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VOL. 3, NO. 15 / OCTOBER 20, 2011

nts e v E n owee Cafe l l a H gs • erge’s Le n i t n u a Ha g at L’Aub n a i s i Lou e Cookin Hom


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Volume 3 • Issue 15


GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque publisher@thejambalayanews.com

NEWS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Lisa Addison Leslie Berman George Cline Dan Ellender Cassondra Guilbeau Mike McHugh Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Karla Tullos ADVERTISING sales@thejambalayanews.com

SALES ASSOCIATES Katy Corbello Faye Drake Lindy George Karla Tullos GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

contents

October 20, 2011 • Volume 3 • Issue 15

COVER STORY 26 OLQHS’ Fourth Annual Taste-N-Tell

REGULARS 7 11 11 12 14 32

The Boiling Pot Tips from Tip Adoption Corner The Dang Yankee What’s Cookin’ Sports Report

FEATURES

26

16

5

Candyland Fashion Show for CF 16 SWLA: We’re All About Good Eating 23 Louisiana Hauntings 25 Halloween Events

ENTERTAINMENT 34 36 37 38 41 44 46 47

Red Hot Books Funbolaya Family Night at the Movies Society Spice Jambalaya Jam Local Jam Eclectic Company Killin’ Time Crossword

25

23 5

14

Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2011 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited. Volume 3 • Issue 15

We are now accepting credit cards! OCTOBER 20, 2011

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A Note From Phil

In Memory of Mom

In just a few days, it will be nine years since Lauren’s mother left us. That unforgettable lady will always be in my heart, and I miss her more each day. Most of you know the story of how we met: I was a tour guide, traveling the world and having the time of my life. Lauren and her mom were passengers on my Southern Plantations tour in May of 1999. The three of us met together, and we remained together until the day she died. “Mom” (as I called her right from the start) was one of the most excited people on the tour. She learned the history of each area we visited, was always watching for something new, and enjoyed trying the local food. I took Lauren and her mom to an outside flea market in Charleston, SC and helped them bargain for a few items. I remember we had ice cream cones and just laughed about everything! One night, we went on a ghost tour, and the guide we had was weirder than any ghost we could possibly have run in to. More laughs! It was the best tour I’d ever had. When the tour ended and we were saying goodbye at the airport, Mom asked if I would come over for dinner sometime (I was living in Providence, RI at the time). “I just can’t believe I won’t see you again!”

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OCTOBER 20, 2011

God wouldn’t be there. (Her priest told her that.) And she never spoke to me again. Neither did the rest of my family. “If you want me at your wedding, I’ll be there – no matter where it is,” Mom told us. “Shame on them. I’ll be your mom, Phil!” she said as she gave me a big hug. “You’re the son I never had.” And she always called me her “son-in-love” instead of ll met. her son-ina e w ek e w e law. h T Mom was the kind of mother that I thought I’d had. She was so full of unconditional love I thought she would burst. she said as we hugged. I remember calling her many “Oh, I get the feeling we’ll be seeing times after we got engaged to have each other,” I told her with a big her calm my own nerves when her smile. One year and six days later, daughter would say something to me Lauren and I were married. in her typical Boston manner that I thoroughly enjoyed spending my sensitive nature couldn’t quite time with Mom. She saw the humor handle. in everything, which made her a “Why did she say that to me, pleasure to be around. But she was Mom?” I’d ask her. also an Italian mother, so she did a “Oh, don’t worry,” she’d say. lot of worrying. “That’s how she is. She loves you The fact that I was an entreprevery much. Just marry her. It will be neur really made Mom nervous. okay.” After I met Lauren, I knew I couldn’t “Okay, Mom,” I’d answer. “But stay “on the road,” so I had to quit will you always be there to encourmy job as a tour guide. Soon after, I age me?” started a kitchen design business. I “As long as I should be,” she’d remember the first big check I made reply. from a huge kitchen I designed for a She looked forward to our visits doctor. I showed it to Mom to prove on Sundays and always prepared a that she had nothing to worry about. feast. She made me her famous pork “I’ll always take care of you and roast, stuffed peppers, prosciutto with Lauren,” I promised her. melon, stuffed artichokes, eggplant We found an old Victorian manparmesan and so many other Italian sion south of Boston shortly after we delicacies. She baked cookies and were married. It needed a lot of cakes and just spoiled me. She knew work, but we fell in love with it and I’d lost my family, but never failed to had to have it. “Ooooh, I don’t know assure me that I had a new one. about that house,” Mom said when Late in 2001, after we’d only been she saw it. The day we bought it, she married a year and a half; Mom stayed up all night imagining all the started getting severe back pains. things that could go wrong. I felt The doctors said it was just arthritis, bad, but Lauren just shrugged and but the pain became excruciating to said, “That’s what Italian mothers the point where she couldn’t even do.” sleep (and I wasn’t buying houses). It was ironic that Mom became We brought her to Mass General “my” mom when Lauren and I were Hospital where, after many tests and getting married. My real mother almost by accident, they discovered refused come to our wedding she had pancreatic cancer. The news because we weren’t getting married broke our hearts. in the Catholic Church. She told the Mom knew her days were numrest of my family not to go because bered, but she never lost her spirit,

and never complained. She got her paperwork together and showed me everything I would need to know when the time came. She was with us for another eight months and we made sure she was home the entire time. We took her to her chemo appointments and made her as comfortable as possible. “Tell me another circus story,” she’d ask me while she was having chemo. She’d close her eyes and listen while I recounted my life as a clown. We bought her a recliner and up until the end, she still watched her cooking shows on television (especially Rachel Ray) and would jot down recipes as she’d always done. “I’m going to make that for you!” she’d say and I would nod and smile. “I know you will, Mom,” I’d answer. One evening when she was feeling pretty good, I put on my tour guide jacket, the one I wore when we’d met. “All aboard!” I shouted from the staircase. We surprised her and took her to the Magnolia Grille in Cambridge that served Southernstyle food. She couldn’t eat much, but she enjoyed the night out, and we still had a lot of laughs. Mom gradually got worse, and her chemo was stopped because it was no longer doing any good. Lauren and I moved in with her, and hospice started coming by. Mom went to bed and never got up again. She stopped eating altogether, and was now on morphine. The last thing she ever said to us was “Goodnight, my children.” That night I kissed her on the forehead. “Go to Daddy when ever you want, Mom. I’ll take care of Lauren. Remember my promise. You and Lauren have nothing to worry about.” Hours later, she was reunited with her husband. Mom, on this anniversary of your death, I want to thank you so much for all your unconditional love, your kindness, your laughter, and for teaching me so much about what it really means to be a family. And most of all, I thank you for your daughter, my wife. I wish you were still here with us, but I remember you told me that you’d be here as long as you should be. I’ll see you again when it’s time. Love to you, Mom, from your son-in-love.

– Phil de Albuquerque TJN Volume 3 • Issue 15


Story by Cassondra Guilbeau • Photo by Peter O’Carroll

Anyone looking for something unique—and sugary—to do in Southwest Louisiana for a great cause will be quite pleased with a new event being held at Treasures of Marilyn. Candyland Fashion Show and Auction is set for Nov, 5, 1-3 pm, and promises a sweet time for all. The event will benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, and will feature a runway show with children’s fashions from local boutiques/stores as well as a family-friendly silent auction, musical entertainment, finger foods and, of course, candy. Tickets are $30 each. Many of the young models participating in the show either have cystic fibrosis or have a family member with cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease affecting about 30,000 Americans. A defective gene causes the body to produce a thick, sticky mucus that affects the lungs and digestive system. There is no cure for the disease, and the median age of survival is only 37. One of the youngest models participating in Candyland is Demi Bertrand, a seven-month-old Sulphur resident with cystic fibrosis. Demi’s mother, Haley Johnson is happy to have events like Candyland and others that raise money for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. “These fundraisers are helpful in many ways, but mainly they fund research for a cure that will give my baby a chance,” Johnson said. Another important benefit is raising awareness and understanding for the disease. The day will be filled with fun and treats, but also some education. In fitting with the theme, each of the models will carry a giant lollipop as they walk the runway. The name of the boutique they are model-

ing for will be on one side of the lollipop, and a fact about cystic fibrosis will be on the other side. For those children with a connection to the cause, that connection will be revealed on their lollipop. “We want to drive home that this disease affects more people in Southwest Louisiana than most people realize,” said Patricia Prudhomme, one of the organizers of the event and regional coordinator for Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco Free Living, the underwriting sponsor of this event. “In recent years, we are finding more and more people right here in our community with cystic fibrosis. We really believe more people are talking about the disease, which is allowing parents of children with cystic fibrosis to come together and establish a support network.” The mission of TFL is a great fit for this cause, according to Prudhomme. “TFL is a natural partner for our friends with CF, their family, friends and supporters,” she said. “Our work to have 100 percent smokefree workplaces will give those with CF what is crucial for better health— clean air.” In an additional effort to grow support for a cure for cystic fibrosis, the young models have

been sharing their dreams for CF on the event’s Facebook page. Lilly Guilbeau, whose father, Brian Guilbeau died from CF in 2009, shared, “My dream for CF is for a cure to be found. I don’t want any other kids to lose their dad or their mom to CF.” Mallory Ardoin, whose aunt has CF, brings a childlike innocence to her dream. “My dream for CF is for patients to feel better soon so they can feel happy instead of sad.” Some of the participants may not have CF in their family, but they already

understand the importance of working to find a cure. Model Anderson Ieyoub wants “all the people to feel better.” And Benjamin AlcantaraDuplechin wants “all of my CF friends to feel better so they can come play at the park.” Three-year-old Taylor Benton will be walking the runway for Candyland, and she already understands the importance of finding a cure for CF. Taylor has CF and knows all too well the toll this disease takes on the body. She takes breathing treatments every morning and every evening, uses a percussion vest to clear her lungs and is tube-fed to keep up her nutrition. Diagnosed shortly after she was born, Taylor already has had multiple hospitalizations and surgeries in her young life.

Anderson Ieyoub modeling for Patton's Western Wear in Lake Charles and Lilly Guilbeau modeling for Broadway Royalty in Westlake. Volume 3 • Issue 15

OCTOBER 20, 2011

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Another local CF patient modeling for a cure is 16-month-old Landon McKee, who takes daily breathing treatments. “It was devastating to find out my son had cystic fibrosis,” said Landon’s mom, Tiffany McKee. “I knew that it was a lifethreatening disease, and it was hard for me to come to terms with it. I just didn’t know what the future would look like for my sweet little boy.” While having a child with cystic fibrosis can often make a parent feel powerless, events like Candyland help McKee feel a sense of empowerment.

“It’s important for me to get involved in events like Candyland because I’m not going to just sit back and wait for someone to find a cure for this disease, I want to actively participate in it,” she said. “I will do all that I can to help give my son and others like him a brighter and longer future. I’m not going to stop fighting until we find a cure.” As if that wasn’t reason enough to attend this event, attendees will be treated to a variety of children’s fashions in the runway show. From infant clothes to trendy fall styles, western

wear to the latest in equestrian fashion, there is something for everyone. Add to that, music, finger foods and candy for an especially sweet afternoon. The silent auction will feature such items as a father and son guided fishing trip, a birthday party with the St. Louis High School cheerleaders, lunch with Mayor Randy Roach and much more. This event is perfect for the whole family. All proceeds go directly to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. To purchase tickets or for more information, call (877) 753-9990. TJN

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OCTOBER 20, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 15


The

Boiling

P l

Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CHRISTUS St Patrick Hospital Regional Physical Rehabilitation Center Awarded three-year CARF accreditation

CHRISTUS REGIONAL PHYSICAL REHAB CENTER AWARDED CARF ACCREDITATION CARF International announced that CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital/Regional Physical Rehabilitation Center has been accredited for three years for its Inpatient Rehabilitation Program-Hospital (Adults). This is the fifth consecutive three-year accreditation that the international accrediting body has awarded to the facility. This represents the highest level of accreditation that can be awarded to an organization and shows the organization’s substantial conformance to the CARF standards. CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital/Regional Physical Rehabilitation Center is a nonprofit organization located at 524 Dr. Michael DeBakey Dr. in Lake Charles.

From left to right: Mayor Randy Roach, Billy Navarre, Lanny Young, co-chair of fundraising committee, and Kay Barnett, chair.

BILLY NAVARRE DONATES TO MILLENNIUM PARK Billy Navarre recently donated $5,000 to the Millennium Park rebuilding project. Volume 3 • Issue 15

From left to right: Oliver “Rick” Richard III, LSU Law Center Chancellor Jack M. Weiss, and Honorable Helen “Ginger” Berrigan at the Distinguished Alumni of the Year event on September 23, 2011.

LSU LAW CENTER RECOGNIZES DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI OF THE YEAR The Honorable Helen “Ginger” Berrigan and Oliver “Rick” Richard III were presented with the LSU Law Center’s Distinguished Alumni of the Year award by Chancellor Jack M. Weiss at the LSU Union recently. The award is given annually to an alumnus or alumna who exemplifies the highest quality and ethical standards of the legal profession. It also recognizes personal and professional achievements, as well as loyalty to the LSU Law Center. For the first time in the 25-year history of selecting a distinguished alumnus or alumna, the Law Center selected two, rather than one, distinguished alumni this year. Berrigan and Richard were recognized on the football field during the LSU vs. Northwestern State University game on Sept. 10. SANDEFUR NAMED TO SOUTHERN COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRY BOARD OF TRUSTEES Dr. James D. Sandefur, executive director of the Optometry Association of Louisiana has been named to the board of trustees at Southern College of Optometry in Memphis. In Louisiana, he has served in every available capacity at his state association’s professional level. Active in promoting optometry causes, Dr. Sandefur has also served on a number of optometry committees, civic organizations, state government committees, his local hospital staff, and as an adjunct professor at SCO, where he received the Lifetime Achievement Award, the highest honor bestowed by the college. He was also the inaugural recipient of the Optometry Association of Louisiana’s James D. Sandefur Distinguished Service Award created and named in his honor. SAM HEBERT ELECTED TO NY LIFE CABINET Sam Hebert of Sam Hebert Financial Group, Lake Charles, has been elected a member of the 2011 Chairman’s Cabinet of New York Life OCTOBER 20, 2011

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Insurance Company. Members of the Elite Chairman’s Cabinet are the top 50 highest producing agents among New York Life’s elite sales force of more than 11,900 licensed agents. Sam was ranked 24 out of the 50 top agents this year. Since 1995, Sam Hebert has been a New York Life agent and registered representative for NYLIFE Securities LLC (member FINNRA/SIPC), a licensed insurance agency. Call Sam at 436-7797 for all of your financial needs. DOUCET NAMED WCCH HOSPITAL EMPLOYEE OF THE QUARTER West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital recently named Yolanda Doucet, senior admissions representative, as its fourth quarter Employee of the Quarter. In her current position, Doucet is responsible for inpatient pre-certing, insurance verification, and scheduling, along with several other duties. She also serves as the assistant to the admissions director. Her fellow employees compliment her on her positive attitude, and her dedication to the satisfaction of patients visiting the hospital. Doucet is a resident of Lake Charles and has worked at WCCH for three years.

Sam Hebert

Yolanda Doucet

From left to right: Maria Alcantara Faul, Vice President Development of Family & Youth; Joey Alcede, Ward 3 Marshaal; and Julio Galan, President and CEO of Family Foundation.

FAMILY FOUNDATION ESTABLISHES ENDOWMENT FROM JOEY ALCEDE The Family Foundation of Southwest Louisiana, the philanthropic arm of Family & Youth Counseling Agency, accepted a $10,000 endowment from Ward 3 Marshal Joey Alcede. Marshal Alcede’s endowment will help ensure that Family and Youth programs will be available for future Southwest Louisiana residents. The Family Foundation of Southwest Louisiana connects donors to the priorities that enhance the quality of family and community life for generations to come. Investing in families secures the future of our community. For more information, call 436-9533 or log on to www.fyca.org. MSU 2011 HOMECOMING COURT Danielle Morrissey, a mass communication senior from Moss Bluff, and Matthew “Ross” Theriot, a mass communication senior from Creole, have been named as McNeese’s 2011 Homecoming Queen and King. The royal pair and court will be presented during the McNeese vs. Sam Houston State football game at 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 22, in Cowboy Stadium. Other court members to be presented during halftime ceremonies are: Seniors Jonathan Landry, Lafayette; Jarrett LeBlanc, Hathaway; Erin Moore, Westlake; and Kristen Veazey, Lake Charles. Juniors are Megan Anderson, Hessmer; Jessica Fry, Lake PAGE 8

OCTOBER 20, 2011

Danielle Morrissey and Matthew “Ross” Theriot

Volume 3 • Issue 15


Charles; Will Hetzel, Hathaway; and Nicholas Johnson; Welsh. Sophomores are Leah Moore, Welsh; and Dillon Richard, Welsh. Freshmen are Grant Dunn, Moss Bluff; and Heather Morrissey, Moss Bluff.

Cheryl Fuselier, alumni association president, far right, accepts the donation from hospital representatives Heather Hidalgo (left) and Kelly Darbonne. McNeese photo

CHRISTUS DONATES TO MSU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital has donated $5,000 to the McNeese Alumni Association to help sponsor the 2011 McNeese homecoming week activities.

help us complete a much needed upgrade to our computer lab. This new technology will enhance the learning experience of our current and future students.” The new computers are scheduled to be purchased and installed in time for the beginning of the second semester in January 2012.

On hand for the check presentation were Debby Nabours, WCCH Foundation director, Bill Hankins, WCCH CEO, Anjanette Portie, WCCH auxiliary president, and Sondra Moss, WCCH Foundation president.

WCCH AUXILIARY DONATES TO HOSPITAL’S FOUNDATION The West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital Foundation recently received a donation in the amount of $10,500 from the WCCH Auxiliary. The donation, made possible by proceeds from sales in the Auxiliary’s Gift Shoppe, was made to assist the WCCH Foundation achieve its core mission of assisting the hospital in providing advanced, quality health care to the community.

Chad Guidry, CPSB member; Carol Core, Delta Downs director of operations; Mark Teal, Vinton Middle School assistant principal; Steve Kuypers, Delta Downs VP and GM; Leo Miller, CPSB assistant superintendent; Wayne Savoy, CPSB superintendent; Stephen R. Hardy, Vinton Middle School principal; and Adrian King, Delta Downs director of marketing.

DELTA DOWNS DONATES $8,000 TO SCHOOL BOARD Delta Downs Racetrack Casino Hotel announced that it has made an $8,000 contribution to the Calcasieu Parish School Board to purchase new computers for the computer lab at Vinton Middle School. “We are so appreciative of Delta Downs’ commitment to our community and our school,” said Stephen R. Hardy, principal of Vinton Middle School. “This donation will

Volume 3 • Issue 15

On hand for the presentation at the employee health fair were Bill Dutridge, Kayla Rigney and plant manage, Gene Lavengco.

FIRESTONE POLYMERS DONATES TO CALCASIEU COMMUNITY CLINIC The Firestone Polymers Lake Charles plant presented the Calcasieu Community Clinic with a $5,000 gift from their local employees. TJN

OCTOBER 20, 2011

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Poppy Day In Flanders’ Fields Major John McCrae, 1915 In Flanders’ fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders’ fields.

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Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders’ fields. Nov. 11 is recognized each year by the United States and several European nations as a day of tribute for those veterans who have served in so many of the wars. In recognition of that, poppies are used as a symbol of remembrance for those who made the ultimate sacrifice. Our local American Legion, Unit

1, will once again be asking for a donation for a poppy on Oct. 22. You will find them from 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. stationed outside certain stores in town. The following groups will man these stations: LaGrange Jr. ROTC Naval Cadets, Civil Air Patrol, Sea Cadets, Sons of the Legion, Junior Auxiliary, and the men of Post 1. Any donation, however small or large, will be used to help our veterans, their families and children. Remember to wear your poppy on Veterans Day! The poppy was chosen after WWI. When hostilities were finally

over, the trenches and mud in France and Belgium (Flanders) were covered in a sea of red poppies.

TJN

Volume 3 • Issue 15


By George “Tip” Cline

Meet Lila

GOOD CUSTOMER SERVICE— FOR A CHANGE! One of our readers recently contacted me about an example of good customer service that she experienced from the makers of Cuisinart products. Soon after she purchased one of their Keurig coffee machines, the unit malfunctioned. After going through the troubleshooting procedures as directed in the manual and not getting any results, she called the manufacturer’s number listed in the manual. Their customer service rep patiently walked her through some additional troubleshooting steps, again without resolving the problem. At that point, the rep told her that they were sending her a new machine at no cost to her. A few weeks later, the new unit arrived and worked perfectly, making the hot fresh brew she had desired. She was very pleased and found it refreshing to deal with a company that really appreciates their customers and requested that I mention them in a column. I had a similar experience with the Insinkerator Company with an instant hot water unit they manufacture. I was also treated very courteously with the prompt replacement of my unit. It’s nice to be able to single out manufacturers that have a real desire to satisfy their customers without the hassle we have unfortunately grown accustomed to. PITHON COULEE With all the push to try and recapture some downtown Lake Charles interest, I find it interesting Volume 3 • Issue 15

that no one has brought up the natural attraction of the Pithon Coulee from Ryan Street past Lakeshore Drive to the lake. With the removal of the old Demmon Beauty School building, there is a pleasantly curving waterway that is almost begging for a wide pedestrian area that should be accompanied by small shops, cafes, bistros, sitting areas and similar pleasantries. Look west from Ryan Street down the coulee and think about what could be there for everyone (including our visitors) to enjoy. I see no end of possibilities for a wonderful combination recreation/shopping/dining area that’s just sitting there waiting for someone with vision to develop this jewel in our midst. Maybe if enough of us talk about it, something just might develop.

Beautiful Lila is a white German Shepherd, maybe a mix, approximately three years old, spayed, up to date on all vaccinations, heartworm negative, and on heartworm and flea preventative. Lila’s foster mom reports proudly that she seems to be housetrained (no accidents in her house), rides perfectly in the car, and is great with other dogs. She is learning her leash manners very quickly, and she sits and is well-behaved most of the time. She’s crate-trained if that is needed in her new home. Lila has been walking with her “foster brother” (an American Bulldog) twice a day, and they do well together. She is thriving in her foster home! Lila REALLY enjoys being a running partner. The new family must be willing to provide

lots of playtime or exercise for this sweet girl to keep her happy and out of trouble. A secure fenced yard for playtime is a must. Call (337) 8421815 to speak to Lila’s foster mom. For adoption application and screening, call Karen at (337) 533-8212. TJN

SUPERMARKET ROUNDUP This issue’s shopping comparison is from the posted prices of the items for sale on Wed., Oct. 12. This week’s stores are: Albertsons, Country Club Road; Kroger, McNeese Street; Market Basket, Ryan Street and Walmart, Nelson Road. Le Sueur Small Sweet Peas, 15-ounce can: Albertsons $1.69; Kroger $1.55; Market Basket $1.59; Walmart $1.44. Cucumber, each: Albertsons $.99; Kroger $.78; Market Basket $.89; Walmart $.68. Post Grape Nuts, 24-ounce box: Albertsons $3.99; Kroger $2.50; Market Basket $2.89; Walmart $2.82. Sliced Ham Steak, per pound: Albertsons $3.49, Kroger $2.99, Market Basket $3.69, Walmart $2.98. TJN OCTOBER 20, 2011

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OCTOBER 20, 2011

By Mike McHugh

Beer: A Brief History Guys, I’ve got to say that I have the greatest wife on the face of the Earth. I’ll tell you why. Recently, we had planned to do one of those husband-and-wife dates: just the two of us spending some quality time together. Of all places, she suggested (note: I said she suggested) that we go to the Beer Fest held recently in Lake Charles. She even offered to be the designated driver. Now beat that, boys! One event on the day’s program was a seminar called “Beer 101.” Now, I personally have consumed enough beer in my lifetime to qualify for a PhD in the subject, but I still attended it for my wife’s benefit. I went mainly for the free samples. Surprisingly, it turned out to be a fascinating lecture. The first topic was the history of beer, and it was there I learned the story of how, of all things, beer is the one substance above all that gave rise to modern society as we know it. Like many great inventions, beer was developed quite by accident. During pre-historic times, when men were still hunter-gatherers, one caveman (let’s call him “Chugg”) returned from a long day of foraging with nothing to show but a sack of wild grain. His mate, hoping for at least a pterodactyl egg or two, took a club to him and dumped the lot of grain into the watering hole. That grain happened to be a primitive form of barley. A number of days later, it was Chugg’s turn to supply the water for his tribe’s regular full moon ritual. This was history’s first instance of the open bar concept. Not long after, cave men began cultivating the barley to satisfy the expansion

of their ritual to celebrate every minor lunar phase. The transition to an agrarian society was on, and although there has been great progress in the art of beer making since those primitive times; alas, the same cannot be said for marital relations. Beer making was practiced by many ancient civilizations, including the Sumerians, the Babylonians, and the Egyptians. Hieroglyphic writings contain the first historic reference to the concept of the happy hour. This practice was instrumental in the construction of the pyramids and was also no doubt the reason why the project finished centuries behind schedule. The Greeks also practiced the art, and the first beer commercial is believed to have been staged between acts during a performance of Oedipus. Beer making proliferated among the Germanic and Celtic tribes of Northern Europe. These people, whose hygienic practices were not as well developed as those of their Mediterranean counterparts, much preferred it to wine, since its preparation did not involve the use of feet. Indeed, beer shaped the course of European history. For one, it likely prevented the Irish from becoming a world power, although it was a major factor in their population boom. The Europeans, of course, brought beer with them to the New World, and by the early 1900s, over 1,700 breweries had sprung up across America. Then came what would be remembered as beer’s dark ages: the Prohibition Era. Prohibition was established with the best of intentions, I’m sure, one Volume 3 • Issue 15


being to preserve grain for the country’s war effort. The problem was, in typical government fashion, Congress didn’t get around to enacting it until after the war was over. And it didn’t go into effect until 1920, more than two years later. That’s not bad, though, when you consider that Congress just recently managed to pass the budget bill for fiscal 1920. And so, Prohibition ended up producing none of the positive benefits that had been hoped for. In

fact, its effects were quite to the contrary, eventually leading to the Great Depression, and I’m not talking about the economy here. Prohibition was finally repealed in 1933, although it took much longer for American beer to fully recover. The number of breweries had fallen to only a small handful, and Americans had turned towards other forms of spirits, such as wine. Many households made their own wine during Prohibition. It was quite easy, and methods were in

place by then that did not involve the use of feet. It also helped that grape juice carried warning labels such as: “TO PREVENT THE FORMATION OF ALCOHOL, DO NOT MIX THIS PRODUCT WITH YEAST AND STORE IT IN A BARREL FOR SIX MONTHS BEFORE CONSUMING IT.” Still, beer made its steady comeback. The 1980s saw the advent of microbreweries and their craftbrewed beers. These presented a refreshing alternative to the mass-

produced American brands, whose quality made you swear that Chugg had returned as a highly paid consultant to the large beer companies. So, during this Oktoberfest season, we can all celebrate the full recovery of America’s beer culture. Its future, and hence the future of civilization itself, is a bright one indeed. The rising popularity of karaoke in recent years is but a minor setback to this overall trend. TJN

I am obviously new to politics. Through my journey these last nine months, I’ve met some amazing people in our community and have renewed some wonderful friendships as well. But I, like many of you, have been disgusted by some of the tactics used in the political process. My intentions in seeking the position of Assessor are based purely on the love for my career, my office team, and my desire to serve the people of Calcasieu Parish to the best of my ability. But, the time has come to defend myself, my family, and my office team against the “guilt by association” stigma that is being perpetuated by ignorance, subtle insinuations, and downright malicious attacks. We in the office understand the anger and disappointment the public has with the past situations, but to accuse a whole office of guilt for the actions of one is unfair to the employees who work hard for you, everyday. It’s also heart wrenching to their families and friends who have to hear these attacks as well. So, LET ME BE CLEAR: There was a thorough investigation performed on the office by an independent auditor, the state legislative auditor, and the district attorney’s office. No stone was left unturned. There was only one issue with only one person. The district attorney has taken action and that person is no longer with the office NO other issues exist with the current personnel or with the finances of the office. My office team and I have been insulted by the malicious attacks and frustrated by the buzzwords and catchphrases used to cast doubt upon all of us. This is simply a political ploy to distract from the fact that the Assessor has one job description: to appraise and assess property fairly. I am the ONLY candidate with ANY EXPERIENCE & KNOWLEDGE in appraising & assessing property. I remain committed to you to always assess your property in a fair and equitable manner. Paid for by Wendy Aguillard Volume 3 • Issue 15

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What’s Cookin’ at L’Auberge Comfort Food at Its Best Fall is here and with the cooler weather, our eating choices change from lighter fare to heartier dishes just like Mom used to make. The perfect place to satisfy these cravings is Le Café at L’Auberge Casino Resort. Le Café has a brand new menu that’s sure to please even the pickiest eater. Personally created by local chefs, there’s a Louisiana influence in all of the dishes that will remind you of home. Some of your old favorites have been revived, and the popular restaurant has added a number of new items that you simply must try. Room Chef Kevin Thompson and his crew have outdone themselves! How about Fork-Tender Pot Roast, Braised Short Ribs of Beef, Meatloaf, Double Pork Chops and Cajun Pot Pie? Don’t miss mouth-watering pasta dishes like Nonna’s Spaghetti and Meatballs or Seafood and Blackened Chicken Pasta. There are a variety of salads and sandwiches to choose from, with the Lobster Club a huge favorite. It’s light, fresh and filled with generous chunks of sweet lobster meat, served on sourdough bread with avocado slices! From the extensive breakfast menu, enjoy Smothered Pork Chops and Eggs, Corned Beef Hash, Eggs Benedict, New Orleans-Style Beignets, Omelets and so much more. As always, Le Café offers hearty portions with value for dollar pricing. The portions on the new dessert menu are made for sharing. In other words, they are enormous! Le Café now offers patio dining, so you can dine outside on the terrace overlooking the tranquil pool and lazy river. At this time of year, it’s like a mini getaway! Even better, Le Café is open 24/7! It’s the only restaurant of its type in SWLA where Chef Kevin Thompson PAGE 14

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Le Café at L’Auberge Smothered Chicken Now here’s the perfect comforting meal for a crisp fall day. Chicken breasts are sautéed, then braised in Marsala wine and cream with mushrooms and green onions; it’s Chicken Marsala simplified!

INGREDIENTS • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves pounded thin • ¼-cup chopped green onion • 1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms • 6-oz. all purpose flour • 1/3 cup Marsala wine • 1/3-cup heavy cream • 1/8-cup chicken stock • salt and pepper to taste you can dine anytime, day or night, with such a wide variety of menu options. Use complimentary valet parking or the easily accessible covered parking garage. A private dining room in the back can be reserved free of charge for community group meetings, social meetings, etc. The restaurant can be reached at 395-7432. For more information, or to take a look at the delicious new menus, go to www.ldlcasino.com/dining. TJN

PREPARATION Coat chicken breasts with flour, then sauté chicken in a large skillet for 5 to 7 minutes, or until cooked through and juices run clear. Add green onion and mushrooms and sauté until soft, then add Marsala wine and bring to a boil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Stir in cream and stock and simmer until heated through, about 5 minutes. Let sauce reduce by half. Serve with mashed potatoes or your favorite starch and vegetable. Serves four. Enjoy! TJN

Precise studies with over 1,500 images Able to detect cancer not seen on mammograms Able to detect leaks and ruptures in breast implants Advanced MRI offers enhanced studies of the breast, which may help detect early stages of cancer or determine the extent of a known cancer.

Phone (337) 494-AMRI • Fax (337) 494-2694 • www.advanced-mri.net • 2770 Third Avenue, Suite 125 • Lake Charles, LA 70601 *Advanced MRI accepts Blue Cross/Blue Shield as well as most other network providers Volume 3 • Issue 15

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Food, food, glorious food. We are so very fortunate to be living in Southwest Louisiana, where we can enjoy some of the best food in the nation. I can personally attest to that: I was almost 20 pounds lighter when we came here eight years ago! Damn that good food! Life here is a veritable feast. We have so much to choose from: succulent oysters, fried, grilled or raw; boiled, fried and barbecued crab and shrimp; and my beloved spicy crawfish, which Phil and I have to have every week when it’s in season. Then there’s boudin and gumbo and andouille and Tasso. Etouffee! Pistolettes! Boudin balls! Po-Boys! Barbecue! I could go on and on. I have to stop—I’m getting too hungry. We have some great restaurants here that will serve you up some amazing dishes. Whatever you desire, they have it. So bring your family and friends (and your appetite) to the best places in town for the freshest meats and seafood. And don’t forget our wonderful Middle Eastern restaurants that have become so popular with the locals. So, where are you eating today? TJN

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The famous centerpiece of Sandy’s Bodacious Burger Basket is an Angus beef patty served on a grilled, sweet, mouth-watering jalapeño bun with mayo, lettuce, tomato and cheese. This burger, with its 1/3 lb. hand-formed beef patty, is sure to please! Not in the mood for a burger? Try the homemade gumbo, famous chicken salad, cheesesteaks, paninis or their daily lunch specials. 5th Floor, Capital One Tower, Lake Charles, La. • 337-439-6916 Breakfast Mon-Fri: 8am-10am • Lunch Mon-Fri: 11am-2pm Follow us on Facebook!

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Chicago native Kathi Kocik Bonamici came to Lake Charles in 1982 and began selling shrimp on the side of the road. From this humble beginning came Steamboat Bill’s, known for serving the freshest, tastiest seafood around and their more than generous portions. The Captain’s Platter is a feast for the fish lover. Try the butterfly shrimp, loaded potatoes, stuffed crabs, fried oysters, gumbo and so much more! Get in line during crawfish season, because it’s the place to go for hot, perfectly spiced crawfish. Are you hungry yet? 1004 North Lakeshore Dr. Lake Charles, LA • (337) 494-1070 Mon-Thu: 10:30am - 9:00pm • Fri-Sat: 10:30am - 10:00pm Sun: 10:30am - 9:00pm

Come on over to The Porch, a locally owned and operated neighborhood coffee house, whose goal is to provide an exciting venue for the arts while serving delicious food and beverages. Start your day with an omelet and a steaming cup of locally roasted coffee. Later on, there are tantalizing soups, sandwiches, salads, pizza, and even a kids’ menu. Come by or phone in your order. You’ll love The Porch and its cozy, New Orleans-influenced atmosphere. Make sure you visit their Facebook page to find out about their upcoming events! 4710 Common Street, Lake Charles, LA. • (337)- 564-5769 Mon.-Wed., 6 a.m.-8 p.m. • Thurs.-Sat., 6 a.m.-close • Closed Sundays www.theporchcoffeehouse.com

Traditional family recipes, friendly, knowledgeable service and a warm, comfortable atmosphere make Cedar’s Restaurant the place to go. Try their delicious luncheon specials—there’s even a convenient drive-thru pickup for call-in orders! Bring the whole family for dinner, and enjoy a wide array of authentic dishes from an extensive menu, including hummus, kibbi, stuffed grape leaves, chicken schwarma, tabbouleh, Greek chicken and so much more. Only the freshest ingredients are used to make your dining experience unforgettable. What are you waiting for? Come in today! 3905 Ryan St., Lake Charles, LA • 337-477-7701 Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm • Fri-Sat 11am-10pm • Sun 11am-8pm 2nd location • Prien Lake Mall Volume 3 • Issue 15

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Appetizers Potato Spuds Cheddar Peppers Texas Toothpicks Shrimp & Cheese Tabasco Hot Wings Yam Sticks Shrimp Scampy Angel on a Wing Angel on Horseback

Poboys Pistolette Fried Cheese Corn Nuggets Stuffed Jalapeno Jambalaya Boudin Balls Crawfish Balls Boudin (Hot or Cold) Crawfish Boudin

Short Orders Hamburger Cheese Burger Bacon Ch Burger Chicken Fried Steak Double Meat Burger Pan Sausage Sausage Link Hot Link Boudin Burger BBQ Beef BBQ Pork Ham Sandwich BLT Sandwich Shrimp Burger Turkey Club Ham Club

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Fish Sandwich Grilled Chicken Shrimp on a Stick Fries Onion Rings Fried Okra Tater Tots with Cheese Chicken Fries Egg Rolls Vegetable Sticks Hush Puppies Crab Fingers Cole Slaw Potato Salad Seafood Potato Stuffed Potato

Smoked Ham and Cheese Catfish Shrimp Oyster BBQ Beef or Pork Crawfish Sausage

Dinners Ribeye T-Bone Hamburger Steak Chicken Fried Steak Pork Chop Dinner (Fried or Grilled) Chicken Tenders Grilled Chicken Breasts

Our Specialty John’s Catfish Divine Grilled Catfish with Crawfish Topping, Served with Roll & Salad

Seafood Dinners One Dozen Shrimp Fried or Grilled One Half Dozen Shrimp Fried or Grilled Catfish Dinner Fried or Grilled One Dozen Fried Oysters One Half Dozen Fried Oysters Shrimp & Catfish Combo Shrimp & Oyster Combo Popcorn Shrimp Fried Crawfish Frog Legs (In Season) Stuffed Crab Dinner Seafood Platter Shrimp & Crab Gumbo Chicken & Sausage Gumbo Crawfish Platter Boiled Crawfish In Season by # Boiled Crabs In Season Boiled Shrimp By # Fried Crabs By # Crawfish Etouffee

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Come dine with us in our newly remodeled Sulphur location. We now have flat screen TVs and a meeting room. Our friendly staff is eager to serve you! Whether you go for our wonderful buffet that offers a variety of dishes and a great salad bar, or try the delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner options on the menu, we guarantee you’ll be satisfied! Have you tried one of our mouth-watering burgers? They’re the best in town, we guarantee it! Got a sweet tooth? We have just what you need! Try one of our delicious shakes, malts, or a creamy dreamy banana split that’s sure to satisfy your sweet craving. Did you know we can cater your special event? Give us a call and we’ll give you the details! 1023 Benoit Lane, Sulphur, LA. 70663 • (337) 527-9448 Sun.-Thurs., 6 a.m.-11 p.m. • Fri. and Sat., open 24 hours! MSU IDs accepted for discount

Dine in or take out at Roy’s Specialty Meats on Common Street in Lake Charles or South Thompson in Iowa. Either way, if a home-cooked meal is what your taste buds are longing for, this is the place to go! Roy’s carries choice beef filets, ribeyes, boudin, sausage, chicken, and pork, plus po-boys, chopped beef sandwiches, weekday plate lunches and deer processing. Roy’s honors food stamps and offers six great meat deals from $47.95 to $122.95. 4313 Common St., Lake Charles • (337) 564-5705 401 S. Thompson, Iowa • (337) 582-2220 Sun: 11-3 • Mon: 11-2 • Tues-Thurs: 11-9 • Fri-Sat: 11-10 Follow us on Facebook! Volume 3 • Issue 15

Fox’s Pizza Den was founded on a few principles you will want to know. Before we opened our doors to the public, we decided to offer only THE BEST Pizza, Hoagies & Wedgies. We use only the finest ingredients, and cook with tender, loving care. Our quality and cleanliness are your assurance of outstanding value. You can always rely on Fox’s Pizza Den to be the very best available - ANYWHERE! 2590 Maplewood Dr., Sulphur, LA. • (337) 533-1181 Mon.-Thur.: 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. • Fri.: 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. • Sat.: 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. www.foxspizzadensulphur.com

Nina P's Café, family-owned and operated, has been serving the local area since 1999, and is now a household name. At Nina P's, we deliver every meal with a smile and are sure to make each customer feel right at home. We serve a wide variety of items, from our scrumptious fried chicken club served with our homemade onion rings, homemade burgers, New Orleans-style Po-boys, and Southern-style chicken and sausage gumbo to daily plate lunches, fresh salads, and huge spuds. We truly hope you leave Nina P’s feeling like part of our family. 1600 A W. McNeese St., Lake Charles, LA • 337-479-2201 Mon-Sat from 11am-3pm OCTOBER 20, 2011

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Looking for gumbo like your mama used to make and seafood to die for? Head for Seafood Palace, and eat your fill of boiled or fried crabs, Po- Boys, catfish, shrimp, boudin balls, pistolletes, oysters, seafood platters, crawfish in season, and other local favorites that will keep you coming back for more! Seafood Palace has been consistently serving you delicious food for 10 years, and pride themselves on their friendly staff and clean, casual atmosphere. 2218 Enterprise Blvd., Lake Charles, LA. (337) 433-9293 Mon.-Sat., 10:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. Follow us on Facebook!

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Serving Southwest Louisiana since 1981, Hollier's Cajun Kitchen offers a wide variety of Cajun specialties, including steaks, seafood, gumbo, etouffee and boiled crawfish in season. They also offer daily lunch and dinner buffets, along with a soup and salad bar. This family business has been making their famous boudin and sausage for over 31 years that can be purchase heated, cold, or frozen. They also make a variety of delicious Cajun products, such as cracklins, hog head cheese, andouille, crawfish boudin, beef jerky and tasso. For all you hunters, Hollier's also does custom processing. They also cater rehearsal suppers. The Hollier family wants to thank their loyal customers for letting them serve Southwest Louisiana for so many years!

1709 Ruth St., Sulphur, LA. • (337) 527-0061

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By Lauren de Albuquerque

Things that go bump in the night: Explainable—or not? That’s what SWLA Paranormal sets out to do when they investigate for otherworldly activity. The group has been in existence since 2005. Founded by Rev. Lonnie Hall, a Church of Christ minister, Hall wanted to start a group using scientific methods to research and document possible paranormal activity instead of using psychics, Ouija boards or séances. “We go in to search for answers,” said member Susan Patrick Lamendola. “Our mission is to disprove hauntings and find logical explanations for unexplained incidents. We do all the research and investigation at no charge to clients and it’s totally confidential, unless the client approves full disclosure.” The group gets calls from families and businesses that have unexplained things occurring that frighten them. “We try to do an average of two investigations per

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month as time allows, because we all work fulltime jobs,” she said. Member Anncie Wright indicated that investigations depend on the time of year. “Fall seems to have more investigations than summer,” she said. “Summertime, everyone is so busy that we slow down a bit.” Investigations take many hours. Research on each site is done beforehand; there’s the actual investigation and afterwards, the group goes over hours and hours of audio and video evidence. An average investigation probably takes a total of about 60 hours or more from start to finish. SWLA Paranormal uses digital voice recorders, electro-magnetic field detectors, lasers, Infrared cameras and a DVR system, laser thermometers and motion detectors, plus some old-school methods such as props or baby powder. Members are responsible for supplying their own equipment, as the group does not solicit funds in any way. The group started with approximately seven active members and has now grown to 15. The team is always looking for new members with new ideas and techniques, as long as they fall

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within SWLA Paranormal’s philosophies of investigating. The size of the investigation determines the amount of team members needed. Once that is determined, whoever the lead is on the investigation chooses members for his team. And they’ve gone all over the state. “We’ve traveled all over Louisiana, from Chauvin to Shreveport,” said investigator Darrell Buck, who also happens to be the art director for The Jambalaya News. “Not all members go; it typically depends on the size of the investigation. During the investigation, no investigator is left alone. We work in teams for safety reasons and also so that we can validate each other’s findings.” Group members have had a lot of bizarre experiences in the course of their work. John Wright recalls an investigation in Kinder where the group ended up outside in an open field. “We were standing in the field, and heard a herd of horses running towards us,” he said. “Right before you’d think they’d be right up on you, the sound stopped and we didn’t hear anything else. There was no light outside and the whole area was pitch black. When we talked to the owners, they said they had never had horses on the property.” Buck’s favorite investigation was in Shreveport. “The building was over 100 years old in an old part of the city,” he said. “We saw shadows and it had an electromagnetic field that seemed to travel around the top floors. We were actually able to follow it around with EMF detectors. There was also a spot in one room that felt like static electricity. We were able to measure it, and I even had the pleasure of laying in it. I’ve never experienced anything like that. We also caught some very good EVPs (electronic voice phenomenon) including one that said ‘not gonna hurt you’ and another EVP that sounded like a conversation between a man and a woman. Very cool.” The Jambalaya News office is in an old building in downtown Lake Charles. As you can expect, even before we moved in, SWLA Paranormal paid a visit. They’ve done several investigations in the past few years, and have come up with a lot of unexplained phenomena. Team member Anncie Wright remembers what happened during PAGE 24

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the second investigation. “We were coming down the stairs,” she recalled. “I said, ‘If you want us to stay, give us a sign.’ Well, the last guy down said ‘Ow, that burns!’ When we looked at his arm, he had been pinched, and you could see where fingernail marks broke the skin.” When the group went back upstairs, Anncie spoke to “whatever” might be there. “I told it that it didn’t need to hurt us. If it wanted our attention, it could touch me,” she said. Unfortunately, she did get touched later—and the entity left a red handprint on her arm! Both incidents were photographed and recorded on video. Buck likes what he calls “the ceiling fan incident.” “In the sales office, there are three ceiling fans,” he said. “On that night, we noticed that the middle fan was spinning slowly. We checked that it was turned off and it was. We even thought that it may have been a draft, but it would start and then stop again. We even asked that it stop and spin the fan in the opposite direction—and it did! We still haven’t been able to figure that out, but it was very exciting!” That same night, John Wright said he will never forget sitting in Buck’s office and seeing the shadow of a woman in front of the window going towards the stairs.  I’ve heard a woman singing as I’ve gone down the stairs and had someone whisper in my ear. My former editor saw a woman through the window standing on the front porch. When she opened the door, no one was there. I often work late at night and I personally love the idea of spirits in the old house, although I probably wouldn’t appreciate getting pinched by one! It’s pretty safe to say that The Jambalaya News office is haunted, but the group has investigated other places and found absolutely nothing, or reasonable explanations for what had been occurring. “You have to be a skeptic,” Buck said. “Don’t think that every noise in the night is something paranormal. Most of the time, these things can be debunked. But at the same time, don’t have a closed mind. There are some things in this world that can’t be explained.” To contact SWLA Paranormal please visit their website at www.swlaparanormal.org. TJN Volume 3 • Issue 15


ing bowling, spacewalk, balloon art, golf hole-in-one, arts & crafts station, face-painting, football throw, a basketball shootout and much more. Free admission and no costumes required. The City recommends that trick-ortreat activities end at 8 p.m. Parents are encouraged to have their children home by 8:30 p.m. unless they are attending a supervised function sponsored by other parents or civic organizations. 

SHANGRI LA SCARECROW FESTIVAL OCT. 18-NOV. 12 The Scarecrow Festival at Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center in Orange, TX., will take place from Oct. 18 through Nov. 12. Scarecrows from various local businesses, schools, organizations, families and individuals will be on display along the pathways of Shangri La. Visitors can vote for a favorite entry and prizes will be awarded in several categories. The festival concludes during Shangri La’s Autumn Fair on Nov. 12, at which time winners of the Scarecrow Festival will be announced. For more information, visit www.shangrilagardens.org. USS ORLECK’S HAUNTED SHIP OCT. 21-31 The USS ORLECK Naval Museum is proud to present its first Halloween Haunted Ship featuring the BLUDD SHEDD Crew! The Halloween Haunted ship will be open for tours from Oct. 21-31. Fri. -Sat. 6 p.m. - midnight or until, Sun. – Thurs. 6 – 10 p.m. or until, and Oct. 31 (Halloween): 6 p.m. – midnight or until the last victim leaves! Cost is $12 per person (Sorry, no discounts for young children, minimum age for entrance is 10.) Group rate: $10 per person for groups of 15 or more. VIP Fast Pass: $20 per person - skip the long line and move to the front! WITCHES AND WHISKEY AT L’AUBERGE OCT. 29 Win your share of $10,000 in the Jack After Dark costume contest Sat., Oct. 29, 9 p.m. – until at Jack Daniel’s. Register at 10 p.m. and receive one free drink. Winners will be announced at the witching hour of 12:10 a.m. There will be a $15 cover charge after 9 p.m. (discounted cover charge if you attend the Goo Goo Dolls concert). Enjoy Halloween drink specials and “freak” to the beats of DJ CaGe. Scary Good Times!

HOLY TRINITY EPISCOPAL PUMPKIN PATCH THRU OCT. 31 The church grounds of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church will once again be covered with big orange pumpkins grown in and around the Navajo Indian Reservation in New Mexico. The Pumpkin Patch will be open until Oct. 31 from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. weekdays and Saturdays, and noon - 6 p.m. Sundays. School classes, daycare facilities and grandparents can bring children to Pumpkin Patch Storytime. There are two classes on 10 different days, so please call the church office (625-4288) to schedule a visit. Picnics can be held in the Pavilion if arrangements are made beforehand. The proceeds from the sale of pumpkins, gourds, and pumpkin bread fund Holy Trinity’s outreach projects. The church is located at 1700 Maplewood Drive in Sulphur. For more information, please contact Cyndi Khoury at 5278787 (CMKTypist@aol.com) or the church office at 625-4288. JENNINGS MAIN STREET HALLOWEEN OCT. 31 Local merchants and individuals will once again be handing out trick or treat favors and candy to area goblins from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Trick or treating is limited to children 12 and under. Main Street will be blocked off between Academy and Market Street for the safety of the youngsters. The spaces to hand out candy are free to any merchant or individual interested. Call Polly at 821-5532 for more information or to reserve your space. Founders Park will be the location of the tenth annual Jennings Daily News Costume Contest. The Canine Costume Contest begins at 5:15 p.m., with the Children’s Costume Contest on stage at 5:30. The entry fee for both divisions is a canned good or non-perishable item or $1 cash for Caring Hands. For contest details, call 824-3011. TJN

CENTRAL SCHOOL HAUNTED HOUSE OCT. 30 Friends of Central School invite you to experience another side of local history by bringing the family to the Central School Arts and Humanities Center on Sun., Oct. 30 in downtown Lake Charles for an evening of ghost stories, haunted history tours, and spooky kids’ activities. From 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., the Central School will transform into a family-friendly haunted house with an array of activities and performances for all ages and a bonfire in the parking lot at 7:30 p.m. Meet spooky clowns and other creepy characters, get your face painted and listen to ghost stories! Come dressed in your Halloween best. There is no admission but donations are welcome. For more information or to volunteer in the haunted house, contact the Arts Council at (337) 439-2787. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM HALLOWEEN OCT. 31 Jack-O-Lantern Mask Workshop classes at the Children’s Museum in downtown Lake Charles begin at 11 a.m. and noon. Color your own Jack-O-Lantern mask! Classes are limited to 15 children. Members only Halloween Fest is from 4-6 p.m. This is a great opportunity for parents to bring their kids into a non-scary and safe environment for trick-or-treating fun. Be sure to bring something to carry your candy! Cookies and punch will be served. Get your membership today to join the fun! Museum will CLOSE at 3 p.m. Call 337-433-9420 or visit www.swlakids.org for more info. CITY OF LAKE CHARLES HALLOWEEN ACTIVITIES OCT. 31 The City of Lake Charles Recreation and Parks Department will host Halloween Harvestfest 2011 on Mon., Oct. 31, at the Lake Charles Civic Center Coliseum, 900 Lakeshore Dr., from 5 to 8 p.m.  A variety of music, games, prizes and trinkets will be available for the entire family, includVolume 3 • Issue 15

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on Addis a s i L By

It’s been said that folks in Southwest Louisiana live to eat and really, who can blame us? We know that we have the market cornered when it comes to good eats. With cuisine such as rich gumbo, savory red beans and rice, creamy crawfish bisque, delectable fried shrimp, tasty boudin, and more, Louisianans find any excuse to celebrate. A melting pot of cultures, we dine with such gusto here in part because our cuisine connects us to our diverse heritage, which includes French, Spanish, African, German, and many other influences. Simply put, we love our food. And, who better to help create that food than celebrity Chef John Folse? A great friend to Our Lady Queen of Heaven School through the years, Folse returns once again and will be emcee and featured participant in the Fourth Annual Celebrity/Amateur Chef “Taste-N-Tell” Showcase on Dec. 12 at OLQHS. This exciting culinary competition gives professional and amateur chefs a great opportunity to show off their skills and highlight the best of their delicious recipe selections in the categories of appetizer, entrée, or dessert. Returning this year is the popular Junior Division, where nine to 12 teams from the OLQHS Culinary Club will compete for the chance to capture “Best in Category.” The Taste-N-Tell competition is unique in that it will be judged by the amount of votes each chef receives from attendees. Guests may purchase “Baron Bucks” in denominations from $5-$100, and then place them in the Tip Jar at their favorite chef ’s table. At the end of the Continued on next page PAGE 26

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Top: Chef John Folse poses with Junior Culinary Team members (L to R) Hannah McCloskey, Kelsey Berlin, Alex Hebert. Bottom: Culinary Club Sponsor/Director of Development Lisa Jakel poses with culinary members Matthew Vincent, Gunner Goodwin, Evan Falgoust. Volume 3 • Issue 15


competition, the amounts received will determine the winner of each category. Proceeds from this annual fundraiser will be used to continue various programs for OLQH students. WHY A COOKING COMPETITION Monsignor James Gaddy, pastor of Our Lady Queen of Heaven Church, says the culinary competition was modeled after the same type of fundraiser that he had once participated in for a Women’s Shelter in Jennings. So, four years ago, OLQHS began the competition/fundraiser as a way to encourage amateur and professional chefs to showcase the best of their dishes. The popular event has continued and with each year, more exciting features are added. But one thing remains the same – the delicious culinary creations! With this annual fundraiser, the wonderful programs at OLQHS are able to continue, and the school can keep the tuition at a manageable level. In addition, the event continues to encourage children to be creative with their culinary dishes and to aim for the stars. THE CULINARY CLUB About eight years ago, according to Lisa Jakel, director of development and public relations at OLQHS, the school began a Culinary Club for their middle school students. The Club gives students an opportunity to learn more about the culinary world, meet some of the best chefs in our area, and involve their parents and siblings as they share their family recipes and create their own. Indeed, Jakel said the Culinary Club recently visited L’Auberge Lake Charles Casino Resort, where students got to experience every restaurant venue that L’Auberge has to offer. “It was very exciting for them,” Jakel said. “They learned so much from the chefs there and they had a great time.” Jakel said the Culinary Club originally had 52 students from the sixth to eighth grade classes but now, the Club has grown to more than 200 students. “The students in this Club are so fortunate because they have the chance to visit some of the finest kitchens in the city and the unique opportunity to train with chefs from all over the world,” she said. This year’s competition will help to finance future programs at the school and will also give six lucky Culinary Club teams the opportunity to show off some of the skills they have learned. Two teams will be entered in each of the categories and will

be judged under the Junior Division titles. Make sure to stop by their tables to cheer them on and vote for your favorite dishes! CHEF JOHN FOLSE Returning as emcee of Taste-N-Tell is celebrity Chef John Folse. Although Folse has had much success in his life and has traveled far and wide (Beijing, Hong Kong, Paris, Moscow, etc.), he’s never forgotten his Louisiana roots. When he opened Lafitte’s Landing Restaurant in Donaldsonville in 1978, he set out to market his restaurant by taking “a taste of Louisiana” worldwide. In 1989, Folse was the first nonItalian chef to create the Vatican State Dinner in Rome. He’s received countless awards and has written numerous cookbooks. The Louisiana Legislature once gave him the title of “Louisiana’s Culinary Ambassador to the World.” He has a unique philosophy when it comes to his take on cooking: “Choose first the heritage of your people. Herein lies the spice and flavor of your very palate. Choose secondly the ingredients of your area. Herein lies the uniqueness of your creations.” How did Folse first became connected with Our Lady Queen of Heaven School? It turns out that Jakel once took a break from her many years of teaching prior to taking her position at OLQHS. On that break, she became Folse’s first administrative assistant. It was a successful business partnership and the two also became lifelong friends. Through her work with OLQHS, Folse eventually became involved in the fundraising endeavor and has been a great friend to the school over the years. “He’s actually opening a new restaurant in New Orleans in 2012 called Restaurant R’evolution,” Jakel said. “OLQH will be attending the restaurant’s grand opening and he has a large painting that one of our parents, Lauren Gonzales, did that is actually a colorful, vibrant collage of things that our students thought he needed to serve in his kitchen. That’s pretty cool.” Folse says his new restaurant will “incorporate the bounty of Louisiana’s fresh ingredients and seafood as we recreate Louisiana dishes while

Top: Culinary students in the kitchen at L'Auberge with Chef Gerry Gulla using a pastry sleeve to make homemade tater tots. Middle: Culinary students resting after enjoying a delicious lunch prepared by all the chefs at L'Auberge. Bottom: OLQH culinary students Christian Iafrate, Sam Bruchhaus, and Matthew Ieyoub cheering on their great lunch at L'Auberge.

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also developing brand new menu items.” He may have learned a few things from the students through these years and during his participation in Taste-N-Tell and other OLQHS events, but the students have learned so much from him. In preparation for the upcoming event, some of the students shared a few things that they have learned from Folse about the field of cooking (and life): • Eat humble pie. (Be a regular person no matter how important you become; give what you have out of happiness.) • Refrigerate the dough. (Take time to rest and recover, and learn patience; refrigerate your ideas for years; at the same time, try new ideas.) • Don’t talk with your mouth full. (Know when to talk and when to listen.) • Play with your food. (Never sit still when creativity is involved.) • Fork over control. (Love partnerships; allow room for everyone.) • Serve family style. (Love what you do!) THE COMPETITION AND CONTESTANTS “This year, we hope to add even more celebrity chefs and have additional restaurants participate,” Jakel said. “Cedars Greek

and Lebanese Restaurant has already come aboard and they are eager to participate. We hope to have others join with us as well.” The Taste-N-Tell competition will include approximately 18-20 amateur chef teams in addition to the 6-9 Junior Division teams. Each chef is asked to make a $250 donation or to obtain a corporate sponsor for the entry fee. Since there is a limited number of entries and space availability, chefs are required to complete and submit all sponsorship fees and forms by Nov. 15 in order to be entered in the competition. There are three categories in which guest chefs will compete: appetizer, entrée, or dessert. Chefs are also encouraged to decorate their table and surrounding area as a way to further showcase the theme of the dish they are serving. Jakel said this also gives chefs one more opportunity to catch the eye of guests (in addition to appealing to their taste buds with their delectable dishes!) so that they can encourage them to purchase “Baron Bucks.” Last year’s winners included Sister Camille Martinez’s tantalizing Martha’s Mudbug Pies as the appetiz-

Top: Culinary members Sydney Brown and Hannah Savoie receive Baron Bucks from Brenna LeBert. Bottom: Chef John Folse and Father Keith Pellerin taste Alligator and Pork Sausage Sauce Piquante from Vincent Brothers.

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er winner; Brock Brame’s delicious jambalaya for the entrée division; and Keith Duplechin and Anna and David Duplechin’s scrumptious homemade ice cream for the dessert category. Other participants in last year’s competition were, in the category of appetizers: Monsignor James Gaddy, Canards Au Ciel or “Heavenly Duck”; Joe Heacook, Boudin Eggrolls with Bistro Sauce; Scott Morris, Fried Manchego & Polenta Flan Crème Fraiche and Smoked Duck Breast with Arugula topped with Blueberry Citrus Sauce; Josh Rogers, Crawfish Au Gratin Nachos; and Chef Styron, Oyster Shooters. For the category of entrees, other participants included: Chef John Folse, Smoked Corn & Crawfish Stew in Mini Bouchees; Brandon Guillory, Game Chili; L’Auberge Chefs Matthew and Jorge, Lamb Lollipops with Wild Rice Medley; Scott Morris, Miso & Ginger Glazed Korean Short Ribs; Dawn Wallwork and John Paul Marceaux, Oyster Dressing; and Matthew Vincent & the Vincent Brothers, Alligator with Pork Sausage Sauce Piquante. JUNIOR DIVISION WINNERS Junior Division winners in last year’s competition were: Grace Helms,

Kennedy Hebert, Olivia Hebert, Madeline Stine, and Ashlyn Theriot, with their dish of Oyster & Artichoke Bisque for the appetizers category. Under entrees, winners were Daniel Best, Grant Kelly, and Jake Ottenweller with their culinary creation of Jamboree Jambalaya. Taking the honors in the dessert category were Maggie Kuehn, Andie Ottenweller, Jenna Watkins, and Jasmine Weber for their concoction of Heavenly Pumpkin Pie. Additional participants in the Junior Division were: Kelsi Berlin, Alex Hebert, and Hannah McCloskey with their dish of Italian Pizza Surprise, Appetizers; Peyton Doumite, Cameron Fontenot, Gregory LaBorde, and Quinn Roan, for their dish of Chicken & Rice, Entrée; and Anna Guidry, Elaina Kilpatrick, Alexis Manuel, Hannah Theriot, and Sydney Witherwax, for their creation of Dessert Sushi, in the Dessert category. If the descriptions of these amazing dishes pique your interest and tease your taste buds, then you won’t want to miss this year’s Taste-N-Tell. The doors will open to the public at 6:30 p.m., but chefs may begin their table set-up at 10 a.m. the morning of the competition. Chefs are asked to create bite-sized portions for approximately 300 guests. They are required to bring their dishes as close to being completely prepared as possible due to limited accommodations. Each chef will have two 8-foot skirted tables to

Top: Second grade OLQH students Grace Houssiere and John Reina give Chef John Folse advice on how to run a successful restaurant. Bottom: Chef Brock Brame with his winning team after his Jambalaya is given 1st place award. (L to R) Olivia Midkiff, Belle Brame, Lisa Jakel, Camille Cunningham.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24 - 6PM • 7PM • 8PM Sit back and enjoy the beautiful atmosphere of candlelight and soft music as you are treated to a hairstyle, a euphoric neck and shoulder massage, a therapeutic foot massage, and a soothing scalp and hand massage including a warm paraffin wax dip. Wine & Hors'douvres will be served. Availability is limited to eight people an hour so reserve your space today with a credit card or check... It's guaranteed to be an evening to remember! At only $60 a person, it's an offer too good to pass up! All proceeds benefit salon continuing education; allowing us to attend shows and bring back the latest in beauty trends!

109 W. LaGrange, Lake Charles Call to book an appointment. (337) 477-6868 Next Spa Night Dec. 19

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prepare and display their dishes. Our Lady Queen of Heaven School will provide the plates, bowls, napkins, toothpicks, forks and spoons for serving. SPONSORSHIP AND SUPPORT The event will be held at 6:30 p.m. Mon., Dec. 12, at the Our Lady Queen of Heaven School, Family Life Center Gym, 3939 Monsignor DeBlanc Place in Lake Charles. The cost of attending is $40 per person in advance, and $50 at the door. Due to the size of the venue, only 350 tickets will be available for the competition,

so make sure to get your tickets soon! For the past two years, according to Jakel, the events sold out prior to the day and there were no tickets available at the door. Guests also have the option of sponsoring the event. The Banner Sponsorship program offers the following options: • $2,500 “Caviar Sponsor” – Includes 10 tickets, a reserved table, and the sponsor’s name on the event banner. • $1,000 “Rockefeller Sponsor” – Includes eight tickets and the sponsor’s name on the event banner.

• $500 “Bienville Sponsor” – Includes four tickets and the sponsor’s name on the event banner. • $250 “Remoulade Sponsor” – Includes two tickets and the sponsor’s name on the event banner. For inclusion in the banner, sponsorships are due by Dec. 1. All sponsorships are tax deductible. At Taste-N-Tell, you can see celebrity Chef John Folse in action, sample tasty cuisine and enjoy some wonderful fellowship, all while supporting an outstanding local school. Where else can you do all of that and get to be a judge? Don’t miss this fun

opportunity! Get your tickets today. Call OLQH School (477-7349)for more information or email ljakel@olqhs.org or djackson@olqhs.org. Lisa Addison has been a writer for more than 30 years. She writes for local, regional and national publications.

TJN

PLEASE COME JOIN US FOR THIS RED CARPET EVENT!

Thursday, November 3, 2011 at 7:00 pm Old Historic Muller Building 625 Ryan Street, Lake Charles, LA TICKETS Tickets are $25.00 and all proceeds will benefit The Imperial Calcasieu Museum. You may purchase them through The Perfect Fit Boutique (337-433-5855) or The Imperial Calcasieu Museum (337-439-3797). Please sign and present your ticket at the door for a chance to win fabulous prizes provided by the designers and other local businesses!

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OCTOBER 20, 2011

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Harvest time is here, and local festivals and fun abound. One of the most unique festivals around is the Scarecrow Festival, held at the Shangri La Gardens in Orange, Texas. Michael Hoke, Shangri La director, was looking for a mission-related community-wide event for the fall. “Since the nearest scarecrow festival is more than 150 miles away, and we could make it earth-friendly by having scarecrow sponsors use recycled materials for construction, it seemed a perfect match,” he said. “Scarecrows reflect various ‘green’ philosophies ranging from composting to zoology.”  Immediately, Shangri La staff got behind the idea and have run with it ever since. “Shangri La’s administrative staff, along with the education department, does all of the planning,” he added. This is the festival’s third year, although the first year was canceled due to Hurricane Ike. Approximately 100 organizations, schools, churches, businesses, and families adopt a site in Shangri La to build a scarecrow.  “Since many have multiple scarecrows at their site, we usually have more than 200 scarecrows,” Hoke said. Each visitor to Shangri La receives a ballot

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when they enter. The ballots are counted at the end of the event to choose first, second and third place in each category. Shangri La staff can also select up to four winners to receive the Director’s Award. The event runs from Oct. 18 through Nov. 12, and has become a tradition that attracts very creative people from throughout the region “You literally never know what the wonderful, creative people of Orange will produce,” said Hoke.  “This year, we are all looking forward to an annual favorite from the Orange Fire Department. Last year, they had a Scarecrow Fireman, helping an old lady get a cat from a tree.” In the past, several families produced scarecrows that reflect their families. “We are looking forward to seeing what they come up with this year,” he said. “To really get an idea of how wonderful this event is, you have to see the results.” Last year, almost 12,000 people came to Shangri La to see the scarecrows. Make sure you’re one of them! Located at 2111 West Park Avenue in Orange, Texas, Shangri La is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sundays, noon - 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.shangrilagardens.org.

TJN

OCTOBER 20, 2011

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Sponsored by

ker n Shouma By Brando

The Perfectly Positive Performance Pyramid As some of you are aware, there is a show on television entitled “Dance Moms.” I’ve seen, I mean, I’ve really paid attention, to a total of about 10 min-

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utes of this show and I have come to the conclusion that it is one step to the better of the child-abuse festival that is “Toddlers & Tiaras.” It’s a short step. The “plot” of this “reality” show follows a famous dance instructor, Abby Lee Miller, as she berates, manipulates and cajoles a group of children (and their horrible, backstabbing parents) into elite dancers. One of her many techniques for humiliating her students is a photo pyramid with the “best” dancer on top and the “worst” dancers on the bottom. According to Skinner, it’s both positive reinforcement and positive punishment.

Well, we here at The Sports Report don’t like to punish young people. But the pyramid did give me a great idea on how to evaluate some of the high school football season’s top performers thus far. So, without further ado, I give you The Sports Report’s Perfectly Positive Performance Pyramid (performers listed in no particular permutation). Kennon Fontenot, QB, Barbe – All summer long, the rumor was that Barbe’s offense would be one of the best in the state. The Bucs had Division I prospect Tre’ Goodly returning to play running back and freshman all-state wide receiver Trey Quinn also coming back. All the Bucs

needed to do was find a quarterback to give them the ball. And, boy did they ever. Fontenot has been a revelation as Barbe’s signal-caller this season, passing for, as of this writing, 1,400 yards and 13 touchdowns. Those numbers are impressive enough but, if you look at the list of the state’s best passers, you’ll see that Fontenot’s 94 attempts are far and away the fewest among the group. No quarterback in the top 20 has been efficient at racking up passing yards as Fontenot. Only G.W. Carver’s Joey Louis comes close with 1,212 yards on 113 attempts. And, of the top 20, only Fontenot and Ralph average more than 20 yards per completion; Fontenot leads the group with

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an average of just under 24 yards per completion. And, yes, Fontenot was helped out by his 500-yard torching of St. Thomas More on Sept. 30, but this was not some fluky night against an overmatched opponent. STM is a top contender for the Class 5A state title this year and Fontenot also torched another highly regarded team, Acadiana, for 391 yards the following week. To put it in perspective Fontenot has thrown for just 158 fewer yards than the entirety of… Jeff Davis Parish (Jennings, Lake Arthur, Welsh, Elton), though it’s been quite a season so far for the quartet of football-playing schools in Jeff Davis. Through six weeks, the four schools are a combined 19-5. Jennings has lost only two games, one against resurgent rival Eunice and another by state powerhouse Notre Dame by a combined total of just seven points. Meanwhile, three of the Bulldogs’ four other wins have come against opponents in Class 4A. Welsh is also sitting at 4-2 and had a huge intra-parish showdown with Lake Arthur on Oct. 14 with the winner maintaining a shot at the district title while the loser left in no better than third place in a tough district. Elton is unbeaten and looks like a potential state title contender in Class 1A. Lake Arthur (4-2), as mentioned, had a clutch showdown with Welsh to keep their district title hopes alive and claims the area’s best rusher Trent Hargrave. Speaking of Trent Hargrave… Lake Arthur’s offensive line… he hasn’t been the area’s best running back, yardage-wise, by himself. He’s had lots of help. The Tigers’ offensive line has provided Hargrave with the running room necessary for him to rack up 987 yards and 15 touchdowns on 160 carries. Typically, in Class 2A, offensive linemen are considered “good-sized” at around 225 pounds, so a coach would feel pretty lucky to get a 250-pound kid on the offensive line. Lake Arthur has three such behemoths in guard Aaron Hebert (265), tackle Bryce Zaunbrecher (250) and center Trevor Whitlow (275). Linemen of that size are usually found in larger classes like Class 3A, where in… District 4-3A – A little redistricting magic made over 4-3A from one of the weakest districts in Class 3A to probably among the top two strongest. As of week six, four teams sit with just two losses overall. Crowley (3-2), which features LSU commitment Devante Bourque, and Westlake (4-2) with Devin Eaglin in the backfield sit atop the standings with Notre Dame

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(3-3) after each winning their district openers. Iowa (4-2) fell to Crowley but still has time to either catch the leader or play spoiler to someone’s title hopes. South Beauregard (3-3), a newcomer to 3A, has been competitive but looks to be the odd team out against a slew of tough district opponents. Notre Dame is usually the bully in this group, but the Pios are having a down year and the time’s right for another team to take control and possibly make as much noise as… The Elton Indians – seem likely to make in Class 1A. The Indians are

6-0 for the first time in a long time and with Micah Lavan and Austin Bertrand running the offense; it doesn’t look like many teams have a chance to stop them. All but one of Elton’s wins so far has come against 2A opponents and the Indians scored 43 and 54 points against East Beauregard and Mamou respectively. The key win in Elton’s season, however, was the Indians’ season-opening 12-7 win over Kinder. Beating a team as good as Kinder on the road seems to have set the tone for the entire season. Look for the Indians to make

some noise come playoff time. So, there you have it. And while The Sports Report’s Perfectly Positive Performance Pyramid doesn’t place its performers in a particular position on the pyramid (they really are all winners, see), I invite all of you out there, should you so desire, to make your own suggestions as to who deserves to be on top and who should serve as the base. I won’t do it, though. I don’t want to be anything like that “Dance Moms” Abby Lee lady. She gives me the creeps. TJN

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

Something for Everyone in Books for Pre-Teens Books for “tweens” or pre-teens, ages 9 to 12, are more and more popular — and the age recommendation is just a guideline; some 8-year-olds will love these books as much as I did, and I haven’t been 12 since … well, it was a while ago. Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick is unusual and unique. It has two separate story lines — one told in words and one in pictures — that take place 50 years apart, yet end up being related. The illustrations, all in black pencil, fill more than half the book and often advance the story without any text at all.

In 1977 in Gunflint Lake, Minn., young Ben is grieving the loss of his mother. The boy, who has been deaf in one ear since birth, is now having nightmares that wolves are chasing him. One night, he investigates a curious light and finds clues to family secrets that lead him to New York City. The alternate story line, told almost completely in pictures, begins in 1927 in Hoboken, N.J., where young Rose Kincaid obsesses over a movie star and adores the images of skyscrapers across the river in Manhattan. One day, she slips out the window and

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crosses the river to watch a silent movie in the city. As she finds out that the movie theater is installing sound equipment, we discover that she is deaf. Through a series of events, Ben ends up in the back rooms of a museum, checking out cubbyholes and drawers of stored wonders and making magical discoveries. Of course, the two story lines eventually merge, and the result is delightful. Selznick’s previous work was the Caldecott Medal winner The Invention of Hugo Cabret. For kids who love dinosaurs, this is the perfect book: Dinosaurs: A Visual Encyclopedia from DK Publishing. It has more than 300 pages in full color — and I do mean COLOR! There are beautiful illustrations on every page — lots of them. Rather than one running commentary, most pages are made up of mini facts and information boxes with appropriate art. The brief text discusses science, from the first life on Earth, including plants and

flowers, to modern humans. Besides all the animals described, topics include how a fossil was formed, what killed the dinosaurs, different eras of our changing planet, how animatronic dinosaurs are built, the ice age, cave paintings, and myths and legends. Sometimes, the book will show an ancient creature and compare it with a living relative; for example, the giant millipede of 350 million years ago was “as big as a crocodile,” but today’s millipedes are considerably smaller. (Whew!) The text is user-friendly and can even make you smile: “While modern animals may well be fascinating, those of the past were often bigger, stronger, or much, much weirder.” The weird ones can be truly ugly and even scary, with bizarre helmet heads or horns or spikes and shapes that leave one awed by the spectacles of nature but often ready to laugh: A megatooth shark would have been 67 feet long, and it weighed “as much as 30 elephants,” with a “bite five times more powerful than that of a Tyrannosaurus.” Kentrosaurus was a Volume 3 • Issue 15


16-½ feet long plant-eater with a brain “the size of a walnut.” And Euoplocephalus “was the dinosaur equivalent of a Batmobile.” This fascinating book is really hard to put down. Dear America: With the Might of Angels — The Diary of Dawnie Rae Johnson by Andrea Davis Pinkney is the latest entry in the Dear America historical fiction series. It’s 1954, and the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that it is illegal to have separate schools for whites and blacks. In Hadley, Va., Dawnie Rae Johnson, age 12, attends the rundown school for

black children, but dreams of going to Prettyman, the nicely maintained allwhite school in her hometown. “That’s how it is. Negroes get a stinky school with broken clocks. White kids get a castle,” she writes in her diary. After she scores high on a special school test, she is selected to be the first black student to go to Prettyman. But it isn’t easy for Dawnie — some of the townspeople are against the decision to send her to the white school. And she isn’t the only one in her family to have to put up with the racist bullying. The book also discusses the history and primary figures of the Civil Rights era. Bullying has probably always been with us, but it seems to have gotten all out of proportion in recent years, leading children and teens to withdrawal, violence, and even suicide. According to Dear Bully: 70 Authors Tell Their Stories edited by Megan Kelley Hall and Carrie Jones, “a child commits suicide as a direct result of being bullied once every half hour.” Horrifying. These authors are hoping to curtail that. Bullying may take physical form or may include emotional blackmail, mind games, or cyberspace intimidation, but it turns the school into a “battlefield.” Teachers and administrators often do nothing, parents are in

denial, and other kids usually don’t step in to help because they don’t want to become victims themselves. The book includes essays from authors who were bullied and a few who did the bullying themselves. They offer advice for children who find themselves the victims of this psychological warfare. Their general advice: It will get better when you’re an adult and can pick the people around you, so hang in there. The book also shares resources for teens and resources for teachers and parents. I think it would be especially

powerful if parents would read and discuss it with their children. Adult language. Every once in a while I like to buy a comic book, to sort of revisit my childhood. But when I got xoxo, Betty and Veronica In Each Other’s Shoes, I discovered the Archie Comics characters I loved, without one illustration in the whole book! It’s a comic book story in the form of a novella. Here are the Archie characters we’re familiar with: Betty is a reporter for the school newspaper, and when the position of editor opens up, she wants the job. Meanwhile, Veronica wants to be in charge of the charity fashion show. Both positions — editor and fashion show coordinator — are put to a school-wide vote, and our favorite gals win. But through comic shenanigans, they end up with the wrong assignments. At first they help each other, then they start fighting because they think the other’s interests are boring. But they find good points in each other’s ideas and opinions and learn respect for them. This is part of a series, with two other books available. It’s good, clean fun. Copyright © 2011 by Mary Louise Ruehr. TJN

Phone: 337-474-1864 Email: info@lwv-lc.org Website: www.lwv-lc.org

Election October 22 For Sample Ballot go to WWW.SOS.LA.GOV

For Candidate Information go to WWW.LWVLOUISIANA.COM Click on Voter Services Volume 3 • Issue 15

OCTOBER 20, 2011

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Brought to you by Melanie Perry, Agent 108A Executive Drive, Moss Bluff, LA 70611 BUS: 337-855-7768 www.melanieperry.net State Farm, Bloomington, IL

HAPPY HALLOWEEN! - WORD SEARCH Black Cat

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Vampire Werewolf Witches Brew Help the witch find her grumpy black cat. Draw the path to the cat starting at 1 and counting by 1s up to 100.

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r m ende's Museu l l E an en By D e Childr of th r o t c Dire

Real Steel (Dreamworks, 2011) My childhood was fulfilled when my parents got me a set of Rock-emSock-em Robots for Christmas. I think I was 18. (Definitely a late adopter.) So you can imagine how eager I was to see Real Steel, a Hugh Jackman fatherson movie about fighting robots. So much has changed since my 18th Christmas. Now, robots have shadowing programs and remote controls, and so on. But they still look the same, with metallic, vaguely human bodies made of plastic and steel. Oh, I forgot, this is just a movie. In this big-budget picture, Hugh Jackman plays Charlie Kenton, a

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vagabond traveling robot remote control fighter. The movie is set somewhere in time after 2016, but you’d hardly know it from the reflective opening scenes. Here’s Charlie in his truck, visiting carnivals and other back road venues, putting his current robot up against whoever wants to fight for money. In the midst of a losing fight, along comes the news that his son’s mother has died. Charlie hasn’t seen the son, Max, since forever. Now Max is 11 and about to be adopted by his aunt. In a shady deal with Max’s uncle, Charlie agrees to babysit the boy for 50 thou while Aunt and Uncle take a quick trip to Europe. His plan is to ditch Max with an old girlfriend while he hits the road again with a new used robot. Do you notice something here? There’s an overabundance of human plot structure in which the technology is sort of assumed. In this near future, robots are as ubiquitous (everyday) as iPhones. Sure, they’re

too expensive to use as anything but moneymakers, but no one gives a sophisticated fighting robot a second glance, unless they’re a fan of the World Robot Wrestling league. It turns out that little Max is a huge fan of robot wrestling, and insists on accompanying Charlie on the road. The rest of the movie plays out as you would expect. Along the way, there are some very interesting and well-played characters, including Charlie’s old flame Bailey (Evangeline Lilly), who runs a gym. In fact, her father taught Charlie everything he knows about boxing. The interaction between Bailey and Charlie, at least in the beginning of the movie, is engaging and well played. In my opinion, the first half of the movie is the best, when we’re being set up for the fighting action that follows. The second half is very long on theatrics and close-ups of Charlie, Bailey and Max as their robot fights its way to a national robot championship. Oh, the action is great, but Max, played by Dakota Goyo, reminds me way too much of little Anakin Skywalker and Ricky “Champ” Schroeder com-

bined. If you’re into cute, you’ll get plenty of it in Real Steel. At the same time, the movie rocks on its own level. Having watched some of the robot revolution play out in Japan (where robot teams routinely play soccer with each other) I was pleased to see the yeah-so-can-yourrobot-fight attitude that everyone had about the machines in Real Steel. And parents be warned, there’s a lot of fighting in PG-13 Real Steel, not all of it robot versus robot. Charlie gets the crap beaten out of him by one villain he owes money to, while Max is forced to watch. This is definitely a testosterone kind of family movie, and small children should probably skip it. But thankfully, it’s all set in the future. Moms shouldn’t have to worry about their kids wanting to run off and fight robots for a living. A least not this year. TJN

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FASHION FUSION RUNWAY SHOW It was an evening of glitz, glam and wine for the ladies! This sold-out event hosted a crowd of fashion divas who mixed and mingled over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. Some lucky ladies won some fabulous door prizes prior to the start of the Fashion Fusion Runway Show held in the Evergreen Room at Graywood Plantation. Lake Area women strutted down the runway modeling the latest clothing, accessories, hair and makeup from SWLA merchants, Mimosa Boutique, TeCi’s Ladies Apparel, Stella Dot Jewelry, Salon Lindsay and more to benefit the Calcasieu Parish Women’s Shelter. Raise your glass to a spectacular show!

Rheagan Sutton and Sarah Rainwater

Amber Comeaux and Megan Domingue

Chris Khoury and Jana Stine

Lynette Clark, Mallory Padgett and Keri Forbes McCorquodale

Kristen Rosalis and Amy Springer

Terri, Amy and Allison Louviere and Lauren Louviere Monroe

Alice Brassette Dingler and Laurie Cunningham

Annie Poirier and Marie Mai LeBlanc

Waverlye Bayard and Millie Barnett

FRENCH WINE TASTING EXPERIENCE Here’s a toast to Thomas Jefferson, the first American to explore the Bordeaux region of France and bring back enough wine to stock America’s first great wine cellar! And here’s another toast to the many Acadians who gathered in the Contraband Room of the Lake Charles Civic Center to enjoy the of pairing fine Bordeaux wines with little nibbles of this and that from La Truffe Sauvage to perfectly compliment the nuances of the French wines. Cheers to Rouge et Blanc and The CVB for this Grand Acadian Awaking!

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Nathaniel Allured, Jared Woodhouse and Jared Tate

Bernice and Bobby LaLande

Anne and Eddie Robichaud with Denise Theriaut

GREAT ACADIAN AWAKENING Crowds gathered at the Lake Charles Civic Center to celebrate the culture, customs, traditions, and history of the Acadians. The Louisiane-Acadie, Inc., recognized in Louisiana, Canada and France as the united voice of Louisiana’s Acadian and Cajun population hosted this “Great Awakening” of activities including French classes and dancing by the Cajun French Music Association. Everyone enjoyed Cajun artists, vendors, and specialties from local restaurants, boudin wars, and so much more! A big thumbs up to promoting and maintaining our rich heritage! Peggy Matt and Ray Trahan

Misti King and Lindley Franks

Narisse Darbeau, Maggie McBride and Sarah Edwards

Emma Pousson, Eloise Boullion and Johanna Jessen

Marvin and Tina Brooks

Chelsea Feucht and Jacob Witt

Chelsenea Brooks and I’leayana Thomas

Jo and Glen Daigle

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OCTOBER 20, 2011

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SAM HOUSTON HS HOMECOMING It was time for the Sam Houston High School’s Class of 2002 to break out the purple and gold in celebration of a fabulous fun homecoming week. In addition to the dance at the Brick House, the golf tournament, family fun day, pre-game tea and more, the class was invited to ride on a float during the traditional Big Sam homecoming parade--a real crowd pleaser for the high-spirited spectators. The traditional homecoming football game is always packed with excitement: there are performances from the band, dancers, cheerleaders and the crowning of the homecoming queen! The after-game bonfire homecoming dance on Saturday wrapped up this fun-filled week for the Broncos. Let’s here it for the Purple and Gold spirit! TJN Alli Aguillard and Lauren Reeves

Kourtney Ainsworth, Sierra Settles and Angelana Gulla

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OCTOBER 20, 2011

Ashley Taylor, Bianca Orsot and Jen Dantley

Hannah Smith and Mary Beth Glass

Ann Marie Snead, Peyton O’Quinn and Taylor Doga

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MOVIES UNDER THE STARS FALL SERIES This fall, friends and families of all ages will be treated to another great line-up of current and timeless feature films. • Oct. 21 – The Music Man – River City will never be the same when a con man strolls into town convincing its people that they need a community band. This time-honored, Oscar winning musical will be celebrating its 50th anniversary next year! • Oct. 28 – The Muppet Movie – With a brand new Muppet film coming to theatres this November, we’re bringing back the original. There will be new, exciting preshow activities at each event beginning at 6 p.m. with each film starting at dusk. Prien Lake Park is located at 3700 West Prien Lake Road in Lake Charles and admission is free. Bring your own lawn chairs, blankets and food. Snacks can also be purchased on-site. For more information, call 721-3500. SHANGRI LA FALL SATURDAY ADVENTURE SERIES Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center announces upcoming programs for the Saturday Adventure Series this fall. The programs begin at 9:30 a.m. and last about an hour. Participants will meet at the admissions window at the scheduled event time. All programs offered in the series are free of charge, but an RSVP is required as space is limited. Call (409) 6709799 to reserve a spot today. • Oct. 22 – Vegetable Canning 101 – During this hands-on adult program, learn the methodology of water bath canning. Visitors will also learn about cold packing, hot packing, pickling and raw packing. • Oct. 29 – Atakapas, Pirates & Trappers – Come discover the hidden history of Adams Bayou dur-

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ing this adults-only program. Get a firsthand look at how this waterway has changed through time and those in attendance will learn tales of the interesting people who used the bayou in the past. • Nov. 5 – Harvesting Rain Water – Learn how water barrels provide a free source of chemical-free water that is ideal for watering gardens and lawns. During this hands-on adult session, make and take home a rain barrel. A materials fee of $25 will be required to reserve a spot. Located at 2111 West Park Avenue in Orange, Texas, Shangri La is open to the public Tues. – Sat., 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. and Sun., noon-5 p.m. For more information, visit shangrilagardens.org. CULTURE FEST OCT. 21-22 The first Culture Fest Louisiana will celebrate the diversity of SWLA with food, music, fashion, art, and performances that span across the many cultures and ethnicities found in our region. Held at the Lake Charles Civic Center, it will include a variety of events for all ages and backgrounds, including a cultural display area, an international village for children, a world café, and a wide schedule of live entertainment. Beginning at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, enjoy Native American flute music by Peter Villegas, Celtic songs, and the Grammy-nominated Cajun band the Lost Bayou Ramblers. Also presented will be an extensive tasting of wines and beers from across the world. Saturday will include an exciting variety of music, dancing, art, and cuisine from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. For more information, go to www.CultureFestLouisiana.com. TREY KILLIAN MEMORIAL 5K OCT. 22 Sat., Oct. 22, is National Make A Difference Day, and it’s also the Trey Killian Memorial 5k. This run/walk will be held at Sulphur’s Heritage Pavilion. Registration begins at 7 a.m. and the run/walk starts at 8 a.m. Online registration is available at www.active.com (search for Trey Killian 5K), or you can find the link on Facebook.com as well. Paper registration is also available; call 853-9442 for more information. There will be other events that day: The Sulphur Police Department will be hosting a drinking and driving/ texting and driving awareness program, complete with a drunk goggles golf cart driving course. There will be giveaways and lots of information available, along with a bake sale. Trey was killed in an alcohol-related accident in the early morning hours of Sept. 26, 2010 when the vehicle he was a passenger in flipped several times, resulting in his death. A scholarship fund in Trey’s name has been opened at MidSouth Bank in Sulphur, and all net proceeds from this event will benefit this fund. YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN AT LUTCHER THEATER OCT. 24 The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein is headed for the Lutcher Theater stage, Mon., Oct. 24, for one performance only at 7:30

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p.m. Tickets range from $40-$70 and may be purchased at www.lutcher.org or call the Lutcher box office at (409) 886-5535. The Lutcher Theater for the Performing Arts is located at 707 Main, Orange, Texas. CLEAN OUT FREEZER AND PANTRY DAY OCT. 30 Take aim and help feed the hungry! The local Sportsmen for the Hungry organization, in affiliation with Hunters for the Hungry, will host a food collection drive on Sun., Oct. 30, from 1-4 p.m. in the Gordon’s Drug Store parking lot, located at 2716 Lake Street. A convenient drive-thru service will be provided. All food collected will be directly donated to Abraham’s Tent, a local non-profit organization whose mission is to provide food for the poor and hungry in Lake Charles every day of the year. Needed food items include: wrapped and labeled frozen meats (wild game and domestic), canned or boxed foods, rice, cooking oil, seasonings, vegetables and paper goods. For more information, please contact Sally Foret at (337) 433-7090 or George Paret at (337) 477-6773.

New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein

‘THE ART OF FASHION DESIGN II’ NOV. 3 The Perfect Fit Boutique and Imperial Calcasieu Museum present “The Art of Fashion Design II” on Thurs., Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. at the Old Historic Muller Building on 625 Ryan Street in Downtown Lake Charles, featuring designer Lourdes Chavez’s Spring 2012 Collection and Starfire Jewelry Designs. Personal appearances by Lourdes Chavez & Charlie Wharton of Starfire Designs. Hors d’oeuvres and wine will be served. Tickets are $25, and all pro-

ceeds will benefit The Imperial Calcasieu Museum. You may purchase them through The Perfect Fit Boutique (337) 433-5855 or The Imperial Calcasieu Museum (337) 439-3797. ‘A NIGHT OF DERBY SILKS’ NOV. 3 The Stables at Le Bocage is the setting for “A Night of Derby Silks,” which will be held on Thurs., Nov. 3 at 6:30 p.m. The event will benefit Habitat for Humanity and includes cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, an equestrian event and silent auction. Tickets are $100 per person; cocktail attire required. For more information, call 497-0129, ext. 22. JITTERBUG & GRUB NOV 4 The Missionaries of LaSalette will kick off their Third Annual Missionaries of LaSalette 2011 fundraising efforts for missions and vocation with Jitterbug & Grub! Dinner, dancing and fun festivities featuring Barry Badon and the Bayou Boys Band, a delicious jambalaya dinner and an exciting silent auction. It will be held at the Knights of Columbus Hall at St. Theresa’s Catholic Church in Carlyss from 6-11 p.m. Cost is $20 per person. Advance tickets are available at St. Theresa’s Church office or by calling Janet Gautreaux at 583-4837 or Angie Clark at 583-4010.

Computer Repair/ Sales • Network Management Home and Business Security Camera • Professionally Installed Gerrit Lawrence

1306 A Sampson St., Westlake • (337) 721-1969

photo by www.monsoursphotography.com PAGE 42

OCTOBER 20, 2011

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RUN FOR THE SON NOV. 5 Take part in this year’s 5k Challenge or 1 Mile Fun Run on Nov. 5 to benefit the LaSalette missionaries. Registration will be accepted on race day beginning at 6:30 a.m., but pre-registration is encouraged to guarantee Run for the Son T-shirts. Participants may register online at www. imathlete.com. All ages are welcome to participate. Pre-registration cost for adults is $20 and $25 on race day. For children under 12, pre-registration is $14 and $20 on race day. Cash prizes will be awarded in both events. The race will begin and end at Our Lady of Prompt Succor in Sulphur. Donations for both events are needed. Please consider helping to make this event a success with a monetary contribution, silent auction items, or volunteer to help or plan to attend. For details or to make a donation, contact AunJelle LaFleur at 842-5879 or Angie Clark at 583-4010.

Monday - Saturday, 7am - 3pm FREE Wi-Fi!

BREAKFAST – SOUPS SALADS – SANDWICHES 127 W. College Steet (337) 474-2200 www.CHEZCAFFE.com

LC VETERANS DAY ACTIVITIES NOV. 5 The Mayor’s Armed Forces Commission and the City of Lake Charles will host the City’s annual Veterans Day observance activities beginning with the Veterans Day service at Veterans Memorial Park on Sat., Nov. 5 at 10 a.m. The annual Veterans Day parade will follow the service at 11 a.m. The parade will roll on Pine St. heading east, south on Ryan St., west on Broad St., and north on Lakeshore Dr., concluding at the corner of Lakeshore and Pine. Business organizations or individuals interested in participating in the parade must fill out a parade application no later than Fri., Nov. 4 and return the application to: Office of the Mayor, City Hall, P.O. Box 900, Lake Charles, LA 70602; or fax the application to 491-1206 (no fee for entry in the parade). Entry forms can be picked up from the brochure rack on the first floor at City Hall, or call 491-1201. IONIC LODGE #26 MASONIC GOLF CLASSIC NOV. 12 Ionic Lodge #26’s Masonic Golf Classic will be held on Nov. 12 at the National Golf Course of Louisiana, 2801 Louisiana Way in Westlake. Shotgun start begins at 9 a.m.; participants need to be onsite at 8 a.m. Oct. 31 is the last day to register. Two-man scramble is $220 per team. Participants will receive a golf shirt and a Golfers’ gift bag. Prizes will be given to the four golfers closest to hole, the longest drive of the day and there will be other prizes as well. Hole Sponsorship is $100 and includes: Hole sign at tournament with company name and logo; full page ad in Masters’ Ball souvenir book with company name and logo; and a platinum sponsorship award to be presented to sponsoring company. For a registration form or more information, contact Bradley Stevens at (337) 764-8031, Shawn Papillion at (337) 304-2922, or Reggie Moore at (337) 526-1647. ICM’S UPSCALE ATTIC SALE NOV. 17-20 It’s time once again for the Imperial Calcasieu Museum’s Upscale Attic Sale! On Thurs, Nov. 17 at 7 p.m., there will be a private preview party for museum sponsors and benefactors. Fri., Nov. 18, 9-11:30 a.m. will be the “Preferred Shopping Hours” for museum members only. Doors will open to the general public at noon. The sale will continue through the weekend from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Sat. and noon-3 p.m. Sunday. Use this opportunity to take advantage of these one-of-a-kind, gently used antiques! The ICM is located at 204 West Sallier St. in Lake Charles. SWLA HEART WALK NOV. 19 More than 1,500 Southwest Louisiana residents are expected to take steps to improve their heart health on Sat., Nov. 19 when they participate in the American Heart Association’s Start! Heart Walk on the McNeese State University campus—Quad.  The annual event, which raises funds to fight heart disease and stroke, America’s No. 1 and No. 3 killers, begins at 8 a.m. The non-competitive, three-mile walk includes teams of employees from local companies, along with friends and family members of all ages. A one mile route is also available for survivors who choose this shorter distance. For more information, call the SWLA American Heart Association at (800) 257-6941, ext 6174 or visit swlaheartwalk.org. TJN

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OCTOBER 20, 2011

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To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19 • Louisiana Crossroads Accordion Blowout @ Central School, 7 p.m. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20 • Felton LeJeune & The Cajun Cowboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Zydecane @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • The Stark Experiment @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • Kirk Holder/Chris LeBlanc @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Brad Brinkley @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Geno Delafosse & French Rockin’ Boogie @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Now or Never/Seven Ways Gone @ Nate’s Place, 8 p.m. • Password @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Lucy In Disquise @ Luna Live, 9 p.m. • Side Street Jazz Band @ Cigar Club, 9 p.m. • City Heat @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m.

• The Kadillacs @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22 • Paul Gonsoulin @ The Porch, 10 a.m. • Scotty Pousson & The Pointe aux Loups Playboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • 40oz to Freedom @ Luna Live, 8 p.m. • David Locklear @ Micci’s Lounge, 8 p.m. • Ronnie Collins & Robert LeBlanc @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Foret Tradition @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Misanthropic Inoculation @ Twiggy’s, 8 p.m. • Password @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Judd Bares & Six String Rodeo @ CitiLimits, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Soul Vacation @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • The Kadillacs @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Judd Bares @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27 • Pete Bergeron @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m.

• Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • T-Broussard & The Zydeco Steppers @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 8 p.m. • The Chris LeBlanc Band @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28 • Coushatta Pow Wow @ The Pavilion, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 4 p.m. • Lesa Cormier & The Sundown Playboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Odyssey @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Justin James @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Soul Vacation @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Horace Trahan @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • Kevin Fowler @ Texas Longhorn Club, Vinton, 8 p.m. • LA Express @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Bernie Alan @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • Paul Gonsoulin @ My Place Bar, 9 p.m. • Vince Vance & The Valiants @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • The Chris LeBlanc Band @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29 • Coushatta Pow Wow @ The Pavilion, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 10 a.m. • TBA@ Luna Halloween Pub Crawl @ Downtown Lake Charles, 6 p.m.

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• Joe Simon & Louisiana Cajun @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Odyssey @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Goo Goo Dolls @ L’Auberge Event Center, L’Auberge du Lac Casino, 7:30 p.m. • Louisiana FIYA @ Yesterday’s, 8 p.m. • T.D. McMurry @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Justin Moore @ Texas Longhorn Club, Vinton, 8 p.m. • LA Express @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Bernie Alan @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • Vince Vance & The Valiants @ Caribbean Cove, Isle of Capri Casino, Westlake, 9 p.m. • Fright Night @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30 • Coushatta Pow Wow @ The Pavilion, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 10 a.m.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3 • Don Fontenot et Les Cajuns de la Prairie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Cam Pyle @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4 • Howard Noel & Cajun Boogie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • We Are Catcoons @ St. Nicholas Benefit, Stellar Beans, 7 p.m. • Karma @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Prime Time @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Beer for Breakfast @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. TJN

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m.

For nineteen years, Habitat for Humanity: Calcasieu Area has literally been providing the keys to successful homeownership for more than 69 Southwest Louisiana families, families who could not qualify to own a home through any other program because of their limited income. Volume 3 • Issue 15

OCTOBER 20, 2011

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Bu ow mu ing Hebre bi Brian Z nd in his “ that a have c w l y d l a t e h n t open iting Rab is text, a us theme udy Th closed, as e Some Po hich I cou unusu f flying in ast a doze forgotten ok t o Vis le a st ut w and ligio ut th years ed later at absence, I’d ted time ge d Go Sm op,” witho ree or four y abo ure on a re t less than hip l ’s g t n e i n L v ’ s “ h ec t mo , bu relations I follow ve months e, so I wa e report, a The H ther t ”–al rmon t nkedg b i r of “At appily ano Torah e than a se ted on the a way tha ic, pu luesy t over f hat would late bagga poor, ove e h g r d c r g n e e e i t e a liv is mo – he refl and God oice, risin as an en and b als . likely set, filing ation on th w cades show was nged rock ock origin s on n sv e , i p i e r s s d u t s u H s m e g / . u s o i n o r d r t f ti son hear Thei country-t ash Rip R with cover en w g my nt. betwe ver before ead this les und. ventin d ticket age t of ng D ong iter s out se illy featuri ertoire, al er, songwr vis. d it ad ne ing as he r ll as profo pur prayer e h t o worke p o b f d e e s ip ll ot rocka 25-year r o bandlea aire Bill Da still nds though I h rforming f and fa usical as w the Yom K this year, a a B t a ( z t f m e Pe do Jaz , al from occurred extraordin chair leg itself e sounds o peace, bu for forgiv I MSU ich is why Shearman the tail-en loy a t s e i e o h h . r s g d t t h a d i e t o T it ke w te as ou Wh cNeese’s d all but So ap ll me sins and as lly comfor unes ide gu himself t lide when h ost of . i l f s s e d s s M d s y n i n o a a d m a s er t alw ited our ecia over t heatre, I m SU jazz b d and Big e t plied ntorte ) as a r pray as esp c He co d to chair ot glass he fused abou we re found I w the familia adition in Arts T ert by the Md Little Ban k Sheng, th s e n ? h h s o c h c I c a r e t g e c s, c att Chur ith th really a con the talente nd to Patri f jazz studi ose nes it to missin dox Jewish song, red w But I was . Football? ity o e h n o o a o b m t n u , h w r d o t s s , o a r r m e t . e e t i e e u c g m nc the O ophon aling” he co memb w dire d ised, b the tim ited audie people? The Band plished ne essor of sax e lively an itely from h I was ra in which t need of he ngrer m i i l e ut on uss h e o t c ” h f b , o n i e n t i m e i o c h h f o “ r r o m c t s w g acc sistant p e ti e de e we n disc in thi ebeira ho are provin s nts ar Wher t I had a fin re I got to erary fan i “Mish or those w ned to sing and a is already hose stude if their pro eir t e i u l h B f e the other atio, w ef set prays e only lear e deeply. tenur ing, and w sical path, easure of th aloud ity to ch’s p yle with an ring a bri ’s e ’v r t m I i o h u c t d P s e a m n e e m r l h u u r h t ng ock ref efu dd y Do , touc ion to In comm exciti s a us Rodd n songs an Dash Rip R h, fan gation s our tradit e want the his prayer. mp o on an hat night i e b g r e e t u o t It i betw And as f s, bu se w ard b sh co ing t fully ly eno gram work. of tho when sing eform Jewi bbie k. a dieh ster classic g funni ounded joy ir a s , g e e r p n e i i b m s e h r a i a e s d n cou min man r, the ider R it to b e of b s azz m ser, D usic p I adm te for the j e the rang t to hear eep in year the w g’s compo e of 30-plu di- show ugh the m s and guita ng the k e t n s o s o a s r o ta to s  I g ’s alth ass, drum e, includi urried, this la y lost the s er the cou ttings for tr with a reat it was al voices. att Harris ste c b v t e n from performan at, felt unh don’t muni an, who o mporary s e offered e how g ompositio (sax) on Mhanie LaCo n e e f l lly g o v m e p a h n t d i c o e w at h con t, ho anc k, and I rea rick Frie l h r e t a t o band y Bill Ishe nd by Step tian (sax) ll f s b o r r r m e t i w e y c o a a a c a h s s P h a b r t r i b c A d t a d is t solos ast Dive,” illiam Chr Lizard.”  ova- ye al Jewish p n], joy an iration” to n ost lai vis or bass up a swea m e l L i o p n a n c [ e s e W i o i o s t i a t n t d t s i d o a S e D a . n h i k “ Th d s m e t a e s r r r an fo lly “ Th p et) nthu p erbeliev n even wo vy numbe “trans ith, healing y – especia ated a new (trum Mantooth’s d earned e nd faculty a o t a e i f r n a n c Johns several he e Melancon k d mu an . and m c Fran eser ved a e student McNeese eir i g o – s n c y n t e u i e K n r h d e s e, but er l du Jewis moveme ar Jewish m t always b three All McNee e; check th News for th umm wed a littl ll four r D o m l r n u l Refo of vernac mit, has e glo kes a iritua tions. nces are fre ambalaya s ay hav mming ta J re t ad mporary sp major key a m s n e u e m h g r u m T o r f I d te and This, tea. Conte h is sung in since f websi les. c o i h p u w u my c much of sched , music

d n e k e e W e n es l r O a h eC k a L In

PAGE 46

OCTOBER 20, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 15


limbs, and uses some big muscle groups to boot, that wouldn’t be surprising no matter how many beats per minute he was putting out. For years, I had confused Dash Rip Rock with North Carolina-rockers Rod Dash and Rick Rock, so I missed most of the band’s early efforts at inventing country punk and generally making a musical nuisance of themselves around the Southland. But maybe it’s better to have seen them this way, in the pres-

ence of a few of the curious and the fans, as a mature, witty, smartassed trio in command of their instruments, making musical reference to just about every major song and major star of the last decades, proving they’re now at the height of their powers. As the set wound down, or rather, up, to its boffo ending, just hearing “Stairway to Heaven” sung to the tune of “Freebird” about made my year. Rock on, dudes. TJN

Killin’ Time Crossword

Crossword puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com (www.bestcrosswords.com). Used with permission. Volume 3 • Issue 15

OCTOBER 20, 2011

PAGE 47


The Jambalaya News - Vol. 3 No. 15  

November 20, 2011 OLQH's Fourth Annual Taste-N-Tell: Savoring the Cuisine of Louisiana

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