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June 22 - 28, 2011


June 22 - 28, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

9 N O . 41

contents ADAM LYNCH

AMILE WILSON

6 Gates Galore Is there a gate in your Jackson neighborhood’s future? Maybe, if you live in Avery Gardens. FILE PHOTO

Cover photograph by www.joshhaileystudio.com

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THIS ISSUE:

The way people talk, you’d think bonds are bad. But just how do streets and pipes get fixed? ery other day, Rooster’s daily for lunch and, on the weekends, neighborhood restaurants like Babalu. Wassilak has become an integral part of the music scene and formed close friendships with many of Fondren’s musicians. One of these musician friends, Bobby Sims, recently stepped in the shop to play with Wassilak and Harkins, and offered praise for the two and Fondren Guitars. “Me being a broke musician, they’re always ready to help out if I’m a little bit short,” Sims says. “Money is important, but the bottom line is they make good connections with their customers.” Indeed, Wassilak is more than just a businessman. He plays with several local cover bands and with some members of his church, Bellwether Church, where he plays each Sunday. He and Harkins also play for private parties, weddings and charities. He calls himself a fill-in man, usually jumping in to work the bass guitar or keys. The store’s next concert, which may feature Wassilak and Harkins (and free beer), will be Thursday, July 7, during Fondren After 5. In the meantime, Wassilak has enough to keep him busy. “Every day you come in, you might have to send a guitar to Japan, a guitar to Australia, make repairs, reschedule lessons,” he says. “But I can’t pick a favorite part of this business. … It’s been really good to me, I like where I’m at. I plan on staying here a while.” —Meryl Dakin

18 Musical Newbies Our annual “Artists to Watch” roundup presents a dozen musical acts you may not know. VALERIE WELLS

ric Wassilak wears all the hats at Fondren Guitars, a business that serves as a hub for local musicians to buy, play, learn and repair their equipment. He’s store manager, handles sales and repairs, schedules lessons for 150 guitar students and heads the store’s eBay business. Owner Patrick Harkins calls him the “master of shipping,” handling all of the store’s international business. A Chicago native, Wassilak relocated to Phoenix to work for a corporate music store, citing his hometown’s cold weather as the main reason for the move. He transferred to Jackson in 2005 through his work but soon left the business, saying the corporate vibe just wasn’t for him. Wassilak got his start at Fondren Guitars the week Harkins went on his honeymoon in May 2008, quickly picking up all the shop’s duties. His presence at the store allowed Fondren Guitars to increase its Internet presence and become available internationally. Personally, Wassilak doesn’t feel the need to spread out much farther than the Fondren area. He ditched his car two years ago and walks everywhere he needs to go. “I live right around the corner, I work right here,” he says. “Everything is right here in the neighborhood, although I might work on getting myself a bike.” Fondren Guitars is one of his favorite haunts due to a small group that gathers to play the instruments (and the pinball machine). Then there’s Sneaky Beans’ coffee ev-

30 Pick of Picks Guitar, mandolin, banjo—if it has strings and makes music, it also has the perfect pick. Who knew?

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eric wassilak

COURTESY CALICO PANACHE

4 ............. Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 .......................... Talks 12 .................. Editorial 12 .................... Stiggers 12 ........................ Zuga 13 .................. Opinion 30 ............... Diversions 32 ....................... Books 33 ..................... 8 Days 34 .............. JFP Events 26 ....................... Music 28 ......... Music Listings 36 ....................... Sports 37 ................. Astrology 38 ......................... Food 42 ........... Fly Shopping

Bonds or Bust

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editor’snote

Josh Hailey Josh Hailey is an artist and photographer from Jackson. He bounces all over these days from the West Coast to the Deep South and everywhere in between. Check out his work at joshhaileystudio.com. He took the cover photo.

Jordan Lashley A native of Philadelphia, Miss., editorial intern Jordan Lashley loves culture and the arts. She is an avid reader and animal lover. In the fall, she will pursue her master’s degree in English at Mississippi State University. She wrote a Talk and a music feature.

Meryl Dakin Editorial intern Meryl Dakin is a recent USM grad in English literature and an aspiring journalist. She looks forward to many long years of enjoying fascinating people, exciting travel and abject poverty in her chosen field. She wrote a Talk.

Jonnett Johnson Editorial intern Jonnett Johnson is a super cool senior at the University of Southern Mississippi, majoring in journalism with a minor in English. She hopes one day to become a real-life Carrie Bradshaw. She wrote a music feature.

Tim Roberson Tim Roberson is a Jackson native and graduate of the University of Mississippi. He is the editor of the digital music magazine, Play Music City and the owner of Light Bulb Writing Studio in Jackson. He wrote a music feature.

Rebecca Wright Rebecca Wright is a Mississippi transplant from Michigan. She loves hanging out with family and friends, reading, and home projects. She has a passion for both human and animal rights. She wrote a music feature.

Latasha Willis Events editor Latasha Willis is a native Jacksonian, a graduate of Tougaloo College and the mother of one cat. Her JFP blog is “The Bricks That Others Throw,” and she sells design pieces at zazzle. com/reasontolive. She wrote a music feature.

June 22 - 28, 2011

Meredith W. Sullivan

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Former New Yorker Meredith W. Sullivan is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology. The JFP stylist spends her days dreaming about where to travel next. She enjoys life in Fondren with her husband and Diggy dog. She coordinated the FLY feature.

by Briana Robinson, Intern Editor

Vow to the Music

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arold Camping and his followers used the gay pride movement as a sign the world was ending last month. One week later, the closing of Be-Bop Record Shop supposedly marked the end of the music industry as we know it for some other people. Apparently, there are no more places to buy local CDs and mingle with the city’s other music connoisseurs. After 37 years of serving the Jackson area, Be-Bop may have closed its doors, but only to the shop. They didn’t take the music with them. Is it yet another sign of a failing music industry? Perhaps, but we should try not to look at it so pessimistically. Instead, see it as a call to action. We all know that people are downloading music more than buying albums from stores these days. This does not, however, mean that there is no hope. The concept of the album or CD is not dead, and hopefully, will never be dead if we don’t let it die. We must not forget about all the other places in Jackson where the music scene flourishes, regardless of the state of the larger industry and its problems. Coffee shops such as Sneaky Beans and Cups offer albums for sale from local musicians and have small free shows on occasion. Such places these are becoming the popular hangouts for music connoisseurs because they sell music and have live shows. The Jackson music scene is doing just fine. Artists continue to write music and produce albums despite the hardships of being a musician in general, just as they’ve always done. You can hear live music at numerous venues each weekend and during the week. The Jackson area has a core group of people whose faces can be seen at almost every music event. Now, we just need more to join us. Music goes beyond the computer and the Internet, and maybe people don’t realize that. Each decade seems to come with its new and improved way of doing things. Sadly, for whatever reasons, people forget about the old methods sometimes. CDs replaced cassettes and vinyl records for the most part, but they all serve the same purpose and continue to do so. Within the past decade or so, digital downloading has become a popular way of obtaining music. My concern isn’t about downloading’s effect on the music industry, but rather its effect on the way musicians create music and listeners hear it. I can still remember the first CDs I ever bought. It was back when BMG Music Group still existed, offering toogood-to-be-true prices. With “12 CDs for the price of 1” and other crazy deals, I frequented its website, and bought albums from all of the artists I had recently heard and enjoyed. I never understood how they

could afford to give away music like that. I was young and was just realizing how much I enjoyed listening to music and did not take it for granted. Linkin Park and New Found Glory were among the first in my album collection. After receiving CDs in the mail that I was looking forward to hearing, my entire outlook on life would cheer up. I vowed never to get a single fingerprint on the cover of the jewel case or on the CD. All my spare time was spent listening to the whole album on repeat. While I am not as anal about fingerprints today, I still do my best to keep each CD I buy in the best condition possible. I can honestly and confidently say that I have never in my life broken or scratched a CD to where it was unplayable. I also keep all of the CDs, rather than saving them on my laptop’s hard drive and tossing them aside. My CD collection is reaching 300 right now; it includes every disc that I have ever bought (including those from before my home was destroyed by Katrina). I haven’t illegally downloaded any of the music I own. This isn’t because I have loads of money to spend on buying anything I like. It’s because I deeply care about the music and have vowed to continue supporting artists who make quality products and never compromise the sound or album by downloading a few tracks that I heard on the radio. My CD collection, which I have displayed proudly in my bedroom in chronological order by purchase, is the only physical proof I have that I am following that vow.

Buying an artist’s album in hard copy is important to the way that I am able to listen to and interact with the music. Sitting in my room with no distractions, I devote all my attention to the album, taking in the artwork and lyrics provided in the liner notes while listening through the best speakers I can obtain. Listening to a CD, especially for the first time, is one of the most rewarding and thrilling experiences in my life, and it requires almost no effort, just a willingness to support the artist. Buying albums also lets the artists know that people are actually still interested in hearing their complete product and gives them the means with which to do so. They won’t be discouraged and attempt to create only singles or guaranteed hits. My collection might not be proof that anyone other than me is buying albums today, but at least I do. And surely there are plenty of others like me. I continue to build my CD collection whenever I find CDs from artists that I enjoy hearing, even when I could just make a playlist of the songs from YouTube. This way, the music stays special. I have made an investment into each one of the albums I own, although some were gifts from those who know what I would buy for myself. There’s plenty of music in Jackson to be bought in just about every genre. When surfing the Web looking for music, there’s no reason to forget about the old way of doing it: attending shows and buying music there. Opportunities are around every corner and they seem to be here to stay. With our help, artists know how important they are and continue to bring us joy.


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Paul Minor’s attorneys plan yet another appeal. p 10

news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, June 16 Ayman Al-Zawahri, deputy to Osama bin Laden and co-planner of the 9/11 attacks, succeeds Bin Laden as the new lead of al-Qaida. ... The Mississippi Supreme Court orders the suspension of Stone County Justice Court Judge Theresa Brown Dearman for presiding over a criminal case involving her nephew. Friday, June 17 Vietnam launches a $32 million joint project with the U.S. to clean up dioxin contamination from the spraying of Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. … An unknown shooter fires shots into the home of Greenwood Sen. David Jordan. Saturday, June 18 Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords returns to her hometown of Tucson for the first time since she was the victim of a shooting rampage in January. … Golden, Miss., native Army Sgt. Christopher Bell, who was killed June 4 in a roadside bomb in Afghanistan, is laid to rest in Columbus. Sunday, June 19 Rory McIlroy wins the U.S. Open by eight shots and sets a new record for the golf tournament.

June 22 a- 28 2011

Monday, June 20 The U.S. Supreme Court blocks a massive sex discrimination lawsuit against Walmart that could involve up to 1.6 million women. … The Hinds County Board of Supervisors approves a fee increase for American Medical Response services.

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Tuesday, June 21 Citizens and lawmakers attend a dedication service to name Jackson’s FBI building after civil-rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner who were murdered by Klansmen in 1964, and FBI Agent Roy K. Moore, who headed up the investigation into their deaths. … Former U.S. senator and presidential candidate John Edwards appears in court charged with using campaign funds to hide his extramarital affair. Get daily news updates at jfpdaily.com.

Whitwell Scales Back Gate Plan

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ard 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell is scaling back his citywide gated-community proposal to a single neighborhood on County Line Road to increase its chances before the Jackson City Council and the mayor’s office. Current city policy demands that 100 percent of a neighborhood’s residents agree to build a gate and that residents of the enclosed neighborhood take over street and infrastructure repair on everything behind the gates. Last month, Whitwell introduced an ordinance that would have released the 100-percent-approval requirement for the gate construction in addition to freeing gate seekers from the financial responsibility of maintaining infrastructure behind the gate. He warned on Twitter June 14 that denying his gate plan would increase “flight out of Jackson.” Ward 2 Councilman Chokwe Lumumba said, however, that taxpayers should not have to pay for infrastructure bills behind a gate that blocked other city residents from using a gated street as a convenient thoroughfare. Lumumba said the ordinance could be applied to neighborhoods on streets that serve as alternative travel routes when more heavily used roads are choked with traffic. Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. said gated communities represent a liability to city vehicles like garbage trucks that must maneuver through the gates, and that gates also pose a problem to city employees who must visit homes to read water meters.

by Adam Lynch ADAM LYNCH

Wednesday, June 15 Insurgents fire a mortar round into Afghanistan’s National Police Training Center in Wardak during the new building’s inauguration ceremony, showing serious gaps in security. … Gov. Haley Barbour nominates John R. Kelly of Gulfport to serve on the state Board of Education.

The Rolling Stones took their band name from the Muddy Waters song, “Rolling Stone.”

This week, Whitwell introduced his scaled-back plan. “Under this ordinance (residents) would not be responsible for the infrastructure as they are under the current administration’s procedure,” Whitwell said Monday. “It still has the public-access gate component which I believe is important, but it’s narrowed to neighborhoods that are adjacent to adjoined cities and that have a Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whitwell is now tailoring a cemetery inside their subdivision. gated-community ordinance to apply only to the north To my knowledge, the only one Jackson neighborhood of Avery Gardens. that exists under those specifications is the Avery Gardens neighborhood.” The desired Avery Garden gate would Avery Gardens Homeowners’ Associa- open automatically to any vehicle or pedestion President Edley Jones said Avery Gardens trian that approaches. Jones said the crime is already separated from the rest of the city for deterrent lies in the gate’s ability to delay veall practical purposes, as a brick wall-enclosed hicles entering or leaving the neighborhood. community lining a circular avenue going no- Jones said drivers looking to dodge traffic where beyond residents’ individual driveways. citations from Jackson and Ridgeland police “All we want is a lawful, public-access commonly pull into the scenic neighborhood gate,” said Jones, who says a gate would deter wrongfully expecting it to have a rear exit. crime and calm traffic. “Private ownership and Planning Committee Chairman and coded gate scenarios can’t work with third par- Ward 6 Councilman Tony Yarber allowed ties who need to have easy access to their loved Whitwell’s original ordinance to die at the ones in the cemetery in the neighborhood, so Monday Planning Committee because Whitall we really need is a public-access gate. There well planned to introduce the revised version is a distinction here in how to address property of the ordinance. owners’ interest versus the public interest of “I think he’s removing the politics behind not being closed out, and we think it’s a win- the ordinance,” Yarber said. win for everybody.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Secret Songs

money

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veryone has a secret song or two. You know the one: You wouldn’t want your best friend to know about it for fear of ridicule. We twisted the arms of JFP staff and interns for their secret iPod tune and here’s what they revealed: Royksöpp “Robot” ABBA “Take a Chance on Love” Cansei de Ser Sexy “Music is my hot, hot sex” Soundtrack from “Space Jam” Uncle Luke and the 2 Live Crew “Dance too much booty in the pants” Jay-Z “Big Pimpin’” Soundtrack from “Little Shop of Horrors” Sammy Davis Jr. “Rhythm of Life”

“As my father used to say, every kind of money ain’t good money.” —Ward 6 Jackson City Councilman Tony Yarber on June 20, about his opposition to a $500,000 development in south Jackson.

3Oh!3 “Choke Chain” Jewel … (any song, really) Soundtrack from “Grease” The Monkees “Greatest Hits”


by Jordan Lashley

7th Annual

Opportunities Aplenty

O

JORDAN LASHLEY

n a recent Friday afternoon at the Opportunity Center at 845 Amite St. in downtown Jackson, most of the clients were in the midst of their afternoon siesta. One gentleman in the corner meticulously folded his khaki pants, taking great pains to get the creases perfectly straight and even. All the while he hummed the tune to Ray Charles’ “I’ve Got a Woman.” The large mural on the wall leading to the common area of the Opportunity Center depicts a gigantic, detailed hand Jennifer Jefferson fell on hard times but used resources at nestling a small image the Opportunity Center to get back on her feet. She now works at the center as a program coordinator and helps of the Earth in its palm. homeless men and women. The mural, illustrating the hymn “He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands,” represents the cen“Fifteen people finished the program,” ter’s religious foundations and its mission: says Cathy Funches, the city of Jackson’s to help people get out of the downward homeless programs coordinator. “Today spiral of homelessness by getting them em- they are out of transitional homes and shelployed and into permanent homes. All of ters. One of our ladies recently bought her the center’s work serves this purpose. own house, so we celebrated with her.” In 1981, representatives from seven Without the services that Stewpot and Jackson area churches founded Stewpot the Opportunity Center provide, Jackson’s Community Services, an organization that homeless population stands little chance of addresses all levels of need for Jackson’s finding jobs or homes. homeless people. A division of Stewpot, the “If you get out on the streets, and Opportunity Center serves as a day shelter you’ve been there a long time, it’s hard to for homeless men, women and children get those people back,” Funches says. “So if while providing services necessary to ob- we can catch you … as soon as you get out tain employment such as computers, mail there and help get you back into a place, the stops, phones, laundry and showers. Em- less chance you have of staying out there.” ployees of the center help clients build their Jackson native Jennifer Jefferson is an resumes, fill out job applications, register to example of how Opportunity Center provote and contact potential employers. grams and connections can work. After fallClients seek shelter from the elements ing on hard times, she used resources availwithin the walls of the center every day. At able at the Opportunity Center, including least 10 clients use the Opportunity Center’s housing and financial programs, to get back computers, donated by Millsaps College, to on her feet. Today, Jefferson is an employee email potential employers, put together re- of the center, serving as the Opportunity sumes and fill out job applications. 2 Work program coordinator. She has staOn a recent Friday afternoon at the bilized her living arrangements and started Opportunity Center at 845 Amite St. in rebuilding her credit with a BankPlus prodowntown Jackson, most of the clients gram offered through the center. were in the midst of their afternoon siesta. “And now I am banking,” Jefferson says. One gentleman in the corner meticulously As a non-profit organization, the Opfolded his khaki pants, taking great pains to portunity Center operates on donations get the creases perfectly straight and even. and funding from various groups. RecentAll the while he hummed the tune to Ray ly, they obtained a small amount, $34,000, Charles’ “I’ve Got a Woman.” from the city of Jackson and another longThe center helps clients find housing, term source of funding from an anonymous provides drug and alcohol treatment, and donor. These sources are enough to sustain helps locate financial assistance. Recently, the Center for the rest of the year; however, BankPlus conducted a workshop on how it is always in need of additional funding to to begin banking and maintain a bank ac- provide essentials and services to Jackson’s count. Last month, the center hosted the homeless population. Transitional Jobs Program, where the staff For information on the Opportunity partnered homeless individuals with local Center or to donate, visit www.stewpot.org, employers and agencies to obtain job expe- or look up the group on Facebook. Comment rience and stable employment. at www.jfp.ms.

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• A very nice pair of dress shoes for when he really needs to dress up. It’s always better to spend a few extra bucks here because you can keep these items for years. • A vintage pair of khakis, the ones he will throw on anytime he wants to be comfortable. They should be soft, yet durable enough to be washed hundreds of times. Cotton is a must on this selection. Come back next week for Part Two!

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hopetalk

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Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

June 22 - 28, 2011

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politicstalk

by Adam Lynch

What’s Wrong with Bonds?

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ast week, Republican lieutenant governor candidate Tate Reeves (the current state treasurer) refused to pull a campaign ad that his Republican political opponent described as “misleading.” In his television ad, Reeves criticized state legislators for getting “into the habit of borrowing money for things that ought to be paid for in the annual budget.” Reeves declared in his commercial that the state has “got to get out of that cycle,” and that he plans to discourage borrowing money by being the “taxpayers’ watchdog.” It is a role Reeves said he has filled as state treasurer. His opponent, Billy Hewes, a Republican state senator from Gulfport, countered Reeves’ ad last week, complaining that the treasurer signed off on all the bond debt increases throughout his term. “He is telling the voters that he has been a staunch voice for decreasing government debt. But the record shows a drastically different Tate Reeves,” Hewes told reporters at a June 13 press conference at the state Capitol. “One would think our treasurer would be a little more accurate about his numbers.” Instead of pulling the ad, Reeves responded with an attack on Hewes’ record as a senator who approved most bond projects proffered by the Legislature. “After 20 years in the Legislature and hundreds of votes for more spending and billions more in debt, it’s heartwarming to know that Senator Hewes has now finally realized with 50 days to go in this campaign that we need to reduce our debt burden,” Reeves told the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal. Hewes admitted that he promoted most of the bond issues as senator. He said, however, he was not claiming to have worked against bonds while approving them. As a member of the three-member Mississippi Bond Commission, Reeves did exactly that. The state Legislature approves new bond debt every legislative session for municipal projects such as infrastructure repair and economyboosting developments such as new museums. The bond commission gets the final say on which money the state will lend at low interest rates. It does not approve every bond proposal that survives the Legislature.

FILE PHOTO

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Last September, Reeves refused to sign off on a $6 million low-interest state bond to fund critical water and sewer infrastructure repair for the city of Jackson, months after the city suffered a number of water pipe ruptures that effectively shut down the water supply to many state-owned buildings. Reeves used his opposition to the bond as a political spring-board last year, saying he and Gov. Haley Barbour had managed to keep the state’s bond debt low through their general reluctance to accept more bond debt. “In the first four years the governor and I were in office, we had less debt on the books at the end of that four-year period than we had in the beginning, and we completely curbed the growth of our debt burden,” Reeves told the Jackson Free Press in August. “We didn’t do that by running around, chasing people and begging them to take money.” Rep. Credell Calhoun, D-Jackson, slammed the two for demonizing what he considered to be an important step in funding local projects. “Too much debt is a problem, but you can’t take too hostile an approach on the use of bonding,” said Calhoun. “You’d think they didn’t know that just about everything in state, county and local government is paid for with bonds.” Calhoun added that either candidate, if they consider bonding an enemy of the state budget, will set local municipalities up for deterioration and disaster. “There’s always a need to revitalize or renovate school buildings or colleges and infrastructure. All of those things would rot down without bonding to keep them together. If you have to wait until you get the funds to make those improvements, it wouldn’t happen,” Calhoun said. “It’s like buying a house. Many of us would never get a house if we had to wait to save the money to afford a house. And things cost more to build later when factoring in inflation, so saving up for it may not be as costeffective. That boy’s confused, I think.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.


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Teens take part in a cup activity that symbolizes the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases during an abstinence rally June 4.

After the activity, Hernandez asked for a show of hands from those who wanted to get married. Everyone raised his or her hand. While the rally portrayed marriage as the end goal and a destination that most everyone will reach, recent U.S. Census Bureau data show that not only are people delaying marriage, but that married couples represent just 48 percent of all U.S. households. In 2010, married couples represented just 45 percent of Mississippi households, a decrease from 49.7 percent in 2000. Americans are delaying marriage until later in life: 43 percent of white women ages 25 to 29 have never married, compared to 71 percent of black women ages 25 to 29 who have never married. The average age for marriage is now 28 for men and 26 for women. Lakendrick Brown, 14, is a freshman at Wingfield High School and a member of God’s Refuge. He had quite an eventful day at the rally. During the cup activity he got herpes, and later he performed in a skit. In the skit, Brown played the role of Marcus, a player with two girlfriends. In the end, both of his girlfriends found out he’d been cheating, and one of them ended up pregnant. “I wanted to go to college. There are so many things I had planned. Lord, what am I going to do?” he threw his hands up and cried out at the end of the skit. Brown said he planned on signing his abstinence pledge later that day when he got home, and if he had to pick an ideal age to get

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married, it would be his mid-30s. “In my 20s, I want to try and experience more,” he said. “After I have that, I’ll settle down and have a family.” Khitta Kommany, a student at Northwest Rankin High School, played the role of one of Brown’s girlfriends in the skit. “I want to at least be finished with college before I get married,” she said. A group of 13-year-old girls just giggled and shrugged their shoulders when they were asked when they want to get married. Mississippi Department of Human Services Special Projects Officer Jerry Vardaman also spoke at the rally. His slideshow presentation displayed herpes-infected fingers, swollen syphilis-infected eyes and lips covered with oral warts, causing many teens cover their faces and yell, “Eww.” Vardaman knows it isn’t a pretty sight, but he hopes teenagers will get the message: STDs are real. In 2010, the state reported the more than 29,000 cases of STDs. But Vardaman’s presentation wasn’t all serious. At one point he walked over to a church pew lined with candy bars. “Sometimes in a relationship, they may want to score with your Whatchamacallit or your Kit Kat,” he says as he picks up a corresponding candy bar. “…If you are sexually active and don’t take precautions, you could end up with Sugar Babies, Junior Mints, a Baby Ruth or an STD.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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arriage might be far away from most teenagers’ minds, especially as they relish freedom from teachers and textbooks this summer. But waiting until then to engage in sexual activity was the message more than 40 teenagers heard during an abstinence rally earlier this month. “Who we represent?” organizer Viola Watson sang as the rally began at God’s Refuge Christian Fellowship Center in west Jackson. “Jesus. J-e-s-u-s C-h-r-i-s-t Homeboy.” The majority-black group of teenagers clapped and swayed in the church pews. Most of the teenagers are members of the church, but others have come from churches as far away as Magee and the Delta. Nikki Hernandez created the program “First Love Alliance” to promote the message of abstinence and host rallies for teens after Mississippi ended its state-wide abstinence rally in 2009. The state ended the rally after the ACLU sued the state Department of Human Services for promoting religion at a taxpayerfunded event. Private sponsors funded the rally Saturday. While Hernandez admits that it is hard to measure the program’s effectiveness, she thinks it’s an important message that all teens need to hear despite the religious overtones. She’s planning more rallies throughout the city. LaRickie Robinson from the Northtown Child Development Center was the first speaker. She called six girls and six boys to the front of the pulpit. She then gave them small Styrofoam cups of water and asked them to gargle the water, spit it back into the cups and stand across from each other. The boys and girls then combined their water into one cup. This activity symbolized the act of sex, and the teens released embarrassed giggles as they read the consequences of their actions on the bottom of their cups. The consequences included herpes, gonorrhea, HIV and pregnancy. A few escaped without any negative consequences. “When you have unprotected sex, this is how your body transmits the different diseases,” Robinson said. She then passed out an abstinence pledge for the teens to sign.

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Keeping it Local!

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courttalk

The Dog Wash Attorneys for Paul Minor, above, are moving forward to appeal his honest services fraud convictions.

A 2011 MS Youth Hip Hop Summit

JSU on July 9- 10th Stop the School to Prison Pipeline! Join hundreds of Youth from around the state to learn how to ORGANIZE and ADVOCATE for your FUTURE. Youth Justice and Hip Hop Workshops include: Know Your Rights, Organize It, Bullying Prevention, Dating Violence, Sex Ed, Get Your $ Right, Dj’ing, Bboy/Bgirl Dance, Urban Art, Rap and MORE!!!!!!!

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Free to ages 10 to 22!

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by Adam Lynch

Minor to Appeal Convictions FILE PHOTO

Celebrating 20 years of

ttorneys for convicted lawyer Paul Minor are planning their next move now that U.S. District Judge Henry Wingate finally re-sentenced Minor and former judges John Whitfield and Walter “Wes” Teel. Wingate re-sentenced the three June 13, 18 months after the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals tossed some convictions in an alleged loan scheme in December 2009. “What he’s convicted of is not a crime under the new Skilling v. United States Supreme Court decision,” said former Supreme Court Justice Oliver Diaz, one of Minor’s attorneys. A federal jury convicted the three of federal bribery and honest-services fraud in 2007, but Minor’s attorneys successfully appealed the bribery portion of the conviction. The appeals court found that the federal statute under which prosecutors snagged a corruption conviction did not apply to the Minor case, and vacated that portion of the conviction, leaving intact the charges of honest-services fraud, a charge alleging a scheme to deprive voters of the services due them by an official. With the federal bribery charges gone, Wingate re-sentenced Minor to eight years, Whitfield to about six years and Teel to four. Minor originally was sentenced to 11 years, Whitfield slightly more than nine years (110 months) and Teel slightly less than six years (70 months). With time served, Teel could be a free in a matter of weeks. Prosecutors argued that Minor guaranteed loans for the judges and then paid off the loans himself. Minor’s defense team—which includes Greenwood attorney Hiram Eastland on the corruption charges and former Supreme Court Justices Diaz and Chuck McRae on the honest services fraud charges—say that prosecutors never proved that Minor expected an exchange of services for the money. Wingate issued jury instructions in the 2007 trial that omitted any need to prove Minor derived benefit from the paid-off loans. “You may find specific criminal intent even though you may find that the rulings were legal and correct, that the official conduct would have been done anyway, that the official conduct sought to be influenced was lawful and required by law, and that the official conduct was desirable or beneficial to the

public welfare,” Wingate wrote. Eastland said prosecutors misstated the law required to convict Paul Minor by “representing to the district court that no thisfor-that quid pro quo was required to convict Minor of the federal bribery, honest-services bribery and RICO bribery charges brought against him.” Diaz, who was found innocent of corruption related to Minor’s loans in 2005, said without proof of an actual bribe, a jury could find guilty anybody who aids a judge’s campaign and whose interests appear in that judge’s court. The U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear Minor’s appeal last year while he waited for resentencing, but his attorneys say that the courts may be more receptive to consider the appeal now that the resentencing stage is complete. Minor’s new appeal to the 5th Circuit now enters a legal world with a tighter definition on what constitutes honest-services fraud, since the ruling of the controversial Skilling v. United States case set new, stricter parameters. On June 24, 2011, the Supreme Court found in Skilling that the federal honest-services statute only deals with mail and wire fraud “bribery and kickback” schemes. Even though the court validated most of former ENRON CEO Jeffrey Skilling’s convictions in its decision, it jettisoned federal prosecutors’ attempt to apply the statute to schemes involving “undisclosed self-dealing by a public official or private employee.” (“Self-dealing” involves someone acting in their own interests rather than in the interests of a client.) The court decided that narrowing the application of the statute “to encompass only bribery and kickback schemes” was “not unconstitutionally vague,” and therefore proper. Last year, the Supreme Court overturned several cases with honest-services convictions, including Imad Hereimi v. United States, Jack Hargrove v. United States, Paula Harris v. United States and Mustafa Redzic v. United States, based on its 2010 interpretation of federal law regarding the ENRON-related case. It did not address Minor’s request for Supreme Court review, however, since his case was still awaiting resentencing by Wingate. Minor’s attorneys say that prosecutors convinced the jury to convict Minor in 2007 for the kind of scheme the Skilling decision undermines. Minor’s prosecutors never revealed one favorable court ruling that Minor’s loans allegedly purchased from the judges. Federal prosecutors, who argued that the men’s offenses were “serious” at the recent re-sentencing, did not have an immediate response to Minor’s plan to appeal. The government has 30 days to respond to Minor’s appeal after it is filed. Comment at www.jps.ms.


immigrationtalk

by Meryl Dakin

The Choice to Leave

Osiel Mendez spoke June 16 about seeking asylum in the United States.

tation of Alan Stwolinsky, the prosecuting attorney. AP also reported that the murder was retaliation for Stwolinsky helping seize 434 kilograms of cocaine from the Zetas. The unrest and violence in Guatemala has not abated since Mendez’s departure. “I hate all authority in Guatemala, but I’m happy here. I don’t want to return to Guatemala,”

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he said. “I feel comfortable and secure here, and I feel a kinship to all Americans, since all of us share the same blood as Jesus Christ.” Mendez pledged his allegiance and appreciation for MIRA, saying he would do anything they asked him to do out of gratitude for their assistance. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

here’s a not-so-new trend in fast food these days that is truly as good for you as it tastes: the smoothie. In the late 1960’s, Steve Kuhnau began experimenting with mixing fruit, nutrients, and proteins at home in an attempt to remedy his allergies and low blood sugar. Kuhnau, a nurse, found his little concoctions began to have a big impact on his health. In 1973, Kuhnau opened Smoothie King a health food store, the Town & Country Health Foods in Kenner, LA, selling vitamins along with his signature healthy drinks, and the idea for Smoothie King was born. The Smoothie King mission is simple: to help more people achieve a healthier lifestyle. That’s not a difficult thing to achieve with so many delicious options to choose from. With favorites like Blueberry Heaven, Cranberry Cooler, Hearty Apple, and Mangosteen Madness, if staying healthy is your goal, a smoothie from “the King” will help you stay on track. What about you gym rats looking to bulk up? Trim down? Get energy? Smoothie King has just the right smoothie to help you reach your goals. Modern nutrition products give elite athletes and weekend warriors alike an advantage in meeting their goals. With sports nutrition being a billion dollar business, how do you know what you’re getting? Smoothie King carefully reviews what’s on the market so you can be confident that the short list of products offered at the King truly delivers. Don’t forget that it’s just as important to fuel up after your workout as before. The King carries post-exercise products specifically designed to make sure you recover and get the most out of your muscle development. It seems like every time you turn on the TV, a new diet pill promises quick and easy fat loss. How do you know where to begin your quest to trim the fat? Make Smoothie King your first stop. With plenty of options to get you jump-started, the King takes the guess work out of your weight loss search. You know what the experts say: breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Well, now you can have your smoothie and drink it too…for breakfast. Smoothie King is open at 7 a.m. every weekday to serve delicious, healthy smoothies to start your day off right. From smoothies to vitamins, supplements to snacks and enhancers, Smoothie King has what you need to get healthy and stay healthy all in one place.

jacksonfreepress.com

him attain asylum, and several years later, rejoined him with his family. Asked to describe how he felt upon their reunion, Mendez said, “Yo sentí muy, muy happy.” (I feel very, very happy.) Patricia Ice assisted him with his claim. He has no fear of authorities here as he did in Guatemala. “When I see police here, I don’t hide from them,” he said. “I’m not scared of them. I’m happy that I see them passing by.” In Guatemala, the police facilitate the drug cartels, Mendez said. Colom allegedly received $11.5 million for his presidential campaign from the Zetas. In December 2010, the Associated Press reported that the Zetas transmitted a radio message to Colom, stating: “We are the Zetas group and just wanted the country to know that President Álvaro Colom received $11.5 million before elections ended. He will pay for failing to comply, be it (via) guilty or innocent (people). … You, Mr. President, are the one who sold the country out to the Zetas. Now you will pay the price, surprises that will come with actions not words.” In May, the Guatemalan government attributed the slaughter of 27 people on a farm in Petén, Guatemala, to the Zetas. On June 13, the AP reported that federal officials in Guatemala found a video showing the decapi-

COURTESY BILL CHANDLER

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uatemalan native Osiel Mendez sought asylum when he entered the United States in 2005, five years before his wife and two sons were able to cross the Mexican-American border to join him. He received asylum in 2008. On June 16, Mendez came to a meeting of the Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance with his family to share his story. “In the countries of South America, the worst people are the people in authority,” Paul Morris Jr., lead organizer for MIRA, translated for Mendez. “The worst person, the head of it all, is the president of Guatemala.” Mendez claimed that President Álvaro Colom used to be the leader of the Zetas, a violent drug cartel based in Mexico and Guatemala. Because of Mendez’s involvement with human-rights groups in his country, the Zetas targeted him in 2004, and he began receiving death threats by phone and through letters slipped under his door. He was attacked twice, and his oldest son was threatened as well. “What was my solution?” he asked his audience. “If I’d stayed in Guatemala another month, I’d be dead.” Mendez traveled through Mexico and joined a group of men in the desert who were trying to cross the border to the United States. When he arrived in Mississippi, MIRA helped

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jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

To Be a Music City, Support Musicians

I

n the first issue of the Jackson Free Press nearly nine years ago, we ran a cover story written by Publisher Todd Stauffer called “Creative Class Rising.” He reported that development guru Richard Florida, author of the “Creative Class” books, had ranked Jackson high on his “creative” potential scale: No. 75 out of 278 cities studies. We came in higher than Memphis or New Orleans. We launched the paper in a hopeless climate filled with crime obsession, a pigeon-infested King Edward Hotel shell and a corporate daily newspaper that tended to bash the city and send locals out of town in its weekend “best bets” (and would famously call our nightlife “non-existent” in a news story). In contrast, we came out swinging with hope and a mission to help foster a creative capital city where young people wanted to gather and create and make music and write and paint and start small businesses. We would not accept no for an answer on the King Edward’s renovation—it had to happen, we proclaimed with wide eyes—and we started to dissect other media’s faulty crime coverage. And we brought the idea of stubbornly supporting locally owned business in our very first issue—and we’re happy to see that our “Think Local, Shop Local” meme has been picked up throughout the metro. Believing in our city’s ability to become a haven for artists, we immediately started heralding a Farish Street Entertainment District that would outdo Beale Street if for no other reason than it would be more diversely owned and operated. Not a decade later, we are seeing the fruits of the labors of all the urban warriors we’ve reported on for nine years. Our creative class is rising—with vibrant artistic scenes dotted around the city from Midtown to Fondren, Jackson State to downtown. It hasn’t been without struggles—and with any luck we’ll finally see Farish Street spring to life with a new B.B. King’s and other venues soon. Meantime, though, venues like Hal & Mal’s, Fenian’s and the George Street clubs have been plugging at this effort for years. But, they can’t do it alone. If we want to do what Austin did back in the 1980s and blow up musically, it will take our entire village to make it happen. Yes, that means attending live music shows (and booking shows early enough to get crowds on weeknights). We must also get creative, as Austin visionaries did, about ways to really support our musicians. Large-scale development is great, but let’s put our heads together to get artists in some of those empty downtown spaces and study smart efforts such as the Austin Music Foundation. We need a Jackson Music Office to help with bookings, attracting national acts traveling in the south, helping compile CDs (perhaps to go out in a welcome kit or maybe even our BOOM magazine), creating local music events and more. As we have from day one, the JFP stands ready to assist and promote such efforts: Who will step up in the public and private sectors to really make Jackson into the music city we should and can be? We believe; do you?

KEN STIGGERS

‘Beg-O-Nomics 101’

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June 22 - 28, 2011

rother Hustle: “Welcome to the Compensatory Investment Request School of Business and Entrepreneurship class titled ‘Beg-O-Nomics 101’ or ‘How to Acquire Capital for Your Business.’ This class is a prerequisite for the ‘Hustler International Street Vendor’ class and ‘Aunt Tee Tee’s Internet Solution Online Business’ class. “I know why all of you are here: You’re unemployed, broke and desperate. Every day, I witness the current plight of the middle and poor classes through television, newspaper, online blogs and talk radio. And thanks to a 18th-century French politician named Honore de Mirabeau, I know about four ways of living in society: beg, borrow, steal or get a job. “At the Compensatory Investment Request School of Business and Entrepreneurship, students must master the craft of accumulating capital for their prospective businesses. In ‘Beg-O-Nomics 101,’ students will learn how to acquire capitol (or hustle some money) from the rich. “The class starts with students learning business planning and marketing strategies, followed by brief lessons about using imagery, articulation and written communication to get enough start-up capital for the business. Sales demonstration and pitch drills will allow students to rehearse their presentations to potential money donors. Final lessons in capitalizing on capital teach students how to spend their newly acquired funds. “Avoid the hassle of borrowing money, serving prison time and looking for employment. Learn the art of gaining capital through Beg-O-Nomics. If the bankers, CEOs and private corporations can do it, so can you. 12 “Let’s get this class started.”

KAMIKAZE

The Propaganda Machine

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et me explain the difference between Eric Bolling and Jon Stewart. One guy is on a fake news show on Comedy Central. The other is on a real news network where they are supposed to deliver (ahem) real news. Deliver a well-placed joke on one network, and we laugh. Make an ill-timed one on another, and you may find yourself in hot water. Bolling continued FOX News’ association of the word “thug” or “hoodlum” with “black” recently when he suggested that President Barack Obama was having “hoodlums in the hizzouse” by inviting the controversial president of Gabon, Ali Bongo Ondimba, to visit. First off, FOX, the suffix “izzle” shouldn’t be uttered on a serious news show. Second, we’ve stopped using “izzle” or its derivative “izzy” two Snoop Dogg albums ago. Third, you make yourself look utterly foolish and uninformed when you categorize some black people, hip-hop artists or young people in general as “thugs.” Just a few weeks ago, your network made a huge horse’s patootie out of itself when Sean Hannity categorized hip-hop artist Common as a “gangster rapper.” That collective laughter you heard was millions of folks doubled over at your spin. Anyone who’s a fan of Common or seen any of his movies will tell you that Common is probably the most un-gangster rapper alive. He’s a good and successful rapper but no “thug.” Birds don’t fly, and squirrels don’t run from this fella, yet FOX News labeled him a “threat to national security.” Let’s go over this again so we can be clear.

All young black kids are not “thugs.” A group of them gathered in a park are not a “gang.” A president doesn’t invite “hoodlums” to the White House. And unless you’re a comedian, suggesting that the commander-in-chief is “chugging 40s” while tornados ravage the midwest is not appropriate. Nor is it “cool” or “hip.” Now some folks will say we should throw political correctness to the wind. We should call things as we see them, right? Well, many of us are sick of being categorized because of our skin color, our clothes, the side of town we live on or the kind of music we listen to. This comes sincerely from a guy formerly described as a “thug rapper” who now frequents City Hall to stay involved in the inner workings of this machine called Jackson. Bolling subsequently apologized for his comments. And, of course, FOX was prepared to “move on” even though they ran the Common story into the ground and are on day 100, it seems, of Anthony Weiner coverage. Have we forgotten that both Bush administrations had relationships with influential Saudis and relatives of Osama bin Laden? Rapper Eazy-E visited George H.W. Bush while he was president and made a sizeable donation to the Republican Party shortly after his music was deemed “obscene” in Florida. Look it up. Or, is it just more slanted propaganda used to discredit a sitting president? And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019, or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn” and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


The Musical Bridge Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Lacey McLaughlin Assistant Editor Valerie Wells Senior Reporter Adam Lynch Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Assistant to the Editor ShaWanda Jacome Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Quita Bride, Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Brandi Herrera, Garrad Lee, Natalie Long, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Robin O’Bryant,Tom Ramsey, Tim Roberson, Briana Robinson, Doctor S, Julie Skipper, Ken Stiggers Editorial Interns Charity Anderson, Dustin Cardon, Meryl Dakin, Callie Daniels, Alexis L. Goodman, Jonnett Johnson, Jordan Lashley, Sadaaf Mamoon, Amelia Senter, Brianna White Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Design Interns Rachel Bush, Christy Dawson Editorial Cartoonist Chris Zuga Photographers Christina Cannon, Jert-rutha Crawford, Tate K. Nations Charles A. Smith, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson, William Patrick Butler

SALES AND OPERATIONS Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Account Executives Randi Ashley Jackson, Adam Perry Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Events and Marketing Coordinator Shannon Barbour Accounting Montroe Headd Distribution Avery Cahee, Mik Davis, Clint Dear, Aimee Lovell, Ashley Nelson, Steve Pate, Jennifer Smith Interns Sandra Benic, Briana Easterwood, Alaya Malone, Breanna Sanders

ONLINE Web Developer Megan Stewart Web Producer Korey Harrion

CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Releases Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Internships Fashion

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2011 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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n May 27, 2011, the planet lost one of its sacred sons with the death of poet, author and soul musician Gil Scott-Heron, who passed away in New York City at age 62. Scott-Heron was an artist who transcended genre, and more fascinatingly, time and space. He was the literal embodiment of the line that connects African American music traditions today from their roots in Africa. A self-proclaimed “bluesologist,� Scott-Heron dedicated his life to being “a scientist who is concerned with the origin of the blues.� Although best known as a spoken-word artist, Scott-Heron’s music encompassed everything from jazz and blues to funk and performance poetry. His poetry was rooted in West African griots, the holders of oral tradition who traveled from place to place to deliver songs and poems that spread news, satirized it and offered political commentary. As Amiri Baraka argues in “Blues People: Negro Music in White America� (Harper Perennial, 1999, $13.99), the genesis of jazz and the blues can be traced back to African cultural aspects like the griots, but also to instrumentation, musical phrasing and viewpoint. Scott-Heron’s songs and compositions always maintained and linked these traditions, and as such, he embodied and embraced his role as a cultural and musical bridge. His most famous work, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,� has features of the griots’ poetic political commentary, the instrumentation of jazz, and the phrasing and pace of the blues. What made Scott-Heron a bridge was the fact that his music provided the groundwork and inspiration for other forms of music that would follow him, most notably hip-hop. Along with Harlem’s Last Poets, ScottHeron was a harbinger of not only hip-hop’s spoken-word style, but also its roots as a purveyor of political and social commentary for the African American community. Rightly so, hip-hop and rap historians know Scott-Heron and the Last Poets as the genre’s godfathers. As many hip-hop academics have argued in the face of critical takes on the culture, hip-hop has a firm connection to all African American music forms, going back to the pre-American, African traditions. Indeed, Scott-Heron provided the vocal styling for rap, but more importantly, he helped to legitimize hip-hop through the connections his music made through time. Hip-hop artists are well aware of this

Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson -

legacy. Boogie Down Productions, Common, Black Star, The Coup, Little Brother and far too many more to name have carried Scott-Heronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tradition forward by sampling 601-397-6398 his songs and solidifying his legacy. And bringing it full circle, Scott-Heron sampled Kanye Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flashing Lightsâ&#x20AC;? in â&#x20AC;&#x153;On Coming From a Broken Home (Parts 1 and 2)â&#x20AC;? on his 1935 Lakeland Dr. final album, 2010â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m New Here.â&#x20AC;? 601.397.6398 In 2009, after years of musical and academic admiration, I finally got to see a Gil Scott-Heron show in Boulder, Colo. It will always rank as one of those defining moments in my music career, right up there with seeing Scarface come out on stage with De La Soul in Atlanta, Ga., in 2000, finally seeing Stevie Wonder, celebrating life at a Femi Kuti show, and the first time I saw Phish play â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wilsonâ&#x20AC;? live. I was nervous going into the show, based on reviews of his inconsistent live performances that were commonplace in the latter part of his career. When the lights went down, though, Scott-Heronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unmistakable deep, smoky voice and tight piano playing guided the band through a whirlwind of classics, washing all my worries away. That would prove to 8/19A=<ÂşA@3/:@=19AB/B7=< be my only shot at seeing Scott-Heron live, but it was never about that. Scott-Heronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s records provide a soundtrack to my earthly journey, while making me smarter and more spiritual at the same time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whitey on the Moonâ&#x20AC;? helped me understand the hypocrisies of structural racism at a young age. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lady Day and John Coltraneâ&#x20AC;? is my favorite Sunday afternoon song. And if ;]`SRSbOWZaOb rap is the CNN of the streets, as Chuck D eeeO`T[aQ][]` says, then â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ghetto Code (Dot Dot Dit eee`]QY'!'Q][ Dit Dot Dot Dash)â&#x20AC;? was an early report from the front lines: Damn if I know. While Scott-Heronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death saddened me, I used it as a time for reflection and joy in the things he gave the world and me. Now, it is our turn as hip-hop heads, and music fans in  /23:7B/AE/GAWQY 0:/19AB=<3163@@GEVWbSB`OaV;WZZW]\OW`S general, to make sure his legacy is passed on to 35G>B13<B@/:EVWbS@OPPWb ! the next generation by continuing the work he started. Gil Scott-Heron built the bridge and " A7FF/;:WSa]TbVS0SOcbWTcZ>S]^ZS led us over it; now it is our time to lead others # G3/@A4Wf;S across, with his music and vision as the guide. $ B63=@G=4/23/2;/<:]eZWTS Garrad Lee has a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in history from Jackson State University, and will be % 9=@<5SbC^ teaching history at Hinds Community College. & AB=<3A=C@2WUWbOZ2WRG]cBSZZ He grew up in south Jackson, but now lives in ' 0@3/97<503<8/;7<0Z]e;S/eOg Belhaven with his wife, dog and cat. His regular  /D3<532A3D3<4=:2A]4O`/eOg JFP music column is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Key of G.â&#x20AC;?

Hip-hop has a firm connection to all African American music forms, going back to the pre-American, African traditions

CORRECTION: In Volume 9, Issue 40 (June 15-21, 2011) we left off contributor Meredith W. Sullivanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s byline from the Fly Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Gift Guide. The Jackson Free Press apologizes for the error.

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GARRAD LEE

13


v i l A

E June 22 - 28, 2011

WILLIAM PATRICK BUTLER

ven professional musicians constantly learn, adapt and experiment. Recently, the band French Camp from Brooklyn, N.Y., spent two weeks in Jackson to record at Byron Knight’s private studio. Knight knew the guys in the band, and the band knew his studio offers both digital and analog recording. They came for the analog experience, which Knight said offers better sound quality. “No musician who records at home could sound like that,” he said. “Bands always opt for analog. They don’t have any money.”

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WILLIAM PATRICK BUTLER

g n i p e e K Music e h T e

Analog recording stores audio as a wave instead of numbers. It is more costeffective, but the equipment and expertise is becoming scarce. Knight got the analog equipment as payment for a job in Nashville a few years ago. One reel of analog tape that records 15 minutes costs about $350. Three or four of those can make an album. Knight calls analog recordings a “pure” sound. “You are not waiting on a computer to hold it,” he said. A digital home studio that could capture music close to that quality might cost as much as $20,000. Rohit Sharma, 21, hasn’t spent that kind of money. An amateur musician who studies English at Mississippi State University, Sharma spends hours working on

David Banner helped put Jackson on the hip-hop map.

Allison Jenkins Wooden Fingerperforms xxxxxx with alt-rock band Wooden Finger at Jackson venues.

tracks, uploading them to free websites when complete. In his bedroom, he has his own mini-studio: MXL 991 condenser microphone, Alesis Multimix 8 USB mixer, FL Studio and Adobe Audition software. He doesn’t expect much out of making music other than personal satisfaction. “I just wanted to contribute to the big ocean of music that’s out there,” he says. Building a Home Studio Home studios can be good for artists who do not want to spend too much money on recording and who feel comfortable using equipment at home. The necessary tools can all be bought for under $500. “It can be a computer, a good microphone, an interface to connect the microphone to the computer and some recording software. That’s really all you need,” Jackson musician Scott Albert Johnson says. “You get that, and you’ll have a home studio.” Knight, who owns Sneaky Beans coffee house as well as a private recording studio, thinks an aspiring musician might need to spend closer to $1,000 for a basic home studio. This is assuming the musician already has a computer, a guitar and electricity. He suggests Apple Logic software (about $200), Apogee Duet (a two-channel recording apparatus that runs about $500), and a Rode NT1 microphone (about $200). It’s not going to be the same quality as a $20,000 digital home studio, but it’s what aspiring musicians need. “Ten years from now, you wouldn’t regret buying this,” he said. A home studio helps a musician with the writing process. “It’s hard for a musi-

cian to tell whether it’s a good song or not,” Knight says. “If I get used to playing a song myself, I won’t know what is sounds like until I play (the recording) in the car.” A home studio is a good tool, but it has its down side. Knight said few people know how to record, so they often make poor recordings. To balance that, he recommends aspiring artists to play live music as much as possible. “If you want to put a record out, get it done professionally,” he says. Musical instrument and accessory retailer Guitar Center (1189 E. County Line Road, Suite 4, 601-956-8053) has also recognized the trend of home recording. Its free “Recording Made Easy” workshops cover rotating topics, including effects, mixing and publishing, signal flow and microphone techniques, and virtual instruments and loops. Workshops are open to the public and held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturdays. (Call first to check the schedule.) “Overall, I think that it’s a good thing that this technology has become open to everyone. The barrier of entry has been made a lot lower,” Johnson said. “I think it’s a great thing that you don’t have to have a lot of money or access to a professional studio to make a record. All you need is the talent and that’s the way it should be.” Some musicians prefer to use a combination of professional studios and home recording. One method is to professionally record the rhythm track, which includes the basic drums and bass, and then take it home to work on. “Home studios are less expensive, and it’s more easily accessed since you’re not


WILLIAM PATRICK BUTLER

El Obo performed at the 2010 Esperanza Holiday Showcase.

AMILE WILSON

The Downtown Harp and Juke Fest last October included dozens of artists.

MUSIC EVENTS

Get the Word Out Many artists and aspiring artists recording at home share their music online on Facebook, and at sites such as thesixtyone.com, bandcamp.com and soundcloud.com. One most Jackson artists use is ReverbNation.com The sites give fans unlimited listening opportunities. They can download songs at the artists’ price. “Facebook is so much more streamlined, and it’s easier to keep track of what you’re doing,” Johnson said. “It’s the most integrated way of getting music out there and seeing where your fans are. Since it’s a social media website, it has the best chance of reaching the most people.” Cody Cox, a musician who plays with the bands Furrows and Liver Mousse, advises musicians not to rely on Facebook alone. “You have to tell people when you self-promote,” he says. Posters, flyers and telling people faceto-face about your next gig is great advertising. That’s not enough, though. “You’ve got to deliver when they get there,” Cox says. “Anyone can tell when a band is bored.”

Some instruments or techniques may need a more intricate home set-up or maybe even a professional studio to get the best sound. Drums, especially, need the right kind of room for acoustics. Professional studios are sure to have it, but some houses might not. Having a professional sound is important to the guys at Sonic Signature, a Jackson-based recording company. Leroy Jones, managing partner, says professional studios offer more options to fine-tune recordings. Achieving isolation between instruments is important, for example. “It’s key for having the right dynamics of having a live band recording,” he said. Sonic Signature offers workshops that cover how to advertise, how to get on the radio, marketing, publishing and producing. Join the Community Cox believes in making community with his music. He books other bands for Ole Tavern on George Street and Sam’s Lounge. Occasionally, if he needs a bigger room for a group, he’ll book them at Hal & Mal’s. His company, Elegant Trainwreck, produces albums and markets them as well as books talent. He has sold CDs at Sneaky Beans, Cups Espresso Café (where he also works) and Black Diamond Tattoo. “That works well for me. I’ve even

sold at Pizza Shack—places you don’t expect. It’s more eye-catching,” Cox said. Every time he works on an album, Cox has to decide whether to go for “lofi charm” or spend time and money up front. He advises musicians who want to go professional to spend as much money as possible on record quality and on packaging. He gets local artists to help him conceive and design his covers. Like Cox, Weems shares advice with other musicians. “More local artists have recorded in the past few years, and more knowledge is being built,” Weems said. “We collectively learn from each other’s mistakes.” All the technology and business plans are moot if a musician isn’t any good. How to you get to be good and get a following around town? “Practice,” Knight said. “Most people practice what they already know. There’s no sense in that.” While the democratization of technology has hurt record companies, Malaco Music Group director Tommy Couch Jr. says it can help aspiring musicians. Recording songs, posting videos on YouTube and figuring out grassroots marketing can create a small following. “You need to get music heard,” Couch said. “Do the best you can to play coffee shops, bars and jam nights.” Valerie Wells contributed to this report.

Sugarland June 24, 8 p.m., at Golden Moon Hotel and Casino (Highway 16 W., Choctaw). The award-winning country-music duo perform their new album, “The Incredible Machine.” Ellis Paul also performs. For ages 21 and up. $25, $150; call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000. Forever Friday June 24, 10 p.m., at Suite 106 (106 Wilmington St.). Enjoy local music, poetry and art displays. $10 before 10 p.m.; call 601-4548313. Telling Our Own Stories 2: Hip-hop Arts Edition June 25, 12 p.m., at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). Rhyme-N-Reason Foundation sponsor the event, which includes music by hip-hop and rap artists, food, presentations by graffiti artists and filmmakers, and a panel discussion on the U.S. prison industry. Free; call 928-961-0393. Beth McKee June 25, 8 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The Jackson native and former member of Evangeline returns to give a homecoming show. $9.50, $13; visit bethmckee.com. Mississippi Music Foundation Youth Symphony Auditions through Aug. 30. The three-level symphony is a full orchestra consisting of strings, winds, brass, percussion, harp and keyboard. Members participate in a 25-30 week season including rehearsals, sectional rehearsals and master classes with guest soloists. Participants must be Mississippi residents. Call 662-429-2939. See more music listings on page 28.

jacksonfreepress.com

dealing with an engineer’s time,” musician Jamie Weems says. He’s used both home and professional studios to record. “In a more established studio, however, the artist can put energy into recording and not have to manage the technical aspects.”

Jazz Night Live June 24, 7 p.m., at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). Enjoy the sounds of Jazz Beautiful featuring Pam Confer and a cash bar with artisan beer, light wine, soft drinks and juice on the last Friday of each month. Light snacks included. Buy tickets at the door or at circaliving.com. $12; call 601-362-8484.

15


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June 22 - 28, 2011

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16

-ICROCOSMOFAN)NDUSTRYby Tim Roberson KRISTIN BRENEMEN

!DVICEFORASPIRING *ACKSONMUSICIANS

The Be-Bop Metrocenter location closed in 2009.

T

he Be-Bop sign still hangs prominently in Maywood Mart, but the shelves inside are empty. Be-Bop Record Shop was once the largest record store chain in Mississippi, but the last Be-Bop location, in Maywood Mart, closed in April. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our sales pretty much peaked around 1999 and 2000. We had eight stores at that time and were still growing, but along came CD burners and the penetration of the Internet into house holds,â&#x20AC;? Drake Elder, co-owner of Be-Bop, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From there, we saw a 15 to 20 percent decline in business each year in the early part of the 2000s and since.â&#x20AC;? Elder said by 2005, sales at Be-Bop had leveled out. The store enjoyed a steady clientele that continued to buy CDs, and sales of gospel and blues helped. Younger shoppers tended to buy digitally over the Internet, if at all. Several other factors, among them Hurricane Katrina, the economic downturn and spiking gas prices, helped Be-Bop end. Be-Bop is a microcosm of trends that have persisted

since the launch of Napster, the first prominent peer-to-peer file sharing network, in 2001. Though other services have stepped in to fill Napsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoes, each version further decentralized the peer-to-peer network to make downloads harder to track. Now, file sharing through websites such as BitTorrent.com are common. Even with the ease that consumers can find downloads for free, the sales of digital tracks and albums are still the only thing gaining ground, in an industry that has seen record sales slide every year since 1999. The numbers for 2010 are no better. Nielson Soundscan reports that the record industry lost 2.4 percent on sales of 1.507 billion units in 2010 versus 1.545 billion in 2009. Total album sales in 2010 slipped to 326.2 million units, a 12.7 percent decline over 373.9 million units in 2009. Digital sales, however, continued to climb, with 86.3 million digital albums sold in 2010, gaining 13 percent over 2009 figures of 76.4 million albums. Overall, the industry is changing its face as technology forwards the thinking of how music is produced and how fans consume. This process is changing the music business. Social networking and tech advancements allow musicians to record, distribute and promote through Twitter and Facebook. Independent musicians have discovered ReverbNation.com, a website that helps share music and information. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the modern recording industry world, the barrier to entry is much lower financially and otherwise,â&#x20AC;? Jackson-based artist Scott Albert Johnson said. This in turn, creates a greater number of artists that the recording industry has to sort through to find those it wishes to promote and whose albums you might one day find on iTunes. The greater number of artists creates hundreds of niches. The offerings are quickly becoming too much for a physical store to hold. Only digital space can provide what consumers demand. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


Saturday June 25, 2011

Thursday, June 23

Lazy Bone

Ladies Night

Saturday July 9, 2011

LADIES NIGHT DRINK FREE 9-11

Ladies drink free until midnight well drinks only Guys drink 2-4-1 well drinks and domestic beer until 10:00

Good Paper

Saturday July 16, 2011

Raymond Longoria & Forrest Parker

Karaoke

Ghost Town FRIDAY June 24

Friday, June 24

Official Weigh-in

Saturday July23, 2011

#2 With Me and Hugh

Hillbilly Deluxe

Caged at the Coliseum Live onstage at 5 pm. No cover

Saturday July 30, 2011

SATURDAY June 25

Saturday, June 25

Patrick Smith, Rodney Moore & Timmy Avalon

SUNDAY - June 26

OPEN MIC JAM 7-11 MONDAY - June 27

come out and meet the fighters

ALL SHOWS start at 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover

HAPPY HOUR

THURSDAY - June 23

BAR OPEN

CAGED AT

Ladies Night

TUESDAY - June 28 2 for 1 Domestics Free Pool from 7-10

THE COLISEUM

AFTERPARTY

$1.00 off Well Drinks 2 for 1 Well Drinks Weekdays 4pm - 7pm Every Wed. 8pm - Close

6107 Ridgewood Rd Jackson, Ms www.electriccowboy18.com

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

WEDNESDAY - JUNE 29 KARAOKE 2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

Home of blues, jazz, bluegrass and something or ‘nother

Let the Subterranean Fun Begin!

Join Us On July 11 Italian Night | 6-11pm

Underground 119 will Become Guido and Luigi’s Authentic Italian Cuisine Created by Chefs Tom Ramsey and Brian Cartenuto

+6/&+6-:

22

23

24

25

BILL &

TEMPERANCE Bluegrass

CHRIS GILL & THE SOLE SHAKERS

BIG AL & THE HEAVYWEIGHTS

Delta Blues

BEN PAYTON

Delta Blues

Blues

29

30

01

02

LIVE MUSIC

CLINT JORDAN Weekly Chef’s Specials created by Chef Tom Ramsey Open 4pm Wed-Sat Entertainment starts 8pm Wed-Thursday and 9pm Fri-Sat Friend us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter

LISA MILLS Jazz

JUVENATORS Delat Blues

ALL WED & THUR SHOWS: 8-11 | NO COVER | ALL FRI & SAT SHOWS: 9-1 | $10 COVER

119 S. President Street | 601.352.2322 | www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Bluegrass

17


the music issue

Artists to Watch you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know them â&#x20AC;Ś yet.

Lyrics of the Spirit

by Latasha Willis

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June 22 - 28, 2011

COURTESY TODD AGNEW ENTERTAINMENT

18

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hen this group of musically oriented females came together to make music, the result was a powerful, soulful sound that they wanted to share with the world. The all-girl rhythm-and-blues group Calico Panache includes six members: Jessica Smith (piano), Olivia Walker and Amanda McDaniel (vocals), Chiquita Adams (bass guitar), Cherita Brent (drums) and Larissa Hale (keyboard, trumpet, saxophone and French horn). Adams, Smith and Walker met at Tougaloo College and discovered a common denominator: a passion for soulful music. In 2009, they formed Calico Panache. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Calico,â&#x20AC;? which means unusual and diverse, represents the different personalities and interests of each member. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Panache,â&#x20AC;? meaning style and flair, represents the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spirited sound and appearance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a certain essence when all of us are together,â&#x20AC;? Walker says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a vibe we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel anywhere else.â&#x20AC;? In January, Hale joined the lively four as their second keyboardist and brass and wind instrumentalist. In February, McDaniel became the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second vocalist. All residents of Jackson, the group plays in venues such as Level 3, Suite 106, Last Call, Dreamz JXN and many more. They also perform at events for Jackson State University and Tougaloo College. Recently, however, they have been out of the public eye and composing original music. Hard at work in the studio, Calico Panache is recording a mix-tape set to release this month. Calico Panache is planning a huge event that will provide exposure for local musicians. While surprise is key, the band encourages others to contact them for information. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to give away too much information now and give away the surprise,â&#x20AC;? Smith says. You can also hear Calico Panache perform at the JFP Chick Ball July 9. For information, visit calicopanache.com or follow on Twitter @calicopanache.

Risko Danza by Briana Robinson

T

his time last summer, the members of Risko Danza had no idea that they would soon be part of a successful band. After meeting through mutual friends, vocalist and guitarist Matthew Nooe, 18, and drummer Perry Townsend, 18, started to play together, seeking a bassist to complete their line-up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in Jackson, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing else to do, so we learned to play music,â&#x20AC;? Nooe says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After getting good and learning that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun, we decided to make a band.â&#x20AC;? Risko Danza was complete after Jacob Lewandowski, 20, came in to play bass. In January, everyone in the band started taking the music more seriously. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been hard, especially to find

J

ackson native Donnie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doeâ&#x20AC;? Hicks says he wants to put the capital city on the map for rap geniuses. Independent rapper Hicks, 25, has performed at just about all of the local clubs and is known for his high-energy performances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody loves my music,â&#x20AC;? Hicks says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The whole club sings with me.â&#x20AC;? While Hicks has been rapping since he was 15, his professional career only started within the past year. Living by the motto â&#x20AC;&#x153;work hard, pray harder,â&#x20AC;? Hicks has already released four mix tapes, with another, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Streets or Beats,â&#x20AC;? coming out July 4. He is selling them online at reverbnation. com and iTunes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was either gonna be the streets or the beats,â&#x20AC;? Hicks says about the motivation for his newest mix tapeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope rapping works out so I can stay out of the streets.â&#x20AC;? He uses his music as an inspiration, showing him that a person can move forward in life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping that God will bless me with something, so I can let the world see what I do,â&#x20AC;? Hicks says. He anticipates extending his tour to surrounding states and performing on television. In his short career, Hicks has performed with Rocko and David Banner and has collaborated with most of the local rappers. His music is a blend of local and national trends. Acts such as Outkast have influenced him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music is life for me, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all I got,â&#x20AC;? Hicks says. Constantly playing shows, he already has had four this month. He is part of Supa Kidz Music Group, FKMZ and First Up Fly Gang. His new single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;No Booty Pads,â&#x20AC;? has been popular, and listeners can request it on WJMI-FM 99.7 and WRBJ-FM 97.7. For information, contact Doe Hicks directly at 601497-7811 or doehicksbiz@gmail.com.

venues because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re young and people assume that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not serious about our music,â&#x20AC;? Nooe says. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve played multiple times at Sneaky Beans, Cups, Wingstop on North State Street and at house parties, and they hope to find more places. Now, Risko Danza is making its way around Jackson, playing original songs and various covers ranging from blues to classic rock, and its original music, which the members write together, is somewhere in between. They have had nine live performances and released a CD called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live,â&#x20AC;? that sells for $5. The band strives to touch on most genres, including indie, classic rock and blues but is mostly influenced by The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, John Coltrane and The Black Keys. For booking, call Matthew Nooe at

DANE AUSTIN CARNEY

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by Briana Robinson

COURTESY CALICO PANACHE

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Doe Hicks

by Jordan Lashley

COURTESY DOE HICKS

/

Calico Panache

601-665-2073 or email at GMNooe@comcast.net. Visit riskodanza.weebly.com to hear the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music.


By Amelia Senter

M

usic lovers and Martians are abuzz about Jackson hip-hop duo Da A$tronautz, composed of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sir Flywalkerâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Darrin Givensâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Co$ignâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Cory Archie. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do all the score and make all the instrumentals,â&#x20AC;? Flywalker says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Co$ign) brings a different creative outlook. â&#x20AC;Ś I do the beats, and he constructs the songs. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of perfect.â&#x20AC;? The pair met in high schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Flywalker attended Ridgeland High School and Co$ign attended Murrahâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;while on a double date with their then-girlfriends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was going to sell him beats, just going to make money,â&#x20AC;? Flywalker says.â&#x20AC;&#x153;But the way that he rapped on them, I was like, we can make some nice songs together.â&#x20AC;?

COURTESY THOMAS JACKSON

Da A$tronautz

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COURTESY LOGAN MASON

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by Callie Daniels

Music Lessons

ogan Mason says with a wide grin, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would like to keep on playing. Just keep on playing as long as possible.â&#x20AC;? His blue eyes lit up in the rain as he introduced his girlfriend of two years, the harmonica-playing guitarist Jennifer Kennedy, and his violin-playing best friend, Redin Spann. Three of them make up Masonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new band, The Old Family Circus. The musicians have played together for three years, initially as Logan Mason and the Natchez Trace Bandits. They have been playing for seven months under their new name. Old records that his grandfather would often play inspired Masonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love of music. His piano teacher often pushed Mason to strive for the best in music. In addition to a background that gave him his passion for music, Masonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love for the Natchez Trace adds flair to his song writing. He pulled back his shirtsleeve to show a tattoo of the state of Mississippi with the Natchez Trace outlined in blue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My favorite song would have to be â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Jesse and Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a story-telling song,â&#x20AC;? Mason says. Young Joe lost a gambling game to a man on the Natchez Trace, and he shot the guy he lost to. He became a better gambler as he got older, and he settled down with Jesse. Soon enough, his past caught up with him, and he was tried and hung. Heartbroken, Jesse hangs herself, too. Mason loves writing story-telling songs. His voice croons and echoes on songs such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eula,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Sweet Louiseâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rocky Springs.â&#x20AC;? He is working on releasing a record within the next two months. The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s genre is folk and story telling. The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s names point to influences on Masonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s song-writing: the Natchez Trace, antique records and poetic lyrics. Mason has been playing all over Mississippi, especially in Jackson. Visit www.reverbnation.com/theoldfamilycircus to learn more about Logan Mason and the Old Family Circus

The two didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see each other again for another three years, but reunited in the winter of 2009 and began making music together. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We thought our music was regular, until people were like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;this sounds like nothing like the stuff around here!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Flywalker says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That (reaction) drove us to get in a group together and to keep making music together.â&#x20AC;? Flywalker says their music evades singular categorization. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people classify it (our music) as alternative hip-hop,â&#x20AC;? Flywalker says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are talking about something of everything. We touch everything.â&#x20AC;? Flywalker is a self-proclaimed â&#x20AC;&#x153;jazzheadâ&#x20AC;? and lists his musical influences as John Coltrane, Naz, Notorious B.I.G. and Tupac. Flywalker says the band also draws inspiration from music in Bruce Lee movies. He adds that the name, Da A$tronautz, comes from â&#x20AC;&#x153;being different.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The way we look at the music industry is that we try to go outside the spectrum,â&#x20AC;? Flywalker says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really just used the solar system and space in saying â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re exploring space like astronauts instead of just walking on the ground.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;Ś (Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re) doing something different.â&#x20AC;? In spite of the implications of their name, the group realizes the gravity of music as a motivating force. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really rap about a lot of violence,â&#x20AC;? Flywalker says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to make positive look cool.â&#x20AC;? Da A$tronautz has performed at Hot Topic in Northpark Mall, Dreamz JXN, Jackson State University and this springâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Skate MSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids Need Fresh Airâ&#x20AC;? CD release party at Sneaky Beans. The duo now plans to focus on graduating from collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Flywalker from Mississippi

State and Co$ign from JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and are working on a mix tape, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grand Theft Audio,â&#x20AC;? to be released in September as well as an album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;NASAâ&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not Another Sucker Albumâ&#x20AC;?)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;to be released in January 2012. Contact Da A$tronautz at their website, daastronautzmusic.com, or email astronaut music@gmail.com. COURTESY DA ASTRONAUTZ

by Brianna White

he sweet sound of a guitar chord greet listeners on the Thomas Jackson Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Attack of the Mean Eyed Waitress.â&#x20AC;? The song is the essence of the band: a witty message combined with soulful rock to create good old southern blues. The three-member group, based in Hattiesburg, has entertained listeners since 2007 with blues-inspired indie rock. Dubbing themselves an â&#x20AC;&#x153;orchestraâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;with ironyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the group creates a mesh of guitar solos and drum beats to evolve its unique sound. Influenced by Muddy Waters and Steely Dan, the Thomas Jackson Orchestra is comprised of bassist Sam Adcock, drummer Scott Street, and lead singer and guitarist Thomas Jackson. The group mainly plays in Hattiesburg, Jackson, the Gulf Coast and north Mississippi. Known for the wide range of genres they embrace, TJO gives fans a mix ranging from hard rock to pop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We write stuff that will appeal to a lot of different people,â&#x20AC;? Jackson says. During a show, TJO is likely to play pop-inspired â&#x20AC;&#x153;Super Girl Blues,â&#x20AC;? an uplifting song about a former sweetheart, and the blues-driven, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Be So Sad,â&#x20AC;? a melancholy song lamenting heartache. The Thomas Jackson Orchestra plays at local venues such as Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Fenianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Ole Tavern on George Street, often wearing nifty pairs of shades. The group plays with a common goal: â&#x20AC;&#x153;to get better,â&#x20AC;? Jackson says. With three strong rockers, one full-length album and a new EP, the band is working hard to develop its music and fan base. To learn more or find out about upcoming shows, visit their Facebook page or email tjack26@yahoo.com

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Logan Mason and The Old Family Circus

jacksonfreepress.com

Thomas Jackson Orchestra

19


the music issue

Artists to Watch you don’t know them … yet.

Peewee

by Rebecca Wright

by Garrad Lee

J

ustin Cook, of Jackson-based rock band Mr. Kid and the Brothers Fox, has a mean bass face on the stage. Off stage, he loves to cook great food. “I could probably wax philosophical about the interconnectedness of the two,” Cook says. “Or perhaps, I could blabber about sensory similarities between sound and taste. Not necessary. Food is good. Music is good. Enjoy ’em both, I suppose.” With that in mind, Cook, 29, shares his recipe for corned beef, along with the right music to listen to while you enjoy the fruits, or hunk of meat, of your labor.

JUSTIN’S CORNED BEEF The Protein

About 5 pounds of beef brisket, trimmed

The Rub

June 22 - 28, 2011

3/4 cup kosher salt 2 teaspoons of saltpeter (Read up on it if it makes you nervous. Ignore the wives’ tales concerning male libido.) 3 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons whole black peppercorns 2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds 2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds 1 tablespoon whole juniper berries 1 tablespoon allspice berries 7 whole cloves 2 teaspoons ground ginger 7 bay leaves, torn

20

Rub brisket down, pressing berries and spices and whatnot into the meat so they’re stuck in, nice and tight. Place brisket in vacuum-sealed bag or a zip-top bag with as much air as humanly possible taken out. Place in bottom of the fridge (you know, where it’s nice and cold) for a week. Flip bag daily. After seven days or so (a few more if you feel like it and the expiration date allows), take the brisket out and rinse it off thoroughly. Place brisket in pot just large enough to hold the meat, and add enough water to cover. Cook it on the stove slow and low, with the water’s temperature hitting about 175-180 degrees. 10 hours of cooking will suffice. Take out, let cool, slice and serve in sandwich form or by its delicious lonesome. You’ll get bonus points for boiling cabbage, celery and potatoes in the liquid. Consume while listening to The Pogues’ “Rum Sodomy & the Lash.” Temper your Irish joy with knowledge that the Irish actually don’t eat corned beef. Forget such knowledge, and be blissfully ignorant. Drink Guinness or Irish whiskey.

The Narwhals by Brianna White

L

COURTESY THE NARWHALS

COURTESY COURTESY JUSTIN COOK JUSTIN COOK

Just Cookin’ With Justin Cook

Peewee’s music is available online at reverbnation.com and datpiff.com. For upcoming shows, follow Peewee on Twitter @GoPeewee, or find him on Facebook at “Go Wee Pee.’” For bookings, contact gopeeweebiz@gmail.com. COURTESY PEEWEE

F

ans know Adrian Jackson better as Peewee, an MC in the Jackson area. His latest single, “Go Peewee,” is in rotation on WRBJ-FM 97.7. Peewee, 25, is a Mississippi native who has always had a passion for music. He worked hard to get where he is and has no intention of slowing down. He works as a barista at the King Edward Hotel and is also a student at Jackson State University, where he is majoring in health and recreation. Between work and school, he manages to DJ, write, record music and perform his own work. The musician also works with children. He recently

helped to incorporate his song, “Go Peewee” into a program to help fight childhood obesity with music and dance, trying to get kids to be more active. He strives to be a role model to children and youth. “Go Peewee” has a hip-hop sound, but he doesn’t want to box himself into a specific genre. “I try not to classify my music, because music can go anywhere, and that’s the type of person I am. I really just label it as music,” Peewee says. “If you listen to my music, it varies —it gives you different styles, and I like that.” His passion as an artist is evident in his conversation and in his music. He recently released a mix tape titled, “Hello My Name is Peewee.” He will make a music video for “Go Peewee” later this summer and will release a second recording later this year.

ed by female singersongwriter Sarah Bryan Lewis, the Narwhals have brought a new kind of rock to the Mississippi scene. The Hattiesburg-based group formed last summer, and their journey since has been a whirlwind. The Narwhals’ lineup consists of Sarah-Bryan Lewis (lead singer and guitarist), Jaime Jimenez (keyboardist), Stephen Scott (guitarist) and Coday Anthony (drummer). A self-described “mid-level band,” The Narwhals’ folk-rock influences are The Mountain Goats and Bob Dylan. The band’s songs cover a wide range of topics, including societal conflict and relationships. “I want our music to make a statement,” Lewis says. A blaring statement can be found in “Another Statistic,” a track off the band’s latest live EP, “The Narwhals Live on WUSM.” In the song, Lewis croons about difficult relationships and the challenge to overcome mistakes: “Drink your wine / pop your pills / take it in till it kills.” The Narwhals have a deeper understanding of the music business because three of the band’s members—Lewis, Scott and Anthony— graduated as entertainment industry majors from the University of Southern Mississippi. The Narwhals’ music is readily available. You can find the band’s fourtrack EP on narwhals.bandcamp.com. Fans can name their own price for the EP, and the website offers assistance for the download. The Narwhals have plans to relocate to Los Angeles next January, but until then fans can catch them at Ole Tavern on George Street in Jackson and other venues throughout the southeast. For more information, email narwhalfans@gmail.com, or listen to The Narwhals’ music on Facebook.


Santore Bracey by Alexis Goodman

COURTESY SANTORE BRACEY

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F

rom traveling back and forth from Jackson to auditions in Dallas, to writing music for stage plays and working on his album, Santore Bracey is a busy man. A Jackson native, Bracey began singing gospel in church when he was 5. At 14 he was backing other artists, and he realized that he was passionate about singing. “I just love seeing how music makes a person feel and seeing how people enjoy true music,” he says. Bracey is working on his first album and writing music for stage plays, including “Congregation Gone Wild,” “P.S. I Love You” and “Vengeance is the Lord.” Bracey often uses the stage plays as an outlet to get his own music in front of an audience. “Santore,” Bracey’s self-titled album, is scheduled for release in February 2012. “The album is about living, loving, and being happy and excited,” he says. “One day love can make you happy, and the next day you might not care about it, so I just want to get it that out there.” Bracey, 29, is not signed with a record label but is not bothered by paying for everything on his own. “Before my first daughter, I had a lot going on, but when she came along, it changed my whole outlook on life,” Bracey says. His three children are his biggest inspiration, he says. Bracey attended Forest Hill High School, Jackson State University and Belhaven University. He is working on a degree in business management to help his entertainment career. The most rewarding experience for Bracey has been to be able to grace the stage with famous artists. He has opened for R&B artist Dave Hollister and gospel artist Paul Porter, and has sung background for Porter. In May, he competed on FOX TV’s “The X Factor” where he made it through two rounds. “Jackson really has a lot of good talent, but no one is looking here,” Bracey says. “I just want to open the door for others, as well as for my own children.” Connect with Santore Bracey on Facebook.

1855 Lakeland Dr. Jackson, MS • 601-364-9411 21


in-death’s door

NEW GINS

the music issue

Artists to Watch

Topher Brown by Jonnett Johnson

WORLD

Slimm Pusha by Pamela Hosey

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June 22 - 28, 2011

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22

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Not only is Slimm smart and funny, he also has a plan. Instead of nailing the songs on an album and pushing it into the hands of every radio station, Slimm took his time to learn the industry first. He then researched and developed a strategic plan for his music career, especially promotions. Slimm has a mix up (his rendition of a mix-tape) titled “The BingBangBata Mix-up” which is getting a lot of positive feedback. His next mix up, “IfPushComes2Shove” has 13 tracks, half of which are fun summer music, including the slamming summer anthem, “Pool Party.” The other half is music with strong messages. The song he is most proud of is “Lady Friend” To download “The BingBangBata Mixup” and to find out more about Slimm Pusha, visit his website at bingbangbatabow.com and follow him on Twitter @slimmPUSHA. COURTESY SLIMM PUSHA

limm Pusha (aka E’Sirah Harris) found his way to Jackson after living in Montgomery, Ala., Georgia, Tennessee and the Mississippi Delta. While studying English at Jackson State University, Slimm felt he wasn’t serving his life’s purpose: to produce and make music that everyone will enjoy. “Music has always been my passion,” Slimm says. He was playing drums at age 3, writing music at 13 and recording at 18. He also plays the piano. Without hesitation, Slimm says that he doesn’t want to be referred to as a rapper. At 25, his appearance is clean cut, and he doesn’t travel with a large entourage. He plans to keep it that way.

COURTESY TOPHER BROWN

FROM “M AROUND THE

y goal in life is to play music,” Topher Brown says. That is what he’s been doing since he started playing guitar 15 years ago. His musician father Ricky Brown and blues legend Robert Johnson, his musical idols, sparked a love of country and blues music. Brown, 28, grew up in Brookhaven and attended Copiah-Lincoln Community College and New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. But when disaster hit, his love for music took over. “When Katrina came through, I hit the road and been on the road ever since,” Brown says. He formerly played with The Colonels. He became a part of The Band Perry, when lead singer Kimberly Perry, a good friend of Topher’s, asked him to join in 2010.

“They needed someone they knew and trusted,” Brown says. He’s been playing guitar with the folk/country, Country Music Television award-nominated band for a year. The Band Perry keeps Brown busy, but he also has his own band, Topher Brown and the Family Business. “We’re all really close friends. We hang out every day. That’s how I came up with the name,” Brown says, describing its music as a combination of rock ‘n’ roll and blues. Topher Brown and the Family Business play mostly in and around Brookhaven, sometimes in McComb and Jackson. “I’m kind of a fly-by-theseat-of-my-pants kind of guy,” Brown says. He is unsure of his future other than the fact that he will continue to play music. “It’s the one thing that truly makes me happy.” Visit www.thebandperry.com and the Topher Brown and the Family Business page on Facebook for more information.


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DIVERSIONS|music

by Rebecca Wright

Sit Down and Do It ken voice, he recalled growing up in Mobile, Ala., as a “Coast boy,” and learning to play piano and clarinet as a child. He spoke nostalgically and proudly about his daughter, Patricia, and talked fondly about his teaching career at Mississippi College. At age 67, he is enjoying retirement with his wife, Judy, in Clinton. “Composing is something I did after I earned a living,” he says. Creating music has been always been a passion for Scalter who, throughout the course of his life, has created many beautiful compositions performed all over the United States. He spoke about his composition process matter-of-factly. “The thing I’ve learned is that you just have to get a routine and do it. You have to learn some skills and then you have to sit down and do it,” he says. “I used to have this idea that you go out and sit under the trees, and you wait for inspiration, but that doesn’t get

Natalie’s Notes

it… The hardest thing is to decide what you want to do and to limit yourself. It’s just like any other job: You learn as much as you can and then sit down and work at it.” Sclater holds three music degrees: a bachelor’s degree in theory composition and master’s in music from the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, and a doctorate in music composition from the University of Texas. He taught music composition and theory for 40 years at Mississippi College. He recently launched a website, www.jamessclater.com, and is compiling recordings of his work online. In addition to his site, you can hear his compositions on YouTube. His retirement allows him to devote more time to some of his hobbies such as reading, writing, and photography, as well as playing clarinet with the Mississippi Wind Symphony. He is continuing his life’s passion of composing music. “I’d like to keep writing, and what I’m hoping in the future is that I can get

some performances in other areas of the country. My plans are just more of the same stuff.” LAURIE ROSS

F

rom the moment modern composer pulled up in his little red truck wearing jeans and tennis shoes, to the final moments of conversation in Cups Espresso Café in Clinton, James Sclater exuded approachable, down-to-earth warmth. Listening to his music is like peering into a kaleidoscope where multi-faceted colors and shapes translate into unpredictable sound and rhythm. Sclater is a talented and accomplished classical composer who just won his sixth award from the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters. His most recent award is for his 2010 composition, “Concerto for Piano and Wind Ensemble,” which musicians in Mississippi and Georgia have performed in the past year. One of the competition judges described this piece as, “a strikingly ambitious three-movement work of majestic scope and achievement.” He is a tall man with graying hair, kind eyes and a gentle spirit. In a soft-spo-

Composer James Sclater won his sixth award from the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters this year.

A Rocker’s Lament

by Natalie Long

I

June 22 - 28, 2011

COURTESY SETH LIBBEY

received a Facebook message the other day from a on seeing as many shows as I can. guy I’ll call Rocker99. His letter was pretty critical, As far as coming to your shows, I do appreciate citing he never sees me at any shows in Jackson, or the Facebook invites. That and the emails to music@ any of his band’s shows, for that matter, as well as jacksonfreepress.com helps me stay connected. But many other expressive forms of criticism. if I don’t know about the show, or you tell me at As I pondered how to respond to him, I thought the last minute, please don’t get mad. Just keep a I could take my words and express them to other local chick updated. musicians who may feel this way in this week’s notes. Please send your listings by Mondays at noon As the music freak that I so that they make the paper. am, it kills me that I can’t make Anything after that time will it to every show in Jackson. As be on the website, but not in a teacher who needs her rest the paper. to manage a classroom daily, I would love to know it’s hard to make it to shows more about this city’s great during the week due to my music scene. So, if you have day job. If you could start any suggestions, please let me your shows earlier (9 p.m.know. Anytime you see me out, ish), I would try to make it. let’s talk. I sometimes can’t afford to go Tonight, check out to every show—I’m a gal on a Shaun Patterson at Time Out teacher’s budget, remember. (6270 Old Canton Road), Also, I perform on the Seth Libbey at Fenian’s (901 weekends myself, and if I have E. Fortification St.), and a weekend off, I don’t go far DJ Phingaprint at Poets II from my house. A lot of you (1855 Lakeland Drive). could come to our gigs, too, Thursday night has Meagan but again, I understand if May at Philip’s on the Rez you’ve got a gig when we do (135 Madison Landing Circle, or take a weekend off to rest. Ridgeland) and the Amazin It’s a double-edged sword. My Lazy Boi Band at F. Jones summer has begun, so I plan Seth Libbey plays at Fenian’s Wednesday. Corner (303 N. Farish St.).

26

This weekend, go to the Martini Room at the Regency Hotel (400 Greymont Ave.). They host “Martini Fridays” and “Soulful Saturdays” every weekend, so make it a plan to visit this new upscale establishment. Friday night, Debauche plays at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.), McB’s (815 Lake Harbour Drive) has Hunter and Rick, Fire (209 Commerce St.) has The Wicked Gentlemen, and Martin’s (214 S. State St.) hosts Banner Fair. Saturday night get your groove on with Lazy Bone at The Cherokee (1410 Old Square Road), Fade 2 Blue at Reed Pierce’s (6791 S. Siwell Road, Byram), and Bones with Swamp Babies at Ole Tavern (416 George St.). Enjoy the jazz brunch concerts on Sundays at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood), King Edward Hotel (235 W. Capitol St.), Sophia’s at the Fairview Inn (734 Fairview St.), Char (4500 Interstate 55 N, Suite 142) and Fitzgerald’s at the Jackson Hilton (1001 E. County Line Road). All have wonderful musicians and fabulous food, and of course, you’ll have a blast. We still need volunteers for this year’s Chick Ball, July 9 at Hal & Mal’s. I can’t really say much because it’s a secret, but the musical lineup this year is going to be awesome. Put this event on your calendar—you don’t want to miss this. If you would like to volunteer or donate art, gifts or money, email chickball@ jacksonfreepress.com or call 601-362-6121 x16. Watch jfpchickball.com for the lineup announcement. Have a great week, and if you see me out, please stop by and say hello!


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livemusic JUNE 22 - WEDNESDAY

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An Annual Fundraiser for the Margaret Walker Center

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BOOKS p 32 | SPORTS p 36 by Valerie Wells

VALERIE WELLS

Rocks That Roll

Deborah Shoemaker plays the guitar with a petrified wood pick.

June 22 - 28, 2011

30

lin for six years and the guitar for 15. He collects guitar picks. He has about 50 “cheap” ones he keeps on his coffee table and some special picks he keeps in safer places, like his wallet. The tortoiseshell is special partly because it is a harder substance. Looney says he can pull more out of his mandolin with harder picks. “Some people like a pick with a little bend to it. I like picks that don’t bend at all,” he says. “As I got to be a better player, my pick got heavier and heavier.” The density of the material and the thickness of the cut of a pick affect sound. All of Looney’s picks create

38 million years ago as driftwood in a great flood. Layers of sand storms, silt, clay, minerals, glacier dust and millions of years of slow conditioning turned decaying wood cells into stone. His daughter, Deborah Shoemaker, is the park manager. She also plays the guitar. Shoemaker demonstrated the petrified wood pick, strumming her acoustic guitar. She held her hand at different angles, never letting the stone pick slip, explaining that every slight angle can make a difference. Shoemaker, 40, hires various craftsmen to shape and bevel guitar picks from pieces of petrified wood, all from Mississippi, but none from the protected logs at the conservation park. This past weekend, she was sorting through a new order that had just come in from out of state. The small plastic bags contained dark brown and yellow pieces of polished stone. Some were rounder than others, all were wider than her thumb. She’s organizing the new shipment to sell at her booth at the Intuitive Encounters Mindful Spirit Expo this weekend. Hales said for him, playing with a petrified wood pick is spiritual. “These things are old. Being that old, being here longer, it feels good in your hand and in your tone. It’s like old guitars and old violins—like an old Stradivarius—just sound better,” he said. Petrified wood allows for that kind of singular expression through mood and technique, Hales said. “Any musician wants to play so that you can hear half a chord and you know who it is.” VALERIE WELLS

J

ohn Looney bounced a synthetic Dunlop Gator Grip guitar pick on a table at Hal & Mal’s. He was in between sets playing the mandolin with Anna Kline and The Grits & Soul Band, so he didn’t have much time for this demonstration. “You hear that?” he asked, when the pick plopped on the table. Then he pulled a tortoiseshell guitar pick from his wallet and dropped it at the same distance as the Dunlop. The tortoiseshell, now illegal to sell, made a lower pitch with its softer thud on the table. Looney, 28, has played the mando-

slightly different tones on his mandolin. He really likes his pick made of ebony, a hard wood. “It’s harder, but it’s a brighter tone,” he said. “Other materials produce a more mellow sound. For the mandolin, I need more volume and to be able to pull more sound out of it.” He is always searching for the best sound and best feel, so he experiments with different picks. Looney works at Morrison Brothers Music, and reports that the Blue Chip pick is all the rage now. It’s beveled on the edge, and it slides off the string. The bevels, the soft edges and the triangular shapes create varied tones. Sharper points produce a brighter sound. Softer edges sound smooth. Some players prefer to only use their fingertips, while some banjo players like a steel tip. Jazz players love sharp edges on their picks, Looney says. They move faster. “A lot of it is the feel of the pick, how it rolls off the string,” he says. Looney thinks he is going to have try a petrified wood pick next. Musician Scott Hales, 47, uses a petrified wood pick—not exclusively, but he uses it fondly. “The thickness has more of a muffled-type tone,” he said. He likes to use petrified wood when he’s picking, doing leads or strumming. “All the bending is in the string. I can tell the difference. I can hit sharper notes.” He agrees with Looney that little things like the pick you use a make a huge difference when you hit that string. That’s why he prefers using a heavy pick, a pick that doesn’t bend at all. Hales is busy recording some of his blues and jazz tunes at a studio in his Madison County home just six miles from the Mississippi Petrified Forest, a private park. The gift shop at the park sells all kinds of petrified wood souvenirs, jewelry and guitar picks. Bob Dellar, 66, who works in the gift shop, pulled out a tray of picks from the display case containing an assortment of shiny stones shaped to make music: thick green triangles with sharp points, rounded picks with wood grains, thin white picks with black squiggles and yellow-gold rocks that will slide over guitar strings one day. The stone picks came from petrified logs found on the property. The ancient logs landed here about

Petrified wood makes a heavy pick that some musicians prefer.


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DIVERSIONS|books

by James L. Dickerson

Mojo On My Mind

June 22 - 28, 2011

E

32

veryone is probably familiar with Mississippi’s historical role in the creation of blues, rock ‘n’ roll and country music. Without that incredible history, “American Idol” would be limited to contestants who excel at classical music and ethereal folk songs. Mississippi is the fountainhead for mojo music culture. Unfortunately, when it comes to music books, commercial publishers aren’t all that interested in the past. As a result, few books are published about Mississippi recording artists or musical trends, at least not by commercial publishers. Celebrity kissand-tell rock memoirs are what sell these days, especially if they deal with addiction or incest. Our celebrated musical history is cruising on the fumes of stubborn pride, a development that has opened the door for academic and university presses, where the financial bottom line is of less importance than the historical significance of a book. I recently reviewed “Memphis Boys: The Story of American Studios” (University Press of Mississippi, 2010, $50) by Roben Jones, a book that focuses on one of the most successful studio bands of all time, two members of whom are Mississippians. The same publisher released a biography of Mississippi John Hurt earlier this month, “Mississippi John Hurt: His Life, His Times, His Blues” ($35) by Philip R. Ratcliffe. The book traces Hurt’s musical journey and is bolstered by interviews with people who knew him well. Other recommended books include: “Preachin’ the Blues: The Life and Times of Son House” by Daniel Beaumont (Oxford University Press, 2011, $24.95) scheduled for publication next month. The book begins in 1964, just before the explosion

of the youth culture, when three young, white blues fans drove from New York City to the Mississippi Delta in search of Eddie James “Son” House Jr., an important figure in the development of the Delta blues during the 1930s. “Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus: Writings 19682010” (Public Affairs, 2011, $29.95) and “Bob Dylan: Like a Complete Unknown” by David Yaffe (Yale University Press, 2011, $24). Why is the Minnesota-born Bob Dylan included? Unlike most post1950s recording artists, most of whom owe their musical development to Elvis Presley, Dylan’s folk roots can be traced to Mississippi’s Jimmie Rodgers, the father of country music, and various Delta blues artists who expressed their lonesome poetry with the instruments of the common man, the guitar and the harmonica. In 1997, in a tribute to Jimmie Rodgers, Dylan released on his own Egyptian Records label an album titled “The Songs of Jimmie Rodgers.” In the liner notes, Dylan wrote: “Times change and don’t change. The nature of humanity has stayed the same. Jimmie is at the heart of it all with a seriousness and humor that is befuddling, notwithstanding that infamous blue yodel that defies the rational and conjecturing mind. His is the voice in the wilderness of your head. ... [O]nly in turning up the volume can we determine our own destiny.” That about says it—the part about the voice in the wilderness inside everyone’s head—and it may just be our true legacy. James L. Dickerson is the author of the awardwinning “Mojo Triangle: Birthplace of Country, Blues, Jazz and Rock ‘n’ Roll.” (Schirmer Trade Books, 2005, $24.95) For a listing of Mojo Triangle recording artists check out Wikipedia’s “Mojo Triangle.”


BEST BETS June 22 - 29, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

STERLING PHOTOGRAPHY

David Pigott performs during F. Jones Corner’s blues lunch. … Historian Ed Payne speaks during History Is Lunch at noon at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … The “Pieces of the Past: Spoils of War” exhibit at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.) hangs through July 10. Free; call 601576-6920. … See the opera film “Don Pasquale” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children; call 601-936-5856. … Seth Libbey is at Fenian’s. … Ralph Miller performs from 6-10 p.m. at Irish Frog. … Fire has music by Oh No Fiasco at 7:30 p.m. and RED at 8 p.m. $12. … Stevie Cain performs at Brady’s.

Coliseum. $43.50; call 800-745-3000. … Olga’s has music by “Tiger” Thomas Rogers from 7-10 p.m.

Hal & Mal’s has music by Scott Albert Johnson in the restaurant (free) and Beth McKee in the Red Room ($9.50, $13).

FRIDAY 6/24

SUNDAY 6/26

Fairy Tale Theatre at Vicksburg Theatre Guild/Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg) is at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.; runs through June 26. $6, $4 children 12 and under; call 601-636-0471. … Fondren Theatre Workshop presents “Leading Ladies: A Night of Nostalgia” at 7 p.m. at Brent’s Diner and Soda Fountain (655 Duling Ave.). Proceeds benefit CONTACT the Crisis Line. $25; call 601-9822217. … “A Night of Worship with Joseph M. Banks” is at 7 p.m. at Jackson Academy Performing Arts Center (4908 Ridgewood Road). $15; call 601-672-7948. … Jazz Night Live is at 7 p.m. at circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road). $12; call 601-362-8484. … At 7:30 p.m., Lingofest Language Center (7048 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland) hosts an open house and Latin party. Free; call 601-500-7700. … Dreamz JXN hosts Can’t Feel My Face Friday. … Forever Friday is at 9 p.m. at Suite 106; DJ Sean Mac spins hits. 10 before 10 p.m.; call 601-454-8313. … Banner Fair performs at Martin’s at 10 p.m. … Ole Tavern has music by the Bailey Brothers and Hogdoggin.

SATURDAY 6/25

The Mindful Spirit Expo at Mississippi School for Therapeutic Massage (935 A Lakeland Drive) is from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. today and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. tomorrow. $10 exhibitions, $20 speakers, $25 for both; visit intuitiveencounters. com. … Politix in the Park is at 11 a.m. at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St.). Free; call 601-960-3008. … “Telling Our Own Stories 2: Hip-hop Arts Edition” at North Midtown Arts Center kicks off at noon. Free; call 928-9610393. … Artist and exhibitor LaRita Smith gives a gallery talk from 2-4 p.m. at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-1557. … The “Caged in the Coliseum” matches begin at 7 p.m. at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). $25, $35; call 800-745-3000. … Gospel artist Joseph M. Banks performs at 7 p.m. June 24 at Jackson Academy Performing Arts Center.

Mississippi Museum of Art’s “The Orient Expressed” exhibit hangs through July 17. $12, $10 seniors, $6 students; call 601-960-1515. … Ace Atkins signs copies of “The Ranger” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). $25.95 book; call 601-366-7619. … The “I’m Good” Health Awareness Block Party at 5:30 p.m. at Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center (3502 W. Northside Drive) includes music by Recognition, Lou Writer and DJ T-Money. Free; call 601-362-5321. … House of Cards performs during Centric Thursday at Dreamz JXN. … Comedian and ventriloquist Jeff Dunham performs at 7:30 p.m. at the Mississippi

MONDAY 6/27

Native American storyteller and magician Autumn MorningStar is at Madison Public Library (994 Madison Ave., Madison) at 10 a.m. and Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland) at 2 p.m. Free; call 601-8564536. … Martin’s hosts the Open-mic Free Jam.

TUESDAY 6/28

The Mississippi Main Street Association Awards Luncheon is at 10:30 a.m. at Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St.). $40; call 601-944-0113. … “An Evening in the Garden” is at 6:30 p.m. at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Free; call 601-932-2562. … Shaun Patterson performs at Wing Stop (952 N. State St.).

WEDNESDAY 6/29

Sportswriter Rick Cleveland and baseball legend Boo Ferriss speak during History Is Lunch at noon at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … See the opera film “Simon Boccanegra” at 6:30 p.m. at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children; call 601936-5856. … Fitzgerald’s has music by Jazz Beautiful. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

See Beth McKee perform at 8 p.m. June 25 at Hal & Mal’s. COURTESY ARDEN BARNETT

THURSDAY 6/23

Raphael Semmes performs during Table 100’s jazz brunch from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. … See crafts by Anne Campbell and Rhonda Blasingame at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland) through June 30. Free; call 601856-7546. … Haggard Collins is at Burgers and Blues from 5-9 p.m. … Dreamz JXN’s Generation NXT concert includes music by Smoke, Lyrik Skillz and Stunna Mane.

jacksonfreepress.com

WEDNESDAY 6/22

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jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

Leading Ladies: A Night of Nostalgia June 24-25, at Brent’s Diner and Soda Fountain (655 Duling Ave.). Each night, dinner is at 7 p.m., and the show is at 7:30 p.m. Fondren Theatre Workshop presents vocal performances of Broadway tunes by local women from past metro-area theater productions. Cash bar. Proceeds benefit CONTACT the Crisis Line. Seating limited. $25; call 601-982-2217. Red, White and Jackson June 30. From 11 a.m1 p.m. at Smith Park (302 Amite St.), enjoy free food and music by Faze 4. From 7-9 p.m. at the Old Capitol Green (S. State St.), come for tours of the Old Capitol Museum, crafts, space jumps, food from local vendors, entertainment from the First Baptist Church of Jackson, a reptile exhibit and fireworks. Free; call 601-948-7575. Sun Salutation Training Sessions July 6-30. Learn to do sun salutations in preparation for the Yoga for Non-violence fundraiser for the Center for Violence Prevention Aug. 6. Participating yoga studios include Butterfly Yoga (3025 N. State St., 601-594-2313), Joyflow Yoga (7048 Old Canton Road, 601-613-4317), Mat Work Yoga and Pilates Club (408 Monroe St., Clinton, 601-6246356), Northeast YMCA (5062 Interstate 55 N., 601-709-3760) and StudiOm Yoga (665 Duling Ave., 601-209-6325). Times vary; call for details. Free; call 601-500-0337 or 601-932-4198. An Evening with Zac Harmon July 7, 7 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in the F.D. Hall Music Center Auditorium. The bluesman performs in honor of the late Margaret Walker’s birthday. Proceeds benefit the Margaret Walker Center. $30; call 601-979-2055. Seventh Annual JFP Chick Ball July 9, 6 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). This fundraising event benefits the Center for Violence Prevention’s programs in nearby rural areas. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. More details: jfpchickball.com and follow on Twitter @jfpchickball. Get involved, volunteer, donate art, money and gifts at chickball@ jacksonfreepress.com. Be a sponsor for as low as $50. $5 cover; call 601-362-6121, ext. 16. Mississippi Happening. Guaqueta Productions hosts the monthly broadcast, which features a special musical guest. Download free podcasts at mississippihappening.com.

June 22 - 28, 2011

COMMUNITY

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Business Owner Workshops through June 25, at Jackson Community Design Center (509 E. Capitol St.) unless otherwise indicated. The Jackson Business Accelerator Collaboration sponsors a series of workshops for prospective, new and current business owners. Free; call 601-540-5415. • June 22, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Dominic DeLeo presents “Practical Skills for the Hardworking Business Owner,” “Real-world Professional Development” and “Hiring, Firing and Supervising a Staff.” • June 25, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., speaker and topic to be announced. “History Is Lunch” June 22, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Historian Ed Payne presents “Ancestors in Blue: Piney Woods Enlistees in the First New

“Roadmap to Homeownership” Housing Fair June 23, 1 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Talk with housing and finance experts about buying a home, cleaning up your credit, avoiding foreclosure and energy efficiency. Free; call 601-982-8467. Crystal Springs Tomato Festival June 24-25, in downtown Crystal Springs. The “Peace, Love and Tomatoes” festival is at 6 p.m. June 24 and 9 a.m. June 25. June 24 events include the Tomato Queen contest, a barbecue and a street dance. June 25 events include a 5K run/walk, the Kiddie Parade, the Bike Rally Poker Run, hot air balloons, a farmers market, an art gallery, a tomato museum, food and music. Call 601-892-2711. Precinct 4 COPS Meeting June 24, 6 p.m., at Redeemer Church (640 E. Northside Drive). These monthly forums are designed to help resolve community issues. Call 601-960-0004. Open House and Latin Party June 24, 7:30 p.m., at Lingofest Language Center (7048 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland). Enjoy music and refreshments, and learn more about Lingofest’s Spanish classes. Free; call 601-500-7700. Porsches and Coffee Breakfast June 25, 8:30 a.m., at Broad Street (4465 Interstate 55 N.). The Magnolia Region Porsche Club of America meets the last Saturday of each month. Prospective members welcome. Email magown@yahoo.com. Homebuyer Education Class June 25, 9 a.m., at Jackson Housing Authority (2747 Livingston Road). The class covers topics such as personal finances, home inspections, and the role of lenders and real estate agents. The class is required to qualify for a Jackson Housing Authority loan. Registration required. Free; call 601-362-0885, ext. 115. Politix in the Park June 25, 11 a.m., at Koinonia Coffee House (136 S. Adams St., Suite C). The bipartisan event allows the community to meet current political candidates for county and state offices. Also enjoy space jumps, snow cones, cotton candy, free barbecue and music by Mix or Die DJs. No grills or coolers allowed. Free; call 601-960-3008. The Next Big Event June 25, 6 p.m., at Rikki’s Coffee and Snack Shop (4576 Highway 80 W.). Minority Business Network is the sponsor. Small and minority business owners, and future entrepreneurs are welcome to promote their business or next events. Bring business cards, brochures and other promotional materials. Refreshments and door prizes included. RSVP. $5; call 601-750-2367 or 601-316-5092. Camp WILD, Grades 4-5 June 27-30, at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Campers participate in indoor and outdoor activities that focus on Mississippi’s ecosystems, and learn about the identification, collection and conservation of indigenous species. Hours are 9 a.m.-noon. $140, $115 members; call 601-354-7303. Storytelling with Autumn MorningStar June 27, 10 a.m., at Madison Public Library (994 Madison Ave., Madison), and 2 p.m., at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). MorningStar is a Native American magician and storyteller. Free; call 601-856-4536. Mississippi Main Street Association Awards Luncheon June 28, 10:30 a.m., at Old Capitol Inn (226 N State St.). MMSA members receive awards in several categories. Bid at the silent auction before the luncheon; proceeds benefit the Charles O. Beasley Scholarship Fund, awarded annually to a Main Street manager. $40; call 601-944-0113. An Evening in the Garden June 28, 6:30 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Enjoy a guided tour of the library’s new Learning Garden and gardening activities. Refreshments served. Call 601-932-2562.

Mindful Spirit Expo

I

by Alexis Goodman

ntuitive Encounters, an organization whose motto is, “loving your whole self,” will host the Mindful Spirit Expo in Jackson June 25. Billed as Jackson’s premier mind, body and soul expo, the intent of the event is to expand ideas about taking care of one’self and learning to live joyfully. The schedule is packed with exhibitors who provide services such as intuitive counseling, life and business coaching, massage therapy, acupuncture, yoga and more. Guest speakers will bring insight to their topics of spiritual calming such as Reiki and heart-centered healing. Essential oils, crystals, inspirational art, herbal body-care products and more are available for purchase. Jamie Roth, author and intuitive counselor, is speaking on the Reiki technique and her new book, “General Manager of Your Universe” (September Dawn, 2011, $11.95) She will be available for individual sessions during the expo. Sunday, June 26, medical intuitive specialist Patti Conklin will appear following the expo. Visit patticonklin.com for more information. The Mindful Spirit Expo is 10 a.m.-6 p.m. June 25 and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. June 26 at the Mississippi School of Therapeutic Massage (1935-A Lakeland Drive). The cost is $10 for a weekend pass to exhibitors only; $20 for speakers only; $25 for both. Visit intuitiveencounters.com.

FILE PHOTO

Radio JFP on WLEZ, Thursdays from noon1 p.m., at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from noon-1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. This week’s guest is Deirdre Danahar of InMotion Consulting and Coaching, who will discuss the June 25-26 Mindful Spirit Expo. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Listen to podcasts of all shows at jfpradio.com. Call 601-3626121, ext. 17.

Orleans Infantry.” Bring a lunch; coffee/water provided. Free; call 601-576-6998.

WELLNESS Anusara Yoga Immersion, Part 2, at Butterfly Yoga (3025 N. State St.). The course is part of the Anusara teacher-training program. Sessions are Thursdays from 5:30-8 p.m. June 23-July 21, June 25-26 and July 16-17. $500; call 601-594-2313. Mississippi Department of Insurance Town Hall Meetings June 23. The topic is the creation of Mississippi’s Health Insurance Exchange. Call 601-359-2012. • 8:30 a.m., Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). • 12:30 p.m., Hinds Community College, Muse Center (3805 Highway 80 E., Pearl). • 5:30 p.m., South Pointe Business Park (500 Clinton Center Drive, Clinton). “I’m Good” Health Awareness Block Party June 23, 5:30 p.m., at Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center (3502 W. Northside Dr.). The event includes free STI screenings for females ages 15-26, giveaways, refreshments, a fashion show and music by Recognition, Lou Writer and DJ T-Money. Free; call 601-362-5321. Mental Health Research Conference Call for Abstracts through July 15. The theme is “Innovative Mental Health Services: Building Relationships and Strengthening Diverse Communities.” Social workers, mental health professionals and students may participate. Abstracts must be 500 words or less, doublespaced and submitted in Microsoft Word by July 15. Accepted presentations will be published in conference proceedings for the Oct. 6-7 event. E-mail smhart@jsums.edu. Jackson Inner-city Gardeners Call for Volunteers through Aug. 30. JIG needs volunteers to help maintain plots and harvest vegetables. The produce will be donated to help feed the homeless and elderly and sold to the community at affordable prices. The garden is at the corner of W. Northside Drive and Medgar Evers Boulevard beside the BP gas station. Volunteers can help Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30-7:30 p.m., and Saturdays from 8-11 a.m. JIG sells produce at the garden Saturdays from 8:30 a.m.-noon. Call 601-924-3539.

FARMERS MARKETS Byram Farmers Market (20 Willow Creek Lane, Byram), through Oct. 29. The market is open Monday-Saturday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Products include fresh produce, wildflower honey, roasted peanuts, jams, jellies, birdhouses, baskets and gourds for crafting. Call 601-373-4545.

Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.), through Dec. 17. The market is open 8 a.m.2 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Call 601-354-6573. Jackson Roadmap to Health Equity Project’s Farmers’ Market (2548 Livingston Road) through Dec. 17. Buy from a wide selection of fresh produce. WIC vouchers accepted. Hours are 9-6 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Free admission; call 601-987-6783. Old Fannin Road Farmers’ Market (1307 Old Fannin Road, Brandon), through Dec. 24. Farmers sell produce Monday-Saturday from 8 a.m.-7 p.m. and noon-6 p.m. Sunday. Call 601-919-1690.

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856. • “Don Pasquale” June 22, 6:30 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera’s production of Donizetti’s classic opera is part of the Live in HD Summer Encores movie series. $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children. • “Dudamel: Let the Children Play” June 23, 7 p.m. In the film, Gustavo Dudamel, director and conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, leads the journey through the stories of young people experiencing the joy of music throughout the world. $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children. • “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” June 28, 7 p.m. See the extended edition of the film, which includes an introduction by director Peter Jackson from the set of his next film, “The Hobbit.” $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children. Events at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). Call Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000. • Jeff Dunham June 23, 7:30 p.m. The comedian and ventriloquist performs on his “Identity Crisis” tour. $43.50. • Caged in the Coliseum June 25, 7 p.m. Psychout Productions presents cage matches between Houston Alexander and Brian Albin, Jerrett Becks and Paul McAdams, and 13 other fights. $25, $35. Fairy Tale Theatre June 24-26, at Vicksburg Theatre Guild/Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). Children ages 7-18 perform. Show times are 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. June 23-24, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. June 25, and 2 p.m. June 26. Group rates for the 10 a.m. shows are available. $6, $4 children 12 and under; call 601-636-0471.


jfpevents “Vengeance Is the Lord” Dinner Theater June 25, 7 p.m., at CrossRoads International House of Worship (4085 Northview Drive), in the House of Joy. Sandra Howard and Company presents the play about a family dealing with a tragedy that challenges their faith. Limited seating. $20; call 601-906-2713. “Incompatible with Christian Teaching” Film Screening June 26, 7 p.m., at Broadmeadow United Methodist Church (4419 Broadmeadow Drive). Anne P. Brown’s documentary is about Methodists advocating change in the United Methodist Church’s policies regarding homosexuality. A question-and-answer session follows the screening. Free; email dreammississippi@gmail.com.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS “The Ranger” June 23, 5 p.m., at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Ace Atkins signs copies of his book; reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.95 book; call 601-366-7619. Southern Writers Group Meeting June 23, 6:30 p.m., at G. Chastaine Flynt Memorial Library (103 Winners Circle). Writers and aspiring writers meet on fourth Thursdays to share and discuss writing and publishing. Free; call 601-919-1911.

CREATIVE CLASSES Free Beginner Clogging Lesson June 23, 6 p.m., at Dance Unlimited Studio (6787 S. Siwell Road, Byram). The Mississippi Explosion Clogging Crew offers the class. Cyndi Spikes in the instructor. Free; call 769-610-4304. Powder Horn Class June 24-25 and July 8-9, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Walter Mabry is the instructor. Materials included. $250; call 601-856-7546. Cupcakes and Cake Balls June 26, 1 p.m., at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). In the five-hour workshop, learn how to make, bake and decorate cupcakes with buttercream frosting, cream cheese frosting and fondant. $135; call 601-898-8345. Young Artists Summer Camp, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Participants ages 8-10 explore art techniques and terms, learn the workings of the museum and exhibit their artwork. Sessions are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. June 27-July 1, July 1115 and July 25-29. $240 per week, $225 members; call 601-960-1515.

Shut Up and Write! at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Sign up for the workshop series of JFP Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd’s popular non-fiction and creative writing classes starting this fall. Gift certificates available. Fee and non-refundable deposit to be announced (includes materials); call 601-362-6121, ext. 16.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Events at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Call 601-960-1557. • Gallery Talk with LaRita Smith June 25-26, 2-4 p.m. Smith offers tours of the galleries, tells stories, answers questions and elaborates on selected pieces from her exhibit. Free. • Storytellers Ball Juried Exhibition Call for Entries through July 15. The exhibition theme is “Material World.” Artwork related to the 1980s is acceptable. Artists may submit up to three 2D and 3D pieces (excluding videos) through July 15 for display from Aug. 4-21. The opening reception is Aug. 4 from 6-8 p.m. Winners receive cash prizes and two tickets to the Storytellers Ball Aug. 11. $25 entry fee. Ceramics Showcase Call for Art, at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). The gallery is looking for pieces to display in the annual Mississippi Ceramics Showcase beginning July 8. Submit up to five works via separate emails to jonathan@weltycommons.com by attaching an image and including a title, the size and the media used. June 30 is the deadline. Submitters are encouraged to schedule a lecture and demonstration for their work. Call 601-352-3399.

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Art Exhibit through June 30, at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). See glass works by Donna Davis, and artwork by clients of Mississippi State Hospital and Jaquith Nursing Home. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. Free; call 601-432-4056. “Whimsy” Exhibit through June 30, at Cups in Clinton (101 W. Main St., Clinton). See works by Elizabeth Bennett. Free; call 601-924-4952. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE Call for Charity Garage Sale Donations through July 2, at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Gently used items are welcome. Drop off donations during a scheduled class or call to schedule a pick-up. The garage sale is July 2 from 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Proceeds benefit Bethel Junior Center and Mountain Child. Donations welcome; call 601-213-6355. Summer Reading Workshops through July 3. Designed to help students and their parents with JPS mandatory summer reading assignments, United Way’s workshops are held throughout the summer at area libraries. Workshops are offered for every grade. Go to myunitedway.com or dial 211 for a schedule and locations. Volunteers needed. Call 601-948-4725. JPS Summer Feeding Program through July 15. The JPS Food Service Department serves meals to youth ages 18 and younger at 11 a.m. weekdays, excluding July 4, at 13 JPS schools. Call for a list of locations. Free; call 601-960-8911.

CARA Recycling Program, at Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (960 N. Flag Chapel Road). Community Animal Rescue and Adoption, Mississippi’s largest no-kill animal shelter, is earning cash for operating expenses by participating in the FundingFactory Recycling Program. They are collecting empty laser or toner cartridges and used cellphones from the community and sending the waste products to FundingFactory in exchange for cash. Donations welcome; email sadiecat17@comcast.net. NAMIWalks Registration through Nov. 5, at NAMI Mississippi (411 Briarwood Drive, Suite 401). NAMIWalks is an annual walk to raise funds for NAMI Mississippi, a local branch of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. NAMI is a nonprofit, grassroots organization dedicated to providing support, education and advocacy for consumers of mental health services and their family members. Visit namims.org to join an existing team, form a new team, walk as an individual or become a sponsor. Each team member who raises at least $100 will receive a T-shirt. Donations welcome; call 601-899-9058.

jacksonfreepress.com

Summer Feeding Program through July 28, at Kingdom Faith Ministry (1036 S. McRaven Road). The program for youth ages 18 and younger includes breakfast at 8 a.m. and lunch at 11 a.m. on weekdays, excluding July 4. Free; call 601-922-1155.

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Randy Watkins, former PGA Tour member, shows his form as he tees off.

G

olf is the one sport I have a love-hate relationship with. If you have never played golf, I will try to put that in perspective for you. Golf is like the ex-girlfriend that got away. You learn she is back in town, and all you can remember is the good times you had together. Those wonderful memories make you want to start the doomed relationship all over again. At the start of a retread relationship with golf, I remember everything I love about the game: the fresh air, time with friends and that first tee shot. Then, slowly and inevitably, all the old problems that doomed that relationship the first time arise: Hooks or sliced shots off the tee, sand bunkers, the rough and water all come back, like all the fights in that old relationship. Just when I want to walk away, it happens. I hit the perfect tee shot, the great chip onto the green or sink a long putt. Magically, I forget all the bad fights and remember why I fell in love in the first place, even though I know it will end badly. Leaving the course, I remember the one shot that went my way. It’s like that one moment that made me fall in love with that woman the first time. Even with that love-hate relationship, I know I will play golf again if invited. I started playing golf when I lived in Hattiesburg in the early 2000s, but I did not know what the courses in Jackson were like. So I sought out a person with the knowledge I lacked. Turns out, a former PGA Tour member and Viking Classic tournament director, Randy Watkins, was the man to get the dish on golf in Mississippi. Watkins grew up in northeast Jackson and joined the PGA Tour in the 1980s. After his playing career was over, he came home to build and manage courses in the Jackson area. “Golf is a sport you can play forever, man or woman,” Watkins said. “Playing golf is great exercise, especially if you walk 18 holes.” Trust me, I have walked 18 holes like a PGA player, and I was so tired that I needed a nap halfway through. Still, it’s a good way to enjoy nature and play at the same time.

Because I had only played public courses, I asked Watkins about the difference between public and private courses. “There are several good public courses in Mississippi,” he said. “All the state parks that have courses—Sardis, Jackson, Grenada and McComb—are wonderful places to play.” Watkins was referring to courses at Mississippi State parks: LeFleur’s Bluff in Jackson, Quail Hollow in McComb, Mallard Pointe in Sardis and The Dogwoods in Gernada. “Also, there are very nice municipal and public courses in Jackson and Flowood area,” he said. “Public courses offer better access to the game, are less expensive, and golfers are not encumbered with memberships or dues.” Watkins said private courses are part of a lifestyle and a place to network. “People who live around and join private golf courses commune with neighbors and often have cookouts and parties together,” he said. “Private courses also offer lessons, clinics and tournaments.” Golf, if you have never played, is the one sport where players are supposed to call penalties on themselves. It would be like an offensive lineman throwing a flag on himself every time he held a player, or a basketball player calling a foul on himself. In no other sport do you police yourself like you do in golf. That makes golf unusual as a sport. It is also a cruel sport. Watching the Masters in April, I could feel for Rory McIlroy who collapsed in his final round. If you never played golf, you might not understand. Golf only allows you to grab greatness for a short time. You have to make the most of it before the golf gods feel you have had enough and take away that greatness. If you’re new in town and interested in playing a round of golf in the Jackson area, ask friends or co-workers for their recommendations. If you are just learning the game, try to play during the week so you do not hold up play. Always allow fast groups to play through, and remember to follow all course rules. Golf can be fun for any skill level or great for spending time with friends. But remember: I warned you about the love-hate relationship. I can just picture my old girlfriend now. Public and Municipal Golf Courses Eagle Ridge Golf Course Highway 18 S., Hinds Community College, Raymond, 601-857-5993 Grove Park Golf Course 1800 Walter Welch Drive, 601-960-2074 Le Fleurs Bluff Golf Course 1225 Lakeland Drive, 601-362-5485 Live Oaks Golf Club 11200 Highway 49 N., 601-982-1231 Patrick Farms Golf Club 300 Clubhouse Drive, 601-664-0304 Pearl Municipal Golf Course 1001 Center City Drive, Pearl, 601-932-3562 The Refuge 2100 Refuge Blvd., Flowood, 601-664-1414 Sonny Guy Municipal Golf Course 3200 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave., 601-960-1905


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38

ANDREW DUNAWAY

dining

#USTOMER3ERVICE2EP

by Andrew Dunaway

Cooking With Love

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hen it comes to soul food, homestyle and country cooking, Jackson has a corner on the market. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re never more than a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw from a plate of fresh vegetables and lovingly cooked mains. Nowhere is that more true than on Terry Road. Under a faded, colorful, sign sits Collins Dream Kitchen (1439 Terry Road, 601-353-3845). Sylvester Collins has been cooking professionally for about 40 years. Before opening her establishment, Sylvester Collins cut her teeth in the food-service industry working 14 years as the kitchen manager at a Sack â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Save, then 10 years at Collins Carry Out and 15 years at her Dream Kitchen. Collins Dream Kitchen is a landmark, running the gamut from crackling bread and fried chicken to red beans and sausage as well as soul spaghetti. Everything is cooked with care and love. Where did you learn to cook? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just like a gift from God. I always loved cooking. My mother had six kids and I was the oldest, so I used to do a lot of cooking at home. How did you go from cooking at home to cooking professionally? I was the sole supporter of my kids and I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t making enough money to take care of them, despite working three jobs. I had a dream Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d come in on my own so thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where I really started. Did anyone inspire you to do this? Really nobody. I started off small, very, very small. Everything was carry out. We just had a little front with a little, small kitchen on Ellis Avenue. Everything was to go. Then I decided to move where (the customers) could sit down. Since youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been cooking your whole life, what is the first recipe you mastered? Oh, I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really say because I always just cooked, and it came off the top of my head. I hardly ever measure anything.

What would you consider to be your cooking style? Home-style, but right now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to cook healthier. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not putting bacon drips in the food. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not putting pork in there. We have pork on the menu, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re keeping it to the side. How often does your menu change? Every day, but we have certain items that are mainstays. Some of our customer favorites like red beans and rice, spaghetti and meat sauce, and bacon-fried chicken are available every day. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of your favorites? I would say my favorite recipe is the beef casserole. I make it with noodles, cheese and corn. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of a Mexican style. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen you featured before in John T. Edgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Southern Bellyâ&#x20AC;? for your soul spaghetti. Oh, yeah; everybody loves spaghetti. Did you notice any change after your soul spaghetti was featured in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Southern Belly?â&#x20AC;? Yes, a lot of people came in asking for it. One little old lady ... saw it in an airline magazine, and she wanted the spaghetti.

Sylvester Collins, owner of Collins Dream Kitchen, has filled Jackson bellies for 15 years.

What makes your spaghetti so special? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know why people love it. Maybe the way itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prepared? I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if you have some special ingredient to it. Something Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather not say. What is your most invaluable kitchen tip? One thing I learned is that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to really cook with love in order for it to come out right. You just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t throw something together. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to love what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing. What is one piece of advice you would give anyone who wants to cook professionally? Be sure thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what you really want to do ... itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real hard job. There are no easy roads. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have a lot of ups and downs, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have problems hiring good, dependable help and trustworthy people.

SYLVESTER COLLINSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BEEF CASSEROLE 1 pound ground beef 2 stalks of celery, chopped 1 large green bell pepper, chopped 1 large onion, chopped Garlic to taste 1 pound cooked egg noodles 1 10.5-ounce can of cream of mushroom soup 1 15.5-ounce can of whole corn kernels 1 10-ounce can of Rotel tomatoes 1 8-ounce can of tomato sauce 1 6-ounce can of black pitted olives 1 4-ounce can of sliced button mushrooms 1/2 cup Velveeta cheese 1/2 cup grated mozzarella cheese

1/2 cup granted cheddar cheese

SautĂŠ the bell pepper, onions, celery, garlic and ground beef until well browned. Add the corn, Rotel tomatoes and tomato sauce. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and let simmer to allow the flavors to meld. Add the cooked egg noodles and the Velveeta cheese and stir to combine. Add grated mozzarella and cheddar cheese and pour into sauce pan. Bake in a 350 degree oven until hot. Serves four.


5A44 FX5X

%*/&+BDLTPO Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

MEXICAN

Tres Amigos (3716 I-55 North, 601-487-8370) All your favorites including nachos, fajitas, chalupas, carnitas, flautas, chimichanga, quesadillas and more. Steak, Seafood, Chicken and Vegetarian options, along with great prices on combinations dinners and ala carte dinners.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar complete with multiple televisions for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rockyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;polished casualâ&#x20AC;? dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino.

NOW OPEN Next to Tullos Chiropractic ÂĄLunch Specials Served Everyday! Mon-Sat | 11-2 & 4-10 3716 I-55 N Jackson, Ms phone: 601-487-8370 fax: 601-487-8371

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Butts in Townâ&#x20AC;? features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A â&#x20AC;&#x153;very high class pig stand,â&#x20AC;? Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie. Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Rd. Jackson 866-906-0942) Specializing in smoked barbeque, Lumpkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers all your favorites for on-site family dining or for catered events, including reunions, office events, annivesaries, weddings and more.

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Ceramiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license! Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (910 Lake Harbour, Ridgeland, 601-956-2929) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Authentic, homey, unpretentiousâ&#x20AC;? thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how the regulars describe Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, a staple in Jackson for years, offering great Italian favorites with loving care. The tiramisu is a must-have!

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Petra CafĂŠ (2741 Old Canton Road, 601-925-0016) Mediterranean and Lebanese Cuisine. Everything from Stuffed Grape Leaves, to Spinach Pie, Shrimp Kabobs, Greek Salads, Hummus and more. Now Open in Fondren! Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends. Kristos (971 Madison Ave @ Hwy 51, Madison, 601-605-2266) Home of the famous Greek meatball! Hummus, falafel, dolmas, pita sandwiches, salads, plus seasoned curly fries (or sweet potato fries) and amazing desserts. Mezza (1896 Main St., Suite A, Madison 601-853-0876) Mediterranean cuisine and wood fired brick oven pizzas. Come experience the beautiful patio, Hookahs, and delicious food. Beer is offered and you are welcome to bring your own wine. Vasilios (828 Hwy 51 in Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic Greek dining featuring fresh seafood daily along with gyros, greek salads, appetizers and signature Mediterranean desserts. Their redfish is a standout, earning rave reviews.

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-12AM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

VASILIOS

601-956-5040

AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

Open daily 11 am-2 pm and 5-10 pm for dinner

All You Can Eat

â&#x20AC;˘ Fresh Seafood Daily

CRAB LEGS DINNER 5p.m.-Close Tues-Thurs

M-F ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď?Ą-ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď?°, ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;-ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď?° Sď?Ąď?´ ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;-ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď?° Cď?Ąď?˛ď?˛ď?šď?Żď?ľď?´ Aď?śď?Ąď?Šď?Źď?Ąď?˘ď?Źď?Ľ

ď&#x2122;&#x2030;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x201E;.ď&#x2122;&#x2039;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x2020;.ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2039; | ď&#x2122;&#x2039;ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2039; Hď?ˇď?šď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x201E; Mď?Ąď?¤ď?Šď?łď?Żď?Ž

Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

By popular demand, we have added Shrimp Scampi to our menu!

Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

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jacksonfreepress.com

ITALIAN

Super Card

6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (1220 N State St. 601-352-2001) 2009 and 2010 and 2011â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the local favorite: fried ravioli. Best Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks... and a grown-up vibe.

JSU

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Wired Espresso CafĂŠ (115 N State St 601-500-7800) This downtown coffeehouse is a true gathering place, featuring great coffee and a selection of breakfast, lunch and pastry items. Wi-fi.

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39


June 22 - 28, 2011

40

Capital City Beverages distributed by

M I S S I S S I P P I â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S C O M P L E T E B E E R S O U RC E

Ask for these beers at stores and restaurants in Central Mississippi. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find these beers? Call 601-956-2224 for more information.


Paid advertising section.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Stamps Superburgers (1801 Dalton Street 601-352-4555) Huge burgers will keep you full until the next day! The homestyle fries are always fresh. Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Poets Two (1855 Lakeland Drive, Suite H-10, 601-364-9411) Pub fare at its finest. Crabcake minis, fried dills, wings, poppers, ultimate fries, sandwiches, po-boys, pasta entrees and steak. The signature burgers come in bison, kobe, beef or turkey! Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing wings in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

ASIAN

Thanks For Voting Us BEST FRENCH FRIES IN JACKSON!

2003-2011, Best of Jackson Jackson

1801 Dalton Street (601) 352-4555

Byram

5752 Terry Road (601) 376-0081

Monday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.

SUNDAY BRUNCH

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977

Lunch: Fri. & Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Daily Lunch Specials - $9

Daily Lunch Specials $9

Happy Hour Everyday 4pm-7pm

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces.

LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR

SOUTHERN CUISINE

2-FOR-1, YOU CALL IT!

Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) 2010 Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a sumptious buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of four homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution featuring a full breakfast, blue-plate specials, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys and wraps. Save room for something from their famous bakery! For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Mmmm... Bagels. Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

Sunday - Thursday 10pm - 12am

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

Try The

(a very high-class pig stand)

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant.

Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street • Madison, MS • 601.853.8538

jacksonfreepress.com

%*/&+BDLTPO

41


The Tribal Trend

If there is something you’d like to see on our FLY page, tell us on Twitter @FlyJFP.

by Meredith W. Sullivan

F

ashion watchers spotted Ikats and Aztecs all over the Spring/Summer 2011 runways, and Jackson has definitely caught on to this tribal trend. A little bit boho, a little bit south-ofthe-border, you should certainly work these easy-to-wear pieces into your summer look.

Abbott Jewelry turquoise earrings, The Shoebar at Pieces, $30 Gryphon Sunshine shorts, 4450, $300

Foley & Corina clutch, 4450, $384

VLP wrap bracelet, The Shoebar at Pieces, $40

Chan Luu beaded bracelet, 4450, $345 Stripe Mission dress, Migi’s $42.99

Antik Batik Kiss Spartiates sandals, Blithe & Vine, $211

Aztec top, W by AZ Well, $29.99

Long multicolor tank, W by AZ Well, $34.99

Smock jumpsuit, Migi’s, $86.99

Patterson J. Kincaid tank, 4450, $145

NASH(dash)BECK feather earring, The Shoebar at Pieces, $35

Where2Shop:

4450, 4450 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-3687; Blithe and Vine, 2906 N. State St., 601427-3322; Migi’s, 131 Market St., Flowood, 601-919-8203; The Shoebar at Pieces, 425 Mitchell Ave., 601-939-5203; W by AZ Well, 132 Market St., Flowood, 601-992-1661

SHOPPING SPECIALS

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com.

Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, 601-898-8345) Parents & Kids Magazine 2011 summer day camp family favorites. Mention the Facebook post for $50 off kids or teens summer camps.

Tangle Boutique and Salon (607 Duling Ave., 601-987-0123) Something old is new again. Lockets ranging from $109-$260 make a classy gift for that special lady in your life.

The Green Room in Fondren (3026 N. State St., 601-981-9320) Huge sale! Everything in the store is under $30. All eco-friendly clothes and accessories.

Candy’s Confections (1149 Old Fannin Road, Suite 7, Brandon, 601992-9623) Get a sweet birthday cake for your special little one’s summer party. Custom cakes made to order. See photos at www.fatcakeguy.com.

June 22 -28, 2011

Old House Depot (639 Monroe St., 601-592-6200) Ahoy, Matey! New arrivals of all sorts in the store.

Beaded belt, Migi’s, $26.99

42

Check out flyjfp.com for information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


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v9n41 - The Music Issue