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August 31 - September 6, 2011


August 31 - September 6, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

9 N O . 51

contents FILE PHOTO

AMILE WILSON

8 Cost of ID Enacting a voter ID law in Mississippi won’t hit taxpayers in the wallet, right? Or will it? AMILE WILSON

Cover photograph of Vick Ballard Courtesy Mississippi State University

10

THIS ISSUE: ............. Editor’s Note

LISA PYRON

rick cleveland Rick Cleveland steps out of the melting Mississippi heat and into Sneaky Beans in Fondren. “It was a mistake to walk here,” he says. “I hate this heat, and I hate Yazoo clay.” Cleveland is a Mississippi native, born and raised in Hattiesburg, and a perennial winner for Best Columnist in the Jackson Free Press’ annual “Best Of” reader poll for his sports writing at The Clarion-Ledger. “It’s a great honor to be chosen as Jackson’s best columnist, but it isn’t really fair,” he says. “You see, Donna (Ladd) is a great writer, but she usually only writes one column a week, whereas I write four or five columns a week. I could write two or three stinkers and still have time to redeem myself.” Cleveland and his family have spent many years in the Jackson area, first residing in Rankin County and then moving to Fondren so that his daughter, Annie, could attend Murrah High School’s Academic and Performing Arts Complex. “I love Fondren, especially the diversity, the convenience, the people and the music scene,” he says. Writing is a Cleveland family tradition. Cleveland’s brother Bobby is an outdoors columnist and assistant sports editor for The Clarion-Ledger and his son, Tyler, is trying his hand at sports writing in Hattiesburg. His father, Robert “Ace” Cleveland, was a sports writer for the Hattiesburg American in the

late 1940s and the Jackson Daily News in the ‘50s. Ace was inducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame posthumously in 1998. Rick Cleveland has been writing about Mississippi sports for more than four decades, but still has a never-ending enthusiasm for sports. “Each game is a passion play,” he says. He has been to 26 Super Bowls, yet Cleveland says he would rather spend Friday night at a high-school football game such as Weir vs. Mize, the perennial class 1A rivalry before Mize moved up. “The whole town is involved with those games, and it is as close to the pure game as you can get,” he says. Cleveland has covered many famous Mississippi athletes and recites from memory a long list that includes Walter Payton, Jerry Rice, Archie Manning, Ray Guy and Brett Favre. His most memorable sports moment wasn’t football, though, but soccer. “Watching the 2006 World Cup final between the French and the Italians with my family in an Italian bar in London, England,” he says. “When Zindane head butted the Italian player, the bar went crazy. When the Italians won, we all poured out of the bar into the street and started dancing. It was amazing.” In describing his love of sports writing, Cleveland quotes his great friend and mentor, the late Mississippi author Willie Morris: “We always write best about the things that we care about best.” —Richard Coupe

28 Sky Meets Trees The Mississippi Delta inspires artist Pryor Graeber’s work; her vivid imagination makes it art. TOM RAMSEY

4 ................... Slowpoke 6 .......................... Talks 12 ................... Editorial 12 .................... Stiggers 12 ........................ Zuga 13 .................. Opinion 28 ............... Diversions 30 ....................... Books 32 ..................... 8 Days 34 .............. JFP Events 37 ....................... Music 38 ......... Music Listings 41 ................. Astrology 42 ........................ Food 46 ......... FLY Shopping

Without a Republican opposing him in November, Tyrone Lewis forges ahead with his plans.

42 No Dorito Zone Tom Ramsey offers a dramatic (and delicious) departure from the same old game-day food.

jacksonfreepress.com

4

Sheriff Lewis

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editor’snote

Bryan Flynn Sports writer Bryan Flynn is a lifelong Mississippian who resides in Richland. When not writing for the JFP, he writes a national blog, playtowinthegame.com. He lives with his wife and their four cats. He wrote several football preview features.

Diandra Hosey Bay Springs native Diandra Hosey played women’s basketball at Jones County Junior College and Mississippi College. She has a law degree from MC School of Law, and is an associate with the law offices of Matt Greenbaum. She wrote a football feature.

Doctor S Doctor S is the JFP’s sports consultant. He is a graduate of Miskatonic U., where he majored in Cthulhu Studies and was a member of the varsity 43-man squamish team. He wrote a football feature and graciously passed SWAG duty.

Richard Coupe Richard Coupe is an avid fan of the beautiful game, a husband, brother and father of four. He’s still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He interviewed Rick Cleveland for the Jacksonian feature.

Torsheta Bowens Torsheta Bowens is originally from Shuqualak, Miss. She is a mom, teacher and coach. In her free time, she loves to read. (She just doesn’t have any free time.) She reviewed books.

Meryl Dakin Meryl Dakin is a recent USM grad in English literature and aspiring journalist. She looks forward to many long years of enjoying fascinating people, exciting travel and abject poverty in her chosen field. She wrote an arts feature.

Meredith W. Sullivan Meredith W. Sullivan is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology. She spends her days dreaming about where to travel next. She is enjoying life in Fondren with her husband and Diggy dog. She styled FLY.

August 31 - September 6, 2011

Ashley Jackson

4

Account executive Ashley Jackson, a Brandon native, loves volunteering with youth, cooking, doing homework, wearing awesome shoes, and dancing like a fool while playing her extensive vinyl collection.

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Learning to Win

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ear the end of August every year, I start getting jittery. Yes, I’m ready for cooler temperatures. I also like being a Libra and having an October birthday—the big 5-0 this time!—and I love the crispness and smell of Autumn air. Football weather, I call it, just like my daddy did. My stepfather, Willie Hoyt Smith, never had a son, or any child of his own, so I was it. We shared a love of cats—“them rascals!” he would yell out about them as I chased one or another around the house in a raucous game of hide-and-seek. Later, when I moved up north, I would get envelopes willed with snapshots of his latest cat-rascal, often without even a note. When I called him, though, we didn’t usually talk about cats. We talked sports. This surprised my city friends who never heard me talk about any athletic enterprise. I was in big-city mode by that point, and sports didn’t fit my new life, I thought then. But it’s what daddy and I had connected on since I met him when I was in the fourth grade. He loved any sport and just about any team that could play. In homeroom at Neshoba Central, the guys at first were surprised that I knew “the scores” (especially if it involved football or basketball). And I was one of the loudest fans at all high-school games, screaming my head off even as I sat in the band section shivering in my flag-girl shorts and white go-go boots and bright lipstick. My life is nothing if not a dichotomy. Daddy would be at every Neshoba Central home game, home or away, watching me play in the band, and regardless of whether our team was worth anything (usually not). Then Marcus Dupree emerged at our rival, Philadelphia High School, or Philly as we called it. (We also had uglier words for it.) Then, Daddy would manage to go across town for a game now and then, especially if we were playing out of town. I understood. “Marcus,” as everyone called him, burst into our world when I was a junior and he was a freshman, as I was recently reminded watching the ESPN 30 for 30 “The Best That Never Was” documentary about him. He was so good that he simply rocked our realities. The ESPN film contains footage of Marcus that was lost for years, but watching it, I felt like it was yesterday when my daddy would tell me about all the opposing players fighting over pieces of Marcus’ tear-away jersey, then later of us and the world waiting to hear where he would end up playing in college (a bigger question than “who shot JR?” even). I remember reading Willie Morris’ outstanding “The Courting of Marcus Dupree” years later—a book that is really more about race relations in a town famous for the lack of it and that ends on a high note before Marcus went to the University of Oklahoma and, indeed, became “the best that never was.” Watching his former coach, Barry Switzer, in the film, my disdain for the cocky coach over the years bubbled back up. Daddy and I and so many others blamed Switzer for not

knowing how to inspire Marcus to be all that he could be. Daddy used to say, “Kids from the South don’t always know how to win.” He often said something similar about the teams we both loved: the New Orleans Saints (which he always called “them-damned-Saints”) or my alma mater Mississippi State, especially. Thinking back, I realize how astute this observation was about the South, and not just about our sports teams. We’re so often raised in the shame-soaked South to not be winners, to believe we’re meant to be bottom of the barrel, to even think we don’t deserve to be excellent or to be noticed. We’re told to be ashamed of our state, our city or our region, or maybe our accents (I tried to get rid of mine for a while, along with my love of sports). We’re told too often that we’re not good enough. And when we’re capable of proving them wrong, maybe a Switzer comes into our lives: a coach or a boss or a teacher who is out of touch with the fact that we, especially if we come from poor backgrounds, might not be as up on the life-management skills; our people were too busy refighting the Civil War or ironing pants for a living to teach us well. We might not be good at networking, yet. We may not know how to manage our time. Maybe we grew up eating terribly unhealthy food or we’re surrounded by people who don’t have those skills to share with us. Or all of the above. In the ESPN film, Switzer—now older and hopefully wiser than when he tried to take a gun on a plane some years back—expressed regret that he didn’t coach Marcus better. But even more poignant, the film showed how Switzer wasn’t Marcus’ only nemesis: He was surrounded by people greedy for a piece of his fame and folks, including his mother, who just

didn’t know how to teach him to stay great. The film revealed a tragedy of bad timing and unfortunate circumstances, and a confused, ill-equipped young man surrounded by people who didn’t know how to have his best interests at heart. The hardest part to watch is when Marcus says he regrets not going back to Oklahoma: what might have been. In that way that sports metaphors have a way of taking hold of my psyche, I could feel the weight of missed opportunities of myself and other Mississippians who just don’t always know how, or believe they can, reach out and grab the, er, Super Bowl ring. I also thought about our city and our state and how we settle for much less than we can be. Like Marcus, our community can get caught up in petty whining about those who challenge us to be better, and we can get lazy about what it takes to go the distance. Or, we listen to corrupt “mentors” out for an easy buck (as Marcus did). I’ve long thought that we need to teach ourselves to win, to be the best. First, of course, we need to believe we can. But, equally as important, we must give up the idea that anything worth doing well is supposed to be quick and easy. It was clear that Marcus didn’t return to Oklahoma, in part, because Switzer didn’t go easy enough on him or treat him like the superstar he hadn’t earned the right to be just yet. No doubt, though, Switzer had no idea how to motivate him, and many of our most successful “leaders” don’t know how, either. That means we must motivate ourselves and those around us. We must work hard and well; learn to manage our lives and emotions, focus on the task at hard, think best, live large, and be loud and proud. Oh, and to leave our guns back at the house. We can’t bully our way into success and safety. Ask Coach Switzer.


Have a ZEN moment.

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news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, Aug. 25 Mississippi receives $8.1 million in a lawsuit against Brown & Williamson tobacco company following allegations that B&W used a third party to avoid paying money owed from the tobacco lawsuit settlement. ‌ Evacuations begin in North Carolina as thousands of residents and tourists flee inland to escape the approaching Hurricane Irene. Friday, Aug. 26 Habitat for Humanity announces five new green-certified housing complexes for the elderly to be opened in Bay St. Louis Aug. 29. ‌ The first rains of Hurricane Irene hit the East Coast, bringing 110 mph winds and waves up 9 feet high. Saturday, Aug. 27 Hurricane Irene kills 21 people and leaves 1.5 million homes without power on the East Coast. ‌ Author Stetson Kennedy, who exposed the Ku Klux Klan, dies at the age of 94.

August 31 - September 6, 2011

Sunday, Aug. 28 Dozens visit Martin Luther King’s memorial in Washington, D.C., on with the anniversary of his “I Have a Dream Speech� despite the fact that a dedication service for the memorial was postponed due to Hurricane Irene. ... The New Orleans Saints beat the Oakland Raiders in a preseason game.

6

Monday, Aug. 29 Hinds County Board of Supervisors denies Milwaukee Tools’ request to not pay $1.4 million in property taxes due to a clerical error. ‌ Gov. Haley Barbour calls a special session to consider bonds for an economic-development project. Tuesday, Aug. 30 The city of Jackson breaks ground on a $340,000 project for landscaping and sidewalks at the corner of Mill and Pascagoula Streets. ‌ The Rev. Al Sharpton announces he will begin a stint as an official MSNBC talk-show host on Monday. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

Budget Wars Whimper to a Close

T

he Jackson City Council’s approval of a 75-cent per hour raise for city employees making less than $17,000 per year may not make it into the city’s final budget for fiscal-year 2012, which starts Oct. 1. City Council members demanded a special meeting Aug. 24 over budget concerns but ended up only passing two amendments: the pay raise and hiring a policy analyst in the city clerk’s office. Council members previously challenged Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. over their involvement in budget process, and council President Frank Bluntson also sparred over Johnson’s refusal to release a list of all city employee names and their salaries. By the end of the special meeting, however, council members seemed satisfied with the budget for 2012. At the Aug. 24 meeting, Ward 2 Councilman Chokwe Lumumba made a motion for all city employees making less than $17,000 a year to receive an additional $2 per hour. Under the mayor’s proposed budget, all city employees will receive a 2 percent raise in January 2012. An addition to the mayor’s raise, Lumumba’s proposal would have gone into effect Oct. 1 and would cost the city approximately $262,080, he said. “We have the job of expressing the people’s wish,� Lumumba said. “The way we see it, the people in our city do not wish to be working at poverty wages. Although we can’t

by Lacey McLaughlin KENYA HUDSON

Wednesday, Aug. 24 The University Club in downtown Jackson announces that it is closing its doors after more than 30 years. ‌ Following rebel victories in Tripoli, a group of international journalists are freed after being imprisoned in a hotel for days by armed Gadhafi loyalists.

The first football player to appear on a Wheaties cereal box was Walter Payton, former Jackson State University player and Chicago Bear from Columbia, Miss. Payton died in 1999.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Johnny DuPree hit the ground running post primaries. p 11

solve all the problems in one fell swoop, we can try to address these problems.� Deputy City attorney James Anderson Jr. warned council members that the additional raise could cost more that Lumumba’s estimate because of worker’s compensation insurance and overtime payments. He also said it could result in legal problems if some workers made more than their supervisors. Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell then made a motion to decrease Lumumba’s proposed raises to 75 cents an hour because of the additional costs, and council members passed the motion. The council, Ward 2 Councilman Chokwe Lumumba is pushing for more however, has yet to pass raises for low-paid city employees for fiscal-year 2012. next year’s budget and the raise may not make it to the final version. Whitwell also pushed to fund a study Johnson expressed concerns about how to improve Parham Bridges Park, which is in the last-minute raise would affect other areas his ward. He pulled back his motion, when of the budget. “If we are going to try to im- Johnson said that it would overlap work that prove the pay of lower-paid workers, we are the city was already doing, and suggested that going to need more time to assess it,� Johnson Whitwell help form community partnerships said. “If not, we are going to run into some BUDGET WARS, see page 7 problems in terms of litigation.�

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“It wouldn’t be a political memoir but a book about lessons of leadership in a mega-disaster.� —Gov. Haley Barbour at an Aug. 29 press conference regarding his plans after he leaves office.

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talk

news, culture & irreverence

BUDGET WARS, from page 6

for Parham Bridges Park like the Fondren community had done to build Fondren Park. The Ward 1 councilman rescinded his original motion, and Johnson promised to take care of park maintenance when alerted of the issues. “It was obvious that there wasn’t an appetite for just singling out one park among my colleagues, and I respect that,” Whitwell said. “The mayor assured me that there is plenty of money in the budget for him to get employees and staff to handle upkeep and landscaping at Parham Bridges.” Ward 3 Councilman Kenneth Stokes proposed that the city hire a stenographer to transcribe meetings, but that motion failed. Stokes expressed concern that the city clerk’s office was not providing detailed meeting minutes and wanted an account of meetings similar to court transcripts. “If you come up with a transcript of some of our meetings that are three hours long, it’s going to be difficult to produce the minutes,” Johnson said. Jackson City Clerk Brenda Pree told council members that her office’s budget includes the purchase of an agenda software program called NovusAgenda that will allow the clerk’s office to go paperless. The software provides a searchable database by topic or date so that the public can access meeting minutes. Pree said that the software will cost $38,000 over the course of five years, which would include a maintenance agreement. “Right now what we have is working for

us, and what we are asking for in this budget cycle is to go paperless, which will enhance us even farther,” Pree said about the meeting minutes. The council budget committee had held a recap meeting Aug. 17 to offer amendments to the budget. At that meeting Lumumba made a motion for the city clerk’s office to include a policy-analyst position, for which the finance department found additional funds. Council members voted to hire a second analyst Aug. 24. Bluntson said at the Aug. 24 meeting that he was still determined to obtain the salaries and names of all city employees, and came armed with copies of former attorney general’s opinions stating that public employee salaries and names can be disclosed to the public. “We want to check everything out,” Bluntson said. “It’s a matter of public record.” Johnson points out that determining employees’ salaries is an administrative function and not for the city council to decide. The Jackson Free Press filed an open-records request for the documents on Aug. 26. Regarding the budget process and the council’s concerns, Johnson recommend that the council and administration begin working on the 2013 fiscal-year budget in January so the administration will have more time to make adjustments to the budget on the council’s behalf. Whitwell said the biggest point of the special meeting was to demonstrate to the mayor that the council wants a stronger presence in the budget process, and said he was satisfied with the mayor’s response. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Football and Fashion by Elizabeth Waibel

Lumpkins BBQ is offering tailgating packages.

New location, expanded hours Steve’s Downtown Deli and Bakery will open a second location at 200 S. Lamar St. in a few weeks. Owner Steve Long said the new restaurant will have a similar menu to the one at the South Congress Street spot. Long plans to start out serving lunch and breakfast. He will eventually offer a variety of vegetarian options, daily taco or burrito specials and southern noodle bowl specials. The Lamar Street location will open in mid to late September. Visit stevesdowntown.com or call 601-969-1119 to check out the menu or place an order.

jacksonfreepress.com

A Football Feast Lumpkin’s BBQ (182 Raymond Road) is offering tailgating packages for football season this year. Customers can order packages that feed 25 or 50 people and include ribs, whole smoked chickens and pulled pork. They come in boxes made of recycled pallets and will be around until the Super Bowl. Call 601-373-7707 to order.

COURTESY LUMPKINS BBQ

A

new Canton boutique is bringing more fashionable clothing options to plus-size women in the Jackson area. Bishie Chrissi’s (313 Franklin St., Canton) offers trendy clothing and accessories, such as distressed jeans, party dresses, shirts, shoes, bracelets and earrings. Christy Luckett, who owns the boutique, said she decided to open a plus-size boutique because there are only a few in the area. Since the store opened Aug. 20, she says people have responded enthusiastically to what Bishie Chrissi’s has to offer. Bishie Chrissi’s is open 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Call 601-398-7066 for information.

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Putting a Price Tag on Voter ID

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August 31 - September 6, 2011

Send cover letter and resume to kimberly@jacksonfreepress.com.

8

While many people have driver’s licenses, 107,094 people bought photo IDs from the Department of Public Safety in 2010, paying more than $1,499,000. If voter ID passes, that’s $1,499,000 that the Mississippi Legislative Budget Office estimates DPS will lose in revenue, not counting a possible uptick in reSen. Joey Fillingane, who sponsored Mississippi’s voter ID quests for IDs once they ballot initiative, may have put an unrealistic price tag on are required for voting. implementation. Regardless, $1.5 million per year is dramatically more than Fillingane’s photo ID law in 2006 because people had to $100,000 estimate. pay to get copies of their birth certificates. Fillingane said he does not agree with Fillingane said he took the language for the Budget Office’s estimate. He thinks the the initiative from Indiana’s voter ID law. But Legislature will create a new ID only good for when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Indivoting and not for driving, cashing a check or ana’s voter ID law in 2008, it said that people other things that require identification. who had trouble getting copies of their birth “I don’t think that given our current bud- certificates or who faced other obstacles to votget condition that we would do anything but ing might still successfully challenge the law. that,� he said. The state would still have to The ultimate responsibility for impleprovide IDs in later years as more people reach ment the initiative—and adequately funding voting age, although not nearly as many as in it—rests with the state Legislature. Fillingane the first year, Fillingane said. said the initiative would apply to absentee votThe Brennan report points out that ers as well as those who go to the polls; people voter IDs are a recurring cost: “Many voters would have to show a photo ID to request an who lack the accepted ID—young and low- absentee ballot. Lea Anne Brandon, assistant income voters, and those who rent rather than secretary of state, said she does not think apown property—are highly mobile, and states plying the ID requirement to absentee voting will have to bear the costs of re-issuing new has been addressed, yet. In 2007, Attorney IDs for these voters whenever their names or General Jim Hood said his office had conaddresses change.� ducted 38 voter-fraud investigations within But just offering photo IDs for free is not the prior three years. Almost all of them were enough. Based on court cases in other states, absentee issues. the Brennan Center found that photo IDs The Legislature will also have to decide must also be readily accessible. Some states how much to spend on educating the public have expanded the number of offices where about new voting procedures through methpeople can get IDs, are keeping offices open ods such as TV and radio public-service anlonger and opening mobile units. All of those nouncements, special websites and mail camchanges, helpful as they may be, add to the paigns, in addition to the cost of educating cost of putting voter ID in place. poll workers about the new policy. Missouri’s Supreme Court struck down a Comment at www.jfp.ms.

FILE PHOTO

L ACE Y ’S

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he debate surrounding voter ID in Mississippi has focused on political and historical arguments, rather than funding. While its proponents have lauded voter ID as essential for preserving the democratic process, opponents have claimed it is an effort to discourage African Americans and other minorities from voting—especially those old enough to remember Jim Crow-era tactics such as poll taxes. In the past, the U.S. Supreme Court has only upheld voter ID laws when states provide photo ID free of charge to those who do not have one, concludes a paper by the Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law. As far as the courts are concerned, requiring people to purchase their IDs is an unconstitutional poll tax. The Mississippi initiative mandates that the state will provide free photo IDs free to anyone who doesn’t have one and can’t afford to buy one. Today, state ID cards are $14, although they cost $17.92 to manufacture. The initiative does not specify who would determine whether someone can afford to pay. The Brennan Center report points out that a federal court blocked Georgia’s voter ID law because it required people to take an oath that they could not pay to get free IDs. The court said people might be reluctant to take the oath out of embarrassment or because they did not know if they qualified. The initiative states that providing free IDs could cost up to $100,000, depending on how many people requested one. State Sen. Joey Fillingane, R-Sumrall, sponsor of the initiative, said that amount would be reached only if everyone in the state old enough to vote applies who doesn’t already have some kind of government-issued ID. “Of course, that wouldn’t happen,� Fillingane said. Giving away $100,000 worth of free ID cards may not be a lot of money, but it’s also not the entire cost of enacting voter ID. Here’s how it works: Mississippi will hand out free IDs. But not just for one year. The state must do it every year for new voters and every time someone needs a new ID.

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blighttalk

by Lacey McLaughlin

Ward 3 resident Jannette White says abandoned property has led to lower property values and crime in her neighborhood.

J

annette White, 51, has lived on the same plot of land on Smith Robinson Street in the Virden Addition for the majority of her life. In 1987, White built a house next to her mother’s house so that she could be her caretaker. Her mother died in 2006. She points to a boarded-up home across the street at 2815 Smith Robinson St., which White says has been vacant since 2001—10 years. Faded “for sale” signs lacking a contact or realty company are in the yard. White says she doesn’t know who would buy the property because the house lacks floors and has structural damage. She says the home has attracted drug deals, transients and even stray dogs. “It’s a hot mess across the street,” White said. “… Before, there were four or five dogs there, and I wouldn’t let my grandchildren go outside.” White attended the city’s Ward 3 meeting Aug. 16 armed with a photo album that she calls the “famous book.” In the book, White posts pictures of derelict properties to show to city officials. During the meeting,

she showed the city’s Solid Waste Division Manager Vernon Hartley a property that had accumulated trash, and the next day, the city picked it up. “I feel like we got something accomplished,” White said. An unidentified woman answered the phone number listed on the for-sale signs at 2815 Smith Robinson St., and said this reporter had dialed the wrong number. The Hinds County tax rolls list Peters Bryce Financial Corp., a real-estate firm based in Utah, as the owner of the property. Last year, the city of Cleveland, Ohio, banned the firm from conducting realestate business there after it repeatedly did not appear at hearings about neglected property. The Cleveland Plain Dealer reported that the company owned 40 properties there and owed more than $4.7 million in fines for unkempt properties. The company owns six properties in Jackson. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said in his July State of the City address that his administration was “redoubling” its efforts to clear neigh-

borhoods of burned structures and speed up the backlogged cases of derelict properties. Last year, Mississippi enacted legislation that allows the city to impose penalties on property owners who break the city’s codes. Before, the city placed tax liens on properties for cleaning and home demolition, but property owners did not have to pay the fines until they sold their property. The new law adds the fines to the owner’s property taxes, due Feb. 1 each year. The city has also instituted a hearing officer to determine fines or give property owners more time to restore their homes. Last week, the Jackson City Council approved an order for the city to hire contractors to clean up 77 dilapidated properties. The city’s Community Improvement Division also conducted hearings on 237 more properties by the end of the month, and those soon will be sent for the council’s approval to hire contractors to clean them up as well. The majority of the properties require weed removal or windows boarded up. Despite the city of Jackson’s push to clean up property, Claude Smith, manager of the Community Improvement Division, said that the city has not demolished any homes this year. It has, however, removed eyesores such as junky cars from property. For the past year, the mayor’s administration, the Department of Planning and Development and the Community Improvement Division have worked to streamline and improve its code-violation process. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant program provides funds for demolition and boarding up homes. The city currently has $450,000 in CDBG funds, which will likely carry over to fiscalyear 2012, which starts Oct. 1. “I think the process that we are in now is going to work a lot better and be more effective,” Smith said. “It gives us more time to work a case. Before now every time we had an issue, (or) a technicality would come up with the case, we’d have to start it over.” Smith added that the city should start

demolishing properties within a few weeks. The city’s strategy is to not just clean up one property in an area, but to tackle neighborhoods and clean all derelict properties at once. Code enforcement officers regularly patrol areas and receive tips from citizens about suspect properties. The officers locate property owners and notify them of violations before a scheduling a hearing. Once hearing officers conduct hearings, the city council must approve the properties for clean up. Property owners have 10 days from the date of the hearing officer’s determination to appeal the process. The city’s environmental review board and building officer also review code violations for approval. Fine are between $1,000 and $1,500 depending on the property, and property owners must also pay the contractor’s fees for the clean up or demolition. Jackson Planning and Development Director Corinne Fox said that if homeowners aren’t notified properly, the city could face costly lawsuits. She said all parties involved ensure that the process runs smoothly and avoids litigation. “We redid the whole process in terms of notification and going through the proper procedures,” Fox said. “We have always gone through proper procedures, but we did not have a designated hearing officer, and now we do have someone who is designated just to hear these cases, (who has) been able to speed up the process somewhat. … We determined that we need to be more thorough in our notification process, and that’s what has taken so long.” Smith said that the majority of derelict property owners move away or have inherited land from deceased relatives. To find the owners, officials research the tax rolls to determine the last person who paid property taxes. Smith said this can delay the process, but even if the city has exhausted all efforts to contact unresponsive property owners, officials can still proceed with the clean up process. “That means that we lose all hope of recouping our money for the expense of the property,” Smith said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

LACEY MCLAUGHLIN

Getting it Right

9


electionstalk

by Elizabeth Waibel

August 31 - September 6, 2011

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party atmosphere filled the Convention Complex Friday night as supporters celebrated the victory of Tyrone Lewis, set to become Hinds County’s first black sheriff since Reconstruction. “I want you to know, I didn’t start off running for sheriff to be the first black sheriff; I aim to be the next best sheriff,” Lewis told supporters. He added, however, that it was not a coincidence that the reception fell on the same weekend as the 48th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. “You are looking at a part of his dream,” Lewis said, adding that he intends to be “the sheriff for everybody.” Lewis is a former Jackson police officer and acting police chief, appointed by the late Mayor Frank Melton. He ran an aggressive grass-roots campaign, collected endorsements from city and community leaders, and used social media to build up support. Lewis defeated longtime Sheriff Malcolm McMillin in the Aug. 2 Democratic primary by slightly more than 2,000 votes. He does not face a Republican challenger in November’s general election. After days of ballot questions, McMillin issued a statement conceding the race Aug. 11, which said some people campaigned for Lewis “on their view that Hinds County now needs a black sheriff—a requirement I obviously could not meet.” Although Lewis’ supporters repeatedly said the celebration was not about him being black, and Lewis pointed to the fact that people of several races were present, the audience was overwhelmingly black. Othor Cain, managing editor of the Mississippi Link, told the group that Lewis’ campaign was “above board,” and they should embrace the fact that they had elected a black sheriff. “I’ve always known that Hinds County was large enough with African Americans to have a black sheriff, so why not celebrate this man for who he is tonight?” Cain said. “Don’t be ashamed of that, don’t be afraid of that. Celebrate your blackness—it’s a good thing.” Terris Harris, the master of ceremonies, said Mississippi and Hinds County have come a long way. “Tyrone would not have won if he didn’t get some white supporters,” he said. “President Obama would not have won if he did not get some white supporters, and Johnny DuPree will not win if he doesn’t get some white supporters.” A representative for Johnny DuPree, Democratic candidate for Mississippi governor, was at the reception to congratulate Lewis. Dennis Sweet, a Jackson attorney who hosted the event, told people that if they are Democrats, DuPree needs their support. During the event, supporters repeatedly said Lewis can “clean up Hinds County and

AMILE WILSON

Preparing for the Future Hinds County Sheriff-elect Tyrone Lewis is celebrating his win in the primary election and looking ahead to taking office in January 2012.

Jackson.” Lewis promised to work with other law enforcement agencies in the area and with the community to reduce crime. “For those individuals that have been creating havoc in this community, we will defeat you. … I-55 runs north and south, I-20 runs east and west. Take your choice,” he said. “For those of y’all that are looking for safety and peace, we’ve got your back.” Lewis told the Jackson Free Press that his transition team is gathering information to see what is working and what is not, so he has not made any personnel decisions, yet. “I can tell you this—this community voted for change, and they wanted change, so I’m going to give them change,” he said. “If that encompasses making changes inside of the department, then that’s what we’re going to do. But we know they wanted change to feel safe and to be safe in the community, and we’re going to give them that as well. We have to make sure we have the right people in place to make sure they get that.” Lewis said he does not know of anyone specific who he wants to put in place, but he is not in a hurry to make staffing decisions. “We want to make sure we make the right decision and pick the right personnel to make sure that we’ve got the right operation in place,” he said. Two days later, on Sunday night, Clinton police arrested Aaron B. Banks, Lewis’ campaign manager, for driving under the influence. Banks was charged with first-offense DUI after he was involved in an accident on Clinton Parkway in which alcohol was present, Clinton Chief of Police Don Byington said. Banks has also been charged with contempt of court for failure to appear in court for an earlier traffic citation, Byington said. There were some injuries in the accident, Byington told the Jackson Free Press, although he did not know the extent because the police report was not ready as of Tuesday. Lewis referred questions about the arrest to Banks or his attorney. He said everyone is accountable for their own actions, and he has “moved from campaign mode to transition mode.” Abundant Spirit Glory Empowered Church on Cooper Road in Jackson lists “political consultant and grass-roots organizer” Aaron B. Banks as its pastor, but the church would not comment or confirm the connection. Banks did not respond to phone calls. WLBT erroneously reported Monday that Banks was arrested Friday night, the same night as Lewis’ campaign celebration. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


COURTESY JOHNNY DUPREE

by Lacey McLaughlin

Aiming to Make History

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attiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree proved that grass-roots organizing matters more than cash when it comes to winning the Democratic Party nomination for governor. Now, many voters are wondering about the likelihood of DuPree winning the governor’s race against Republican Phil Bryant on Nov. 8. On Aug. 23, DuPree beat Clarksdale businessman Bill Luckett in the primary runoff election for the Democratic Party spot on the November ballot. Luckett received more donations, but DuPree ran an aggressive, race-neutral campaign and poised himself as a people’s politician with more than 20 years experience serving in government. On Aug. 17 Dupree reported $601,403 in campaign contributions for 2011, while Luckett reported $906,041. DuPree is the first black Mississippian since Reconstruction to win a major-party nomination for governor. In the Aug. 2 primary, DuPree had 4,000 more votes than Republican gubernatorial candidate Phil Bryant. But those numbers may not be an indication of DuPree’s chances over Bryant. The majority of counties in Mississippi have a high number of Democratic candidates in local races, and because the state does not have open primaries, more voters vote in Democratic primaries

than in the Republican primaries. Marty Wiseman, director of the John C. Stennis Institute for Government at Mississippi State University, said that despite race, the chances for any Democrat to win the governor’s race would be slim this election cycle. “There are a lot of people out there will cast a Democratic vote, but the (Democratic) party structure is in disarray right now and mixed up with arguably the best Republican strategist we have ever had,” Wisemann said, referring to Gov. Haley Barbour. Wiseman predicted that DuPree could still hold his own, however. In the last governor’s election in 2007, Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Arthur Eaves received 43 percent of the vote. Wisemann also noted that Democratic Attorney General Jim Hood received more votes than Barbour. But DuPree’s candidacy raises unknowns about the number of black voters who will turn out Nov. 8. “Everyone is going to know about DuPree before the election rolls around. If he can massively turn out the African American community and put together coalitions (to counter) some of these other (positions) the Republicans are taking. … he might be able to get over the hump,” Wisemann said. Political author Jere Nash said DuPree needs about 38 percent of registered white

voters to vote for him. “If you assume on Election Day that the African American turnout is between 25 and 28 Johnny DuPree won the Democratic primary runoff for governor. percent, and then you as- Can he win the race in November? It hinges on turnout. sume the white turnout is 75 to 72 percent, then the Democratic nominee would need to get vide lower class whites along the line of race.” 38 or 39 percent of the white vote to win,” Orey also said that the national attention Nash said. DuPree received after the runoffs will help him Nash added that DuPree likely would get the name recognition he needs: “Clearly, need 90 to 95 percent of the black vote to win. he will need to obtain white crossover voting In 2008, President Barack Obama received 95 in the general election. The positive of that is percent of the black vote in Mississippi and 43 that being the mayor of Hattiesburg and a napercent statewide. tive son of the area will allow him to possibly Jackson State University political sci- obtain votes where Democratic candidates ence professor D’Andra Orey said he doesn’t may not have been as successful in the past.” think Republicans or Tea Party members will Sam Hall, DuPree’s campaign director, launch direct racial attacks, but will instead use said 80 percent of voters who voted in the “southern strategy” tactics of going after issues primary came back to the polls for the runoff, such as welfare. Orey said DuPree would be which is “unheard of.” Hall said DuPree will wise to focus on issues that affect lower-class focus on making government more efficient whites such as jobs and the economy. through technology and better management. “The biggest challenge is to create a struc“What he has been able to do in ture that would coalesce his base of African Hattiesburg and the plans that he has laid out Americans with progressives and lower-class during this campaign I think speak to what whites who typically vote on the Republican people want most right now in this state,” Hall ticket,” he said. “The Republicans have done said of the Democratic nominee. a great job of using the southern strategy to diComment at www.jfp.ms.

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PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

he best way to describe eating the most authentic Chinese cooking in Jackson is to prepare yourself for not only a great meal, but an unexpected adventure. Welcome to Mr. Chen’s Authentic Chinese Cooking and Oriental Grocery. The first thing you notice about eating at Mr. Chen’s is the quality of the food, served piping hot, fresh from the kitchen, using only the freshest ingredients. Authentic cuisine takes on a new meaning at Mr. Chen’s. With offerings like salted, crispy frog legs; spicy intestines in a hot pot; tossed jelly fish in sesame oil; Mr. Chen’s is the place to Jin Xiu Li experiment in true Chinese cooking. For those not so adventurous, you will find delicious Chinese staples like Shrimp with Vegetables, Kung Pao Beef, and Sesame Chicken, just to name a few. For vegan and vegetarians out there, Mr. Chen’s provides a wealth of vegetarian options such as varied tofu dishes, sautéed sweet pea leaves, bok choy with black mushrooms, and so much more. What truly makes Mr. Chen’s unique is that it is not your ordinary restaurant. Mr. Chen’s is also an Oriental grocery with the most colorful, oneof-a-kind products. From fresh produce to exotic meats, this isn’t your everyday supermarket. With aisles full of imported delicacies, it’s almost as fun to shop at Mr. Chen’s as it is to eat there. Take a walk to the back of the store to the seafood department and you will find exotic seafood like conch and jellyfish alongside live lobster, crab, and tilapia, among other finds. Eating at Mr. Chen’s redefines fresh-caught: You can choose your fish right from the tank and have it prepared and served in any number of delicious ways. In addition to exotic food stuffs, Mr. Chen’s Oriental Grocery sells Asian textiles, decorations, cookware, and lucky bamboo, in addition to a vast variety of other specialty items. One specialty that is not often found in Chinese restaurants is “Bubble Tea.” Served chilled or frozen, Bubble Tea is flavored tea with tapioca pearls at the bottom. The tea can be liquid milk-based, similar to a Chai or frozen frappachino, with the pearls suspended in the ice. Bubble Tea is always served with a big straw for a perfect taste combination of both the pearl and tea. So whether you are looking for a truly authentic Chinese meal or just needing to stock up on some exotic soy sauce, make your way to Mr. Chen’s, where you don’t have to scale the Great Wall of China to experience real Chinese cuisine in Jackson.

jacksonfreepress.com

electionstalk

11


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Pick Better Battles

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ackson city government could be a prime example of democracy in action. The Jackson City Council and the administration of Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. could see their roles as they are designed, working hand-in-hand within democracy’s intentional system of checks and balances. Instead, council and the mayor’s office too often act out adversarial roles, reacting with the same kind of swaggering animosity toward each other as we see played out in Washington, D.C. The recent meetings regarding the budget are a perfect example. Both the administration and the council know (or should know) the budget process. Yet the council, in what looks like a purely politically motivated move, put the administration on notice that it hadn’t had enough input in the process, and called a special meeting to add last-minute amendments. After the bombast and sparring regarding the city budget in the council’s regular session Aug. 23, the Aug. 24 meeting was practically a non-starter. Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell, the most outspoken member regarding the mayor’s not fully integrating the council in the budget process, offered one amendment, to fund a study for Parham Bridges Park in his ward. Whitwell did not have the support of fellow council members, the proposal duplicated other city plans and, appropriately, the amendment died. The council passed two amendments at the special meeting: one giving low-wage employees a 75-cent-an-hour raise (down from an originally requested $2 an hour) and another hiring an analyst for the city clerk’s office. The first amendment, proposed by Ward 2 Councilman Chokwe Lumumba, came out of nowhere, and could prove not to be viable from a legal or budgetary standpoint. Such a proposal may have had a better chance if it had been proposed in a timely manner. The second amendment was pro-forma. Then there was council President Frank Bluntson’s request for a list of city employees, their titles and salaries. Regardless of Bluntson’s reasons for wanting the information (they are irrelevant from a legal standpoint), this isn’t his first dance. As outsiders looking in, the request came as an 11th-hour demand, and it put Johnson on the defensive. Bluntson then escalated the confrontation, threatening legal action if Johnson was not forthcoming. We’re curious, too, as to Bluntson’s reasons for wanting the information and have requested a copy through the Freedom of Information Act. There may be nothing to see, but regardless, Johnson has no standing in denying to provide it. The council and the mayor’s office could do a lot better job of picking their battles. In a time when many U.S. cities are on the edge of insolvency, Johnson’s budget may prove to be a marvel, and the sparring makes the entire bunch look like posturing peacocks. No one expects them all to hold hands and sing “Kumbaya,” but they can surely serve as better examples of a unified city government.

KEN STIGGERS

Hump Day Disco

August 31 - September 6, 2011

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ig Roscoe: “At Clubb Chicken Wing, a lot of my unemployed customers have jumped on the gripe, moan and complain bandwagon. The vibe here is so sullen that it’s affecting my staff and other customers. I really empathize with those who have been laid off, but I can’t tolerate this aura of gloom, despair and agony at my club. “Clubb Chicken Wing is a place where people come to forget about their troubles and worries, not a place to sit around and mope. It’s time to lift the morale and confidence of the Ghetto Science community. I want Clubb Chicken Wing to live up to its motto: Chill with the ‘peoples’ at Clubb Chicken Wing, where the party is jumpin’ and the grease is poppin’. “Ladies and gentlemen, I’m proud to announce Clubb Chicken Wing’s Weekly Hump Day Job Network Session and Disco. Every Wednesday night, the hopeless will become hopeful with the Back Room Resume Writing Workshop and Job Counseling Rap Session. “Lady ‘Fancy’ McBride will provide dress-for-success, hygiene and grooming tips for job seekers who want to look good and get a job. “Sharpen your computer literacy and social networking skills with IT guru, Aunt Tee Tee Hustle. “Closing out the evening is the Hump Day Disco, featuring the Battle of the Unemployed Deejays. “And don’t forget the extended Hot Wing Happy Hour. Remember: Hot Wings are free for unemployed workers who show their severance-pay check stubs to Little Momma Roscoe at the door.”

KAMIKAZE

Stop Waiting; Start Working

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n past columns I’ve spoken about what has been coined the “savior complex,” the tendency of a group, party or race to expect one individual to be the answer to all that ails it. It’s the thought that by electing or appointing the perfect person to a position of power, we can sit back and watch as they magically make everything better with the stroke of a hand. In the black community, locally and nationally, the story has played itself out all too often. Some thought that Martin Luther King Jr. would end all the problems in the black community. When things didn’t move fast enough, out came the complaints. When the Montgomery bus boycott didn’t yield immediate results, folks whispered that King “may not be the one.” When former Jackson Mayor Frank Melton declared he would end crime in 90 days, some folks rejoiced. They actually believed that they could sit at home and watch Melton conduct a one-man crusade against criminals. It’s always easier when you can sit back and watch. Hell, when things fail we can just blame him and absolve ourselves of any culpability. Well, we all know how that “experiment” worked out. Crime still happens in Jackson, and we quickly realized that it would take a concerted effort between our leaders, law enforcement and the courts to curb crime. No one person signals a solution. When America elected its first black president in 2008, I cautiously celebrated. While it was indeed a historical moment, I hoped that black folks wouldn’t mark this as a milestone where all our problems would be fixed. Then there were the “Obama’s gonna pay for my gas and mortgage” clips on You-

tube, and it became an omen of things to come. Fast forward to 2011. President Obama’s approval ratings have dropped below 50 percent. Pundits say he’s losing traction with his black voter base. Unemployment has risen to nearly 16 percent in the black community, and some have rested that issue squarely at the feet of our president. Listen. Blaming Obama for problems in our community is a stretch, at best. Saying that’s he’s not doing enough to address unemployment is a little premature as well. But then again, for those of us who expected everything—from monthly “Obama money” to more black sitcoms on TV— it’s probably a rude awakening. You realize Obama is not a savior. He is but a man, a vessel with no magic, a leader who can only be as effective as his colleagues in Congress and a leader who can only be as effective as his followers. There are no worldly saviors. And though we expect much of our public officials, they cannot singlehandedly change policy within the confines of government. King couldn’t end racism and inequality with speeches and marches. Melton couldn’t end crime with his unorthodox methods, and Obama’s unquestionable swagger is not going to put folks to work or a chicken in every pot. It’s going to take work, work from us all to steer this ship into calmer waters. And, to paraphrase the recent words of Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed on MSNBC, if you don’t think Obama is focusing enough on black folk, then what’s the alternative? Do you think Rick Perry, Mitt Romney or Michele Bachmann have a “black agenda” to roll out? And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

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BEN GARROTT

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ny poll conducted in Mississippi posing the question “What’s your favorite NFL team?â€? would probably produce results something like 94.5 percent Saints, 2.5 percent Cowboys, 1 percent Colts, 1 percent Packers, and 1 percent “Other.â€? I’m part of that “Other.â€? So is that Buffalo Bills fan I met at Fenian’s Pub a while back and that lady who passes me on Lakeland Drive every morning with her Washington Redskins bumper sticker. Most Mississippians who grew up in the ’70s, ’80s and early ’90s were fed a steady diet of Saints, but not all of us digested it. Some of us rebelled, often influenced by nothing more than football cards and The George Michael Sports Machine (Google it). Many of us ran to the comfort of Marcus Allen and the Raiders, others to the Montana-to-Rice-era 49ers. Regardless of how and why we landed where we did, each one of us has our story, and those stories interest me. Mine? Glad you asked. It was Millsaps College, Jan. 11, 1987. I was a short, goofy, 11-year-old sitting in the Franklin Hall dormitory lobby, waiting for my parents to finish visiting my older sister Mary, a Millsaps freshman. She was the smart one, the pretty one, the one who listened incessantly to The Police and forced me to go watch the movie “Duneâ€? for purely Sting-related reasons. It was at the precise time, on a tan Zenith TV in that lobby, that I witnessed “The Drive.â€? Of course, I didn’t know it was “The Drive.â€? At the time, it was “The 4th Quarter of the Game I Was Watching Before We Went to Burger King.â€? What it became was the worst thing to happen to the city of Cleveland since Lake Erie caught on fire. (Sorry, LeBron. Your exodus doesn’t rank third in my book.) It was 98 yards that changed my life. John Elway ripped the heart out of the Cleveland Browns, one scramble and one clutch conversion at a time. But John Elway wasn’t the one that earned my undying devotion. That day, I fell in love with the Cleveland Browns—a team with Bernie Kosar, a wily quarterback who looked more like the comedian Gallagher than a hero. A team with a battery-tossing end-zone section called the “Dawg Pound.â€? A team with uniforms plainer than the ones I sported in the pee wee league. All those rugged football context clichĂŠs seemed to fit them: “blue collar,â€? “hard-nosed,â€? a defense that will “bend but not break.â€? Their fan base mirrored the team, too—factory worker types. They were the “Rust Belt Folk.â€? Celebrity stargazers could leave their Sharpies at home for Browns games. On Jan. 11, 1987, the Browns became

my rock. A sealbrown and burntorange rock with no discernible logo, but my rock, nonetheless. Unfortunately, the rest of the league would be filled with too much paper and not enough scissors. Following “The Drive,� a rare sequel that eclipses the first ensued: 1988’s “The Fumble,� starring Earnest Byner. The Browns mustered one last challenge in 1990, but were dealt a convincing 16-point loss to Elway and co. in the AFC Championship Game. Then, the absolute unthinkable happened: In 1996, the Cleveland Browns, eight-time league champions (the last being in 1964), moved—no, were moved—to Baltimore, a town that the Colts jilted in 1984. A Brown became a Raven. A purple and black Raven with — gasp! — a logo on his helmet. The proud Browns fan base, myself included, retreated to our VHS memories and old Sports Illustrated articles. In 1999, the NFL awarded the city of Cleveland with another Browns franchise. It wasn’t the same. It was like humoring your parents but knowing that the goldfish in the fishbowl wasn’t your old buddy, Roscoe. My Roscoe, the old Browns, had been flushed down the toilet four years ago. I was looking at a stand-in, a wannabe Browns goldfish. Although they remain one of four teams in the league to have never made a Super Bowl, the Browns are on the up-and-up. I’m part of that, and I’ve got a Bernie Kosar football card in my wallet to prove it. Football does this to us. It helps define us by what we are and what we are not: Republican; Democrat; Methodist; Baptist; Bulldog; Rebel. Many of my favorite memories are from football games. It’s why accomplished men and women in their 50s and 60s scour Internet message boards looking for the decision that an 18-year-old from Walnut, Miss., makes about attending college. It frequents grooms’ cakes at weddings. It gives us something better to chat about in elevators other than, “It’s hot� or “It’s really, really hot.� It’s a sport for everyone, by everyone. Former Redskins quarterback and current ESPN broadcaster Joe Theismann said: “Nobody in football should be called a genius. A genius is a guy like Norman Einstein.� Well said, Joe. I’m glad you and the rest of the gang are back. Ben Garrott hails from Winona. When he’s not working to improve children’s mentalhealth services, he promotes hockey-free Sports Centers. Ben lives in Fondren with his beautiful wife and lovely daughter.

Football gives us something better to chat about in elevators other than, ‘It’s hot’ or ‘It’s really, really hot.’

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Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

13


B

August 31 - September 6, 2011

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI

efore Sept. 1, every college football fan anticipates the new season with hope and optimism. No matter what any publication says, these diehard fans believe their team will beat the odds and have a great season. Several factors go into trying to predict how a college football season will turn out. Some factors can be calculated with ease, like returning starters, coaching and the schedule. Other factors are harder to figure out, like injuries and unknowns at quarterback. When considering an upcoming season, take what you know and make a best guess on the unknown—just throw it against the wall (or notepad) to see what sticks.

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Even using the most scientific approaches, it is all just a best guess. The sense of pride, as a sportswriter, comes from getting it close or right. So here are my scientific/best guess previews and predictions for the 2011-12 college football season. Feel free to bang on me for being wrong. I enjoy it. Really, I do. Hit me with your best shot. You can yell at me at jfpsports.com, on Facebook.com/jfpsports or on Twitter @jfpsports. (If your favorite team is not from Mississippi, check out jfpsports.com for a preview and prediction for every FCS conference.)

University of Southern Mississippi Golden Eagles Head Coach: Larry Fedora (fourth season: 22-17 overall 14-10 C-USA) 2010-11 season: 8-5 (5-3 C-USA) Loss in the Beef O’Brady’s Bowl Stadium: M.M. Roberts Stadium, Hattiesburg Radio: 105.1 FM USM has had 17 straight winning seasons—only Virginia Tech, Florida State and Florida have had more—and has gone to a bowl game in 13 of the last 14 seasons. While USM has been the model of consistent winning in Mississippi, C-USA titles, on the other hand, have eluded the team. The Golden Eagles’ last conference title came in 2003. USM has not won the C-USA overall championship since the conference split into two divisions in 2005. The only time the program has even reached the championship game was in 2006 and ended with a loss to Houston. Last season, South Carolina blew out USM in its opening games, but the team’s other four losses were by a combined 11 points. The Golden Eagle offense put up 36.8 points per game, but the defense gave up 29.5 points per game. Three of the USM losses were in shootouts against East Carolina (44-43), UAB (50-49) and Tulsa (56-50). A combined eight points kept the Golden Eagles from having a perfect conference record. For the 2011-12 season to be a success, the offense must keep playing at a high level, and the defense has to make more stops to put the Golden Eagles on their way to a special season. This season USM has a favorable schedule in conference getting two of the better teams, SMU and UCF at home. Road trips to East Carolina, UTEP and UAB will pose a challenge. Watch quarterback Austin Davis this season. When he finishes up his career, he should own just about every QB record in school history—passing Brett Favre.

USM’s Austin Davis

Outlook: The schedule provides a chance for USM to go undefeated this season but, as any USM fan knows, this team will find a way to lose at least two games it shouldn’t. Virginia and Navy fit the bill in 2011. Prediction: 10-2 with a trip to the C-USA title game Schedule: (tentative TV games and network in bold) Sept. 3, Louisiana Tech

(Fox Sports Network); Sept. 10, at Marshall (CSS); Sept. 17, Southeastern Louisiana; Sept 24, at Virginia; Oct. 1, Rice (CSS); Oct. 8, at Navy (CBS Sports Network); Oct. 22 SMU (CBSSN); Oct. 29, at UTEP (CBSSN); Nov. 5, at East Carolina (CSS); Nov. 12, UCF (CBSSN); Nov. 17, at UAB (CBSSN); Nov. 26, Memphis (CSS)


COURTESY MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Mississippi State Bulldogs Head Coach: Dan Mullen (third season: 14-11 overall, 7-9 SEC) 2010-11 season: 9-4 (4-4 SEC) win in Gator Bowl, final rank: 17th in coaches’ poll, 15th in AP Poll Stadium: Davis Wade Stadium at Scott Field, Starkville Radio: 105.9 FM Hopes are high in Starkville after a Gator Bowl victory over Michigan and a nine-win season. The Bulldogs ranked in both the coaches’ and AP polls for the first time since 2000. The biggest test of Dan Mullen’s first three years as MSU head coach now comes into play: maintaining the success from last season. Last time the Bulldogs made a bowl game and finished with a winning record was 2007 under Sylvester Croom. The next season MSU took a step backward, and Croom was shown the door, replaced by Mullen. Bulldog fans do not want to take a similar step back this season. The Bulldogs need to find answers for three

questions if this season is going to mirror last season’s success: First, can MSU rebuild the offensive line? MSU is missing Derek Sherrod and J.C. Brignone from an offensive line that only allowed 23 sacks and helped this team finish 16th in rushing in the country. Second, will the Bulldogs find replacements for Chris White, K.J. Wright and Pernell McPhee at linebacker and defensive end? MSU finished with a defense that only allowed 19.8 points per game for a 19th ranking. Finally, will QB Chris Relf develop even more as a passer? The Bulldogs’ success this season will depend on Relf’s passing game. Last season, MSU was 86th in the country with just 186.5 passing yards per game. MSU has a manageable schedule with a huge game at home looming against LSU in the third game of the season. The Bulldogs also have the defending SEC East champions, South Carolina and Alabama at home. Trips to Georgia and Arkansas will be the only major road tests this season. Sorry, Auburn fans, but expect a big fall.

MSU’s Chris Relf

Outlook: MSU has the chance to be a dark horse in the race for the SEC West title. The talent is there, but they cannot overlook any team on their schedule. A second trip to a bowl game should be a lock this season. Prediction: 8-4 with a return trip to a bowl game Schedule: (tentative TV games and networks in

bold) Sept. 1, at Memphis (Fox Sports Network); Sept. 10, at Auburn (SEC Network); Sept. 15, LSU (ESPN); Sept. 24, Louisiana Tech; Oct. 1, at Georgia; Oct. 8, at UAB (FSN); Oct. 15, South Carolina; Oct. 29, at Kentucky; Nov. 5, UT Martin; Nov. 12, Alabama; Nov. 19, at Arkansas; Nov. 26, Mississippi

Jackson State University Tigers Head Coach: Rick Comegy (fifth season: 32-24 at JSU, 140-72 overall) 2010-11 season: 8-3 tied for first place in SWAC East Stadium: Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium Radio: 1300 AM

JSU’s “White Tiger,” Casey Therriault

Outlook: Comegy has his hands full and, with a possible expulsion from the NCAA next season, fans will be watching his every move. There are already rumblings that Comegy should go. A winning season soothes every angry fan base. A losing one and it is bye, bye Comegy. Prediction: 8-3, very shaky prediction with the title game ban Schedule: (tentative TV games and networks in bold) Sept. 3, Concordia College; Sept 10, Tennessee State (Fox Sports South); Sept. 17, at Southern University; Sept. 24, Alabama State; Sept. 29, Texas Southern (ESPN U); Oct. 8, ArkansasPine Bluff; Oct. 15, at Mississippi Valley State; Oct. 29, at Prairie View A&M; Nov. 5, Grambling State; Nov. 12, at Alabama A&M; Nov. 19, Alcorn State

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Jackson State suffered its first losing season under head coach Rick Comegy in 2009 but bounced back in 2010, finishing in a tie for first place in the East division. If not for a two-point loss to Alabama A&M, JSU would have been in the SWAC title game. Hopes were high heading into this season, until the NCAA and the SWAC laid the smackdown on the Tigers. Because of a low APR, a method used by the NCAA for graduation rates, JSU was banned from playing in the SWAC title game. The postseason ban hurts even more this season because JSU will be celebrating its 100th year of football. Now Comegy has to find a way to keep his team focused with the players knowing they have nothing to play for at the end of season. Teams banned from post-season play seem to either fall apart early and never get on track or deliver a big f-you to the rest of the league and run the table. JSU lost its three games by a combined 13 points. Even if the Tigers cannot play in the SWAC title game, fans can still come out and see star quarterback Casey Therriault. A lot was made about Therriault’s journey to JSU last season but, besides his past, the kid proved he can play. Therriault assaulted the single-season records at JSU and gets a second chance to do the same this season. Another reason to watch Therriault is to see how many NFL scouts make their way to JSU to get a look at him in person.

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FROM PAGE 15

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

University of Mississippi Black Bears Head Coach: Houston Nutt (fourth season: 22-16 overall, 10-14 SEC/ 19th overall season: 133-86) 2010-11 season: 4-8 (1-7 SEC) Stadium: Vaught-Hemingway Stadium Radio: 97.3 FM

Ole Missâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boby Massie

Houston Nuttâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tenure in Oxford started out with a bang, overachieving to reach the Cotton Bowl in 2008 and underachieving to reach the Cotton Bowl in 2009. Last season the wheels came off the track for Ole Miss. How quickly did things go sideways in 2010 for the, er, Bears? Mississippi blew a big lead in the second half against Jacksonville State and lost in double overtime. Nutt went after ex-Oregon quarterback Jeremiah Masoli in the offseason after Jevan Snead left early for the NFL. Snead leaving early was one of the worst mistakes made by a Mississippi football player until this past year when DeAndre Brown left USM early. The Black Bears managed to defeat only Kentucky in SEC play, and for the second year in a row, in-state rivals MSU spanked them in the Egg Bowl. Nutt is now 1-2 against the Bulldogs and will keep hearing the TSUN reference from MSU fans until he beats them. This season begins with unknowns at quarterback once more. Masoli is gone, and his backup Nathan Stanley has transferred. Nutt now brings in another transfer to compete for the

starting job. Randall Mackey and Zach Stoudt will battle Barry Brunetti, from West Virginia, for the right to start under center. Expectations for Ole Miss are low this season after its painful-to-watch 2010-11 campaign. Mississippi will face a tough test early in the season opener against BYU at home. The Black Bears do have one thing in their favor this season. Just like facing BYU at home, Mississippi gets Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas and LSU in Oxford. While the Bears might not win the SEC West, a home schedule like theirs means they will be deciding factor in the race. Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bowl hopes might come down to road games against Fresno State, Auburn, Kentucky and MSU. Outlook: Pulling out a winning season will be tough for the Bears. Just about every team on their schedule will be improved this season, and they play a couple of tough nonconference games. Finishing 6-6 would be an achievement. Would a losing record cost Nutt his job? Prediction: 5-7, at home for a second straight year for the holidays Schedule: (tentative TV games and networks in bold) Sept. 3, BYU (ESPN); Sept. 10, Southern Illinois; Sept. 17, at Vanderbilt (SEC Network); Sept. 24, Georgia; Oct. 1, at Fresno State (ESPN2); Oct. 15, Alabama; Oct. 22, Arkansas; Oct. 29, at Auburn, Nov. 5, at Kentucky; Nov. 12, Louisiana Tech; Nov. 19, LSU; Nov. 26, MSU

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17


Head Coach: Karl Morgan (second season: 0-10) 2010-11 season: 0-10 last place in SWAC East Stadium: Rice-Totten Stadium, Itta Bena After last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 0-10 debacle where every game was played basically on the road, there is nowhere to go but up for Valley. The Delta Devils will be back at home this season and looking for their first win since 2009. Outlook: The Delta Devils have not tasted victory since their win over Lincoln (MO) on Nov. 14, 2009. Just on odds alone you have to believe MVSU will notch a win somewhere. Prediction: 2-8 Schedule: Sept. 3, Alabama State; Sept. 10, Murray State; Sept. 17, at Alcorn State; Sept. 24, at Prairie View A&M; Oct. 1, Southern University; Oct. 8, at Alabama A&M; Oct. 15, Jackson State; Oct. 22, at Grambling State; Oct. 29, Texas Southern; Nov. 3, at South Alabama; Nov. 12, Arkansas-Pine Bluff

Head Coach: Ron Roberts (36-16) 2010-11 season: 11-4, season ended with a loss in Division II Championship Game Stadium: Travis Parker Field, Cleveland Radio: 930 AM Delta State made the most of its playoff appearance last season playing in the DII for the second time in program history. The Statesmen fell to Minnesota Duluth 20-17 in the championship game. The Gulf South Conference coaches named Delta State as the preseason favorites. Other favorites are North Alabama and Valdosta State. Outlook: If MVSU has nowhere to go but up, Delta State might have nowhere to go but down. The Fighting Okra get conference-favorite Valdosta State at home but travels to face North Alabama. Prediction: 9-2 Schedule: Aug. 28, Elizabeth City State University; Sept. 1, Northwestern State University; Sept. 10, at Fort Valley State University; Sept. 17, at Arkansas Tech University; Sept. 24, at Henderson State University; Oct. 1, Ouachita Baptist University; Oct. 6, University of Arkansas-Monticello; Oct. 13, at North Alabama; Oct. 22, Valdosta State; Nov. 5, West Alabama; Nov. 12, at West Georgia

Head Coach: Aaron Pelch (second season: 7-3) 2010-11 season: 7-3, 2nd place finish in the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Stadium: Harper Davis Field Radio: Online at gomajors.com The Aaron Pelch era at Millsaps got off to a solid start. The Majors started slowly but reeled off five wins to end the season. Millsaps will have a chance to repeat its success this season. Quarterback Garrett Pinciotti returns after a full season as a starter. This team also has D3.com preseason first team running back Shane Bowser to help the offense. Outlook: Millsaps has a chance to win the SCAC title this season. It would be interesting if the Majors did win as this is their last season in the SCAC. One thing in Millsaps favor is that their lone conference loss to DePauw University falls off the schedule. Prediction: 8-2 Schedule: Sept. 3, at Mississippi College; Sept 10, LaGrange College; Sept. 17, at Louisiana College; Sept. 24, Trinity University; Oct. 1, at Sewanee; Oct. 8, at Austin College; Oct. 15, Rhodes College; Oct. 29, Centre College; Nov. 5, at Tarleton State; Nov. 12, BirminghamSouthern College

Head Coach: Joseph Thrasher (third season: 10-14/ overall 25-30) 2010-11 season: 4-7 seventh place west division of the Mid-South Conference Stadium: H.T. Newell Field Radio: Online at blazers.belhaven.edu Belhaven struggled in 2010 because of a tough schedule that was made tougher by injuries. The Blazers went 1-5 in conference play. Their only Mid-South conference win came against University of the Cumberlands (Ky.), a strange win because Cumberlands won the West division title. In the coachesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; preseason poll, Belhaven was picked to finish seventh in the West division once again. The defense should be a strength with linebacker Ricky Wadlington returning for his senior season. Wadlington was selected to the All-West Division team and Player of the year. Victory Sports Network named Wadlington a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Super Sixâ&#x20AC;? player and top NAIA linebacker. Outlook: Belhaven is listed as the 35th best NAIA school in the Victory Sports Network Preseason Poll. Half the teams in the Blazers division are ranked ahead of them. If preseason polls are to be trusted (and they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t to be trusted) Belhaven has a chance at a .500 conference record. Prediction: 5-7 Schedule: Aug. 27, Texas College; Sept. 3, at Louisiana College; Sept. 10, Mississippi College; Sept. 17, at Lindsey Wilson College; Oct. 1, at Bethel University; Oct. 8, Faulkner University; Oct. 15, at Shorter University; Oct. 22, Union College; Oct. 29, at University of the Cumberlands; Nov. 5, Cumberland University; Nov. 12, Georgetown College Comment at www.jfp.ms and jfpsports.com. Follow Bryan Flynn @jfpsports on Twitter.

The First Ever JFP Top 25 COURTESY LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY

Head Coach: Melvin Spears (first season 0-0, overall 20-14 at Grambling State) 2010-11 season: 5-6 (4-5 SWAC) third place in the SWAC East Stadium: Jack Spinks Stadium, Lorman Radio: 90.1 FM Former coach Earnest Collins left Alcorn State to take over at his alma mater Northern Colorado after last season. The Braves turned to one of their former players when they brought in Melvin Spears. Spears will retool the defense and rely on his offense to carry the load early. It helps to have quarterback Brandon â&#x20AC;&#x153;Air Canadaâ&#x20AC;? Bridge back under center. Outlook: Alcorn State can compete for the East title. The Braves have a manageable schedule but the defense has to come together quickly. Prediction: 7-3 Schedule: Sept. 3, Grambling State, Sept. 10, at Arkansas-Pine Bluff; Sept. 17, Mississippi Valley State; Sept. 24, at Texas Southern; Oct. 1, at Alabama State; Oct. 22, Concordia College; Oct. 29, at Southern University; Nov. 5, Alabama A&M; Nov.12, Prairie View A&M; Nov. 19, at Jackson State

Jordan Jefferson of the LSU Tigers, No. 3 in the JFP poll.

August 31 - September 6, 2011

Head Coach: Norman Joseph (seventh season: 33-29 at MC/54-49 11th season overall) 2010-11 season: 4-6 7th place in American Southwest Conference Stadium: Robinson-Hale Stadium, Clinton Radio: Online at gochoctaws.com Mississippi College hoped to build up the success of the 2009-10 season last year, but injuries derailed its hopes. The Choctaws were really behind the eight ball once running back Steven Knight went down with an injury. MC returns seven starters on offense and eight starters on defense. The biggest returning starter is Knight, who was named to the first team offense by DII.com. Outlook: The Choctaws get two of the top three preseason American Southwest Conference teams at home. If MC hopes to turn around after a disappointing season, they must hold serve at home. Prediction: 5-5 Schedule: Sept. 3, Millsaps; Sept. 10, at Belhaven; Sept. 17, Hardin-Simmons; Sept. 24, at Louisiana College; Oct. 8, Mary Hardin-Baylor; Oct. 15, at East Texas Baptist; Oct. 22, Howard 18 Payne; Oct. 29, at Sul Ross State; Nov. 5, Texas Lutheran; Nov. 12, at McMurry

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College football is back this week, and the games count for real. Every game matters in college with no preseason games. THURSDAY, SEPT. 1 College football, (Fox Sports South, 7-10:30 p.m.) Mississippi State is the first school in action when they travel to face Memphis. MSU destroyed Memphis last season. FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 College football, (ESPN, 7-10 p.m.) TCU travels to Baylor for a Friday night match up. Plus, it’s week three of high-school football around the state. SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 College Football Saturday kicks off; JFP Sports will be doing a live chat all day long. (ESPN, 3:456:45 p.m.) BYU comes to Oxford in a big out-of-conference match up with Ole Miss, and (Fox Sports South, 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m.) USM faces Louisiana Tech to open the season. SUNDAY, SEPT 4 College football, (ESPN, 11 a.m.2 p.m.) Bethune-Cookman faces Prairie View A&M in the yearly MEAC/SWAC challenge. MONDAY, SEPT 5 College Football, (ESPN, 710 p.m.) Miami (Fla.) starts their season against Maryland. Worth a look just to see who will be able to play for the Hurricanes.

August 31 - September 6, 2011

TUESDAY, SEPT 6 Major-league baseball, (Fox Sports South, 6-9 p.m.) Atlanta heads to Philadelphia to take on the Phillies in a huge divisional match with playoff implications.

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WEDNESDAY, SEPT 7 Major-league baseball (Fox Sports South, 6-9 p.m.) Braves and Phillies tangle for a second night in a row, while we await the New Orleans Saints vs. Green Bay Packers the next night. Fun fact: Three teams in the SEC have never played in the SEC championship game: University of Mississippi Black Bears (the only team from the SEC West); University of Kentucky Wildcats; and Vanderbilt University Commodores. Join Bryan’s live chat during college football’s opening day Sept. 3 at jfpsports. com. Follow @jfpsports on Twitter.


A

t the end of every football season since 1996, the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum has awarded the Conerly Trophy to the best football player at a four-year university or college. Five quarterbacks, six running backs and four defensive players (linebackers or defensive line) have won the trophy so far. Ole Miss has the most Conerly winners with five, followed by Mississippi State with four, Southern Miss with three, Delta State with two and Millsaps College with one. No wide receivers or defensive backs have won. Using past award winners as a guideline, here’s a list of players to watch this year by school.

Fletcher Cox The defensive end will try to cause chaos on the offensive line. To win the Conerly, any defender must stand out and make game changing plays; the NCAA does not keep official defensive stats. Ole Miss

Austin Davis Davis has a chance to rewrite the USM record books and replace a guy named Favre. The four-year starter at quarterback has put up numbers year after year. In 2010, Davis threw for 3,103 yards, adding 452 yards on the ground and a whopping 30 combined touchdowns. USM’s C-USA hopes will rest on Davis’ shoulders offensively. Korey Williams If USM’s C-USA hopes rest on Davis for the offense, it will be Williams who leads the defense. Williams is on every national award watch list a defensive lineman can be on. It would be crazy to leave him off this list. Jackson State

Kentrell Lockett

Mississippi State Chris Relf Relf broke onto the scene as a junior in the 2009 Egg Bowl and gave Bulldogs fans their first glimpse at what 2010 would look like. Relf had a productive season last year, throwing for 1,789 yards, rushing for 713 yards, with 18 passing or rushing touchdowns. As Relf goes so does MSU in 2010.

Southern Miss

Kentrell Lockett Lockett is the biggest proven game changer Ole Miss has on its roster. The Defense let the Black Bears down last season, allowing comebacks and close losses. Lockett will try to change that as well as pick up hardware nationally and the Conerly.

Casey Therriault In just one season in the capital city, Therriault has captured the hearts of the JSU faithful. Therriault threw for 3,436 yards and 31 touchdowns. He added 10 more touchdowns on the ground. Therriault is a finalist for the Walter Payton Award and was a finalist last season for the Conerly. Alcorn State Brandon Bridge As a freshman last season, Bridge gave the Braves fan a lot to be excited about. Nicknamed “Air Canada” because he is from Toronto, Bridge played well in his first season.

COURTESY ALCORN STATE

Vick Ballard The only thing you have to know about Ballard is the number 20. Ballard finished 2010 with 20 touchdowns (tied for sixth in the nation), and he missed a full game against UAB. In games he played in, Ballard only failed to find the end zone twice; against Florida and Alabama. Ballard also added 968 rushing yards to go along with 106 receiving yards.

Brandon Bridge

He threw for 2,086 yards and 19 touchdowns. Alcorn fans hope to see even more from Bridge in 2011. Belhaven Ricky Wadlington The senior linebacker for the Blazers is coming off a 2010 season where he had 104 total tackles, 9 tackles for a loss, one interception and one forced fumble. Wadlington led the Mid-South Conference and Belhaven in tackles last season. His totals are the third best in school history for a single season. Mississippi College Steven Knight The 2010 season started with promise for Knight until he got injured in the second game of the season. Knight missed the next eight games. Despite hopes for a more productive season following 2009—when he lead the conference in rushing yards, attempts and touchdowns—it was not meant to be. Knight is back for his senior season this year.

L

et me be clear. Women can and do understand the game of football. Furthermore, women enjoy participating in the sport. However, because it’s men that mostly play football, many men subscribe to the belief that football is exclusively for men, and they choose to leave the women in their lives out of the sport. This behavior results in stressful times for relationships. Girlfriends, wives and fiancés explode in feelings of neglect. If you want a peaceful football season, take heed. • Communication is essential. During the football season, you must communicate with your woman. She is more than capable of discussing football with you. She can tell you all about how Jay Cutler was engaged to that girl on “The Hills” and then cowardly broke it off. Her football knowledge is not limited to the Chicago Bears. She is well versed in Chad Ochocinco’s engagement to that promiscuous woman on “Basketball Wives.” That is not the extent of her knowledge. She will adore you for affording her the opportunity to discuss Reggie Bush’s stats, as she is well informed that he is no longer dating Kim Kardashian. Do not dare interrupt her and steal her

spotlight by adding that Jay Cutler bailed in the NFC championship game last year; Chad Ochocinco signed with New England, and Reggie Bush got traded to the Dolphins this year. If you feel the need to tell her how Texas A&M wants to enter the SEC, you should expect for her to tell you about the cute dress that she bought from H&M. • Do not expect her participation to be limited to “facilitator.” Her job is not to facilitate your participation in the sport. Do not expect her to fluff the cushions on the couch to ensure that your bottom will be comfortable as you sit there during an entire fourhour game. Instead, invite her to sit next to you and cuddle with her as the two of you watch the game together. You should not expect her to facilitate you by being your “beer fetcher” or “remote control grabber.” Even if she happens to be standing by the refrigerator as your tongue yearns for the taste of beer, not only should you get off the couch and get your own beer, but you should also ask her if she desires her drink of choice. Needless to say, she will be happy to go on “beer runs” for you as along as you provide enough funding for shoe shopping.

FIKLE PHOTO

&//4"!,,Keeping Your Woman Happy During Football Season

Keeping your woman involved in the football season will keep both of you happy.

As for the remote control, while you are cuddling with her, you must change the channel back and forth to Bravo and TLC occasionally for her viewing pleasure. • If you are watching the game at a stadium, look forward to snuggling with her during the game and keeping her warm. In turn, she will be happy to smuggle your Crown Royal in her purse as you safely pass security. She will attempt to overcome the embarrassment of you behaving like a drunkard fan if, prior to the game, you skipped tail-gating to take her on a shopping excursion. Moreover, before you reach the point of inebriation, if you courteously express to her

by Diandra Hosey

how the 90-pound cheerleader looks fat and how she is so much prettier than the entire squad, then she will assist you in yelling at the referees for stupid calls and opposing players for dirty plays. • As for watching the games at bars, you absolutely must invite her. If you invite her, there is a strong chance that she will decline. On the other hand, if you don’t, she will yell about it later, and affirm that she loves football and wanted to accompany you. You will then feel compelled to invite her on the next trip. She will accept your invitation and attend every trip to the bar thereafter. • Finally, if your favorite team is playing during worship service, but your woman wants you to accompany her to the service, there is no need for you to feel conflicted. No conflict exists. Your only option is to forget about the game and go to worship service. All highlights are available on Sports Center anyway. Similarly, if there is a wedding scheduled on the Saturday of a big rivalry game, then you should brush up on the electric slide because your only healthy option is to accompany your woman to the wedding. 21 Happy football season! jacksonfreepress.com

Fletcher Cox

by Bryan Flynn

COURTESY OLE MISS

COURTESY MISSISSIPPI STATE

#/.%2,97!4#(,)34


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August 31 - September 6, 2011


by Bryan Flynn

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I

t officially started Aug. 6. No, not the new Favre knows the NFC North and would league year in the NFL. Favre Watch 2011 have weapons galore like Calvin Johnson, kicked off when the retired quarterback, Brandon Pettigrew and Jahvid Best. The LiBrett Favre, denied to The Miami Herald ons are a potential playoff team this season but that he had any interest in joining the Miami only if Stafford stays up right. Dolphins. On Aug. 10, former Minnesota ViHistory has shown us that Stafford will kings head coach Brad Childress told the NFL go down and so will Detroit when he does. Network in an interview that That is unless, the Lions Favre might not be done. add Favre. “I believe he’s finished Favre index: If Stafplaying, but you know, we’re ford doesn’t last till mid-seajust starting to play these son, you can book it. (preseason) games,” Childress said. “If somebody gets San Francisco 49ers/ nicked, someone may have Seattle Seahawks a need, and somebody may I put these two teams be a salesman enough to talk together because they are him off the ranch.” basically the same. The Favre Watch 2011 49ers are hoping Alex Smith heated up more two days latfinally justifies being picked er when Favre himself got in23 spots ahead of Aaron volved again. This time talkRogers or that rookie Colin Is Brett Favre done? ing to the NFL Network, the Kaepernick can do the job old gunslinger said he wasn’t as a second-round draft pick motivated to play in 2011. from this year. “I don’t have that feeling, that chip on my Seattle got rid of Matt Hasselbeck and shoulder,” Favre said. “I mean, I could easily added Tarvaris Jackson, who couldn’t beat talk myself into that chip on my shoulder like, Favre in Minnesota. The Seahawks still have ‘Hey, everybody hates you,’ ... I could moti- Charlie Whitehurst, who has spent more time vate myself.” holding a clipboard in the NFL than a football. You have to be blind not to notice how My thinking is sound here. The NFC Favre’s statement ends: He could easily talk West could be the weakest division in the himself into playing this season. The NFL NFL. Heck, last season the Seahawks won the Network’s Rich Eisen reminded us on twit- division with a losing record. ter: “First rule of Favre Watch: Favre Watch is So think about for just a second. If the NEVER over.” Seahawks can defeat defending Super Bowl Until this season just about over, there is Champion New Orleans Saints with Hasno way to completely say without a shadow of selbeck at QB, just think what they could do a doubt that Favre will not return. Favre fits my with Favre at QB and a home playoff (maybe theory of crazy ex-girlfriends: Just when you more) for winning the division. think they are gone forever, they come back. Again the 49ers finished 6-10 last season With that in mind, here are the teams with Alex and Troy Smith taking turns at QB that could use Favre in the 2011 season. Mi- and Mike Singletary who was way over his ami is not the list because it was discussed ear- head as a head coach. In a weak division with a lier but Favre would be a good fit there. playoff defense (hello, Patrick Willis) it makes sense to add Favre for a playoff run. Washington Redskins Favre index: It will happen if either team Twice in 2011, Favre would get a shot will just pick up the phone and call. at the New York Giants, Dallas Cowboys and Philadelphia Eagles. Oakland Raiders/ When your quarterbacks in Washington Jacksonville Jaguars are Rex Grossman and Kellen Clemens, why The Raiders swept the AFC West season wouldn’t you want Favre? It is not a big stretch going a perfect 6-0 with a revolving door at since Redskins owner Dan Snyder is known quarterback. Jason Campbell and Kyle Boller for bringing in aging veterans and throwing are battling for the job, but neither has made huge amounts of money at them. the playoffs. Mike Shanahan could nix this deal. Also, Raiders owner Al Davis loves to chunk Washington is a long shot for the playoffs. the ball down for an offense and loves being Favre index: Not likely. the “Island of Misfit Toys.” Favre would fit in nicely on both counts. Detroit Lions As far as Jacksonville goes, this team has The Lions will be a very good football David Garrard who is a .500 starter who is team this season. The sticking point is Matt always hurt and rookie Blaine Gabbert, who Stafford’s health. is not ready yet. Colts are beatable, Texans Since being drafted with the number-one never make the playoffs. Jags head coach overall pick in 2009, Stafford has only played Jack Del Rio needs to make the playoffs to in 13 total games in two seasons. He is as frag- keep his job. ile as a porcelain doll, so adding Favre to back Favre index: Pick up the phone, guys. him up would make sense. For the love of God, pick up the phone!

23


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ach week of the college football season has at least one must-see showdown. There are in-state rivalries, big conference games and, of course, the annual homecoming games. Here are the college games I would pay to see. Week 1: Sept. 3 Main event: Millsaps at Mississippi College: any game called the “Backyard Brawl” between two schools mere miles away is a must see. Honorable mentions: BYU at Mississippi: A big out-of-conference test for the Rebels. Louisiana Tech at USM: Only team the “Big 3” all play in common. Grambling State at Alcorn State: A SWAC battle to begin the year for two teams with title hopes. Week 2: Sept. 10 Main event: Mississippi College at Belhaven: Why can’t this game be “Backyard Brawl II”? Better yet, why can’t the three small Jackson area colleges—MC, Millsaps and Belhaven— play for a trophy each season? Week 3: Sept. 15-17 Main event: LSU at MSU: Bulldogs have a chance to show the country they are for real on ESPN’s Thursday Night Football. Honorable mention: Mississippi Valley State at Alcorn State: Great way to spend a Saturday, watching an in-state SWAC battle. Week 4: Sept. 24 Main event: Louisiana Tech at MSU: Bulldogs should know what they are up against after watching tape of LA Tech and USM. Week 5: Sept. 29-Oct. 1 Main event: Texas Southern at Jackson State Sept. 29: The Tigers showcase their talent on ESPN(U). We will know by now if JSU’s season is up or down. Main event 2: Georgia at Ole Miss Oct. 1: The other SEC Bulldogs are supposed to be better this season. Week 6: Oct. 8 Main event: Arkansas-Pine Bluff at JSU: It is homecoming at JSU. Tiger fans get the homecoming halftime show. Week 7: Oct. 15 Main event: South Carolina at MSU: The defending SEC East champs come to Starkville

in what could be a huge SEC showdown. Honorable mentions: Alabama at Mississippi: Black Bears try to derail the Crimson Tide. JSU at MVSU: The Delta Devils host the Tigers for a conference victory and in-state bragging rights. Week 8: Oct. 22 Main event: Valdosta State at Delta State: The Statesmen in a big conference match-up that normally has playoff implications. Honorable mention: Arkansas at UM: SEC battle that will affect the West title race. SMU at USM: Golden Eagles host the Mustangs for homecoming. Union College at Belhaven: Blazers have homecoming this weekend as well. Concordia College at Alcorn State: Braves should win this homecoming battle. Howard Payne at MC: Nearly the whole state has scheduled homecoming the same week, including the Choctaws. Week 9: Oct. 29 Main event: Texas Southern at MVSU: Texas Southern makes their second trip to Mississippi. This time it is to play the Delta Devils for homecoming. Honorable mention: Centre College at Millsaps: Majors get a shot at a homecoming win. Week 10: Nov. 5 Main event: Grambling State at JSU: Two traditional SWAC powers mix it up. Honorable mention: West Alabama at DSU: Fighting Okra play their homecoming game against a conference foe. Tennessee-Martin at MSU: Bulldogs should take care of business and enjoy the homecoming festivities. Week 11: Nov. 12 Main event: Alabama at MSU: Bulldogs get their shot at the Crimson Tide and a possible West title for either team. Honorable mention: Louisiana Tech at UM; LA Tech’s Mississippi journey comes to an end on their third trip and first trip as the homecoming opponent for the Black Bears. UCF at USM: Golden Eagles face a major test against Central Florida in conference action. Week 12: Nov. 19 Main event: ASU at JSU: Capital City Classic, Battle of the Bands, a major SWAC/instate rivalry. This game is must see every year. Honorable mention: LSU at UM: Tigers take on the Rebel Black Bears. Will UM still be playing for anything at this point? Week 13: Nov. 22 Main event: UM at MSU: The Bulldogs have owned the Rebel Black Bears for two years. Will the Egg Bowl stay in Starkville? No matter which team wins, this is can’t-miss football. Honorable mention: Memphis at USM Nov. 26: A rivalry between states and conference foes. Tiger and Golden Eagle fans wait for this game every season.


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Pryor Graeber works on a painting in her home studio.

COURTESY PAMELA HOSEY

ryor Graeber calls herself a â&#x20AC;&#x153;colorist,â&#x20AC;? somewhere between an impressionist and an abstract artist. Her signature paintings of two-dimensional rows of trees burst with large strokes of color within a chosen palette. Her inspiration for the look comes from her upbringing on a cotton farm in the middle of nowhere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Delta, you never see the sky meet the land,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You only see it meet the trees. Her paintings reflect the scenes of her childhood, with a few extra dollops of chroma. Depending on her mood, the trees range from subdued and pastel to vivid and heavily contrasted. Some reflect the true hue of a certain season; others juxtapose complementary colors to achieve a supernatural intensity. High in demand are her experimental white-tree prints. The subtle difference in shades of white give her linear forest an ethereal look, reminiscent of winter in Narnia. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What people tell me about my paintings is that they make them happy,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not sophisticated. ... Well, some are, but mainly theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just fun.â&#x20AC;? Graeber paints every day for several hours at a time. At 53 with two almost-grown sons, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s able to devote herself to her craft entirely. But painting isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t her only artistic venture. She comes from a musical family: a mother who was a choir director and three vocalist sisters. Together, they form the band â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pryor and the Tombstones,â&#x20AC;? and have performed in downtown Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Underground 119. They also recorded the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buford Family Christmasâ&#x20AC;? album on their own, laying it down in 10 hours. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were crazy that night,â&#x20AC;? Pryor says. The CD was sold at the Alluvian Hotel in Greenwood, where they perform at Christmas each year, and proceeds went to the Boys and Girls Club there. Growing up in a family of artists, Graeberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for visual art emerged early. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In kindergarten, the blank piece of paper the teacher put in front of us was my favorite part,â&#x20AC;? she says. In college at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Graeber studied art for two years then business for two. Her studies prepared her to become an entrepreneur a decade later when Ann Herlihy, owner of the now-closed Fondren Traders, began to sell her paintings. Aside from selling her paintings in local businesses and galleries, Graeber also began donating paintings to Jackson charity balls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That made me look like an artist, if my stuff was there next to a real artist,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so lucky; it all just grew from there.â&#x20AC;? Graeber found a life mantra in a quote by 19th-century French painter Pierre Bonnard, who said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;What attracted me then was less art itself than the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, with all that I thought in terms of free expression, of imagination and liberty to live as one pleased. â&#x20AC;Ś I wanted at all costs, to escape from a monotonous existence.â&#x20AC;? Graeber plans to continue painting, having found an escape from monotony in her art. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson loves its artists, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to us,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never leave here.â&#x20AC;? You can find Pryor Graeberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art at many Jackson area galleries, including Nunneryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.); Jackson Street Gallery (500 Highway 51, Suite E, Ridgeland) and Interiors Market (659 Duling Ave.). 28 Also, catch her performance Sept. 1 at Underground 119.

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jacksonfreepress.com


DIVERSIONS|books

by Torsheta Bowens

The Football Fanatics Book Shelf

F

rom Friday nights at small-town high schools to Monday evenings in NFL stadiums, fans around the country are ready for some football. In Mississippi, the sport is King. If the 2006 USA Football title of “Best Football State” in the nation wasn’t enough to convince the whole country, these books based on Mississippi football definitely will be. Some may be a bit hard to track down, but they’re worth the effort. “Y’all vs. Us: Thrilling Tales of Mississippi’s Hottest High School Rivalries” by Xavier M., Martin F. and Xavier M. Frascogna Jr. (Mississippi Sports Council, 2008, $34.95) Everyone remembers his or her biggest high-school football rivalry. On the night those two teams met, the entire town shut down, and everyone was dressed in school colors and yelling friendly insults at the opposing fans. “Y’all vs. Us” brings those rivalries to print. This book chronicles 15 of Mississippi’s most infamous rivalries including West Jones vs. Wayne County,

Jackson Academy vs. Jackson Prep and Clinton vs. Madison Central. It explores the history and traditions of each school and how the community responds and is affected by their team and the rivalry. All of this makes it a great title chock full of Mississippi football history. “The Courting of Marcus Dupree” by Willie Morris (University Press of Mississippi, 1992, $30) You probably know Marcus Dupree because of the college injuries that plagued him or the ESPN story of his fall from football. But this book by Mississippi’s own late Willie Morris gives an embracing account of Dupree at 17 as he became almost an overnight sensation bringing a small town, state and country to their feet with his amazing talent. Morris spoke with teachers, coaches, family members and, most importantly, Dupree himself in this moving account of the player during his senior season in Philadelphia, Miss. If you saw the documentary, you’ll most assuredly want this “story before the story.”

“Gridiron Gold” by Xavier M., Martin F. and Xavier M. Frascogna Jr. (Velocity Sports and Entertainment, 2007, $42.75) Coaches are some of the best motivators and often have the most inspiring stories to tell. If you are in need of inspiration, “Gridiron Gold” is a must read. Through interviews with some of Mississippi’s most well-known and respected football coaches, untold stories of determination, drive, pain and victory sprinkle this reader’s delight. A historical read that will make you laugh and cry. “I Beat the Odds: From Homelessness to the Blind Side and Beyond” by Michael Oher with Don Yeager (Gotham Books, 2011, $26) The movie, “The Blind Side” pulled at our heartstrings with a touching account of former

Ole Miss standout and Baltimore Raven player Michael Oher. But the movie barely scratches the surface. “I Beat the Odds” is Oher’s personal account of his life. The graphic details of his mother’s crack habit, his homelessness and his life in general take you deeper into this amazing man’s life and his redemption. Once you pick up this powerful and moving autobiography, you won’t put it down. “Gridiron Glory: Celebrating 100 Years of Mississippi Football” by Xavier M., Martin F. and Xavier M. Frascogna Jr. (Mississippi Sports Council, 2010, $32.95) Any true football fan knows that the best part of the game is sitting under the lights watching the action. You will always treasure those moments. “Gridiron Glory” is a collection of photographs that depict 100 years of Mississippi football. This collection of black-and-white and color shots takes you from 1905 to South Panola’s 2009 State Championship win. This pictorial account is almost as entertaining as being there.

Shall We Dance?

August 31 - September 6, 2011

Donate $10 to Mississippi Spay and Neuter (The Big Fix) and receive free group dance classes the entire month of September at Strictly Dancing.

30

Donation can be made at Strictly Dancing at 953 North Street in Jackson or at the Mississippi Spay Neuter in Pearl. Call 601-944-1315 for more information.


LUNCH BUNCH LUNCH

Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011|11:45 am Jackson Medical Mall Community Room

Great Expectations: What do outstanding teachers look like? Four educators from JPS were recently selected to receive the coveted Outstanding Educator Award. The award is presented each year by PPSJackson in partnership with the Community Foundation of Greater Jackson, which holds the Outstanding Educator Fund. Please join us as we recognize the 2011 honorees: Mary Cook, 4th grade at McLeod Elementary; Laâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keshia Opara-Nadi, 1st grade at Pecan Park Elementary; Diane Setzer, Kindergarten at Davis Magnet Elementary; & Barbara Stevens, 12th grade English at Callaway High School. Jackson Public Schools board president, retired educator, and parent Kisiah Nolan will join us to speak about the critical and important role outstanding educators play in the lives of our students.

Reserve a $5 lunch by calling 601.969.6015 ext 301 or e-mail lcockrell@parents4publicschools.org

jacksonfreepress.com

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201 www.ppsjackson.org

31


BEST BETS Aug. 31 - Sept. 7, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 8/31

COURTESY STEVE JOHNSON

Historic Jefferson College director Robin Person speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … The luncheon with author Lysa TerKeurst is at noon at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum, Sparkman Auditorium (1150 Lakeland Drive). $12.50; call 601-829-4583. … See the extended edition of the film “Scarface” at 7:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children; call 601-936-5856. … The open jam with Will and Linda is at Pelican Cove. … No Thank You Love plays at 9 p.m. at Fenian’s. … Larry Brewer performs at Buffalo Wild Wings. … Renegade is at Kathryn’s. … Snazz performs at Fire.

Tony Davenport’s art exhibit at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road) is up through Sept. 30. Hours are 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Free; call 601-362-8484. … Dreamz JXN hosts Can’t Feel My Face Friday. … Davey Arwine and Nick Blake are at Irish Frog from 6-10 p.m. … Proceeds from the Heart Benefit Gospel Concert at 7 p.m. at New Horizon Church International (1770 Ellis Ave.) go toward a heart transplant for Sgt. Donnie Myers. Donations welcome; call 601-613-6223. … The Thomas Jackson Orchestra performs at Ole Tavern. … Vertical Ascent plays at Time Out at 9:30 p.m.

SATURDAY 9/3

See Diane M. Jordan’s quilt display at the Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland) throughout the month of September. Free; call 601-856-7546. … Glen Warren’s art exhibit debuts today at 10 a.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.) and hangs through Sept. 30. Free; call 601-960-1557. … Fondren After 5 is from 58 p.m. Free; call 601-981-9606. Stops to make include the free furniture show at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road; call 601-362-8484) and Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling Ave.; call 601-213-6355) for free dance classes; $5 swing after-party kicks off at 8 p.m. Visit the JFP table at Fondren Corner for new copies of BOOM Jackson. … Pryor 32 and the Tombstones are at Underground 119.

Andy Hardwick performs during Fitzgerald’s 11 a.m. brunch. … Mel Waiters, Sir Charles Jones, Stevie J and more perform at Charles Evers’ 89th birthday celebration at 1 p.m. at The Plant on 80 (1421 Highway 80 W.). $30 at the gate; call 601-948-5835. … Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) includes the films “Nabucco” at 2 p.m. ($16) and “Conan O’ Brien Can’t Stop” at 5 p.m. ($7). Visit msfilm.org. … Diesel 255 is at Pelican Cove at 8 p.m.

The Central Mississippi Blues Society Jam is at 7 p.m at Hal & Mal’s. $5. … Burgers and Blues, Fenian’s and Irish Frog have karaoke. … Martin’s hosts an open-mic free jam. … Pub Quiz at Ole Tavern.

TUESDAY 9/6

Violinist Tom Lowe and harpsichordist John Paul perform at Music in the City at 5:15 p.m. at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free, donations welcome; call 601-960-1515. … Jesse Robinson and Friends play at Underground 119 at 6 p.m. $5. … Time Out has open-mic night. … Fire hosts open-mic comedy night. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith is at Burgers and Blues.

WEDNESDAY 9/7

The Parents for Public Schools Lunch Bunch is in the Community Meeting Room at 11:45 a.m. at the Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.) . $5 lunch; call 601-969-6015, ext. 320 to RSVP. … Mississippi Sen. Hillman Frazier speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Philip’s on the Rez has karaoke with DJ Mike. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

Enjoy appetizers and music at Music in the City at 5:15 p.m. Sept. 6 at the Mississippi Museum of Art’s Trustmark Grand Hall. JULIAN RANKIN

THURSDAY 9/1

SUNDAY 9/4

MONDAY 9/5

Country music artist Jo Dee Messina hosts the St. Jude 5K at 8 a.m. at Township at Colony Park (1111-A Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). $25 5K registration; call 800-238-6030; register online at stjude.org/jodeemessina. … Jackson Audubon Society’s monthly bird walk is at 8 a.m. at Mayes Lake at LeFleur’s Bluff (115 Lakeland Terrace). Free, $3 car entrance fee; call 601-956-7444. … Join JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn for a live chat during opening-day college football at jfpsports.com. … Jackson State University takes on Concordia College at the W.C. Gorden Classic at 1:30 p.m. at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium. $25 in advance, $30 game day, $10 ages 3-18 in advance, free for current JSU students with ID; call 800-848-6817. … Martini Room hosts Soulful Saturday at 6 p.m. … Enjoy ballroom and salsa dancing at Burn the Dance Floor at 7 p.m at Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling Ave.). $10, $5 with college ID; call 601-213-6355. … Afroman performs at 8 p.m. at Fire. $15; call 601-592-1000 or 800-745-3000. … Brady’s has karaoke. … Kolectiv Rhythm, Tawanna Shaunte’, Lonn’e George and Jarez Singleton perform at Saturday Night Live at 8:30 p.m. at The Executive (333 N. Mart Plaza). $10. … Comedian and actor Pierre Edwards performs at 9 p.m. at Old School 101 (2460 Terry Road). $10; call 601-238-5100 or 386-338-8398. … The Beggars No Mo’ Band plays at Pelican Cove. … The Houserockers are at Underground 119 at 9 p.m. $10 cover. Stevie J performs at Charles Evers’ 89th birthday concert at 4 p.m. Sept. 4 at The Plant on 80.

August 31 - September 6, 2011

FRIDAY 9/2


Enrollment Is Open Now!

Revealing Heaven On Earth 8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table

The University For The Arts

9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Service Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Televised on WAPT Children’s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten

• Private Voice and Piano Lessons

Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

• Class Piano for Children

• Class Piano for Adults • Music Composition & Technology • Music Play! (early childhood music class) • Digital Photography Learn more and register online at: music.mc.edu/the-taylor-school

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS 601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

Art & Design • Music Theatre • Dance For current events and more, visit

www.usm.edu/arts-letters AA/EOE/ADAI

Don’t let dirty grout ruin the look of your tile. GB74LTaW[TiX fgT\a YeXXZebhg GB@BEEBJ

www.grout-works.com | 601-940-8499

jacksonfreepress.com

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33


6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

Listings for Friday, Sept. 2 - Thursday Sept. 8 2011 Apollo 18

PG13

The Help

PG13

Shark Night 3-D PG13

30 Minutes Or Less

R

Seven Days In Utopia

G

3-D Final Destination 5

R

The Debt

R

Our Idiot Brother R

Final Destination 5 (non 3-D) R

Colombiana PG13

Rise of the Planet of the Apes PG13

Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark R

Cowboys & Aliens PG13

3-D Conan the Barbarian

Crazy, Stupid, Love PG13

R

3-D Spy Kids: All the Time In the World PG Spy Kids: All the Time In the World (non 3-D) PG One Day

PG13

The Smurfs (non 3-D)

PG

Captain America: The First Avenger (non 3-D) PG13 Cars 2 (non 3-D) G

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Radio JFP on WLEZ, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from noon-1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. This week’s guest is Dr. Stuart Rockoff, who discusses Beth Israel’s 150th anniversary gala. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Podcasts at jfpradio.com. Free; call 601-362-6121, ext. 17. Fondren After 5 Sept. 1, 5-8 p.m. This monthly event showcases Fondren’s shops, galleries and restaurants. Free; call 601-981-9606. Mississippi Happening. Guaqueta Productions hosts the monthly broadcast, which features a special musical guest. Download free podcasts at mississippihappening.com.

COMMUNITY Sports League Registrations at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). The Department of Parks and Recreation is conducting registration for the upcoming season from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Call 601-960-0471. • Adult Fall Softball League Registration through Sept. 9. The league consists of co-ed teams with a limit of 20 players per team. $250 per team. • NFL Punt, Pass and Kick Competition Registration through Sept. 14. The competition for youth ages 6-15 is at 10 a.m. Sept. 17 at Battlefield Park (953 Porter St.). Free. • Adult Flag Football Registration through Sept. 30. Limit of 20 players per team. Games begin Oct. 17. $325 per team. • Adult Fall And Winter Basketball League Registration through Oct. 7, at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Men and women ages 35 or older may participate. Limit of 15 players per team. Games begin Oct. 17. $325 per team. Events at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). • Certified Nursing Assistant Training Center Graduation Sept. 2, 11:30 a.m. The ceremony takes place at Center Stage. Call 601-364-1188. • Ebenezer Apostolic Ministries Inauguration Banquet Sept. 3, 6 p.m., in the Community Meeting Room. The church honors Bishop Larry Arnold Sr. for his years of service. $35; call 601-918-4031. Luncheon with Lysa TerKeurst Aug. 31, noon, at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive) in Sparkman Auditorium. TerKeurst is a New York Times best-selling author and president of Proverbs 31 Ministries. She also speaks at 6:30 p.m. at Pinelake Church (6071 Highway 25, Brandon). $12.50 luncheon, free evening lecture; call 601-829-4583. “History Is Lunch” Aug. 31, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Historic Jefferson College director Robin Person gives a virtual tour of the HJC site. Bring lunch; coffee and water provided. Free; call 601-576-6998.

August 31 - September 6, 2011

Know Your Labor Rights Lecture Aug. 31, 5 p.m., at Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance Offices (612 N. State St.). A representative from the U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Office gives a presentation on labor rights. Call 601-354-9355.

34

Precinct 1 COPS Meeting Sept. 1, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 1 (810 Cooper Road). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues or problems, from crime to potholes. Call 601-960-0001. Ekklesia Fall Registration through Sept. 2, at Ekklesia School of Ministry and Theology (New Horizon Church, 1770 Ellis Ave.). Certification programs include Christian studies, and ministry and theological studies. Register by Sept. 2. Classes begin Sept. 6. Call 601-346-7503.

ACT Test Prep Course, Session I Sept. 3, 10 a.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). The fast-paced presentation of test-taking strategies is designed to help college-bound students get higher scores. $70; call 601-974-1130. Kitchen Chemistry Day Sept. 3, 10 a.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Learn about chemistry by using common household products. Experiments include bubble painting, tornadoes and Mentos rockets. $8, children under 12 months free; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-KIDS. W.C. Gorden Classic Sept. 3, 1:30 p.m., at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). Jackson State University takes on Concordia College in the annual football game. Free for JSU students with ID. $25 in advance, $30 game day, $10 ages 3-18 in advance; call 800-848-6817. Burn the Dance Floor Sept. 3, 7 p.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Enjoy ballroom dancing from 7-9 p.m., a free salsa class at 9 p.m. and a salsa party from 10 p.m.-2 a.m. $10, $5 with college ID; call 601-213-6355. Jackson Arts Collective Monthly Meeting Sept. 5, 6 p.m., at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). Every first Monday, the Collective Steering Committee meets to discuss business of the previous month and listen to local artist proposals for the sponsorship of events that fall in line with their mission. Open to the public. Call 601-497-7454. Survival Spanish Sept. 5-26, at Lingofest Language Center (7048 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). Learn basic conversational Spanish from 7-9 p.m. Mondays. $98, $30 materials; call 601-500-7700. Story Time Tuesday Sept. 6, 10 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). A zookeeper reads an animal story, and the kids get to do a related craft project or have an animal encounter. Free with paid admission; call 601-352-2580. First Tuesday Lecture Sept. 6, noon, at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Biologist Kathy Shelton talks about frog preservation in Mississippi. $4-$6, children under 3 and museum members free; call 601-354-7303. “I-C-STEM In My Future” Call for Applicants through Sept. 6, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). The JSU Department of Mathematics is seeking applications from students in grades 7-10 for a two-year college preparation program focused on technology. Prospective students must be enrolled within a 70-mile radius. Applications must be postmarked by Sept. 6. Interviews are on Sept. 8-14. Call 601-979-5993. Leadership, Personal Development and Life Skills Seminar Series through May 22, at Operation Shoestring (1711 Bailey Ave.). Operation Shoestring and Kuumba Promos host the seminars on first and third Tuesdays from 6:30-8:30 p.m. during the school year. The purpose is to introduce leadership skills, life management skills and cultural pride to local youth. Enrollment required. Free; call 601-353-3663 or 601-957-2969. Public Policy Toastmasters Club 8689 Meetings, at Universities Center (3825 Ridgewood Road). The group meets on first and third Tuesdays at 5:15 p.m. in the computer lab. Improve your communication skills, and become a better speaker and leader. Membership required. Call for details at 601540-8472 or 601-432-6277. Arabian Dance Party Sept. 2, 7:30 p.m., at Petra Cafe (2741 Old Canton Road). Watch a belly dancer perform, and enjoy Arabian dancing and Greek dancing with plate breaking. No cover, food prices vary; call 601-366-0161. Yu-Gi-Oh Tournaments, at Java Ink (420 Roberts St., Pearl). Compete and trade cards with other fans at 2 p.m. Sundays. Admission varies each week; call 601-397-6292.


jfpevents

WELLNESS Understanding Breast Health For All Ages Sept. 1, 11:45 a.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.), at the Cardiovascular Center. Dr. Larkin Carter explains the correlation between a woman’s age and breast health. Registration required. Free, $5 optional lunch; call 601-9486262 or 800-948-6262. Fitness Camp, at Lake Hico Park (4801 Watkins Drive). Do cardiovascular and strength training exercises, and learn about proper nutrition. Sessions are from 8-9 a.m. Saturdays. $20; call 601-331-8468. First Friday Free ADHD Screenings, at the office of Suzanne Russell, LPC (665 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Licensed professional counselor Suzanne Russell offers free 30-minute ADHD screenings for children on first Fridays through Dec. 2. Appointment required. Call 601-707-7355. Zumba Fitness Classes. The Latin-inspired aerobics classes are held at two Dance Unlimited Studio locations. $5; call 601-209-7566. • Mondays and Thursdays at 5:30 p.m., and Saturdays at 9 a.m. at 6787 S. Siwell Road, Suite A, Byram. • Wednesdays at 6 p.m. and Saturdays at 11 a.m. at 3091 Highway 49 South, Suite E, Florence. Fitness Center, at Jackson Roadmap to Health Equity Project’s Farmers Market (2548 Livingston Road). Hours are 8 a.m.-9 p.m. weekdays. $20 per month; call 601-987-6783.

FARMERS MARKETS Jackson Square Farmers Market through Sept. 25, at Jackson Square Promenade (2460 Terry Road). Hours are 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Free admission, $5-$10 vendor fee; call 601-372-7157. Livingston Farmers Market (129 Mannsdale Road, Madison), through Oct. 13. The market is open 4-8 p.m. Thursdays. Call 601-898-0212. Byram Farmers Market (20 Willow Creek Lane, Byram), through Oct. 29. The market is open 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Call 601-373-4545. Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.), through Dec. 17. Open 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Call 601-354-6573. Old Farmers Market (352 E. Woodrow Wilson Ave.), through Nov. 12. Hours are 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sunday. Call 601-354-0529 or 601-353-1633. Jackson Roadmap to Health Equity Project’s Farmers Market (2548 Livingston Road) through Dec. 17. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays, and 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturdays. Call 601-987-6783.

TRISTA B.

F

or the first time ever, Ballet Mississippi joins the festivities at the 20th Annual CelticFest Sept. 911. The dancers will perform two selections from the Irish-themed ballet, “As An Céilí.” The title means “from the céilí,” or “from the party with music and social dancing.” Catherine Bishop, teacher and artistic director for the Jackson Irish Dancers, choreographed the selections. The first section is a ballet set to traditional Irish music. The second section is Irish traditional dancing performed to modern Irish music. CelticFest Mississippi celebrates traditional music, dance and culture of Ire-

by Valerie Wells

2009 1st Place Winner:

2010 1st Place Winner:

Best Beer/Draft and Bottled

Best Beer/Draft and Bottled

6111 Ridgewood Rd. Jackson, MS 601-978-3502

land, Scotland, Wales, Cornwall, the Isle of Man and Brittany. It takes place Sept. 9-11 at the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive, 601-713-3365). For information, visit celticfestms.org. Old Fannin Road Farmers Market (1307 Old Fannin Road, Brandon), through Dec. 24. Hours are 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday and noon-6 p.m. Sunday. Call 601-919-1690.

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856. • “Scarface” Aug. 31, 7:30 p.m. The screening of the classic Al Pacino film includes interviews with filmmakers and performers. $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children. • “Wynton Marsalis and Eric Clapton Play the Blues” Sept. 7, 7:30 p.m. The screening of the concert at Lincoln Center in New York City includes performances and behind-the-scenes rehearsal footage. $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children. Events at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). • Art House Cinema Downtown Sept. 4. Films include the opera “Nabucco” at 2 p.m. ($16) and “Conan O’Brien Can’t Stop” at 5 p.m. ($7). Popcorn and beverages available. Visit msfilm.org. • “Hurricane on the Bayou” Mega-HD Cinema through Oct. 31. The film explores the Louisiana wetlands, Hurricane Katrina, and recovery efforts in New Orleans and the bayou. Show times are noon weekdays and 4 p.m. Saturdays. $6.50 adults, $5.50 seniors, $4 children, $3 students; call 601-960-1552. Nameless Poets from Jackson Open Mic Sept. 4, 6 p.m., at Suite 106 (106 Wilmington St.). A poetry writing workshop is at 6 p.m., and open-mic is from 7-10 p.m. $5 admission, $3 to perform; call 601-720-4640. Power APAC Call for Applications through Nov. 18, at Power Academic and Performing Arts Complex (1120 Riverside Drive). Jackson Public Schools’ program supplements Jackson students in the arts. Students in grades 6-12 may apply for the 20122013 school year by 4 p.m. Nov. 18. Auditions are from 1-3 p.m. Dec. 10. Call 601-960-5387.

MUSIC Afroman Sept. 3, 8 p.m., at Fire (209 S. Commerce St.). The rap and hip-hop artist is known for songs such as “Crazy Rap” and “Colt 45.” $15; call 601-592-1000 or Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000. Saturday Night Live Sept. 3, 8:30 p.m., at The Executive (333 N. Mart Plaza). Kolectiv Rhythm, Tawanna Shaunte’, Lonn’e George and Jarez Singleton perform. Wear casual attire. $10; email mitch_32367@yahoo.com.

More EVENTS, see page 36

?VX`hdc»h=dbZ[dg C;A;ddiWVaa H]dl^c\:kZgn<VbZd[i]Z '%&&HZVhdcdc-IK»h Get ready for your weekly game with

Mon - Fri 4:00 - 7:00 pm

•1/2 priced appetizers • Double mixed drinks for the singles price • Weekly pitcher specials *Join our e-club for email blast specials throughout the season visit our website www.draftfreak.com

Are You A Sports Fanatic? Know-it-all on football? Obsessed fan?

Join Bryan Flynn and other JFP sports bloggers at

jfpsports.com and speak your mind! Win prizes playing JFP Pro Football Pick ‘Em. Tweet news and scores from high school sports games throughout the season to @jfpsports. (Use hashtag #jxnfootball for local games; #msfootball for games around state.) Bryan will lead a live chat on college-football Opening Day: Saturday, September 3 jfpsports.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jfpsports Local businesses: Advertise in our expanded Sports sections, print and online packages 35% off! Call 601-362-6121 x11 for details.

jacksonfreepress.com

Ballet Irish

35


jfpevents

from page 35

BE THE CHANGE

Now Open Early Wed.-Sat. Doors Open At 8:00

Friday, September 2 & Saturday, September 3

Ghost town Sunday - September 4

Two Shows

Monday - September 5

This Week’s Music

August 31 Doug Franks Open Mic Jam

September 1 Juju’s Drum Circle 5:00-10:00 pm The Amazin Lazy Boi Band Midnight-until

September 2 Virgil Brawley 8:00 - 11:00pm Chad Wesley Band midnight - until

September 3 Jesse “Guitair” Smith 8:00 - 11:00pm August 31 - September 6, 2011

Ladies Night: Ladies Drink Free 9-11 & Karaoke

Full Kitchen Friday & Saturday 8:00 & 11:00

36

Thursday - September 1

Jesse Robinson & The 500lb Blues Band midnight - until

LIVE MUSIC DURING LUNCH

MON - FRI, 11AM - 2PM OPEN LATE - SECURITY PROVIDED

OPEN MIC JAM 7-11 BAR OPEN

Tuesday - September 6 2 for 1 Domestics Free Pool from 7-10 2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

“Fill the Bus” School Supply Drive through Sept. 2, at Fondren Corner (2906 N. State St.). Drop off school supplies for Boyd Elementary students at the designated location. Donations welcome; call 601981-1658, ext. 20. Mississippi Spay and Neuter Clinic Fundraiser Sept. 1-30, at Strictly Dancing (953 North St.). Bring a donation and attend classes in September at no cost. $10 donation; call 601-944-1315. Heart Benefit Gospel Concert Sept. 2, 7 p.m., at New Horizon Church International (Renaissance South) (1770 Ellis Ave.). Proceeds go toward a heart transplant for Sgt. Donnie Myers of Camp Shelby. Free, donations welcome; call 601-613-6223. Charles Evers’ 89th Birthday Concert Sept. 4, 4 p.m., at The Plant on 80 (1421 Highway 80 W.). Performers include Mel Waiters, Sir Charles Jones, Nellie “Tiger” Travis, Stevie J, Ms. Jody, Robert “The Duke” Tillman and Dr. D. Doors open at 1 p.m. $30 at the gate; call 601-948-5835. Music in the City Sept. 6, 5:15 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in Trustmark Grand Hall. In partnership with St. Andrew’s Cathedral, the museum offers a free concert one Tuesday a month. Hors d’oeuvres served first; performance is at 5:45 p.m. Violinist Tom Lowe and harpsichordist John Paul perform. Free, donations welcome; call 601-354-1533.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS “Otis and the Tornado” Sept. 7, 4 p.m., at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Loren Long signs copies of the book. $17.99 book; call 601-366-7619. Weekly Storytime, at Campbell’s Bakery (3013 North State Street). Children and teens are welcome to listen to a story Wednesdays from 2-3 p.m. Volunteers and book donations welcome. Free; call 601-362-4628.

CREATIVE CLASSES Events at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). $89; call 601-898-8345. • Thai Taste Explosions Workshop Sept. 1, 6 p.m. Learn how to cook with authentic Thai ingredients. Recipes include spring rolls, chicken satay and banana leaf-wrapped snapper. • Southern Specialties from “The Help” Cooking Class Sept. 2, 6 p.m. Learn to make fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, skillet cornbread and other southern favorites. Events at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Call 601-213-6355. • Free Dance Classes and Swing After-party Sept. 1. Learn Bollywood aerobics at 5:30 p.m., salsa at 6 p.m., bachata at 6:30 p.m., Breakin’ Aerobics at 7 p.m. and swing at 7:30 p.m. Free. The $5 after-party is from 8-10 p.m. • Argentine Tango Workshop Sept. 3, 1 p.m. Percell Rivere St. Thomas instructs. $30. Events at two Easely Amused locations. $26.75; call 769-251-5574. • “Whoo’s That Girl?” Painting Class Sept. 6, 7 p.m., at 2315 Lakeland Dr., Suite C, Flowood. Paint a whimsical owl with vibrant colors. • “Look at Me Now” Painting Class Sept. 6, noon, at Trace Harbor Village, 7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland. Paint Van Goghinspired flowers and leaves. Shut Up and Write! Sept. 10-Nov. 19, at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Sign up for the workshop series of JFP Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd’s popular non-fiction and creative writing classes held every other Saturday. $150 (includes $75 deposit); call 601-362-6121, ext. 16. Weekly Creative Group Meetings, at Java Ink (420 Roberts St., Pearl). The Java Ink Jotters writers group and the Sketchers drawing group meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. No joining fee; all ages and skill levels welcome. Free; call 601-397-6292.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Furniture Show Sept. 1, 5 p.m., at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). See the latest designs by local furniture makers. Exhibitors include James Dunaway, Andy Hilton, Sully Clemmer, Jeremy McMahon. Charles Campbell, Grant Courtney, Jerome Foster, Stephanie Dwyer, Jay Johnson and Bryan Smyda. Also see Tony Davenport’s “Jazz Over Jackson” exhibit of jazz-themed and Jackson landmark paintings (through Sept. 30) and works by Christy Henderson, Virginia Weathersby, Sarah McTaggart and Bruce Niemi. Free, artwork for sale; call 601-362-8484. Glen Warren Art Exhibit Sept. 1-30, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). The Puckett native’s paintings frequently have animals, especially birds, as subjects. Free; call 601-960-1557. Craft Exhibit Sept. 1-30, at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). See quilts by Diane M. Jordan. Free; call 601-856-7546. Art by Choice Exhibition through Sept. 11, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). See an exhibition of and purchase works from Mississippi artists and galleries across the country. Hours are Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday from noon-5 p.m. $3-$5, children under 5 and museum members free; call 601-960-1515. Print and Ceramics Showcase through Sept. 16, at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). The local art exhibit includes ceramics and prints such as woodcuts, screen prints, etchings and monotypes. Free; call 601-352-3399. Midtown Debris Organization through Oct. 8, at the old Cultural Expressions building (147 Millsaps Ave.). The interactive performance art exhibit includes items collected from the Midtown area. Saturdays, make art from the collection, and enjoy dance and multimedia sculpture. The exhibit closes with a block party from 3-7 p.m. Oct. 8. Hours are Mondays and Wednesdays from 6-9 a.m., Fridays from 6-9 a.m. and 3-6 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free; call 601-497-7454. “A Time for Sharing” Exhibit through Oct. 28, at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). See works from Mary Lynn and Bob Dunaway, and Larry Smith. Free; call 601-432-4056. “The Freedom Rides: Journey for Change” through Oct. 31, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). The exhibit examines the arrival, incarceration and impact of the Freedom Riders in Jackson. Hours are 8 a.m.5 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays. Free; call 601-576-6850. FROGS! Beyond Green through Jan. 9, at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). See 25 species of exotic frogs and toads. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays and 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sundays. $6, $5 seniors, $4 ages 3-18, members and babies free; call 601-354-7303. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


DIVERSIONS|music

by Brittany Kilgore

Strength from the Old Ways When Gordon got her first guitar, she began listening to the Carter Family, one of the first country bands that evolved out of folk music. She has played back-up bass with lots of local musicians, including Taylor Hildebrand and Jamie Weems, and she’s been in several local bands, such as Horse Trailer, The Scramblers and Hot Tamales. Recently, she decided to get back to the music style she loves through her new act, Li’l Miss So & So. “It’s my invention of playing old-timey tunes and writing. It allows my voice to be who I really am through storytelling,” she says. During our interview, Gordon sang “My Time to Ride,” a song about getting away from domestic violence, and her voice had an antique, rustic quality. Gordon grew up in Brandon and graduated from Northwest Rankin High School. At 21, she received a nursing degree from the University of Mississippi. Gordon then took a nursing job in Asheville, N.C., a city she describes as a mecca of old-time music. A couple of years later, she moved to Austin, Texas, and over the years, she worked in Virginia Beach, Va., and Annapolis, Md., helping to deliver babies and caring for new mothers. “Wherever you go, you can always find a group of people who play old-time music,” she says.

Natalie’s Notes

BROOKE ALLEN

M

usic, motherhood, quilts and homemade pickles define Valley Gordon. Her worn guitar case proudly displays a sticker that reads “Old Time Music.” Gordon, 34, has played guitar since she was 15. Many old-time musicians left their mark on her career, especially Elizabeth Cotten and Algia Mae Hinton, whom she considers role models. “Both of those women played traditional, old-time music, but it was in a time when women really weren’t a part of the music scene,” Gordon says. “In the 1930s, you heard Billie Holiday in jazz, but it was very rare to see a woman performing for money. … Even at square dances it was very rare to see a woman playing a banjo or fiddle. So, I really draw inspiration from those two women because they grabbed their uncles,’ fathers’ and brothers’ instruments and taught themselves how to play. These were women with children and full-time jobs.” Gordon can relate. She’s the single mother of two daughters (Pearl, 4, and Ruby, 6) and works as a labor and delivery nurse at Baptist Health Systems in Jackson. Yet, she makes time to play old-time music, a traditional genre that she says blends the blues and the bluegrass, incorporating America’s white and black influences.

Valley Gordon sings old-timey music.

Gordon refers to herself as a traditionalist. She favors a lifestyle full of jarred tomatoes and homemade pickles over modern, contemporary life. “I would live in the 1930s because it was a time when people worked hard for what they had and got their pay,” she says. “I think it’s so simple and beautiful. … I like to knit; I like making quilts; I like to can my own tomatoes and make my own

pickles. I just really feel like these are things that are just lost in our generation and our culture—we’re just, like a quick fix. I draw strength and energy in an old-timey way. “This is me in my style of poetry and storytelling and writing and playing oldtimey tunes.” Catch Li’l Miss So & So at 6 p.m. Oct. 6 during Fondren After 5 on the porch at Sneaky Beans.

Festival Fall

A

FILE PHOTO

s a teacher, I dread the beginning my Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade hankering I’ve of school because of the whirlwind had since the parade ended in March. To craziness. Thank goodness it only see what the Celtic Heritage Society has lasts for a couple planned this year, visit of weeks. Then I’m in my celticfestms.org. routine, and everything is If Irish isn’t your thing, much more relaxed. On head over to Pelahatchie the plus side, I get so exSept. 10 for the Muscadine cited to know that fall— Festival, featuring bluegrass my favorite season—is badass Ricky Skaggs perjust around the corner. forming at 3 p.m. And just like football, this For blues lovers who is also the time of year love road trips and music when some great festivals festivals like I do, head on happen. Get your calenup to Greenville for the dars and Sharpies out, 34th Annual Mississippi and start marking yours Delta Blues and Heritage like I have mine. Festival Sept. 17 with WellsFest is one of many Sept. 9 through fall festivals featuring local Willie Clayton, Bobby Sept. 11 is the 20th An- music and lots of fun. Rush, Grady Champion, nual CelticFest, held at Victor Wainwright and the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry the Wildroots, plus many more acts. For Museum. This year will be my first year the festival schedule, go to deltablues.org. in attendance (sad, ain’t it?). I cannot wait Attend this year’s WellsFest Sept. 24, for all the activities and music that are on hosted by Wells Memorial United Meththe schedule for the weekend. I’m looking odist Church. The music lineup is always forward to getting my “Irish” to soothe stellar, and I’m sure Raphael Semmes,

WellsFest music coordinator, will not disappoint. This year’s festival benefits The Mustard Seed, a local nonprofit organization that helps people with disabilities engage in the arts, such as pottery and music. Visit wellsfest.org for more information. Make a big circle on your calendar for Saturday, Oct. 1. The Town Creek Arts Festival at the Mississippi Museum of Art will host 40 artists and craftsmen from the Magnolia State to show off their masterpieces. The new Art Garden stage will feature “homegrown Mississippi musicians” throughout the day’s festivities. For information, visit msmuseumart.org. Two more events Oct. 1: Unity Mississippi hosts OUToberfest, which will have live music and speakers in Smith Park (downtown, across from the governor’s mansion) from noon to 7 p.m.; take a trip to downtown Hazlehurst for the Rockin’ Railroad Festival featuring blues man James “Super Chikan” Johnson. If you go, check out the birthplace of our state’s most famous blues man, Robert Johnson. With fall comes the Mississippi State Fair Oct. 5 to 16 at the Mississippi Fair-

grounds on High Street. I have already started my countdown for fair food and music. The Oak Ridge Boys, Corey Smith, 3 Doors Down with Theory of a Deadman and Pop Evil, as well as many other acts perform this year. Head to downtown Meridian Oct. 8 for the 59Twenty Music Festival, featuring North Mississippi Allstars, Sonny Landreth, Cary Hudson and Wes Lee, just to name a few. Local filmmaker and weatherman Edward St. Pé puts on the Second Annual Mississippi International Film Festival at the Russell C. Davis Planetarium Oct. 21 through 23, which will not only celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Riders with the movie “Freedom Song,” but will also turn Jackson into an Elvis Presley Fan Club with a 50th anniversary screening of Elvis’ movie “Blue Hawaii” and the rockabilly music movement. Check out mississippi filmfest.com for the lineup of movies and bands playing. Have a great week, and if you see me out and about, please say hello!

jacksonfreepress.com

by Natalie Long

37


livemusic

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AUG. 31 - WEDNESDAY

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WEDNESDAY

8/31

CATHEAD VODKAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIVE KARAOKE

SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

LADIES NIGHT GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE THURSDAY

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$1.50 LONGNECKS, $3 WELL DRINKS, $4 SELECT CALL DRINKS, $5 JAGERBOMBS FRIDAY

9/2

CADILLAC FUNK SATURDAY

9/3

Weekly Lunch Specials

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

LADIES NIGHT w/ DJ Stache

LADIES DRINK FREE

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

Friday September 2

Thomas Jackson

Orchestra

Saturday

MONDAY

9/5

TUESDAY

9/6

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MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE

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SING IN FRONT OF A LIVE BAND

LADIES NIGHT Agust 31 - September 6, 2011

GUYS PAY $5, LADIES ENTER & DRINK FREE

38

MONDAY

9/26

GARAGE A TROIS (STANTON MOORE OF GALACTIC, MARCO BENEVENTO, SKERIK & MIKE DILLON)

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712

DOWNTOWN JACKSON WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

September 3

Righteous Buddha

Monday

AMALGAMATION

September 1

September 5

PUB QUIZ 2-for-1 Drafts Tuesday

September 6

Elegant Trainwreck Presents:

Jacob Lipking 2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Wednesday

September 7

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE FREE WiFi

Open Mon-Sat, Kitchen open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

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7HISTLE3TOP#ORNER#AFE15DJV GDOH$YH+D]OHKXUVW

THIS WEEK

NOW OPEN ON TUESDAYS

WEDNESDAY 8/31

Wednesday, August 31st

Jake Ousley & Grant Terry (restaurant)

THURSDAY 9/1 Restaurant Open As Usual

FRIDAY 9/2 Swing de Paris (restaurant)

SATURDAY 9/3 CLOSED FOR LABOR DAY WEEKEND

VIRGIL BRAWLEY & STEVE CHESTER

(Acoustic Blues) 8-11, No Cover Thursday, September 1st

PRYOR & THE TOMBSTONES (Americana) 8-11, No Cover Friday, September 2nd

CHRIS DERRICK BAND

MONDAY 9/5

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

CLOSED FOR LABOR DAY

Saturday, September 3rd

TUESDAY 9/6 PUB QUIZ w/ Laura and Donovan (restaurant)

Coming Soon FRI9.09: Bill & Temperance (rest) SAT9.10: Vagabond Swing (rr) SAT9.17: Dax Riggs (rr) TUE9.27: Ten out of Tenn (big)* SAT9.30:The 484 South Band (rr)

HOUSEROCKERS

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Tuesday, September 6th

JESSE ROBINSON & FRIENDS

starts at 6pm, $5 Cover, Limited Menu

Wednesday, September 7th

FRI10.21: Stagolee w/ JTran (rr)

ANNA KLINE & THE GRITS & SOUL BAND

Monday-Thursday

Thursday, September 8th

Blue Plate Lunch with cornbread and tea or coffee

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

FRI10.14: JJ Grey and MOFRO (big)*

$825

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Reb Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily.

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks!

(Folk) 8-11, No Cover

BOOKER WALKER

Friday, September 9th

DUFF DORROUGH & THE MOONBEAMS (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, September 10th

visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi * Tickets available at www.ticketmaster.com

FEARLESS FOUR

(Rhythm & Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

venuelist

39


8/19A=<ºA@3/:@=19AB/B7=<

EO\bb]aQ]`S

Thursday, Sept.1

Ladies Night Ladies drink free until midnight well drinks only Guys drink 2-4-1 well drinks and domestic beer until 10:00

Friday, Sept. 2

DJ Reign Saturday, Sept. 3

US

6107 Ridgewood Rd Jackson, Ms www.electriccowboy18.com

NOW HIRING

Business Development Specialist Home and Hospice Advantage is seeking a dynamic, energetic individual to join our team. The Business Development Specialist will be training, coaching and mentoring our sales team members.

â&#x20AC;¢ Daily Travel is required. â&#x20AC;¢ Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in Business or Mkting preferred. Graduate degree preferred but not required.

August 31 - September 6, 2011

â&#x20AC;¢ Minimum of 5 years sales exp., preferably in hospice.

40

â&#x20AC;¢ Competitive wage and full benefit plan, matching 401k, mileage reim. at .51 cents per mile. If interested in this excellent opportunity, please email your resume to mail to: jwheelock@hospiceadvantage.com or by fax to:

989-891-2214

To learn more about us visit www.hospiceadvantage.com EOE

0751/A6

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BANDS WANTED

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MUSICIANS WANTED

DRUMMERANDBASSISTNEEDED EDQGORRNLQJIRUEDVVLVWDQGGUXPPHUEHWZHHQ WKHDJHVRIDQGFDOOLILQWHU HVWHG $EATHCOREGUITARISTS 0HWDOEDQGORRNLQJIRUH[S¶GJXLWDULVWV,QÃ&#x20AC;X HQFHVLQFOXGH:KLWH&KDSHO&DUQLIH[2SHWKHWF &DOO'DYLGIRUPRUHLQIR   "ECOMEOUR.EXT)NSTRUCTOR 0DMRU6FDOHV6WXGLRLVDFFHSWLQJDSSOLFDWLRQVIRU DFODVVLFDORUURFNRUMD]]JXLWDUWHDFKHU0XVW KDYHSURIHVVLRQDODSSHDUDQFH3OHDVHHPDLO\RXU UHVXPHWR0DMRUVFDOHV#DROFRP #%,,)34.%%$%$&/2!,"5-4/52 &HOOLVWQHHGHGIRUP\DOEXPDQGSRVVLEO\WR WRXUVKRUWO\DIWHU,DPVLJQHGZLWK6RXWK&LW\ 5HFRUGV,QHHGWRVWDUWUHFRUGLQJ$6$30XVW EHUHOLDEOHDQGGHGLFDWHG3OHDVHFRQWDFWPHDW VFRUSLDQR#JPDLOFRP

Looking for band mates? Wanting to sell your gear? Advertise here! Visit JFPClassifieds.com. If you are interested in sponsoring the Musicians Exchange, call JFP Sales at 601-362-6121 ext. 11.


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41


dining

by Tom Ramsey.

New Football Year Resolutions

1 carrot 1 cup rice vinegar 1 cup honey 2 limes 1 tablespoons Sriracha chili sauce 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil 1 green onion 1 bunch cilantro 6 thin-sliced pork chops 1 tablespoon five-spice powder Salt Pepper 1 cup hoisin sauce 12 slider buns

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland 601-956-2929 Monday - Saturday 5 - until

Korean BBQ Pork Sliders make an excellent game day meal.

live music

august 31-september 5 wed | aug 31 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p

thur | sept 1 Almost Awesome 5:30-9:30p

fri | sept 2 Evans Gino 6:30 -11:30p

sat | sept 3 Acoustic Crossroads 6:30-11:30p

sun | sept 4 Deebs Blues 5:30-9:30p

mon | sept 5 Karaoke tue | sept 6 Jesse “Guitar“ Smith 5:30-9:30p

1060 E County Line Rd. in Ridgeland 601-899-0038 | Open Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm, Fri-Sat 11am-Midnight

August 31 - September 6, 2011

HAGGARD COLLINS

42

A

ll that hoopla back at the first of January was just practice. The real new year starts now with the beginning of football season, when everyone is undefeated and hope springs eternal. What better time to make some resolutions? I resolve to not let the victory or defeat of my beloved Saints dictate my mood for more than 36 hours. I resolve to not “shush” my wife and children when they come to me during the game with minute problems like “the house is on fire” or “Zak cut his thumb off—again.” Most importantly, I resolve to be more creative when it comes to football snacking. No more one-pound bag of Doritos. No more delivery pizza. No more whatever it is that I ate and don’t remember. This year, when my friends come over to share my black-and-gold-wrapped joy or anguish, we’ll be well fed. One easy way to be creative but not too stuffy is to make gourmet sliders. And with a little help from your local grocer, you can even do this with minimal effort. Essentially anything delicious between two little buns can be called a slider. Leftover fried chicken and mashed potatoes? Colonel’s Sliders. Leftover spaghetti with meatballs? Sliders Italiano.

KOREAN BBQ PORK SLIDERS (Serves six)

TOM RAMSEY

Voted One of the Best Italian Restaurants Best of Jackson 2011

Half a rack of ribs (pulled off the bones) from Lumpkin’s BBQ with some slaw and barbecue sauce? Juke Joint Sliders. See how easy that is? Let’s say you have a little time, but not too much, and want to do something more than leftovers. Swing by McDade’s and have them steam some shrimp for you. Take them home, and get them good and cold. Make a pot of boiled new potatoes and chill them, too. On the slider buns, put some cocktail sauce, a couple of peeled, steamed shrimp and a couple slices of boiled new potatoes. Voila! Biloxi Shrimp-Boil Sliders. Are you catching my drift of how this works? Newton would have expressed it thusly: [(GF/L)+B(t)+C=Y]>1#D. Translated, that’s great food or leftovers plus tiny buns plus condiment equals yum greater than a pound of Doritos. Now, use your imagination and come up with one on your own. Did you think of rotisserie chicken plus potato salad? I thought you did. Did you call it Picnic Sliders? Nice work. Keep it going, and I’ll give you a recipe for one that you can make from scratch when you really want to impress your guests. And oh yeah. I almost forgot: WHO DAT!?

Thinly julienne carrots and soak in cold water. In a mixing bowl, combine vinegar, honey, juice from limes, and a half-tablespoon Sriracha sauce. Drain carrots and add to vinegar marinade, then place in refrigerator for at least one hour. In a separate mixing bowl, combine mayonnaise, soy sauce, sesame oil and remaining half-tablespoon Sriracha. Mix thoroughly and refrigerate. Roughly chop green onion and cilantro. Season pork chops with five-spice powder, salt and pepper, and rub liberally with hoisin. Refrigerate for 20 minutes before cooking. On a hot grill or grill pan, cook pork chops for two minutes on each side. Remove and allow to rest while assembling sliders. Toast slider buns on the grill. Spread mayonnaise mixture on each bun. Cut cooked pork chops in half and place one piece on each bun, topped with the chopped cilantro and marinated carrots. These things rarely make it to a plate. They just get gobbled up in front of the TV while the Saints march on to victory.


6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

601-956-5040 Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Butts in Townâ&#x20AC;? features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A â&#x20AC;&#x153;very high class pig stand,â&#x20AC;? Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie. Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Rd. Jackson 866-906-0942) Specializing in smoked barbeque, Lumpkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers all your favorites for on-site family dining or for catered events, including reunions, office events, annivesaries, weddings and more.

Open daily 11 am-2 pm and 5-10 pm for dinner

All You Can Eat

CRAB LEGS DINNER 5p.m.-Close Tues-Thurs

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (1220 N State St. 601-352-2001) 2009 and 2010 and 2011â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks..

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Ceramiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license! Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (910 Lake Harbour, Ridgeland, 601-956-2929) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Authentic, homey, unpretentiousâ&#x20AC;? thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how the regulars describe Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, a staple in Jackson for years, offering great Italian favorites with loving care. The tiramisu is a must-have!

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar complete with multiple televisions for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rockyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;polished casualâ&#x20AC;? dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Petra CafĂŠ (2741 Old Canton Road, 601-925-0016) Mediterranean and Lebanese Cuisine. Everything from Stuffed Grape Leaves, to Spinach Pie, Shrimp Kabobs, Greek Salads, Hummus and more. Now Open in Fondren! Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends. Kristos (971 Madison Ave @ Hwy 51, Madison, 601-605-2266) Home of the famous Greek meatball! Hummus, falafel, dolmas, pita sandwiches, salads, plus seasoned curly fries (or sweet potato fries) and amazing desserts. Mezza (1896 Main St., Suite A, Madison 601-853-0876) Mediterranean cuisine and wood fired brick oven pizzas. Come experience the beautiful patio, Hookahs, and delicious food. Beer is offered and you are welcome to bring your own wine. Vasilios (828 Hwy 51 in Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic Greek dining featuring fresh seafood daily along with gyros, greek salads, appetizers and signature Mediterranean desserts. Their redfish is a standout, earning rave reviews.

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Hal and Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Al Stamps (of Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fame) does it again with his signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment!

Now Hiring

Cashier/Sales, Food Prep, Baker, Cook, & Dish Submit resume to

steve@stevesdowntown.com or apply in person mon-fri 2:30-3:30pm No phone calls please

125 South Congress St. | Jackson, MS

VASILIOS AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

â&#x20AC;˘ Fresh Seafood Daily

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Super Card 4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-12AM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

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meet real women tonight

most local singles

try for

free

 More Local Numbers: 1.800.210.1010 18+

Ahora en EspaĂąol

www.livelinks.com

www.thepizzashackjackson.com

August 31 - September 6, 2011

$'#%'%#

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!! WINNER !! BEST PIZZA IN JACKSON 2009 - 2011

5046 Parkway Drive Colonial Mart Off Of Old Canton Road Jackson, MS 39211 Dine-In / Carry-Out

Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm Sun: 11am - 9pm

Still In Belhaven

601-352-2001 1220 N. State St.

(across from Baptist Medical Center)

CATERING AVAILABLE


Paid advertising section.

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Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Stamps Superburgers (1801 Dalton Street 601-352-4555) Huge burgers will keep you full until the next day! The homestyle fries are always fresh. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Poets Two (1855 Lakeland Drive, Suite H-10, 601-364-9411) Pub fare at its finest. Crabcake minis, fried dills, wings, poppers, ultimate fries, sandwiches, po-boys, pasta entrees and steak. The signature burgers come in bison, kobe, beef or turkey! Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing wings in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries! Wing Station (5038 Parkway Drive Suite 8, 888-769-9464) Home of the famous Janky Wings. Wing Station has an array of wings including Lemon Pepper, Honey BBQ and Blazin Bird Atomic. Delivery is available.

SUNDAY BRUNCH

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977

Lunch: Fri. & Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Pick Up Chicken And Angel Biscuits For The Game 707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

“Best Barbecue in Jackson”

2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 - Jackson Free Press

Game Day Party Pack Serves 10 - $44.95 (2lbs of Pork, Beef or Chicken, 2 Pints of Beans, 2 Pints of Slaw, 5 Slices of Texas Toast Or 10 Buns)

Yo u H a n dl the Unif e orm! ndle a H l l We ’ ood! F e h t

1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson,MS | 601.956.7079

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, Fusion has an extensive menu featuring everything from curries to fresh sushi.

SOUTHERN CUISINE

Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) 2010 Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a sumptious buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun.

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant.

jacksonfreepress.com

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution featuring a full breakfast, blue-plate specials, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys and wraps. Save room for something from their famous bakery! For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

45


A Girl’s Game-Day Gear I

by Meredith W. Sullivan

t’s time for football, and the men in our lives can hardly contain themselves. Truthfully, the only things I’m excited about are my game-day looks. And although I’m not one to don official team gear, I do fully support wearing your team’s colors.

Black-and-gold shredded top, Posh Boutique, $45

Lavender ruffle dress, Posh Boutique, $67

Naked Zebra maroon top, Pink Bombshell, $39.95

Chinese Laundry green-patent pumps, The Shoebar at Pieces, $75

Glam yellow wide-legs pants, Posh Boutique, $70

Green-and-gold hoops, Posh Boutique, $30

Red ruffle dress, Pink Bombshell, $46.95

James & Joy one-shouldered dress, The Shoebar at Pieces, $65

Where2Shop:

August 31 - September 6, 2011

Pink Bombshell, 270 Dogwood Blvd., Flowood, 601-919-1366; Posh Boutique, 4312 N. State St., 601-364-2244; The Shoebar at Pieces, 425 Mitchell Ave., 601-939-5203

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SHOPPING SPECIALS

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com. If there is something you’d like to see on our FLY page, tell us on Twitter

4450 (4450 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-3687) Shop smart at the Labor Day sale. Jeans, crop shorts, dresses, and more are $40. Check out the fall shoes and boots.

Re-Runs Consignment Shoppe (1645 W. Government Cove, Brandon, 601-824-3663) There’s a new kid in town. Re-Runs stocks previously loved clothing and accessories at great prices.

Vintage Wine Market (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 1010, Ridgeland, 601-605-9199) Seven of the 10 vodkas recommended by Gayot.com are in stock including celebrity favorite Crystal Head.

The Pilates Place of Mississippi (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 150, 601981-2987) Stock up on Griffin Remedy personalcare products, free of chemicals and other harmful ingredients.

@FlyJFP.

Silly Billy’s Consignment Shop (622 Duling Ave., Suite 205B, 601-672-6993) Fall is coming, so summer items must go. Don’t miss the deals on the summer sales rack.

Silly Billy’s consignment shop Check out flyjfp.com and on Facebook or information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


Silly Billy’s consignment shop Full-service salon dedicated to providing great customer service. We offer excellent services using products of the highest quality. Our mission is to promote healthy hair at an affordable price!

WE OFFER FOILS, GREAT LENGTH HAIR EXTENSIONS AND BRAZILIAN BLOWOUTS.

Stylist Needed Call and schedule an appointment.

Magnolia Marketplace 5352 Lakeland Dr suite 600 | Flowood, Ms 601 992-7980

1775 Lelia Drive, Ste F | 601-982-7772

New

!

New Items In Weekly

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

601-672-6693 601-665-3820

jacksonfreepress.com

Follow us: Facebook:Repeat Street Metro Jackson | Twitter: @RepeatSt | www.repeatstreet.net

Tue. - Sat. | 10 - 6:30 in the Duling Building

622 Duling Ave Suite 205 B

Voted state’s best consignment/resale by Mississippi Magazine.

Ridgeland Location: 626 Ridgewood Road | 601.605.9393 Starkville Location: 832B Hwy 12 West | 662.324.2641

The Funkiest Clothes in Fondren!

47


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Full-Time Office Solutions: from $450.00 per Month â&#x20AC;˘ Full-Time Furnished Office â&#x20AC;˘ Telephone & Telephone Services â&#x20AC;˘ High-Speed Internet â&#x20AC;˘ Reception Services â&#x20AC;˘ Use of Kitchen & Business Lounge â&#x20AC;˘ Conference Room & Meeting Space Usage Virtual Office Solutions: from $129.00 per Month â&#x20AC;˘ Professional Business Address â&#x20AC;˘ Local Phone Number â&#x20AC;˘ Voice Mail & Call Forwarding â&#x20AC;˘ Personalized Reception Service â&#x20AC;˘ Mail & Package Receipt â&#x20AC;˘ Personal Mailbox â&#x20AC;˘ Office & Conference Room Usage

460 Briarwood Dr. | Jackson, MS 39206 Phone: 601.709.4610 | Fax: 601.709.4611

ERASE YOUR

Permanent Makeup Beauty Marks â&#x20AC;˘ Eyes â&#x20AC;˘ Lips â&#x20AC;˘ Brows $25 To $75 off

Weight Reduction â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Basic Program File Bankruptcy

September is Tennis Military Appreciation Month in Mississippi

As little as $200 down

Where justice begins!

MTA & USTA to Adopt a Unit of approximately 75-100 soldiers serving in Iraq or Afghanistan.

FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

Gerald A. Mumford, Attorney-At-Law 601-944-1188 | 601-594-4975 www.themumfordfirm.com

For list of items needed, contact Jenny Markow jennym@mstennis.com | 601-981-4421

The Mumford Firm:

14 Day

www.mstennis.com

plus filing fee

CALL 601.342.0721 Lee Law Office â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS We help people file for relief under the bankruptcy code. We are a debit relief agency.

Prescription appetite suppressant if indicated, is included in base price of $69. Mimic b-12 injections $10 with program. For increased metabolism and fat burning.

Luxury Anti-Aging Facials Microdermabrasion Chemical Peels $35 To $55

Call 601-487-6670 XXXFTUFFNIFBMUIBOEXFMMOFTTDPN

The Empty Hamper

Manicure

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prompt, Personal Serviceâ&#x20AC;?

washed, dried & folded Security Cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;˘ Free Wi-Fi 1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

10% Student Discount Mon. - Thurs. â&#x20AC;˘ 8am - 6pm

Located in Fondren Corner 2906 N. State St. â&#x20AC;˘ (601) 982-9728

Culberson Bail Bonds

Bail Bonds 24 hours a day 7 days a week Payment Terms Available

Fastest & Friendliest Agents in the State

601-824-3254 friend us on facebook

culbersonbonding@gmail.com

v9n51 - JFP 2011 College Football Preview: Bryan Flynn's Sophisticated Wild Ass Guesses  

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