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VOL. 3, NO. 10 / AUGUST 11, 2011

Shoes for Water Lake Area Women in Business

Arts & Crabs Fest Back to School? Go Green!


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AUGUST 11, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 10


GENERAL 715 Kirby St., Lake Charles, LA 70601 Phone: 337-436-7800 Fax: 337-990-0262 www.thejambalayanews.com PUBLISHER Phil de Albuquerque

contents

lauren@thejambalayanews.com

CONTRIBUTORS Lisa Addison Leslie Berman George Cline James Doyle Dan Ellender Maria Alcantara Faul Erica McCreedy Mike McHugh Mary Louise Ruehr Brandon Shoumaker Karla Tullos ADVERTISING

August 11, 2011 • Volume 3 • Issue 10

COVER STORY 33

publisher@thejambalayanews.com

NEWS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Lauren de Albuquerque

On Cover: Healthy Woman Advisory Council. Photo by www.monsoursphotography.com.

An Inside Look at WCH’s Healthy Woman Program

REGULARS 7 10 11 12 15 19 38 51

The Boiling Pot The Dang Yankee Doyle’s Place Tips from Tip Speakeasy A Greener World Sports Report Adoption Corner

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FEATURES 5 18 22 23 26

Shoes for Water BBBS Alumni Breakfast Ideas for Students Lake Area Women in Business Workplace Stress

sales@thejambalayanews.com

SALES ASSOCIATES Katy Corbello Faye Drake Lindy George Karla Tullos GRAPHICS ART/PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Darrell Buck

ENTERTAINMENT 40 42 43 45 48 52 54 55

Red Hot Books Funbolaya Family Night at the Movies Society Spice Jambalaya Jam Local Jam Eclectic Company Killin’ Time Crossword

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ART/PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Michelle LaVoie BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER Kay Andrews

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Legal Disclaimer The views expressed by The Jambalaya News columnists are their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Jambalaya News, its editors or staff. The Jambalaya News is solely owned, published by The Jambalaya News, LLC, 715 Kirby Street, Lake Charles Louisiana 70601. Phone (337) 436-7800. Whilst every effort was made to ensure the information in this magazine was correct at the time of going to press, the publishers cannot accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, nor can they accept responsibility of the standing of advertisers nor by the editorial contributions. The Jambalaya News cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations, even if they are sent to us accompanied by a selfaddressed envelope. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher. Copyright 2011 The Jambalaya News all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without prior written permission is prohibited. Volume 3 • Issue 10

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We are now accepting credit cards! AUGUST 11, 2011

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A Note From Phil When Life Was a Beach It was the spring of 1985. I had just made a fresh pot of coffee to discuss our daily plan with my friend and business partner Rick Cusolito. Our days always started with laughter as we reminisced about our adventure the previous year with Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus. “Hey Chico! (Even to this day, Rick calls me by my clown name.) Do you remember the time…?” “Yup! That was unbelievable!” I’d reply. And we’d laugh and laugh. “Hey Dude, do you think life can get better than this?” I’d ask him. “I doubt it,” he would say. Then came the phone call. Nineteen eighty four was a year I’ll never forget. At 23, I was awarded a contract to travel with The Greatest Show On Earth. I had just graduated from Michigan State with an engineering degree and was awarded the opportunity to go to Ringling’s Clown College and represent the state of Michigan. After graduation, they offered me a contract to travel with them, and I just couldn’t pass it up. This is where I met Rick, who was from Boston. We had so much fun together that year that we decided to go to Boston after the tour ended and go into business together. His family had started a coffee business and needed help, so Rick and I agreed to try to make a go of it. So we planned, delivered, laughed and drank lots of coffee. Then the phone rang, which would change the direction of my life once again. I heard a familiar voice. “Hey Phil! This is Ron from Ringling Brothers! How would you like to get back into show business?” Not this soon, I said to myself. But then came the kicker: “How would you like to live on the beach this summer? I need a couple of clowns to help with a show at Rocky Point Park in Rhode Island, and I thought of you.” Living on a beach? Wow! That sure sounded like another adventure to me! Rocky Point Amusement Park first opened in 1840—can you imagine that? Almost 150 years later, it was still going strong. I was excited to become a part of it. Two months later, my clown trunk was packed and I moved into a trailer on Narragansett Bay with my clown college colleague, Robb Preskins. It was in a corner of the park next to the pool and concession stand. It wasn’t much, but we didn’t need much. And it was a mansion compared to the train car I lived on the previous year. Ron flew in and choreographed our show along with his business partner, Jerry. We auditioned local people to become clowns for a summer, and four PAGE 4

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were chosen. Next, we picked up wood, paint, and supplies and started creating the props. Soon, we were ready for the show. Robb and I would start our day by making coffee and watching the sun come up over the water; then we’d take a stroll on the beach. We would take turns making bacon and eggs on the little stove and eat outside on the patio we created. We even had an old console TV out there—with rabbit ears, of course! The seagulls were our only neighbors, and would circle us, looking for their breakfast.

three shows and they’re fantastic!” We never knew how many people we’d have for each show, but all the shows were great. We had a magic act, a juggling act, a strong man act, and whatever else we thought folks would like. Audience participation was always fun, as we’d get kids and adults up on stage to try and defeat the “Strong Man.” In between shows, we’d walk around and shake hands with the kids. Once in a while, we’d play one of the park games, and everyone came around to watch, as we always made a big scene!

and the chowder was “Manhattan Style,” which meant it was made with a tomato base instead of the betterknown cream base. It was still delicious. We would get at least a dozen clam cakes, and always reach in the bag and grab one to munch on before getting to the picnic table. There, we took the time to dip the cake in the chowder, which made it taste even better. You could count on the seagulls circling overhead begging, and people would throw bits of the cakes high in the air and watch them swoop down and catch one, flying away delighted. As evening approached, Robb and I would grab a cold beer and sit on the ledge just outside our trailer. The pier was nearby and we’d watch people walk out to the end and back. The laughter and cheers from the park seemed to create a moment all its own. We could hear the roar of the roller coaster, the splash as the log ride hit the water, the bumper cars hitting each other and the music from the Zipper. When the park closed down and the lights went out, the moon and stars seemed to come alive. Before they locked up, a security guard would drive by on his motorcycle and we’d give him the thumbs up – letting him know everything was OK. It was another good day at Rocky Point Park. Two content clowns sitting on lawn chairs, laughing and talking about the day, wondering what the next one would bring. “Gonzo, do you think life can get better than this?” “I doubt it, Chico.” I take a sip of beer and fall asleep under the stars. That was the summer of ‘85 – when life was a beach.

TJN

At 9 a.m., the school buses would start to arrive. Robb and I would put on our tennis shoes and jog around the park, waving to all the kids. Next, we’d grab our make-up kits and costumes and walk to our dressing room trailer behind the stage. On the way, we’d look up at the kids as they hopped on the Sky Tram, which carried people across the park from a bird’s eye view. The train would pass behind the stage just as we were getting there, and the person running it would always blow the whistle for us and have everyone wave. “Don’t forget to see the amazing clown show today, everyone!” he’d say. “They perform

One of the guys running the games actually joined our clown show. After our last performance at 6 p.m., we’d take our make-up off in the trailer and change back into our regular clothes. As we walked through the park, it was funny to see the same people we’d had fun with earlier just walk right by us. They had no idea who we were. Before we got home, we always stopped by what was called “The Largest Shore Dining Hall In The World!” There, we would order Rocky Point’s famous clam cakes and chowder. The clam cakes were like big, deep-fried hush puppies with clams,

– Phil de Albuquerque Volume 3 • Issue 10


OLQH Girls Scouts with Becky Girola.

By Maria Alcantara Faul

Water is vital to our survival. People have survived without food for weeks, but to go without water for even just one day will put you in desperate straits. For those of us living in progressive countries, access to clean drinking water is something we take for granted. Every community has systems that treat water to make it safe for us to drink. But this is not true for the rest of the world. It’s sadly surprising to learn that over 1 billion people lack access to adequate and safe drinking water. According to the World Health Organization, over 3 million people die each year from waterborne diseases. EDGE Outreach’s “Shoes for Water Program” aims to address this need. In 1995, EDGE Outreach, then Mega Ministries, was formed as a non-profit organization with the purpose of networking, training and supporting adult youth workers volunteering and working in local churches. The group hosted youth worker seminars and organized mission trips for young people to develop leadership skills and do a variety of humanitarian and ministry projects. “The group addressed whatever was needed in the community during their visits,” said Becky Girola, a longtime volunteer. They brought food

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and clothing, held bible camps, fixed homes, etc. during a typical mission trip. In 2001, EDGE traveled to Kenya and the team installed a water purification system. EDGE’s leadership quickly realized the enormous potential of providing safe drinking water, and sought to include water purification as part of its work in developing countries. Since then, EDGE has expanded its work to include training, equipping and mobilizing people to make a difference. Topics include water purification, water filtration, community health education, and hand pump repair training to empower the people to fix the most commonly found hand pumps in developing countries. To meet their goals, EDGE team members installed the systems in the various communities, then trained residents to use the system and maintain it. “EDGE believes in giving communities a hand up, not a hand out,” Girola said. The cost of labor and training is mostly covered by volunteers, but a purifying system costs $1,000. “This is where Shoes for Water helps,” Girola said. When people donate their used shoes, this creates clean drinking water for those in need.

How? Well, every year, millions of shoes are thrown away, clogging landfills and wasting good useful material. A typical person owns 10-17 pairs of shoes at a time. They are generally replaced every year or so, and the old ones usually get thrown away. “Shoes for Water collects the old shoes, then sells them to companies who either re-sell them, or grind them to be recycled into new products, such as playground equipment or gym flooring,” Girola said. She recently conducted a local drive to collect used shoes. “We collected over 5,000 pairs last fall,” she said proudly. One of the participating groups was Our Lady Queen of Heaven School’s Girl Scout Troop #2147. “It was really fun,” said Girl Scout Elizabeth Broussard. “And it was really stinky!” added fellow scout Lauren Reyes. The girls placed collection boxes throughout OLQH school and the church. Wearing gloves, they sifted through several hundreds of pairs of shoes generously donated by students and parishioners, collecting over 1,000 pairs. “It really made us

feel good to help other people that are less fortunate,” the girls said. Girola hopes to hold another shoe drive soon, with a goal of collecting a total of 22,000 pairs of shoes. “Twenty two thousand pairs of shoes bring in $17,000, which means 17 water purifying systems for communities in need,“ she explained. So, if you have old shoes just sitting around, give those “soles a purpose.” Contact Becky Girola at beckygirola@gmail.com; and see how you can help provide clean drinking water to a community in need. TJN

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The Jam Welcomes Lindy George to its Staff

Certified dietary manager and registered dietition Skilled nursing and rehabilitation services Physical, occupational and speech therapists Rehab gym with recumbent trainer Free housekeeping and laundry services • In-house salon Full time social worker • On-site cinema and chapel

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Lindy George was born and raised in Lake Charles. She comes from a big Lebanese family and owes everything to her parents, whom she would do anything for. After high school, she went to work for Dr. Pat Crawford as his orthodontic assistant, where she remained for 30 years. “During those years, I not only learned a lot about dentistry, but I learned a lot about life, and I cherish the friendships I made,” she says. Lindy has also been an Image Consultant with BeautiControl for almost 20 years. She is a life-long member of The Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, and has one son, Chris. He and his wife Sara have blessed her with three beautiful grandchildren, Gabbie, Emily and Zachary, that are the joys of her life. Her real passion is her furry friends. “I love all animals! They are God’s lil’ creatures, and I can’t live without them!” she says. What she enjoys the most out of life is helping others, and only sees the good in people. TJN

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The

Boiling

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Please submit press releases to lauren@thejambalayanews.com

THREE HONORED AT PATRIOTS BALL At the recent Mayor’s Armed Forces Commission Patriots Ball, Mayor Randy Roach and Mayor’s Armed Forces Commission President LCDR H. James Dodd, USNSCC, recognized three patriots with the 2011-2012 Patriot Award. The three honorees were: Col. John J. Halloran, Jr., USA, (Ret.); Elson “Boone” Lopez (awarded posthumously); and Nicholas Hunter. The Patriot Award is presented each year in honor of three individuals who exemplify patriotism. The mission of the City of Lake Charles Mayor’s Armed Forces Commission is to act as a liaison group to promote goodwill and understanding between the City of Lake Charles and the Armed Forces, both active and reserve.

Seated left to right: Secretary Sondra Hodge, MSU President Dr. Philip Williams, and Association President Pansy Skipper. Standing: Richard H. Reid, left and Bob Davidson of MSU.

SCHOLARSHIP ESTABLISHED FOR DISABLED STUDENTS AT MSU The Calcasieu-Cameron Association for Persons with Orthopedic Disabilities has established a $240,000 endowed scholarship, the CalcasieuCameron Students with Orthopedic Disabilities, with the McNeese State University Foundation. JOSH QUAYHAGEN WINS KARATE TITLES Former McNeese state football player and Lake Charles resident Josh Quayhagen won the individual Black Belt middle weight Kumite World Championship and Black Belt World Team Kumite Champion along with teammates Kris Lee of Baton Rouge and Jeff Crothers of California. Quayhagen was undefeated in all of his matches. The awards were received at The United States Karate Alliance World Championships in Dallas. Quayhagen is owner and head instructor at Performance Evolution of Lake Volume 3 • Issue 10

Charles, and has won eight Kumite World Championships. For more information, call (337) 304-8227. Videos of the fights can be viewed on Performance Evolution’s Facebook page. NEW GOLF PRO AT CONTRABAND BAYOU GOLF CLUB L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort recently named Kurt Picard as its new Golf Pro at Contraband Bayou Golf Club. The Lafayette native has over 18 years experience as a golf professional. Prior to joining L’Auberge, he worked for Games People Play, Inc. in Beaumont, where he served as Director of Instruction and Head Golf Pro. Kurt has been a member of the PGA since 1996. He is a certified club fitter for Titleist, Ping and Mizuno and is certified by the USGA in Rules of Golf. In 2006 and 2008, he was named to the PGA President’s Council on Growing the Game and has served on several PGA Section committees during his golf career.

Kurt Picard

MSU STUDENTS/GRADS FINALISTS IN PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST Two McNeese State University visual arts students, as well as three recent McNeese graduates, have had their photography published in the Photographer’s Forum “Best of College Photography 2011.” They were all selected as finalists in the 31st Annual Student Photography Contest, sponsored by Nikon, USA. Over 3,500 students participated in the contest. Students selected are Brittany Chretien, Lake Charles, and Emily Cutrer Stevens, Sulphur; alumni are Ashley Feagin, Megan Marcantel and Kip Tête. Winners, honorable mentions and finalists, along with their images, can be viewed online at http://pfmagazine.com/wp-content/plugins/pgallery/index.php   ONXLEY ATTENDS LEADERSHIP SUMMIT Kerry A. Onxley, artistic director of The Children’s Theatre Company and director of theatre at Westlake High School recently attended the 2011 Theatre Leadership Summit in St. Louis, MO. The annual summit, coordinated by the Educational Theatre Association, benefits national theatre leaders who make a difference through arts and cultural Kerry Onxley activities. The summit offers training in advocacy, student leadership, producing student festivals and marketing. For 27 seasons, Onxley has directed productions of such classics as You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown, Aladdin, Macbeth, and Frankenstein. Onxley has served as a leadership coach for The Educational Theatre Association and as state director for the Louisiana Thespians Association for 12 years. AUGUST 11, 2011

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WCCH ANNOUNCES RECENT SAFETY AWARD WINNERS West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital recently named Jennifer Zipprian, radiology office clerk, and Karen Lambert, director of marketing, as recipients of its new Safety Award. The award, which honors employees for their promotion of safety and safety awareness in and around the hospital, is distributed to those employees that demonstrate extraordinary awareness and action in minimizing potential safety risks.

Families Action Network, a program of Family & Youth. The $2,000 donation represents a portion of the proceeds from Church of the Good Shepherd’s annual book sale, from which all proceeds are donated to community organizations. Books are already being accepted for next year’s book sale, and those interested in donating can call 433-5244.

ROAD DEDICATED TO FORMER POLICE JUROR DON MANUEL A ceremony was held in Moss Bluff recently to honor former Police Juror Don Manuel, officially renaming “Recreation Boulevard” to “Don Manuel Boulevard.” Manuel represented residents in District One of the Police Jury from 1984-1992 and 2000-2008. During his time in office, Manuel was known for playing an integral role in securing funding for the Community Center and Playground District #4 of Ward 1 for major improvements to facilities.

Sonny Watkins and Melissa Ellis Northcutt, director for university advancement operations. McNeese Photo

NEW ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP ESTABLISHED AT MSU The Sonny Watkins Athletic Scholarship was recently established with the McNeese State University Foundation with donations totaling $15,664.30 from friends and businesses in honor of Watkins, former athletics director, basketball coach and student-athlete in basketball at McNeese.

L’Auberge limousine driver Sylvia Ellis with Ariana and her family.

Peteronious and his family.

ROBERTSON NAMED SWLA BANKING CENTER PRESIDENT WITH BUSINESS FIRST Jude Melville, CEO of Business First Bank, today announced Greg Robertson as the new Southwest Louisiana banking center president. Robertson brings more than 15 years of business and private banking experience in the Lake Charles region to Business First. A graduate of the Graduate School of Banking at LSU and a native of DeQuincy, Robertson currently serves as chairman of the board of the West Calcasieu Community Center Authority and is past Greg Robertson president of the Rotary Club. The father of two children, he also coaches Dixie Youth Baseball and Little Dribblers. For more information on Business First Bank, visit www.b1bank.com. NAVARRES’ UNITED WAY GIVING TOTALS $90,000 Local business leader Billy Navarre and his wife Carrie have become members of United Way of Southwest Louisiana’s Alexis de Tocqueville Society for the ninth year, with a total personal contribution of $90,000. This is a national society that recognizes individuals or foundations whose generosity is motivated by the desire to improve the quality of life in their community. Members of this society have contributed $10,000 or more annually to the United Way campaign. As members for nine years, the Navarres are the longest running members of the Alexis de Tocqueville Society in Southwest Louisiana. TJN

L’AUBERGE HELPS MAKE A WISH CHILDREN L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort recently provided limousine transportation and L’Auberge gifts for Ariana, a 4-year old Make a Wish Child from Lake Charles; and Peteronious, a 17-year old Make a Wish recipient from Sulphur. The Southwest Louisiana Make a Wish Chapter sent both children and their families to Disney World. L’Auberge limo driver Sylvia Ellis helped them travel in style with VIP limo service to and from the airport. L’Auberge has been a proud and active supporter of Make a Wish since 2005, working with local volunteers to grant the wishes of area youth. GOOD SHEPHERD DONATES TO CIVIC ENGAGEMENT TRAINING INSTITUTE The Church of the Good Shepherd recently donated $2,000 to support the Civic Engagement Training Institute, a project of the Children & PAGE 8

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Billy Navarre with Kimberly Dixon and Denise Durel, president of United Way of Southwest Louisiana. Volume 3 • Issue 10


Rouge et Blanc and a Week of Wine-related Events An entire week of wine-related events has been organized around the sixth annual Rouge et Blanc premier wine and food tasting event. It will take place Oct. 15 in downtown Lake Charles on Ryan Street between the grounds of the 1911 Historic City Hall and the Calcasieu Parish Courthouse. Wine and food pairing dinners will be held around Lake Charles during the week leading up to the main event, and an upscale champagne brunch will take place the Sunday following Rouge et Blanc. Tickets are still available to all of the wine dinners, the wine classes the morning of Oct. 15 and the champagne brunch Oct. 16. Wine and food pairing dinners will take place at the home of Shively Lampson, The Harlequin, Graywood Plantation and La Truffe Sauvage. Information on making reservations is available at www.rougeetblanc.us. “Bubbles for Banners,” an upscale Sunday champagne brunch featuring live action stations will be hosted by L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort in the Grand Ballroom from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p. Oct. 16. Participants will sip champagne while enjoying tantalizing dishes, fun demonstrations and live music. A portion of the $50

ticket will support the McNeese Banners Cultural Series. Tickets will go on sale Aug. 19 at the L’Auberge Business Center and at www.ticketmaster.com. L’Auberge is also offering a limited number of hotel rooms at a special rate for this event. Participants must be 21 years of age. Rouge et Blanc has also partnered with the Southwest Louisiana Convention and Visitors Bureau to be a part of the Great Acadian Awakening Oct. 11. An entire day of French-themed activities and music will take place at the Lake Charles Civic Center, and Rouge et Blanc will present a special lecture and tasting of French wines at 5 p.m. The lecture, by Dr. Philippe Girard, is titled “Thomas Jefferson and the Wines of France.” Reservations can be made at www.rougeetblanc.us and tickets are $25 per person. Rouge et Blanc is presented by the Downtown Development Authority and the McNeese Foundation. All proceeds will benefit the McNeese Banners Cultural Series. All wines are provided by the Republic National Distributing Co. For more information, go to www.rougeetblanc.us or by calling the McNeese Banners Cultural Series at (337) 475-5123. TJN

15% Senior Discount All Doctors’ Prescriptions Accepted Experienced Professional Staff • Most Insurance Accepted

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AUGUST 11, 2011

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Dang Yankee The

By Mike McHugh

What’s In Congress’ Wallet? With the economy the way it is, we, like most Americans, have been tightening our belts. Now, since I’m already buying the cheapest brand of beer available, I can’t save any more money in that category. So, instead, we decided to cut back on our cable TV bill by going to a cheaper plan. That move didn’t work out too well, though, because the only channels available under the new plan were the shopping networks and CSPAN. So now, my spare bedroom is full of exercise equipment, and the

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kitchen is full of gadgets that I can’t figure out how to operate, although they made it look pretty easy on the infomercials. At least with the exercise equipment, we now have someplace to hang all those winter coats that we brought from Yankee Land. So, that is what led me to begin watching C-SPAN. It was either that or start to tackle that honey-do list that I’ve been ignoring so long that it still has items on it from our house in Maryland. For those of you who don’t know, because you have a real cable

plan and can watch decent entertainment like Swamp People, C-SPAN covers the proceedings of the United States Congress. Despite my first impression, watching C-SPAN has turned out to be a very educational experience. When I first tuned in, I thought I was viewing footage from a Saturday afternoon at Chuck-E-Cheese. However, as I watched, I began to realize that, behind all of the apparent mayhem, there really is a well-defined structure to our legislative process. Before I go further, let me apologize to my long-time readers who know that I don’t usually write about political matters. This is, after all, a serious column. Still, I feel that I should from time to time use this space as a service to educate the public. The recent debate over raising the Federal Government’s debt ceiling gives us a perfect example of how our Congress works. It turns out that the government has to borrow money to pay all of its bills every month. However, they do not qualify for a Capital One Venture Card, which is a shame because if they did they would rack up enough frequent flyer miles to totally run the Air Force without any taxpayer dollars. So, lacking that,

they issue bonds, which are eagerly snatched up by the Chinese with the profits they made shipping us products that contain enough toxic metals to make the toy department at WalMart qualify as a Superfund site. In an attempt to appear fiscally responsible, the Congress sets a cap on the amount of money that the government can borrow this way. In the past, whenever this cap was reached, the Congress simply voted to add a few zeroes to the number and be done with it so that they could go back and spend it on something that would improve the quality of life for their constituents--something like, say, a goat roping arena. This time, however we have a bunch of new congressmen who haven’t yet learned this protocol, and so instead, they raised a fuss and insisted, of all things, that they would only allow the government to borrow more money if it took steps to get its financial house in order. At least then they might finally qualify for a Capital One Venture Card and earn double points for that goat-roping arena. So, the debate in Congress turned to exactly how to tackle this issue. Some wanted to address it through “revenue enhancements,” which is a code word that congressmen use for “higher taxes.” These enhancements, they claimed, would only come from the “rich,” whom they define as anyone who could afford Budweiser over Lone Star. Although this would not have affected my personal tax bill, I was still concerned for all my friends who offer me beer from their ice chests out of pity. Others in Congress wanted to solve the problem totally with “spending cuts.” This approach also had disadvantages, in that it would require that that essential government services, such as FEMA, would have to be eliminated. This would mean that, after the next hurricane, no one would be there to turn away the truckload of boudin that was donated to feed the hungry evacuees because they were not an approved government vendor, and what’s more, the boudin exceeded the federal standard for trans-fats. In the end, the two sides successfully compromised and agreed to raise the debt ceiling, and so the Chinese will continue to get their interest payments and keep the WalMart shelves glowing. For that, Mister Speaker, can I buy you a Lone Star? TJN

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oyle By Jim D

cities. Maybe they’re out there, but I doubt they’d be interested in us if they were. Why would a race of beings intelligent enough to cross the universe be interested in talking to people who had the ideas, the equipment, and the desire in their hands and let it drift away? We just spent untold dollars as a people and scared the markets (and many folks’ retirement funds) out of nearly a trillion dollars; and in the process weakened the full faith and

credit of the United States for the first time in history so somebody could prove a political point and damage the re-election chances of the President. Since its inception, NASA has cost us $471 billion. I’d rather have had the moon, thanks very much. Keep your eyes on the skies, folks. Remember what we could have had. And you never know who might be lurking around the corner. See you guys on the flip. TJN

I’d Rather Have Had the Moon The last space shuttle has landed. I don’t know why, exactly, but I’m reminded of a phrase uttered by the producers of The Civil War when quoting a British writer, who said the American republic will be so shortlived that those who were around at its founding will still be breathing at its conclusion. The jury’s still out on our Republic, I’m afraid. But as a devoted fan of science fiction as a young reader, I never thought I’d live to see the beginning and the end of the American space program. Like many of you, I was around at the beginning. The first space shuttle was on exhibition at the New Orleans Worlds Fair in 1984, then did a fly-over on the back of a 747 jumbo jet past Lake Chuck on its way to Florida. Magnificent. People were calling all over town to get their neighbors to look to the sky. You’d have thought Superman was there. Superman, or at least his stand-in, wasn’t flying on his own. He was an astronaut, that halest and heartiest of Americans to whom all of us could look with pride. Astronauts were the kings and queens of the ball. When Hollywood reached for a lead character in Terms of Endearment worthy of the great Jack Nicholson, they made him an astronaut. He drove a Corvette, by the way, as did Tom Hanks as Jim Lovell in Apollo 13. Our town has had many encounters with NASA crews, most of which you’d never know about unless you work at Chennault, where NASA trainers have been doing touch and go’s for years. I first discovered this connection by chance when, on a flight from New York to Houston in 1985, I wound up sitting next to Dr. Volume 3 • Issue 10

Pinky Nelson. Making small talk, he said he had a PhD in astronomy. “What the heck can you do with that?” I asked, somewhat taken aback. “Well, I work for NASA.” Hmm. Ever a bright boy, I said, “So, are you an astronaut or what?” I’m sure that impressed him. He was one of the first two men to space walk without a tether and was on the last crew of the Challenger before it exploded on that winter day in 1986. Star Trek had long acquainted us with the fictional concept of people dying in space, or in space travel. But somehow we never believed it until that day. I’ll never forget the look on Ed Barnett’s face as he walked into my office and told me. If you want to see where our dreams took us all those years ago, rent a copy of 2001, A Space Odyssey. As a college freshman the year it came out, I believed there was absolutely no doubt we’d all travel to the moon that way, before the date set down in the movie if not before. Now, it’s been 39 years since man walked on the moon: Eugene Cernan. Apollo 17, launched December 7, 1972 The space program has given us, in addition to imagination and dreams, everything from forest management to improved scans for breast cancer. The computer revolution was fueled by dollars spent to take man to the stars. Those space legends are gone now, replaced by an ever-increasing number of space operas starring aliens who seek to devour our planet like locusts from stationary platforms in the sky above our largest AUGUST 11, 2011

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By George “Tip” Cline

WHERE’S THE PRIVATE ENTERPRISE WHEN WE NEED IT? Our formerly debt-free city is pushing hard for “Lakeside Lake Charles,” – a master plan that’s taking a huge chunk of our Civic Center environs and making a development out of the area. I had no problem with the Lakefront Promenade, other than the loss of parking and the narrowing of Bord du Lac Drive. We are also in the process of redoing the downtown streetscapes. Funny, I remember this being done in the past, and we had to pay to have it undone. It’s been said that if you don’t pay attention to history, you’re doomed to repeat it. Has anyone heard of private enterprise wanting to put out developmental money? Development occurs when private enterprise sees an opportunity for a profitable venture and values the risk involved as worthwhile. I offer for your consideration the recently announced Imperial Pointe development (75 acres) and nearby Oak Crossing (20 acres). Let’s hope that the old lakefront casino properties become an asset once again, and are redeveloped privately. SIGNS NEEDED If you drive eastbound on I-210, and exit at Lake Street, you see left lane signage indicating a mandatory left turn. The right lane does not indicate any left turn, but does allow for traffic to go straight ahead onto College Street, or to turn right onto southbound Lake Street. Since northbound Lake Street has provisions for three lanes of traffic, it would make sense that both lanes exiting I-210 should be able to turn left at that location. The Lake Street PAGE 12

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right northbound lane is used for turning onto eastbound Prien Lake Road. The left lane leads to the westbound I-210 entrance ramp or northbound on Lake Street, along with the adjacent lane. Using both exit lanes to turn left would facilitate the flow of traffic. I’ve been forced to sit through multiple red lights in the left exit lane if traffic is on the heavy side. It may be legal to make the left turn from the right lane, but there needs to be a sign indicating this. FEDERAL FIASCO I don’t know if you are as bewildered as I am considering the fiasco that is Washington, D.C. masquerading as our government. The misguided enthusiasm of throwing money at every possible program with virtually no sense of fiscal restraint has made our beloved country a laughing stock, well on its way to downfall and decay as many great civilizations before us. We have allowed our government to enter into programs that have no reason to exist other than to protect the interests of somebody making hay for themselves or some organization. Let’s face reality. We can no longer afford the follies of the past where we tried to be all things to all people. The concept of protecting everyone from the cradle to the grave has led our government to establish bureaucracies that have crippled our country, made us uncompetitive in the world market and driven money and business to foreign shores. Of course, there must be some basic protections, but the Constitution of the United States clearly states that “We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Volume 3 • Issue 10


Constitution for the United States of America.” There was no intention to control all the areas of our lives and become a nation ruled by special interests that work to the detriment of the precious freedoms so many have striven to maintain for our posterity. SUPERMARKET ROUNDUP This shopping survey was conducted on Aug. 3 at the following locations: Albertson’s-Country Club Road, Kroger-McNeese Street, Market

Basket-Nelson Road and WalmartNelson Road. The price indicated here is the posted price where the product was displayed for purchase. Owens Pork Sausage, 16-oz roll: Albertsons $3.99, Kroger $4.19, Market Basket $3, Walmart $3.38. Wheaties Cereal, 15.6 oz. box: Albertsons $4.49, Kroger $4.19, Market Basket $4.15, Walmart $3.64. Dark cherries, fresh per pound: Albertsons $2.29, Kroger $2.99,

Market Basket $3.99, Walmart $2.50. Casa Manana Salsa, 16-oz. jar: Albertsons $2.49, Kroger $3.49, Market Basket $3.99, Walmart n/a (32-oz. jar only). Again, we see no clear advantage, as all of our stores were competing for your business with differing prices. Watch the weekly circulars to be the most informed for the better deals, and take advantage when you can.

TJN

Annual Clearance/Moving

Sale!!! 20%-50% OFF STOREWIDE 727 Ryan Street Lake Charles, LA

Volume 3 • Issue 10

337.564.6708

Tues-Fri: 11-5 • Sat: 11-2

AUGUST 11, 2011

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Terrance Simien

Do you have a heart for promoting the arts or making a difference? Do you speak French or have Cajun heritage? Does your heart skip a beat when you hear “Boudin Wars?” If so, get involved in the Great Acadian Awakening event, Oct. 11, at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The Great Acadian Awakening is a multifaceted event featuring everything from

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boudin to art, genealogy to culinary arts and music, including Cajun music and the Zydeco Experience of Grammy winner Terrance Simien. “This event is something to be truly passionate about,” said Angie Manning-Istre, communications manager at the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau. “It’s a celebration of who we are in Southwest Louisiana. We are inviting local volunteers to get involved, from French speakers to greeters to Cajun families with history to display aspects of their heritage and genealogy. Familial displays could be anything from family trees or old photographs to actual artifacts or recipes that have been handed down for generations, possibly dating back to the deportation.” There will be activities from 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. at the Lake Charles Civic Center, with the opening ceremonies being held at 11 a.m. in the Exhibition Hall. The Boudin Wars kick off at 5 p.m., and everyone in the community is invited to taste boudin for free and vote for their favorite. “The Southwest Louisiana Boudin Trail is a huge hit for visitors and travel writers who enjoy authentic experiences. This is a chance for the stops along the boudin trail to battle it out in a friendly competition,” said Shelley Johnson, executive director of the bureau. Musical performances will feature the Acadian Cowboys, Lesa Cormier & the Sundown

Playboys, Chris Miller & Bayou Roots and Grammy winner Terrance Simien. There will be a French Wine Experience and food and art vendors. For those looking to learn French, there will be Cajun French lessons. Or, check out a Cultural Coffee Corner for people who would like to practice speaking French with other French speakers. Stephen White, celebrated authority on Acadian history, will be the guest historical speaker, complementing the displays and workshops by the Southwest Louisiana Genealogy and Historical Library. Earlier in the day, storyteller and musician Papillon will deliver a special performance, along with Terrance Simien’s famed Creole for Kids in the Rosa Hart Theatre. These performances start at noon and are completely free for the visiting public. Entry and access to the festivities and music at the Great Acadian Awakening are free. Tickets to the French Wine Experience are $25, including wine and hors d’oeuvres by La Truffe Sauvage. The Great Acadian Awakening is part of a four-city event, beginning in New Orleans, traveling to Houma, on to Lake Charles, and ending in Lafayette. Canadian tours will be following the event, and it will be a true exchange between the Acadian and Cajun cultures. For a complete schedule of events and information on participating, log onto www.visitlakecharles.org/GRA. To volunteer or participate, contact Angie Manning-Istre at aistre@visitlakecharles.org or call (337) 436-9588. TJN

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By Lauren de Albuquerque So here we are, folks. Back to the drawing board. Our much-needed lakefront development was voted down, and we’re back to square one: A big lake with nothing much on it, nothing to draw visitors in and bring revenue to the area. No lakefront restaurants or shops; no tourist attractions. I hear they had dinner cruises, years ago. And long before that, there was, I believe, a dance hall on the lake. But all that was a long time ago. No one even wants to deal with the old Harrah’s hotel; no developers have expressed any interest, so the City has asked Pinnacle to just tear it all down. They call New Orleans the Big Easy. I have a good name for the lakefront: the Big Empty. The Children’s Museum of Lake Charles needs your help. They’re experiencing the woes of many of the non-profits in the area: a decrease in funding and donations while their rent continues to skyrocket each year. They’ve never quite

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recovered from the devastating fire in 2009. The museum has been an important part of the community for many years, bringing fun and excitement to the children of SWLA. So many have celebrated their birthdays there and enjoyed the interactive exhibits. To lose such an asset would be a shame. What can you do to help? Go to www.swlakids.org for membership and birthday party information. The museum gladly accepts donations. And if you want to have a really good time and benefit the museum while you’re doing it, head to the Imagination Celebration at the Civic Center on Aug. 27: a night of celebrity karaoke, music from the Boomerang Experience, live and silent auctions and delicious food from area restaurants. This is the museum’s 9th annual fundraiser, and it will be a blast! For more information, call (337) 433-9420. Get your tickets today! A state website is starting this week that will allow diners to check the sanitary conditions at local restaurants. The Office of Public Health will be posting inspection reports that include critical and non-critical violations, along with corrective actions that have been taken or are pending. This certainly will keep restaurant owners on their toes. But it’s not only restaurants that will be targeted. Inspection records will also be posted for markets, bars, day-care and residential facilities, and seasonal businesses such as snowball stands. The reports should be posted a week after the inspec-

tions are conducted. So log on to www.eatsafe.la.gov and get the scoop! A big thank you to the Seniors of St. Michael’s and All Angels Parish (SOS) for inviting Phil and I to speak about The Jambalaya News at one of their recent gatherings at the church. Special thanks to Dawn Leger for organizing the evening, and to all of the fabulous cooks responsible for the wonderful meal that was provided. It was a pleasure meeting all of you— and your church is lovely! Ever been to a roller derby game? No? Well, it’s about time you checked out the action! The Gulf Coast Rollers Girls of the Women’s Flat Track Roller Derby will be back in town on Sat., Aug. 20 for their “Bad Moon Rising Mash Up Bout.” These matches are loads of fun. Doors open at 6 p.m., game begins at 7. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children under 10. Everyone must bring their own chair, and the

team will be accepting donations for Hobo Hotel for Cats. Last time, it was for the local Pit Bull rescue group. These ladies have a big heart. The event will be held at The Grindhouse, 932 Enterprise in Lake Charles, so come on down and cheer them on!

TJN

AUGUST 11, 2011

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By Erica McCreedy

The Southwest Louisiana lifestyle encompasses everything under the Gulf Coast sun. Our never-ending cycle of festivals - the largest collection in the state - has come to represent our perpetual desire to share our culture while further crafting our sense of identity. Arts & Crabs Fest, a recent addition by the Arts and Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana, is quickly proving to be a cultural force through its joint venture as both an arts festival and an educational campaign for our invaluable Louisiana seafood industry. The second annual Arts & Crabs Fest will make landfall on Sat., Aug. 20, from 4-8 p.m. at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The festival draws together the strongest elements of our Southwest Louisiana perspective to yield a unique and often needed unification of visual art, live music, and our culinary traditions. The day will offer festival goers live music, an extensive art walk, vendors, and a complete crab and beer tasting with local dishes and regional brews. Besides offering the typical playful festival atmosphere, Arts & Crabs Fest carries a steadfast attitude as it develops a

positive image of the Louisiana Gulf Coast. In concert with the Lake Charles/SWLA Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Arts Council initiated the festival in 2010 after the disastrous BP oil spill to increase visibility for our region’s enduring and widely exported crab industry and its relationship to culture. “Many people don’t realize how much our seafood is ingrained in our history,” said Matt Young, director of the Arts Council. “Food culture is central to our identity as Louisianans; the communal experience of crab and crawfish boils, the passing down of oral history over the dinner table, and the historical and economic importance of seafood make up who we are.” The epitome of Arts & Crabs Fest lies with the crab and beer tasting which encourages residents to buy local and showcases the culinary abilities of our restaurants and the qualities of Louisiana beers. From 5-7 p.m., guests will be able to sample ten crab dishes prepared by chefs from area restaurants. Rather than pair the dishes with a wine selection, the event takes a different approach and pairs an Abita beer with each dish to expose guests to the aromas

Grayson Capps and the Lost Cause Minstrels

Holly Beach by Sue Zimmermann PAGE 16

AUGUST 11, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 10


and flavors of Louisiana brews. Guests can vote for their favorite dish to win the People’s Choice Award.

LakeSide Gamblers

Crab dishes include: Crab Gazpacho—Cypress Grill Crab Étouffée—Big Daddy’s Sports Grill Crab Ceviche—Harlequin Crab-stuffed Jalapenos—Sha Sha’s Mini Crab Cakes—Lake Charles Country Club Crab Meat and Poblano Bisque—Coyote Blues Crab and Avocado Salad—Pujo St. Café Crab-stuffed Mushrooms—Cajun Café Crab in White Wine Tomato Sauce with Pasta—121 Bistro; Crab dish—Sabine Pass Crab Shack The day will also feature live music by the LakeSide Gamblers at 4 p.m. and Grayson Capps and the Lost Cause Minstrels at 6 p.m. In addition, there will be a gamut of local talent with a large interactive art walk on the third floor interior balcony. From photography and watercolor to mixed media and ceramics, the art walk will provide guests with a concentration of local art within the festival. At the end of the evening, the Arts Council’s culminating Gold Key Quest raffle drawing will take place, and ten ticketholders will win one of the fundraiser’s prizes, including a $10,000 cash prize.

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Arts & Crabs Fest is just one way that locals are taking the initiative to find creative ways to accelerate interest and activity in arts and culture. Arts funding is continually targeted, and this fiscal year is no different—the arts in Louisiana will absorb a 30 percent overall cut for 2012. “For each $1 that is invested in the arts in Louisiana, there is an immediate $6 return to the Louisiana Treasury,” Young said. “The arts industry acts as an economic engine, and generated dollars are redistributed back into our communities.” Festivals in particular promote local arts and culture while attracting tourist dollars, and tourism pulls in $335 million each year to Calcasieu Parish alone. “We want to embrace Southwest Louisiana and all it can and has offered culturally and economically,” he continued. “We want residents to have confidence in locally caught seafood, area businesses, and local art. Our aim in hosting this festival is simply to celebrate an identity that we all share.” Arts & Crabs Fest is sponsored by the Louisiana Seafood Promotions and Marketing Board, the Lake Charles/SWLA Convention and Visitors Bureau, KVHP/FOX 29/the CW, Abita Beer, Bolton Ford, Knight Media, Inc., Coca-Cola, L’Auberge du Lac Casino Resort, Sweet Lake Land & Oil, American Airlines, First Federal Bank of Louisiana, Isle of Capri Casino, Tobacco Free Living, The Jambalaya News, the City of Lake Charles, the American Press, and Union Pacific. Admission to the festival is a $25 wristband. A limited number will be sold, so the public is encouraged to purchase theirs before the event. Wristbands and $50 Gold Key Quest raffle drawing tickets are available online at www.artsandhumanitiesswla.org or at the Arts Council office located in Central School Arts & Humanities Center, Suite 202 in Lake Charles. Call (337) 439-2787 today to find out more information. TJN

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In 1989, Scott Gossett was a bright, studious seven-year-old who liked language and art. His interests were video games, movies and television, but what he really wanted was to learn how to play ball. Gossett, who lived with his mom and three sisters, didn’t have a male role model in his life. So his mother enrolled him, along with his sisters, in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program. Gossett was matched with his Big Brother Philip Schwartzenburg. “Being the only boy in the house, I remember being really excited to get a ‘Big Brother’ but I was pretty shy at that age,” Gossett said. “It took me awhile to open up to someone new, but I’m glad Philip stuck with it. “I don’t remember the details of our first meeting, but I do remember being extremely shy and riding in his old green truck in complete silence. Retrospectively, it must’ve been really awkward!” Gossett said. “He would ask me questions and I would give just one or

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two-word answers. He must have thought I was bored or uninterested, but I really just enjoyed having a male role model.” With his new Big Brother, Gossett learned to play ball and much more. The two enjoyed fishing, hunting, basketball, baseball and tennis. Gossett stated that Schwartzenburg has a huge family that he grew into by default. “They would always have large gatherings for the holidays and I loved those get-togethers,” he said. Gossett graduated from Sulphur High School in 2000 and went on to attend Tulane University in New Orleans where he received a Bachelor’s degree in French and Religious Studies in 2004. “It’s hard to say how my life has changed because almost as long as I can remember, Philip and his family have been a part of it,” he said. “I can say though, that because of this, he has had a major impact on who I am today. He was the best role model I could have and his family has always been there when I needed them.” Today, Gossett has just completed his first year of PhD studies in French. He is

currently a teaching assistant, which involves teaching upper-level French language courses at the University of Missouri. “The older I get, the more I appreciate his sacrifice, dedication and perseverance. Philip is devoted, selfless and probably the most genuine person I’ve ever known,” Gossett said. “He was more than just a stand-in for the father or brother I didn’t have. He really did become something of a family member. I think Big Brothers Big Sisters is a wonderful program with a noble goal and realistic, substantial results that positively influence the lives of everyone involved.” To his Big Brother Philip, Gossett says, “I can’t thank you enough.” For more information on how you can be a part of something big, call Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Louisiana, a United Way agency. In Lake Charles, 478-5437; DeRidder, 460-5437; Jennings, 824-4847. Think of the possibilities—what will you start? TJN

Volume 3 • Issue 10


A Greener

W

RLD

Green Tips for Back to School Although it’s only the middle of August and the temperature is at its highest, the children of Southwest Louisiana are heading back to school. What can you do to make this school year a greener one for Mother Earth? Electronics Today’s classroom is filled with more plug-in devices than ever before. From computers to cell phones, e-readers to calculators, and printers to photocopiers, your child will be familiar with a greater number of powered devices than you were as a child. Make sure you buy the most ecofriendly options possible. Here’s what you can do: To start, look for the ENERGY STAR label for energy efficiency on all electronics to ensure they consume the least amount of energy, especially when idle. To reduce toxicity of your electronics, try to find electronics that have one of two green certifications: EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) and/or RoHS (Restrictions on Hazardous Substances). Consider getting your child a small solar charger so the electronics can be powered renewably while on the go. Getting him a new computer? Consider a laptop over a desktop as these consume up to 50 percent less energy. The same goes for monitors: an old CRT monitor will consume 75 percent more energy than a new LCD screen.

Volume 3 • Issue 10

Does your child need a new printer or scanner? Keep an eye out for a device that conserves paper. Printers that can automatically double-side are ideal. If that’s not possible, at least look for one that has an easy step-by-step system for doing doublesided printing manually. Finally, don’t forget to donate or recycle any electronics that can no longer be used. The United Nations Environment Programme estimates that the world throws away 50 million metric tons of electronics every single year, much of which is laced with toxic chemicals and heavy metals. There are many charities in our area that accept used cell phones and computers. Never throw used electronics in the trash.

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Paper Although kids today are Internet whizzes, e-mailing homework is still not the norm. Paper is needed for taking notes and tests and writing papers. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t take steps to cut down paper consumption. It’s important to buy products with the highest percentage of postconsumer recycled content possible that is processed chlorine free (PCF), such as New Leaf Paper for printers, and Mead Recycled Notebooks for use in school. Use these products to their maximum efficiency by printing on both sides of the paper and filling notebooks from cover to cover before purchasing a new one. And it never hurts to ask teachers if your child can e-mail his homework. Creative shopping Get together with family, friends and neighbors to discuss some creative strategies for back to school shopping on a budget. Carpooling to stores offers green fuel

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efficiency. Even better, pool your money together and buy basic school supplies in bulk, which is always cheaper. Look over last year’s school items and see what can be exchanged among your circle of friends. For example, that hardly used lunchbox could be exchanged for a backpack that your neighbor’s child forgot about in the closet. Exchanging unneeded items for ones that are needed is always a great green practice. Be a mindful consumer It’s very tempting to run out and buy a bunch of back to school clothes and gear right away. Carefully consider purchases before you make them, and think about waiting a few weeks to see what items are truly needed. Before the end of September, retailers will put clothing and other items on sale to make room for all that Halloween stuff, which means sales and big savings for you! TJN

Local Delta Waterfowl Chapter Uses Funds Locally The Gulf Coast Chapter of Delta Waterfowl is pleased to announce that it has teamed up with the Calcasieu Area Council – Boy Scouts of America to build wood duck boxes that will be erected along the Calcasieu River. Nest-box programs such as this one have demonstrated that local wood duck populations can be increased through erection of properly constructed boxes. Delta Waterfowl has donated $2,000 for box materials and scouts from Troop 107 will construct

and erect boxes as part of an Eagle Scout Project sponsored by Our Lady Queen of Heaven Catholic Church. Delta Waterfowl also announces the grant of two $500 scholarships to two McNeese State University students seeking wildlife management diplomas. For information about Delta Waterfowl, call Bryan Leach at (337) 739-5774. For more information about Boy Scouts, contact Kevin McMurrian at (337) 436-3376. TJN

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“Beat The Heat Lecture Series” at Shangri La Shangri La Botanical Gardens and Nature Center recently announced programs for the “Beat The Heat Lecture Series.” Many of these lectures include experts sharing knowledge with the public on topics such as wildlife, gardening, art and more. Participants will meet at the Admissions Window at the scheduled event time, 7 p.m., with sessions lasting about an hour in the Discovery Theater. All programs offered in the series are free of charge, but an RSVP is required as space is limited. Call (409) 670-9799 for reservations. August 18, 7 p.m. Teeth! The Truth About Sharks and Alligator Gar Attendees will join award-winning outdoors journalist and columnist Chester Moore during this exclusive lecture as he discusses his passion for sharks and alligator garfish. Learn about bull sharks in area rivers, the truth about alleged alligator gar attacks and pick up a few fishing and conservation tips. This is a family-friendly program.

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August 25, 7 p.m. Going Solar Visitors will learn about reducing carbon footprints through a lecture given by Steve and Ledena Howard, who investigated the advantages of solar energy. They will share how they learned about leading a more energy sustainable life and modifying the home to be more earth-friendly. This lecture will include a practical analysis of the aspects of having solar cells installed and discussion of financial incentives to make solar power affordable. This program is for adults only. Located at 2111 West Park Avenue in Orange, Shangri La is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. and Sundays, noon – 5 p.m. For more information, visit shangrilagardens.org.

TJN

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Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. This means if you’re running late and you let your child grab a doughnut or a Pop Tart on her way out the door, you’re doing her a huge disservice. There’s no nutritional value, and after the sugar buzz wears off, she’ll be ready to fall asleep. She needs to stay alert and focused. You need to feed your children a nutritionally sound breakfast, com-

plete with a source of protein. Eggs, of course, are the perfect breakfast. If you know you’re going to have a busy morning, then cook some hard-boiled eggs the night before. Hot cereal, such as oatmeal or cream of wheat, is very satisfying and nutritious, especially on a cold day. Add dried fruit or nuts on top. Whole-grain toast, a bagel, or an English muffin with cheese is quick and easy. So is yogurt with fruit or nuts. You can also make smoothies with yogurt and

fruit. Add a little cinnamon and vanilla, and then pour it all in the blender. Here’s a tasty, nutritious snack for your kids to carry to school: Dump ¼ cup of nuts, ¼ cup of dried fruit, and ½ cup of whole-grain cereal into a Ziploc bag. They’ll love it. Carnation Instant Breakfast is another good choice. It’s been around a long time and for good reason: it’s full of antioxidants (as much as a cup of green tea), has twice the protein of an egg and twice as much calcium as a 6 oz. container of yogurt with fruit.

It tastes like chocolate milk, but it’s so much better. And remember, you don’t have to serve traditional breakfast food simply because it’s morning. There are lots of things you’re kids will love, including: • Fruit and cream cheese sandwich (use strawberries or other fresh fruit) • Breakfast taco (shredded cheese on a tortilla, folded in half and microwaved; top with salsa) • Country cottage cheese (apple butter mixed with cottage cheese) • Grilled cheese or peanut butter sandwich • Leftovers (why not?) Don’t make breakfast a hassle. With a little imagination, it could become your child’s favorite meal of the day.

TJN

SULPHUR

LAKE CHARLES

190 N. Cities Service Hwy. (337) 626-0925

3113 Ryan St, #1 (337) 491-0925 4435 Nelson Road (337) 477-5014

Code 00330, 00274, 00150 *Some restrictions apply. Call for details.

www.ASTtanning.com PAGE 22

AUGUST 11, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 10


By Lauren de Albuquerque

Let’s hear it for our local women business owners who continue to persevere in spite of shaky economic times. And I applaud the women on these pages who are brand-new entrepreneurs, unafraid to take a chance and follow their dreams. Because isn’t that what owning a business is all about? Following your dreams? Isn’t that what life is all about? Owning a business is a lot of hard work. Trust me, I know from firsthand experience. There have been times when I’ve asked myself, “Is this worth it?” The answer I always receive from my subconscious is a resounding YES. So I have to go with that. There’ve been many times I’ve been up all night at the computer when all I’ve wanted was to be in bed, sound asleep. My husband and I have made a lot of sacrifices for the business.

5925 Wright Rd. Lake Charles, LA 310-PART (7278)

Blazin’ Truck Parts & Accessories is owned by Sabrina McCoy and managed by her husband Scott, who has over 28 years of experience and expertise in the heavy-duty truck parts industry. “Our main focus is heavy-duty truck and trailer parts and chrome and stainless accessories,” Sabrina said. “Some of the brands we carry are Grand Rock exhaust, Baldwin and Caterpillar filters, Omega air conditioning parts, United Pacific chrome accessories, Road Works stainless accessories, and much more. We also carry parts for boat, utility, and cargo trailers.” She said they nurture their working relationships with an assortment of vendors because they are dedicated to providing the best products available Volume 3 • Issue 10

in the trucking industry. Come by and see what’s new! They now have Long Haul brand belts and hoses and CB antennas and accessories. In October, Blazin’ Truck Parts will be have their 3rd annual Blazin’ Fest with vendors on site displaying the newest products. There will also be a truck show displaying some big rigs, and you can also enjoy live music. This year, they are adding a Jambalaya Cook-off. Please call to register your team! It’s going to be good family fun. All of the proceeds are being donated to the Parkinson Association of The South. So visit the REAL heavy-duty truck parts specialist, conveniently located at Exit 36 off of I-10, with lots of big rig parking available. They look forward to serving your needs!

But I love what I do and wouldn’t want to change a thing. Following your dreams doesn’t always turn out as planned, but that makes them even more memorable. Nothing, really, turns out the way we plan it. There are lots of twists and turns along the way. The key is to persevere and keep going when times are tough. We have to believe in ourselves and what we’ve accomplished. There are very few things worse than regret, than thinking “What if…” years later. What will you regret tomorrow that you didn’t do today? So keep going! So to all of our women in business, continue to follow your dreams. And you may not realize it, but you could very well be inspiring someone to follow in your footsteps. And that is the biggest honor of all. TJN

1602 W. McNeese Lake Charles (337) 562-9400

Slender Solutions is a licensed provider of The Body Wrap by Victoria Morton, who started Suddenly Slender in Florida 32 years ago. Dixette Williams opened the Lake Charles Slender Solutions 13 years ago. A paralegal for 26 years, she was frustrated with her weight. “I had tried all the usual weight loss stuff, but nothing worked for me,” she said. Desperate, she went on the Internet, and found a Suddenly Slender franchise in Lafayette. She went, and the inches came off. In six months, she had quit her job, and opened Slender Solutions in Lake Charles. “People were skeptical at first,” Dixette said. “But when clients started seeing results, the concept caught on.” The rest is history, as they say. After starting her business in a small rented

building where there was room for only one wrap at a time, she was able to buy the spacious building on McNeese Street where her business is now. With three wrap techs on duty, three wraps can be done at the same time. Male clients are always wrapped separately; and couples that wrap together generally get their own time. We offer the detoxifyig Flat Tummy Mineral Wrap with a guarantee to look 10-30 inches slimmer. The process takes about one hour and you will feel clean, fresh, light and slimmer. In addition, there are a host of products in stock to enhance the results of the wraps. Other services offered at Slender Solutions include airbrush tanning, facial waxing, face taping and skin-conditioning masks. You’ll love glo minerals skinnurturing, talc-free make-up and skin care with UV protection and antioxidant benefits. Ask us about our makeovers! Call 562-9400 and start taking those inches off! www.slendersolutionsoflakecharles.com AUGUST 11, 2011

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Relocating to Lake Charles? Selling your house? Trying to find some good commercial space? Whatever your needs, Derenda Grubb is there to help. In the real estate business since 1998, she hit the ground running when she was awarded both the SWLA Rookie of the Year Award and the CENTURY 21-Bessette Realty, Inc. Rookie of the Year Award in 1998, and Southwest Louisiana REALTOR® of the Year in 2008. Since then, she’s become one of the most accomplished Realtors® in the state. Last fall, she was recognized for her years of excellence by being installed as the president of Louisiana Realtors®.

Need financial security? A home equity loan? Does your credit need to be restored? Come to Lake Charles Finance and Mortgage, and let the experts take care of you. Lesa Higginbotham has 27 years of experience in the business. “We offer personal services with experienced guidance,” she said. “We treat our customers like people. They’re our family— not just a number.” Lake Charles Finance and Mortgage specializes in personal loans, mortgages and help after bankruptcy. PAGE 24

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Grubb is proud of her profession and has worked diligently through the various real estate organizations. “Every citizen should understand they are using the service of a Realtor® whether they ever call one or not, “ she said. “We are there, protecting their property rights and watching out for them and their tax dollars every day. “ Her presidency has been very exciting and will become more so as the year progresses. “Fall is always an interesting and exciting time in Louisiana, but more so when you have an election year,” Grubb said. “I would like to take this opportunity to encourage every citizen, regardless of their political affiliation, to please get out there and vote!” Derenda Grubb (337) 310-215 (office), (337) 842-2696 (cell). www.derenda.com swlashowcase.com www.lakecharleshomes.com

“We’ve discovered the best path to take if you’re looking for a competitive mortgage and excellent service,” Lesa said. “And we help homeowners who have had a bankruptcy or other credit challenge get a home equity loan to find payment relief, restore their credit, and achieve financial security.” Lake Charles Finance and Mortgage, 2620 Common St. 310-CASH (2274)

717 N Eastern Ave. Crowley, LA 70526 (337) 783-2426 Fax (337) 783-2483

Fine Lines Cosmetic Laser Center opened in January 2000. A member of the American Society for Laser Medicine & Surgery, the center provides an experienced and caring staff to supervise and assist with the services you choose. According to owners Bronwen Darbonne, certified laser technician, and Dr. Stephen Cannon, lasers have become a high-tech weapon in the fight against aging skin. Fine Lines Cosmetic Laser Center has five Candela lasers that can be utilized, depending on the need of the patient. “We have invested in a variety of lasers, because each laser deals with different skin issues, and no one laser can do everything,” she said. Laser procedures are needed due to a breakdown in collagen, a fibrous protein in the skin’s connective tissue that causes wrinkling. Natural aging, sun damage, smoking, and other environmental factors break down the collagen layer, causing the skin’s once smooth surface to develop wrinkles. “After a laser treatment, more collagen is formed, giving a more youthful appearance in the skin,” Bronwen said. The skin’s texture is changed and the skin is tighter. A free consultation is given for patients to get an idea of what to expect, as well as giving the clinical staff the opportunity

to determine if the client is a good candidate for the treatment, and if their expectations can be met. “Once that is determined, we discuss a customized treatment plan with a full explanation of the actual procedure and potential outcome,” Bronwen said. Laser treatment benefits men and women of all ages and nationalities, and is used to: • Erase fine lines • Target the root cause of acne • Treat acne scars, rosacea and psoriasis • Permanently reduce unwanted hair • Remove tattoos, warts and birthmarks • Eliminate scars and stretch marks and leg and facial veins Lasers have become mainstream in the quest for younger, smoother skin, or for the elimination of many other undesirable skin conditions. Fine Lines Cosmetic Laser Center laser treatments are also very affordable. Please trust your treatment to the experienced staff at Fine Lines Cosmetic Laser Center.

Fine Lines

Cosmetic Laser Center www.finelineslasers.com. www.myfinelines.com Volume 3 • Issue 10


212 E. Telephone Rd. Moss Bluff (337) 855-1787

Located in Prien Lake Mall (337) 474-2490 Jenifer Dally with sister Jessica Dally Bertrand.

The Candle Cart is locally owned and operated by sisters Jessica Dally Bertrand, 22 and Jenifer Dally, 18, both of Lake Charles. They just opened in May 2011 and love meeting their customers. The Candle Cart features Tyler Candle products, with over 40 scents to choose from. Some of their best sellers include Diva, Fleur De Lis, High Maintenance and Kathina. Shop for candles, laundry wash, sachets, Autoglams, Mixer Melts, Fragrance Fuel, room spray, gift sets and more! Handmade candle charms are made on location and gift certificates are available. You’ll love their gift baskets, which are either pre-made or can be customized for that special someone for any occasion, including: • Birthdays • Anniversaries • Mother’s Day • Father’s Day • Grandparent’s Day • Secretary’s Day • Teacher Appreciation • Valentine’s Day • Bridesmaid Gifts • Christmas The sisters love Tyler Candles because: • they’re soy-based • do not tunnel • do not produce black soot • the wicks do not contain lead, and you can smell the fragrance within minutes! Volume 3 • Issue 10

They also raffle gift baskets filled with popular products. Entries are $1. Join them on their Facebook page, where you can find out about the next raffle, their Exclusive Customer e-mail list for coupons, and updates on new shipments. They welcome your comments or suggestions. Their goal is to own a storefront to better serve their customers. Located at the Prien Lake Mall between Candy Craze and Gamestop, business hours are Mon. – Sat. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and noon-6 p.m. on Sun. For more information, call (337) 474-2490 or e-mail thecandlecartllc@rockmail.com.

After studying dance locally as a young girl, Cynthia Tomlinson lived and danced in New York after graduation from high school. She also studied in Los Angeles, London and Paris, studying with Charles Kelley, Luigi, Phil Black, Twyla Tharp and many others. It’s no surprise that she opened her own dance studio after returning to the Lake Area to live and raise a family. In business for the past 16 years, Les Danseurs recently moved to a brand new facility at 212 E. Telephone Rd. in Moss Bluff. Dance classes include tap, jazz, hip-hop, cheer, lyrical, modern and acrobatics. Ballet classes offer the Classical Russian Vaganova Technique, along with pas de

deux/variations. This class will include boys, and gives them instruction on lifts. There are also adult, pre-K (morning and evening), beginning tumbling (2 & 3) and Mommy and Me classes. Les Danseurs is proud to announce the newly chartered SWLA Ballet Company, along with the new Cheer Competition Team! “We’re so excited about the move to our new building,” Cynthia said. “Parents can drive right up to the door, and we have beautiful new sprung floors.” Registration is every Monday from 4-7 pm. For more information, call the studio at (337) 855-1787 or (337) 274-8009. Certified to teach by Dance Masters of America.

Janelle Courville started making YaYa Power Bars this past January. “My sister-in-law gave me a recipe, and I’ve changed it up to make it mine,” she said. “The name came from my love of my sister friends and the fact that YaYa screams sisterhood!” Janelle makes them out of her home. “Everyone loves them,” she said. “They say it’s like no other protein bar they’ve ever had. They’re moist and chewy instead of hard and bland. Something different.” The bars come in 12 flavors, and the list keeps growing. “The most popular flavors are chocolate, strawberry and banana,” she said. “I also do them with pecans, walnuts and

almonds, and use some gluten-free and organic ingredients.” Everyone loves them—even children. “I’ve had kids as young as five try them,” Janelle said. “They think it’s candy.” This entrepreneur has always felt she was put on this Earth to help people. “This is my way. I also want to motivate people to follow their dreams—especially women.” She is planning to send a portion of her profits to St. Jude’s Hospital and will also donate for breast cancer awareness.” “I want everyone to scream YAYA!” For more information, call (337) 278-1436 or e-mail yayabarbiecourville@yahoo.com. AUGUST 11, 2011

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By Lauren de Albuquerque (337) 422-4703 www.bonschiens.com info@bonschiens.com www.facebook.com/ BonsChiensDogTraining Twitter - @BonsCheins

A professional dog trainer for six years, Lake Charles native Britney Blanchette opened her own business this past February so that she could reach and help more people. “Now that I’m able to actually travel to my clients, I’ve gained business in places as far as Longville, Beaumont, Cameron, and Lafayette,” she said. Britney believes that there are two things that keep her clients happy. “First, I travel to my clients. Most training takes place within a store or group setting by trainers who are not actually certified or well-versed in dog/animal behavior.” Second, the fact that she is one of only FOUR Certified Professional Dog Trainers (CPDTs) in the state makes a huge difference in her business. “Being certified means that I am qualified to work with more types of dog behavioral issues,” she said. “Just because someone

says they are a dog trainer does not mean that they are actually qualified to do the job. Only CPDTs are actually capable of handling the simplest of tasks to the most challenging.” Britney doesn’t use old school, aversive dog training techniques. “What I do is exactly the same as what famous dog trainer Victoria Stilwell from Animal Planet’s ‘It’s Me or the Dog’ does,” she said. The vice president of The Humane Society of LA, SWLA Chapter, and a member of both 4 Paws Society & Lake Charles Pit Bull Rescue, Britney offers 15 percent off to all those who have adopted/rescued their dog(s) from a local animal shelter. “My two dogs are rescues, so saving dogs’ lives from the pound is very important to me,” she said. She takes appointments as early as 10 a.m. and as late as 7:30 p.m., Tues.-Sat. Google Places: Google Places - Bons Chiens Dog Training, LLC

1634 Ryan Street Lake Charles, LA 337-480-3835 www.raufinancialgroup.com

Forging a Future in Finance Denise Rau, Certified Financial Planner, President, Rau Financial Group When Denise Rau entered the financial field over 25 years ago, women were few and far between in the industry. In 2005, after 20 years of working her way up to the top levels of management at several area financial institutions, Rau decided to form her own company, and Rau Financial Group opened its doors. Rau is originally from Lake Charles and received her undergraduate degree from Tulane University and an MBA from the University of Texas. She is a Certified Financial Planner and holds a variety of other certifications and licenses for insurance and securities. Rau says a big part of her job is listening and she likes to ask clients what things are most important to them in their lives. “Then together we look at PAGE 26

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where they are spending their money. Very often, they will find that they are not actually spending the most money on the things they’ve said are most important to them. They are not putting their money where their heart is, and that’s why they are not happy with their financial situation. Once we get these elements aligned, they are on track for achieving not just their financial goals, but their life goals as well, and they feel much more confident about their financial security.” Rau Financial Group has grown significantly, with a staff that now includes three additional financial advisors: Eva Abate, Mark Eckard and Denise Wilkinson. The company recently moved to a new expanded location at 1634 Ryan Street in Lake Charles. For more information, call 480-3835 or visit www.raufinancialgroup.com.

There is stress in every workplace, but a difficult economy makes the situation worse. Layoffs and budget cuts are constant reminders of how precarious our work environment is. As women, we have additional stressors, such as discrimination, stereotyping, and balancing work and family life. Hopefully, your company has employee policies in place to ensure that you aren’t penalized due to your sex. But the other issues remain. How do we handle them? THE WARNING SIGNS When we feel overwhelmed at work, we often lose confidence in our ability to perform well. A stressed-out employee is not a productive employee. Look for these warning signs. If they’re ignored, they can lead to more serious problems: • Headaches or muscle tension • Insomnia • Anxiety • Short temper • Upset stomach • Poor concentration • Apathy

STRESS FACTORS The best way to manage your stress is to identify what’s causing it. • Are there unreasonable performance demands? • Are you being harassed? • Is there a lot of conflict in the workplace? • Have you been forced to take on extra responsibilities or work overtime due to staff cutbacks? • Do you worry about your own job security? • Are you spending more and more time away from home? • Do you feel underappreciated? • Is there a general lack of communication in the company? STRESS MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES So you’ve identified what’s causing your stress. What happens next? There are simple stress management techniques you can practice to take control of the situation.

Volume 3 • Issue 10


Keep healthy. Make sure you get enough hours of sleep so that you’re not tired and irritable. Eat a nutritious breakfast before work. Remember, exercise reduces stress, so make sure you take a walk during lunch or schedule some exercise after work. Substitute water for coffee, tea, sodas and sport drinks. Our bodies and brains depend on water to function properly. If you lack water, you will not function up to par. Drink four to eight glasses of water a day, and keep a bottle on your desk as a reminder. Communicate. Speak with your supervisors to clearly define what is expected of you and then work to meet these goals. This may lessen tensions if everyone knows what is expected of them. Above all, avoid gossips and troublemakers. Manage your time. Take control of your schedule. Prioritize your tasks and don’t take on more work than you can handle. Delegate, if possible. Multitasking is something we all do, but working on three or four things at once splits your focus, and your accuracy and attention to details will eventually suffer.

Uniformly Fit has been open for almost 12 years. It started out as a 900 square-foot store offering only medical uniforms from one manufacturer. Now, it has expanded to 3,300 square feet offering not only medical uniforms and accessories, but also culinary, hospitality, and identity apparel from different manufacturers. Owner Jackie Schuldes is a former respiratory therapist who still maintains her license. But don’t expect her to go back to her previous career any time soon, as she enjoys owning her own business. “It has allowed me to express myself in many different ways,” she said. “And I love being able to meet Volume 3 • Issue 10

Try to work on similar projects at the same time. If you manage your work well, chances are it will give you more time at home. You need that balance; all work and no play is another contributor to job burnout. Organize your desk. There’s nothing worse than a cluttered, disorganized desk. How can you find anything? Searching for that important file while your boss waits impatiently will cause your stress level to the hit the roof. Keep your work environment organized. Use folders, dividers, notebooks—whatever it takes to get everything under control. You’ll work more efficiently when you know where everything is. Remember, there are stressors that we can’t avoid, such as worries about job security, or a load of extra work that’s required on a huge project. But there’s a lot we can do to help workplace stress. So think long and hard about what’s causing your problem— and take the necessary steps to initiate the appropriate changes.

TJN

(337) 515-3691 petunia480@yahoo.com

Photography has always been Erin Viator’s passion. “I can remember the flash bulb going off and the smell of the film from my childhood and thinking someday when I grow up, I’d like to be a photographer!” she said. Born and raised in Lake Charles, Erin is now married with two children of her own and a stepdaughter—and she’s finally realized her dream of becoming a photographer. "There are just some things in life I was meant to do – this is one of them,” she said. Erin opened Effects Photography in 2007, offering her clients the option of either studio shots or onlocation photo sessions—or both! Effects Photography’s sessions are fun and comfortable in a no-stress

environment, with Erin working diligently to capture the true meaning and emotion of family, life and love through her work “I want my photos to reflect emotion and happiness, and I love knowing that someone will hold on to those memories forever through my photography,” she said. “I love the feeling I get when my clients see their pictures and absolutely love them!” Effects Photography offers wedding, engagement, newborn, children, family and high school senior sittings on-site or at her studio. Her goal is to make sure the photos have personality, and that her clients feel at ease and relaxed. Visit www.effectsphotography.com or call (337) 515-3691 for more information and pricing.

3510 Ryan St. Lake Charles, LA (337)562-9990

2700 Cline St. Lake Charles, LA (337) 439-2808

and work with people from varied backgrounds.” In addition to apparel, Uniformly Fit also offers a complete in-house monogramming service. The store has recently added many new items that are geared to be personalized, such as burp pads, towels, bags, blankets, kids’ backpacks, flat iron cases, and more. “We are a full commercial monogram/embroidery facility,” Jackie says. “We have multiple machines and multiple heads. Buy it here or bring it in, and we can personalize it for you. We gladly accept outside orders and contract work. We’re not just scrubs anymore!” Uniformly Fit is open 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Mon – Fri. and 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. on Sat.

“Our customers want us to stand for something more than just the elimination of moisture, soot or odor,” she said. “I understand that every customer wants to know the company they are using is looking after their best interests. Policyholders want their lives back to normal as quickly as possible. Agents want to make sure their policyholder is given excellent service that reflects on themselves and their companies. And the adjuster wants to be assured there will be no surprises in how the jobs are handled”. Service Master offer a comprehensive suite of services: 24-hour emergency services, mold remediation, carpet and rug cleaning, electronic cleaning, HVAC cleaning and restoration, as well as fire, water and smoke restoration. Terri is a member of the Chamber SWLA Economic Development Council and serves as a chamber ambassador.

Terri Kullerd, marketing manager for ServiceMaster Restoration Services, spends much of her day in her bright yellow ServiceMaster car. She never meets a stranger, nor does she arrive empty-handed. “I want to share our information so home and business owners can make an informed decision when it comes to choosing a restoration company,” she said. If you think bringing cupcakes or cookies really gets you in the door, try bringing an ice cream truck. Her customers are still talking about it. With many years of hands-on customer service experience from her former career as a hotel general manager, Terri understands customer perception and loyalty.

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Silpada Jewelry is the real deal. It’s not painted or plated, stamped or sadly strung. Trust us, there is a difference. Our design divas collaborate with world-renowned artisans to develop fashion-forward products that are the standard by which all others are measured. The main reason Stacie Luhrman is a Silpada Jewelry rep is because she loves her family. “I want to spend more quality time with each of them!” she said. “My father was rarely ever home when I was a kid because he had to go to work to support his family. Nowadays, both parents have to work. I want to be there for my kids when they need me, and I also want their dad to be home more, also.” Stacie feels that the more she can contribute financially, the less her husband has to work, which allows for more family time. “It’s good when you get to do the things that make life really worth-

while!” she said. Stacie has always been an independent woman. “I feel like I learned that from my father,” she said. “I always saw my mother as needing my father to get through life. I didn’t want to be that person that needed someone to rely on. She did not have an education to fall back on and she would work part-time jobs on the weekends when we got older.” Stacie’s goal was to become a dentist, but her children came first. “Now that my kids are in school, I am paying for college with my Silpada earnings!” she said. A big part of her job is helping others achieve their goals! “When I see people start reaching their goals, it gives me a sense of pride and accomplishment,” she said. “I know how it is to struggle, and I will do what I can to help others.” Interested in purchasing Silpada, or becoming a rep? Contact Stacie Luhrman at (443) 655-4898 or at www.mysilpada.com/stacie.luhrman

400 W. Hale St. (337) 494-3913 decorative.center@yahoo.com

Pat Kelty, owner and interior designer, opened Decorative Center Fine Furniture and Kelty Design Studio in DeRidder in 1979. She relocated the business to Lake Charles in 1985. The Decorative Center offers complete design assistance. This includes everything involved in building and remodeling, including paint selections, flooring, furniture, accessories and wall coverings. They even offer an in-house workroom, where fabricator Brittany Wilder custom designs draperies, pillows and bedcovers. “We bring to Lake Charles the choices and selections that you find in major cities,” Pat said. “Our furniture becomes your children’s heirlooms.” Decorative Center Fine Furniture PAGE 28

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offers merchandise from exclusive sources such as Maitland Smith, Theodore Alexander and Hancock and Moore. Pat says her customers tell her that her business helped make their building or remodeling experiences enjoyable, and they appreciate the ease with which decisions were made. “We want each client’s home or office to reflect who they are—not just a rubber stamp of everyone else’s,” Pat said. “We guide, we don’t dictate.” For your next home or office remodeling or building project, call Pat Kelty to help guide you in choosing the right furnishings to make your project your very own.

PDI of the South is committed to providing daily independence and quality, compassionate services to the disabled and elderly population of South Louisiana. This organization promotes the idea that each individual is entitled to the same rights, privileges and responsibilities as all others: to live, learn, work and receive needed assistance with the community. “PDI was started by my parents in 1987,” said Margaret McCloskey. “I worked in the company in every capacity. My first job was stuffing envelopes and answering phones. At 17, I was processing billing and payroll. By my early 20s, I was working as a program supervisor. I took over ownership of PDI in the late 90’s.” Margaret grew up surrounded by the health care industry. “My mother has been an RN for over 40 years, and has run Evangeline Home Health for most of my life,” she said. “My siblings and I were exposed early on to the needs of elderly and disabled and the desire to help others. My mother’s compassion and dedication to her patients was what drove us all to follow in her footsteps.” To this day, all of Margaret’s siblings work in healthcare, either at PDI or in their parents’ business. “My sister has also branched out and is a home health care business owner herself,” she said. With approximately 130-140 staff member, PDI of the South offers alternatives to long-term facility placement with:

Companion Services As they age, many people may require only a minimal amount of assistance performing daily needs such as grocery shopping, traveling to medical appointments or on social outings. National Family Caregiver Support Program PDI of the South is the exclusive provider of this service within a five parish area. This program is offered through Calcasieu Council on Aging. Long-Term Personal Care Services This service is an in-home personal care program offered to Medicaid recipients over the age of 21 who are disabled and require assistance with daily needs. Elderly/Disabled Adult Waiver This program is for adults that have suffered an injury or illness after the age of 21 which leave the consumer deficient in 3 or more areas of life. These services are to be provided in lieu of placement in a long term care facility. Recipients must meet both financial and medical eligibility as set forth by Medicaid.

PDI of the South, Inc. 710 W. Prien Lake Rd. Ste 100. Lake Charles, LA 70601 (877) 479-0048 www.pdihealthcare.com Volume 3 • Issue 10


Patricia Prebula President, PREBULA Public Relations, LLC Owner, LA Fitness Health Spa

Back: Jennifer Hebert, E.J. Olsen (LA Fitness Manager), Nikki McFatter, Michael Armand and Lynsey Reed. Front: Charlotte Antonetz, Shelby Hodges, Morgan Falls, Emily Reed and Vince Landry (not pictured).

Patricia Prebula is the current owner and operator of two businesses, PREBULA Public Relations, LLC., and LA Fitness Health Spa. Patricia has over 25 years of experience in public relations. She retired in 2006 from CITGO where she was employed as Manager, Government & Public Affairs, directing and developing strategies and programs to enhance the image of that complex. In August 2006, she formed PREBULA Public Relations, LLC, an issues management company specializing in lobbying, government relations, media relations and strategic communications working for PPG Industries in Lake Charles. In 2009, she purchased LA Fitness Health Spa with her late husband, Al Prebula. Since he passed away in October 2010, Patricia has been running the business with the help of some good employees. “Al taught me a lot about self discipline and appreciation. I feel very fortunate to work with a good team of professionals,” said Patricia. “Owning two business presents its challenges at times, but you’re only as good as the people who represent you in the business. They are Volume 3 • Issue 10

hard-working, dedicated individuals who understand my sincere appreciation for our customers.” LA Fitness Health Spa is a wellness and fitness center. It is the only facility in town that offers a heated indoor pool, outdoor pool, whirlpool, steam room and dry sauna. “We offer personal training, water aerobics, weight training, spin classes and a variety of other programs,” stated Patricia. “Our customers appreciate the variety of options we offer in order to maintain and promote a healthy lifestyle. We recently purchased new equipment and will be adding some new programs very soon that our members will be excited about. We encourage everyone to come out for a personal tour of our facility so our experts can help get you started on a fitness plan.” “I’ve learned some much about being an independent business owner. You have to be knowledgeable in so many areas, i.e. accounting, personnel, maintenance, purchasing and plumbing. I’m definitely not scared of work and don’t think I’ll ever officially retire. I do believe it’s important to find something you enjoy doing and be good at it.”

Dewana Young, Executive Consultant-LII Rodan & Fields Dermatology Dewana Young is an executive consultant for Rodan & Fields Dermatology, and is so excited about her business. “The products changed my life because they actually work,” she said. “The business opportunity was too great to pass up. The ground floor of a new business and partnering with the doctors who created Proactiv® piqued my curiosity. After studying the company, I realized that I didn’t just want to use the products—I wanted to sell them! I love changing skin and changing lives.” With Multi-Med Therapy, dermatologists Katy Rodan and Kathy Fields com-

bine pharmaceutical ingredients with active cosmetics for effective formulations that feel like luxury skin treatments. As the creators of Proactiv Solution®, America’s number one selling acne system, they have seen the difference that intelligent skincare and great skin can make in people’s lives. That’s why they created Rodan + Fields Multi-Med® Therapy designed to deliver the right medicines, in the right formulations, in the right order to transform your skin. Regimens come packaged in 60-day quantities, so you can see results with your very first regimen. All products come with a 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. AMP MD (roller) system was featured on the TODAY's SHOW. It was developed to solve a critical challenge in delivering active ingredients through the skin’s protective outer layer. Gently roll over the face and neck, to safely create precise micro channels in the uppermost layers of the skin, allowing for deeper and more effective delivery of the skin-transforming ingredients. It’s quick, easy and painless, and in just ONE MINUTE a day, you can AMP up your anti-aging results. Dewana Young, Executive Consultant (337) 842-4849; dewanayoung@yahoo.com; Web sites: http://dyoung.myrandf.com (products) http://dyoung.myrandf.biz (business)

4013 Maplewood Dr. Sulphur, LA (337) 625-2442 (337) 474-5589

Largest Locally Owned Office Supply Store in SWLA United Office Supply and Equipment Co., Inc., located at 4013 Maplewood Drive in Sulphur was purchased by Carolyn Cockrill in January 1989. The business was in desperate need of attention. In the past 23 years Carolyn has worked very hard and many long hours to build up the business to where it is today... the largest locally owned office supply store in Calcasieu Parish. United Office Supply sells office supplies, office furniture, office machines, copier and computer supplies, janitorial supplies, promotional products, printing, business cards,

wedding invitations, rubber stamps, fine leather gifts, TimeMist products and so much more. Fast, professional service is what you will find at UOS. Each order has free delivery, with no minimum order amount, so call UOS and save your time and gas! They even do desktop deliveries. Credit, debit and pro cards are accepted, as well as cash and checks. Visit Carolyn and her staff today and experience the locally owned personal service for yourself. You’ll be glad you did! UOS is a proud member of the Better Business Bureau. Start with Trust! Check out UOS with your local BBB of Southwest Louisiana. “Buying Locally-Owned keeps Your $’s Local” AUGUST 11, 2011

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188 E. Telephone Rd., Moss Bluff (337) 855-9190

Pictured Left: Chynna, Michelle, Russell and Sydney.

ALL BECAUSE A GIRL HAD A BABY… When Moss Bluff native Michelle Pawlowski found out she was pregnant, her search for a quality childcare facility began. “To my amazement, all of the facilities were either full with a waiting list or did not take infants,” she said. “I came home and told my husband about the difficulties I was having—and said that I was just going to build one myself!” Michelle never realized that this was the beginning of an amazing opportunity. “I set forth on a quest to find the perfect piece of property to build the perfect childcare facility for my own children,” she said. “I also didn’t realize that my predicament was shared by so many working mothers. You know that saying ‘If you build it they will come?’ To my amazement, they not only came, but we were at maximum capacity before we opened the doors!” The Beginning Ready Set Grow Learning Center opened in August 2005 in the fastgrowing community of Moss Bluff, clearly filling a need. “We had a waiting list that extended over a year for some classrooms,” Michelle said. Hurricane Rita came a month later. Fortunately, the building withstood the damaging winds and rain. “When we were able to reopen, the demand for additional spots was incomprehensible,” Michelle said. “A lot of childcare facilities in the surrounding areas suffered lots of damage and parents needed to get back to work. Our waiting list grew from one year to several years. I told my husband that we needed another building, after only being open for nine PAGE 30

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months. He almost had a heart attack!” Nevertheless, he stood by Michelle’s recommendation and presented their plan to several financial institutions, to no avail. “They all said it was too early, and that maybe we could do a small business loan with SBA,” she said. “We would not take no for an answer. After being turned down by three different financial institutions, we were finally referred to a banker who had the same vision we had. Thanks to his faith and

The Center The Center’s success can be attributed to many things. They offer instructed age-appropriate programs that include the Abeka curriculum. A combination of the Abeka program and hands-on creative curriculums allows children’s imaginations to soar and sparks a desire in them to learn more and more. “Our facilities are clean and safe, and we have large classrooms with a multitude of different areas that promote social and emotional development, even for the youngest infant,” Michelle said. “We are also excited to have added the services of Les Danseurs Dance Academy and the SWLA Ballet Co. to our campus with their brand-new facili-

Ready Set Grow Staff trust in us, we grew from 50 to 100 children within a two-year period.” Even after acquiring a second building, the waiting list did not shrink at all; instead, Michelle discovered there was a growing demand for infants—and her current capacity was only 10. “So, I came up with this idea to build an infant-only center,” she said. “We purchased the property next door to us and built the very first state-of-the-art, infant-only center. We opened in February 2011 and our current licensed capacity is now 130 children. Finally, we now have the ability to accept additional children instead of adding their names to an ever-growing waiting list.”

ty. They offer classes for our students two years and up during the day. This will free up a lot of afternoons for our working mothers so they can spend more time with their families. “ The Ready Set Grow Difference Michelle said their 22 staff members are the biggest contributors to their success. “Our center could not be as successful as it is without the dedication from our director, teachers, administrators, and Mrs. Bonnie and her Shepherd’s Pie,” she said. “I am a true believer that you are only as good as the staff that

represents you, and I feel we have employed the best educated and experienced teachers around. These devoted, dedicated ladies come to work every day with one thing in mind: the best interest of each and every child—and they treat them as if they were their own.” Michelle said they are all one big family; all of them are working mothers who understand the heavy demands that are placed on working families and the need for quality childcare. “From our most seasoned teachers to our newest members of our support staff, each plays a part of our success and the pure enjoyment I have walking into work each day,” said Michelle. We are like a great big family of sisters. We laugh, we cry, we learn and we teach— not only the children and families we serve—but each other as well.” Ready Set Grow Now In the six years since they first opened their doors, Ready Set Grow has three buildings with over 12,500 square feet of uniquely designed child-friendly facilities, 15,000 square feet of playgrounds and an immeasurable amount of love and gratitude to the community of Moss Bluff and the surrounding area. “As I look back over these years and the journey I’ve been on, I’m still amazed and simply say ‘Wow’!” Michelle exclaimed. “This all happened because a working girl had a baby.” She would like to thank her patient and supportive husband Russell. “He’s been my rock. Without him, there would be no success. I would also like to thank my beautiful daughters Chynna and Sydney for all their patience during those weekends mommy and daddy had to work. Without my girls, the vision for Ready Set Grow would never be what it is today. May both of you grow up to be strong, successful and happy women in business!” For more information about Ready Set Grow Learning Center, go to www.readysetgrowdaycare.com for a complete virtual tour of our facility and all the programs we offer.

Volume 3 • Issue 10


3600 Maplewood Dr. Sulphur, LA (337) 625-5054

In November 1989, Lisa F. McMullen, CPA and Pamela C. Mancuso, CPA founded McMullen and Mancuso, CPAs, LLC in Sulphur. The first business for both, they found a compatibility as friends and partners that was rare and felt comfortable in building something for the future together. “We wanted flexibility in our interaction with clients, and we wanted a family atmosphere in which to work and serve our clients,” Pamela said. “We are fortunate to have been able to maintain our partnership and friendship for over 20 years, which is rare today.” Over the years, the company has grown to a staff of eight full-time and two part-time personnel. “Our goal, as a CPA firm, is to distinguish ourselves as a uniquely personable organization,” Lisa said. “We believe that our personal service provides the assurance and com-

DISCOVER THE MAGIC THAT IS THE GYPSY VANNER The Breezy Knoll Farm LLC was formed in 2009 after Terri Martel retired and decided to pursue a lifelong dream of owning a horse, just the beginning of a new adventure. She now breeds magnificent Gypsy Vanner horses, which possess beauty, athleticism, a gentle temperament and genuine affection for people. A versatile breed, they pull carriages and surreys, excel at dressage, jumping, trail-riding (spook-resistant), plus are well -suited as therapy animals for learning and physically disabled individuals. This rare breed originated in the UK about a generation ago when a Volume 3 • Issue 10

fort level necessary to form the relationships required to build our clients’ businesses.” The company’s philosophy says it all: “Through our personal attention, we are better able to relate to our clients and tailor our services to provide a unique approach to meeting their individual needs.” Services include: • Tax planning and preparation • Financial planning • Quickbooks training • Financial reporting • Accounting and payroll services • Financial auditing • Consulting services “We love what we do and we never want our clients to feel that we are so big that we can’t serve their needs,” Lisa said. “We’ve developed close relationships we them, because we’re with them for the long term.” www.mcmullenandmancuso.com “Like” us on Facebook

Debbie Lewing has been a sales director with Mary Kay Cosmetics for eight years, and loves what she does. “It’s a relationship business,” she said. “When you become a consultant, you’re given the tools and the guidance by your recruiter and/or sales director to build your business to whatever level you choose. You are able to meet ladies you may never have met otherwise, and form lasting friendships with your customers and other consultants.” As a sales director, Debbie says she’s privileged to work with a team of incredible women. “There are no quotas, so therefore, they are able to pursue a career in Mary Kay either part-time to have some additional

income, or full-time to pursue a career in management,” she said. In 1963, Mary Kay Ash, as a single mother of three, began a business with her life savings of $5,000. Mary Kay Cosmetics is now a multi-billion dollar company, debt free and in over 30 countries outside the United States. Mary Kay took her dream and has offered the opportunity to women all over the world that might otherwise have had little hope..truly a dream come true. Debbie Lewing, Sales Director Mary Kay Cosmetics (337) 532-9000 www.marykay.com/dlewing

small group of gypsy breeders selectively bred a colorful horse to pull their caravans—thus the name Gypsy Vanners. Only 20 percent of all gypsy horses in the world can claim lineage to the original Vanners. They are DNA-certified by lineage and registered with the Gypsy Vanner Horse Society. There are currently only a handful in Louisiana, but Breezy Knoll Farm will have foals for sale in the near future as the herd is increased. If you are a discerning horse enthusiast who would enjoy experiencing the magic of these magnificent horses, contact Terri Martel at (337) 527-6858. She is a proud member of the Gypsy Vanner Horse Society, www.vanner.org, Louisiana Equine Council and American Horse Council. AUGUST 11, 2011

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4845 Lake Street, PMB #125 Lake Charles, LA 70605 337-205-7455 Info@DecisiveMinds.com www.DecisiveMinds.com www.GSMMA.com

407 Sam Houston Jones Pkwy., Suite E Lake Charles, LA (337) 905-8352 Mon.-Fri. 10-5, Sat. 10-4

With a retail background, Tela Lambert always wanted to open a shop of her own that carried unique things. “I used to love to go shopping out of town because there are some really good gift shops with things that we just didn’t have here,” she said. “I'm blessed to have the support of my husband Dusty of seven years, three children, family and the love of my extended church family of eleven years, Christian World Ministries.” She finally made her dream come true this past April with the opening of Tela’s Things in Moss Bluff.

“I search online for unique products, and also for any specific items that customers want,” she said. “I want to cater to the customer.” Tela's Things has something for everyone in your family, from the ever-so-popular "Swamp People" T-shirts that dad is sure to love, to stylish comfortable fashions for mom, and MudPie fashions for the kids. Tela’s carries Carriage Candles (they make perfect gifts!), infant and children’s clothing, Louisiana children’s books and cookbooks and so much more. Come in and see for yourself!

Michele Scism is a business and social media strategist and the founder of Decisive Minds, LLC and The Global Social Media Managers Association. She uses her signature “Take Action Get Profits Formula” to help business owners get more visibility and more clients for their businesses. As the author of Take Action Get Profits: 5 Steps to Massive Online Visibility and a national speaker on topics related to business and social media, Michele is often asked by business owners to help them figure out how to use social media to get customers or help them find someone to do their social media marketing for them. “Social media is an amazing marketing tool that the majority of business owners still don’t understand,” Michele said. “There are 770 million people around the world using Facebook today. If you can figure out how to get your message out to that audience, then you

can expand your business globally and very quickly. There are 175 million on Twitter and over 100 million on LinkedIn. But social media is still in its infancy and it requires a completely different marketing strategy and therein lies the problem.” Michele offers virtual and live training classes for social media throughout the year. The next training is Aug. 17 and is a virtual day of training, which will provide business owners with proven strategies for both Facebook and LinkedIn. “We will cover everything from how do I create a Facebook Fan Page to what to do once you have created a fan page to how to get your potential clients to find you on LinkedIn and everything in between.” For more information, go to www.TakeActionGetProfitsVirtual.com or call Michele at (337) 205-7455. For a $100 discount, enter the promo code “Jambalaya.”

The Women’s Business Network of Southwest Louisiana Started in April 2010, The Chamber SWLA’s Women’s Business Network (WBN) is a non-membership based group spanning all industries and communities, sharing common interests and goals. The WBN addresses the issues and benefits of being a woman in business in Southwest Louisiana. Women often have to juggle their jobs, homes and families, and yet are becoming entrepreneurs, working in previously male-oriented industries and taking over leadership positions across all industry sectors. For more information on the Women’s Business Network, contact Amanda White at 337-433-3632 or awhite@allianceswla.org.

www.allianceswla.org PAGE 32

AUGUST 11, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 10


Seated from L-R: Lisa Bateman, Eva Broussard, Nadia Nazeer, Olive Bonin and Michelle Poche. Standing from L-R: Debbie Holt, Dolores Hicks, Stephanie Morris, Becky Dent, Patricia Philmon, Stasha Bell Savoie, Debbie Boudreaux and Annette Garber. Not pictured: Carla Clark, Leah Bossano and Ester Vincent. Photo by www.monsoursphotography.com

By Lisa Addison

If you’re a woman living in Lake Charles or the surrounding area and haven’t yet gotten involved in the Healthy Woman program of Women & Children’s Hospital (WCH), it’s time to consider joining this exciting group. Geared towards women ages 25-64, the program offers free monthly educational events that provide women with a wealth of information on health, wellness and life balance to help them maintain a healthy body, mind and spirit for themselves and their loved ones. The idea of balancing the triangle of mind, body and spirit is something that many people yearn for, but not all achieve. The Healthy Woman program aims to change that. “Women & Children’s Hospital is proud to provide the community with the Healthy Woman program to empower women as healthcare consumers, and to engage them in dialogue about effective healthcare and life management choices,” said Annette Garber, marketing director at WCH. “The program was first introduced to the community in 2008, but was re-launched in January 2010.” Wide Variety of Seminars & Activities With more than 1,600 members and offering a plethora of activities including everything from Zumba, Hip Hop and Latin Moves dance classes to its seminar titled “From PMS to Menopause: Understanding Hormones,” this is the kind of program that would appeal to many women. Most seminars are held the first Thursday of

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each month at the Lake Charles Country Club from 5:30-7 p.m. Membership is free and it’s easy to join. Log onto the hospital’s website at www.womenchildrens.com/healthywoman or click the Healthy Woman tab on the hospital’s home page. “I am proud to see how the Healthy Woman membership has grown over the last year,” said Bryan S. Bateman, CEO at Women & Children’s Hospital. “Monthly seminar attendance has nearly doubled and the wide array of topics provides something for all women. In most house-

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Photo by www.monsoursphotography.com

Pictured left: Annette Garber and Nadia Nazeer prepping for the Healthy Woman Anniversary event. Pictured right: Healthy Woman members learning Latin Moves with Daniel Gonzalez

holds, women make the majority of healthcare decisions for their families. Women also wear a variety of hats including employee, mom, wife, chauffeur, caretaker and the list goes on. The Healthy Woman program allows members and their friends to have one evening out a month to take a break, enjoy some nice refreshments and learn something new.” Advisory Council Committed to Program Healthy Woman is supported by a 16-member Advisory Council, which is comprised of local women who are committed to educating and entertaining the women of our community. Led by Garber and Healthy Woman coordinator Nadia Nazeer, council members include: Becky Dent, WCH; Carla Clark, WCH; Debbie Boudreaux, Surgicare of Lake Charles; Debbie Holt, Lifeshare Blood Centers; Dolores Hicks, Calcasieu Parish School Board; Ester Vincent, City of Lake Charles; Eva Broussard, WCH; Leah C. Bossano, Studio 901; Lisa Bateman, WCH; Michelle Poche, WCH; Olive

Bonin, AdSource Outdoor Advertising; Patricia Philmon, Merrill Lynch Financial Advisors; Stasha Bell Savoie, WCH; and Stephanie Morris, Health Systems 2000, Inc. In addition to monthly events, council members have been busy planning Healthy Woman’s first anniversary celebration, which will be held on Thursday, September 8, at Treasures of Marilyn’s in Lake Charles. Tickets can be purchased for $20 each, or a table of eight may be purchased for $160. Guest speaker for the event is Dale Smith Thomas. “Our Healthy Woman members and their friends can expect a great evening,” said Nadia Nazeer, Healthy Woman coordinator. “Dale Smith Thomas is a dynamic speaker who is ready to give women the tools that have allowed her and other women to reach their goals both professionally and personally.” Dynamic Guest Speaker to Headline Event A motivational speaker who was born and raised in rural Mississippi, Thomas has been teaching audiences for more than 17 years on how to

“Choose Success” in all areas of their lives. Her direct approach to helping others has been described as challenging, empowering, and entertaining. Thomas has been a featured guest on many radio and television shows and has been a guest expert on “The Dr. Phil Show,” “The Big Idea” on CNBC, and on programs on CMT, Vh1 and MTV. She is an author of several books and has also recorded several empowerment CD’s. Thomas also owns and operates a series of “Boot Camps,” which are workshops that educate and empower others to take their lives to the next level. The camps have gained national recognition and were featured in a documentary on The Travel Channel. Attendees of the anniversary celebration can expect to be educated, inspired and entertained. The evening kicks off with a health fair and women’s expo from 5-6 p.m., music and hors d’oeuvres from 6-6:30 p.m., followed by dinner and the program from 6:30-8 p.m. Attendees will also have a chance to win some great door prizes provided by the event and booth

sponsors. Garber said any business that would like to participate as a sponsor or would like to have a booth at the anniversary expo can call her at 475-4102. “We are planning for 250300 attendees, so this is a great opportunity for both large and small businesses to reach local women that are committed to making informed choices,” said Garber. “What better way to educate them about your business, than face to face?”

Dr. Eddye G. Blossom, OB/GYN speaking at the Understanding Hormones seminar.

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AUGUST 11, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 10


Photo by www.monsoursphotography.com

Becky Dent, Senior Circle Advisor reviewing the monthly events calendar with member Kathleen D’Water.

Women’s Role in Healthcare When it comes to women and their role in healthcare as well as their consumer purchasing habits, do not underestimate their power. Consider some of these statistics included in the book, Re-Imagine! Business Excellence in a Disruptive Age, by Tom Peters regarding women’s purchasing power. Women influence: 94 % of home furnishings purchases; 92 % of vacation destinations; 91 % of new homes purchases; 80 % of DIY (do-it-yourself) projects; 68 % of car purchases; 51 % of consumer electronics buys; 89 % of the spending decisions around new bank accounts; and 80 % of healthcare decisions. U.S. women spend more than $3.7 trillion annually on consumer goods and services, plus another $1.5 trillion as purchasing agents for business. Mothers, in particular, want to know

that the companies they are spending money with care about the community. With all of the talk of the Healthy Woman program and its upcoming anniversary event, you might get the idea that there’s nothing going on for men, but that’s not the case. There’s another special program at Women & Children’s Hospital called Senior Circle. WCH sponsors the local chapter of Senior Circle, a national nonprofit organization that encourages a healthy active lifestyle for men and women age 50 and better. The WCH chapter was launched in 2010 and has grown to nearly 300 members.

(337) 478-8530 Ext. 120 CELL (337) 802-7410 FAX (337) 477-7217 bnavarre@flavinrealty.com www.flavinrealty.com

3221 Ryan St. Lake Charles

KARLA HUNT 3028 Ryan St. 433-9720

Attend Two Free Events “I want every person age 50 and up to come and check out what Senior Circle has to offer,” said Becky Dent, WCH Chapter Advisor. “We always allow interested people to attend two free events. Once they come and see what we’re all about, they’re usually hooked and are ready to join. From the moment we get a new member, I make sure to introduce them to everything our chapter has to offer and highlight the events

Healthy Woman Car Care Seminar at Nissan of Lake Charles. Volume 3 • Issue 10

AUGUST 11, 2011

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Senior Circle day trip to Houmas House in Darrow, LA.

that will work with their schedule and personal preferences.” Senior Circle members receive these local benefits: • Complimentary private room upgrade during a hospital stay when staffing and availability permit; • Discounts at area retailers and restaurants; • Free monthly activities such as lunch and learns, day trips and game days; • Book club and monthly supper club; • Free exercise classes; • Holiday parties; • Free copying and faxing of important papers; and • Subscription to quarterly chapter newsletter. Senior Circle members also receive these national benefits: • Prescription mail pharmacy program; • Quarterly issues of Senior Circle’s national publication; • Toll-free member services line; • National travel program; • Pharmacy discount card; and

Members enjoying lunch at the Myrtles Plantation in St. Francisville.

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AUGUST 11, 2011

• National car rental discounts. “I’ve had so much fun since joining Senior Circle,” said Kathleen D’Water, charter member. “I’ve met so many new friends and my social calendar is full almost every day. Now I’m a chapter ambassador and volunteer some of my free time to help spread the word about our group. I think it’s the best club in town.” Membership in Senior Circle costs $15 per person, per year or $27 per year for couples. To join, pick up a membership form at the reception desks at WCH, pay online or call the Senior Circle office for a form to be mailed to you. Visit the hospital website at www.women-childrens.com to see a monthly calendar of events, a list of local Senior Circle merchant discounts and to download the quarterly newsletter. Partners in Health It’s easy to see that, when it comes to promoting healthy living, educating Lake Area residents and offering a wide array of services, WCH is hitting it out of the ballpark. “We want the community to know we are their partners in health,” said Bateman. “I know that some area residents still don’t realize that WCH provides both inpatient and outpatient services, or that we have over 200 physicians on our medical staff who offer a broad range of medical and surgical care.” Bateman said that the hospital has recently welcomed several new physicians to the medical staff including a new family medicine physician, urologist, obstetrician/gynecologist and a general surgeon. “We always ask our new physicians to speak at our Healthy Woman seminars and Senior Circle lunch

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Senior Circle February Birthday Party and Mardi Gras Celebration.

and learns, so our members can expect to see several new faces over the next few months.” In addition to offering Healthy Woman and Senior Circle, Women & Children’s Hospital offers a wide range of healthcare services for men, women and children including: • 24-hour emergency services; • Bariatric surgical weight loss program; • Labor, delivery and nursery services; • Diagnostic imaging; • Adult intensive care services; • Laboratory services; • Level 3 neonatal ICU; • Outpatient and inpatient medical and surgical services;

• Pediatrics; • Physical, occupational and speech therapy; and • Respiratory services. For additional information about Healthy Woman, call (337) 475-4064. For Senior Circle, call (337) 475-4002. Go to www.women-childrens.com or call (337) 475-4102 for more information about all of the services and programs that Women & Children’s Hospital offers. TJN Lisa Addison has been a writer for more than 30 years. She writes for local, regional and national publications.

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ker n Shouma By Brando

The Soccer Revolution It’s here, finally. Months of worry about your team’s star players moving to a rival team, of agonizing over every last second of the past season, of wondering whether one more pass completed or penalty called would have won your team one more game, are over.

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AUGUST 11, 2011

With the league’s finances in order and the players in (relative) agreement with team owners, we’re almost ready to start the new season. Football is back! Oh, you thought I was talking about the National Football League. Well, no, not exactly. I mean it is someone’s national football league, just not, you know, the NFL. I’m talking about the English Premier League, home of some of the world’s best soccer. That’s right. I think it’s nice and all that the NFL owners and players union got their differences settled and are back to getting ready for the sea-

son. Wonderful. But right now I’m thinking about the opening day of the EPL on Aug. 13. I’m thinking about Manchester, not Minnesota; Tottenham, not Tampa Bay. You should probably start thinking about the EPL, too, because the next British invasion is not going to be slinging guitars, but rather, kicking a soccer ball. Ready or not, soccer is poised to take hockey’s place at the table as one of the Big Four sports in the United States. I know, I know. You’ve heard all of that before. But it’s statistically true. In a 2007 story about superstar

goal-scorer David Beckham’s move to the Los Angeles Galaxy of Major League Soccer, the premier division of American soccer, the BBC drops some interesting statistics regarding soccer in America. For example, according to the article, more people in the United States watched the 2006 World Cup final than any one game of the 2005 World Series. World Cup ratings in the United States rose another 41 percent for the 2010 event. Already, the EPL is outdrawing the MLS for American soccer viewers and, with Americans owning five EPL clubs (including two of the most heavily followed clubs worldwide, Manchester United and Arsenal), there is more incentive for those owners to expand

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the market and create more fans across the Atlantic. But don’t feel too sorry for the MLS; there are plenty of soccer fans to go around. In another article, published this year, it states that the average attendance for MLS in 2010 increased 4 percent from 2009 to 16,675 fans, while the average attendance for the National Hockey League, America’s fourth-most popular pro sports league, fell 3 percent to a shade over 17,000 fans. This is a remarkable rise in popularity. The MLS has yet to celebrate its 20th year in existence —- it is one of the youngest “premier leagues” in the world — while the NHL has been around since World War I. What we’re seeing is that American fans love their local MLS squad but they also finding European teams, mostly English teams, to love as well. Who says you can’t be both a Houston Dynamo fan and a Tottenham Hotspur fan? In addition, soccer is one of the most popular youth sports in the United States and growing every year. Combine this with the recent revelations regarding concussion injuries in American football —- one doctor recently said that the ideal amount of time children should spend playing American football is zero —- then you’ll start to see an even larger rise in soccer participation. And, regardless of what Jim Gazzolo said in his misinformed and misogynistic July 17 American Press column (timed to drop a huge deuce on the good feelings surrounding the US’ first appearance in a Women’s World Cup final since 1999), women’s soccer is also growing as a sport. In his column, Gazzolo claims, without the benefit of things like, you know, evidence, that “the soccer movement gained little momentum (from the US’s 1999 Women’s World Cup title) long-term” and that “no successful major women’s league followed.” Uh, sure. According to the US Youth Soccer organization, female participation in youth soccer has grown from 100,000 players 30 years ago to 3 million players today. In addition, the final of the 2011 Women’s World Cup between the US and Japan brought ESPN its highestever ratings for a soccer match with over 13 million viewers. The 2011 final was the sixth most-viewed soccer match ever in the United States. The most-viewed soccer match ever? That 1999 women’s final Mr. Gazzolo complained so much about. In fact, with the explosion of sports options on digital cable and the Internet, just about the only place you can’t get soccer coverage is in the

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shrinking pages of the daily newspaper, which is, nowadays, populated by grumpy old cranks more interested in the old days than these newfangled sports they don’t understand. As far as successful women’s major league soccer goes…they’re getting there. The Women’s Professional Soccer league is young (established in 2007) and is struggling to gain a foothold in the vast marketplace of American sports. The league is dealing with some growing pains, and, like the MLS and the Women’s National Basketball Association, it will need years to establish itself and begin generating more

widespread interest. This past Women’s World Cup could provide another small boost toward legitimacy. But Gazzolo implores us to “forget the solid viewing numbers,” before bringing out the hoariest of all chestnuts that soccer is “boring.” He must not have seen the United States men’s team gripping 1-0 stoppage-time win over Algeria at the 2010 World Cup. In that game (which, like the 1999 women’s final, was tied at 0-0 after 90 minutes), the United States, on the verge of elimination, had several chances to score but could not shake the Algerian defense and a controver-

sial offsides call. It was maybe the least boring 0-0 match in Cup history. Finally in the 91st minute, the first of four minutes of stoppage time, Landon Donovan’s rebound goal saved the Americans’ Cup dreams and set off celebrations around the country. Must have missed Abby Wambach’s game-winning goal against Brazil, too. But that’s okay. He’ll have plenty of time to see another exciting, heartstopping moment in soccer history. There are lots of them to come. Because the soccer revolution isn’t just coming. It’s already here to stay.

TJN

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By Mary Louise Ruehr

Nazi ‘Master-Race’ Delusions are Still Haunting I’ve enjoyed the books of Erik Larson, such as The Devil in the White City. He makes history accessible and breathes life into the unforgettable characters who inhabit his accounts. This worked both for and against me in his newest nonfiction book, because the destination and the people I met there were frighteningly real and hard to deal with. In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in

Hitler’s Berlin takes us back to 1933, to the streets of Germany’s capital, where Adolf Hitler is the newly appointed chancellor. The German people, humiliated by the treaty that ended the First World War, were encouraged by the racial pride and nationalistic fervor being whipped up by Hitler. They went along with his agenda of tyranny and violence — against Jews, against Americans, against anybody who didn’t agree with him.

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AUGUST 11, 2011

George S. Messersmith, American consul general for Germany, tried to warn the U.S. State Department: “With few exceptions, the men who are running this Government are of a mentality that you and I cannot understand. Some of them are psychopathic cases and would ordinarily be receiving treatment somewhere.” Into this emerging chaos came the family of William E. Dodd, the new U.S. ambassador to Germany, a reasonable man trying to deal with the lunacy around him. His most interesting relative was his daughter, Martha, a young woman of careless virtue who had affairs with several Germans and a flamboyant Russian, a relationship that sparked the Soviet embassy to persuade her to spy for them. (Martha was even fixed up with Hitler, but nothing came of it.) Paranoia was rampant: “Germans grew reluctant to stay in communal ski lodges, fearing they might talk in their sleep. They postponed surgeries because of the lip-loosening effects of anesthetic.” The Dodds knew the embassy was bugged and

the staff was listening. “Whenever we wanted to talk we had to look around corners and behind doors, watch for the telephone and speak in whispers,” said Martha. Of course, what bothered me the most was the topic of the Jewish “problem.” The Jews were Hitler’s favorite chew toy, and actions against them were escalating, from removing them from jobs to outright violence. Some Jews were “reconciling themselves to the present situation, accepting the status of the inevitable, adjusting themselves to move in their own restricted circles.” Dodd told Hitler that America had ways of handling its own “Jewish problem”; his intention was “to suggest a different procedure” from Germany’s treatment of the Jews, but Hitler became “furious” and told him, “If they continue their activity, we shall make a complete end to all of them in this country.” Well, by this point in the book, I was filled with nausea. Finding out Volume 3 • Issue 10


that Americans knew more than we were taught they knew is very distressing. All those alarm bells, all those warnings, yet Americans in key positions were far more worried about Germany defaulting on its monetary obligations than they were about the demise of the Jews. But “the prickly sensitivities of the day” were getting even worse. One high-ranking German said he discovered that the Gestapo was “attracting all the sadists in Germany and Austria” and “had been actually creating sadists. For it seems that corporal chastisement ultimately arouses sadistic leanings in apparently normal men and women.” Dodd revealed that “He saw Hitler’s stature within Germany grow to that of a god.” And then there was a day in June 1934 “when everything changed,” climaxing in a Nazi purge of “undisguised blood lust, fury, vicious vengefulness.” And Hitler kept insisting to Dodd that he was a man of peace. The title has more than one meaning, referring not only to the “beastly” Nazis, but also to the Tiergarten (literally, “animal garden,”), Berlin’s equivalent of Central Park, where Dodd and others would

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often walk and where later they could speak to each other without being overheard. It was an intense book. I had to take breaks, yet it kept pulling me back in. I think it’s vital for people to look again at this dark page of history. And, of course, Larson’s writing is superb. Even if you don’t go for nonfiction, try this: It reads like a novel. It is just haunting. Author William Dietrich uses Nazi mythology in his latest actionpacked thriller, Blood of the Reich. In the year 1938, proud Nazi and scientist Kurt Raeder is called to the Berlin office of Heinrich Himmler, who wants the zoologist “to help conquer the world.” Raeder’s assignment is to take a vial of the blood of the Crusader Barbarossa to Tibet to open the gates of the hidden kingdom of Shambhala, thereby propping up the fantasy of Aryan superiority. And where exactly is this kingdom of Shambhala? “The traditional belief is a lost valley deep in the Kunlun Mountains at the head of a disappearing river, far from every trade route and habitation. There, the voices of the dead inhabit the wind. Difficult to find and, by repu-

tation, dangerous to penetrate. There are impossible gorges and impossible mountains.” Once there, Raeder is also supposed to look for Vril, a power source that provides “the force…that animates the world.” Ah, more power for the Nazis. Just what they need. The book moves back and forth in time. In present-day Seattle, Rominy Pickett barely escapes an explosion, saved by investigative reporter Jake Barrow. He informs her that his research has revealed that she is not who she thinks she is. In fact, she is the descendant of a U.S. zoologist who knew Raeder in Tibet, and she is in line to inherit his property, including his notes on that Tibetan expedition. But access to those notes puts her in extreme danger from modern-day Skinheads. The fictional tale takes us to Seattle, Europe and Tibet, as the characters discuss myth, spirituality and string theory, no less. Among the people we meet are a colorful aviatrix and a female nun in Tibet. Adult situations and violence. Copyright © 2011 by Mary Louise Ruehr. TJN

MSU Late Fall Registration Info A one-stop registration help desk will be available to students during late fall registration Aug. 15-18 at McNeese State University. Students who have met with their advisers and received their alternate PIN can drop by the Academic Computing Center in Kirkman Hall from 7:45 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon., Aug. 15, and from 7:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tues.-Thurs., Aug. 16-18, to receive assistance with late registration. At the help desk, representatives from financial aid and the registrar’s office will be available to answer questions and help with pin/password resets. In addition, students can sign up for the First Call Notification System, receive help from Information Technology personnel with Banner Self-Service and PINs, as well as make online payments for tuition, fees and parking decals. Students can use the computers in the center to go online to register and make their online payments at www.mcneese.edu. Students paying fees online can use a check or bank draft, MasterCard or Discover credit card and get assistance with the process at the help desk. Students paying with check or cash will need to go to the Cashier’s Office in Smith Hall. Although students can pay for their parking decals at the help desk, they must go to the University Police building to pick up their decal. For more information on McNeese’s late fall registration, contact the McNeese Registrar’s Office at (337) 475-5356. TJN

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U A B A F N OLY

Brought to you by Melanie Perry, Agent 108A Executive Drive, Moss Bluff, LA 70611 BUS: 337-855-7768 www.melanieperry.net State Farm, Bloomington, IL

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Classmates Education Exam Gym Knowledge

Learn Principal Pupil Recess School

Student Teacher Test Text Books

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box and take another turn. When all dots are connected, the player with the most boxes wins.

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AUGUST 11, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 10


r m ende's Museu l l E an en By D e Childr of th r o t c Dire

Cowboys and Aliens

(Universal, DreamWorks, 2011) Who likes cowboy movies? Who likes alien movies? Raise your guns and tentacles. Or in this case, your spike claw, or your inter-thoraxial slime hand. The year is 1873 and everyone is after gold. 007 wakes up out on the prairie. Wait, no, he just looks like 007. We don’t know who he is, but he has a big metal bracelet around his

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wrist. Within moments, he fights two rogue cowboys, getting some new clothes out of the deal, including one of the worst-looking cowboy hats I’ve ever seen in my life. Seriously, along with his vest and short sleeves, he looks less like 007 and more like he escaped from a California dude ranch. This doesn’t stop him from riding to the nearest town, where all is not well. Percy, the son of a local cattle tycoon, is playing target practice on Main Street (the only street). Since Dad is rich, Percy can get away with a lot, but accidentally shoots a deputy, ending up in jail. Meanwhile, our armbanded stranger meets the folks in town, finding out he’s Jake Lonergan, as featured on a wanted poster. Working through some very good Western-style fighting,

Jake finds himself jailed with Percy. That night, Percy’s dad shows up in town, wanting his son. The aliens also show up in flying ships, lassoing the poor screaming townsfolk and hauling them up into the night. Jake saves the day with his strange arm bracelet. At this point, you need to understand that Cowboys and Aliens seems dead serious, but it’s all deadpan humor and satire. For example, the bartender is named “Doc.” The dialogue is intentionally, seriously, lame, and the whole effect is supposed to be cool. But after the cool abduction scene, the movie staggers along through the prairie, painfully developing until it’s the humans against the aliens, since the space bugs have made everyone angry by taking their kin. Yes, kin, and townsfolk, and red men, and just about every other cliché you can think of are in this movie script. Things pick up, with the last half of the movie full of action and violence. The creatures spike the horseriding cowboys and chow down on their necks in some really fast-paced alien style fighting. This can be cool or uncool, depending on if you’ve had dinner yet. On the other hand, Harrison Ford is awesome as the wealthy cattle tycoon, Colonel Dolarhyde. (I pro-

nounce it Dollar Hide. Clever, huh?) He’s a mean character with a soft spot, as hinted at when he almost pulls a man apart between two horses, but at the last minute, cuts a rope and lets the fellow get dragged to death by just one horse. I can’t give away the ending, because you’ve probably already guessed it. I’ve also left out the fact that this movie sports Olivia Wilde as the beautiful and mysterious Ella, wearing her own silly dude ranch hat with her flannel townswoman dress. Thank goodness Harrison Ford got practice wearing his hat in Raiders of the Lost Ark. He saves the whole movie from being a batch of overcooked alien oatmeal. Not only does he go through some much-needed attitude adjustment, possibly coming to grips with his inner child, he also makes friends with the red man and even the townsfolk, not to mention his kin. Warning: the alien violence is extreme, recalling Ridley Scott’s Alien. Though rated PG-13, this film is over the top in screaming, spiking, and bloody intensity. Not recommended for kids. Maybe that’s why the 12-year olds sitting behind me liked it so much. Uh oh, so did I.

TJN

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Hope Therapy Center is a comprehensive outpatient clinic located on East Prien Lake Road here in Lake Charles. We provide physical, occupational and speech therapy services for patients of all ages. We love what we do and are excited for the opportunity to provide services for you or your family member. If you wish to know more about our programs, check out our website at www.hopetherapycenter.net

Bottom row, left to right: Cindy Istre, Office Manager; Emery DeSonier, PT, DPT; Cyndy Lirette, Administrative Assistant. Second row, left to right: Mika Doucet, LOTR, MOT; Kelly Abate, MA, CCC-SLP; Kristin Mathis, PT, DPT. Top row, left to right: Kim B Anderson, PT, DPT, Co-owner and Sonya M. Brooks, MA, CCC-SLP, Co-owner.

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AUGUST 11, 2011

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MARSHLAND FESTIVAL You talk about some good tasting food! The aroma alone of spicy gumbo, etouffee, sauce piquant, shrimp on a stick and more was enough to draw crowds of people to the Lake Charles Civic Center for some good ole chowing down. One crank of live music is all it took to get this full-bellied crowd to bust a move till midnight! The more laid back, easy-breezy shoppers had plenty of unique works of art, jewelry, crafts and more to chose from while the little tykes were entertained with fun activities. I guarontee, those Marshland folks sure know how to throw down a festival! See ya next year!

Jade Nunez and Kirstin Sonnier

Allison Romero and Madison Jinks

Bobbie Fountain, Clifford Little, Dave Coontz and Curtis Fountain

T.J. Murphy and Kasie Scallia

Ken Young and Jeff LaBouve

Stacie Luhrman and Shelby Trahan

Aaron, Brennan and Sid Williams

ACTS ANNUAL FUNDRAISER If you didn’t see the presentation of “ACTS Goes to the Movies,” you missed a really good show! Featuring music from productions performed on the Main Stage of the 1903 historic ACTS One Reid Street Theatre, the performance included wonderful theatre songs from KISS ME Kate and Annie Get Your Gun, as well as shows made famous on Broadway and films over the years. The crowd was brought to its feet by this interesting, funny and talented cast of characters under the direction of Marc Pettaway! ACTS did it again--they brought another wonderful performance for families and friends of our community to enjoy! Norman and JoAnn Fruge Volume 3 • Issue 10

Paula Byrd and Carol Canerday AUGUST 11, 2011

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Gayle McInnis and Vicki Williams

Ruth Crunk and John Coffman

Donna Cespibva with Abram, Phillip and Bridgette Conner

VOLUNTEER CENTER’S ‘CASINO ROYALE’ FUNDRAISER The Volunteer Center of SWLA, Inc. presented their new fundraiser “Casino Royale,” at Reeves Uptown Catering. A crowd of generous supporters of the Volunteer Center joined together for a whole lot of dice-rolling and luck-ofthe-draw fun. Adult beverages helped soften the blow for the not-so-lucky, and we can all agree that delicious food can bring a smile to anyone’s face! It was fun and fabulous, but most important, the stroke of luck was to ensure the continued success of this great organization. Thank you for serving the needs of our community! John Bostick and Barbara Dubose

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Allen and Annette Garber with Beverly McCormick

John and Jenny Lenox with Lacy and Caleb Waldmeier

Emily Parker and Cathy Chapman

Honoria Hebert with Trisha and Jason Martinez

Tommy and Denise Leger

Debbie and Doug Boudreaux

Joan, David and Ted Nixon

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LATIN DANCE NIGHT Now this is what I’m talking about! On a Saturday night, the dynamic Latin dance duo, Jay and Maria Cotto, brought their cha-cha to Pujo St Café for all to enjoy! The evening began with an hour of Latin dance instruction, followed by an open floor dance party. Once Jay and Maria cranked up the Puerto Rican, Island and Cuban music, everyone was suddenly transformed into salsa, merengue’, cha cha, and bachata Latin dancers--or at least they felt like it ‘cause they were having so much fun! Take a look at these smiles. A big thumbs up to dancing the night away with a Latin beat!

TJN

Jay and Maria Cotto with nephew Nick Lugo

Nick Maciel and Isabel Coleman

Stacey Lowin, Amanda Donayre and Marie Keller

Joi Broussard, Calvin Smith and Janet Broussard

Ruby and Wayne Guidry

“I feel it is my duty to restore the public’s faith and trust in the Assessor’s office.” – Wendy Curphy Aguillard, CLA Calcasieu Parish Assessor • Currently serving as Assessor • Certified LA Assessor with 15 years experience • Implemented new financial/ administrative policies

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AUGUST 11, 2011

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Enterprise Blvd. in Lake Charles. For more information, e-mail Jenkober@mac.com.

AUGUST EVENTS AT THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM The Children’s Museum has the following events planned for the month of August: • Amazing Thursday, Aug. 11 - Boat and Water Safety Join Jim McCartney from the Power Squadron at 11 a.m. He will instruct the children on boat and water safety, and they will learn basic knots hands-on! • Saturday, August 13 - Sasol’s Second Saturday Science Show “Liquid Nitrogen Isn’t Just Cool … It’s Freezing!” At 11 a.m., Matt Coyle of Sasol will do liquid nitrogen demonstrations that involve freezing. He will create a water egg and shatter frozen tubing and flowers. He will also generate a vacuum in flask that “sucks in” a hard-boiled egg. The Children’s Museum is located at 327 Broad Street in downtown Lake Charles. Hours are from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.- Sat. Admission is $7.25 for children and adults. Call (337) 433-9420 or visit www.swlakids.org for a complete list of admission fees, memberships and birthday party information. MAXIMUM JEN SHOWS AUG. 12-13 Jen Kober (Treme, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Comedy Central Presents) and Jen Bascom (The Bachelorette, World Cup Comedy) team up once again to bring improv comedy to Lake Charles! This original blend of improv and sketch comedy is sure to leave you laughing as these two talented ladies make up an entire show based off of your suggestions and shout outs! The Jens create scenes and songs right on the spot. There are two weekends of shows each guaranteed to be different from the others, so come back and see them all! Friday’s show is at 9 p.m. and is appropriate for ages 16 and up. There are two shows on Sat.: 7 p.m. is for all ages— bring the whole family and laugh together!  The 9 p.m. show is for ages 16 and up. The shows will be held at The Lake Charles Little Theatre at 813

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AUGUST 11, 2011

TOURNAMENT OF THE STARS AUG. 12-14 The 17th Annual Tournament of the Stars Pro Am Basketball Classic begins Fri., Aug. 12 at 7 p.m. at Barbe High School. The Harlem Legends will kick off the tournament with an exhibition game against the media on Aug. 12 at 7 p.m. at Barbe High School. On Sat., Aug. 13, the tournament will start at 8 a.m. and continue until 9 p.m. at all sites. The series continues on Sun., Aug. 14 beginning at 8 a.m., and final games will match up at 11 a.m. at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The championship game is scheduled for 3 p.m. for women and 4 p.m. for men. The “Back to School Fun Day” will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Civic Center, and the “Dollars for Scholars” celebrity gala will be held at 6 p.m. in the Buccaneer Room. Tickets can be purchased pre-sale for the Pro Am Basketball Classic for the games on Aug. 12 and 13 for $8 until August 5. They can also be purchased at the door for $10. On Aug. 14, tickets will be $5 for adults and $2 for children. Tickets for the gala are $50. For more info, call 491-1466 or visit www.tournamentofstars.com. KREWE DE KAROLINE POKER RUN AUG. 13 The third annual Krewe de Karoline poker run in memory of Carol Breaux will be held Aug. 13 beginning and ending at Wayne & Layne’s Deli and Bar in Sulphur. Registration is from 8:30 to 10 a.m. Stops will be at Fred’s Lounge, Bourbonz, Mollie’s Lamplighter, and Bob & Pete’s. There will be BBQ plate lunches and music from noon until, silent and live auctions at 5 p.m., a raffle and more. Proceeds go to WCCH Genesis Therapeutic Riding Center. For registration information, call 274-9155 or 842-0010. A NIGHT IN TUSCANY AUG. 13 The American Cancer Society’s 2011 Gala will be held at the Isle of Capri on Sat., Aug. 13 at 7 p.m. The evening includes an elegant dinner, a silent and live auction, and live entertainment. Tickets are $100 per person; a table for eight is $1,000. Cocktail attire. For sponsorship opportunities or ticket information, call 433-5817.

Dr. Sarah Jones Gentry

VIOLIN RECITAL AT MSU AUG. 15 The MSU Department of Performing Arts will present a free guest artist recital featuring violinist Dr. Sarah Jones Gentry at 7:30 p.m. Mon., Aug. 15, in the Shearman Fine Arts Theatre. Gentry is an associate professor of violin at Illinois State University. A native of Lake Charles, she is the daughter of Richard and Vera Jones and a graduate of Barbe High School. She studied violin with McNeese faculty member Dr. Allen Fuller and performed in both the Lake Charles and Rapides symphonies. For more information, call the department of performing arts at 475-5028.

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SIXTH ANNUAL LEGIS-GATOR LUNCHEON AUG. 19 The Chamber SWLA Legis-Gator will recap legislation efforts undertaken in 2011 and recognize legislators across the state for working on pro-business, pro-Southwest Louisiana legislation. Scheduled speakers include U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, U.S. Rep. Jeff Landry, and Louisiana Speaker of the House Jim Tucker. The Chamber SWLA has also invited statewide elected officials and the entire Louisiana Legislative and Congressional Delegation.   The luncheon will be held Aug. 19 at L’Auberge du Lac at11:30 a.m. Admission is$45 for Chamber SWLA Members and $55 for non-members. Contact Lynette Clark at 337-433-3632 or lclark@allianceswla.org to reserve your seats. The deadline to RSVP is Aug. 12. REGGIE KEOGH PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT OPENS AUG.19 The City of Lake Charles will exhibit “Places, Faces & Wildlife Around the World” by Reggie Keogh at the 1911 Historic City Hall Arts and Cultural Center at 1001 Ryan Street from Aug, 19Oct. 22. Keogh will host an interactive gallery talk and reception from 6-8 p.m. on the evening of Aug. 19. The event is open to the public and all ages are welcome. In these 77 colorful photographs, this internationally-known local artist takes us on a journey with his love of photography and

travel. Historic City Hall is owned and operated by the City of Lake Charles. The gallery is open Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sat., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. admission is free, but donations are gladly accepted.  For more information, call 491-914 ARTS & CRABS FEST AUG. 20 The second annual Arts & Crabs Fest will make landfall again on Sat., Aug. 20, from 4-8 p.m. at the Lake Charles Civic Center. Ten local chefs from your favorite restaurants will serve crab dishes along with a different Abita beer sample with each dish. It will be held at the Civic Center and will also feature the best in live music with the LakeSide Gamblers and Grayson Capps and the Lost Cause Minstrels. The day will also feature vendor booths, beverage sales, and an art walk featuring the best of local artists. The Arts Council’s annual Gold Key Quest raffle drawing will take place, and ten lucky ticket holders who purchased a $50 ticket will receive fabulous prizes. Admission is a $25 wristband and grants the purchaser access to the entire festival and all of the crab dishes and beer samples. Wristbands and $50 Gold Key Quest raffle drawing tickets are available online at www.artsandhumanitiesswla.org or at the Arts Council office t raphy Exhibi og ot Ph located in Central School Arts & Humanities h og Ke Reggie

LA DOTD Creates Facebook Page for I-10 Calcasieu River Bridge Project The Louisiana Department of Transportation (LA DOTD) recently announced the creation of a new Facebook page to keep motorists informed on the progress of the Interstate 10 Calcasieu River Bridge maintenance project. The Facebook page can be found at facebook.com/I-10-CalcasieuRiver-Bridge-MaintenanceProject. The current maintenance project on the I-10 Calcasieu River Bridge includes repairing and resealing joints on the road surface, removing rust, replacing damaged rivets with bolts and repairing portions of the handrails. The bridge’s handrails feature decorative crossed pistols, which evoke legends of Jean Lafitte and pirates in the Lake Charles area. Some of the original pistols have been damaged or lost over the Volume 3 • Issue 10

years, and new pistols will be cast to replace them. Work on the bridge began on June 27 and is expected to be complete in early 2012. Motorists can expect lane closures between 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. to 5 a.m., outside of heavy traffic hours. At least one lane in each direction will remain open during all lane closures. During one phase of the project, which began in early August and is estimated to last 45 days—there will be a 24-hour-a-day closure of one lane in each direction. LA DOTD advises motorists approaching Lake Charles on I10 to use the I-210 Loop to avoid construction. Anyone who would like to learn more about the project or would like to receive periodic updates can email LADOTD Customer Service at dotdcs@la.gov or call (877) 4LADOTD(452-3683). TJN AUGUST 11, 2011

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Center, Suite 202 in Lake Charles. For more information, call (337) 439-ARTS. FAMILY AND YOUTH FESTIVAL AUG. 27 Family & Youth Festival 2011 will take place on Sat., Aug. 27, , at the Lake Charles Civic Center from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $2 for children and $3 for adults. Featured again this year is Career Paths, a place for teens to explore career choices in a hands-on environment. Family & Youth Festival is a fun event promoting family life and family values in a safe and exciting environment. It is a day of appreciation to the people of Southwest Louisiana, as well as a United Way Community Impact Day. Enjoy games, making crafts, food, and live music in the air-conditioned comfort of the Lake Charles Civic Center. Tickets are available from Family & Youth at 220 Louie Street, Lake Charles, by calling 436-9533, or at the door the day of the event. The festival is an alcohol-free event. IMAGINATION CELEBRATION AUG. 27 Head to the Lake Charles Civic Center Exhibition Hall on Aug. 27 for a fantastic night of celebrity karaoke, music and fun as the Children’s Museum presents the 9th annual Imagination Celebration! This year, the event will host the first ever Celebrity Karaoke Sing Off! Come out and cheer on your favorite local celebrities as they compete for the title. Enjoy the delicious food from the area’s best restaurants and relax by the cash bar. The silent auction and famous live auction, with auctioneer Hal McMillin, will offer unique, must-have items. Please feel free to come dressed in 1950s attire and compete in our bestdressed contest. Enjoy fantastic music by the Boomerang Experience and

rock the night away! Tickets are $50 per person. For sponsorship or ticket information, contact the museum office at (337) 433-9420. HEALTHY WOMAN ANNIVERSARY EVENT SEPT. 8 Women and Children’s Hospital’s Healthy Woman First Anniversary Event will be held on Thurs., Sept. 8 at Treasures of Marilyn’s in Lake Charles. Guest speaker will be Dale Smith Thomas, who will give an empowering and entertaining presentation that will provide women with the tools to become their personal best. Enjoy the free Women’s Health Fair & Expo from 5 - 6 p.m.; hors d’ oeuvres and music from 6 - 6:30 p.m., and dinner from 6:30 - 8 p.m. Tickets are $20 per person or $160 to reserve a table of eight. For more information, call (337) 475-4064 or e-mail nadia.nazeer@womenchildrens.com. USS ORLECK PATRIOT RIDE SEPT. 11 The USS ORLECK Naval Museum is proud to host the USS ORLECK Patriot Ride on Sun., Sept. 11. It will serve to commemorate the 10th anniversary of 9/11, and to honor the service and sacrifice of our active duty military, veterans, police officers and firefighters. Registration is from 8:30- 10 a.m. at the LC Civic Center Amphitheater. Opening ceremonies begin at 10 a.m. and ride begins at 11 a.m. Riders meet back at Amphitheater at 4 p.m. for memorial service. At 5:30, the closing ceremony and prize announcements will be held at the Isle of Capri Casino Hotel. Post-event concert will begin at 6 p.m. Pre-registration fees are $20 per

Scholarship Seminar Aug. 27 The Black Heritage Festival, ConocoPhillips, and Capital One Bank will host a free Scholarship Seminar on Sat., Aug. 27, at the Pryce Miller Recreation Complex, 216 Albert St., Lake Charles. Registration is at 9:30 a.m. and the seminar begins at 10 a.m. The seminar is open to students

from grade 9-12 and their parents. There will be free workbooks for the first 100 households, plus door prize drawings. Contact BHF Executive Director Judith Washington at 304-0620 or e-mail: jwashi4568@aol.com for more information. TJN

Join Up and Join In!

www.lwv-lc.org email: info@lwv-lc.org (337) 474-1864

Newspaper publisher Mary Katherine Goddard (June 16, 1738 – August 12, 1816) in 1877, risking British arrest, Goddard inserted her own name as printer of the first copy of the Declaration of Independence including the signers’ names. Mary Katherine Goddard died on August 12, 1816, at the age of 78, a woman of achievement who had taken an important stand for freedom of speech and the rights of women in the young United States. PAGE 50

AUGUST 11, 2011

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initial rider and $10 per additional rider; $30 and $10 on the day of the event. There online registration at www.orleck.org . Call Penny Miller at (337) 4383038 for assistance registering. WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES SEPT. 17 On Sept. 17, men from all walks of life will walk one mile inside Prien Lake Mall in women’s high-heeled shoes to protest rape, sexual assault and domestic violence. This event is coordinated by the Sexual Assault Response Team (SART). Registration begins at 8 p.m. with the march scheduled for 10:30 p.m. Men, women, and children are invited to participate and pre-registration is welcome. The registration fee is $20 per person, $15 for students, or $100 for a team with a maximum of six members. All participants registering prior to Sept. 5 are guaranteed to receive a free event T-shirt. Men are required to walk in a minimum of 2” high heels. They may wear a more comfortable woman’s shoe if they raise more than $1,000 in pledges. For additional information or to register, please visit www.walkamileswla.org or call (337) 494-7273. LCF SALUTES THE USO FUNDRAISER SEPT. 24 The Louisiana Choral Foundation will celebrate the 70th anniversary of the USO with dinner, dancing to big band sounds, and a musical show “Hooray for the USO!” On Sat., Sept. 24, at 6 p.m., Paxton Hall in First United Methodist Church in Lake Charles will be transformed into a 1940’s USO canteen. A delicious meal with exciting entertainment by LCF members, local dance troupes and musicians will honor the USO tradition of serving our troops. Tickets (for limited seating) are $25 and will be available at Swicegood Music or by calling 491-9348.

TJN

BBBS Seeking Lunch Buddy Volunteers Big Brothers Big Sisters(BBBS) is seeking Lunch Buddy volunteers to enjoy lunch with an elementary-aged child, twice a month, to offer individualized time and attention, with the setting being the child’s school rather than in the community. A volunteer is matched with a child at an elementary school that is close in proximity to work or home. The volunteer and child meet twice a month during the school year to enjoy lunch together and utilize the resources available within the school: computer lab, library, gym or schoolyard. All match activities take place during the child’s scheduled lunch period, on school grounds. Match activities last approximately 30 minutes, depending on the child’s lunch period. Whether the match plays board games, reads a book or just listens, the relationship promotes a positive school experience for the child: good attendance, positive peer and adult relationships, a positive attitude and academic enrichment. As the friendship evolves over time, the Volume 3 • Issue 10

volunteer and child discover ways to make school and learning fun. When a match continues from one school year to the next, the volunteer experiences the satisfaction of watching their Little achieve success in school. BBBS has learned that being important to a child doesn’t take much more than that, but the impact can be huge—for both of you. You don’t need special training or certification. If you are 18+ years of age, able to listen, be encouraging, help build self-confidence and you can commit to one hour, twice a month, for the full school year then you’re ready to be a Lunch Buddy. For more information on the Lunch Buddy program or any of the programs offered—please call Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Louisiana, a United Way agency. In Lake Charles, (337) 478-5437; DeRidder, (337) 460-5437; Jennings, (337) 824-4847 or visit www.bbbsswla.net. TJN

Meet Sarah! Sweet Sarah is a darling girl who came to us pregnant and ready to deliver. She’s been a great mother to her healthy pups and should be weaning them by July 25. She will be ready to be adopted to her very own home where she can get the pampering and nurturing she deserves. We aren’t positive what Sarah’s breed is, but someone suggested Min/Pin mix so we are going with that. She is approximately three years old and very calm and docile. Sarah loves getting tons of attention and is eager to please her human. She is housetrained, crate trained, and ready to bring love to your home. For more information, call Sarah’s foster mom at (337) 533-8212 or email careinlc@gmail.com. Sarah has been spayed and is up to date on vaccinations. An application can found online at www.4PawsSocietyInc.com and faxed to (337) 558-6331 or emailed to fourpawssociety@aol.com. A vet reference and home

visit are part of the adoption process to ensure a good match for both the family and the dog. If you live outside the general area, a “virtual” home visit can be done by e-mailing photos of your yard and home. Hurry! Sarah is waiting!

TJN

LC’s First Stand Alone Chick-fil-A Opening Aug. 11 Chick-fil-A will be opening its first stand-alone Lake Charles location on Aug. 11, where the first 100 adults in line that morning will be awarded a free year’s supply of Chick-fil-A. Seven years after it debuted at an Arizona grand opening, Chickfil-A’s First 100 celebration ushers in each grand opening around the country. The parking lot party draws Chick-fil-A’s loyal customers who come equipped with couches, TVs, computers, tents and other gear as they count down to the newest restaurant opening.

A similar scene is expected in Lake Charles, where Chick-fil-A will award a one-year supply of free Chick-fil-A® Meals (52 certificates) to each of the first 100 adults in line, age 18 and older with identification, at the restaurant located at 3435 Nelson Rd. The line officially opens at 6 a.m., Wed., Aug. 10, with the free meal cards being awarded Thurs., Aug. 11, sometime between 6 a.m. and 6:10 a.m. The restaurant will open for business immediately thereafter. If there are more than 100 people by 6 a.m. on Aug. 10, all 100 spots will be determined by a raffle. See http://www.chick-fila.com/Locations/First-100 for complete rules.

TJN

AUGUST 11, 2011

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To list your event e-mail: lauren@thejambalayanews.com

The

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Taproot @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Judd Bares @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Paul Gonsoulin @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • DJ Kay @ Big Kahuna’s, 9 p.m. THURSDAY, AUGUST 11 • Pete Bergeron @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Don Fontenot et les Amis de la Louisiane @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • David Pellerin @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • 311/Sublime @ Party by the Pool, L’Auberge du Lac, 8:30 p.m. • DJ Cage @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 12 • Joe Simon & Louisiana Cajun @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • No Idea @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Mark Mestre @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Paul Gonsoulin @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Large Marge/Honky/The Loaded 44erz @ Luna Live, 8 p.m.

• DJ Smelly @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Jeff Tyson @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • David St. Romain @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, AUGUST 13 • Scotty Pousson & The Pointe aux Loups Playboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • No Idea @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Cecil’s Band @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Carlos Mencia @ Delta Event Center, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Jeff Tyson @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Slim Harper @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Twangsters Union @ Yesterday’s, 9:30 p.m. • David St. Romain @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. MONDAY, AUGUST 15 • Kristy Lee @ Luna Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m.

• Brad Broussard @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Paul Gonsoulin @ The Porch, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, AUGUST 18 • Felton LeJeune & The Cajun Cowboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Kung Fu Pineapple @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • John Cessac @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Kirk Holder @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 • Howard Noel & Cajun Boogie @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Bayou Katz @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Kris Harper @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Chris Watson @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • DJ Smelly @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Krossroadz @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. SATURDAY, AUGUST 20 • Al Roger & Louisiana Pride @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Bayou Katz @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m.

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AUGUST 11, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 10


• Cecil’s Band @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Chris Watson @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • Leroy Thomas & The Zydeco Roadrunners @ Club 1Sixty5, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 8 p.m. • Signature @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • Twangsters Union @ CitiLimits, Sulphur, 9:30 p.m. • Krossroadz @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. MONDAY, AUGUST 22 • My Wooden Leg @ My Place Bar, 7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24 • Alvin Touchet @ OB’s Bar & Grill, 7 p.m. • Brad Broussard @ Huddle Up Sports Bar & Grill, 8 p.m. • Paul Gonsoulin @ The Porch, 8 p.m. THURSDAY, AUGUST 25 • Lesa Cormier & The Sundown Playboys @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Dustin Ray @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • John Cessac @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Cam Pyle @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m. FRIDAY, AUGUST 26 • Briggs Brown & The Bayou Cajuns @ DI’s Cajun Food & Music, Basile, 6:30 p.m. • Street Side Jazz @ Stellar Beans, 7 p.m. • ISIS @ Mikko, Coushatta Casino, Kinder, 7 p.m. • Reed Planchard @ Cecil’s Cajun Kitchen, DeRidder, 7:30 p.m. • Louisiana Indie Radio Launch Party @ The Porch, 8 p.m. • David Locklear @ The Cigar Club, 8 p.m. • Marcus Ardoin @ Gator Lounge, Delta Downs, Vinton, 8 p.m. • DJ Smelly @ Bob & Pete’s, Sulphur, 9 p.m. • After 8 @ Jack Daniels Bar & Grill, L’Auberge du Lac, 10 p.m.

TJN

MONDAY NIGHTS: Abita Beer Night

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS: Mondo Martini Night

THURSDAY NIGHTS: Be Well Night

LUNA GOODS ON SALE: Luna Classic Tee $15 Luna Guitar Tee $15 Luna Ball Cap $15 Luna Dressings $6 (16oz.) Citrus Vinaigrette Balsamic Vinaigrette Raspberry Vinaigrette Cosmic

Thurs., Aug. 11 @ 9 pm LUNA LADIES NIGHT! FEATURING DJ JOHN FLOYD Fri., Aug. 12 @ 9 pm HONKY WITH THE LOADED 44RZ & LARGE MARGE Sat., Aug. 13 @ 9 pm NIK FEST! (NEW INSTRUMENTS FOR KIDS!) Mon., Aug. 15 @ 9 pm KRISTY LEE Thurs., Aug. 18 @ 9 pm LUNA LADIES NIGHT! FEATURING DJ JOHN FLOYD Fri., Aug. 19 @ 9 pm RESEARCH TURTLES Sat., Aug. 20 @ 9 pm SOUL TRACK MIND Thurs., Aug. 25 @ 9 pm LUNA LADIES NIGHT!

Volume 3 • Issue 10

AUGUST 11, 2011

PAGE 53


Leslie B e four dec rman’s career in ades, an music folksing er, mus d includes stin spans ic teach ts as a booker, e c tival dir oncert promote r, coffeehouse r e notes w ctor, music jou , publicist, fesriter, ar rnalist, trade o album tist ma na rg tainmen anization pre gerwwwww, sid t a the Mu ttorney, and ent, enterp sic Mu seum o resident of Louisian f a . musicall She prefers Southwest y GRAM eclectic, and v all things M Recordin Ys as a mem otes on the g Aca ber o reached at leslie@ demy. She c f the an leslieber man.co be m. gs, y g e k a d e squ s an ne spoon voice that’s ous barito e c . s a and a sh and rau cted turns e end of th rtson h d n h o i a e J h t n t p n   s )a go. kitte by unex pened at r if they ë’s, ears a en (Austin se for g y e p n b a 0 i Z t h 3 m f o v t bel magic nger reme g or one o sang i writer hea a little wor !  e s h e T h o n c l o s o ite Ro ong iliar s troed sound can n he wr d to s aff set. I with a fam trumpet in lashes,” as l move y looks and man, can festival st e e t e h l d ed ou r Mariachi wingy “Ey th as a No lar frank But man o sicians an home of th s u e u u l o r h   c . e e e l r e m o m lik wea as at the ic dev hose your !” or h credib ringo d tasty in ter lyric (“t nees go the in of econom night. Iw G t “ a l a yk g y an ead Por o day tion tricks d or Cole inges so m undulatin itinvita seys (he’s h ) on Satur rhardt (wh r r s n w s y u a t e a i t g o i Cow give me through e dancin Morr t in the c al Cliff Eb Always] Y s d e e w n e m p [ e g e h e l “ t ’v s t l n I o N i e opm n and hi ne of his r that n mate, m on, fr eak”), prop hm that’s g ping this to illing e d v o n o u s a t c n b s r t e e w Joh to di y fav , re tha ’s old ight t ng th I’m ty d rhy g ban n even as with a br a ya ya yai yed m th Johnson Lang eggi ongs in a gasted mn for mo “foul” i a r l b e p b b d t y d i a w s t u e l s e l o y f i o w d a ’s o r c d , A r ) n c c w y S e I am ing this ting nd that e (“Ay, ay, ecause I man Face” d Mayor each oth hted room one’s th a d or ig c writ ths, and no ime by how itten l f n i a s d n y l e u e s beat, ocalization elashes!”) b ralyzed wi l r e B a m e b c t r i v r 4 r o a g w e y c e v e n l a r h h e m ki Ju ’ve Latin ay ay ay Ey s almost p n a single traded nd atmosp ite way to p song aft three e, I’m mar merfests I the third ti w a r u a e o t m d s S v e i e u i a   l . f s l S u Ay, ay ralled I w n’t take do q y ca al yet t hi rd een ay’s n m o n b o f — t o h   s ’t d d . s t u r w l e n n e n o o u m d so e t, and co by.  New B and holy c x lyrical ab millenniu el my p lways.  Joh d if he ha the next d   Z oë n a ber it d was this: iteral , r , w e a igh t a l , e o n h j m w f e u , e i t e v g o d e e i o e n l l n r b t t m c a al ene nly o re e daw ng so prepa is gen d, ecting val sin note t what happ that struck and sudde amazi d away to e played th I’m el e folk festi eekend, th ew Bedfor te , t g g r e a d u e t w B Nor bett et hin ain st dragg , would hav himself. favori h July 4th streets of N brink of no d som Le Vent du ponse way e hat m ot only g e s t y n w i a n t l o Eac nt in the s on the o a e p h h s t e n s t s h a , p re pi rd wit a call and ,” and then t was hold eve tts teeter h year, des n out re k God I w laborations f any o h n t h i a c f w i s o o c an to ol njo ll was ma chuse istrati nd ea But th f the best c eekend, bu hear/see. there Dueling Ba and mom heart is sti Massa -happen, a ty’s admin elene o o w t . n t “ y e e i s   s i H t than dys leapt e!  Oh, m memory. for on Summerfe d ever hop g three act , gonna ng of the c . Alan and smooth i e l y n o i e u i d s s g r h o y e l n t s n c u l i n e t f a Kenn our hat tim it again in elf that I e I a n p o ch Ke ion kshop fe hap anization . Jamie K n c s e i t t s t i e e e o , t s g P d mys r Sloan aring n y jam at a wor guar nko’s org o of itself roductio ay ra and whose ene ntry, o unding he I promised down at a hearu a s p e t g l a M s e u o o f o w o d u ed It t.co ery p his year, Kor almost t rews mak d Louise n mysel misse wife d includ op, al e v T lly sit cause I’ve ce in perso a u t seems r various c d Sheila an r committe of They usband and olk, rock, p heart of e c a i e o t b d v a l , e e n f t u wo the h bracing s are at th ht se and h , Marilyn a d, and othe minimum rs bluesy ximity ic a inwrig arm jazzy- ite our pro n’t mane em e c r a i t d y h d c g l t n W i n e a l a e l a l a v , w m o rw esp I did ystic food Nord tents s, and c who ing he ny years, d sts.  Well, ked up a and m erfest. calm circle their rafters and ad-in time d ent du zz quartet mV a e e f i L c n o for m l Summer ear, so I p c at the sales Summ n we had lk-rock-ja in a char chiefs he artists, ppointed l the seats a s e d o p f h a l n a T severa gain this y covery CD ht now. fuss. T p at their s up to fil m!) scallo ad is trad in French d English. rdyo c ig is e it a u u w b h y e o Qu and sing ente st and hu nd age of her Red y iTunes r e (“Time show dience sh fish and ( d time is c c a h i m a o y k c k d t u a o d p r a n n d s r a i e g a e o e i r c But o D n an ’s sp the in the fri tionally rseas ghly F rs are keyb lerice, violi st and it rs of Nick hs (“There i e , h t v p , e o n d ( c g e n t x i in e u sta far er ove Oc embe nguitar as Bo nd an .  from nHer c ly”), Phil oung (“Aft Bandmman Nicol r Demers, er, accordio t. line, a ho come ) and near stage ma d p Y e l i R e e e e w y r in of No rtune”), N and Georg ass”) gurdy ncer Olivi d bassplay jean Brun d, by all the countr k over ma ered. I hea P o a n ) é t F n ” a d s o R a s h h r l s y u t o s t p o g t r e o s F Ru ste ni st En ud sM big acr r, I o a a , g d i a l ere e s n w n e o i s h a B y I t h e u G s w n c ne v s, ll T he mo Thi duties, so s playing uo perp er ingd ldbeat t i T A t a “ t S d ( h o n t n a R , al in so or dh som or d unk oup ent Harri g once aga f the origin retaagem the big gr those solo wings, mis - ist an ë Lewis, fr cription (w , acoustic f m y o Zo des ing n provin espectful o rent interp oicmostl ents, and tantial foll val’s perfor y defies laying “sw s of her ow elty e r v t s m s n i o t u b a s r u p t m sions ering a diff eper by re ulal ng e fe luding m ins ?), nov o th s h e i s l t d l w ” i f e f n k f v s o e d a l r e r c s e s yet o an probe vaud azz and fo s big band l eras of th forme least 6/7th r stages, in elds h to i w c j a , n a c e   a n n t tio t vo well Lati ing a on the oth fore seen. en to re, Slo sound e grea ng as rk e t ele, g.  He -y bass-y cate hush l n u i k devisi rs from th ances I’d never b reak to lis g hero Ma u eli om e rds, h n b ” try bo more of a d ed singer numb and 1940s. no/keyboa istle, mout artists ok a short e songwriti es Around c i e a h s i t I to h Villag mak wispy-vo 1930 utilizes p , penny w luding n the Radia c r e wic ose “Love th joy whe a n h i t n i S e n u e than a g o r i G wh uss ica, f wi , c l n r e n o e s o y p s m har et, hand John me hug m trump made

s: u o d n eme r T s i Small edford B New erfest Summ

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AUGUST 11, 2011

Volume 3 • Issue 10


does, and in these selections, she finds nuances that I hadn’t heard before. There were incredible performances and hilarious stories between the songs, such as Cheryl Wheeler’s “Potatoes” and her canned (cremated) cats on the mantel riffing; QuasiModal String Band featuring Lisa Gutkin (Klezmatics and former Whirlygig fiddle), Matt Greenhill (mandola and guitar, youngest of the Greenhill folk royalty family)

and Steve Arkin (banjo) making their first public appearance. And I couldn’t forget Californian singer and guitarist Claudia Russell with her mandolin-playing husband Bruce Kaplan, singing Kyle Johnson’s “Ready to Receive,” my current favorite love song, replaying over and over and over and over in my van from home to Trader Joe’s and back. I didn’t want it to end.

TJN

Bayou Writers’ Group Church, 3501 Patrick Street, Lake Charles. Go to www.bayouwritersgroup.com and http://bayouwritersgroup.blogspot.com for more information on this exciting organization devoted to the writer. TJN

Bayou Writers’ Group meets the first Saturday of each month at the Carnegie Memorial Library, 411 Pujo St. from 10 a.m – noon. Join Bayou Writers’ Group for their 7th Annual Bayou Writers’ Conference, Sat., Nov. 12 at Fellowship Hall, University United Methodist

Killin’ Time Crossword

Crossword puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com (www.bestcrosswords.com). Used with permission. Volume 3 • Issue 10

AUGUST 11, 2011

PAGE 55


The Jambalaya News - Vol. 3 No. 10  

August 11, 2011 Great Women Want Great Health: An Inside Look at the Healthy Woman Program

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