Page 1

JK

PRODUCTION PUBLICATION

J AMAICAN A MERICAN C LUB W WW .J AMAICAN A MERICAN C LUB . ORG

T IRADE ON THE M ARKET AND D OWNT OWN K INGSTON AND S TREET W ISDOM

T RIVIA Question: Who was the first person in the Caribbean to create a bio-engineered fruit ?

Answer:

This fruit was deThe Solo Sunrise is veloped by Dr. Paula Tennant, Jaa strain of papaya that is resistant to maican plant biotechnologist. the devastating Ring Spot disease.

T ABLE OF CONTENTS 

Trivia page 1

Tirade on the Market and Downtown Kingston and Street Wisdom page 2

Out of the frying pan memoirs page 3


J AMAICAN A MERICAN C LUB N EWSLETTER

P AGE 2

Tirade on the Market and Downtown Kingston and Street Wisdom Written by Carol Lawton In the street you learn the streets, its alleys, its lanes, its corners and each person who travel through it. The market is a dynamic factor that when politician and administrators make a decision they do not see the ripple effects. An orderly downtown market is needed before any invest will flow into the area by outside. The city needs to look at creative finance and collection which I think is being looked at and not the central government. The money that moves in that small area is crazy as good are exchanged and redistribute across the island. Even a simple decision as remove the ugly stall carries a ripple effect. Lets me show you how 2 garbage wood pallets are worth $36K per year. A wooden stall is rented for $100 per day hence $3K per month hence $36K per year. Now imagine when one man owns 100 of these stalls, 20 push carts (rent as well to cart men) to move them and goods around .The underground economy is huge just for him as when you see him you will have pity thinking he is not making money. The chaos ensures him making money. I could pull numerous works in downtown that are high paying but would be silly as we all know them. (Assumption on my part) Hence to remove him would affect the haggler from country, the follow of goods across the market, and efficiency of the market. But a man like this making over $3M does not even have a high school diploma. When these people are making that amount of money how can we tell the young around them that education will make them money vs. hustling. The hustling is business so no pity for these people who make as much as the PM. I had though the present JLP would move rapidly to pull these people into the fold by changing the tool called the TRN from a money collection tool to a system development tool to close the informal economy which does not give it full share to the government and erodes the formal economy. Frankly the city can afford to fix it now that it has made its collections more efficient at 70 percent up from 30 percent. Lets be frank as usual, the KSAC councilors have no excuse for the bull that they are pulling off about their party is not in power, the MP is not giving anything, the central government is not helping. Its all bull. If revenue is at $15billion that means the city now has almost US$200 million to invest into the city which can be expand further by grabbing the other 30%. This is recurring money since these fees and city taxes are due every year. The collection of taxes from the citizens by the KSAC could even by government paper and be a part of the city portfolio. The sale of government paper would be sold to the KSAC as Samari bonds at rates that are variable and equal to the inflation rate of a hard currency on which the bonds could be pegged hence no 14% and higher rates but 2-3%. If it’s the welfare, you politicians are about these are the ideas that are out there. But a poor man’s wisdom is lost up high and the fool is praised for his/her inaction. Jamaica not land of wood and water but land of talk and talk. Stop the hustling of the people. Stop the informal economy as its not all drugs but its untaxable business activity that we all know. Lets stop the garbage and put the taxpayer money to work on rebuilding the city vs. hiding behind falsity of inaction. The generation that is looking at you is very much analyzing the system making rational decision as to if the system is for them. The formal economy pays taxes but get no service, the informal pays nothing and gets no service. Yet the revenue is there to create an efficient system which is equitable to all. But hi this is just what this poor man learns from walking the street and listening to the corner talk. PS: They are not all idlers and criminals on those corners


W WW .J AMAICAN A MERICAN C LUB . ORG

P AGE 3

Out of the Frying Pan & into the Fire Written by Karl A. Mitchell www.karl-mitchell.com

I viewed a television program that depicted a gentleman reflecting on his young life during the sixties. Inspiringly, I picked up my diary which I maintained since my elementary school days. My former teacher, Mr. Clark (now a National Commerce Bank senior executive and a major sponsor of Jamaica’s National Volleyball Team), taught us the importance of keeping a diary. Plus, he nudged us to write about our daily activities. I attempted to travel back in time to relive the experiences that I read in the diary. I imagined myself to be looking through a crystal ball or hypnotic lenses as I perceived my life in its virgin form. The most cherished experience of my elementary school days, was the one that taught me how not to succumb to peer pressure by standing on my convictions. I’ll expound on this experience in a pristine and brief manner in the following paragraphs. I was in the fifth grade at Ewarton Primary School; who was somewhat naïve, and lived a sheltered lifestyle. Naturally, I was susceptible to Doug’s, a classmate, wiles and penchant for attracting mischief. Doug was comical as he was adventurous. He was a free spirit – a cross between Mercury and Peter Pan. The school bell rang. “Karl!” Doug asserted, “Let’s go to the principal’s orange orchard, today.” “Doug,” I replied, “Didn’t Mrs. Powers, the principal, stated that no pupil is allowed on her private property without her authorized consent?” “Yes,” he responded, “However, my uncle works for her.” “Thus, she is partial toward me because of my relation.” “Okay!” I resigned We were eating oranges that we picked off the trees. Suddenly, there was a shuffle behind a tree. “Who goes there?” shouted Mas’ Jones, a groundskeeper. Instinctively, Doug dashed for the fence. In a panic, I followed in his wake. We scaled a fence and traversed a vegetated plot. Suddenly, we heard a rustling noise behind us. Mike, a marijuana farmer, chased us with a machete for trespassing and trampling on his illegal agricultural enterprise. I thought to myself: out of the frying pan and into the fire. “Swish, swish!” he swung at us. “Yu bumbo ras cloth!” he cursed at us. I fell. “Clang! Clang!” clanged the machete against a stone. “Ahhhhhhhhh! Ahhhhhhh!” I screamed. “Yu sissy wuss, git yu bludcloth outta ya befur me limb up yu cloth!” shot back Mike. I gathered my composure and ran home as Doug disappeared over the horizon. “Out of the Frying Pan & into the Fire”: Excerpted from The Memoirs of Karl A. Mitchell


Organization JK

PRO DUCTIO N

Primary Business Address Address Line 2 Address Line 3 Address Line 4 Phone: 555-555-5555 Fax: 555-555-5555 E-mail: someone@example.com

This would be a good place to insert a short paragraph about your organization. It might include the purpose of the organization, its mission, founding date, and a brief history. You could also include a brief list of the types of products, services, or programs your organization offers, the geographic area covered (for example, western U.S. or European markets), and a profile of the types of customers or members served. It would also be useful to include a contact name for readers who want more information about the organization.

W E’ RE ON THE W EB! EXAMPLE. COM

BUSINESS TAGLINE OR MOTTO

B ACK P AGE S TORY H EADLINE

This story can fit 175-225 words. If your newsletter is folded and mailed, this story will appear on the back. So, it’s a good idea to make it easy to read at a glance. A question and answer session is a good way to quickly capture the attention of readers. You can either compile questions that you’ve received since the last edition or you can summarize some generic questions that are frequently asked about your organization. A listing of names and titles of managers in your organization is a good way to give your newsletter a personal

touch. If your organization is small, you may want to list the names of all employees. If you have any prices of standard products or services, you can include a listing of those here. You may want to refer your readers to any other forms of communication that you’ve created for your organization. You can also use this space to remind readers to mark their calendars for a regular event, such as a breakfast meeting for vendors every third Tuesday of the month, or a biannual charity auction. If space is available, this is a good place to insert a clip art image or some other graphic.

Caption describing picture or graphic.

Summer 2015  

Jamaican American Club Newsletter

Summer 2015  

Jamaican American Club Newsletter

Advertisement