Page 1

j a c o b

W E L D O N

P O R T F O L I O

2007-2011


JACOB WELDON MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

weldonjacob@gmail.com


T

his portfolio is a compilation of work

completed during my time at Montana State University from 2007 to 2011. There are three sections: one focusing on eight architectural designs, the others on personal photography and hand drawings. The architectural designs are placed chronologically to show my process and growth throughout my undergraduate years at Montana State University. They represent my understanding of urban design, cultural perception, and design of form and structure. The language used to represent these ideas are sketches, diagrams, drawings and digital and physical models.

These,

along with photography and hand drawing sections, demonstrate my creativity, modeling skills and digital capabilities.


F R E E H A N D

P H O T O G R A P H Y

A R C H I T E C T U R E

1 2 3 4

F A L L

07

SPRING09

F A L L

09

2007-2011

THREE PLANES SIX STICKS

URBAN INFILL

GROWING PLACE GENERATING EXCHANGE

SPRING10

DIALECTICAL PAIRINGS EXIT GALLERY

SUMMER10

ROME STUDIO

F A L L

10

COMMUNITY DESIGN CENTER

D R A W I N G S


F A L L

07

THREE PLANES SIX STICKS


F A L L

07

THREE PLANES SIX STICKS


S P R I N G

09

the

PARTI SKETCH

DISPLAY UNIT

The knot breaks the rule within an ordered and consistent system, thus creates an emphasis on the knot rather than the ordered system. The premise was to create an ordered and consistent architectectural language and find a way to break that system. Thus once the system is broken, en emphasis will be made on that which broke it (the knot).


S P R I N G

09

DISPLAY SPACE DIAGRAM

This diagram shows how the displays act as a “knot” within the display space; breaking up the ordered system of how people walk through the space.

PERSPECTIVE FROM THE STREET

AXONOMETIC DRAWING

(DISPLAY

SPACE)

inte in int terio or axonometrricc drraawi wing ing n

URBAN INFILL


S P R I N G

09

URBAN INFILL

MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS


S P R I N G

09

URBAN INFILL

FINAL RENDERINGS

VIEW OF DISPLAY SPACE

PERSPECTIVE FROM THE STREET


G R O W I N G

p l a c e

The first project in Butte,Montana was aimed at creating growth within the community.

As individuals become

more aware of the benefits of micro-gardening and organizations see the benefits of community gardens and green space there is an emerging need for access to appropriate products and tools. My proposal resulted in creating a public green house within a tower inspired by Butte’s iconic mining towers.


F A L L

watercolor street perspective

09

GROWING PLACE


F A L L

D

09

E

GROWING PLACE

S

I

G N

e v o l u t i o n Diagram iagram showing mine tunnels beneath Butte’s utte s surface.

Later studies were made with the use of conThe evolution of the green house tower began with hand drawn partis (in ( plan) p ) inspired p from underground g miningg tunnels.

The strengh and significance of thiss project is its display of hand drawings which drove a significant part of my process.

ceptual

modeling

and

elevation

drawings.


F A L L

preliminary plan drawing

preliminary tower sketch

09

GROWING PLACE


F A L L

09

a c c u m u l a t i o n The second project in Butte, Montana enhanced the initial concept of accumulation.

Accumulation or accumulating density implies motion and preservation.


F A L L

09

GENERATING EXCHANGE

The aim of this project was

Overall this project aimed to

to

exchange.

explore the duality that oc-

The program entailed a com-

curs within the process of

munity center, marketplace,

accumulation and the rela-

along with offices, public cafe,

tionship

and public meeting rooms.

solid, transparent, and void.

generate

an

first floor plan

ground floor plan

between

what

is


F A L L

09

GENERATING EXCHANGE

profits collection

several things grouped together or considered as a whole

Accumulation an increase by natural growth or addition

accretion

Density

parti sketch - exploration of accumulation as a linear expression

a spatial property of being crowded together

compactness

tightness concentration

parti sketch

site parti

physical model


F A L L

VIEW OF SOUTH ENTRANCE

GENERATING EXCHANGE

PUBLIC MEETING ROOM

PUBLIC MEETING ROOM

digital model

09


S P R I N G

10

DIALECTIC:

the juxtaposition or interaction of conflicting ideas, forces, etc.

PARTI SKETCHES

VIEWS OF BRIDGER MOUNTAINS

-

EXPLORATION OF ACHIEVING WEIGHTLESSNESS


S P R I N G

10

DIALECTICAL PAIRINGS

Emptiness points us towards the beauty in life's

All natural objects make a kindred impres-

Culture acts as the filter, through which we see

openness and beckoning: in window gleam, in dust

sion, when the mind is open to their influ-

and understand the world. Culture defines

motes on an oak table. Architecture with empti-

ence....We

impres-

the HOW we come to see and understand

ness is thus always unfinished: if not literally, then

sion made by manifold natural objects. It is

reality which, in turn, influences the WHAT

by the space it makes and potential it shows. We

this which distinguishes the stick of timber of

we see in reality and in the world around us.

become engaged with the intervals and open end.

the wood-cutter, from the tree of the poet.

- Michael Benedict

mean

the

integrity

of

- Ralph Waldo Emerson

- Juan C. Moreno


S P R I N G

10

DIALECTICAL PAIRINGS

NATURE/CELLULAR

T

his project was aimed at creating a dialectical

This balance creates a dialect between the two as

pairing with a long span space and a cellular space.

well as between the long span and cellular spaces.

Rooted within the heart of industrial Bozeman, my

The cellular building is made up of short stay hotels

project aspires to create the notion of silence to

and apartments. The longspan building contains an

the site. Weightlessness is seen as a balance be-

art gallery, wine gallery, music hall, and restaurant.

tween dynamic and static thus creating silence.

APARTMENTS


S P R I N G

10

DIALECTICAL PAIRINGS

The project reacts to the site’s immediate surroundings, connecting to the landscape and creating a place of awareness for the surroundings. GROUND FLOOR PLAN CULTURE/LONGSPAN

MUSIC HALL

MUSIC HALL

MOUNTAIN VIEW DIAGRAM WINE GALLERY

By taking the ratio of the peaks down to the site, a strong connection was made to the immediate surroundings. Views of the Bridger Mountain Range were broken down to relate to each major peak.

Ranging from Baldy

Mountain to Hardscrabble, each void represents a view as well as a peak. ART GALLERY


S P R I N G

10

DIALECTICAL PAIRINGS

interior apartment

in between exterior and interior

interior apartment


S P R I N G

music hall

art gallery

wine gallery

10

DIALECTICAL PAIRINGS


S P R I N G

10

DIALECTICAL PAIRINGS


S P R I N G

10

DIALECTICAL PAIRINGS


SPRING10

the

EXIT GALLERY

(Project by Jake Weldon and Scott Freitmuth)

RY @ Montana State University

DESIGN INTENTION

The Exit Gallery is in a constant state of change. The design strategy was to create an adaptable space because new artwork is displayed weekly. The gallery consists of moving wall partitions that can be folded in any manner the artist wishes to display their art.

The

reason

for

this

project’s

placement in this portfolio is due to the display of construction documents

completed at

the end of the design process.


SPRING10

P R O C E S S Scheme 1

EXIT GALLERY

LEGEND OF SYMBOLS

Sceme 2 Detail reference tag

For the first revision we were concerned with achieving a more poetic solution than we had previously created; mainly focusing on structure. As far as the first scheme went, there were some aspects that worked really well poetically and some that were obviously detracting from the feeling of this gallery. The panel system, we felt, was very poetically strong from the beginning: actively creating a different space with the changing artwork. Our concrete enclosure, on the other hand, had no say in the dialect of the space: it was too mute. It was also a very impractical enclosure system; originally not insulated and lacking wall or ceiling space to run appropriate mechanical componets. Our alternative was a simple steel stud wall with corrugated aluminum sheathing. This wall construction provided ample airspace for proper insulation and mechanical conduit, and the corrugated siding added slightly more visual interest than the CMU, which contrasted well with the panel system. After considering how impractical a non-insulated enclosure system in our climate was, we concluded that it was also far too impractical to have a non-enclosed gallery space. This presented a major design problem: how to enclose the panel system without masking its dynamic movement? The solution was a structural glazing wall that would allow for maximum transparency. Glass fins were substituted for mullions so the view of the panels was not obstructed to the passer by. Because the entire structure was now enclosed, we moved the building off to the north side of the walkway so that people were not forced through the gallery. Rather, they were forced to walk beside it and look through the glass wall to notice the panels. t.

Our first scheme was derived from the concept of allowing the building to adapt to ever changing artwork. To achieve this, we left the gallery space open to the outside so that nothing was obstructing the moving panels. In this sense the panels acted visually as the exterior of the building to reinforce the movement and adaptation. To ensure the artwork was protected from the outside elements, peices would be displayed in hermatically sealed containers made of plexi-glass To keep the main emphasis on the panel system, the smaller parts of the program were enclosed with simple CMU walls and concrete plank roof to appear as mute as possible. The building was sited right on the main walkway so that students would be forced to travel through the gallery to experience the art and the buildings adaptation to it.

Section reference tag

Elevation reference tag

Door reference tag

Window reference tag

Construction type tag

LINE TYPES LEGEND

Final Scheme URRIRYHUKDQJ UR

WATER

FUHDWHVVKDGHLQWKHVXPPHUEXWVWLOO DOORZVSHQHWUDWLRQLQWKHZLQWHU

SEWER ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL existing sidewalk new sidewalk ADA entry

QLJKWLQVXODWLRQVFUHHQ QLJKWLQVX WRKHOSFRQVHUYHKHDWLQ WR KH WKHZLQWHUDLQVXODWHG WKH Z VFUH VFUHHQUHWUDFWHGIURPWKH URRI URRIZLOOLPSURYHLQVXODWLRQ RIWK RIWKHZDOOXSWR5

Grid Line

Visible partitions

Overhead

Cut Through

Detail Callout

/RZ(JODVV Phase 2 Baseline results

Phase 3 Baseline results*

3DQHO0DWHULDO RXUPRYDEOHSDQHOVKDYHFKDQJHGWR DWUDQVOXFHQWIRUPSDQHOWRDOORZIRU PRUHGD\OLJKWLQJZLWKLQWKHJDOOHU\

* phase 3 E-quest test results do not factor

%\LPSURYLQJWKHJODVVWR/RZ( ZLQGRZVWKHKHDWFUHDWHGZLWKLQWKH VSDFHZLOOQRWHVFDSHRXWWKURXJK WKHHQYHORSHEXWUHĂ€HFWEDFNLQWR WKHVSDFH

in thermal performance of insulated shade. shade adds an addition R-12 to wall assembly which will lower electric and gas consumption.

re vi s i on b loc k

architect stamp

node creative

S cot t Fre imu t h Jak e We ldon

EXIT GALLERY

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY BOZEMAN

s h e e t n um b e r

date of issue - May 4, 2010 re vi e we d by Ty le r Ca ll a n d h i s p os s e

REVISIONS

A0.2


SPRING10

EXIT GALLERY

CONSTRUCTION

DOCUMENTS

S.U.B. existing bldg.

2 A3.1

5

4

3

2’-0”

2

17’-2”

1

5’-2”

5’-2”

AJM Johnson 4 A6.1

4 1 A6.1

ESTCODE

existing bldg.

Top of south wall 118’ 0”

Top of North wall 114’ 0” Top of Track 112’ 0”

1

4

5

2

3 A6.1 Restroom 104 75 sf

Gallery 102 1190 sf

2

2 A6.1 Finish Floor 100’ 0” remaining tree

F

E

Top of Footing 96’ 0”

1

14’2 to top of wall D

3

removed tree

’0”

A

100 HT= OR SH

existing sidewalk

HEIG

FLO

new

PROPERTY LINE

r line contou

65’

A

F

C

B

100’

FINI

45’

0

1 A3.1

5

new sidewalk

6’

1/4” = 1’

4

sidewalk = 98’ 8”

Romney

Cross Section

1

C B

FFE = 100’ 0” = 4900’ above sea level

36’-9”

D

6’-3”

5’

15’-6”

15’-6”

20’

10’

F

E 10’-0”

E 2

1

D 2

4

3 C

1

Roof 116’ 0”

B

Top of North wall 114’ 0”

4

20’

5

existing bldg.

Top of Track 112’ 0”

25’

1

A

1 2

2 benchmark

PROPERTY LINE

5

232’

Reception 101 238 sf

Gallery 102 1190 sf

1

1

4

Grant St.

Finish Floor 100’ 0”

W S

Top of Footing 96’ 0”

E M

WV

Longitudinal Section 1/4” = 1’

H

2 Y D

N

N 75’

10’

SITE PLAN 1/16” = 1’

Project North

True North

50’

5 1 A3.1

A

B

C

6’-0”

D

E

4

1

2’-0”

F 4 A6.1

36’-9”

6’-3”

15’-6”

Top of south wall 118’ 0”

10’-0”

15’-6”

0’-9 1/2”

KALWALL insulated skylight Structural Steel Tee C channel 4.5” Round HSS

Insulated shade

1 A2.1

Top of Track 112’ 0”

5’-0”

5’-2”

2

Office 103 100 sf

3

3 2

2

3 A6.1

5’-2”

5’-2” 5’-2”

Top of Track 112’ 0”

structural Tee

1 Restroom 104 75 sf

Restroom 105 75 sf

Storage 106 394 sf

2

3

4 3

2

1

100’ 4”

Reception 101 238 sf

1 A2.2

1” thick concrete w/ exposed fasteners

17’-2”

Gallery 102 1190 sf

5’-0”

2 A2.2 17’-2”

steel c-channel

FINWALL glass fin

2

3

Top of North wall 114’ 0”

Partition track

2

2

steel plate

Top of North wall 114’ 0”

FINWALL curtain wall

Mechanical 107 60 sf

1

1 A6.1 KALWALL insulated skylight

shade mounting bracket

1

2 A3.1

30 lb felt

5/8” OSB

FINISH FLOOR HEIGHT= 100’0”

2’-0”

5

1

1 2’-0”

4

4’-0”

1

1

6” metal stud

4 5

2 A6.1 Finish Floor 100’ 0” Concrete Slab

2 A2.1

Finish Floor 100’ 0” Concrete Slab 6 mill Vapor Barrier

0’-5”

6 mill vapor barrier 3” Rigid insulation 3” Rigid Insulation

Gravel fill

36’-9”

6’-3”

15’-6”

15’-6”

10’-0”

Footing

Top of Footing 96’ 0”

A

B

C

D

E N

1

N

Floor Plan 3/16” = 1’

Project North

True North

South wall section 3/4” = 1’

2

North wall section 3/4” = 1’ 1’-0”

0

1

Top of Footing 96’ 0” 0’-8” 4” Foot Drain

F

5’

10’

20’


SPRING10

EXPLODED

DETAILS

KALWALL insulated skylight Old Castle Fin-wall steel plate/hardware

steel c-channel

HSS hollow round column 4-1/2”

structural Tee brushed stainless steel hardware 6” rigid insulation weld connection

1” thick concrete w/ exposed fasteners

30 lb felt concrete slab 5”

5/8” OSB foundation wall 8” 6” metal stud

Wall to Roof Connection

1

2

F i n - w a l l t o fl o o r c o n n e c t i o n

KALWALL insulated skylight 3-form Translucent Panel

brushed stainless steel hardware brushed sttainless steel hardware

Structural Tee HSS hollow round column 4-1/2”

Old Castle Fin-wall Partition Track

HSS hollow round column 4-1/2”

3

3-form panel to column connection

4

Fin-wall to roof connection

EXIT GALLERY


SUMMER10

ROME STUDIO

A

C E N T E R

F O R

THE

GISMONDI R O M E

MODEL

S T U D I O

2

0

1

OF 0

ROME 2

0

1

PROJECT SUMMARY

Rome Studio for 2010 required a center that would be used to house the Gismondi Model, a 75 foot by 75 foot model at 1:250 scale of ancient Rome. From inside the inhabitants are able to view the model and have a better context due to an unobstructed view of the

real Colosseum.

(All drawings for this project, from conceptual work to final presentaion, were done by hand)

(PROJECT

COMPLETED BY JAKE WELDON AND MICHAEL GUILIANO)

0


SUMMER10

E A S T

E L E V A T I O N

S E C T I O N

F I R S T

D E T A I L

A

D E T A I L

B

L O W E R

F L O O R

P L A N

F L O O R

ROME STUDIO

P L A N


SUMMER10

ROME STUDIO

P R O C E S S S E C T I O N

W O R K

S T U D I E S

B U I L D I N G

P A R T I

S I T E

P A R T I


SUMMER10

upper level entrance

walkway to entrance

h a n d

Gismondi Model

scultpure space

ROME STUDIO

d r a w n

P E R S P E C T I V E S

noguchi sculpture (photograph)


FALL10

CDC

COMMUNITY

DESIGN

CENTER

The Help Center provides 24 hour crisis counseling, sui-

two included programming. Phase three encompassed four

cide outreach and crisis intervention.

In becoming a cli-

separate designs done by each member of the team. My de-

ent of CDC, the assigned student team worked with the

sign was chosen due to easy transfer into the new design

Help Center staff and provided them with four phases of

as well as the preservation of the old Help Center building.

work. Phase one included research for the project. Phase


process

FALL10

of

CONCEPTUAL DRAWINGS

design

P R O C E S S

O F

CDC

M O V I N G

With expanding the Help Center the problem of how the staff would continue working through construction had to be addressed.

EXISTING HELP CENTER

The solution was the idea that one part of the new design would be built away from the existing Help Center to provide a temporary work space for the staff.

COUNSLING WING

Once the staff was moved into the SSiittee Paarrti t

temporary workspace, further construction on the call center would begin.

CALL CENTER AND OFFICES


FALL10

CDC

Proposed A Alllleyway -4’ 6’’

e 4

3

6

Bozeman n Creek

35 3 5’ 5’ Creek Se tback

5

7

Existing Building B

Church Street

1

2 3 Existi Exi sting ng Bui Buildi lding ng SITE PLAN 1/8’’’’ = 1 1/8 1’0’ ’0’’’

Exissting Exis ting He Help Hel H p Centter Cent er B Build uild ildiing ing

8 ADA DA Pa P Parking a ark rrki kin ing ng g

N

The Help Center 421 Peach Peach St, Boze Bozeman man, MT MT

4

-0 0’ 6 0 6’’

0 6’’ 0’ 6

A

B

C

D Pe Pea P ea each ch Str Stttrre S re ee e

Project #: 04-10 15 November 2010

Existing Trees

E isting Exi ti Conttours

New Tr Trees ees

New Co New Conto ntours t urs

Paving Pavi Pav ing

E hist Exhi Exh isti ting ing Bu B Build uild ildiing ings ings


FALL10

TECHNICAL

CDC

DRAWINGS

Section A

B

B

Corrugated Metal Clip Roof

C

2.5x12 Glulam Beam

A

C

2x10 Beam

10 1/4” Sip Roof Panel

6 1/2” Sip Wall Panel Drip Edge

Beam Structure for Roof

17' - 0"

2x2 Cedar Slats

B C

Two Pane Low E Glass Window

8 1/4” Sip Floor Panel

A

A

Second Floor

D

8' - 10 1/2"

D

D

2x2 Cedar Slats

36” wide Sliding Door

E

12x12 Concrete Column Wood Flooring Concrete Slab 6 mill vapor Barrier Existing Building Floor

0' - 0" 3 inch rigid insulation

F

Gravel Fill Footing

1

WALL SECTION

2

3

4 5

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

6

7 8

1

2

3

4 5

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

6

7 8


FALL10

F

CDC

I R

N

A

L

E

N

D

EXTERIOR CALL CENTER

E

R

I

N

G

S


FALL10

INTERIOR CALL CENTER

COUNSELING ROOM

MEETING ROOM

WAITING ROOM

CDC


PHOTOG


GRAPHY


PHOTOGRAPHY

p h o t o g r a p h y

Italy


PHOTOGRAPHY

p h o t o g r a p h y

Montana


j a c o b

W E L D O N

A

R

T

W

O

R

K


ARTWORK


ARTWORK

I

T

A

L

Y

travel drawings Over the couse of two and a half months spent traveling in Italy, travel drawings were performed as weekly assignments and quickly became an everyday routine.


ARTWORK


JACOB CHARLES WELDON MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

weldonjacob@gmail.com

Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio  

A compilation of my undergrad architecture projects done chronologically from my freshman to senior year.

Advertisement