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NATIONAL SYMBOLS AND EMBLEMS


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NATIONAL SYMBOLS AND EMBLEMS Jamaican National Flag 1.1 The Jamaican National Flag was first raised on Independence Day, 6 August, 1962. It signifies the birth of the nation, recalls past achievements and gives inspiration towards further success.

Design

Length

 Width 

Fly

Hoist

1.2 A bipartisan committee of the Jamaican House of Representatives designed the Jamaican National Flag. The flag comprises a diagonal cross or saltire with four triangles in juxtaposition, the diagonal cross in gold, the top and bottom triangles in green and the hoist and fly triangles in black, as in the illustration below (which shows the flag from the observer’s perspective, with the hoist edge of the flag to the left and the fly to the right). The length of the flag is twice its width (for example, a flag 3 feet wide will be 6 feet long). The width of the diagonal cross is one-sixth of the width of the flag (for example, the width of the cross on a 6 foot by 3 foot flag will be 6 inches).

Symbolism 1.3 The colours of the flag have the following symbolism: • Black depicts the strength and creativity of the people; • Gold, the natural wealth and beauty of sunlight;  Green, hope and agricultural resources

2.

Use of National Emblems, Symbols etc.

8.1

The Chancery and Protocol Division of the Office of the Prime Minister is responsible for authorizing the use of the national Emblems (the Coat of Arms and the National Flag), the National Anthem, the National Symbols (Tree, Flower, Fruit and Bird) and the National Pledge.

8.2

The following summarizes some of the key principles concerning the use of national symbols. 1. The Coat of Arms may not be used without the prior permission of the Chancery and Protocol Division of the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM). 2. The National Flag of Jamaica may be used freely provided:


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(a) when an image or representation of the National Flag is being used for advertising, commercial or promotional purposes, it should:  always be used, represented or shown in a dignified manner  be represented in the approved colours of black, gold and green.  not be defaced by way of printing or illustration or be masked by other objects, but should be displayed in a manner which is described as ‘aloft and free' whereby all symbolic parts of the Flag can be seen.  never have placed on it any mark, insignia, letter, word, number, figure or drawing of any kind. (b) the rules set out in Chapter 18 – Flag Use are respected. 3. Other flags of Jamaica are personal flags or flags of agencies of the state and may only be used by the person or agency to whom they relate or in a manner expressly permitted by them. 4. The national Emblems may not be incorporated into a trade mark or used for any commercial or other public purpose without the prior permission of the Chancery and Protocol Division of the Office of the Prime Minister. Applicants should note the following guidance:  Section 12(1) of the Jamaica Trademarks Act of 1999, states that a trademark containing the Coat of Arms of Jamaica, the national flag or other national symbol is not registrable as a trademark. The Act also states that the flags, armorial bearings or other state emblems of other member countries of the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property are not registrable unless that country authorizes such use.  Where persons submit trademark applications to the Jamaica Intellectual Property Office (JIPO) in which national emblems/symbols are used, the applications will not be accepted unless they are accompanied by authorization for use granted by the Office of the Prime Minister or from the appropriate authorities in the country concerned. Where there is no authorization to use the emblem, the applicant will be directed to request permission from the OPM or the country concerned. The OPM, in its consideration of an application to use the national symbols in a trademark, shall have particular regard to the manner in which the national symbols are to be represented in the [may grant or refuse approval for the use of the national symbols representation being used as part of the] artwork of the proposed trademark. Factors which the OPM may take into account in considering an application to use the national symbols may include whether the intended purpose is for educational or non-educational use, whether the product will be commercially free or freely distributed.


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Use of the National and Other Flags 1.

Flying and Other Use of the National Flag

1.1

The following guidance should be observed in the flying or other use of the National Flag:   

              

The national flag takes precedence over all other flags on Jamaican soil, including flags of other sovereign nations. The national flag is a symbol of the nation and must always be treated with dignity and respect. The national flag should never be smaller than any other flag flown at the same location. When the national flag is flown with other national flags, each flag should have the same width and be flown at the same height. If any of the flags is square, or nearly square, it may have a slightly larger width (up to 125%) so that its overall area is similar to the other flags. The Jamaican national flag should be hoisted first and lowered last The national flag should never be flown above another national flag on the same staff (this would suggest superiority, or conversely, inferiority of one flag, or nation, over another). The national flag should not be displayed in a position inferior to any other flag. No other flag should be placed above or to the left of the national flag, (as viewed by an observer). In a parade of flags, as the host country, the Jamaican flag enters last. All other flags are placed with consideration given to alphabetic order Except at foreign diplomatic and consular missions and at offices of intergovernmental organizations, no foreign flag may be flown publicly in Jamaica unless the Jamaican national flag is flown at the same time. During the hoisting and lowering of the national flag, or when the national flag is passing in parade or in review, all persons present should face the flag and stand to attention. Persons in uniform should salute and men not in uniform should remove their hats. The national flag should be flown at the official residence of The Governor-General. The distinguishing flag of The Governor-General should also be flown when in residence. The national flag should be flown at the official residence of the Prime Minister. The distinguishing flag of the Prime Minister should also be flown when in residence. The national flag, in the form of a car pennant, should be flown on the cars of the GovernorGeneral and the Prime Minister when they are present. The national flag should not be draped over a vehicle, except on designated state, military and police occasions. In state/official funerals, the coffin is draped with a 12x6 Jamaican flag The national flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature. The national flag should normally be flown at all government and municipal offices and establishments, on or near the main administrative building, between 8am and sundown only but may be flown for twenty-four hours if illuminated in darkness. The national flag should be flown on all government-owned ships, defence craft and lighthouses. A representation of the national flag should be displayed on all governmentowned aircraft, rail and motor vehicles The national flag should be flown on all merchant ships, boats and other vessels of Jamaican registry. All foreign registered vessels entering Jamaican territorial waters must fly the Jamaican national flag in the customary courtesy position (normally in the rigging on the starboard side of a mast) The national flag should be flown on or near Polling Stations on the day of Elections.


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         

The national flag may be flown on government-aided schools when in session. The national flag may be flown on private buildings on all national and state occasions and must be flown on the occasion of official visits by the Governor-General and the Prime Minister On occasions of official morning declared by the Office of the Prime Minister, the national flag is flown at half-mast for the period specified. The half-mast position is the mid-point of the visible flag pole. The national flag should not be flown in inclement weather. The national flag should not be allowed to touch the ground. The national flag should be hoisted briskly and lowered ceremoniously. The national flag should never be fastened, flown, used, or stored in such a manner as to permit the flag to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way. A torn, faded or otherwise damaged flag should be removed and replaced with a new flag. The damaged flag should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning privately. The national flag should not be flown or otherwise used purely decorative purposes on anything that is for temporary use and is likely to be discarded, except on state occasions. The national flag should not be draped over the body, other than at competitive events where it has become customary for competition winners to drape their national flag over their shoulders when completing a lap of victory or at a photo-call. In these exceptional circumstances, every effort must be made to preserve the dignity of the national flag, not least by ensuring that it does not touch the ground and is properly handled before and after the event. Ideally, the flag should be draped with the hoist of the flag to the right or over the right shoulder.

2. Flying and Other Use of the National Flag by Jamaican Diplomatic and Consular Representatives 2.1 In countries where it is the custom for diplomatic and consular representatives to fly their national flags on their official premises, residences and vehicles, Jamaica’s diplomatic and consular representatives should fly the Jamaican national flag. The usual size of flag flown at diplomatic and consular premises is 12 feet by 6 feet but, where the prevalence of high winds makes large flags unsuitable, the usual size is 6 feet by 3 feet. On vehicles, the usual size is 12 inches by 6 inches 2.2 Diplomatic and consular representatives may fly the Jamaican national flag at any time if they think it desirable, paying due regard to the views of the local authorities and to the practice followed by their foreign diplomatic and consular colleagues. On the occasion of local official celebrations or of mourning, local practice should be observed. As a general rule, it is desirable that the Jamaican national flag be flown on all occasions when this would be regarded as complimentary to the local authorities or to countries locally represented, or when omission to do so might give offence (e.g. on the occasion or death of a foreign Head of State).

3.

Commercial Use of the National Flag

3.1 For guidance on the use of the National Flag for commercial purposes and in trademarks, etc. please see Chapter 16 – National Identity and Symbols.

4.

Flying and Other Use of Other Flags of Jamaica

Royal Standard


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4.1 The Royal Standard is flown only when The Queen of Jamaica is present. Specific guidance and instructions will be provided by Buckingham Palace for the flying of the Royal Standard during visits to Jamaica by The Queen.

Flag of the Governor-General 4.2 The Governor-General’s flag is to be flown by day and night at the residence of the GovernorGeneral, and lowered when the Governor-General is away from Jamaica or when he demits office. 4.3 The Governor-General’s flag should be flown on any ship in which he takes passage, and at any military ceremony at which he is present. The flag should also be flown in miniature on any vehicle or vessel in which the Governor-General is travelling. The Governor-General’s flag should be lowered immediately after he has left the vessel or vehicle in which he was travelling, unless he is scheduled to return to the vessel or vehicle in a short period of time. The Governor-General’s flag should never be flown on a vessel that is underway or on a vehicle that is in use when the Governor-General is not on board the vessel or in the vehicle.

Flag of the Governor-General’s Wife 4.4 The wife of the Governor-General has a personal flag which is used on designated occasions. The flag may be flown in miniature on any vehicle or vessel in which she is travelling, other than when she is accompanying the Governor-General (when the Governor-General’s flag is flown).

Flag of the Prime Minister 4.5 The Prime Minister’s flag is to be flown by day and night at the official residence of the Prime Minister and at the Office of the Prime Minister, and lowered when the Prime Minister is away from Jamaica or when he demits office. 4.6 The Prime Minister’s flag should be flown on any ship in which he takes passage. The flag should also be flown in miniature on any vehicle or vessel in which the Prime Minister is travelling. The Prime Minister’s flag should be lowered immediately after he has left the vessel or vehicle in which he was travelling, unless he is scheduled to return to the vessel or vehicle in a short period of time. The Prime Minister’s flag should never be flown on a vessel that is underway or on a vehicle that is in use when the Prime Minister is not on board the vessel or in the vehicle.

Defence Force Flags 4.7

Please consult Jamaica Defence Force for guidance on the use of Defence Force flags.

5. 5.1

Flags of International Organisations

International Organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, International Civil Aviation Organisation, CARICOM and the Commonwealth of Nations, are bodies whose members are primarily nation-states. Flags of International Organisation are normally flown only at times and places relating to the organisation or at an event hosted by the organisation. For example, the flag of the Commonwealth of Nations is flown at Commonwealth Heads of Government Meetings and the Commonwealth Games.

5.2


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At offices of the organisation or when the organisation hosts an event, the flag may be given the position of honour amongst other flags displayed there. For example, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City, the UN flag is flown above the flags of the member states.

5.3

6.

Flags at Sea

Flags are particularly important at sea, where they can mean the difference between life and death, and consequently where the rules and regulations for the flying of flags are strictly enforced.

6.1

6.2

Flags at sea have their own names. A national flag flown at sea is known as an ensign.

A courteous, peaceable merchant ship or yacht customarily flies its ensign on a staff at the stern of the vessel together with the flag of whatever port or waters it is currently visiting (known as a courtesy flag) at the mast. To fly one's ensign alone in foreign waters, a foreign port or in the face of a foreign warship traditionally indicates a willingness to fight, with cannon, for the right to do so. This custom is still taken quite seriously by many naval and port authorities and is readily enforced in many parts of the world by boarding, confiscation, and other civil penalties.

6.3

In some countries, yacht ensigns are different from merchant ensigns in order to signal that the yacht is not carrying cargo that requires a customs declaration. Carrying commercial cargo on a boat with a yacht ensign is deemed to be smuggling in many jurisdictions.

6.4

There is a system of international maritime code signal flags for numerals and letters of the alphabet. Each flag or pennant has a specific meaning when flown individually.

6.5

'Dressing Ship' is done with the international code signal flags. Officer's flags, club burgees and national flags are not used. The ship is dressed at 0800 and remains dressed until evening colours (at anchor only, except for a vessel's maiden or final voyage). The ship’s ensign is hoisted at the stern staff and the national flag may be displayed at the bow staff. A rainbow of international code flags is then arranged from the waterline forward to the waterline aft. Flags and pennants are bent on alternatively. It is good practice to follow a sequence of two flags, one pennant, two flags, one pennant etc. The sequence of flags can be any order but is usually arranged to give a harmonious colour pattern.

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7.

General Principles of Flying and Use of Flags

There are no internationally agreed regulations governing flag etiquette but there are generally accepted international practices, the key elements of which are as follows: 1. If displaying more than one flag, the national flag should be hoisted first and lowered last. 2. A general guide to the order of precedence of more than one flag is as follows: a. Flag of host country b. Flags of other country/countries c. Flags of International Organisations d. Flags of Provinces of host country e. Flags of Regions/Counties/Cities f. Corporate/House/Club/School/Organisation flags 3. When two or more national flags are flown together, all flags should be the same size and flown on separate flagpoles of the same height. The foreign national flags should normally be flown in alphabetical order according to the official language of the country unless there is another accepted order among the states concerned.

7.1


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4. When a national flag is displayed with another flag, the national flag should be on the observer’s left, facing the staff. If the national flag is crossed with another flag, its staff should be in front of the other flag. 5. When three flags are flown the national flag should be flown on the centre flagpole. 6. When four flags are flown the national flag should be on the observers left. 7. When five flags or more are flown a national flag should be placed at each end of the line. 8. In a semi-circle arrangement of flagpoles, the national flag should be in the centre. 9. In an enclosed circle, the national flag should be centred and flown immediately opposite the main entrance of the building, or, if placed externally should be flown next to the entrance of the main building. The order of the flags should be clockwise in alphabetical order, either in official language of country or in English. 10. When the flag is displayed from a staff projecting horizontally or at an angle, the top, left corner (the canton) of the flag should be placed at the peak of the staff. 11. When a flag is displayed from a staff on a speaker’s platform, it should be on the speaker’s right as he faces the audience (i.e. on the observer’s left). 12. A flag carried in a procession should be free flying. If a national flag is carried in procession with other (non-national) flags, it should be the first in the procession. If two or more national flags are carried in line abreast, the Jamaican national flag should be placed on the right hand side of the line facing the direction of movement or in the centre of the line. Alternatively, national flags may be placed at both ends of the line.

Mourning 13. As a sign of mourning, flags on flagpoles should be flown at half-mast. A black ribbon is attached to flags hoisted on shorter outrigger staffs, and a black cravat to military parade flags. 14. A flag to be flown at half-mast should be hoisted to the top of the flagpole for an instant and then lowered to the half-mast position. Similarly, when lowering the flag it should first be hoisted to the top of the flagpole then reverently lowered to the ground. NB There are two recognised “half-mast” positions, both of which are equally correct:

 

the midpoint of the visible flagpole or

a point from the top of the flagpole that equals the depth of the flag (for example a 3 feet (0.9m) deep flag, should be lowered 3 feet (0.9m) down from the top of the flagpole. The customary half-mast position in Jamaica is the mid-point of the visible flagpole. 15. If more than one flag is flown at one location, all flags should all be flown at half-mast or not flown at all. 16. If more than one flag is flown at one location, the national flag should be hoisted first and lowered last 17. Flags of foreign nations should not be flown unless their country is also observing morning. 18. When a national flag is half-masted, it is normally flown in this position for a period of seven days, or until the funeral of the deceased person. (NB. This is a matter on which countries have widely different traditions and etiquette.) 19. A flag used as a coffin drape should be placed so that the hoist of the flag is at the head and the top edge of the flag is over the left shoulder.

Source: State and International Protocol Manual Prepared by: Mr. Maurice Dalton Protocol Consultant, Commonwealth Secretariat


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COAT OF ARMS The original Coat of Arms, granted to Jamaica in 1661, was designed by the then Archbishop of Canterbury, William Sanderoft. Apart from a partial revision in 1957, it remains virtually the same as was originally designed. The Arms shows a male and female Arawak, standing on either side of the shield, which bears a red cross with five golden pineapples superimposed on it. The Crest is a Jamaican crocodile surmounting the Royal Helmet and Mantlings. The original Latin motto, "Indus Uterque Serviet Uni", has been changed to one in English: "Out of Many One People�. Use of the Jamaican Coat of Arms should not be permitted without the official sanction being first obtained from the Office of the Prime Minister The Coat of Arms signifies national sovereignty or ownership. It belongs to Jamaica and in general is for official use only. It is used on Government possessions such as buildings, official seals, money, passports, proclamations, publications, certificates, national honours and badges. The Coat of Arms, when used on letterheads should be placed in the position of prominence which is the top left, top right or centre. Departmental logos, when used in conjunction with the Coat of Arms should be placed at the bottom centre of the letterhead or alternatively below the Coat of Arms at the top left corner of the letterhead. (additional information on the Coat of Arms is attached)

NATIONAL ANTHEM All persons should stand at attention at the playing of the National Anthem and men should remove their hats. Persons in uniform should salute The first verse of the National Anthem should be sung and/or played on the arrival and departure of the Governor-general and of the Prime Minister. The National Anthem may be sung and or played on occasions of public gatherings Schools Singing of the National Anthem should form part of the ceremony of raising and lowering of the Flag at the beginning and end of term and at Independence Celebrations

National Symbols and Emblems  

National Symbols and Emblems of Jamaica

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