other luxury options. The interiors of the buggies will also give customers a chance to experience just how luxurious a Lincoln automobile really is.

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Digital


9.0 - Media Plan 9.1 Introduction

The goal of the media plan for this campaign was to effectively distribute the exposure of our brand and its current lineup and reach our target audience in the best way possible to maximize the effectiveness of the campaign.

9.2 Campaign Media Strategy

For this campaign, we have selected to use a pulsing strategy for our media buying. This means that our message will have a constant presence amongst our selected media, while some months will have an increased amount of both reach and frequency. We found that holiday seasons featured heightened buying behaviors amongst our target group, so we decided to pulse more GRPS during months with prominent celebrated holidays in the United States. As you can see in our chart, we have decided to pulse extra levels of reach and frequency in the months of January, February, May, June, July, October, November and December while we will have a base level of exposure in the months of March, April, August and September.

9.3 Spot Market Selection

Through our research, we found that Lincoln’s largest markets in terms of purchased automobiles were located in the northeast as well as throughout the south. Therefore, we decided to choose cities that were located in these areas and that also represented some of the largest markets in the country. These markets included the cities of New York and Boston representing the northeast as well as New Orleans and Atlanta in the south. Along with these markets, we chose to included Detroit due to the fact that this is where the Lincoln automobiles are manufactured and brand awareness is higher than most cities.

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9.4 Year At A Glance

The year at a glance chart found in the Media Appendix, section 12.3 shows a month by month breakdown of our media plan. The chart includes reach, frequency, GRPs and the total dollar amount associated with them. The chart is divided in each of these categories to show the difference between our original goal and what the actual estimated levels show. We were able to meet and sometimes exceed our goals through our media plan. While the chart shows that we are over budget by $1,020,000, we will use part of our contingency budget to make sure we are achieving these estimates. 96 95 94 93 92 91

Reach Goal

90

Reach Est

89 88 87

9 8 7 6 5

Avg Freq Goal

4

Avg Freq Est

3 2 1 0 1

2

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10.0 - Campaign Evaluation

In order to effectively evaluate this campaign, surveys will be distributed each and every quarter of the campaign. These surveys include:

10.1 T.O.M.A. Survey The top of mind awareness survey will allow our agency keep track of the target group’s awareness of the Lincoln brand. More importantly, this survey will be able to evaluate the target’s awareness of Lincoln’s most recent lineup of vehicles which we will be promoting. This survey will be distributed to members of the target group nationwide, with a specific attention to our selected spot markets 10.2 Media Mix Survey In addition to the T.O.M.A. survey, there will also be media mix surveys that will be distributed that will ask participants not only if they have been exposed to our advertising message, but also where and when they were exposed. This way we will be able to determine which different media platforms are more effective and which ones are less effective. This information will be helpful in case our current plan isn’t performing the way we had planned. This survey will also be conducted quarterly amongst members of the target group, in particularly our selected spot markets. 10.3 Strategic Implications With the information collected from these surveys, our campaign will be able to be evaluated every quarter based on where the awareness levels are for the brand and current lineup as well as which media vehicles were most effective. This information will help us alter the campaign at each quarter if need be.

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11.0 – References 1. Lincoln Luxury Cars, SUVs, & Crossovers. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Sept. 2012. www.Lincoln.com 2. Kiley, David. “Is Detroit’s Comeback for Real?” Popular Mechanics. Hearst Corporation, 10 Feb. 2011. Web. 24 Oct. 2012. <http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/news/industry/is-detroits-comeback-for-real> 3. “Luxury Cars, SUVs, Sedans, Coupes, and Crossovers | Cadillac.” Cadillac.com. General Motors, n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2012. <http://www.cadillac. com/flash.html> 4. “Lexus: The Best in Luxury Cars, Luxury SUVs, and Luxury Hybrids.” Lexus: New Luxury Cars and SUVs from Lexus USA. Toyota Motor Sales, n.d. Web. 24 Sept. 2012. <http://www.lexus.com/> 5. “Pride of the Fleet. Leader of the Category. SUV of the Year.” Mercedes-Benz. Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC, n.d. Web. 24 Sept. 2012. <http:// www.mbusa.com/mercedes/index> 6. “Car & Automobile Manufacturing in the US.” IBS World. Web. 4 Oct. 2012. <http://clients.ibisworld.com/industryus/print/productsandmarkets. aspx?indid=816>. 7. “Ford Motor Company” Hoovers, Web. 6 Oct. 2012 <http://subscriber.hoovers.com/H/company360/overview. html?companyId=10597000000000> 8. “Mercedes-Benz History”. Edmunds.com, Web. 10 Oct 2012. <http:// www.edmunds.com/mercedesbenz/history>

Lincoln | 27

9. Dammann, George H.; Wagner James K. (1987). The Cars of LincolnMercury. Crestline Publishing Co.. p. 199. ISBN [[Special:BookSourc es/0-912612-26-2|0-912612-26-2]] 10. “Consumers See Fewer Differences among Car Brands.” Best Car Brands. Consumer Reports, Jan. 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012. <http://www. consumerreports.org/cro/2012/01/consumers-see-fewer-differencesamong-car-brands/index.htm> 11. “The Made in America Movement - The Made in American Movement.” The Made in America Movement. The Made in America Movement, 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012. <http://www.themadeinamericamovement. com/>.


12.0 - Media Appendix 12.1 Media Flowchart National

Lincoln | 28


12.2 Media Flowchart Spot/Totals

Lincoln | 29


12.3 Media Plan Year at a Glance

12.4 Spot Markets

Lincoln | 30


CROSSTAB TITLE : Untitled STUDY NAME : Fall 2009 NHCS Adult Survey 12-month STUDY TYPE : Population START FIELD DATE : 11/05/2008 END FIELD DATE : 12/04/2009 DATE EXECUTED : 12/17/2012

CROSSTAB TITLE : Untitled STUDY NAME : Fall 2009 NHCS Adult Survey 12-month STUDY TYPE : Population START FIELD DATE : 11/05/2008 END FIELD DATE : 12/04/2009 DATE EXECUTED : 12/17/2012

12.5 Simmons Data

TV Prime Time

SELECTED BASE : STUDY UNIVERSE

Total

Total

30 - 45

Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index

24,489 222,896 100.0% 100.0% 100 24,489 304,202 136.5% 100.0% 100

QUINTILE 1 (HIGHEST) 4,642 44,542 100.0% 20.0% 100 4,642 60,733 136.4% 20.0% 100

QUINTILE 2 QUINTILE 4 QUINTILE 3 QUINTILE 5 (2ND (2ND (LOWEST) (MIDDLE) HIGHEST) LOWEST) 4,772 5,030 4,777 5,268 44,547 44,554 44,532 44,722 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.1% 100 100 100 100 4,772 5,030 4,777 5,268 63,081 61,158 60,339 58,891 141.6% 137.3% 135.5% 131.7% 20.7% 20.1% 19.8% 19.4% 104 101 99 96

CROSSTAB TITLE : Untitled STUDY : Fall ยน LabelNAME changed by 2009 user. NHCS Adult Survey 12-month STUDY TYPE : Population START FIELD cell DATE : 11/05/2008 * Indicates count from 31 to 60. Projections may be unstable, use with caution. END FIELD DATE 12/04/2009 ** Indicates cell:count below 31. Projections are likely unstable, use with caution. DATE EXECUTED : 12/17/2012 Copyright Experian Simmons 2012 SELECTED BASE : STUDY UNIVERSE

TV Early/Late Fringe Total

Total

30 - 45

Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index

24,489 222,896 100.0% 100.0% 100 24,489 304,202 136.5% 100.0% 100

QUINTILE 1 (HIGHEST) 4,620 44,501 100.0% 20.0% 100 4,620 58,117 130.6% 19.1% 96

QUINTILE 2 QUINTILE 4 QUINTILE 3 QUINTILE 5 (2ND (2ND (MIDDLE) (LOWEST) HIGHEST) LOWEST) 4,801 4,867 5,040 5,161 44,562 44,543 44,525 44,765 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.1% 100 100 100 100 4,801 4,867 5,040 5,161 58,837 61,503 62,821 62,924 132.0% 138.1% 141.1% 140.6% 19.3% 20.2% 20.7% 20.7% 97 101 103 103

SELECTED BASE : STUDY UNIVERSE

TV All Day Total

Total

30 - 45

Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index

24,489 222,896 100.0% 100.0% 100 24,489 304,202 136.5% 100.0% 100

QUINTILE 1 (HIGHEST) 4,442 44,534 100.0% 20.0% 100 4,442 59,006 132.5% 19.4% 97

QUINTILE 2 QUINTILE 4 QUINTILE 3 QUINTILE 5 (2ND (2ND (MIDDLE) (LOWEST) HIGHEST) LOWEST) 4,969 4,943 4,884 5,251 44,544 44,463 44,444 44,912 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 20.0% 19.9% 19.9% 20.1% 100 100 100 100 4,969 4,943 4,884 5,251 59,822 61,479 62,391 61,503 134.3% 138.3% 140.4% 136.9% 19.7% 20.2% 20.5% 20.2% 98 101 103 100

CROSSTAB TITLE : Untitled ยนSTUDY Label NAME changed by 2009 user. NHCS Adult Survey 12-month : Fall STUDY TYPE : Population *START Indicates count from 31 to 60. Projections may be unstable, use with caution. FIELDcell DATE : 11/05/2008 ** cell :count below 31. Projections are likely unstable, use with caution. ENDIndicates FIELD DATE 12/04/2009 DATE EXECUTED : 12/17/2012 Copyright Experian Simmons 2012 SELECTED BASE : STUDY UNIVERSE

Internet

Total

Total

30 - 45

Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index

24,489 222,896 100.0% 100.0% 100 24,489 304,202 136.5% 100.0% 100

QUINTILE 1 (HIGHEST) 5,155 44,537 100.0% 20.0% 100 5,155 64,551 144.9% 21.2% 106

QUINTILE 2 QUINTILE 4 QUINTILE 3 QUINTILE 5 (2ND (2ND (MIDDLE) (LOWEST) HIGHEST) LOWEST) 4,968 4,725 4,755 4,886 44,454 44,534 44,548 44,824 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 19.9% 20.0% 20.0% 20.1% 100 100 100 100 4,968 4,725 4,755 4,886 61,425 60,498 58,906 58,821 138.2% 135.8% 132.2% 131.2% 20.2% 19.9% 19.4% 19.3% 101 100 97 96

ยน Label changed by user.

ยน Label changed by user.

* Indicates cell count from 31 to 60. Projections may be unstable, use with caution. ** Indicates cell count below 31. Projections are likely unstable, use with caution.

* Indicates cell count from 31 to 60. Projections may be unstable, use with caution. ** Indicates cell count below 31. Projections are likely unstable, use with caution.

Copyright Experian Simmons 2012

Copyright Experian Simmons 2012

Lincoln | 31


CROSSTAB TITLE : Untitled STUDY NAME : Fall 2009 NHCS Adult Survey 12-month STUDY TYPE : Population START FIELD DATE : 11/05/2008 END FIELD DATE : 12/04/2009 DATE EXECUTED : 12/17/2012

CROSSTAB TITLE : Untitled STUDY NAME : Fall 2009 NHCS Adult Survey 12-month STUDY TYPE : Population START FIELD DATE : 11/05/2008 END FIELD DATE : 12/04/2009 DATE EXECUTED : 12/17/2012 SELECTED BASE : STUDY UNIVERSE

Radio Drive Time Total

Total

30 - 45

Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index

24,489 222,896 100.0% 100.0% 100 24,489 304,202 136.5% 100.0% 100

QUINTILE 1 (HIGHEST) 4,772 44,547 100.0% 20.0% 100 4,772 63,928 143.5% 21.0% 105

QUINTILE 2 QUINTILE 4 QUINTILE 3 QUINTILE 5 (2ND (2ND (MIDDLE) (LOWEST) HIGHEST) LOWEST) 4,806 4,562 5,095 5,254 44,522 44,519 44,516 44,793 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.1% 100 100 100 100 4,806 4,562 5,095 5,254 62,346 63,370 56,757 57,802 140.0% 142.3% 127.5% 129.0% 20.5% 20.8% 18.7% 19.0% 103 104 93 95

CROSSTAB TITLE : Untitled STUDY : Fall ยน Label NAME changed by 2009 user.NHCS Adult Survey 12-month STUDY TYPE : Population START FIELD cell DATE : 11/05/2008 * Indicates count from 31 to 60. Projections may be unstable, use with caution. END FIELD DATE 12/04/2009 ** Indicates cell :count below 31. Projections are likely unstable, use with caution. DATE EXECUTED : 12/17/2012 Copyright Experian Simmons 2012 SELECTED BASE : STUDY UNIVERSE

Radio All Day Total

Total

30 - 45

Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index

24,489 222,896 100.0% 100.0% 100 24,489 304,202 136.5% 100.0% 100

QUINTILE 1 (HIGHEST) 4,602 44,552 100.0% 20.0% 100 4,602 61,756 138.6% 20.3% 102

QUINTILE 2 QUINTILE 4 QUINTILE 3 QUINTILE 5 (2ND (2ND (MIDDLE) (LOWEST) HIGHEST) LOWEST) 4,751 4,743 4,738 5,655 44,552 44,537 44,495 44,761 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.0% 20.1% 100 100 100 100 4,751 4,743 4,738 5,655 61,677 62,443 61,260 57,066 138.4% 140.2% 137.7% 127.5% 20.3% 20.5% 20.1% 18.8% 101 103 101 93

Outdoor

SELECTED BASE : STUDY UNIVERSE

QUINTILE 1 (HIGHEST)

Total

Total

30 - 45

Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index

24,489 222,896 100.0% 100.0% 100 24,489 304,202 136.5% 100.0% 100

5,155 44,537 100.0% 20.0% 100 5,155 64,551 144.9% 21.2% 106

QUINTILE 2 QUINTILE 4 QUINTILE 3 QUINTILE 5 (2ND (2ND (MIDDLE) (LOWEST) HIGHEST) LOWEST) 4,968 4,725 4,755 4,886 44,454 44,534 44,548 44,824 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 19.9% 20.0% 20.0% 20.1% 100 100 100 100 4,968 4,725 4,755 4,886 61,425 60,498 58,906 58,821 138.2% 135.8% 132.2% 131.2% 20.2% 19.9% 19.4% 19.3% 101 100 97 96

CROSSTAB TITLE : Untitled STUDY NAME : by Falluser. 2009 NHCS Adult Survey 12-month ยน Label changed STUDY TYPE : Population START FIELDcell DATE : 11/05/2008 * Indicates count from 31 to 60. Projections may be unstable, use with caution. END FIELD DATE : 12/04/2009 ** Indicates cell count below 31. Projections are likely unstable, use with caution. DATE EXECUTED : 12/17/2012

Copyright Experian Simmons 2012 SELECTED BASE : STUDY UNIVERSE

Magazine Total

Total

30 - 45

Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index Sample Weighted(000) Vertical % Horizontal % Index

24,489 222,896 100.0% 100.0% 100 24,489 304,202 136.5% 100.0% 100

TOTAL TOTAL READ ANY READ ANY MAGAZINE MAGAZINE ENGLISH ENGLISH S READ S READ - LANGUAGE LANGUAGE 20,601 20,601 19,826 19,826 753,276 165,909 731,508 163,271 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 337.9% 74.4% 328.2% 73.2% 100 100 100 100 20,601 20,601 19,826 19,826 1,017,727 226,593 988,105 222,995 135.1% 136.6% 135.1% 136.6% 334.6% 74.5% 324.8% 73.3% 99 100 99 100

ยน Label changed by user.

ยน Label changed by user.

* Indicates cell count from 31 to 60. Projections may be unstable, use with caution. ** Indicates cell count below 31. Projections are likely unstable, use with caution.

* Indicates cell count from 31 to 60. Projections may be unstable, use with caution. ** Indicates cell count below 31. Projections are likely unstable, use with caution.

Copyright Experian Simmons 2012

Copyright Experian Simmons 2012

Lincoln | 32


“Speaker Up” Runtime: 30 seconds Narrator sounds like Jeremy Irons

13.0 Creative Appendix 13.1 Television

VO: Music SFX: Pavlov Stelar “Booty Swing” comes in.

VO: It defines us

VO: and shapes our opinions SFX: Beats start in the song

SFX: Music volume increases

VO: and never stops changing.

Close up of a Phonograph needle. The needle drops onto the record as the music starts.

Zoom out slowly from the phonograph to see it is seated in the passenger seat of an older car.

Cut to the rearview mirror as the beat starts. A Lincoln MKZ comes into focus as driver adjusts mirror.

Cut to the Lincoln MKZ and follow the car before it drives out of the camera’s view.

Close up shots of the speakers in the car, changing to a new speaker with each bass beat.

VO: Cut through the static with the only THX II certified speaker system.

VO: Standard in every Lincoln model.

VO: So don’t just sing with the choir.

VO: Step up and lead it.

VO: Lincoln. Drive emancipated. SFX:Music fades out

Cut to close up of the MKZ’s dashboard displaying the THX logo. Pull back into backseat of car showing a man in a tophat in sillouhette driving.

Cut to camera following the old car from the beginning. The MKZ drives past in a blur.

Cut to camera behind the MKZ as it drives away. An object flies out the window and the camera pans up to follow it before lowering to the ground.

Still shot as the object descends to the ground slowly and it is revealed to be a tophat.

Lincoln logo and slogan fade in on a black background.

Lincoln | 33


13.2 Print

13.3 Radio Lincoln: 30 second spot Lincoln has a deep authoritative voice, Announcer has a smooth more baritone tone MUSIC:

The Cure to Cabin Fever

PRESIDENTIAL THEME MUSIC

Abraham Lincoln: Four score and 16 years ago the folks at Lincoln brought forth on this continent, a new automobile, conceived in luxury and dedicated to the proposition that all driving experiences are NOT created equal. MUSIC:

Lincoln knows that even the cabin in the woods grows stagnant once in awhile. When it does you can step outside and get some fresh air, or climb into a cabin that will never get old. The all new redesigned Lincoln MKX with standard Navigation System with Traffic and Travel Link was constructed to prevent you from ever Lincoln. getting stuck again. So chop down that musty door and cruise the unbeaten path. Drive Emancipated.

UPBEAT MODERN AMBIENT MELODY

Announcer: Fast forward to today and you will find a car company still dedicated to providing a superior level of both luxury and comfort in their automobiles. From the fuel efficient hybrid MKZ to the spacious and fully equipped Navigator, there is a Lincoln for all of those who seek a car that combines the class of an older generation with the technology of the future. Lincoln. Drive Emancipated.

Lincoln | 34


13.4 Digital 13.4.1 Banner

13.4.2 Facebook

Lincoln Motor Company Stuffy suits, choking ties, and those shoes that are a size too small. It’s time for you to step out of the past and into something a little more modern. Unbutton the suit, drop the hat, and live emancipated.

Dare to drop the hat “Stuffy suits, choking ties, and those shoes that are a size too small. It’s time for you to step out of the past and into something a little more modern. Unbutton the suit, drop the hat, and live emancipated.”

Lincoln | 35


13.4.3 Splash Page

Choose a Vehicle

Continue to Lincoln Homepage >

M KK ZZ LL ii nn cc oo ll nn M Starting MSRP $35,925 Fuel Economy 22 / 33 CITY

“Lincoln Drive Control Retractable Panoramic Glass Roof Push-Button Shift SYNC with MyLincoln Touch New 2.0L EcoBoost I-4 Engine Lane-Keeping System THX II Certified Audio System Active Park Assist Adaptive Cruise Control Multicntour Front Seats with Active Motion Inflatable Rear Safety Belts Heated/Cooled Seats Heated Steering Wheel 3.7L TI-VCT V6 Intelligent All-Wheel Drive”

HWY

Lincoln Drive Control Retractable Panoramic Glass Roof Push-Button Shift SYNC with MyLincoln Touch New 2.0L EcoBoost I-4 Engine Lane-Keeping System THX II Certified Audio System Active Park Assist Adaptive Cruise Control Multicntour Front Seats with Active Motion Inflatable Rear Safety Belts Heated/Cooled Seats Heated Steering Wheel 3.7L TI-VCT V6 Intelligent All-Wheel Drive

Continue to Lincoln Homepage >

Lincoln | 36


13.5 Outdoor/Spot

We will take over multiple touring stage coaches in our targeted cities. While they will look like ordinary coaches from the outside, they will come with the interior one would find inside of one of Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cars, including leather seats and a full dashboard complete with the THX sound system.

Lincoln | 37


The Lincoln Motor Company

Lincoln | 38


Table of Contents

1.0 Situation Analysis 1.1 Product/ Service.......................................................................Jamie 1.1.1 History.......................................................................Jamie 1.1.2 Description of product line....................................Jamie 1.1.3 Image/Attributes...................................................................Jamie 1.1.4 Strategic Implications..............................................Jamie 1.2 Product Class............................................................................Jamie 1.2.1 Market Overview.....................................................Grant 1.2.2 Geographic Distribution........................................Grant 1.2.3 Cost/ Sales................................................................Jamie 1.2.4 Demand Factors....................................................................Jamie 1.2.5 Strategic Implications..............................................Jamie 1.3 Competition.............................................................................Jamie 1.3.1 Cadillac.....................................................................Jamie 1.3.2 Lexus.........................................................................Jamie 1.3.3 Mercedes – Benz......................................................Jamie 1.3.4 Strategic Implications..............................................Jamie 1.4 The Consumer/ Target Profile...............................................Grant 1.5 Environment............................................................................Grant 2.0 SWOT Analysis 2.1 Strengths...................................................................................Grant 2.1.1 Brand Awareness.....................................................Grant 2.1.2 American Made.......................................................Grant 2.1.3 Luxurious Interior...................................................Grant 2.2 Weaknesses...............................................................................Jamie 2.2.1 Perceived as an “Old Person Car”..........................Jamie 2.2.2 Lack of previous media exposure compared to competitors..............................................................Jamie 2.2.3 Limited product line..............................................Jamie 2.3 Opportunities..........................................................................Grant 2.3.1 Engage a younger generation................................Grant 2.3.2 Increased focus with close of Mercury.................Grant Lincoln | 39

2.4 Threats.......................................................................................Jamie 2.4.1 Media saturation from an abundance of car advertisements........................................................Jamie 2.4.2 Competition from other more “classy” brands....Jamie 2.4.3 Car brands with more features..............................Jamie 2.5 Actionable Set...........................................................Grant & Jamie 3.0 Advertising and Marketing Communication Objectives.Grant & Jamie 3.1 Advertising Objective 3.1.1 Awareness of Brand 3.1.2 Change “Outdated” Perception 3.1.3 Enhance Luxury Features 3.2 Marketing Objectives 3.2.1 Current Market Group 3.2.2 Target Group 3.3 Media Objective 4.0 Campaign Timeline..............................................................................Grant 5.0 Multi-Attribute Model (MAM): Message Design and Positioning Guidelines 5.1 Consumer Data Collection....................................................Jamie 5.1.1 First Survey: MAM Attribute survey.................................Jamie 5.1.2 Second Goal and Structure....................................Grant 5.1.3 Second Survey Results and Strategic Implications...G 5.1.4 Survey Distribution.................................................Jamie 5.2 Data Analysis 5.2.1 Multi Attribute Analysis chart................Grant & Jamie 5.2.2 “Performance” Line-by-Line analysis...................Jamie 5.2.3 ”Style” Line-by-Line analysis................................Jamie 5.2.4 ”Interior Design” Line-by-Line analysis..............Grant 5.2.5 ”Price” Line-by-Line analysis................................Grant 5.2.6 ”Fuel Economy” Line-by-Line analysis...............Grant 5.2.7 Secondary “Performance” Line-by-Line analysis..G&J 5.2.8 Secondary ”Style” Line-by-Line analysis...............G&J 5.2.9 Secondary ”Interior Design” Line-by-Line analysisGJ


5.2.10 Secondary ”Price” Line-by-Line analysis.............G&J 5.2.11 Secondary ”Fuel Economy” Line-by-Line analysisGJ 5.2.12 MAM-Model Strategic Implications...................Jamie 6.0 Budget Allocations................................................................................Jamie 6.1 Overall Campaign Budget......................................................Jamie 6.2 Contingency Budget................................................................Jamie 6.3 Media Vehicle Spending.........................................................Jamie 6.3.1 Television..................................................................Jamie 6.3.2 Internet.....................................................................Jamie 6.3.3 Magazine..................................................................Jamie 6.3.4 Radio.........................................................................Jamie 6.3.5 Outdoor....................................................................Jamie 6.4 Budget Summary........................................................Jamie 7.0 Media Selection 7.1 Media Quintile Analysis.........................................................Grant 7.1.1 Television.................................................................Grant 7.1.2 Internet.....................................................................Grant 7.1.3 Radio.........................................................................Grant 7.1.4 Outdoor....................................................................Grant 7.1.5 Magazine.................................................................Grant 7.2 Media Selection Analysis..........................................Grant 8.0 Creative Execution 8.1 Introduction.............................................................................Grant 8.2 Performance, Style and Options............................................Grant 8.3 Drive Emancipated..................................................................Grant 8.4 Message Strategy......................................................................Grant 8.4.1 Television.................................................................Grant 8.4.1.1 Television Ad Rationale.........................Grant 8.4.2 Print..........................................................................Grant 8.4.2.1 Print Ad Rationale..................................Grant 8.4.3 Digital.......................................................................Grant 8.4.3.1 Banner Ad................................................Grant 8.4.3.2 Facebook..................................................Grant

8.4.3.3 Splash Page..............................................Grant 8.4.3.4 Digital Rationale.....................................Grant 8.4.4 Radio.........................................................................Grant 8.4.4.1 Radio Rationale.......................................Grant 8.4.5 Outdoor/Spot..........................................................Grant 8.4.5.1 Outdoor/Spot Rationale.........................Grant 9.0 Media Plan 9.1 Introduction.............................................................................Jamie 9.2 Campaign Media Strategy.......................................................Jamie 9.3 Spot Market Selection.............................................................Jamie 9.4 Year At A Glance......................................................................Jamie 10.0 Campaign Evaluation 10.1 T.O.M.A Survey......................................................................Jamie 10.2 Media Mix Survey..................................................................Jamie 10.3 Strategic Implications............................................................Jamie 11.0 References..............................................................................Grant &Jamie 12.0 Media Appendix 12.1 Media Flowchart National...................................................Grant 12.2 Media Flowchart Spot/Totals...............................................Grant 12.3 Media Plan Year at a Glance................................................Grant 12.4 Spot Markets..........................................................................Grant 12.5 Simmons Data....................................................................................Grant 13.0 Creative Appendix.............................................................................Grant 13.1 Television...............................................................................Grant 13.2 Print........................................................................................Grant 13.3 Radio......................................................................................Grant 13.4 Digital.....................................................................................Grant 13.4.1 Banner....................................................................Grant 13.4.2 Facebook................................................................Grant 13.4.3 Splash Page.............................................................Grant 13.5 Outdoor/Spot.........................................................................Grant 14.0 Group Evaluation

Lincoln | 40



Campaign booklet