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JW the

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s ’ s a g s n e i r r e p T S y . r t e l e l SoREPRESENT? n a n V B lue kin B Rus Vol. 11, Issue 7 April 21, 2011

How do you

Breaking the mold Four students from four different schools explain how their school defies its stereotypes Page 10-11

Mill Valley High School 5900 Monticello Road, Shawnee, KS 66226


2

April 21, 2011

{briefs}

InThisIssue News: page 4

Cafeteria food changes 4

April 21, 2011

{news}

ChangesToExpect

These lunches are just a few that must be altered to meet 2022 sodium restrictions Mac ‘n cheese meal

1,553 mg macaroni and cheese + 90 mg gelatin + 169 mg green beans + 140 mg milk + 0 mg oranges

STUDENTS MOVE DOWN the lunch line on Monday, April 18 and choose between various side dishes during second lunch. Photo by Courtney Cooke

Legislation alters lunches

1,952 mg total 164% above 2022 level

Chicken quesadillas meal

sarah darby {news editor}

Proposal aims to increase school nutrition standards School lunch selection will drastically change next year following a proposal by the Department of Agriculture to change nutrition standards. Proposed on Friday, Jan. 14 as part of the Child Nutrition Bill, federal legislation will echo the Institute of Medicine’s 2009 guidelines for nutrition. Additional fruits, vegetables and grains must be implemented by 2012 and gradual sodium reductions through 2022 will reduce district sodium measures. To meet the first part of the regulations, the district will offer one cup of fruit and one cup of vegetables per day starting fall of next year to meet the first 2012 deadline. In addition, more dark green and orange vegetables and legumes will be served, while starchy vegetables will be cut back. Corn, along with potatoes and peas, are considered starchy, just one concern of many for district director of student nutrition Julie McGrath, R.D. “Switching kids to a popular vegetable like corn, to a less popular vegetable like a legume, we’re concerned we’re going to turn kids off,” McGrath said. For kitchen manager Jean Gile, student opinion is of the highest concern. “My job is to make the food look and taste good...” Gile said. “I want to serve you like I would serve my kids.” Even more drastic will be changes to sodium levels. By 2022, lunches for K-5 will be reduced to less than 640 mg from an average 1,377 mg. Lunches at the 6-8 level will go from 1,520 mg to less than 710 mg and 9-12 lunches will go from 1,588 mg to less than 740 mg of sodium. This poses a dilemma for McGrath. “If we try to reduce the amount of sodium, and if all the other places students eat are not going to reduce theirs, people are still going to have that taste for high-

920 mg quesadilla + 0 mg grapes + 58 mg peas + 140 mg milk + 937 mg rice 1,118 mg total 51% above 2022 level

Cheese pizza meal

Photos by Courtney Cooke

842 mg pizza + 0 mg pineapple + 11 mg corn + 140 mg milk + 61 mg carrots 1,054 mg total 42% above 2022 level

Sodium level statistics: >

1,420 mg - 2012 sodium cap

>

1,080 mg - 2016 sodium cap

>

740 mg - 2022 sodium cap

>

50 percent - percent of current meals meeting 2022 sodium cap

>

1,588 mg - average sodium level of current school lunches

SENIOR HENRY THOMAS follows the lunch line selecting barbecue ribette over chicken patty on Monday, April 18. Photo by Courtney Cooke

er levels of sodium,” McGrath said. Approximately 50 percent of current school lunches, based off current nutritional analysis from the district web site, fail to meet proposed sodium guidelines. For example, a typical chicken on a bun meal, with 700 mg per patty, 190 mg per bun and 90 mg per milk carton, totals 980 mg of sodium without side dishes, well over the new limit. Freshman Madison Thomas eats lunch daily and doesn’t notice high sodium counts. “I don’t think it tastes too salty,” Thomas said. “It’s a good idea that they use it [salt] to preserve the food but at a certain point it’s just too much.” Also a challenge will be paying for food that will include fresh produce. In the past several years the district has decreased drink, chip, cookie, snack and ice cream sizes and introduced low fat milk. Since introducing fresh fruits every day but Monday, the school’s produce bill has spiked 50 percent. “These kinds of products are geared towards school lunch to be affordable,” McGrath said. “I want to serve a healthy lunch but it does come down to would a parent be willing to spend $4 a lunch if it came down to buying boneless breaded

chicken.” High a la cart profit ratios help to supplement low school lunch costs. Because of the revenue they provide, a la cart will remain unchanged in future years. “If all we sold were lunches and no a la cart, we’d easily have to charge $4,” McGrath said. Junior Amanda Morgan believes students will like upcoming changes. “I feel like they’ll react positively because a lot of kids complain about how unhealthy what goes into it is and if they change it, it will be healthier, so I think it will be better,” Morgan said. Sophomore Alex Reeves, however, will continue to bring his lunch. “I probably wouldn’t [eat school food] because when you’re mass producing food, you can’t match the quality of what I make at home,” Reeves said. McGrath thinks the changes are positive, but she and her staff are worried about student reaction like this. “They don’t want to spend all morning preparing something and have kids go ‘Oh, gross,’” McGrath said. Gile shares similar thoughts. “They love chicken nuggets, maybe they’re not the best but who can afford grilled chicken?” Gile said.

Feature: page 8 Classic play rewritten 8 {feature}

April 21, 2011

ON SATURDAY, APRIL 16, people of all ages came together to promote environmental protection in a 3-mile walk that followed Brush Creek in Kansas City, MO. Photo by Kat Rainey Photo Illustration by Emily Johnson and Kristina Milewski

Club Operation participates in Earth Walk to promote recycling

jill applegate {features editor}

Seated in drama teacher Jon Copeland’s room on a makeshift set for the spring play, “Pride and Prejudice,” sophomore Allison Mackey giggled with a castmate over something written in the script. The “Pride and Prejudice” script is different from the scripts of Copeland’s previous shows of “30 Reasons Not To Be In A Play” last spring and “Hello, Dolly!” last fall. Over Christmas break, Copeland decided upon the play and found six different scripts. But after reading them, he then decided to write his own. “I felt some of [the previously made] scripts didn’t have the same humor as the [2005 version of the] movie,” Copeland said. “The novel is public domain. The plot was there, the characters were there and I wanted to go back to the source and make it as much Jane Austen as possible.” This desire to re-create the original story is what inspired Copeland to sit down every day after school during third quarter to write his own script. Senior Ronnie Sloop, who plays Charles Bingley in the production, agrees that the re-written play will be more entertaining for students. “As far as the audience that we’re going for, I think it’s fantastic,” Sloop said. “He took out all of the stuff like the comparisons that died 200 years ago or the words that you have to have a thesaursus or a dictionary to understand.” Mackey agrees that the new script incorporates more of the original story. “I think it just really benefited the play as a whole,” Mackey said.

BehindTheScenes

The brand new “Pride and Prejudice” script has also offered Copeland to have freedom to set up scenes the way he sees them. “One thing I really like in the 1940 version of the movie was a scene where it changes from [one location to another],” Copeland said. “I was able to split the stage into the two locations and with lighting I can go from location to location instantly.” One challenge that Copeland has faced while directing this show was whether or not to have the students speak in English accents. “I was afraid that the English accents would be too much,” Copeland said. “But when you’re speaking the language the way Jane Austen wrote it, it automatically sounds English to a certain degree. It’s just speaking more precisely.” The “Pride and Prejudice” cast has play practices MondayThursday from 3:30-6 p.m. However, this sometimes poses challenges to members of the cast. Sloop has to make time for practices in the midst of two jobs and Mackey gave up basketball in order to participate. “I decided not to try out [for basketball] this year because I didn’t want to take any chances of not being able to try out for the play,” Mackey said. The show will be performed from May 5-6 at 7 p.m. The cost at the door will be $2 for students with student ID’s and $6 for adults. “Things are always changing as the show approaches because it’s a process, but I feel like it’s really clicking,” Copeland said. “It’s fun to get together after school everyday with kids that like to tell a story as much as I like to tell a story.”

lisa joerling {reporter} TOP: DIRECTOR JON COPELAND meets with the entire cast to run through the schedule for rehearsal on Monday, April 4. ABOVE: COPELAND REPOSITIONS ACTORS and dancers during a ballroom scene in Act II. Photos by Emily Johnson

The JagWire takes a look at what goes on behind the stage “It’s nerve-wracking during the show, but at the end when everything goes well, I always get a warm, fuzzy feeling,” backstage manager senior Grace McWhirt said.

“It wasn’t too hard to memorize my lines. They’re pretty short,” junior Malayia Reece said. Reece plays Charlotte in “Pride and Prejudice.”

memorizing lines

stage crew

“Costumes help the audience envision the time period and how society was portrayed,” sophomore Alec Santaularia said. Santaularia plays Mr. Darcy in “Pride and Prejudice.”

costume preparation

Opinion: page 12 How to be Earth-friendly 12

April 21, 2011

{opinion}

StaffEditorial

Being Earth-friendly doesn’t have to be difficult Here are three easy ways high school students can help the Earth

plug all electronic devices from the wall while you aren’t using them (not only will that save power, it’ll really confuse your parents when they attempt to turn a lamp on and it doesn’t Each year around Earth Day, people begin work). During the day, open your blinds and to realize the importance of conserving turn off the lights around your house; there our natural resources and then attempt to is no need to waste electricity when the sun is completely restructure their lives to be more out. “green.” Two: Recycle; it’s that simple. Just about Yet being Earth-friendly doesn’t seem to be every classroom has a cardboard box for used attainable unless you’re a well-off adult with paper and another for plenty of money and time plastic bottles, and they to spare. Sure, it’s great are usually sitting right to buy hybrid or electric next to the trash can. “There are simple, easy cars, put solar panels on Simply toss old assignthe roof of your house things that every single ments and empty drink and not shower, but those person can do, no matbottles into those boxes ways to conserve the reter the age or budget.” instead of throwing sources of the planet just them into the trash aren’t feasible for high can. In the cafeteschool students. ria, the recycling bins However, conserving shaped like Coca-Cola the natural resources of this planet does need bottles are by both the to be a priority, and there are simple, easy tray dump area and the doors back to the hall. things that every single person can do, no matWalking those few extra steps won’t take much ter the age or budget. energy from you and you’ll be able to do your Here are three ways that you, a busy and part for the Earth without much effort. broke teenager, can help the Earth- without Three: Reduce. Give carpooling a chance. We spending thousands of dollars or foregoing have 1,100 students and the majority of them hygiene. One: Save your electricity. Turn off lights in live in the Western Shawnee area, meaning your house when you don’t need them and un- that chances are good that at least a couple stu-

dents live within a few streets of your house. By driving to school with friends, less gasoline will be consumed and less carbon dioxide will be released to the air. And with gas prices continuing to rise, an added bonus would be saving money by splitting the cost with two or three other people. Incorporating these three simple ways to conserve Earth’s resources won’t just save the planet overnight, but your positive change will set the example for your friends and family

to do what they can as well. If we, as a student body, dedicate ourselves to doing all the little things that we can in order to conserve energy, recycle and reduce our waste, we can set that same example for our district and other schools in the area. We can’t sit back and wait for others to take the first step in taking care of the world around us. We need to get up and take control for ourselves and be the ones to create our own change.

Cartoon by Asia Yates

Respecting each other in a relationship is really important A relationship is about getting to know the person, not looking good emily adams{guest columnist}

As a high school student, you’ve probably heard your fair share of speeches on respect. It started when we were little tykes, fumbling with our first words, struggling to pronounce the ‘l’ and ‘s’ in “Please” and the ‘th’ sound in “Thank you.” Then as we got older the school counselors started talking about the dangers of bullying, and so on. But something I’ve realized lately is that they never really addressed respecting the opposite sex. Not very thoroughly, anyway, and now here we are: big, bad, hormonal high schoolers, eagerly exploring the world of romance. I guess everybody just figured respecting the person

you’re dating is common sense, but from what and all that. My group later found out from our I’ve been observing lately, we seem to have for- leader that as the topic of respecting the opposite sex came up in the guy’s group, a popular gotten how to do that. Here’s the thing: dating is great- it’s a lot of response was, “They don’t respect themselves, fun and it feels amazing when you find a girl or so why should we even bother?” At first this insulted guy that you click withme, but then I started to but it’s dangerous in a see the other side. In a way. When you enter a re“When you enter a way, the guys were right. lationship, you gain powWhen you walk around in er over each other on a relationship, you gain short, low-cut and tight deeper level. The way you power over each other clothes and give yourself treat the other person, on a deeper level.” away like it’s no big and your faithfulness-or deal, you may think lack thereof- to them is you look confident, but suddenly a much bigger honestly, acting like that contributor not only to is a brightly-flashing how they think of you but to how they think of neon arrow pointing to the fact that you can’t themselves. A couple of years ago, my youth group had a even respect yourself- or the guys you datediscussion about purity. The girls and the guys enough to dress appropriately or say ‘no’ every were divided into two separate groups to dis- now and then. If you want people to treat you with the recuss the basics of relationships and abstinence

spect you deserve, you’ve got to start respecting yourself. That means deciding on boundaries for yourself and sticking to them, and asking yourself questions like “Is this too short, too low, or too tight?” and “Am I doing this because I think it’ll make people like me more or because I want to?” It’s also important to think about how you act around guys who aren’t your boyfriend- respect goes two ways. You wouldn’t like it if your boyfriend was flirting with other girls, so why would it be okay for you to do the same thing to him? And guys, it doesn’t matter what her track record is, she’s special, and she still deserves just as much respect as you do. Please, if you’ve captured her heart, be careful with it. It may be all fun and games to you but to her, it’s real, and 10 years from now when you look back on your high school career, it’s probably not going to be about how far you go or how many girls you dated. More likely it’s going to be about the actual relationships you had.

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Sports: page 15 Out-of-school sports

A&E: page 16 Vintage shops 16

April 21, 2011

{a&e}

A step back

Boomerang

in time

In addition to high quality everyday vintage clothing, Boomerang also offers many costume options. Located at 3900 Pennsylvania Avenue, Kansas City, Mo.

kaitlin rounds {reporter}

Each vintage store in Kan- en’s clothing and half designer Vintage stores provide a one-of-a-kind experience sas City is slightly different. reproductions. Run by Donna Walking into Boomerang, a vintage shop in the Westport district of downtown Kansas City, MO, the wide array of clothing and accessories from the 1950s, 60s, 70s and 80s is overwhelming. The walls inside the store are fully lined with everything from giant poodle skirts to leisure suits to authentic flapper dresses. Boomerang is one of many vintage stores in the Kansas City-area that has experienced a lot of success in the last few years. “We keep a pretty steady business,” Tim Lach, an employee at Boomerang, said. “People work hard and like to have fun, and we’re there for that.” While many vintage stores are hot spots for costume shopping, Boomerang especially flourishes in that department. Not only do they offer plenty of clothes for sale, but more high end or unique items are available for rent. “Halloween is our Christmas time because of our costumes,” Lach said. “Halloween night guys will come in with no idea what they need and we’re here to help.”

Re-Runs, Inc. is one of largest vintage retailers in the United States and has gained fame by providing clothing for movies, television and photographic media. “We work with a whole network of people in the movies,” Re-Runs employee Andy Chambers said. “We’ve provided clothes for Secret Life of Bees and Across the Universe. That one we just sent in boxes and boxes of clothes from the 70s, just anything they could possibly need.” Re-Runs has become so renowned as a vintage store they have had a large range of celebrity clientele. “Jack White [lead singer of the White Stripes] came in once,” Chambers said. “He bought a hat. Not for him, someone else. [Actor] Paul Rudd also comes in all the time. He likes to buy boxy men shirts. Oh, and [singer] Rufus Wanewright came in once and gave the owner a ticket to his show after he finished shopping.” While Re-Runs sells 100% vintage clothes, all made at least 20 years ago, some shops also sell reproductions. Donna’s Dress Shop sells about half true vintage wom-

Foulk, the clothes are all ones that women would feel comfortable wearing at home, work, or social events, and not only costume items. The atmosphere of Donna’s Dress Shop is bright and inviting. Any clothing from formal dresses to bathing suits to aprons and jewelry can be found there. “I have new stuff every day,” Foulk said. “I keep things updated on Facebook. A lot of people bring stuff to me. The buying comes in spurts and sometimes I’ll go on house calls.” In a time when the economy has been suffering vintage shopping becomes not only a way to have fun and create one’s own unique style but also a way to save money. “We do better now than we did a few years ago because vintage clothes are considered ‘green,’” Chambers said. The consensus from those involved in the vintage clothing circuit is a positive one. “I love being able to see clothes getting a second, third, sometimes even fourth chance,” Chambers said. “Everything’s one of a kind that we sell, and there’s always an element of surprise. It’s just kind of magical.”

Donna’s Dress Shop With both authentic vintage clothing and reproductions, Donna’s Dress Shop specializes in wearable vintage. Located at 1410 W. 39th St., Kansas City, Mo.

Re-Runs, Inc. One of the largest vintage stores in the nation, Re-Runs has gained esteem in the entertainment industry. Located at 4041 Broadway, Kansas City, Mo.

Retro Vixen Selling all reproductions, Retro Vixen specializes in women’s wear for special occasions, with unique dress options. Located at 1620 W. 39th St., Kansas City, Mo.

Rock Candy ABOVE: A CUSTOMER MAKES a purchase on Friday, April 4 at Re-Runs, Inc. “The vintage shop circuit is like a community.” Re-Runs employee Andy Chambers said. “We all shop at the same estate sales and help each other out.” Chambers has been working at Re-Runs since it opened. Photos by Kristina Milewski

With both men’s and women’s clothing, Rock Candy sells 100% authentic vintage clothing and accessories. Located at 1415 West 39th St., Kansas City, Mo. Photos by Kristina Milewski Graphic by Jill Applegate

Cover by Ali Judy

Club Operation participated in Earth Walk, sponsored by the Kansas City based recycling group Bridging the Gap, on Saturday, April 16. The Earth Walk was a 3-mile walk in Theis Park, along Brush Creek. Family and consumer science teacher and club sponsor Rebecca Caves thinks the Earth Walk was a success. “It was a lot of fun. We got free passes for a yoga place because it was too cold to do yoga in the park before the walk,” Caves said. Sophomore and club member Morgan Battes think small steps can be taken for our school to become greener.

“Recycling in our school is something people should make the effort to put bottles in the recycling bin instead of the trash,” Battes said. Caves agree and adds how we could use even more bins. “We’ve noticed the recycling bins filling up, we could easily use 10 more of them in our school,” Caves said. Caves sees people stepping up by bringing their lunch and recycling. She hopes more will understand the need. “I just hope people will recognize the need for recycling,” Caves said. “It’s the little things that will help.”

Location change

Forensics wins

maya sudduth {reporter}

hanna torline {reporter}

It was decided on Wednesday, April 13 that graduation would be held outdoors. Principal Tobie Waldeck put a lot of consideration into the decision. He had been approached by students, mostly seniors, and parents alike sharing their thoughts and concerns about graduation. “Like any decision there are alternate views and I am considering everything,” Waldeck said. With the decision finally made, many are concerned because graduation invitations state that graduation will be held in the gymnasium. However, Waldeck isn’t worried. “I think people are going to know that the change has been made, especially if they walk into the gym and no one’s there,” Waldeck said. The change is seen as a positive thing by most students. “Now we will be able to have a lot more people,” senior Sarah Verhamme said. “And graduation will be different than all the other years before.”

The Forensics team came home with a gold medal for sweeps from the Osawatomie Forensics Speech Invitational on Friday, April 15. The team got first place out of 13 teams, its fifth win this season. Forensics coach Jeanette Hardesty was very pleased with how well the team placed. “I’m very proud of the team this year,” Hardesty said. “Everybody brings different talents and we are having success.” There were five first place finishes at the tournament, coming from seniors Ross Platt in the extemporary category and Sara Brigham for her informative speech, juniors Brayton Young in humorous solo acting and Josh Duden in serious solo acting, and the duet of freshman Claire Young and Duden for informative duet acting. The five wins show how the team has been working together. “To pull off first place trophies everybody has to perform well as a team,” Hardesty said. “Everyone has performed well across the board.”

Upcoming events:

JUNIOR LAURA BLAINE looks away as nurse Nicole Fornal inserts the needle into her vein at the blood drive on Tuesday April 5. Photo by Austin Gude

Students donate for a cause sarah gonzales {reporter}

Every spring the Red Cross, sponsored by StuCo, visits and gives students and teachers opportunities to donate blood. Last year 63 people donated blood. On Tuesday, April 5, 69 people came to donate but only 59 of those people were eligible to donate blood. “The number one reason why people do not donate blood is because they are not personally asked,” Donor Recruitment representative Denise Rose said. According to Rose there are many different reasons as to why a person should donate blood. Blood transfusions are needed every 42 seconds, and only a third of Americans are able to give blood. With the amount of blood needed, sophomore Marisol Guerrero feels good about her decision to donate. “I know I’m helping someone else for what ever reason it is,” Guerrero said. “It will benefit them all in a good way.” On Saturday, April 23, beginning at 9 p.m., electronic music artist Pretty Lights will perform. Tickets are still available online at www.midlandkc.com for $25.

The next Shawnee City Council meeting is Monday, April 25 at 7:30 p.m. The meeting will be held in City Hall in downtown Shawnee off of Johnson Drive.

Tryouts for the annual talent show will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 27. Anyone interested in participating may sign up in the main office.


www.mvnews.org

{ads}

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3


4

April 21, 2011

{news}

ChangesToExpect

These lunches are just a few that must be altered to meet 2022 sodium restrictions Mac ‘n cheese meal

1,553 mg macaroni and cheese + 90 mg gelatin + 169 mg green beans + 140 mg milk + 0 mg oranges 1,952 mg total 164% above 2022 level

Chicken quesadillas meal

STUDENTS MOVE DOWN the lunch line on Monday, April 18 and choose between various side dishes during second lunch. Photo by Courtney Cooke

Legislation alters lunches sarah darby {news editor}

Proposal aims to increase school nutrition standards

920 mg quesadilla + 0 mg grapes + 58 mg peas + 140 mg milk + 937 mg rice 1,118 mg total 51% above 2022 level

Cheese pizza meal

Photos by Courtney Cooke

842 mg pizza + 0 mg pineapple + 11 mg corn + 140 mg milk + 61 mg carrots 1,054 mg total 42% above 2022 level

Sodium level statistics: >

1,420 mg - 2012 sodium cap

>

1,080 mg - 2016 sodium cap

>

740 mg - 2022 sodium cap

>

50 percent - percent of current meals meeting 2022 sodium cap

>

1,588 mg - average sodium level of current school lunches

School lunch selection will drastically change next year following a proposal by the Department of Agriculture to change nutrition standards. Proposed on Friday, Jan. 14 as part of the Child Nutrition Bill, federal legislation will echo the Institute of Medicine’s 2009 guidelines for nutrition. Additional fruits, vegetables and grains must be implemented by 2012 and gradual sodium reductions through 2022 will reduce district sodium measures. To meet the first part of the regulations, the district will offer one cup of fruit and one cup of vegetables per day starting fall of next year to meet the first 2012 deadline. In addition, more dark green and orange vegetables and legumes will be served, while starchy vegetables will be cut back. Corn, along with potatoes and peas, are considered starchy, just one concern of many for district director of student nutrition Julie McGrath, R.D. “Switching kids to a popular vegetable like corn, to a less popular vegetable like a legume, we’re concerned we’re going to turn kids off,” McGrath said. For kitchen manager Jean Gile, student opinion is of the highest concern. “My job is to make the food look and taste good...” Gile said. “I want to serve you like I would serve my kids.” Even more drastic will be changes to sodium levels. By 2022, lunches for K-5 will be reduced to less than 640 mg from an average 1,377 mg. Lunches at the 6-8 level will go from 1,520 mg to less than 710 mg and 9-12 lunches will go from 1,588 mg to less than 740 mg of sodium. This poses a dilemma for McGrath. “If we try to reduce the amount of sodium, and if all the other places students eat are not going to reduce theirs, people are still going to have that taste for high-

SENIOR HENRY THOMAS follows the lunch line selecting barbecue ribette over chicken patty on Monday, April 18. Photo by Courtney Cooke

er levels of sodium,” McGrath said. Approximately 50 percent of current school lunches, based off current nutritional analysis from the district web site, fail to meet proposed sodium guidelines. For example, a typical chicken on a bun meal, with 700 mg per patty, 190 mg per bun and 90 mg per milk carton, totals 980 mg of sodium without side dishes, well over the new limit. Freshman Madison Thomas eats lunch daily and doesn’t notice high sodium counts. “I don’t think it tastes too salty,” Thomas said. “It’s a good idea that they use it [salt] to preserve the food but at a certain point it’s just too much.” Also a challenge will be paying for food that will include fresh produce. In the past several years the district has decreased drink, chip, cookie, snack and ice cream sizes and introduced low fat milk. Since introducing fresh fruits every day but Monday, the school’s produce bill has spiked 50 percent. “These kinds of products are geared towards school lunch to be affordable,” McGrath said. “I want to serve a healthy lunch but it does come down to would a parent be willing to spend $4 a lunch if it came down to buying boneless breaded

chicken.” High a la cart profit ratios help to supplement low school lunch costs. Because of the revenue they provide, a la cart will remain unchanged in future years. “If all we sold were lunches and no a la cart, we’d easily have to charge $4,” McGrath said. Junior Amanda Morgan believes students will like upcoming changes. “I feel like they’ll react positively because a lot of kids complain about how unhealthy what goes into it is and if they change it, it will be healthier, so I think it will be better,” Morgan said. Sophomore Alex Reeves, however, will continue to bring his lunch. “I probably wouldn’t [eat school food] because when you’re mass producing food, you can’t match the quality of what I make at home,” Reeves said. McGrath thinks the changes are positive, but she and her staff are worried about student reaction like this. “They don’t want to spend all morning preparing something and have kids go ‘Oh, gross,’” McGrath said. Gile shares similar thoughts. “They love chicken nuggets, maybe they’re not the best but who can afford grilled chicken?” Gile said.


www.mvnews.org

{news}

GasOverTime 1960

$0.31

1980 $1.25

2000

Today, you could buy a bottle of water in the cafeteria for the same price.

$1.51

A 20 oz. soda is only two cents cheaper than a gallon of gas was over a decade ago.

Recent world events raise cost of gas, threatening to test the national record

$2.74 2010 2011

The JagWire explores affordable gas stations at various distances

Price Chopper 22210 W. 66th St, Shawnee Mission, Kan.

Express Mart Phillips 66 1509 W. 12th St. Kansas City, Mo.

Kwik Shop 1436 Church St. Eudora, Kan.

$3.78 as of

$3.71 as of

$3.69 as of

>

>

18.68 miles away from Mill Valley

>

20.83 miles away from Mill Valley

>

Owned by ConocoPhillips

>

Owned by the Kroger Co.

>

Offers a discount with a $50 or more grocery purchase One mile away from Mill Valley

Monday, April 18

Monday, April 18

Monday, April 18

THE PRICE CHOPPER gas station is a quick option for reasonable gas prices. Photo by Nichole Kennelly

mutes. Also, China’s demand for oil is estimated to grow by 6.5 percent, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Rising gas prices affect more than just consumers, however; they also impact those selling the gas. Amarjeet Singh, the owner of Monticello 66, experiences a two to three percent loss in business when the price of gas goes above $3.50. “We lose the sales inside,” Singh said in a phone interview. “People don’t buy as much as before when gas was cheaper because their budgets have changed.” Singh determines his price based off the stock market. The fuel companies see the stock price, which is posted daily at 6 p.m., and set the price. Singh then adds on the state taxes, and sets his price for the next day. He isn’t optimistic for the future of gas prices. “It will stay between $3 and $4,” Singh said. According to ABC News, analysts expect oil demand to decrease by the end of the summer, and believe gas prices will be lower in the last half of the year.

$3.83

said. The price of oil varies based on the value of the dollar, which has lowered against the value of other world currencies. Oil has also been affected by recent world events, such as the civil war in Libya and the disaster in Japan. When the Libyan rebellion began in February, the country’s daily exports of 1.5 million barrels of oil were canceled, according to Yahoo News. Libya produces approximately two percent of the world’s oil supply. As reported by ABC News, however, the price of oil would still be approximately $90 a barrel without the impact of those global occurrences. The higher cost caused by those events is referred to as the “political risk premium” and is determined by manufacturers’ expected future risks to the oil supply. The price of oil would still be high without these predicted risks, based on current supply and demand. The economy grew faster than expected, which means more jobs and more workers with daily com-

Nowadays, a gallon of gas costs more than a gallon of milk.

GasForCheap

JUNIOR WHITNEY AUSTIN begins to fill her tank at Casey’s General Store on the corner of Johnson and Woodland Drive on Sunday, April 17. Austin spends approximately $100-200 per week on gas, depending on what car she drives. Photo by Nichole Kennelly

Only last year, gas cost less than a McDonald’s Happy Meal.

As of Monday, April 18, the national average gas price is $3.83 for regular unleaded, almost $1 more than the national average at this time last year, which was $2.86. This is caused by the rising price of crude oil, which reached over $112 a barrel on Friday, April 8. When gas prices get higher, the majority of the population will be affected. Junior Whitney Austin’s family made a major change when prices began to rise. “It costs at least $100 to fill up the tank,” Austin said, who drives a Ford F-250 Super Duty that gets around 14 miles to the gallon. Austin estimated that she drives 600 miles a week. She lives in Edwardsville and owns horses kept in Tonganoxie, so the miles add up. “I wanted to cry [when gas prices started rising],” Austin said. “[My mom said,] ‘Holy crap, this is highway robbery.’” The Austins purchased a Dodge Neon to reduce the need to drive the F-250. The Neon gets anywhere from 25 to 30 miles per gallon, according to Austin’s estimate. The higher price of gas has also caused art teacher Jodi Ellis to make some changes, despite owning a Honda Civic. “Even when you’re getting good gas mileage, you consider what stops you have to make and try to get them all in the same times,” Ellis said. “If I have to run errands…I try to do it in the most economical route so I’m not backtracking.” She estimated that her Honda gets around 43 miles to the gallon. “I used to be able to fill up my car for about $25 and now it’s anywhere from $35 to $40 depending on where I go to get gas,” Ellis said. The Oil Price Information Service, or OPIS, expanded its forecast gas price to reach the range of $3.75 to $4 this year. Yahoo News reported that analysts expect the average gas price to soon test the national record, which was $4.11 on July 17, 2008, and report gas prices above $4 in states such as Alaska and California. Ellis, who pays for both of her kids’ gas costs, is concerned about gas prices rising even higher. “I think [we’ll definitely make] sure that when we go anywhere as a family, we’re driving my vehicle,” Ellis

2009

alyne roemerman {reporter}

A tall cafe mocha at Starbucks costs just above the price of gas this year.

Price of gas continues to rise

$2.43

Back in the day, you could buy a gallon of gas for little more than the price of a gum ball.

5

EXPRESS MART PHILLIPS 66 is about 20 minutes away, but has fair prices. Photo by Nichole Kennelly

THE KWIK SHOP in Eudora offers the cheapest gas in the De Soto area. Photo by Nichole Kennelly


6

April 21, 2011

{news}

PreppingForState

Music Festival

Music competition successful

Junior Paige Hillebert walks through some of the most important aspects of preparing for competition.

What is the most challenging part when preparing for competition? “Acapella songs. It’s really nerve wracking because if we get stressed people tend to go sharp and it sounds bad. Our acapella piece was really hard because we would tend to be flat.”

How is it decided who goes to the competition? “For large group, all of Jag Chorale goes. For solos, anyone could go but you had to meet with Ms. Stoppel to decide if you went. If you weren’t ready, you wouldn’t go.”

Can you give us a brief summary of the process it takes to prepare for the regional competition? “Well, first we picked our songs. Then we sight read them. After that we break it up into sections and learn those parts. Then we practice our parts over and over and over again and then polishing.”

In your opinion, how did the competition go? “Large group I thought we did really well. We worked really hard. We were well prepared and I think it showed. For small group, I felt really confident. It felt really good and you could see the reaction from the audience and we just sang really strong. The judge wrote ‘goosebumps’ on our score sheet.”

SongsTheyPerformed

At large group competition

The JagChorale and Blue and Silver bands performed these songs in group competition

Choir

> “The Pasture” by Z. Randall Stroope > “O Whistle and I’ll Come to Ye” by Mack Wilberg > “O, My Luve’s Like a Red, Red, Rose” by David Dickau

Band > “Billboard March” by Knor > “Hymnsong Variance” by Robert W. Smith > “Manhattan Beach” by John Philip Sousa > “Flashing Winds” by Jan Van Bder Roost

BAND TEACHER DEBRA Steiner practices with the Blue Band at the state large group band and choir competition on Wednesday, April 30. Photo by Kat Rainey

josh duden {reporter}

Chorus and band bring home honors from music competitions Recently on April 9 and April 13 both the choir and the bands experienced success at regional and large group competition, but practice began long before competition was ever in sight. Practice began three months before the regional choir and band competition at Baker University for solos and small ensembles. Students in the JagChorale and the Madrigal choir were required to meet with director of choirs Sheree Stoppel a minimum of four times prior to competition. However, she encouraged them to come in for help once a week. At competition students and choirs were ranked on a scale of one to five where one is the highest rating. This year at large group the JagChorale received a two and the bands and the Madrigal choir each received a one. Madrigal member Paige Hillebert says they went through many ups and downs when preparing the Madrigals small ensemble. “We lost so many people when preparing for our Madrigals small ensemble,” Hillebert said. “We started with 16 and ended with 12, so it sounded unbalanced. We worked hard to balance out the sound and earn [our] one.” Hillebert and the Madrigals received one of 25 one-ratings given out to the soloists and small ensembles by the judging panel, the highest rating possible to achieve at the regional competition. Last year only a single one was achieved out of all students and ensembles. Stoppel appreciates the work put in by the entire choir. “They are doing great,” Stoppel said. “They are flexible, eager to learn, and really positive for the most part. They have learned hard work pays off.” Much like the choirs, the band has also worked hard. Any student who chose to do a solo for regionals had to meet with director of bands Debra Steiner a minimum of three times within two months

prior to competition. Steiner says she is impressed with the bands’ success and effort. “This year, so far, is the best year I’ve had teaching,” Steiner said. “Every class period the students worked hard and got better. Not one time did I walk away thinking time was wasted.” It was clear that hard work had paid off when both bands received a one rating and the Blue band received a score of 79 out of 80. Senior Ross Platt explains the feeling of accomplishment after receiving such a high score. “It felt really good to know that all of our hard work had paid off,” Platt said. Between practices every Blue 1 and Blue 4 for the band and choirs, to practice outside of school, the music department has worked all semester leading up to competition. The solos and ensembles as well as the bands will make their way to State

on April 30 at Newton High School. Platt says the hard work is justified . “You have to love playing music and like what you’re doing to put in the amount of time to do well,” Platt said. “If you are dedicated it can be a lot of fun.”

FAR ABOVE: JUNIORS RYAN HANNAH and Nathan Kersey review their music for the state large group band and choir competition on Wednesday, April 13. “Practicing helps me make sure that I know my music and do my part in the band,” Kersey said. Photo by Kat Rainey ABOVE: SOPHOMOREs RaCHEL ALLEN and Gracelynn Presley, and seniors Amanda Organ and Hayley Ostronic rehearse “It’s Raining Men,” on Monday, April 11 to prepare for the spring concert. Photo by Courtney Cooke


www.mvnews.org

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8 {feature}

April 21, 2011

Photo Illustration by Emily Johnson and Kristina Milewski

jill applegate {features editor}

Seated in drama teacher Jon Copeland’s room on a makeshift set for the spring play, “Pride and Prejudice,” sophomore Allison Mackey giggled with a castmate over something written in the script. The “Pride and Prejudice” script is different from the scripts of Copeland’s previous shows of “30 Reasons Not To Be In A Play” last spring and “Hello, Dolly!” last fall. Over Christmas break, Copeland decided upon the play and found six different scripts. But after reading them, he then decided to write his own. “I felt some of [the previously made] scripts didn’t have the same humor as the [2005 version of the] movie,” Copeland said. “The novel is public domain. The plot was there, the characters were there and I wanted to go back to the source and make it as much Jane Austen as possible.” This desire to re-create the original story is what inspired Copeland to sit down every day after school during third quarter to write his own script. Senior Ronnie Sloop, who plays Charles Bingley in the production, agrees that the re-written play will be more entertaining for students. “As far as the audience that we’re going for, I think it’s fantastic,” Sloop said. “He took out all of the stuff like the comparisons that died 200 years ago or the words that you have to have a thesaursus or a dictionary to understand.” Mackey agrees that the new script incorporates more of the original story. “I think it just really benefited the play as a whole,” Mackey said.

BehindTheScenes

TOP: DIRECTOR JON COPELAND meets with the entire cast to run through the schedule for rehearsal on Monday, April 4. ABOVE: COPELAND REPOSITIONS ACTORS and dancers during a ballroom scene in Act II. Photos by Emily Johnson

The JagWire takes a look at what goes on behind the stage

“It wasn’t too hard to memorize my lines. They’re pretty short,” junior Malayia Reece said. Reece plays Charlotte in “Pride and Prejudice.”

memorizing lines

The brand new “Pride and Prejudice” script has also offered Copeland to have freedom to set up scenes the way he sees them. “One thing I really like in the 1940 version of the movie was a scene where it changes from [one location to another],” Copeland said. “I was able to split the stage into the two locations and with lighting I can go from location to location instantly.” One challenge that Copeland has faced while directing this show was whether or not to have the students speak in English accents. “I was afraid that the English accents would be too much,” Copeland said. “But when you’re speaking the language the way Jane Austen wrote it, it automatically sounds English to a certain degree. It’s just speaking more precisely.” The “Pride and Prejudice” cast has play practices MondayThursday from 3:30-6 p.m. However, this sometimes poses challenges to members of the cast. Sloop has to make time for practices in the midst of two jobs and Mackey gave up basketball in order to participate. “I decided not to try out [for basketball] this year because I didn’t want to take any chances of not being able to try out for the play,” Mackey said. The show will be performed from May 5-6 at 7 p.m. The cost at the door will be $2 for students with student ID’s and $6 for adults. “Things are always changing as the show approaches because it’s a process, but I feel like it’s really clicking,” Copeland said. “It’s fun to get together after school everyday with kids that like to tell a story as much as I like to tell a story.”

“It’s nerve-wracking during the show, but at the end when everything goes well, I always get a warm, fuzzy feeling,” backstage manager senior Grace McWhirt said.

stage crew

“Costumes help the audience envision the time period and how society was portrayed,” sophomore Alec Santaularia said. Santaularia plays Mr. Darcy in “Pride and Prejudice.”

costume preparation


www.mvnews.org

{feature}

Conservation alyne roemerman {reporter} mackenzie hampton {managing editor}

Eco-consciousness spreads ment company, has been involved in over through sustainable initiatives six different Olympic Games, including The need to protect the planet is highlighted this month with Earth Day on Friday, April 22. An all-inclusive approach to the preservation of the Earth is sustainability, which takes the concept of going green and reworks it into an entirely new way of thinking and approaching everyday decisions. Sustainable students The school has made efforts to be more eco-friendly through the work of Club Operation. President Morgan Battes remains positive about the club. “I think it’s something good to be involved with,” Battes said. “We have tried to do a lot this year. I don’t know how much of it has actually gotten through to the students, but everyday...we take out boxes, cardboard boxes that the cafeteria sets out for us, [to recycle.] Otherwise they’d just be thrown in the dumpster, so that’s pretty big.” Battes would like to see students make more of an effort. “I’d just like people to be more conscious of this kind of stuff; instead of throwing away their water bottle, putting it in the recycling bin, just making these easy decisions that really help in the long run,” Battes said.

Making choices to benefit the future The 2012 Olympic Games in London will be the first summer games to be planned, from the beginning, with sustainable objectives. CH2M Hill, a top design, consulting and program manage-

2:

Unplug lights and electronic devices when you aren’t using them. Approximately 75% of energy used by electronics is used when they are “off.”

Step

4:

Adapt your ways of transportation. Walk or bike when the weather is nice, and carpool with friends whenever possible.

Improving energy efficiency and utilizing renewable resources for energy sources. Reducing the amount of waste by reducing, reusing, and recycling, working towards a goal of zero waste.

> Sustainable Transport:

Reducing carbon emissions by choosing low carbon transportation whenever possible.

> Sustainable Materials:

Consuming locally-made products made from renewable or recycled resources.

> Local and Sustainable Food:

Lowering the amount of waste from food and choosing foods that are produced locally and are in season.

> Sustainable Water:

Reducing water pollution and increasing the efficient use of water.

> Land and Wildlife:

Utilizing lands appropriately while making efforts to preserve natural habitats.

> Culture and Heritage:

Supporting the arts and humanities, and also supporting the revival of local customs and cultures.

> Equity and Local Economy:

Ensuring that economies encourage and support fair trade practices and equal oppurtunity employment.

> Equity and Local Economy:

Ensuring that economies encourage and support fair trade practices and equal oppurtunity employment. Source: BioRegional and WWI

Step

5:

Eating less meat can reduce CO2 emissions. It’s not necessary to go vegetarian, but instead of eating meat for both lunch and dinner, choose to consume it at only one meal.

Step

6:

Use reusable bags for your purchases. Keep a few bags in your car so you always have them on hand. Source: YouSustain

the least amount of packaging and for items that are locally produced.

plastic bags when you bring your lunch, or buy a reusable water bottle instead of disposable plastic bottles.

> Zero Carbon:

> Zero Waste:

and just received an internship in Washington D.C. with an architecture firm. To prepare herself for what many companies are looking for in employees, Johnson wrote several papers about sustainability. Johnson believes that sustainability is crucial and that our system of living is geared toward consumption and without sustainability our system will shut down. “It is a lateral system that is engineered to keep moving forward, like a straight line,” Johnson said. “If we continue living in this lateral system, it will inevitably just end at some point because the resources supporting the system will run out.” She explains that the solution for this problem results in a circular system. “Sustainability is an approach to a more closed loop system of living, one that enables life to continue to be supported forever.” Johnson points out that sustainability does focus on helping the environment but that isn’t all it’s about. “It’s this big picture and the environmental aspect of it is only one small part of the puzzle. The architecture side of sustainability is people wellness,” Johnson said. “I’ve been studying for years how the design of a building has a physiological affect on how people live their lives, how Mill Valley graduate works happy they are and productive. If I put towards sustainability more windows in a classroom, the kids Sara Johnson, a 2007 graduate, is are going to be more productive just by studying to become a sustainable architect the day lighting. the London games. CH2M Hill, when providing their services to events such as the Olympics, meets environmental requirements needed in order to leave behind facilities that will last for future generations. Carla Rellergert, a program manager for CH2M Hill, was the environmental manager for the 2012 Olympic Games from 2006-2007. Part of her job was developing the environmental requirements that the venues being built for the Games had to meet in order to make the least environmental impact possible. “I am incredibly proud of the work that CH2M Hill performs and honored to be a part of the solution, that leads the way as environmental stewards in our world,” Rellergert said in an e-mail. Rellergert has also made her personal life more sustainable by choosing to reduce the number of days she drives from her house in the Rocky Mountains to the CH2M Hill offices in Englewood, CO. She also estimates that she recycles 90% of her household waste. “I encourage everyone to always think of the decisions that they make every day in relation to the environment and to their community- from the type of transportation they use, saving energy, recycling waste, reducing water, volunteering within their community, sharing ideas and learning from each other,” Rellergert said. “All the choices and actions we make today will impact future generations and the quality of our planet.”

SteppingTowardsSustainability about your purchases before products that can be reused. Step 1: Choose Step 3: Think you buy them. Look for items with Use containers instead of disposable Step

Pr

lesOf p i c Sustainability n i

re

for the futu

9

Photos by Ali Judy and Jill Applegate


10 {feature}

April 21, 2011

How do you

REPR St. Teresa’s kaitlin rounds {reporter}

Approaching the end of her senior year, St. Teresa’s Academy senior Morgan Said has always been happy going to an all-girls Catholic school and is thankful for all the opportunities her education has opened up for her. Editor-in-chief of the school newspaper, The Dart, and recently named Missouri Student Journalist of the Year 2011, Said thinks she more publicly represents the school because all of her classmates and teachers know that she is responsible for choosing the stories that are published about the school. “I’m honestly such a huge newspaper freak,” Said said. “I put all my energy and invest all my emotions into it. It’s my claim to fame at school. Journalism is definitely the niche that I place myself in.” Attending an all girls school has proved to provide a much different high school experience than Said would have experienced at any other school. Many of the stereotypes associated with all-girls schools are not true, according to Said.

FAR ABOVE: SENIOR MORGAN SAID waits on Monday, April 18 for her U.S. Government teacher Patrick Sirridge to pass back a test they recently took over Congress. ABOVE: SITTING AMONG ABOUT 100 other students, Said types on her school-issued Netbook during a free period. Photos by Kristina Milewski

“People always think we all fight all the time, but we really don’t,” Said said. “Because, think about it. What do girls at other schools fight about? Boys. And we don’t have any here, so mainly it’s just competition over grades. But other than that everyone tends to be pretty friendly towards one another.” According to Said, all the girls in general seem to be relatively close and get along well at school, even if they don’t all hang out on the weekends. They even get a chance to joke around in ways they would not at a co-ed school. “This is kind of gross, but since we go to an all-girls school, in the winter we’ll have contests to see who can go the longest without shaving,” Said said. “Because, really there’s not anyone to impress or hide our hairy legs from.” With the absence of boys comes the absence of status rivalry. The girls at St. Teresa’s channel most of their energy into their academics. “We definitely work hard, and it’s tough academically, but we’re not really used to anything else,” Said said. “We don’t do busy work, just lots of hands-on projects and discussions. Our grades consist of about three essays and five tests a quarter, which is nice if you’re a good test taker.” Said and her classmates are fully aware that they are perceived differently by other schools in the area. “I think people see us as a bunch of stuck up rich girls that go crazy on the weekends,” senior Emily Cox said. “People should really be more open minded about us. We’re doing the best we can to learn, just like anyone else. Everyone for some reason thinks going to school here is more dramatic, but it’s really not.” The most commonly recurring complaint the St. Teresa girls seemed to have about their perception dealt with their promiscuity and sexuality. “I hear a lot of people say we’re sluts or lesbians, just because we go to an all-girls school,” freshman Natalie Fitts said. “It’s especially funny coming from the Rockhurst [preparatory school for boys] guys. They’ll just ask us if there’s a bunch of lesbians at

our school, and I just want to say, ‘So, like, you guys are all gay then?’” The students at St. Teresa’s do have fun on the weekend, just not typically as outrageous as they are often perceived. “We all have our groups we hang out with on the weekend, just like any other school,” Said said. “If we want to hang out with boys we normally hang out with the guys at Rockhurst.” Dances at St. Teresa’s are slightly different than dances at most co-ed schools. “All dances are like WPA (Women Pay All formals),” Said said. “We pay for everything and ask the guys.” One of the biggest differences noticed immediately about the girls at St. Teresa’s compared to girls at Mill Valley is none seem to be wearing any makeup, and nearly all have their hair pulled back. “What’s the point of putting that much effort into our appearance?” Said said. “It’s not like there’s anyone to impress and it’s so much easier to just wake up in the morning, throw on your uniform, and not really worry about anything else.” Being an all-girls school also tends to be beneficial in the academic environment. “A lot of girls aren’t held back by speaking their mind in class because they’re afraid a certain boy will think they’re dumb,” Cox said. “Classes are really open and everyone gets a chance to know each other.” The teachers at St. Teresa’s notice that is is different from many other learning settings. “Every single leader on campus is a girl,” journalism teacher Eric Thomas said. “I am one of a dozen men and there are more than 600 women on campus. It really is so different, definitely better for the girls. It’s different from the world in the way that they are given the opportunity to have every single leadership position available.” Overall the students at St. Teresa’s like the alternate environment their school offers them. “Out here is really a different world than Johnson County, or even the rest of Kansas or Missouri,” Said said. “The atmosphere overall is just really small and secluded.”

Blue Valley josh duden {reporter}

Pushing his way through crowded hallways headed to class, Blue Valley High School senior Jacob Prewitt seems just like another teenager. Wearing a dark green polo and khaki pants, he fits right in alongside the other students. But who is Jacob, and how does he break the stereotype of “just another Blue Valley kid?” “People probably think I’m stuck up and rich because of the way I dress and where I go to school,” Prewitt said. “But that couldn’t be further from the truth.” Today, his single mother and he stuggle to get by. Working at the local Planet Sub, he has to work to make money for gas and any activities he participates in. “I’ve had a job for a year and a half now and I basically support myself,” Prewitt SENIOR JACOB PREWITT from said. “My Blue Valley High School takes a parents lunch break on Thursday, April 7. Photo by Taylor Young are

looking at the

divorced, and I live with she does her best, but it she has always wanted.” Life has always been for Prewitt, and it began While his father lived in for work, Prewitt and hi behind. After his return ents began fighting and junior year, they filed fo “I always thought my I thought it was just me though,” Prewitt said. “Th put me in a unique situa my mom with no one. N ily to comfort her. I was Now a year later, Pre mother have changed fr during the divorce. He n what he has even after a At the end of the year, h sas State University with major. “Financial aid has he witt said. “Hopefully, wi money saved from work more affordable.” Surrounded by stude motivational posters he to his seat in Trigonome room falls silent and as pencil on paper begins, blends in with his peers

statistics


{feature} 11

www.mvnews.org

RESENT? Ruskin

h my mom. I know t’s not the lifestyle ” a little different n with his father. n Washington D.C. is mother stayed n, Prewitt’s pard by the end of his or divorce. y dad was a [jerk], e being a teenager The divorce just ation...My dad left No friends or fams all she had.” ewitt and his rom the dark times now appreciates a hard day’s work. he will attend Kanh an undecided

elped a lot,” Preith that and the k, it’ll be a little

ents, desks and e works his way etry class. The the scribbling of Prewitt once again s and takes his test.

s

> Blue

Bonner Springs

maya sudduth {reporter} The epitome of individuality, senior Elgin Thrower walks down the hallways of Ruskin High School and demands attention. From his perfectly formed Mohawk, to the fresh SENIOR ELGIN THROWER kicks on his and his choir class sing “Rock feet, and With You” by Michael Jackson the necklace on Monday, April 11. Photo by that hangs Kat Rainey around his neck proclaiming “They Call Me Bo” he exudes confidence and breaks stereotypical norms. “People think that Ruskin is like a round of Call of Duty Free Mode where everybody walks around with guns trying to avoid being killed or that we’re all black and ignorant,” Thrower said. Thrower knows that this stereotype is not all true. “We have do have a lot of ignorance here [Ruskin] but there is a lot of talent and potential too,” Thrower said. Thrower is a character of many musical talents from “carrying a tune” to playing a variety of musical instruments. “I can play the drums, guitar, and piano. The piano is my favorite,” Thrower said. “I don’t

Valley 1493

> Enrollment: > Economically

disadvantaged:

5.63%

> Non-economically

disadvantaged: 94.37% > Ethnicities: > African American: 1.94% > Hispanic: 4.02% > White: 86.47% > Other: 7.57%

The JagWire asked four students from separate schools to show how they represent their school

know how to read [piano] music though so I learn songs I like by ear.” Along with singing and playing instruments, Thrower loves to act. He has been in the renditions of “High School Musical” as Ryan Evans, and “The Wiz” as The Lion. “Out of all the characters in ‘High School Musical’ I had to play the gay guy,” Thrower said, humorously. Thrower took first at the Missouri State High School Activities Association State Qualifying Tournament doing Humorous Interpretation, were he had 8-10 minutes to act out a play, story, skit, etc. without props. Along with taking first at MSHSAA he placed first at the National Forensics League National Qualifying Tournament, making him the first person in Ruskin history to earn this title. Thrower loves being on the stage whether he be playing a feminine guy role or a cowardly lion. “It’s just a great experience to bring people into a theater and take them to an imaginary world and tell them a story, and then be able to go out in the audience like ‘what you just saw on that stage was not actually me I fooled you for about two hours’,” Thrower said. In the future Thrower plans to make acting his profession of choice. “I plan on landing a star role in a movie or on a TV show and becoming famous and rich,” Thrower said. Until he lands his big role Thrower has to focus on his numerous school activities until graduation. “I spend most of my time outside of school practicing for things I do in school,” Thrower said.

> Bonner

Springs

> Enrollment: 752 > Economically disadvantaged: 40.03% > Non-economically disadvantaged: 59.97% > Ethnicities: > African American: 10.77% > Hispanic: 12.23% > White: 72.47% > Other: 4.52%

hanna torline {reporter}

Standing out in a sea of t-shirts and jeans, Bonner Springs High School senior Kaylie Holloway confidently answers review questions in her Calculus class. Her curly blonde hair, navy blue dress and brown beaded necklace set her apart from the classmates sitting around her. A sign hanging on the far wall of the room reads: “Acceptance is seeing with your heart, not with your eyes.” An idea that is easier said than done. After 11 years of rivalry between Mill Valley and Bonner Springs, neither school holds high opinions of the other. “I think other schools stereotype Bonner as either ‘ghetto’ or ‘trashy,’” Holloway said. “There are always different types of people at any school, but Bonner’s not ‘trashy’ or ‘ghetto.’” Holloway is the epitome of someone who breaks through stereotypes. People’s first impression of her is often as the blonde cheerleader. However, she doesn’t fit into just one clique or description. “I’m a cheerleader, but I’m in the play,” Holloway said. “I play sports, but I’m smart. I don’t think I’m in just one clique.” She knows that stereotypes are only skin deep. “You can’t judge a person without actually knowing them,” Holloway said. “If you really look at the big picture you realize that people are just like you.”

> Ruskin

> Enrollment: 747 > Economically disadvantaged: 74.2% > Non-economically disadvantaged: 25.8% > Ethnicities: > African American: 86.5% > Hispanic: 3.1% > White: 9.8% > Other: .6%

This idea seems to resonate throughout the school. A student painting of an Indian hangs in the main corridor of the school. The artwork, titled “Peace Painting” was created “to promote peace and honor the hardship of people fighting for acceptance in our society.” Although Bonner is sometimes viewed in negative ways by students from other schools, not every person is the same. But even at her school she doesn’t fit the unfair stereotype of a school where almost 40 percent of the students are economically disadvantaged. “People think of ‘trashy’ when they think of Bonner,” Holloway said. “Some people stereotype me as the blonde cheerleader goody-goody…but stereotypes usually aren’t right.”

ABOVE: SENIOR KAYLIE HOLLOWAY discusses the answers to a few calculus problems on their test study guide with a student sitting behind her on Thursday, April 7. Photos by Kristina Milewski

> St.

Teresa’s

> Enrollment: 529 > Students on Scholarship: 23% > Non-Scholarship Students: 77% > Ethnicities: > African American: 3% > Hispanic: 3% > White: 92% > Other: 2%

Sources: Kansas State Department of Education, St. Teresa principal of student affairs Mary Anne Hoecker, Missouri State Department of Education


12

April 21, 2011

{opinion}

StaffEditorial

Being Earth-friendly doesn’t have to be difficult Here are three easy ways high school students can help the Earth

plug all electronic devices from the wall while you aren’t using them (not only will that save power, it’ll really confuse your parents when they attempt to turn a lamp on and it doesn’t Each year around Earth Day, people begin work). During the day, open your blinds and to realize the importance of conserving turn off the lights around your house; there our natural resources and then attempt to is no need to waste electricity when the sun is completely restructure their lives to be more out. “green.” Two: Recycle; it’s that simple. Just about Yet being Earth-friendly doesn’t seem to be every classroom has a cardboard box for used attainable unless you’re a well-off adult with paper and another for plenty of money and time plastic bottles, and they to spare. Sure, it’s great are usually sitting right to buy hybrid or electric next to the trash can. “There are simple, easy cars, put solar panels on Simply toss old assignthe roof of your house things that every single ments and empty drink and not shower, but those person can do, no matbottles into those boxes ways to conserve the reter the age or budget.” instead of throwing sources of the planet just them into the trash aren’t feasible for high can. In the cafeteschool students. ria, the recycling bins However, conserving shaped like Coca-Cola the natural resources of this planet does need bottles are by both the to be a priority, and there are simple, easy tray dump area and the doors back to the hall. things that every single person can do, no matWalking those few extra steps won’t take much ter the age or budget. energy from you and you’ll be able to do your Here are three ways that you, a busy and part for the Earth without much effort. broke teenager, can help the Earth- without Three: Reduce. Give carpooling a chance. We spending thousands of dollars or foregoing have 1,100 students and the majority of them hygiene. One: Save your electricity. Turn off lights in live in the Western Shawnee area, meaning your house when you don’t need them and un- that chances are good that at least a couple stu-

dents live within a few streets of your house. By driving to school with friends, less gasoline will be consumed and less carbon dioxide will be released to the air. And with gas prices continuing to rise, an added bonus would be saving money by splitting the cost with two or three other people. Incorporating these three simple ways to conserve Earth’s resources won’t just save the planet overnight, but your positive change will set the example for your friends and family

to do what they can as well. If we, as a student body, dedicate ourselves to doing all the little things that we can in order to conserve energy, recycle and reduce our waste, we can set that same example for our district and other schools in the area. We can’t sit back and wait for others to take the first step in taking care of the world around us. We need to get up and take control for ourselves and be the ones to create our own change.

Cartoon by Asia Yates

Respecting each other in a relationship is really important A relationship is about getting to know the person, not looking good emily adams{guest columnist}

As a high school student, you’ve probably heard your fair share of speeches on respect. It started when we were little tykes, fumbling with our first words, struggling to pronounce the ‘l’ and ‘s’ in “Please” and the ‘th’ sound in “Thank you.” Then as we got older the school counselors started talking about the dangers of bullying, and so on. But something I’ve realized lately is that they never really addressed respecting the opposite sex. Not very thoroughly, anyway, and now here we are: big, bad, hormonal high schoolers, eagerly exploring the world of romance. I guess everybody just figured respecting the person

you’re dating is common sense, but from what and all that. My group later found out from our I’ve been observing lately, we seem to have for- leader that as the topic of respecting the opposite sex came up in the guy’s group, a popular gotten how to do that. Here’s the thing: dating is great- it’s a lot of response was, “They don’t respect themselves, fun and it feels amazing when you find a girl or so why should we even bother?” At first this insulted guy that you click withme, but then I started to but it’s dangerous in a see the other side. In a way. When you enter a re“When you enter a way, the guys were right. lationship, you gain powWhen you walk around in er over each other on a relationship, you gain short, low-cut and tight deeper level. The way you power over each other clothes and give yourself treat the other person, on a deeper level.” away like it’s no big and your faithfulness-or deal, you may think lack thereof- to them is you look confident, but suddenly a much bigger honestly, acting like that contributor not only to is a brightly-flashing how they think of you but to how they think of neon arrow pointing to the fact that you can’t themselves. A couple of years ago, my youth group had a even respect yourself- or the guys you datediscussion about purity. The girls and the guys enough to dress appropriately or say ‘no’ every were divided into two separate groups to dis- now and then. If you want people to treat you with the recuss the basics of relationships and abstinence

spect you deserve, you’ve got to start respecting yourself. That means deciding on boundaries for yourself and sticking to them, and asking yourself questions like “Is this too short, too low, or too tight?” and “Am I doing this because I think it’ll make people like me more or because I want to?” It’s also important to think about how you act around guys who aren’t your boyfriend- respect goes two ways. You wouldn’t like it if your boyfriend was flirting with other girls, so why would it be okay for you to do the same thing to him? And guys, it doesn’t matter what her track record is, she’s special, and she still deserves just as much respect as you do. Please, if you’ve captured her heart, be careful with it. It may be all fun and games to you but to her, it’s real, and 10 years from now when you look back on your high school career, it’s probably not going to be about how far you go or how many girls you dated. More likely it’s going to be about the actual relationships you had.

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{opinion} 13

www.mvnews.org

Cutting music tunes out more than a simple melody

The elderly are too positive about my college education

SMSD considers cutting music funding to save but at what cost?

Words of encouragement make procrastination tantalizing option

joel hodgdon {reporter/ads}

Besides the ever popular recess, my favorite part of elementary school was band. Call me what you will, I looked forward to those 45 minutes a day where I would unintelligibly try to make rudimentary music on my baritone. But for some elementary children, the option to make music may soon no longer be there. Due to the recent budget woes of the Shawnee Mission School District, the district considered cutting band and orchestra programs. Thankfully, superintendant Gene Johnson recommended against doing away with music... for now. This local victory for the arts still paints a bleak picture for the future of music programs. With teachers, athletics and even whole schools on the chopping block, it is only a matter of time before our own music programs get the axe. As a community we need to band together and communicate with the district authorities to make sure that our own music programs never have such a close call. The idea that the school district I formerly attended is flirting with the option to cut music programs saddens me and other music lovers to the core.

In a phone interview, former elementary music instructor Christal Hamann said why she believes these programs are important and need to stay in schools. “Music provides correlations to reading and math and gives kids self confidence,” Hamann said. “Music helps kids shine, it gives them selfesteem and makes them a part of something.” Cuts anywhere in the budget are sure to be felt but districts need to understand the consequences of cutting music programs. Hamann feared a future where children are educated without music. “They will lose appreciation for the classics, for creativity and basically for people,” Hamann said. “Kids will have music around them, but they will never understand it.

sarah darby {news editor}

Despite the occasional old man and the lingering smell of vitamins, V-8 juice and urine, I have loved working as a waitress at a retirement home. Unfortunately, all of the elderly I am surrounded by there have messed with my sense of self-motivation. I am a minority at my job because of my age and it constantly places me in a battle between

Cartoon by Asia Yates

my own college reality and the nostalgia of the way college and growing up used to be for the majority of residents I serve. The number of times I have been told by such sweet faces, “Honey, you don’t have to think about it,” or “You’ve got plenty of time left,” is astounding. Despite the positive energy, the reality is there isn’t much time left to decide where I’m going to college. Over spring break I visited the University of Arkansas and was bombarded with “Save the dates” for deadlines at their college. Application opens this summer and the last ACT this year is in June. This is my college reality. I have studied for the ACT, researched colleges and planned my own visits. My proactive self knows the college decision in front of me will not get any easier by not thinking about it. However, after being told over and over again by people who have been made honest by their age that all is well is, it is easy to slip into “forget my future, live in the present, mode.” It is much easier to smile and nod and believe everything is in front of me than to prod into the plethora of real advice Betty might have and even then it is uncertain if I can yell loud enough for her to hear me. Since that would take extra effort, I have set a new approach from here on out. At work I will stay on neutral subjects: grocery shopping, jewelry compliments and the occasional war story are A-okay. But college though, I’ll stay away from that slippery slope. It’s not worth risking my sanity or theirs.

Alternative dances seek to fix problems, not create them

Alternative Prom is not really an alternative, alternative dances, along with student comFor every dance this year there has been an Like it or not, strict enforcements makes alternative Prom necessary alternative, so it just made sense that there be but rather an additional Prom that seeks to sup- plaints, have encouraged the administration to lauren proctor {a&e editor}

As someone who has attended every schoolsponsored dance so far this year, I feel safe in saying that the dances have not been as enjoyable and student-friendly as they should be. At Homecoming I felt awkward even getting within a foot of my date and at WPA I had to revert back to the “jump” form of dancing from my middle school days. In anticipation of these strict enforcements, seniors decided to throw alternative dances.

an alternative for the most important dance of all, Prom. Although the administration has not acknowledged or addressed any other alternative dance this year, there has been an active campaign to discourage students from promoting and attending alternative Prom. Incorrect information has been circulated, and the event has been blamed for harming school spirit and ticket sales for regular Prom. This is uncomfortably similar to election time, where politicians focus on tearing down their opponents rather than promoting themselves. Rather than immediately addressing the problems with the dance policy, administrators looked for someone else to blame and found a convenient scapegoat in alternative Prom.

plement, rather than replace, the school Prom. It’s not on the same night, and tickets are less than the cost of a usual Saturday night dinner and a movie. Other schools with similar dance policies often have secondary dances after the school dance where they can dance the way they want. This is the function filled by alternative Prom, only on a completely different date so that it’s not in competition with the school Prom and After-Prom. Prom is the last major event for seniors before they graduate, a night that should be remembered forever, and is an important milestone for juniors as well. However, juniors have a chance to continue working with the administration to improve the dance policy. This year’s

YouSaidIt What is your view on alternative Prom? “It’s a good way to dance the way you want. You should go to both.” {freshman Beth Luder}

“[The alternative dances] hurt our school funding and spirit.” {sophomore Preston Simmon}

“An alternative Prom was expected. Students should go to both.” {Junior Jenna Curtis}

try to improve the dance policy, but seniors are out of time for negotiation. Alternative dances would not have even been necessary if the administration had not lost sight of who the dances are really for. Dances aren’t for parents, teachers or the administration; they’re for students. While the “connected sway” was a good start, many seniors remain unsure of how the dance policy will be enforced at Prom. Alternative Prom is a dance for students, by students and is being held to ensure that all seniors and juniors will have a positive Prom experience. I plan on attending the school-sponsored Prom and hope it will be great. However, I’m attending and organizing alternative Prom to make sure my senior Prom is everything I want it to be.

“[The alternative Prom] hurts future classes by competing with the school’s prom.” {senior Scott Weidner}

Photos by Austin Gude


14

April 21, 2011

{sports}

Pushed out by newer sports

joel hodgdon {reporter/ads}

The sport of baseball is in the bottom of the ninth-and losing Baseball is no longer America’s national pastime. There, I said it. Now take a deep breath Coach Strickland and keep reading. Everybody grew up with baseball. With leagues for everybody from kindergarteners to professional players to old men more interested in their respective alcoholic beverages than the game, I believe the sport of baseball and its subsidiaries includes more people in America than any other sport. But sad to say, baseball isn’t America’s favorite sport anymore. Whether the cause of this is steroid scandals, the much debated length of the season itself or the growing popularity of other sports, baseball is no longer the powerhouse it once was. A part of this is due to the World Series. When’s the last time your family had a World Series party? For that matter, I doubt most people know when it is. The moniker of calling baseball players the “boys of summer” is a misnomer in the extreme. Compared to the mecca of football and advertising, the Super Bowl, the World Series is a joke. By the time the series gets here, the nation is fully in football mode and about ready for Halloween. Major League Baseball’s sevengame championship series just drags on a little too long for most Americans to care. Major league baseball attendance reflects the falling of baseball’s star in the sports world as well. In fact, according to ESPN, for the 2009 season, the average attendance for a National Football League game was double that of a MLB game. (67,000 verses 30,000). But live baseball is not the only medium that has suffered. Television ratings have been lukewarm for baseball practically since the invention of the television. NFL games routinely beat out post-season baseball in ratings, according to Nielsen media research. Football isn’t the only contender for the title of America’s favorite pastime. Ice hockey is a good example. USA hockey, a youth league, is setting participation records, especially in younger age brackets. The popularity of European style soccer, another challenger, is growing. Right here in the Kansas City area there is evidence of soccer’s rise in public consciousness shown through the success of Sporting Kansas City. Baseball, you had a good run. Face it, apple pie isn’t really that great either.

ABOVE: SOPHOMORE EMILY BRIGHAM practices long jump on Monday, April 11. Emily ffinished first in the Ottawa, Lansing and Jaguar Invitationals. Photos by Emily Johnson

Getting up to speed hanna torline{reporter}

Track team continues to win despite losing many athletes With a large number of point-producing athletes not returning to the track team due to graduation, moving and some not coming out for the team, it was unclear if the returning athletes would be able to fill the shoes of those who didn’t return. Head boys coach Chris Dunback was apprehensive about the start of the season. “We lost a lot of quality seniors,” Dunback said. “We were unsure how the season would turn out, but the results have been positive.” Despite an overwhelming number of underclassmen competing on varsity, the girls team has won all of its meets. The boys team has also been successful with a second place, two third places and a fourth place finish. Head girls coach Mark Peck is pleased with how the teams have performed. “It’s early to say, but we are headed in the right direction,” Peck said. “These kids are filling the shoes of athletes [we lost] and they are doing even better.” Contributing to the girls’ first place wins, sophomore McKenzie Schmitt proved she was ready to step up and produce points. “I have done really well so far, and so has the team,” Schmitt said. “It’s the larger meets that count, but our success shows that we are only going to get better.” The team has found that a lot of its points

SOPHOMORES MCKENZIE SCHMITT and Emily Brigham sprint during practice on Monday, April 11. The girls scored 50 points combined at the Friday, April 1 Ottawa Invitational. Photo by Emily Johnson

are coming from the younger athletes. In the first meet of the season, 109 of the team’s 206.5 points (almost 53 percent), not including points scored in relays, were scored by sophomores. Additionally, the freshmen girls scored 36 individual points, more than the 34 points scored by juniors or the 27.5 points scored by seniors. Compared to last season, when both teams won league and the girls finished third at state and the boys finished fifth, throwing coach Cory Wurtz sees a distinction not only in points coming from underclassmen, but also how points are being scored. “There isn’t the four-event dominant person like we had last year,” Wurtz said. “Instead, there are four different people scoring points for us.” Some of those athletes are seniors Macauley Garton, returning after winning state in javelin, Chad Thomas, Adam Farnow, and junior Parker Brush, who are all stepping up to lead the team. Sophomore Maddie Estell, who earned a gold

medal in the high jump and second place in the triple jump, sees the leadership forming in both the girls and the boys teams. “Both teams have pretty strong leaders,” Estell said. “But underclassmen are doing well also.” Another underclassman who proved she was able to score was sophomore Emily Brigham, who won every event she participated in at the Ottawa Invitational, including the 300- meter hurdles, which she had never competed in before. Dunback sees the positives of underclassmen like Brigham taking on more events. “We didn’t know how it would play out,” Dunback said. “It’s a surprise that younger girls are stepping up and filling holes that we are missing.” However, regardless of who is being relied upon to produce points, Peck still expects the team to be successful. “We hope to be successful and win league,” Peck said.”That’s what we strive for every year.”

ByTheNumbers:

ON THURSDAY, APRIL 7, senior Dillon Casper finished sixth in the 200 meter dash with a time of 23.74. Photo by Emily Johnson

Girls > 10 scored by freshmen > 72.28 scored by sophomores > 16 scored by juniors > 14.56 scored by seniors

Points scored by classes at the Shawnee Mission West Invitational

Boys > 3 scored by freshmen > 0 scored by sophomores > 28.5 scored by juniors > 40.75 scored by seniors


www.mvnews.org

{sports}

Too cool for school sports Spring features athletic opportunities for three students in non-traditional sports sarah fulton {sports editor}

sarah gonzales {reporter}

joel hodgdon {reporter/ads}

T.J. Phillips

Freshman T.J. Phillips is in a class of his own. The lone athlete from the school on his club lacrosse team, he enjoys the uniqueness of his chosen sport. “I’ve been playing lacrosse since I was in fourth grade and I’ve always loved the sport,” Phillips said. “It’s fast and very fun.” A spring sport, lacrosse is played with 10 players: three defenders, three midfielders, three attackers and one goalie. “Lacrosse is like a couple different sports, it has some similar positions to soccer and is played like hockey,” Phillips said. “Like in hockey, in lacrosse you can go behind the goal about ten yards.” Phillips acknowledged that, unlike hockey or soccer, lacrosse isn’t the first sport most people choose to play. “On the East Coast everybody plays, it just hasn’t got to the midwest and Kansas yet,” Phillips said. He remains hopeful in the sport’s potential to grow. “It’s really growing in the youth league, where before there were four or five teams, now there are 12.” US Lacrosse, the national governing body of men’s and women’s lacrosse, has also reported that the sport is growing. On average the participation of lacrosse at the youth level has grown over the last 10 years by 9 percent annually. For Phillips and his club team, the Blue

15

Preview

>Baseball

The team next hosts Piper on Thursday, April 28 at 4 p.m. Head coach Jeff Strickland says the game will be tough. “Piper is a very good team, undefeated in league,” Strickland said. “It will be a challenge for us.”

>Softball

Next in action tonight at 4:30 p.m. against Spring Hill, the girls are currently 3-4. Head coach Sarah Haub is confident. “We have good individual players,” Haub said. “I hope we win both games.”

> Girls Soccer

Currently 6-0-1, the girls host De Soto tonight at 4:30 p.m. Head coach Arlan Vomhof says the team is united. “Our strength is our cohesion,” Vomhof said. “The girls all get along well.”

>Boys Golf

DURING THE GAME against the Olathe Lacrosse Club on Thursday, April 14, freshman TJ Phillips prepares to pass the ball to a fellow teammate. Phillips scored two points, helping the team to a 9-3 victory. Photo by Nichole Kennelly

Valley West Jaguars, the future is bright. In May of last year the team went 9-0 in the city championship tournament. Phillips hopes that his team’s early preparation and new members will help them make a repeat bid for the championship. “We started practice in December, hopefully it will pay off,” Phillips said. He gave some tips for aspiring lacrosse athletes hoping to learn the sport. “You need to just practice the essentials, shooting and catching,” Phillips said. “Once you get the basics down it really is tons of fun.”

Lilly Hanning

Ally Brake

Photo by Courtney Cooke

Senior Ally Brake describes her football team as “family.” Brake joined the Kansas City Spartans women’s football team as a wide-receiver after she turned 18. The team members range in age from 18 to 40, including several All-American players. “We are very diverse and a pretty fun, easy going team,” Brake said. “We really have some very good athletes.” Brake and The Spartans play in the Women’s Football Alliance, a coalition of 60 teams from all over the country. Games are every weekend with teams playing the teams closest to them geographically. The Spartans are based out of the Shawnee Mission North District Stadium. Brake used to be nervous before games, but now she says they are second nature and she looks forward to playing. “At first it was nerve racking, there are a lot of things to think about. But once you get out there it feels so good just to play and to get things right,” Brake said. “Now games just kind of happen, I eat a sandwich to prepare and then I play.”

Prancing, trotting, and saddles are all necessary in competitive horseback riding. Sophomore Lilly Hanning has been riding horses since she was two years old. “My uncle had a horse, and I rode it for the first time,” Hanning said. “I bonded with that horse and I started taking lessons. Now I show on my own.” Hanning and her horse, Unreal Britches, have been successful in placing at shows. “She scored a few high point awards,” trainer Mary Sharp said. “She has gotten Rider of the Year award a few times. I felt really proud of her. She’s worked hard and she thought she wasn’t going to be successful because she had just started.” Being successful has helped her find benefits and drawbacks of SOPHOMORE LILY HANNING walks her horse, named Unreal Britches, on Saturday, April 16. Photo by Courtney Cooke horseback riding. “The best thing is the bonds that you create with the horses and I also love teaching little kids,” Hanning said. “The worst thing for me is probably staying physically in shape. You use many different muscles groups when you ride.” Even though Hanning has her likes and dislikes, her trainer pin-pointed her strengths and weaknesses. “Lilly’s strength is that she had a horse first mentality and she is always willing to learn more,” Sharp said. “Her weakness is that she needs to be more flexible when things do not go the way she wants them to. I don’t want her to get frustrated when things don’t go as planned. With horses you always have to expect the unexpected and learn to be okay with that.”

Head coach Adam Wessel says the team is young and he is looking for improvement during today’s 7:30 a.m. meet at Spring Hill. “It is all so new to the team,” Wessel said. “I just want to see growth.”

>Boys Tennis

Playing tonight at Gardner-Edgerton, head coach Eric Ammerman is not worried about tonight’s quadrangular. “We are winning more than losing,” Ammerman said. “I think we will be competitive.”

> Track and Field

Competing on Friday, April 22 and Saturday, April 23 at 8 a.m. in the KU Relays, boys head coach Chris Dunback is looking forward to success. “We’ve had a tremendous start,” Dunback said. “It has been very positive.”

Player spotlight

Senior Taszia Roseberry: Softball How long have you played softball? Since I was five, I started playing tball and then started playing competitively when I was eight. What are your goals this year? To make the team better as one instead of just being individual players. What are your plans for softball after high school? I have a scholarship to play at NorthWest Missouri State. What is your favorite softball memory? My junior year I dove into second base and a girl tagged me in the face. I had a bruise the size of a softball for two weeks.


16

April 21, 2011

{a&e}

A step back

in time

kaitlin rounds {reporter}

Boomerang In addition to high quality everyday vintage clothing, Boomerang also offers many costume options. Located at 3900 Pennsylvania Avenue, Kansas City, Mo.

Each vintage store in Kan- en’s clothing and half designer Vintage stores provide a one-of-a-kind experience sas City is slightly different. reproductions. Run by Donna Walking into Boomerang, a vintage shop in the Westport district of downtown Kansas City, MO, the wide array of clothing and accessories from the 1950s, 60s, 70s and 80s is overwhelming. The walls inside the store are fully lined with everything from giant poodle skirts to leisure suits to authentic flapper dresses. Boomerang is one of many vintage stores in the Kansas City-area that has experienced a lot of success in the last few years. “We keep a pretty steady business,” Tim Lach, an employee at Boomerang, said. “People work hard and like to have fun, and we’re there for that.” While many vintage stores are hot spots for costume shopping, Boomerang especially flourishes in that department. Not only do they offer plenty of clothes for sale, but more high end or unique items are available for rent. “Halloween is our Christmas time because of our costumes,” Lach said. “Halloween night guys will come in with no idea what they need and we’re here to help.”

Re-Runs, Inc. is one of largest vintage retailers in the United States and has gained fame by providing clothing for movies, television and photographic media. “We work with a whole network of people in the movies,” Re-Runs employee Andy Chambers said. “We’ve provided clothes for Secret Life of Bees and Across the Universe. That one we just sent in boxes and boxes of clothes from the 70s, just anything they could possibly need.” Re-Runs has become so renowned as a vintage store they have had a large range of celebrity clientele. “Jack White [lead singer of the White Stripes] came in once,” Chambers said. “He bought a hat. Not for him, someone else. [Actor] Paul Rudd also comes in all the time. He likes to buy boxy men shirts. Oh, and [singer] Rufus Wanewright came in once and gave the owner a ticket to his show after he finished shopping.” While Re-Runs sells 100% vintage clothes, all made at least 20 years ago, some shops also sell reproductions. Donna’s Dress Shop sells about half true vintage wom-

Foulk, the clothes are all ones that women would feel comfortable wearing at home, work, or social events, and not only costume items. The atmosphere of Donna’s Dress Shop is bright and inviting. Any clothing from formal dresses to bathing suits to aprons and jewelry can be found there. “I have new stuff every day,” Foulk said. “I keep things updated on Facebook. A lot of people bring stuff to me. The buying comes in spurts and sometimes I’ll go on house calls.” In a time when the economy has been suffering vintage shopping becomes not only a way to have fun and create one’s own unique style but also a way to save money. “We do better now than we did a few years ago because vintage clothes are considered ‘green,’” Chambers said. The consensus from those involved in the vintage clothing circuit is a positive one. “I love being able to see clothes getting a second, third, sometimes even fourth chance,” Chambers said. “Everything’s one of a kind that we sell, and there’s always an element of surprise. It’s just kind of magical.”

Donna’s Dress Shop With both authentic vintage clothing and reproductions, Donna’s Dress Shop specializes in wearable vintage. Located at 1410 W. 39th St., Kansas City, Mo.

Re-Runs, Inc. One of the largest vintage stores in the nation, Re-Runs has gained esteem in the entertainment industry. Located at 4041 Broadway, Kansas City, Mo.

Retro Vixen Selling all reproductions, Retro Vixen specializes in women’s wear for special occasions, with unique dress options. Located at 1620 W. 39th St., Kansas City, Mo.

Rock Candy ABOVE: A CUSTOMER MAKES a purchase on Friday, April 4 at Re-Runs, Inc. “The vintage shop circuit is like a community.” Re-Runs employee Andy Chambers said. “We all shop at the same estate sales and help each other out.” Chambers has been working at Re-Runs since it opened. Photos by Kristina Milewski

With both men’s and women’s clothing, Rock Candy sells 100% authentic vintage clothing and accessories. Located at 1415 West 39th St., Kansas City, Mo. Photos by Kristina Milewski Graphic by Jill Applegate


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18

April 21, 2011

{a&e}

Have your

CUPCAKE mackenzie hampton {managing editor}

lisa joerling {reporter}

3 Women and an Oven- 14852 Metcalf Ave. Overland Park Although small and tucked away, the 3 Women and an Oven Boutique Bakery has many unique treats to offer customers. Even though the bakery has many decadent desserts to share, the JagWire decided to take a look specifically at their cupcakes. Walking into 3 Women and an Oven, there was an automatic aroma of sweets. They have 12 different cupcake flavors daily along with delicious vanilla and chocolate baby cakes that are perfect for satisfying a sweet tooth. Jayne Torline and Stacey Webb, co-owners of 3 Women and an Oven, started the bakery in May 2002 when they decided to share their love of baking and make baked-fromscratch desserts for friends and customers. Preparations go on throughout the day at the bakery to keep the desserts fresh and enjoyable for customers. The baking manager starts at 6:30 a.m. preparing these desserts where steps are made to produce yummy treats. “Because everything we make is from scratch, there are multiple steps and, depending on the recipe, we have multiple ingredients,” Torline said. “We work at keeping the recipes pure and use as many locally produced ingredients as possible.” Besides the average customer, many businesses get to enjoy 3 Women and an Oven’s desserts and cupcakes as well. “We have a variety of sales outlets: Walk-in businesses, phone orders, email orders, fax orders and several wholesale customers that also sell our desserts at their local locations such as Dean & Deluca, Nordstrom’s Espresso Bar, ingredient restaurant and several others,” Torline said. “You could say we have hundreds daily that enjoy our desserts.” Cupcakes are starting to become a popular dessert and 3 Women and an Oven Bakery Boutique is definitely not the only bakery that offers cupcakes, but they do offer something that customers truly appreciate. “There are several cupcake shops that have popped up over the past few years but our sales have also increased. Our customers tell us that they appreciate the fact that we do not use a box mix and they can truly taste the difference of a scratch made product,” Torline said. “Also we provide so much more than just cupcakes. We have talented cake artists that create amazing custom cakes for a variety of celebrations. We are coming up on graduation, and the creativity options are endless.”

and eat it, too

Photos by Taylor Young

Smallcakes- 14150 W. 119th St. Olathe

COUCHES AND MODERN photography allow customers to relax while they watch cupcakes being made in the open kitchen at Smallcakes cupcakery on Thursday, April 14. Photo by Ali Judy

Smallcakes, a local bakery with three locations in Overland Park, Olathe and Lee’s Summit, was the JagWire’s favorite out of the three. Their slogan, “maybe a cupcake will help?” really makes them unique. We tried a dozen of the delectable cupcakes which are made from scratch every morning. Smallcakes features 15 different flavors daily and each cupcake is made with Shatto milk. A few JagWire favorites were the birthday cake, lemon, pink vanilla and cookies and cream cupcakes. Smallcakes even had a peanut butter and jelly cupcake which was surprisingly good. No matter what flavor of cupcake, each was moist and seemed to crumble perfectly apart. Aside from selling cupcakes, Smallcakes also offers birthday parties where kids and adults can decorate their own cupcakes. We thought their prices were average at $3 per cupcake and $33 for a dozen. Smallcakes is our favorite cupcake place because of their great cupcakes and their short distance from

Gigi’s Cupcakes- 6780 W. 135th St. Overland Park

AN ORDER OF a dozen cupcakes (top), including their signature flavor Pink Champagne, sit on a table in 3 Women and an Oven. Photo by Taylor Young

Smells of sugar fill the air at Gigi’s cupcake shop in Overland Park. After a 15 minute drive and tons of traffic, we arrived at Gigi’s and walked in to the pretty tiny but very adorable store. We tried the red velvet and one of the more unique flavors, key lime pie. The cute white chocolate heart on top of the red velvet added a nice touch. Baked fresh everyday these cupcakes smelled and looked nearly perfect, and the flavors in both of these were extremely strong. The key lime was very sour. Gigi’s offers 33 flavors of cupcakes, all with adorable names like cherry limeade and lemon ice box but only offer around 10 per day which is disappointing if you are looking forward to a certain flavor. Other flavors they bake include miss princess, midnight magic, chocolate malt and banana cream pie. Their prices are very average compared to other cupcake places in the area, priced at $3 a cupcake. Overall Gigi’s would be a great place to stop by after school or IN GIGI’S KITCHEN flavors of icing are placed aside for the bakers while elaborate tables wait in the lobby for customers just to get a sweet treat. on Saturday, April 16. Photo by Taylor Young


{a&e} 19

www.mvnews.org

Spicy Krab Wrap Longboards

Students share their most enjoyable dining experience

Junior Ceci Fyock chose the Spicy Krab Wrap from Longboards located in a strip mall at 6269 North Oak in Kansas City, Mo. The wrap is a tortilla filled with crab meat, rice, peanuts and peanut sauce.The cost is $6.50

> > >

lauren proctor {a&e editor}

How would you describe it? Hot Asian seafood wrap of yumminess. It is spicy but not too spicy; it makes my face swell up. My mom calls it Botox cheeks. Why did you order it? I like crab. Actually, I like everything in there. How would you describe the restaurant? It is all Hawaiian Philippine themed, there are surf boards on the walls. It is all about surfing and islands. It has a really friendly feel to it.

sarah fulton {sports editor}

Rib Dinner

Oklahoma Joe’s

>

RecipeForDisaster

Mario’s

How would you describe them? A flood of juiciness in my mouth. Delicious.

>

How do you feel while you are eating them? I feel so satisfied and like I have the best food in the world. [I feel] like no one could ever top it.

>

When was the first time you ever had it? A couple of years ago. I was told [Oklahoma Joe’s] had delicious barbecue, and I was already obsessed with ribs, so I had to go try it.

Sophomore Megan Ring chose the Cheese Grinder from Mario’s located at 204 Westboard Road in Kansas City, Mo. The Cheese Grinder is a hollowed out hoagie bun filled with melted cheese and tomato sauce. The cost is $4.75

> >

How would you describe it? Melted yumminess, it is really warm, he makes it right there on the spot. It is really big like a foot long... it is a two hander. How would you describe the resaurant? It is a really quaint place; it is calming because there are not many people there. You are not distracted by how crowded it is and you can focus on the food.

Students share the worst thing they have ever eaten

“Liver. It is soft, squishy and nasty.”

{junior Chelsea Rohr}

Cheese Grinder

Senior David Massmann chose the barbecue beef ribs from Oklahoma Joe’s located on the southwest corner of 119 Street and Strang Line Rd. in Olathe. The beef ribs cost $12.79 for a half slab with one side.

“Rocky Mountain oysters...they’re cow testicles.”

{senior Daniel Higgins}

“Shark, it was just weird. It doesn’t taste like a fish, but it tastes fishy.”

{senior Hayley Ostronic} Photos by Courtney Cooke Graphic by Austin Gillespie and Asia Yates


20

April 21, 2011

{photo essay}

Exploring Kansas City’s very own S E V E R A L CHILDREN RIDE in a small train for $2 during the community yard sale on Sunday, April 10. Photo by Nichole Kennelly GOLDEN TEA, HIBISCUS, Peach Tea, and Black Berry Tea can all be found at the market. Selling for $1.07 an ounce, the unique teas are popular. Photo by Taylor Young

lisa joerling {reporter}

History, shopping and fresh,organic produce make City Market unique

ABOVE: VENDORS SET UP their stands and sell fresh fruit every weekend during the spring, summer, and fall. Photo by Ali Judy R I G H T: T W O CHILDREN SIT by their display of toys during the community yard sale at the City Market on Sunday, April 10. Photo by Nichole Kennelly BELOW RIGHT: SPICE V E N D O R , GEORGE, has been coming to The River Market to sell his own spices at the same location for years. “I have been selling here since 1990 and I have the best location at the market,” George said. Photo by Ali Judy

THE CITY MARKET Coffeehouse sets the mood with their spiral stair case and abstract paintings . Their menu has everything from a breakfast burrito to their signature Turtle Latte. Photo by Taylor Young

The City Market, located downtown, offers fresh, organic fruits and vegetables at very inexpensive prices. Opened in 1857, it is one of the largest farmer’s markets in the midwest. There are more than 40-full time tenants that offer shopping, cafes and entertainment. The City Market offers restaurants like Minsky’s, Cascone’s, Bo-Lings and many other specialty cafes. The tenants surrounding are open year -round and are part of this very diverse community. The farmers’ market is open every Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday, offers over 140 vendors and has featured farmers. John Goode, a featured farmer, has a small farm in Wathena, Kan. and has been growing crops since 1986. His farm is in the process of becoming a certified organic farm. He sells plants such as lavender, tomatoes and Swiss chard. One of John’s employees, Val Ave, helps sell the plants at the market. “I think people like coming here because they can get fresh, organic locally grown food,” Ave said. Ave loved the environment of the market and wanted to be a part of it. “I’ve been a customer for years, I just love how fresh the food is,” Ave said. Employees of the Lolli-Cup, a tea, boba and coffee shop, are thrilled with the turnout the City Market gets. “We started setting a booth out besides just our store to get more customers,” employee Max Maybrier said. The booth helps add customers to their busiest part of the day. “It starts out slow on most days, but it get very busy around noon,” employee Jessica Dao said. A huge yard sale also fills the parking lot of the market, presenting tables full of used things ready for a new home; the yard sale helps emphasize the recycling and going green theme of the market. The City Market offers organic fruits and vegetables at inexpensive prices, along with the natural soaps and the going green theme of the yard sale. Being 154 years old, the City Market is sure to offer some history. Besides history the restaurants surrounding offer various types of food and make the City Market a great place to eat, save some money, buy organic products and spend an afternoon.

Volume 11, Issue 7  

seventh edition of Mill Valley High School's student newspaper.

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