Page 1


October 20, 2016 • Volume 8 • Issue 13

715 Kirby St. Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262

COVER 12 Marilyn Williams: Best Life Counseling and Behavior Clinic

5

www.thejambalayanews.com Publisher/Executive Editor Lauren Abate lauren@thejambalayanews.com

Contributors Lisa Addison Jason Machulski Mike McHugh Roger Miller Justin Morris Terri Schlichenmeyer

REGULARS 4 We are SWLA! 7

Dang Yankee

8

Fishin’ Tales

9

Adoption Corner

FEATURES 5 Local Educator Named Geography Teacher Fellow

8

Sales

20

lauren@thejambalayanews.com

Graphics Art/Production Director Burn Rourk

Business Office Manager Jeanie Rourk

THE SPICE OF SWLA 16 Event Guide 18 Halloween Event Guide 20 KC Productions Presents The Rocky Horror Show 23 Bookworm Sez… 24 heART of SWLA: Katherine Petty Prints

23

26 Nightlife Guide

24

28 Justin Morris’s Lake Charles 32 Kites, Arctic and Undersea at Historic City Hall 33 Funbolaya Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by Jambalaya Media, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a self-addressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2014 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited.

2 October 20, 2016

34 Society Spice

32 Vol. 8 • No. 13


Halloween

Musings

Halloween is right around the corner, but every day in October has been relentlessly hot here in SWLA. If you know me, then you are aware that this is a good thing, hating the cold as much as I do. However, I feel sorry for the rest of you, who are bravely putting up your autumn wreaths and Halloween decorations and drinking pumpkin spice lattes while the heat index soars. Autumn means crisp, cool days and nights, boots and sweaters and apple picking and glorious scarlet and orange foliage. There’s a certain scent to the air that is incomparable: smoky, earthy, and both bright and dark at the same time. I’m talking about a New England autumn, of course. Down here, there is not much foliage to speak of. Sure, the acorns are falling off the oak trees, but they’re little acorns. Puny. Not even worth

Vol. 8 • No. 13

mentioning. The big oaks up North drop big, beautiful ones. I used to collect them as a kid, even carried a few in my purse when I was older. When I was a sophomore in high school, my biology teacher gave us an assignment over the Columbus Day weekend. We had to make a leaf scrapbook. As luck would have it, every Columbus Day weekend we would go up to my cousin’s cottage in New Hampshire. It sat on the shore of Newfound Lake, which boasts crystal-clear, tranquil water and is surrounded by gorgeous trees. I found everything I needed: oak. spruce, aspen, elm, maple--you name it. It was so much fun to search for leaves, press them between waxed paper until I got home, and then create a very cool scrapbook that got me an A. I got my family in on it, too—I recall my Dad finding a few leaves for me. It’s a treasured memory. My

mother saved that book for years. Another reason you don’t realize that Halloween is around the corner is because of all the Christmas merchandise that is already for sale in most of the stores. You can’t even buy Halloween decorations now. You have to do that in July, I guess. I went into Lowe’s the other day and it was wall-to-wall Christmas trees and lights. And 88 degrees outside. Confusing?? I’d say. And certain Christmas fanatics are posting how many days it is until Christmas on Facebook (Laura Heller and Kayla Rigney, I’m looking at YOU). It is usually cold on Halloween night in New England, as it should be. The trees are just about bare, and there are piles of leaves on the ground that trick-or-treaters can scuff through as they go door to door. I guess kids here trick or treat in the heat, if they even do that anymore. Now it’s supervised parties or special events that take all the fun out of ringing a doorbell and not knowing who will open the door and what they will give you. The razorsin-apples criminals took care of that. Memories. I remember rushing home from school to get my costume ready. They were never very elaborate; something inexpensive, probably bought at Woolworth’s. The masks smelled like chemicals and sometimes it was difficult to breathe because the nose holes weren’t large enough or were in the wrong place. Because of the cold, we’d have to wear heavy clothes under the costumes.

Mom would make me dinner early so I could join my cousin Richard and our friends at the agreed-upon time. Back then, every house had candy and welcomed us, except for the one house around the corner that we all called The Haunted House. It was a small, turn-of-the century home with gingerbread trim that must have been beautiful in its day, but had now fallen into disrepair. Broken windows, crumbling steps, overgrown bushes, and a twisted tree gave it a stark appearance that was deliciously magnified on All Hallow’s Eve. We all made sure we ran by the house—very fast, in case Something came out. Imagine our shock years later when a fire broke out and firefighters rescued an elderly man and woman who had been living in it all these years—and no one ever knew. We’d come home in the dark with our bags filled with candy, laughing and excited, dumping them on the rug and tallying up our goodies. Richard and I would trade if I had something that he preferred and vice versa. We would eat sweets for days. And the memories we made would be even sweeter. Happy Halloween!

Lauren Abate

October 20, 2016 3


Foundation for the upcoming 2016-2017 fiscal year is newly-elected chair, Kimberly Caldarera. Joining her on the Executive Committee are Eligha Guillory, Jr., Vice Chair; Sawsan Abu Shamat, Secretary; Eric Mire, Treasurer; and Members-at-Large: Carl Ambrose, Sr.; Nancy Burleigh; Gregory P. Thibodeaux; and Don Lloyd, CEO CHRISTUS Southwestern Louisiana. New board members include: Jamie Chapman, Jordan Haman, Laura Leach, Dorothy McDaniel, Michael K. Pendergast, Faith Scott and Courtney Storer. Returning members are Brian Abshire; Missy Amidon; Bob Chandler; Myrna Conner; Patricia Flavin; Marion Fox; Glenda McCarty; Sister Ann Margaret Savant; David Sickey; and Keith Wimberly.

Boyd Gaming Supports Red Cross

Attorney Traub Joins Schrumpf Law Office

Elizabeth Traub

Boyd Gaming is proud to support the American Red Cross in its relief efforts in Louisiana. Earlier this month, they presented the organization with a check for $50,000 to support ongoing relief efforts following flooding throughout the state.

Schrumpf Law Office is pleased to announce that Elizabeth K. Traub has joined the firm as associate attorney. A native of Lake Charles, Traub graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree from McNeese State University in 2004. She received her Juris Doctor degree from the Loyola University College of Law in 2008. In 2009, she was admitted to practice law in Louisiana. Traub is a member of the Louisiana State Bar Association and speaks fluent Spanish. Schrumpf Law Office is locally owned and located in Sulphur. For more information, call (337) 625-9077.

Pinnacle Donates to Ethel Precht Foundation Walk Pinnacle Entertainment Foundation & L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles sponsored The Ethel Precht Hope Breast Cancer Foundation Walk by donating $10,000 to support the organization. This annual walk brings the community together in support of local breast cancer survivors. The Ethel Precht Hope Breast Cancer Foundation funds stay in the Southwest Louisiana community, directly supporting women who have been affected by breast cancer.

Vince Schwartz (Sr. VP-Operations – Boyd Gaming) presents Joshua Joachim (Chief Administrative Officer, American Red Cross) with check.

WCCH Awarded Accreditation by Joint Commission West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital (WCCH) has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for accreditation by demonstrating compliance with The Joint Commission’s national standards for health care quality and safety in hospitals. WCCH underwent a rigorous unannounced on-site survey in May of this year. A team of Joint Commission expert surveyors evaluated WCCH for compliance with standards of care specific to the needs of patients. The Joint Commission is the nation’s oldest and largest standards setting and accrediting body in health care. Learn more about The Joint Commission at www.jointcommission.org.

Memorial Breaks Ground on Behavioral Health Hospital

L to R: Melissa Timman, L’Auberge contract specialist & Precht Breast Cancer Foundation Board Member; Ethel Precht, Precht Breast Cancer Foundation Founder; Michael K. Pendergast, L’Auberge VP & GM; and Jan Wilburn, Precht Breast Cancer Foundation board member.

CHRISTUS St. Patrick Foundation Elects New Officers and Board Members The CHRISTUS St. Patrick Foundation has elected new board members and officers for July 2016 through June 2017. Leading the 4 October 20, 2016

Lake Charles Memorial Health System is moving forward with a $19 million behavioral health hospital in South Lake Charles. Memorial recently broke ground on the new facility. Memorial’s new behavioral health hospital is under construction adjacent to the Memorial Hospital for Women campus. The first phase is set to open in 2017 and will consist of two units: a 28 bed adult unit and a 14 bed adolescent unit. The current adult unit on the 10th floor of Memorial’s main campus will be converted to a 30-bed geriatric unit. Two other phases will be added to the behavioral health hospital in the future: two additional 28 bed units and a medical office building for outpatient programs. When all phases are completed, a total of 65,000 square feet and 102 beds will be available to treat the behavioVol. 8 • No. 13


ral health needs of Southwest Louisiana.

McNeese Foundation Receives Donation Al Cochran, a 1965 engineering graduate and a 2016 general studies graduate of McNeese State University, has donated $20,000 to the university through the McNeese Foundation for the Alfred Cochran Civil Engineering Scholarship.

Port of Lake Charles Announces Winners of Rice Cook-Off In celebration of September as National Rice Month, the CalcasieuCameron Rice Growers sponsored the 19th Annual Rice Cook-Off at the Brick House in downtown Lake Charles. The Port of Lake Charles hosted the event and sponsored the awards luncheon. Family and Consumer Science students from 13 area middle schools and high schools participated in the event. First place for the “Best Dish” category went to Kierra Walker of S.J. Welsh Middle School; second place went to Rachel McVey of Iowa High School; third place was awarded to Makayla Hodge of South Beauregard High School and “Most Heart Healthy” dish went to Evie Talbot of Moss Bluff Middle School.

L’Auberge Supports ArtsFest 2016

L to R: Dr. Nikos Kiritsis, dean of the college of engineering and computer science, Cochran and McNeese President Dr. Philip Williams. McNeese Photo

O’Connor Appointed as Arts Council Board President The board of directors of the Arts Council of SWLA appointed Chuck O’Connor of Stockwell Sievert Law Firm as its 2016-2017 board president during its annual board meeting. O’Connor has served on the Arts and Humanities board for five years. The board also approved a new slate of executive committee members, including Heather LaFleur as First Vice President, Emily Porche as Second Vice President, Anna Mallet as Treasurer and Heather Ogea as secretary. Sixteen new board members were approved, including Taylor Finchum Alexander, Nicole Arabie, Tanya Ardoin, Geneva Breaux, Devan Corbello, Daneisha Davis, Erin Davison. Randee Drayton, Dustin Granger, Amie Herbert, Taylor Hickey, Steven Perez, Katy Rozas, Derek Williams, Roxie Smith of KYKZ, and Will Sherwood.

L’Auberge Casino Resort Lake Charles recently donated to ArtsFest 2016, including $250 cash for supplies, $100 worth of bottled water for the event, and a $350 in-kind donation for a Deluxe Getaway Package, including hotel accommodations for one night, with dinner for two at Favorites Southern Kitchen. This generous support from L’Auberge will ensure that this year’s event will have an even greater impact on Lake Area youth. On Saturday, October 22, ArtsFest returns to engage area children in a free arts festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Lake Charles Civic Center’s Exhibition Hall.

CITGO School Uniform Drive For E.K. Key Elementary CITGO Lake Charles employees recently donated 390 school uniform items to CITGO Partner in Education, E.K. Key Elementary School during the annual CITGO Back-toSchool Uniform Drive. The uniform drive is coordinated by the CITGO Safety Directors and is part of the CITGO Corporate Social Responsibility initiative to support education by providing structure and guidance to students as they pursue academic excellence. Vol. 8 • No. 13

October 20, 2016 5


Local Educator Named Geography Teacher Fellow By Lisa Addison Justin Clark, an educator who teaches advanced classes at both Sulphur High School and Barbe High School, has been named as a 2016 “AGS Geography Teacher Fellow.” As part of his recognition as a teacher fellow, Clark will attend and participate in the AGS (American Geographical Society) Fall 2016 Symposium “Envisioning a Sustainable Planet” Nov. 17-18, in New York. Clark is one of 50 teachers selected from across the United States to participate in this first year of the program which was made possible by a gift from the Boundless Corporation to AGS. “Applicants had to write an essay on sustainability of the Earth and the effects on your region,” Clark said. “I focused on the importance of environmental responsibility without sacrificing the local economy of Southwest Louisiana. Our local economy is based in large part on industry and secondary businesses that rely on industries. Environmental regulations and governmental oversights need to take in the local economy as a factor in all decision making.” According to AGS, the symposium will enable teacher fellows to gain cutting edge knowledge and awareness of the real-world geographic workplace skills demanded by today’s geospatial companies. The teacher fellows will have the opportunity to interact with, and become one of, the nation’s thought-leaders who are involved in the multi-year dialogue about the future of geography. 6 October 20, 2016

“We are very pleased to be able to have Justin among 50 of the best teachers in the country join us in New York City in November,” said Dr. John Konarski, CEO of the American Geographical Society. “Geography and geospatial science have an effect on just about every aspect of our daily lives.” The collective experience and expertise of these teacher fellows will help guide the Society as we lead the discussion about the future of geography. In addition, the teachers will be able to bring back to their classrooms, practical and cutting edge information about the latest advancements in the geospatial world. We are so privileged to have these amazing teachers leading the future of geography with us.” Clark said he is looking

forward to attending the symposium in November. “It is a chance to represent the area at a national level in geography,” he said. “I have made contacts and friends over the years with other geography teachers who will be attending. AP Human Geography is one of the fastest growing AP classes in the country and Louisiana has had some of the largest gains in the country in APHG as far as exam takers and exam passers.” He said he embraces the opportunity to act as a representative of our area at the event. “I always feel it is important for me to do that when talking to people whose knowledge of the state doesn’t extend past New Orleans,” Clark said. “Southwest Louisiana has our own uniqueness to it when it comes to environmental and economic

issues.” Established in 1851, AGS is the oldest professional geographical/geospatial organization in the United States. It is recognized world-wide as a pioneer in geographical research and education in geography. AGS provides leadership to frame the national discussion of the growing importance of geography and geo-spatial tools. Lisa Addison wrote her first short story when she was 7 years old and hasn’t stopped writing since. She has two children, likes trying out new recipes, and loves going on adventures with her kids. Her photography is on Facebook at Lisa Addison Photography, her profiles of people are on Facebook at Humans of Southwest Louisiana, and she blogs at: http:// swlamama.wordpress.com Vol. 8 • No. 13


The Court Jester When I took up tennis about a year ago, I told everyone that it was to get some exercise. But that’s not the real reason. The real reason I took up tennis is because I absolutely stink at golf. My reasoning was as follows. My big problem with golf is that the clubs have really long shafts and small faces, meaning that it requires sniper-like accuracy to be able to make contact with the ball. This is a real problem for someone like me, who has the hand-eye coordination of a musk ox. On the other hand, tennis rackets have really big faces and short shafts. My figuring was that if I could swat a mosquito, which I have had plenty of practice doing since I moved to Louisiana, surely I could hit a tennis ball. I did find that I could hit a tennis ball a lot more frequently than I could a golf ball. My success rate in that area is nearly on par with weather forecasts, whereas at golf I missed the ball about as often as the government misses budget projections. Unfortunately, the thing about tennis that I failed to realize is that the game involves running. I absolutely hate running. I’ve hated it since high school, when my shop teacher, who also coached track and field, Vol. 8 • No. 13

recruited me for the team. I presumed it was because he thought it would be safe for me since it didn’t involve handling sharp tools. Once on the team, I lobbied the coach to let me focus less on the track part, which consisted of nothing but running, and more on the field part, which sounded like it included things that involved minimal running, like maybe flying kites. He refused, and so I quit the team. In golf, you never have to run unless an alligator is chasing you because you drove the ball into a water hazard and hit him in the snout. Mostly, you wear loud clothing and ride around in a cart trying to find where your ball landed. (In my case, I’d have needed an all-terrain vehicle to find my ball.) Needless to say, riding in a golf cart is a much easier way to get exercise than having to chase a tennis ball around the court. I learned that the hard way during a recent outing when the organizer paired me up for a singles match. I had always played doubles; having early on conceived a strategy whereby I could stand still and guard the net while my partner did all the running chasing the balls down in the backcourt.

In singles, however, it’s totally on me to cover the whole court, which in this particular match seemed to be big enough to land a plane on. My opponent was really good at hitting the ball to the exact opposite part of the court to wherever I happened to be. He had me running back and forth like a dog chasing bumper cars. Meanwhile, the best I could manage was to ease the ball back to exactly where he was standing. He could have sat in a beach chair sipping a Corona and still beaten me. I haven’t given up on tennis, but it sure would be nice if they came up with a way to play it without all the physical movement. That’s one area where I have to give credit to the golf people. I’ll concede that golf carts, as they’re currently

designed, wouldn’t work well on a tennis court. But if you could make them more like those zero-turn radius lawnmowers, the idea might become practical. I should write to the Toro Corporation about this idea. That, however, is where I would stop as far as incorporating golf ideas into the game of tennis. For example, I would forever ban the designers of golf apparel from getting into tennis wear. One of the things I like about tennis is that the outfits are generally limited to no more than two colors, whereas many people you see on the golf course look like they’d just stepped out of a circus tent. And when I’m on the court, I don’t need any special clothes to make me look like a jester.

October 20, 2016 7


Photos by Chris Romero

Handicapped Accessible Fishing Having spent two years in a wheelchair, I truly empathize with those in them. Two of my pals, Dr. Richard “Rocky” Kent and Glenn Bordelon are among those who

Rocky catching a fish with Glenn watching in the background 8 October 20, 2016

have to use them but remain very active. Glenn in his wheelchair and Rocky in his red cart maneuver about daily, but being afield and fishing has become a challenge. I asked Jim Bel if we could fish the three culverts at his Hackberry Hilton Hunting and Fishing Lodge. He readily agreed. He saw (and so did I) that fishing from the roadside would allow Glenn and Rocky to renew their love of fishing. That’s exactly what we did. Rocky and I go back to the ‘80s at Lacoste Lodge and the Cameron Fishing Rodeos. During one fishing rodeo, we got trapped offshore in two severe thunderstorms. No storms this time as it was clear and a bit cool as we left Rocky’s home for the trip down. We loaded up the ice, snacks and water we needed at The Fisherman’s Headquarters south of Sulphur. From there, we headed to Jim’s just north of the Sabine National Wildlife Refuge. We parked off road at the first culvert. I hauled Glenn’s wheelchair out of the trunk and helped him into it. Fishing rods in hand, we rolled to the north side of the culvert and Glenn cast a Chartreuse Gulp lure into the eddies about the culvert. Rocky had maneuvered from his driver’s seat onto his cart. With the egress ramp lowered on his van, Rocky rolled out and motored to the Southside culvert. I felt the water would be boiling through with the cool front’s passage but it wasn’t. It was just barely flowing out a bit. There the fun began with me actually catching a few throw-backs and one keeper redfish. Rocky, who is a better fisherman than I, caught his share of throw-backs and two keeper reds. Meanwhile, I helped Glenn join us at the Southside culvert where he caught his first keeper red. I had been a bit concerned with the passing of large trucks and tankers. No problem, as the drivers all slowed and cautiously passed us, not even raising the road dust on us. Our vehicles and chairs were far enough off the Vol. 8 • No. 13


road to allow passage and us to fish. Kudos to the kindness exhibited by the truckers. What started as hot fishing slowed with the lack of flow through the culvert. It was time to head to the second culvert and the Earl Barger Memorial Wharf. The water was boiling through the culvert and we quickly set up to fish the flow. George Gott was already there using a cast net, crab lines, and rod and reel. He had a good catch of shrimp but said the fishing and crabbing were slow. He and Glenn had been classmates at Sulphur High School in 1966. After a short class reunion, Glenn and I cast into the rushing flow and caught a couple of throw-back reds. Then, “The Rock” showed us why he’s a better fisherman than we were, even from a cart. Doc started off his catch with bass. Yep, he caught six keeper bass. He also added four flounder and two redfish. Glenn and I just caught throw-backs. Once this slowed, the ever-ebullient Rocky decided it was time for us to crab. I laughed as we both knew who would be putting out the eight crab lines and periodically checking them and netting the large blue crabs and dumping them in a white plastic clothes hamper while he supervised from his cart. He did help with the tying of bait on the crab lines. By now, the morning cool had dissipated and it was just plain hot. Truly it was Gatorade time between crab line runs. That done, we had one more trek to make to the last set of culverts and fishing again. We rode the short way, parked and unloaded chairs and rods. We set up quickly and Glenn fought in a throw-back redfish as did I. Rocky showed off again by catching two more keeper flounders. But time and the afternoon heat had taken its toll. Glenn headed for his car and the AC. Shortly after that, Rocky headed for his van. I was left with the very fond memory of fishing side by side with Earl Barger at this very spot. A picture of myself and Earl fishing there appears on Jim’s website. Like Rocky, he out-fished me. But the afternoon heat had taken its toll on me as well. To prove that point, I left my rods and reels by the cul-

Rocky with two keepers (redfish and a flounder)

vert. Hopefully, I’ll retrieve them when I head back to Jim’s during duck season. What I did take with me was the joy of being there with Glenn and Rocky, who for one afternoon were not bound by their handicaps. On this day, they retrieved something that was almost lost to them. They got to just fish.

Frank, a 4-5 year old beagle/dachshund mix, is a sweetheart! When standing, he looks like a long-haired dachshund with longer legs. Super-friendly boy is good with other dogs and does not seem to be interested in cats. He loves to be outdoors and will need a securely fenced yard and perhaps, a dog buddy to occupy his time when his person(s) are not around. For more information, call or email (337) 2444563; lapaw@bellsouth.net. Vet check and home visit required prior to all adoptions. Vol. 8 • No. 13

October 20, 2016 9


10 October 20, 2016

Vol. 8 • No. 13


McNeese Professor and E.K. Key Elementary Teacher Travel the Seas as Part of CITGO STEM Initiative & Ocean Exploration Trust Two local educators recently were chosen to participate in ocean voyages aboard the E/V Nautilus as part of the CITGO and Ocean Exploration Trust’s initiative to inspire science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) based education. E.K. Key Elementary fifth grade teacher and Ocean Exploration Trust Ambassador Tiffany Hill who travelled aboard the exploration vessel, the E/V Nautilus in August, sailed off the coast of British Columbia in Canada to Los Angeles on an expedition. McNeese Assistant Professor Amber Hale also voyaged aboard the E/V Nautilus as a Science Communications Fellow in June. The Ambassadorship and Science Communication Fellowship that Hill and Hale participated in are part of the Ocean Exploration Trust’s Community STEM Program which CITGO funds in Lake Charles, Corpus Christi and Houston, as well as in Lemont, Illinois. As part of their oceangoing adventures, Hill and Hale were able to interact with students across the U.S. via live video feed from the ship. The live interactions in SWLA

Vol. 8 • No. 13

that included E.K. Key Elementary School and the McNeese Kids’ College are made available through the ongoing community support of CITGO to engage students in STEM education. The CITGO-OET partnership extends support for the E/V Nautilus Ambassadors Program that Hill participated in, which brings educators and students aboard to travel with and learn from deep-sea exploration experts. The 2016 Science Communication Fellowship, the initiative of OET that Hale participated in, will bring 17 educators together from around the world as a part of the Nautilus Corps of Exploration this year. Fellows are charged with the responsibility of engaging students and the public in the wonders of ocean exploration, sharing discoveries from the 2016 mission, as well as aspects of daily life aboard a working exploration vessel. When asked about her experience, Hale said it is a wonderful way to bring real STEM careers, experiences and inspirational people home to our community. “Students are impressionable and when

they see something like this, it’s exciting to them.” Hale said most students lose interest in the STEM field between the ages of 12 and 14. “It’s important for us to sustain their interest in STEM education before the junior high years.” Hill had an exceptional experience as well and commented on how exciting the adventure was. “The staff of OET was very easy to work with and they gladly pulled in us teachers for some hands-on experience. Everyone has a specific job and it’s not only biologists who are on the ship to make this experience a positive one!” The E/V Nautilus is a great opportunity for educators to learn about how they can get their students excited about oceanography and the importance of teamwork in any type of work situation.” Hill said. The public can watch the real-time action of the E/V Nautilus via live streaming video and participate in live interactions with shore-based audiences via http://www.nautiluslive.org/, a 24-hour portal bringing expeditions from the field to future explorers on shore via telepresence technology.

October 20, 2016 11


Marilyn Williams Local Counselor Offers Hope for a Better Life By Lauren Abate Marilyn Williams, LPC, BC-PTSD Clinician, Parenting Coordinator, Divorce Mediator is clearly an accomplished woman. She opened her private practice, Best Life Counseling and Behavior Clinic in 2012. Her practice is unique and fills an important need in our community. What made her decide to get into this field? “Growing up in a family filled with helping professionals, it was easy to take that course for my

12 October 20, 2016

life,” Williams says. “I wanted to go into nursing; however, in my senior year of clinicals, I decided that wasn’t the direction that I wanted to take.” Williams’s mother, Alice Williams, is a Licensed Professional Counselor and a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, which influenced her to pursue what is now her career. But she had other things to do before that. “I worked for my father from a young age and I found my entrepreneurial spirit through my experiences with him,” she says. “He introduced me to the world of business as I was growing up. So I opened Emily’s Children’s Store when it was located in the Historical Downtown Lake Charles and loved it!” After Hurricane Rita, Williams decided the time was right for her to go back to school. “I made a deal with God,” she recalls. “If He would help me get my education, I would give back to His people. God really has moved mountains in my life and I see His hand in my daily walk.” Williams explains that her first Master’s concentration was in Counseling Psychology. But that wasn’t enough. “I realized I was limited to only being able to ask people how they felt about their situation, when I wanted to know what they were doing and how they were trying to help themselves,” she says. “So, I went back and completed my second Master’s concentration in Behavior Analysis.” A tough time in her life brought about even more training. “I found myself going through a difficult divorce, so I went to Loyola Law School for a Divorce Mediation Certification so I could help other people transition easier with less expense through the divorce process,” she says. “I discovered that divorce mediation is a private, cost-effective, fair and civilized alternative to divorce lawyers and litigation. It doesn’t have to be mean and it does not have to be expensive. Divorce mediation promotes building trust and helps resolve conflict.” From there, she furthered her education with Addictions and Parenting Coordination. She is also a Board Certified PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) Clinician and Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM). Over the last seven years, she has worked in an Vol. 8 • No. 13


“We all stumble; it’s how we pull ourselves back together that makes the difference.”

inpatient dual diagnosis psychiatric facility and private practice to service the needs of patients/defendants within her scope of practice with DSM-5 criteria, PTSD service related and civilian, law enforcement/ fire/first responders, substance abuse and addiction as well as appraisal and assessments with these patients/defendants. Williams currently offers classes in her private practice including Parenting, Anger Management, Work Ethic, Substance Abuse (four levels to choose from), Intensive Outpatient, DUI First Time Offender, 26-week Domestic Abuse Intervention Program, and Life Skills Classes. With over 10,000 hours in advanced training and clinical experience postlicensure to meet the needs of high conflict cases, Williams is a member in good standing of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts (AFCC), American Counseling Association (ACA), Louisiana Counseling Association (LCA), and currently serves as chairperson for Special Interest Group – Behavior Counseling and Behavior Coaching. She is a Licensed General Counselor in both Louisiana and Texas. “People are referred to my classes by judges, the District Attorney’s office, defense attorneys, Employee Assistance Programs, physicians, and other helping professions,” Williams says. “These classes may be mandatory or voluntary. I also do individual and group counseling to help the needs of the community.” A big plus for her patients are her hours. “Most people do not want to take time off of work for counseling,” she says. “My father always told me to show up early and leave when the job is done. With that in mind, I work around people’s schedules. If someone can only meet me after hours, I make sure I work them in after they get off. It won’t help them if they have to miss work, possibly get written up for coming in late, or take a sick day just to see me. I’m Vol. 8 • No. 13

in the business of helping, not punishing. So with that in mind, I see patients during the day, after 5 p.m. and weekends (if they can’t see me during the week).” What makes her different than most counselors in her field? “I’m laid back and real with my patients,” she explains. “I’ll tell them what I think and what has worked for other people going through issues they are facing. I’m straight forward, yet compassionate. I am a Christian, but don’t push my beliefs on others. I take patients from where they are and give them real tools to help that they can start using in their lives.” From her own personal struggles, Williams is someone who made things happen in her life and does the same for her patients. “I don’t just sit back,” she says. “I find a need and I try to help any way I can. I give people a smile and try to bring sunshine where there is despair. Sometimes, we go through tragedy and pain so bad that it consumes us and changes who we are. I help people have more control over their thoughts and their lives instead of their circumstances taking control of them.” Williams says her goal is to help her patients move forward in their lives and not stay stagnant. “Stagnant water stinks, is slimy, and grows mosquitos,” she says. “When we are moving forward and flowing through our lives, we attract happiness. We are healthier when we are growing. We all stumble; it’s how we pull ourselves back together that makes the difference.” Active in the community and the state for many years, Marilyn Williams is here to serve the needs of the Court and families throughout Southwest Louisiana and Southeast Texas. October 20, 2016 13


Accolades Williams has received many letters, cards and notes from her grateful patients. Obviously they cannot be named for privacy reasons, but here are some of their words: “Thank you for doing what you do, for your love and inspiration, and for helping us get our babies back home.” “Thank you for giving me the education and support that was much needed while I was recovering.” “You have a gift for helping others. I am very grateful for your knowledge and words of wisdom.” “Thank you for helping me become a bigger and better person.” “I will forever be grateful to you for not giving up on me. Anyone who has you as a counselor should feel very blessed. I know I do.”

Best Life Counseling and Behavior Clinic 900 Ryan Street, Suite 405 Lake Charles, LA 70601 PH (337) 990.5308 FAX (337) 990-5314 PERSONAL CELL (337) 302-3023

Email: MarilynWilliamsLPC@gmail.com

Websites: BestLifeSWLA.com DivorceMediationSWLA.com

Family Ties Williams comes from a family of caring individuals who are in helping professions. “My mother, Alice P. Williams, was a counselor at S. J. Welsh Middle School for 30 years. Since 1987, she has been seeing patients at the Psychology Clinic and joined me in 2012 when I opened Best Life Counseling and Behavior Clinic. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor and a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. “All of my siblings are in the medical field. My sister, Dr. Margaret Williams, is a psychiatrist. When she lived in Lake Charles she designed and opened 4-Tower Lake Charles Memorial Child/Adolescent Psychiatric Unit. She now resides in Phoenix with a thriving practice. My brother, Dr. Mark Williams, is a Board Certified Ear Nose and Throat Physician in private practice in Lake Charles. He spends most of his day performing surgery and helping patients in his clinic. He is gentle and kind with a heart of gold. My other brother, Dr. Luke Williams is triple Boarded in Internal Medicine, Pulmonology, and Critical Care. He is the Medical Director of the Intensive Care Unit at Christus St. Patrick’s Hospital and also has his private practice at Imperial Health on Dr. Michael DeBakey Drive. Wow! He’s busy!” 14 October 20, 2016

L to R: Dr. Mark Williams, Dr. Luke Williams, Alice P. Williams and Marilyn

Vol. 8 • No. 13


See Page 32 for Article


McNeese Annual Faculty Exhibition Through December 8 The Annual Faculty Exhibition features 45 recent works by visual arts faculty members through a variety of media including ceramics, drawing, graphic design, illustration, book arts, painting, photography, printmaking and mixed media. This exhibit will be on display in the Grand Gallery through Dec. 8. The gallery is open to the public from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday. (337) 475-5060.

Masterworks Chorale Concerts October 21, 23 Masterworks Chorale of the Louisiana Choral Foundation will begin its 40th season with two fall concerts under the direction of Dr. Darryl Jones. They will be performed in the sanctuary of the University United Methodist Church of Lake Charles on Fri., Oct. 21 at 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 23 at 3 p.m. The concerts will include four American folk hymns and the focal point of the concert will be “Requiem for the Living” by composer Dan Forrest. Tickets ($15) for adults (chil-

dren and students with ID free) are available at Swicegood Music (337) 477-2704 or at the door. www.lachoral.org.

Celebration of Life Benefit for Morgan Hardie and Baby Ayce October 22 Morgan Hardie of Creole was seriously injured in a car wreck. Thirty weeks pregnant, doctors performed an emergency C-section that saved both their lives, but they have a long road ahead. She is suffering from severe brain trauma and her little one is slowly making progress. A Celebration of Life benefit will be held at Wilkerson Arena, 2400 Hwy 384, Bell City. We would also like to ask that you keep the entire family in your prayers.

Holiday Market October 22-23 Our Lady of Prompt Succor Church is having their holiday market Oct. 22-23. Admission is free, with door prizes for all ages. There will be over 30 vendors displaying their wares for sale. Hours are Sat., 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. and Sun., 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. at 1109 Cypress St., Sulphur.

ArtsFest October 22 Arts Fest engages area children in a free arts festival hosted annually by the Arts Council of SWLA and the City of Lake Charles. Local businesses and civic groups host booths with art projects, and activities include live music, food, hands-on pottery lessons, educational exhibits, tug of wars, caricature drawings and interactive demonstrations on stage. Will be held at the Civic Center from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Oct. 22. For more information, call (337) 439-2787.

a musical history of swla

Thursday, November 10 | 7–9 PM Benjamin W. Mount Theatre Historic Central School, Lake Charles Local band Sinners, whose influences are deeply rooted in Cajun, swamp pop and country music, will be the house band as talented vocalists and guest musicians from all genres are welcomed to the stage to share the music of Southwest Louisiana’s past. Guest musicians include members of Lost Bayou Ramblers as well as more Lake Area favorites. Limited seating is available.

Family & Friends Flea Market October 22 Family & Friends Flea Market on the corner of Widgeon and Legion St. in Lake Charles will be host Trade Days Oct 22. There will be a car show with a $25 entry fee and a Jambalaya Cook off with a $50 entry fee. All proceeds will benefit the Robertson Family for expenses due to an accident. There will also be we outside vendors. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. (337) 436-0800.

Culture Fest October 22 Tickets available at Eventbrite.com

KnowLouisiana.org

artsandhumanitiesswla.org | (337) 439-ARTS |

16 October 20, 2016

The Magazine of the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities

The Digital Encyclopedia of Louisiana and Home of Louisiana Cultural Vistas

Funds raised at Roots Revival are reinvested back into the SWLA community through the Arts Council’s services and events .

This international celebration of cultures will showcase the arts, music, dance, fashion, food and storytelling of all of the different countries represented in Southwest Louisiana. This is a free family event and will also have several events for children. 11 a.m.- 6 p.m. Lake Charles Civic Center. (337) 409-9636. Vol. 8 • No. 13


2016 ICCS Panther Run October 29 The 2016 Immaculate Conception Cathedral School Panther Run is scheduled for Sat., Oct. 29, and will feature a 5K, 10K and 1-Mile Color Run. The 5K and 10K races will begin at 7:30 a.m. at ICCS, located at 1536 Ryan Street in Lake Charles. The 1-mile Color Run will start at approximately 8:30 a.m. Prizes will be awarded to the top finishers in the 5K and 10K races. Cost is $25 for the 10K and 5K races and $20 for the 1-mile Color Run. On-line registration is available at register.cajuntiming.com. Proceeds benefit the ICCS PTO. For more information, call (337) 433-3497.

Color Run/Bishop Nolan Episcopal School October 29 Walnut Grove will host the 4th annual Walnut Grove 5K and Nutty Fun Color Run on Sat., Oct. 29, with proceeds benefiting Bishop Nolan Episcopal Day School’s Eagle Fund. Online race registration is available until Oct. 24. Race day registration is available from 6 – 7 .am. for an additional $5 fee. Awards for the 5K will be given in various age groups. The color run is open for children ages 2 and up. Halloween costumes are welcome and there will be other fun activities for children. www.walnutgrovetnd.com.

of Country is a tribute to country music greats. One night only at Lewis Auditorium, 175 Cypress St, Sulphur at 6 p.m. Tickets available at theminestheatre.com, at the door, or at the Brimstone Museum office at 900 S. Huntington St., Sulphur.

Tasting on the Terrace November 17 Sample more than 50 unique wines and beers while enjoying complimentary food on the L’Auberge Event Center Terrace on Thurs., Nov. 17.. Tickets are $75 per person and are now on sale at the L’Auberge Business Center. Proceeds benefit the Children’s Advocacy Center, a division of Family & Youth. Hotel rooms are will be offered at a discounted rate through Nov. 10. www.fyca.com.

On the Town Memorial Foundation Event November 19 The Memorial Foundation’s On the Town 2016 events will be held Sat.. Nov. 19 from 7 p.m.- midnight at L’Auberge. Featuring Leif Pedersen’s 1944 Big Band with Kathy DeRouen, along with City Heat, guests will enjoy a four-course meal with wine and an open bar. Cocktail attire. For tickets, go to www.lcmh.com/onthetown.

Southern Gospel Concert & Luncheon November 4 Lake Charles Christian Women’s Southern Gospel Concert luncheon is Nov. 9 at Treasures of Marilyn with Brenda Copeland in concert. Nine vendors will have their goods for sale. Doors will open at 10:30 a.m. for shopping. Lunch and concert starts at 11:45 a.m. The cost is $17. Reservations required by Nov. 4. Call (337) 499-4268 or email lccwlouisiana@gmail.com.

Annual Business Summit and Showcase November 10 The City of Lake Charles will host the 2016 Business Summit and Showcase on Thurs., Nov. 10, at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The event will consist of two parts: a Business Certification Training and a Business Summit and Showcase. This year’s theme is “Shaping Our Economic Future.” The Business Summit will provide a great opportunity for small and emerging contractors to improve their businesses. The Business Showcase will feature booths and opportunities for one-on-one discussions with industry representatives, banks, and purchasing agents, among many others. To register for this free conference, email businesssummit@cityoflc.us or call 491-1392 with your name and company, or you may call Eligha Guillory, Jr. at 491-9151 for more information.

Freddie Pate’s Jamboree November 12 Presented by The Mines Theatre, Freddie Pate’s Legends Vol. 8 • No. 13

October 20, 2016 17


Halloween Events in the Lake Area! Holy Trinity Episcopal Pumpkin Patch Through October 31 The Pumpkin Patch at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Sulphur will be open until October 31 from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays and Saturdays, and noon-6 p.m. Sundays. Bring your children to Pumpkin Patch Story Time. There are two classes on ten different days. Call Frances Wynn at 5275179 to schedule a visit. Picnics can be held in the Pavilion if arrangements are made beforehand. Purchase delicious pumpkin bread made by church members; proceeds from the sale of pumpkins, gourds, and pumpkin bread fund Holy Trinity’s outreach projects. Holy Trinity Episcopal Church Pumpkin Patch, 1700 Maplewood Drive in Sulphur. Contact Cyndi Khoury at 527-8787 or the church office at 625-4288.

USS Orleck’s Carnival of Screams Every Friday and Saturday through October 29 @ The Orleck Naval Museum This year, the USS ORLECK Naval Museum marks its 5th year of Haunted Ship excitement with an all new, all different theme! Join them this year as they debut the USS ORLECK Naval Museum: Carnival of Screams Friday and Saturday nights in the month of October. Gates open at 6 P.M.; Hatches open at 7 P.M. For more information, including driving directions please check us out at www.orleck. org. 604 N. Enterprise Blvd. Lake Charles LA. Contact us at (337) 214-7447, or email info@orleck.org.

The Lost Hollows Through October 31 Whether you want to spend an evening enjoying the fun of the Spooky Timbers trail with your little ones, or prefer to brave the sights, sounds and frights of the Deadly Pines trail, this is a must for all Halloween fans! A shuttle from Spirit Halloween, 3413 Derek Drive, Lake Charles, will transport you to your chilling adventure deep in the woods. All children 13 and under must be accompanied by an adult and everyone must wear closed-toed shoes. Oct. 23-24, 29-31. Go to www.thelosthollows.com for ticket information and details. 18 October 20, 2016

Boos & Brews Ghost Tour October 21-22, 28-29 and 31 @ SWLA Tours Book a trip with SWLA Tours Inc. to the Beauregard Gothic Jail Haunted House. TWO WEEKENDS ONLY. All trips leave Lake Charles at 6:45 p.m. and return by 10 p.m. Listen to SWLA ghost stories in a local brewery, then head to Deridder to visit the Haunted Gothic Jail. Don’t be scared! RESERVE YOUR SPOT NOW! Seating is limited. Book your tour at www.swlatours.com.

CyPhaCon Pub Crawl October 22 It’s time to kick off the CyPhaCon festivities a little early with a very special Halloween Pub Crawl on Sat. Oct. 22 starting at 6 p.m. Locations include Stellar Beans, Pujo Street Cafe’, Tia Juanita’s, MacFarlane’s Celtic Pub, Blue Dog Cafe’, Crystal’s Downtown and Luna Live. Costumes are HIGHLY recommended and there will be special event giveaways and a discount admission coupon to CyPhaCon 2017 for attendees who complete the Crawl. Check out their Facebook page for more information.

Spirits at the Museum October 26: 6-8 p.m. October 27: 6-9 p.m. @ Imperial Calcasieu Museum Wednesday, October 26, local historian Adley Cormier will be telling scary ghost stories and tales of Old Lake Charles in the gallery with George Rodrigue: Louisiana Graveyards on view. Other surprises to follow. Thursday, explore George Rodrigue: Louisiana Graveyards and relax underneath the Sallier Oak with “spirits.” Throughout the evening, there will be tasty treats, entertainment by local musician and a silent auction. * Costumes optional. Tickets are $60 for members and $75 for non-members. Tickets give you entry to both evenings and can be purchased at the Imperial Calcasieu Museum on 204 West Sallier St. For more information, call 439-3797 or visit www.imperialcalcasieumuseum.org. Vol. 8 • No. 13


Halloween Events in the Lake Area! LIVE 104.9 Presents Fall Festival 2016 October 27, 5-8 p.m.

wear your Halloween costumes! Starts at 3 p.m. 110 West Houston River Rd., Sulphur. (337) 527-5725.

LIVE 104.9 is proud to present the 2016 Fall Festival “Terrific Treat” event taking place at the Martin Luther King Center located at 2009 N. Simmons Street in Lake Charles, La on Thursday, October 27 from 5-8 p.m. This “Terrific Treat” is free for all kids attending and will feature live music, free food, candy, face painting, rides, games, and much more. Also featured this year is a “Best Costume Contest” in which $100 will be awarded to the winner. To volunteer or sponsor this event, contact the station at promotions@kzwafm.com or by calling (337) 491-9955.

L’Auberge Casino Resort’s $10,000 Halloween Costume Party/Contest October 29

KC Productions SWLA Presents The Rocky Horror Show October 27-29 KC Productions SWLA present The Rocky Horror Show at the Benjamin Mount Theatre at Central School, downtown Lake Charles. Directed by Keith Chamberlain, The Rocky Horror Show is a humorous tribute to the old science fiction and horror B movies and tells the story of a newly engaged couple who get caught in a storm and come to the home of a mad transvestite scientist. Special midnight showing on Oct. 29! Order your tickets now at www.kcproductionsswla.org.

Friendship Baptist Church Trunk-or-Treat October 28 Celebrate good food and Halloween with the Gumbo Cook-off/Truck or Treat event at Friendship Baptist Church. Trunk-or-Treat starts at 5:45 p.m. and gumbo will be served at 6:30. Carnival games/cake walk/hayride will open at 7:30. It will be a fun evening for family and friends. Free admission. 8085 Gulf Hwy, Lake Charles.

Houston River Baptist Church Harvest Fest October 29 Join the Houston River Baptist Church at the 2016 Harvest Festival! There will be activities for the kids including bounce houses, games, magic shows, face painting and more! Hot dogs and popcorn will be served. Make sure to Vol. 8 • No. 13

JD’s Halloween party is back! Whether you’re here for the screaming good time at the party with Pop Culture or to win the costume contest, you’re welcome! Doors open at 9 p.m. Registration for the costume contest is from 9 – 10:30 p.m. and winners will be announced at 11 p.m. Top prize wins $5,000! Presale tickets $10, $20 at the door. Entertainment by Pop Culture and DJ Paws the Cat. Stay for the afterparty with entertainment by DJ Paws the Cat until 2 a.m.! www.llakecharles.com.

Harvest Fest 2016 October 31: 5-8 p.m. @ LC Civic Center This free community event will take place from 5-8:30 p.m. and will feature a variety of games, train rides, face art, balloons and fun in the Civic Center Coliseum with a “Tiny TOTS World” in the Exhibition Hall. Costumes are encouraged but not required. Concessions will be available. Sponsored by the City of Lake Charles Recreation and Parks Department (337) 491-1280.

SkeleTUNES on the Lake (Halloween Concert by LC Community Band) October 31: 7-8 p.m. @ 2nd Floor Mezzanine, LC Civic Center The Lake Charles Community Band will perform “SkeleTUNES on the Lake” on Halloween night. This ghoulish and sinister concoction of a concert is FREE and will take place October 31, from 7-8 pm on the 2nd floor Mezzanine of the Lake Charles Civic Center. The band is under the direction of Fred Roeder and assistant conductor Leo Murray. SkeleTUNES is sponsored by the City of Lake Charles and Phillips 66. October 20, 2016 19


THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW IS BACK!

An Interview with

Keith Chamberlain By Lauren Abate

probably be something different and then we’ll bring Rocky back again. It all depends on the public Last year, Keith Chamberlain as well. If they want it again next and KC Productions SWLA presented The Rocky Horror Show on year I’ll be happy to oblige. Halloween week to rave reviews and a sold-out midnight show. Great news! It’s coming back this year, with performances on Oct. 27, 28, and 29 at 7:30 p.m., along with the special midnight show on the 29th! Performances will be held at the Ben Mount Theatre at Central School in Lake Charles. We caught up with the very busy and very talented Keith Chamberlain to find out his plans for this year’s Rocky. JAM: The Rocky Horror Show was a big success last year. Is that why you’re doing it again? KC: Yes it was ! I was expecting a hit but it was a great turnout. I am doing it again because of the success of last year, but planned to make The Rocky Horror Show a staple production of the company when I first formed KC Productions SWLA. This will be the second year, so next year will

20 October 20, 2016

JAM: What do you attribute to the cult-status success of the play? KC: I think everyone likes to have fun right? What better way than escaping to the theatre? This show has been a cult classic because of the interaction and participation of the audience and the entire production, whether it’s the stage version or the movie,

which is still played at midnight across the country. Dressing up as one your favorite characters from the show, singing the great songs, dancing the Time Warp and especially around the Halloween season, what could be a better time? I don’t think it will ever change. Like the saying goes ...if it’s not broken, why fix it? JAM: Will the cast be the same, or will there be some new faces? KC: I am pleased that several of last year’s cast members will be returning, along with some great talent from other productions I’ve directed or had the pleasure of seeing. The ensemble is tight, fresh and so on-point. There are a few people that I’ve never worked with before and I’m so glad they auditioned. It just works. The live band that I’ve used for several of my productions will also be returning with a new member as well. If you’ve heard this band, you know what to expect. If you haven’t, get ready for an amazing six-piece band of professional musicians that just adds the glue to hold the musical numbers together. JAM: What can the audience Vol. 8 • No. 13


look forward to in this production? KC: The response was overwhelmingly positive last year that so many people have asked me how I can top it. I always have a few tricks up my sleeve. The costuming is taking a different direction for some, as well as very industrial set design. There will surely be steam generating from that stage! Of course, the amazing vocalists and actors will have the audience on their feet. Be ready for a night to have fun and be totally entertained. JAM: When did you start rehearsing? KC: Our last production, 4000 Days, closed on September 5 and we started rehearsing the very next evening for Rocky. We rehearse four nights a week for a little over two hours. It’s amazing how fast the production came together.

JAM: Anything else that you’d like our readers to know? KC: Our goal at KC Productions SWLA is to offer quality theatre productions that are sometimes different than traditional productions. We also pride ourselves in finding the best in local talent in actors, musicians

and artists. We have also partnered with LaVoglia Ristorante Italiano who will be providing the best in appetizers and beverages before the show begins, during intermission and afterwards. For more information, please visit kcproductionsswla.org or call 302-2259.

JAM: Any challenges with the new production? KC: A few, but who doesn’t have challenges in a production with such a great resulting product? Every aspect of life throws you a curve ball or challenge at some point, but with such a great ensemble, we overcame the obstacles and moved forward stronger and more productive. JAM: Are you going to have Audience Participation Packages again? KC: How in the world can you present Rocky Horror without audience participation bags? A few extra things have been added this year. In the program, we will mention when to use the items in the bags and a light that will flash in the theatre for the audience to be prepared to be ready! The bags will be available at the door for $5.

Vol. 8 • No. 13

October 20, 2016 21


22 October 20, 2016

Vol. 8 • No. 13


The Motion of Puppets Lately, there are days when you don’t move so well. Sports injuries old or new, creaky bones, long night, short night, slept wrong, it can happen at anytime and any age. But, unlike in the new book The Motion of Puppets by Keith Donoghue, your life is still yours, no strings attached. The toy store was almost never open. Time and again, Kay and Theo walked past it, charmed, and tried the door but there was never anyone there. They probably couldn’t have afforded anything anyhow; the income from a cirque acrobat (her) and a transcriptionist (him) wasn’t enough for frivolous purchases, but browsing could’ve been fun. It might’ve also been a nice distraction from the stresses of being newlyweds in a temporary home. They’d moved to Quebec from Vermont for the sake of work, but neither was happy: Theo was often flustered by his beautiful wife, and Kay was bored – which was perhaps why she impulsively agreed to attend an after-hours party with the cirque’s manVol. 8 • No. 13

ager, a notorious womanizer. But Kay loved her husband and could never enjoy a dalliance, so she left the party alone. Walking home, her imagination overcame her and she was sure she was being followed; when she saw a light in the toy store, she hoped she’d be safe there, tried the door, and slipped inside. That was the last thing she knew before her head was removed from her body, her limbs from her torso, and her innards replaced with sawdust. She had memories but could remember little. She could feel, but not hurt; walk, but not talk until something cut a brutal slash across where her mouth should’ve been. She learned then that puppets can move and talk from midnight until dawn but they could never leave the confines of puppetry unless someone who loved them recognized them and helped them escape. Desperately missing his wife, Theo walked the streets of Quebec in search of Kay. Was she dead? Abducted? Or, as the cirque’s “little man” claimed, did mythology hold

the answer? “Never enter a toy shop after midnight.” If those words don’t send a chill through your spine, then The Motion of Puppets is really not the book for you. If they make you a little squirmy, though, you’ll be very happy with the tale author Keith Donohue’s spun. Almost immediately, you’ll notice a sense of off-balance. That may be because, though there’s a modern-day setting to this story, it has a curious feel of Victorian times: it’s dusty and chastely formal and contains a dwarf and a Holmseian academic – all of which, when a cell phone or computer appears, only heighten the in-

stability. Donohue tells his tale from Theo to Kay and back, and we get a good understanding of both – yet not enough to pre-determine how this book will end. For anyone with coulrophobia (fear of clowns), pupaphobia (fear of puppets) or who merely wants a nightsare-getting-longer novel, here’s one that’ll chill you good. For you, The Motion of Puppets is a book to move on. The Motion of Puppets” By Keith Donohue ©2016, Picador $26/ $37 Canada 263 pages October 20, 2016 23


Katherine Petty Prints By Jason Machulski Lake Charles native Katherine Petty is a fine arts graduate of McNeese State University. She started off in elementary education, but took a printmaking class and it caught her heart. Printing since 2003, her favorite form of printmaking is call intaglio, an amazing process that is fascinating to watch. Petty has her own press and makes beautiful prints as her time permits.

The following is a brief rundown of the intaglio history and process: Intaglio printmaking emerged in Europe well after the woodcut print, with the earliest known surviving examples being undated designs for playing cards made in Germany, using dry point technique, probably in the late 1430s. Engraving had been used by goldsmiths since ancient times to decorate metalwork, including armor, musical instruments and religious objects. The niello technique, which involved rubbing an alloy into the lines to give a contrasting color, also goes back to late antiquity. Scholars have suggested that the idea of making prints from engraved plates may have originated with the goldsmiths’ practice of taking an impression on paper of a design engraved on an object in order to keep a record of their work or to check its quality. In intaglio printing, the lines to be printed are cut into a metal plate. This is done either with cutting tool called a burin, held in the hand – in which case, the process is called engraving, or else through the corrosive action of acid – in which case, the process is known as etching. To print an intaglio plate, ink is applied to the surface by wiping and/or dabbing the plate to push the ink into the recessed lines, or grooves. The plate is then rubbed with tarlatan cloth to remove most of the excess ink. The final smooth wipe is often done with newspaper or old public phone book pages, leaving ink only in the incisions. A damp piece of paper is placed on top of the plate, so that when going through the press, the damp paper can be squeezed into the plate’s ink-filled grooves. The paper and plate are then covered by a thick blanket to ensure even pressure when going through the rolling press. The rolling press applies very high pressure through the blanket to push the paper into the grooves on the plate. The blanket is then lifted, revealing the paper and printed image. JAM: In your words, how is this process done? KP: Intaglio is a process where I engrave on a metal plate with a tool called a burin. I put etching ink on the copper plate and wipe it off with a fabric called a tarlatan until I get a certain glow from the plate. I then use damp paper called a pesha, which I lay over the copper plate and pull it through a Conrad press that is hand-turned. JAM: What was your first work? KP: My first piece was of purple magnolia I titled “Moonlit Magnolia.” This piece earned me the Chandler Printmaking Award in a

24 October 20, 2016

Vol. 8 • No. 13


student juried exhibit. I knew then that I loved printing even more. JAM: What are some of your accomplishments? KP: I have published in the MSU arena two different times as an undergrad in a poetry and art publication. JAM: What artists inspire you? KP: My favorite contemporary intaglio artists are Gerry Wubben and Rudy Pozzatti. Gerry Wubben was my favorite mentor in printmaking as an undergrad and his mentor was Rudy Pozzatti. I studied Rudy’s work on my own and when I finally met him, it was such an honor. I have a signed book of his work that he personally gave me. He’s a true inspiration that is very much part of my love for the intaglio process. JAM: Where do you keep your press? KP: I am very fortunate to have a good-sized studio right next to my home. I have my press and everything else I need there with plenty of space to create. JAM: What are you currently working on? KP: I am currently working on another shell for my Nautilus Series, a mezzotint, and a tricolor plate I have been commissioned for. JAM: What plans do you have for the future? KP: I plan on continuing my work. I hope to spread the understanding of this beautiful process so more people can enjoy it. JAM: Where can we find your work ? KP: I sell my work at different events and privately. You can find a piece or two at Pujo St Café in downtown Lake Charles. I also have a Facebook page, K Petty Prints. JAM: Do you have some words of wisdom for artists? KP: For those that are pursing anything they are passionate about, remember to be true to yourself in spirit and mind. And LEARN, GROW, and HAVE FUN DOING SO. SWLArt Group is a collaboration of a variety of local groups & artists, to support the development and improvement of their quality of life & business as well as strengthen the over cultural growth of the community. For more information about SWLArt Group, artists, or events visit their official Facebook page at www.facebook.com/swlart. Also be sure to follow them on Instagram and Twitter @swlart.

Vol. 8 • No. 13

October 20, 2016 25


Thursday, Oct. 20 Mason Fedduci & Jake Spinella 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC

Ronnie Fruge 6 p.m. @ Loggerhead’s Bar 3748 Hwy. 3059 (Old Town Rd.) LC

Joe Harmon & the Harmonics 7 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder

3HG 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC David St. Romain 9 p.m.- 2 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Friday, Oct. 21 Mason Fedduci & Jake Spinella 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC Gus, Reed & Randy 7 p.m. @ Loggerheads 3748 Hwy 3059, Old Town Road, LC

Marshall Tucker Band 8:30 p.m. @ The Grand Event Center Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Tickets are on sale now at www. ticketmaster.com and/or by phone through Ticketmaster at (800) 7453000. Tickets can also be purchased on performance day beginning at 2 p.m. at the Golden Nugget Box Office.

Joe Purvis & Talon 7 p.m. @ Loggerheads 3748 Hwy 3059, Old Town Road, LC

ZZ Top

LA Express 9 p.m. @ The Gator Lounge Delta Downs Racetrack Casino 2717 Delta Downs Drive, Vinton

8 p.m. @ The Grand Event Center Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Tickets are on sale now at www. ticketmaster.com and/or by phone through Ticketmaster at (800) 745-3000. Tickets can also be purchased on performance day beginning at 2 p.m. at the Golden Nugget Box Office.

Encore 9 p.m.-1 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

LA Express 9 p.m. @ The Gator Lounge Delta Downs Racetrack Casino 2717 Delta Downs Drive, Vinton

DJ Jose Mata 9 p.m.- 3 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC 3HG 9 p.m.- 2:30 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Loxley 9 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder The Kadillacs 10 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC

Loxley 9 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder Encore 9 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC DJ Jose Mata 9 p.m.- 3 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC 3HG 9 p.m.- 2:30 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Saturday, Oct. 22 Mason Fedduci & Jake Spinella 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC 26 October 20, 2016

DJ CaGe 11 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC Vol. 8 • No. 13


Sunday, Oct. 23

Monday, Oct. 24 Chester & Jarius Daigle Stacy Bearden JD’s Whiskey Brunch @ 11 a.m.- 3 p.m. L’Auberge Casino Resort Kevin Johnson 7 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC 3HG 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC DJ Jose Mata 9 p.m.- 2 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Vol. 8 • No. 13

5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC Rachel & Ian 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Tuesday, Oct. 25 Kay Miller 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC

Trivial Tuesdays Live Team Trivia 7:30 p.m. @ Luna Live 710 Ryan St.

DJ Verrett/Karaoke 8 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC Charleston & Derek 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Wednesday, Oct. 26 Chester Daigle 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC

Chris Miller & The Bayou Roots 6:30 p.m. @ Loggerhead’s Bar 3748 Hwy. 3059 (Old Town Rd.) LC Whacky Wednesday with DJ Mark 7 p.m. @ Cajuns Wharf

3500 Ryan St, Lake Charles Kris Harper & Matt Moss 8 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC Roger Tienken 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Thursday, Oct. 27 Rusty Yates 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC Bernie Alan 7 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder

October 20, 2016 27


Lucky Club Birthday Bash Lucky Longhorn Casino 2374 HWY 109 S, Vinton

Throwback Thursday and Lucky Hour Buy One, Get One 8-11 p.m. @ Texas Longhorn Club 2374 HWY 109 S, Vinton QRISIS 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Joey & the Jumper Cables 9 p.m. – 1 a.m. @ Blue Martini

Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC DJ Jose Mata 9 p.m.- 2 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Friday, Oct. 28 Rusty Yates 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC Halloween Bash Lucky Longhorn Casino 2374 HWY 109 S, Vinton

Bret Michaels 8:30 p.m. @ The Grand Event Center Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Tickets are on sale now at www. ticketmaster.com and/or by phone through Ticketmaster at (800) 7453000. Tickets can also be purchased on performance day beginning at 2 p.m. at the Golden Nugget Box Office. No Idea 9 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder

and as it turns out, it just so happens that this very album is celebrating a half century since its brilliance was unleashed on the masses. A Brand New Love Affair is Such a Beautiful Thing… To the diehard music fan, there is nothing quite like finding a new record to fall in love with. That rapturous feeling of hearing something new and different: of hearing sounds or arrangements that you’ve never heard before, can be as addictive as a drug. Some records are for a moment and others begin a lifetime love affair with the sounds and textures of one particular artist or concept or performance. And while the “love at first spin” may not happen every day or even every year, sometimes they can surprise you, just as I was surprised by one such album a few weeks ago 28 October 20, 2016

I Had To Prove That I Could Make It Alone Now, But That’s Not Me... To start the tale, we wind back the clock to Christmas week, 1964. It was then, following an appearance on Shindig, that surf pop rockers The Beach Boys found themselves on a Houston-bound flight during which young singer/songwriter Brian Wilson suffered a panic attack that cemented his decision to cease touring with the band the he and brothers Carl and Dennis, cousin Mike Love and friend Al Jardine had launched to international stardom in only the previous three years or so. Wilson allowed the Boys to carry on the touring front while he focused intently on

Big Red & Creole Soul 9 p.m. @ The Gator Lounge Delta Downs Racetrack Casino 2717 Delta Downs Drive, Vinton QRISIS 9 p.m.- 2:30 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Encore 9 p.m. – 1 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC DJ Jose Mata 9 p.m.- 3 a.m. @ Blue Martini

songwriting and musical production, an effort that eventually led to the creation of some of the most groundbreaking and innovative music ever seen. Having delved into the production style of Phil Spector that came to be known as the “Wall of Sound” technique and having been enormously inspired by the new Beatles release Rubber Soul, Wilson set out to create something that emulated both of these influences but that was also personal, deeply introspective and something so different that it would challenge every notion of what even The Beach Boys themselves were musically. Wilson teamed up with lyricist Tony Asher and the two began fleshing out this new sound to present to the band upon their return from a tour in the earliest days of 1966. That product would soon become the iconic record known to the world as Pet Sounds. Wilson employed a group of clasVol. 8 • No. 13


Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

LA Yard Dogs 11 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC

Saturday, Oct. 29 Rusty Yates 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC

Neil Sedaka 8 p.m. @ The Grand Event Center Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Tickets are on sale now at www. ticketmaster.com and/or by phone through Ticketmaster at (800) 7453000. Tickets can also be purchased on performance day beginning at 2 p.m. at the Golden Nugget Box Office.

Halloween at Mikko Live! Costume Contest Over $8,000 in prizes! Register 8-10 p.m. in Mikko.

sically trained studio musicians known collectively as “The Wrecking Crew”, a group of top tier artists largely responsible for Spector’s “Wall of Sound” sessions. The young artist took the helm of this crew of legendary musicians and quickly left them all realizing that this young “Beach Boy” was, in fact, composing and arranging some of the most challenging and mature musical material that any of them had ever played. After months of studio work at a cost that today would equal over half a million dollars, Pet Sounds was first released on May 16, 1966. The 13 tracks (including mega hits Wouldn’t it Be Nice and Sloop John B) presented what many musical historians have called the very first concept album in an evocative passion play that delves deep into the ideals of youth colliding with the realities of adulthood and the inevitable loss of innocence that all maturing people eventually face. Pet Sounds also holds the distinction of being one of the, if not THE first psychedelic record ever made, utilizing bizarre and spacy instrumentation and motifs and occasionally referencing themes of the growing acid culture of the time. What you are left with at the end of the day is an album that reached the Vol. 8 • No. 13

Celebrity judges, live music and dancing

No Idea with DJ TySki at 9pm in Mikko. 8 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder

Big Red & Creole Soul 9 p.m. @ The Gator Lounge Delta Downs Racetrack Casino 2717 Delta Downs Drive, Vinton Encore 9 p.m.– 1 a.m. @ Blue Martini

core group of Beach Boys listeners on many levels while expanding and exploring musical possibilities and stylings never before committed to vinyl, wax or acetate. And while it wasn’t a million-seller like their previous offerings, Pet Sounds has grown in its influence considerably in the years following its inaugural release. The Beatles themselves were so impressed with the album (which was the first U.S. made album to knock a British act off of the top of the UK charts for the first time in eight years) that they have repeatedly said that it was the reason they made Sgt. Pepper’s. The album is listed at #2 on Rolling Stone’s “Greatest Albums of All Time” list, second only to the good Sergeant himself. They Say I’ve Got Brains But They Ain’t Doing Me No Good... I’ve spent many years delving into the annals of music history exploring all sorts of musical incarnations and have had this particular record recommended to me so many times it’s impossible to even count. Somehow, I just didn’t get around to it until just recently and I can easily say that this is now my favorite record to ever see the light of day.

Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC DJ Jose Mata 9 p.m.- 3 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC QRISIS 9 p.m.- 2:30 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Paws the Cat 11 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC

Through songs like Wouldn’t it Be Nice, you touch that sense of youthful optimism and romantic longing, in songs such as That’s Not Me and I Just Wasn’t Made for These Times, you deal with the ideas of isolation and the longing for self identification. Through songs like Don’t Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder) or God Only Knows, you get romance and sadness, and through Here Today, you live the fleetingness of love and satisfaction. Wilson was not scared to get honest and real about the way he felt about things we all feel and he not only explored those concepts openly, he did so against a complex musical backdrop that was infinitely ahead of its time and is genuinely nothing short of real genius. There’s a reason that this is one of the most revered records ever made. My only regret is that I haven’t spent my whole life listening to the brilliance that is Brian Wilson and his masterpiece. A part of me thinks that maybe it’s a good thing, though. At this point in my life, I’ve experienced all those varied themes addressed in these songs and can wholeheartedly relate to those feelings. I’ve also grown and developed as a musician and listener enough to realize the magnitude of what this man did with October 20, 2016 29


Sunday, Oct. 30 Street Side Jazz Band 11 a.m. @ Luna Bar and Grill 710 Ryan St., LC

Chester & Jarius Daigle JD’s Whiskey Brunch @ 11 a.m.- 3 p.m. L’Auberge Casino Resort Reed Planchard 4 p.m. @ Loggerheads 3748 Hwy 3059, Old Town Road, LC DJ Jose Mata

9 p.m.- 2 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC QRISIS 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

DJ Jose Mata 8 p.m.- 3 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Clint Faulk 6:30 p.m. @ Loggerhead’s Bar 3748 Hwy. 3059 (Old Town Rd.) LC

American Kids Duo 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Trivial Tuesdays Live Team Trivia

Monday, Oct. 31

Tuesday, Nov. 1

Bryan Trahan 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC

Chip Radford 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC

13 little tracks a half century ago. It goes a long way towards showcasing some of those elements that can make

a piece of music truly timeless, and when you deal with such personal and universal emotions as this record

7:30 p.m. @ Luna Live 710 Ryan St.

DJ Verrett 8 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC

does, it leaves me a firm believer that this record and this music CAN NEVER truly go out of style.

Something is Happening Here... For this issue’s edition of “Something Is Happening Here” we’re getting a tad out of the box! In keeping with the theme of today’s tale, we have a special concert announcement……. AND WE HAVE A GIVEAWAY!

Wednesday, March 29: Brian Wilson Presents Pet Sounds Saenger Theater, New Orleans Celebrating 50 years, Brian Wilson took to the road this year joined by fellow founding Beach Boy Al Jardine for what is billed as his last tour of the iconic 1966 release Pet Sounds. The tour was slated to run from March of this year through its scheduled close in Acapulco in early December. HOWEVER, earlier this month it was announced that he is extending the farewell Pet Sounds tour into 2017 which will include a stop at the Crescent City’s famed Saenger Theater on March 29. Yes... I already have my tickets and I certainly hope to SEE YOU AT THAT SHOW! AND… IT’S CONTEST TIME! It’s been the better part of a year since I gave away one of those beloved slabs of vinyl and I couldn’t think of a more appropriate time to do so! Thanks to the good folk at The Round About we have a copy of the Pet Sounds 50th Anniversary vinyl reissue to give away to one of you lucky JMLC fans out there! Just like before, we’ll have a trivia question and we will randomly draw our winner from amongst the correct answers. All entries must include your first and last name and your guess to the trivia question and must be submitted to JMLC@justinmorrisentertainment.com by midnight Thanksgiving Day (11-24-16). We will announce the winner right here in JMLC in our issue hitting stands on December 1. The question is: While Brian Wilson did use the legendary “Wrecking Crew” to provide his “orchestra” for this record, he brought in some other studio musicians as well, including one artist who as of today has released 70 albums under their own name, netted numerous Grammy awards and charted over 80 times, who is credited with offering guitar and/or banjo tracks to 5 of the 13 tracks on Pet Sounds. Who is this artist? Just remember to submit your answers to JMLC@justinmorrisentertainment.com by midnight on Thanksgiving for your chance to win a copy of this legendary record! Good luck!

I Know There’s an Answer... THERE IS! And you have just over one full month to figure it out! Best of luck to everyone who participates! We greatly appreciate you grabbing The Jam every couple of weeks to see what’s going down in Justin Morris’ Lake Charles. Much love to you all! Get your guesses in and until next time...I’LL SEE YOU AT THE SHOW! 30 October 20, 2016

Vol. 8 • No. 13


DJ Jose Mata 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Ray Boudreaux 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Wednesday, Nov. 2 Chester Daigle 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC Chris Miller & The Bayou Roots 6:30 p.m. @ Loggerhead’s Bar 3748 Hwy. 3059 (Old Town Rd.) LC Josh Taylor 8 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC The Strangers 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Thursday, Nov. 3 Julie Williams 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC

Tommy Mclain with Louisiana Express 7 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder American Kids 8 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Nigel Edison 9 p.m.- 2 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Friday, Nov. 4 Julie Williams Vol. 8 • No. 13

5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC

Tommy James & the Shondells 8:30 p.m. @ The Grand Event Center Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Tickets are on sale now at www. ticketmaster.com and/or by phone through Ticketmaster at (800) 7453000. Tickets can also be purchased on performance day beginning at 2 p.m. at the Golden Nugget Box Office. Classix Band 9 p.m. @ The Gator Lounge Delta Downs Racetrack Casino 2717 Delta Downs Drive, Vinton The High Rollers 9 p.m.-1 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC

Rick Springfield 8 p.m. @ The Grand Event Center Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Tickets are on sale now at www. ticketmaster.com and/or by phone through Ticketmaster at (800) 7453000. Tickets can also be purchased on performance day beginning at 2 p.m. at the Golden Nugget Box Office. Classix Band 9 p.m. @ The Gator Lounge Delta Downs Racetrack Casino 2717 Delta Downs Drive, Vinton

Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC DJ Jose Mata 9 p.m.- 3 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC American Kids 9 p.m.- 2:30 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC DJ Crush 11 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC

Time Machine 9 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder

Sunday, Nov. 6

The High Rollers 9 p.m.- 1 a.m. @ Blue Martini

@ 11 a.m.- 3 p.m. L’Auberge Casino Resort

Chester & Jarius Daigle JD’s Whiskey Brunch

DJ Jose Mata 9 p.m.- 3 a.m. @ Blue Martini Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC American Kids 9 p.m.- 2:30 a.m. @ Rush Golden Nugget Casino Resort 2550 Golden Nugget Blvd. LC Time Machine 9 p.m. @ Mikko Live Coushatta Casino Resort 777 Coushatta Drive, Kinder LA Yard Dogs 11 p.m. @ Jack After Dark Nightclub L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Ave. L’Auberge, LC

Saturday, Nov. 5 Julie Williams 5:30 p.m. @ Ember Grille & Wine Bar L’Auberge Casino Resort 777 Avenue L’Auberge, LC October 20, 2016 31


Kites, Arctic and Undersea at Historic City Hall Historic City Hall Arts & Cultural Center will host an opening reception for two new exhibitions on Friday, October 21 from 5:30-8 p.m. All ages are welcome, admission is free, and refreshments will be served. Both exhibitions will be on display through December 31. Art on a String; Asian Kites in Flight contains approximately one hundred kites from over a dozen countries. Many were made by kite makers whose ancestors created a particular kite design and taught the craft to his family, who then passed the tradition to successive generations. For thousands of years across Asia, kites played a role in communication, religious ceremonies, military reconnaissance, and even fishing. Uses, design styles, and construction methods differed between cultural regions. Included in the exhibition are Korean and Hawaiian fighter kites, the Trai cobras, the Vietnamese Sun kite, a Malaysian kite from Penang Island and the Sri Lankan animal kites. The largest kite in the exhibition is a 95-foot Centipede with whirling eyes crafted by Li Shang-Pei, grand kite master of Taiwan. Also, ceremonial kites still used today in annual events held to commemorate ancient rites including the Edo mini kites by Tetsutaro Noguchi and the Nogoya Insect kites by Kozo Kato of Japan. Art on a String is on national tour by the Blair-Murrah Exhibition Organization. Award-winning photographer, Keith Monroe, opens two photographic collections and will be available to meet and greet guests. Wild Arctic and 7/10ths Blue (percent of surface water to dry land) have been in the making for years. The display includes images taken in extreme and challenging conditions from five continental regions and four

32 October 20, 2016

ocean systems. Polar bears, harp seals, great white sharks to clown fish are just a few of the creatures highlighted in the exhibit. Monroe has been scuba diving since 1977 and has photographed underwater wonders from the Red Sea to the South Pacific and three U.S. coasts. He has worked with National Geographic photographers and other high-end shooters in photo projects around the world. In his most recent expedition, he traveled to the high Arctic to record the fragile environment, both visually and scientifically, of the floating icepacks of the Arctic Ocean to the glacier graveyards of southern Greenland. The 7/10th’s Blue component of the exhibit explores the depths of tropical and subtropical waters from the Gulf of Mexico to the Coral Triangle of the southwestern Pacific. These sensitive areas of our seas are often challenged in survival from both natural and manmade events. Conservation through personal stewardship and awareness is the cornerstone of the message Monroe tries to share photographically. Mark your calendar for Thursday, November 10 as Monroe hosts a lecture in the second floor gallery of Historic City Hall. The event will be open to the public at no charge; doors will open at 5:30 with the program to begin at 6 pm. Historic City Hall is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are gladly accepted. Charlestown Farmers’ Market is open on Bilbo Street behind the center every Saturday 8 a.m.-noon. For more information, call 491-9147 or visit www. cityoflakecharles.com.

Vol. 8 • No. 13


Vol. 8 • No. 13

October 20, 2016 33


ROUGE ET BLANC A bottle of white, a bottle of red, perhaps a little bit of EVERYTHING instead? That was the scene at the annual affair that now turns the MSU Quad into the area’s biggest wine bar every October as Rouge et Blanc returned for its 11th year. Until next year… Cheers!

Tonya and Victor Lavine

Kate St. Romain, Brandie Alexander and Cassidi Ellis

Roger and Kristyna Wiseneske with Nicole and Chase Peloquin

Ashley Chafin and Amy Nyberg

Elizabeth McLaughlin with Lesley and Hannah Leger

CHEECH AND CHONG AT GOLDEN NUGGET Comedy’s original “Doobie” Brothers made their way to the Golden Nugget stage recently. Celebrating a career dating back 45 years, Richard “Cheech” Marin and Tommy Chong brought a memorable show that gave EVERYONE the giggles and officially closed out their 2016 tour. I hope you all had the chance to see these squinty eyed funny guys while they were here!

Nelly and Roger Fontenot

Bobbye and Jo-El Sonnier 34 October 20, 2016

Lorraine and James Bill

Wilma Garrett, Dreama Chaney and Jackie Antonicelli

Amanda Soto and Mary and Frank Rodriguez Vol. 8 • No. 13


Rhonda Ory, Angela Turton, Sarah Rainwater and Christy Mathew

CHUCK FEST Brian Moore and Matt Moss

Morami and Chad Engler with Bonnie Thorn

Russell Cee, Bryan Smith Jr. and Joey Boyette

David and Jessica Rivero

The Lake City’s little annual free festival is not quite so little anymore. The 2016 Chuck Fest was the biggest and best attended yet and took up more than two blocks of downtown Lake Charles for the first time ever. It was truly a complete and terribly fun day in the Chuck. Can’t wait for next year!

Evan Derrick, Jerred Keill, Hannah Chamblee and Hannah Galbraith

FAMILY AND YOUTH’S ‘MI CASA’ DINNER When it comes to good causes, you are hard pressed to find one better than SWLA’s Family and Youth organization. You’re also going to be hard pressed to find an outfit that puts on cooler functions than these guys. This year’s Mi Casa dinner, hosted in the breathtaking home of Sam and Denise Hebert, featured food and beverage stations courtesy of Coushatta Casino and Republic Distribution and live music. Great job, as always!

Debra and Jerome Lastrapes

Larry and Diane Mason, George and Chris Baldauf and Mary Ann Denger Vol. 8 • No. 13

Nic and Becky Hunter

Amy Nyberg, Courtney Fuller and Erika Simon

Sam and Denise Hebert October 20, 2016 35


The Jambalaya News - 10/20/16, Vol. 8, No. 13  

Marilyn Williams of Best Life Counseling, Keith Chamberlain Productions Presents Rocky Horror, Katherine Petty, SWLA Halloween Event Guide

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you