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May 11 - 17, 2011


May 11 - 17, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

9 N O . 35

contents ADAM LYNCH

JERRICK SMITH

8 A $4M Flood Study McGowan Partners non-profit says it’ll foot half the $4 million study bill for a lake plan. KRISTIN BRENEMEN

Cover photograph of Kennedy Elizabeth Smothers by Kristin Brenemen.

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THIS ISSUE:

Are geniuses made or born? What if your kid is at risk? Adoption and more family-centered info.

marie owen

27 Imagination Revived FIGMENT Jackson, a totally non-commercial and interactive art event, happens this weekend.

38 Summer Simple Providing a hearty meal in the summer doesn’t mean working for hours in the kitchen.

jacksonfreepress.com

The Jackson group of 15 people actively searches for sites to build a community. In April, Owen brought architects Charles Durrett and Katie McCamant, the foremost experts on co-housing, to Jackson to speak and lead a workshop titled “Intentionally Building Community.” The workshop broke down the logistics such as finances and making group decisions. On the last day, the group toured potential co-housing sites in downtown Jackson and the surrounding areas. About 70 people attended the lecture, and 15 attended the workshop. “(The Jackson group) likes knowing their neighbors. They want to build a neighborhood that’s interesting and fun, but safe and economically feasible, sustainable and environmentally conscious,” Owen says. “But more than that, they want to have fun.” Owen envisions numerous co-housing developments in Jackson and across the state of Mississippi. Co-housing communities often revitalize neighborhoods and create a place where neighbors sit down and have dinner together, host events and become more like family members. When she’s not designing or creating Mississippi’s first official co-housing community, Owen loves to read, knit, go to the movies and teach yoga to a group in her neighborhood. She is also the chairwoman of worship at Broadmeadow Methodist Church. — Lauren Fredman

FILE PHOTO

Marie Owen wants to create a greater sense of community between her neighbors and the rest of the city through the concept of co-housing. Owen, 62, a freelance graphic designer, went to Murrah High School and attended college at the University of Southern Mississippi before living in California and Texas. After graduating, she returned to Jackson 32 years ago. She now creates logos and brochures for businesses in Jackson. The Jackson native learned about cohousing from a 2009 USA Today article. A co-housing community is a group of houses or a neighborhood built with the intention of creating a collaborative community. The concept came from Denmark about 20 years ago. Today, North America has about 120 co-housing communities. “(A co-housing neighborhood) is a neighborhood that’s turned inside out. Our neighborhoods now are built for cars, not people,” Owen says. “What you see are garages; you don’t see your neighbors. Co-housing neighborhoods have cars on the outside and houses that face inside with sidewalks, courtyards, gardens and playgrounds.” Owen and her sister Hilda Owen attended the Cohousing Conference 2010 in Boulder, Colo., last June, and started laying the groundwork to form a co-housing community in Jackson. Over the past year, the pair has hosted formal meetings and socials to educate Jacksonians about the concept.

ANIMUS COLLECTIVE

4 ............. Editor’s Note 4 ................... Slowpoke 6 ........................... Talks 12 ................... Editorial 12 ................. Kamikaze 12 ..................... Stiggers 12 ......................... Zuga 13 ................... Opinion 27 ................ Diversions 28 ...................... 8 Days 30 ............... JFP Events 33 ....................... Music 34 ......... Music Listings 37 .................. Astrology 37 ...................... Puzzles 38 ......................... Food 42 ..... Shopping Guide

Families and Kids

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editor’snote

Kristin Brenemen Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with penchant for dystopianism. Her Zombie Survival Kit has been upgraded with a new sonic screwdriver. She designed the cover and many pages in this issue.

Lacey McLaughlin News editor Lacey McLaughlin is a Florida native who enjoys riding her bike around Jackson. She is always on the hunt for news tips. Email lacey@ jacksonfreepress.com or call 601.362.6121 x. 22. She wrote GOOD and Arts features.

Valerie Wells Valerie Wells is assistant editor of the JFP and BOOM Jackson. She’s interested in covering the media in Mississippi and figuring out who controls the news. Email ideas to valerie@ jacksonfreepress.com. She wrote GOOD features.

Latasha Willis Events editor Latasha Willis is a native Jacksonian, a graduate of Tougaloo College and the proud mother of one cat. Her JFP blog is “The Bricks That Others Throw,” and she sells design pieces at zazzle.com/reasontolive. She wrote a GOOD feature.

Lauren Fredman Lauren Fredman is a Missouri School of Journalism graduate and an education fellow for the Institute of Southern Jewish Life. She enjoys spending time outdoors, doing arts and crafts, reading and spending time with friends. She wrote the Jacksonian.

Tim Roberson Tim Roberson is a Jackson native and graduate of the University of Mississippi. He is the editor of the digital music magazine, Play Music City and the owner of Light Bulb Writing Studio in Jackson. He interviewed Better Than Ezra.

Meredith W. Sullivan Former New Yorker Meredith W. Sullivan is a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology. She spends her days dreaming about where to travel next. She is enjoying life in Fondren with her husband and Diggy dog. She coordinated the FLY page.

May 11 - 17, 2011

Ashley Jackson

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Account executive Ashley Jackson is a Brandon native. She loves volunteering with youth, cooking, doing homework, wearing awesome shoes and dancing like a fool while playing her extensive vinyl collection.

by Ronni Mott, Managing Editor

Thanks for Brooklyn

F

rom my 6- and 7-year-old vantage point, being a kid in Brooklyn, N.Y., was just about perfect. In the few blocks between my house and school, I walked past an array of houses, apartment buildings, and little stores and offices with big glass windows. Holding my mama’s hand, I walked under subway trestles so loud I had to cover my ears and scrunch my whole face shut when a train clattered by overhead. Every sidewalk had spaces carved out for trees, the roots of the older ones pushing up the concrete in sharpedged cracks. Many stores had metal doors to storage basements set into the sidewalks that, when open, always looked to me like passages to secret underworlds. I was happy to see them closed and padlocked, and took great care never to walk across them. In fair weather, everyone was outside, sitting on stairs or painted stoops or folding chairs, playing checkers or gossiping from window ledges in German or Yiddish or English. Kids bounced balls in alleys and jumped through chalked hopscotch grids or tightened roller skates around sneakers and tried not to get tripped by sidewalk cracks. The candy-store owner seemed to know all the kids and their parents, if not by name, by sight. Good customers occasionally got an extra penny’s worth of sugary pastel dots stuck on big paper rolls, leaving our fingers and chins all sticky and sweet. Winter snowstorms brought out thick parkas, boots, mittens and hats, leaving only our noses and eyes peeking out. The snow muffled every sound except that “whift, whift” noise my arms made against the shell of my parka, and the crunch of a first step into untouched snow. We’d stay out until our lips were blue, and we were stiff with ice, then mama would fuss at the mess we made as we melted and puddled inside the front door, shivering. I’ll admit it: Looking at life from 3 feet off the ground can be idyllic. I didn’t have to deal with traffic or parking. I still bounced when I fell on the ice or tripped on concrete. The high cost of city real estate didn’t bother me. No one ever threatened to abduct me, even when I went around the block to get milk or batteries with a dollar or two clutched extra-tight in my fist so it wouldn’t fly away. Talk about adventure! It seemed everyone knew one another, and always, always someone was looking out and watching over the kids. These days, neighborhoods like my childhood Brooklyn would be called “mixeduse.” My family lived in a duplex, but across the street and around the corner, lots of folks lived in apartments over green grocers, hardware, music and bookstores, the occasional laundromat or barbershop, and maybe a pizza joint on the corner. It seemed we could get just about everything we needed within walking distance. I remember apartment buildings next to churches next to public schools. Cities grew up around neighborhoods. Before America became a suburban car cul-

ture, if you didn’t live in a city, you either had money or you were connected to the land in some way, farming or ranching or supporting those activities. It might seem like we’ve always had suburbs, but they are a modern phenomenon, less than 70 years in the making. By the late 1960s, urban architecture was heavily influenced by abstract art, most notably that of Piet Mondrian and urban planner Le Corbusier, who enthusiastically embraced abstract forms and industrial design. “Architecture has for its first duty, in this period of renewal, that of bringing about a revision of values, a revision of the constituent elements of the house. We must create the mass production spirit,” he wrote in 1923. Le Corbusier promoted tearing down old “decrepit” neighborhoods in favor of glass and concrete towers devoted to commerce. His theories advocated separating homes from businesses, creating huge inner-city apartment complexes that isolated people’s living spaces from the rest of their lives. Suburbs increased our isolation, sprawling in the wake of the post-World War II economic boom and the Interstate highway system. Urged on by the Madison Avenuecreated American dream, everyone wanted a house and yard, two cars and a gleaming new kitchen in the latest color. Integration forced the issue as those with means abandoned cities like Jackson to those without, aka white flight. Families, like cities, moved from the core as the young, educated and upwardly mobile moved as far away as possible from parents and grandparents, separating themselves from the generations before them. These days, the pendulum is swinging back the other way. Mixed-use is a favored buzzword of urban planners. Young people are

living at home longer, and multi-generational households are normal again. Environmentally aware and financially challenged, young people seem less interested in the outward trappings of success than in sustainable environments where living, working and entertainment options are all within arms reach. People want to give their children safe, sane neighborhoods, free of the aggression and violence engendered by America’s late 20th-century’s abstracted and isolated existence. Family values, it turns out, aren’t so much about being seen at church in our Sunday best. Instead, families embrace and teach the philosophies and ethics of faith traditions, among them compassion, generosity, equanimity and passing on knowledge. My relationship to my birth family is complicated. Without aunts, uncles or cousins, it is tiny, and regrettably, some of us don’t like one another all that much. But, while never warm and fuzzy, my family has been generous in its gifts, like strong attitudes for integrity and work. Among my father’s gifts are political skepticism, distrust for the motivations of the wealthy and a lifelong thirst for knowledge. From my mother, I received my strength of will, determination and musical ear. My sister Lisa nurtured my curiosity and gave me the ability to be awed by nature, and my sister Inga provides a never-ending opportunity to practice forgiveness. It’s more convoluted than that, of course. I’d be willing to bet your family, whether that of birth or time, is complex, too. As much as I want to deny it, though, my family made the deepest well of my being, and they deserve my gratitude. But my 7-year-old self is just thankful for Brooklyn.


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news, culture & irreverence

Thursday, May 6 The Mississippi Development Authority announces the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Trail that will create markers for tourists and Mississippians to explore the state’s civil-rights heritage. … Former President Bill Clinton endorses gay marriage in New York state, giving weight to a bill that would legalize gay marriage in the state. Friday, May 7 The Labor Department reports that the economy added 244,000 jobs in April, and private employers created 268,000 jobs, the highest numbers since February 2006. … The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers releases a map showing that low-lying areas in Mississippi from Belzoni to Vicksburg will likely see flooding over the next two weeks. Saturday, May 8 Mississippi Sen. Jack Gordon dies at age 66 after a battle with brain cancer. …Gov. Haley Barbour requests a major disaster declaration from the President Barack Obama for 14 Delta counties where flooding caused hundreds of people to evacuate their homes. Sunday, May 9 President Barack Obama conducts his first television interview since Osama Bin Laden’s death with “60 Minutes.”

May 11 - 17, 2011

Monday, May 10 A fire at the Neshoba County Fairgrounds destroys 16 cabins. …. Eight female Navy officers become the first women to serve on submarines after the Navy repealed a ban preventing women from serving on submarines.

6

Tuesday, 11 Malco Theatres Inc. pulls a controversial political ad by Madison County Sherriff candidate Mark Sandridge at Malco Grandview Theater in Madison citing the company’s policy not to run political ads. … Microsoft announces that it will buy Skype for $8.5 billion. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

Metro Facing Sewer Headache MEREDITH NORWOOD

Wednesday, May 5 Mississippi Delta residents prepare for floods as water from the Mississippi River rises. … Oprah Winfrey features Freedom Riders on her television show in honor the 50th anniversary of their bus rides through the South to challenge Jim Crow laws.

In the opening of “The Simpson’s” until 2009, baby Maggie was accidentally scanned with the groceries and rung up for $847.63. It’s supposedly the annual amount for raising a baby in the U.S. in 1989, when the series was first created.

Johnson told the Council earlier this year that the city’s aging sewer infrastructure and sewer treatment plant earned it a $240,000 fine from the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality. The fine, Johnson said, is a one-time expense, but could be a recurring problem were the city not working out a deal with the federal regulatory agency. Jackson Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. presented to the city Jackson City Attorney council last week the first of many expensive water and Pieter Teeuwissen said the sewer contracts required to meet federal clean water standards. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was imposing ackson’s outdated sewage treatment its own fine on the city. Teeuwissen said he plant is dumping too much sludge did not know the exact amount of the EPA and waste back into the Pearl River, fine the city was facing, but said the federal and the city is paying big bucks to get agency informed the city that it had likely it into federal compliance. “maxed-out” the agency’s sliding scale for “What we’re doing right now is sort municipal violations. of coming up with a plan of action that The city must immediately address the everybody can agree on,” said Jackson amount of bio-solids collecting in its sewage Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., who put three lagoons in south Jackson. The lagoons serve contracts totaling $1.4 million before the as a repository for sludge as bacteria process Council May 3. “We’ll sign off on a con- it for re-entry into the Pearl River. However, sent decree (with the federal government) the lagoons appear to be taking on more saying we’ll comply with sewer system re- waste than they were designed to handle, quirements. This will be a time-saver to do and the city must finance its removal. it, but we will have to invest the resources “You have to remove 81,000 tons of to implement it. Hopefully, this will get us sludge,” said Phillip Gibson of environto the point of having that document.” mental engineering company Camp Dress-

J

Blind and disabled, McArthur Chism crafts art from bottle caps. p 10

by Adam Lynch er and McKee, which the city agreed to contract for $300,000 last week. The $1.4 million total payment on three different contracts with CDM, Chester Engineers and Waggoner Engineering last week is only the beginning of what will be a much greater expenditure as the city fights to get into federal environmental compliance. “We’ve said all along that our water system might take $100 million to fix, and we still have a couple hundred million left on the sewer master plan. That’s the floor (cost), and it could go up from that,” Johnson told the Jackson Free Press. “Four-hundred million and $600 million have been thrown about, but we won’t know a definite number on the sewer upgrades until we’ve completed our negotiations with EPA, and we won’t have a definite number on water until we’ve upgraded our master plan.” Teeuwissen told a public forum last year at Koinonia Coffeehouse that the EPA was breathing down the city’s neck regarding water-quality violations at the city’s overworked wastewater treatment plant. “We have a sewage treatment plant in south Jackson that was designed to treat 50 million gallons (of wastewater) a day. It went online in 1989, under (Mayor Dale) Danks’ administration. That plant started exceeding its capacity within a year. Now we’re 20 years down, and we’re still exceeding capacity,” Teeuwissen said. “The EPA has brought SEWER, see page 7

Who Needs Genius?

money “It’s all about the money.” —Gary Rhoads, RankinHinds Pearl Flood and Drainage Control District Levee Board chairman on why the board entered into an agreement with a local non-profit backed by Jackson developer John McGowan. The McGowan-sponsored non-profit, the Pearl River Vision Foundation, is willing to pay the local district’s half for the cost of a $4 million study on the flood control plan.

As you’ll see in the following pages, raising genius kids is a whole lot more about “nurture” than “nature,” according to the most recent research. It follows, then, that there are specific things parents and society can do to raise kids that just don’t make to that level. Have them listen to “Baby Trump” instead of “Baby Einstein” Have them watch 12 hours of YouTube daily Teach them that Twinkies are a food group Use videogames and TV as a babysitter Give them unlimited Internet access Eliminate arts and music education Maintain No Child Left Behind Limit their news to FOX News Feed then mercury shortcake Let them eat lead paint chips Hire work-release babysitters Send them bedtime emails Enroll them in gun classes Encourage Bieber Fever Ration your hugs Don’t breastfeed Ban their books Robotripping Baby Gaga


talk

PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

news, culture & irreverence

SEWER, from page 6

to the city’s attention various alleged violations including the amount of sludge in the south Jackson sewage lagoons.� Although the population of the city of Jackson has been declining for decades, the growing communities surrounding the city, including municipalities in Rankin and Madison counties, rely on Jackson’s water infrastructure and its single wastewater treatment plant for sewage processing. The exploding population of the suburbs is pressing the plant beyond its limit. Adding to this is the federal government’s increasing scrutiny of quality of water issues for freshwater rivers and streams. The Pearl River, for example, carries a finite amount of water and can be easily inundated with oxygen-killing bacteria from the city’s sewage-treatment plant. Johnson said that the city of Jackson is not the only victim of the nation’s

renewed war on pollution through jawdropping fines. “There have been numerous violations across the country and these cities are in negotiations with the EPA and the regulatory agencies of their states. In most cases, it’s a very expensive proposition,� Johnson said. Jackson’s suburbs, which hold water and sewer contracts with the city, may see future increases in their contract prices to reflect the cost of water-system upgrades. “We have contracts with our satellite users, and some of those users will be required to assist with upgrades, but we’ll talk about that later, because we don’t know the numbers,� Johnson said. “We have notified them that we are in negotiations (with the federal government). As soon as we know something, we’ll let them know something about cost-sharing.� Comment at www.jfp.ms.

KiOR Heats Up COURTESY KIOR

by Ward Schaefer

Men’s Fashion Tip of the Week:

W

elcome to Rogue Tips, a weekly pants and shorts for evenings out, BBQ, look at men’s fashion! We’re graduation events, casual Fridays. taking this opportunity here in the JFP to help out the men of Jackson (as 2. Jeans. Please, not the pair you cut the well as the women grass in! A buying for their good med iu mmen) by offering wash denim clot h i ng t ip s , that can be used what to wear to as an alternative different events, to dress pants how to prepare for pa r t ies. for job interviews, Pair it with a and to answer any nav y blazer que st ion s you for an updated, may have. c ont e mp or a r y Now in our look. 44th year of doing business in 3. Linen shirts. Ja ck son —w it h Cool with pants Luke & Alison Abney our staff logging and jeans. Yes, over 100 years of it will wrinkle, experience on the floor at The Rogue—we but that is what linen does; it provides have dressed people for many occasions, a relaxed look. Great for Memorial Day and we hope to use our experience to help cookouts with shorts: roll up the sleeves you dress for your lifestyle. and leave un-tucked with your flip flops. As we head into the beginning of We look forward to having some summer, here are some items you need for fun with this column and welcome your your closet: questions and feedback on our Facebook page, @RogueMensStore on Twitter or 1. Brown loafers. Perfect with jeans, linen therogue.com.

The Wildest Party in Town!

B

iofuels company KiOR has yet to produce any of its vaunted crude oil substitute in Mississippi, but the startup is making big moves on financing. With pledges from oil refining companies to use its product, plans to issue $100 million in public stock and a potential loan guarantee from the federal government, the company is assembling the resources necessary to begin its estimated $500 million expansion plans in Columbus. On May 3, KiOR announced it had secured a second “offtake agreement� with a refining company to process the synthetic crude oil it makes from wood chips. The agreement with Catchlight Energy, along with a March agreement with Hunt Refining, means that KiOR is now eligible for the $75 million loan from the state that the Mississippi Legislature approved last year. A spokesman for the company, Matt Hargarten, said that he was unable to comment on the company’s pending loan from the state, however, while KiOR applies for an initial public offering. Last month, the company submitted

initial filings to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for a proposed $100 million IPO. KiOR is unusual, however, in applying for an IPO without having reported any revenues. The company is also seeking a $1 billion loan guarantee from the U.S. Department of Energy. Even with the loan guarantee and capital raised from a stock offering, though, KiOR may need more to support its initial expansion. The company estimates its first proposed plant, in Columbus, will cost around $190 million. Its next four plants, two that will also be in Mississippi, will process three times as much wood as the Columbus plant and will likely cost more to construct, according to Jim Lane, publisher of the industry newsletter Biofuels Digest. “It wouldn’t be out of whack to suggest a cost in the $300 million range for those larger projects—no matter what, the company is going to have to find more than $1 billion to fund out even the first five plants,� Lane wrote in an April 13 assessment of KiOR’s IPO plans. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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Biofuels startup KiOR is planning an initial public offering and moving closer to construction of its first Mississippi production plant.

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the Corps provided to the board last year. Clearly frustrated, members of the board questioned how they would manage to pay the board’s half of the cost. The Corps is responsible for the other half. “We’ve done spent money from Hinds and Rankin counties, and now the Corps has come back with a plan that’ll cost us $4 million. But the problem is we have to raise $2 million locally,” Rhoads said this week. McGowan Working Partners spokesman ADAM LYNCH

lowood Mayor Gary Rhoads says the Rankin-Hinds Pearl River Flood and Drainage Control District (aka the Levee Board) is working with a non-profit foundation backed by McGowan Working Partners for one reason: cash. “They can orchestrate (a deal) for us without being on the taxpayer’s back. That’s the bottom line. It’s all about money,” said Rhoads, chairman of the Levee Board. “It’s not going to be local taxpayer money.” Last month, the Levee Board entered into a resolution with the McGowan-backed Pearl River Vision Foundation, which proposes to “assist and represent” the Levee Board in negotiations with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in creating an updated flood-control plan for the Pearl River. Like the Foundation, a majority of the Levee Board wants that plan to include a new lake, created by dredging the river and installing an underwater dam. The board believes a properly dredged lake can theoretically be big enough to contain floodwater comparable to the historic Pearl River flood of 1979. McGowan Working Partners founder John McGowan embraced the Levee Board’s “one-lake” plan earlier this year. McGowan has long advocated for creation of lakes on the Pearl, but debated with the board for years on the possibility of two lakes, not just one. McGowan’s original plan would have partially inundated neighboring Mayes Lake and a portion of its surrounding park. Board members eventually came to an agreement on a lake plan to put to the Corps, which must still approve the plan. Until recently, the Corps remained a steadfast opponent to the idea of any new lake in the Pearl for environmental reasons. The Corps agreed to the Levee Board’s wishes late last year and decided to include the lake component in a plan that could consist of a levee expansion north of Lakeland Drive and another expansion near the town of Richland. Gary Walker, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers senior project manager, told the board this year that the plan to study the flood-control project could jump to $4 million, nearly doubling the plan’s original $2.2 million estimate

Dallas Quinn, spokesman for McGowan Working Partners, said a McGowan-backed non-profit will pay for half of an estimated $4-million study focusing on Pearl River flood control.

Dallas Quinn said he did not think the cost of the district’s half would be $2 million, but said the Foundation would “complete the work.” McGowan’s representatives were before the board last month, offering to lend a hand: “You heard (Walker) say it could be three years to conduct the (flood control) study, and another two years to complete the funding. That puts us at five years before we’d even know we could start building,” Quinn said. “We propose this team of engineers, consultants and attorneys to sit down with the Corps and the board and negotiate (the flood-control plan), and look at any other alternative (funding) routes to move this forward.” One of those potential funding routes makes use of Section 211 of the federal Water Resources Development Act of 1996, which provides authority for non-federal sponsors,

like the Levee Board, to begin the design and construction of flood-control projects without a federal co-payment. The section makes possible reimbursement for the federal government’s share at a later date. McGowan has advocated for a larger lake as a later addition to the initial smaller lake, but is not actively pressing for the second lake at the moment. More recently, he has argued for the removal of the levee-expansion component of the single lake plan. The new levees would make later expansion of the lake, or adding a second lake, difficult. Levee Board attorney Keith Turner said the most recent lake maps formally endorsed by the Levee Board, and submitted by Waggoner Engineering, depict expanded levees girding several lake alternatives averaging in size of between 255 to 260 feet above sea level. The Pearl River Vision Foundation presented its own map before the board in April, but would not provide a copy of the map to the Levee Board or to the Jackson Free Press. Quinn did not say if the foundation lake design contained a levee expansion. Turner and Quinn say the initial design, regardless of the inclusion of levees, is likely a moot point because the lake that survives federal review may look nothing like the initial design. This is because an agreement between the Corps and the Levee Board (and its Foundation surrogate) does not exempt the floodcontrol proposal from federal environmental laws. The project, despite its non-profit funding source, must still abide by the National Environmental Policy Act. Also, the district will not be eligible for reimbursement unless the Corps approves the lake plan. Peer review by affiliate members of the Corps is necessary for projects costing more than $45 million. The Levee Board has no clear cost for the lake, but has cited estimates as high as $600 million. McGowan claims the lake will cost considerably less than that, but has posted no estimates below the $45 million cap for peer review. The levees will likely be a component of the plan if the Corps sticks to its demands of levee inclusion for flood control. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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any residents of both Hinds and Press’ Jackblog. Less than 24 hours later, the Madison counties spoke out this YouTube video was closed to comments, after week against a controversial political a string of remarks critical of the ad appeared. ad that played on fears of Jackson’s Karen Scott, director of marketing “violent crime” showing prior to feature mov- for Memphis-based Malco Theaters, said ies in Malco Grandview Theater in Madison. the company was pulling the ad in a May Malco pulled the ad from its theaters May 11. 11 statement. “Our screen advertising is The ad uses a road to show the small handled by a third party,” Scott wrote in an divide between the city email. “It is the policy of of Jackson and Madison Malco Theatres to not run County and indicates what political campaign ads, and could happen to Madison we have requested that this County if voters do not be removed immediately.” Scott would not specify elect Mark Sandridge as Madison County sheriff. the third party, or if the the“Imagine for a moater had screened any other ment this road was our candidate’s ads. county line,” the ad’s narraSandridge and local tor says. Malco Grandview manag“This side represents ers did not return calls for one of the most violent citcomment. ies in the nation. Over here, Jackson resident Dorson our side, one of the most Residents of Hinds and Madison ey Carson, who is running desirable communities in counties spoke out against a for state representative of America to raise a family. political ad Mark Sandridge, district 64, which includes candidate for Madison County And there’s one candidate sheriff, ran at Malco Grandview parts of Madison County, for Madison County sheriff in Madison ... for a day or two. said crime is not just a conthat intends to keep it that cern in Jackson residents. way: Mark Sandridge.” “Crime does not stop In an email to the Jackson Free Press, at County Line Road,” Carson said, adding Madison resident Bruce Bancroft criticized that property crimes are the most numerous the ad. “I would like to say that as a Madison crimes in the city, not violent crimes. resident, I am very offended by the ad at the In an April 21 statement, the city reportMalco Theater,” Bancroft wrote. “While Jack- ed that overall crime in the city dropped 6.7 son does have its share of problems, I don’t percent compared to the same time last year, know of any central city in a metro area that with total property crime down by 3 percent doesn’t. Bashing Jackson serves no purpose and violent crime down by 27.3 percent. other than to incite. Instead, why not offer up It is not uncommon for candidates solutions to make it and the entire metro area for political office, and their supporters, a better place to work and live?” to campaign using the fear of crime in A May 5 post on Sandridge’s campaign Jackson. In 2003, both Haley Barbour Facebook page states that the video premiered (for governor) and Wilson Carroll at Malco Grandview Theater in Madison (for Hinds County district attorney) used May 6 and would appear on all screens before outdated and inaccurate “dangerous” every movie for the next three months. rankings in their campaigns. In 2009, Several Hinds and Madison residents the “Better Jackson PAC” used a similar questioned Malco’s decision to screen the ad, strategy in support of mayoral candidate after a link to it started showing up on Face- Marshand Crisler. book, Twitter and in a post in the Jackson Free Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

May 11 - 17, 2011

www.ppsjackson.org

10

homelesstalk

by Lacey McLaughlin

A Helping Hand

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storage closet inside a homeless day shelter is an unlikely studio for wellknown Mississippi folk artist McArthur Chism. But these days Chism is just glad to have a quiet space where he can thread the bottle caps he collects with wire hangers and make crosses, birdhouses and frames. Galleries throughout the state sell Chism’s work including The Attic Gallery in Vicksburg and Cat Head in Clarksdale. Numerous publications have published stories about the 69-year-old artist, and the Mississippi Arts Commission featured his work in the “Crossroads of the Heart” exhibit that toured the state in 2001. The Glendora, Miss., native grew up in Water Valley, but has lived in Jackson for the majority of his life. He is now partially blind and relies on his motorized wheelchair for mobility. On April 1, Chism became homeless after the rent on his apartment increased. Chism, who receives Social Security disability payments, had been struggling to pay medical bills from two surgeries he had last year and could no longer afford to pay rent. Now, Chism spends his days making his art at Stewpot Community Services’ Opportunity Center on West Amite Street until 4 p.m., when it closes. At night, he drives his wheelchair through west Jackson’s pockmarked sidewalks to the Billy Brumfield House Men’s Shelter or the Gateway Rescue Mission on Gallatin Street. Whenever he has money from selling his art, he spends a night at the Sleep Inn on Gallatin Street. The battery on Chism’s wheelchair must recharge every few hours and can present an additional challenge for seeking shelter. On the night of May 5 the shelters were full, and Chism slept in his wheelchair under a bridge. It wasn’t the first time. “He’s sold some pieces lately, and some of the galleries have sent him checks,” says Heather Ivery, director of the Opportunity Center. “But it’s one of those things. When you become homeless, a hundred dollars isn’t going to help you.” Wearing a tucked-in collared shirt and dress shoes, Chism shows few signs of distress. He works calmly on his art, which requires a steady hand and a good deal of patience. A birdhouse can take up to eight hours to make, and a cross takes about an hour. His work usually sells for $100 or less. “It will cut you quicker than a doctor will,” he says about the sharp edges of a bottle cap. Ivery says that when Chism first came to the center he was in distress because he had no place to keep his tools or artwork. She helped transport his tools—a hammer, pliers, bottle caps and hangers—and cleared a place for him to work. “It’s definitely therapeutic for him,” she says.

LARRY MORRISEY, MISSISSIPPI ARTS COMMISSION

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Mississippi folk artist McArthur Chism, known for his bottle-cap creations, recently became homeless in Jackson.

Ivery said she is trying to get Chism involved with HEARTworks, a program based out of Stewpot Community Services that provides opportunities for homeless men and women to sell their work. His work will also be on sale at the Arts Alive! Festival at Smith Park, May 13 and 14. Last April, the Opportunity Center closed due to lack of funds. In November, the center reopened with funds from an anonymous donor that would keep the day shelter going for six months. The center serves an average of 100 of the city’s homeless population a day by providing a laundry and showers, along with access to phones, computers and mail. It also serves as a pickup site for day labor. The Opportunity Center partners with the city and other local agencies to provide mental-health services, housing assistance, employment services, alcohol and drug therapy and GED classes. Ivery says that the donation from the private source runs out at the end of May. The center has a few small grants to keep it afloat for a little longer, and is seeking a longterm source of funding. Opportunity Center clients will host a car wash from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 14, to raise funds for the shelter. Suggested donation is $5 per car. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Arts Alive! Arts Alive! Festival is May 13 and 14 in Smith Park.The free festival promotes performing and visual arts, boosts downtown and raises awareness of homelessness. Proceeds benefit charitable organizations like Stewpot Ministries. Visit www.artsalivejackson.com.


COURTESY MAD GENIUS

by Ward Schaefer

Talking It Out

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akeem and Matthew have been fighting. Seated in a classroom at Blackburn Middle School, the two eighthgrade boys explain the origins of their conflict, an ever-escalating series of slights. After an exchange of mean comments in the hallway, Hakeem bumped into Anthony in the lunchroom, and Anthony retaliated with profanity. The two scowling boys aren’t explaining their problems to a teacher, however. Instead, the two have sought help with Blackburn’s peer-mediation program. Two of their schoolmates, Carjin and Erika, offer to help the two reach a resolution that satisfies them both in the soothing tones of a guidance counselor. If the scene seems artificial and the young people unbelievably mature, that’s because it is fake. In reality, all four students are peer mediators. They perform this role-play in a promotional video for Blackburn’s new peermediation program, TAP Out. (TAP is an acronym for Talk About the Problems) Since November, Blackburn students with discipline referrals for conflicts with other students have had the option of requesting a referral to TAP instead of taking the traditional consequence for their misbehavior such as detention or suspension. At the end of the confidential session with two peer mediators, the

participants sign an agreement committing to certain actions to resolve their conflict. “Too often we have children who have conflicts—at this age, they just do,” Blackburn principal Marietta Carter said. “They often don’t know how to resolve these conflicts in a peaceful way. (TAP mediators) are actually doing what I used to have to do (as an assistant principal): Bring children in and give them an opportunity to hear each other’s side. That’s all it takes usually, and the problems are resolved.” The impetus for TAP came from Bridget Harkins, a veteran teacher at Blackburn who teaches the “Open Doors” gifted classes for the sixth through eighth grades. “The children in this age group have a hard time dealing with their problems,” Harkins said. “For the most part, it’s usually a physical response to the problem. We had lots of fights, and children were being suspended and having to spend three days at home. I thought, ‘This is ridiculous. I know these children. If they’re given an opportunity to learn a different way to solve their problems, it will really work.’” Last school year, Harkins enlisted the help of Malkie Schwartz, director of community engagement for the Goldring-Woldenburg Institute of Southern Jewish Life, to es-

Students at Blackburn Middle School are learning to use peer mediation to settle disputes that previously would have ended in fights.

tablish a mediation program. Schwartz, then a law student at Mississippi College, leapt at the chance to involve her organization in the greater Jackson community. Schwartz signed up for a conflict-resolution class and researched other mediation curricula. Harkins, the program’s coordinator, selected an initial group of 24 students to participate in a training that Schwartz led. Then, the students selected 10 out of their group to serve as the school’s first cohort of mediators. They named their program TAP, in part because of the wrestling connotations of “tapping out” to signal submission. TAP mediators have handled 11 cases since November, and teachers have already noticed an improvement. “I’ve spoken with some of the teachers, and they feel like the program has been beneficial,” Carter said. “As we grow, and as this

program becomes a part of our culture, I know we’ll see a real significant difference.” Conflicts between students who have gone through mediation have not recurred, though individuals may still find conflicts with new peers, Harkins said. Participants and mediators have been “brave,” Schwartz says, to seek an alternative to the violent responses that tend to be the norm in middle school. “It’s taken a little while to have the kids buy into it as a cool thing to do, because in middle school they think it’s cool to be able to beat somebody up sometimes,” Harkins said. “In the climate of our school, it’s been a godsend for some of these children who really wanted another way to work out their problems ... . This gave them an opportunity to find another way.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

youthtalk

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jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Divisiveness Hurts Kids and Families

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ue the ominous voice: “Imagine for a moment this road is our county line. This side represents one of the most violent cities in the nation. Over here, on our side, one of the most desirable communities in America to raise a family.” Thank you, Madison County sheriff candidate Mark Sandridge, for one of the most offensive campaign ads we’ve seen in recent memory. Was this ad another racist attempt to scare white folks into voting for a supposedly law-and-order candidate who’s going to keep them safe from all the black folks to the south? Perhaps. You could certainly sense that in the clip that aired at Malco Theater in Madison until corporate pulled it under fire. Regardless, there is more at play here, and it’s decidedly anti-family. The direct statement in this video is that it’s “desirable” to raise a family in Madison County—a county that has its own share of crime, including heinous domestic abuse, not to mention the added (and greater) dangers of commuting daily in a driving-while-texting world. This kind of cheap divisiveness hurts the greater metro area, because it turns us into us-vs.-them. It’s the kind of rhetoric that makes people believe Jackson is one of the most violent cities (actually, we’re not, although car break-ins are pretty numerous in our poor city), and one to stay away from. That is exactly the wrong tactic if you want to strengthen families and decrease crime. And it sends the direct message to the young people of our city—especially those born into tough circumstances, as many of us were—that there is little hope for them. They live in a hellhole, and they’re bound to be criminals. That shatters hope. And it’s a damn lie. This city is on fire with progress and change and the excitement of diverse groups working together. Families are returning to the relative safety (and lower fuel bills) of city life where they are becoming part of a greater community that, in turn, helps them raise stronger, more brilliant children who aren’t encoded with fear of “the other” or “them.” Most wonderfully, the patience for such ugly demagoguery has changed dramatically since this paper launched almost a decade ago in a media climate that thrived off sensationalism and scaring people to death to raise ratings and sell ads to businesses in the suburbs. Intelligent people throughout the metro are beginning to know that we thrive or fail together, and many of them spoke out loudly against this ad both to the candidate and to Malco management this week. This kind of divisiveness, whether from the city outward or the suburbs inward, is just another form of hate. It will destroy families and our community spirit if we let it. But we showed this week that we will not allow it to. Hateful divisiveness is out of style in the Jackson metro. Pass it on.

KEN STIGGERS

Cootie Creek County Sheriff

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May 11 - 17, 2011

r. Announcement: “In the ghetto criminal justice system, the people are represented by members of the Ghetto Science Team: police officer and part-time security guard at the Funky Ghetto Mall; Dudley ‘Do-Right’ McBride, renegade documentary filmmaker; Kunta ‘Rasheed X’ Toby; and attorney Cootie McBride of the law firm McBride, Myself and I. This is their story.” Dudley: “The dispatcher called us to investigate a disturbance at the Cootie Creek County Line Movie Theater. Folks from the Ghetto Science Community want their money back because the movie theater showed Meen O. Whitman’s offensive campaign ad for sheriff of Cootie Creek County.” Cootie: “I saw the ad yesterday on the ‘Qweesha Live’ special called ‘Breakdown of Offensive Television Ad Propaganda.’ It put the Ghetto Science Community in a bad light.” Kunta: “It reminds me of the Willie Horton political ad from 1988. And the new sheriff promised to stop the ‘savages’ from crossing the Cootie Creek County line.” Dudley: “In my humble opinion, people should not support places, areas or events where they are not welcome.” Cootie: “I agree, Dudley. I would definitely demand my money back from that movie theater, especially after seeing a political ad labeling me a violent savage. And isn’t it funny how folk on the other side of the county line blatantly deny their own crime issues?” Dudley: “Kunta, are you filming this investigation?” Kunta: “Yeah. Look out for these scenes on my new cable-television-realityshow series called ‘The Real Law ‘n’ Order in an S.U.V.’” 12 Doink, doink.

KAMIKAZE

Freedom and Responsibility

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h, the First Amendment: freedom of speech—that little inalienable right that we all have and that we all have invoked. Clearly some of us don’t really understand what it means. Nor do we understand the responsibility that comes with it. Some folks lean on it like a crutch. Others hold it up as a shield. Still others retreat to it for refuge. Regardless, our right to speak freely separates us from many other countries. It’s why we’re great. But I wonder why some of us are confused by it. This column is not about taking a side. Hopefully, it can create a dialogue—one that I think is much needed in this country, especially when historic events happen like those of the past week. Osama Bin Laden is dead. His killing has evoked the gamut of emotions in Americans on all sides of the issue: those who celebrated Bin Laden’s death and those who were vehemently against any outward displays of joy. Some say his killing is justice for 9/11, while some are skeptical of the events that surrounded the tragedy a decade ago. Pittsburgh Steelers running back Rashard Mendenhall found out that freedom of speech can land you in hot water. His Twitter comments following Bin Laden’s death raised the ire of a lot of football fans. “What kind of person celebrates death?” he tweeted. “It’s amazing how people can HATE a man they have never even heard speak. We’ve only heard one side.” It even made the team president (and Mendenhall’s boss) Art Rooney II issue a statement. Does cheering the death of an evil man make you barbaric? Does denouncing those cheers or

disputing the events of 911 make you un-American? Does supporting the government unconditionally make you naive? Or does questioning the government make you a traitor? Where is the line drawn on one’s opinion? Freedom of speech is just that: the freedom to speak freely without the fear of persecution. In some countries you can be killed for your comments. But while you are highly unlikely to be arrested for what you say in America, some folks don’t understand that freedom of speech doesn’t absolve you of consequences. You still have bosses, constituents, family and, in the case of Mendenhall or any other public figure, fans that you have to answer to. You can’t use freedom of speech as an excuse to make outlandish, unfounded statements or insults about others or your country. You won’t get locked up, but you could very well be fired, blackballed or, even worse, get your butt kicked pretty good for it. As far as free speech goes, this debate will rage on. How are we to freely comment on our president, politicians and policy without being vilified? How can we learn to criticize, in love, without retribution? How can we show support for people, places and ideologies without being attacked? Will we never get to that point? How will future generations handle these rights that our forefathers placed before us? Osama Bin Laden’s death has challenged us again to examine our opinions on this issue. Is it freedom of speech or watch what you say? And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019, or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn” and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


LANGSTON AND LISA KENNEDY MOORE

One Year Later

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Lacey McLaughlin Assistant Editor Valerie Wells Senior Reporter Adam Lynch Reporter Ward Schaefer Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Assistant to the Editor ShaWanda Jacome Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Quita Bride, Lisa Fontaine Bynum, David Dennis Jr., Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Carl Gibson, Brandi Herrera, Garrad Lee, Lance Lomax, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Chris Nolen, Robin O’Bryant, Casey Purvis,Tom Ramsey, Tim Roberson, Doctor S, Ken Stiggers, Jackie Warren Tatum, Byron Wilkes Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris Intern Jordan Lashley

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Graphic Designer Holly Harlan Production Designer Latasha Willis Editorial Cartoonist Chris Zuga Photographers Christina Cannon, Jert-rutha Crawford,Tate K. Nations Charles A. Smith, Jerrick Smith, Amile Wilson, William Patrick Butler

SALES AND OPERATIONS Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Account Executives Randi Ashley Jackson, Adam Perry Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Events and Marketing Coordinator Shannon Barbour Accounting Montroe Headd Distribution Lynny Bradshaw, Cade Crook, Clint Dear, Linda Hamilton, Aimee Lovell, Steve Pate, Jim Poff, Jennifer Smith

ONLINE Web Developer Megan Stewart Web Producer Korey Harrion

CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Releases releases@jacksonfreepress.com Queries editor@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Internships interns@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2011 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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crawfish boil, our kids playing pickup games of baseball and football, or even conversations about days we love and the ones we look forward to. We just congregate unexpectedly. It was and still is the sense of community, after only a year, that makes us get up with excitement each day to know what we are coming home to. We are making a difference and believe that we were “called” here to live. Our yearning to be a part of this community in Jackson has become a reality. We look forward to any and every opportunity to watch the neighborhood and city grow. We are not just interested in watching, but we are involved in the positive changes we are so fortunate to see on a daily basis. You should be, too. It is every Jacksonian’s responsibility to be a part of the community. The changes we have seen in the last year have been nothing less than amazing. Fondren Park opened, and we can hear the laughter of children daily. New restaurants opened their doors in the city including Fatsumo, Parlor Market, Babalu and Bodega. Not to mention, the state-of-the-art Mississippi Children’s Museum has added to the depth of Jackson’s museum offerings. Do not mistake this positive talk as naiveté. We understand that Jackson has its problems. Aren’t there problems everywhere? Utopia doesn’t exist. If it did, however, we are pretty sure Fondren and this city with all of its multicultural offerings, restaurants, neighbors and hospitality are pretty close to it. We believe in telling the positive story of Jackson and its rebirth. We have become ambassadors for the city. We wear this story on our sleeves, and we tell it as often as we can. And if you want to hear more, don’t log on to www.anything or even do a Google search of our names. No. Instead, take a drive through Fondren and other neighborhoods in Jackson, and see what is happening. Even better, drive to Ridgeway Street, and you will probably see us sitting out front, soaking everything in. And if you have time, stop, talk and let us tell you more about this great city. Langston and Lisa Kennedy Moore are newlyweds who reside in Fondren. Langston works for a statewide non-profit organization, and Lisa works for a national contract office-furniture company.

We understand that Jackson has its problems. Aren’t there problems everywhere? Utopia doesn’t exist.

SCORE Jackson Community Outreach May 16-18 2011

Sponsored by the Jackson Business Accelerator Collaboration SCORE is a non-profit association to educate and help small businesses start, grow, and succeed. SCORE is a partner with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), and has been mentoring small business owners for more than 40 years.

Events: Tuesday, May 17th 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM

Business Development Workshops: Lunch provided, Call for location info

Tuesday, May 17th 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM

Networking Opportunities: Mississippi E-Center, 1230 Raymond Road Refreshments provided

Wednesday, May 18th 7:30 AM to 9:AM

SCORE Breakfast: University Club of Jackson, Regions Plaza, 22nd floor downtown Jackson

If you’d like to find out how SCORE can help your business or how you can volunteer with SCORE to help grow local businesses, call to reserve space at one of our events! 601-540-5415 or www.jacksonbusiness.net

“We all do better when we work together.”

jacksonfreepress.com

Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

he cliché is “time flies when you’re having fun.” We agree. Don’t get us wrong, though; we both have careers that keep us going more than relaxing. But what we do know is that we have arrived at the place that was calling us to have fun, be involved and make a difference. And the time has flown since we landed in Fondren. It’s been an entire 12 months. Before we were married, we spent many weekends in Jackson, the place we never really admitted to each other we wanted to be. We had a roof over our heads across the river and were content for the most part. However, we knew we did not belong there. Nothing much about that county reflects who we are. The houses mirror each other like reflections in water, the “conveniences” are 15 minutes away traveling by car, and the big-box stores offer us about as much diversity as a bag of Pep-O-Mints. Our weekends or weekday-off days, we crossed the bridge to Jackson. We carried with us three simple tasks: drive slowly, look observantly and dream endlessly. It paid off. Our dream of living in Jackson is now a reality. Our choices of homes started with a Belhaven, over-our-heads renovator. We then found a northeast Jackson “fixer-upper” we could have probably handled. But neither felt like home. The third time was a charm, because when we walked into this house, in an eye blink, it felt like our home. Let us say this home is on the west side of Fondren. When we told friends, co-workers and family we were moving to Ridgeway Street (God bless Frank Melton), the only thing they knew about Ridgeway was the mayor and the story about the house he destroyed here. We can honestly say, as do they, that after being here a year, the perception they had was sad, wrong and uneducated. Neighbors welcomed us with open arms, smiles and even warm, fresh-baked cookies when we arrived. The concern on their faces—some folks had lived here for more than a decade and weren’t sure how we would fit in—flatlined into “this is going to be good” attitudes after our first brief encounters. And once we gathered together more, we all knew that we are meant to be here in this community. No formal invitations are ever extended here. Our events seem to just happen. It doesn’t matter if it is a front-yard

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amilies are at the heart of everything we do. They serve as a witness to our lives, support us when we fail and remind us of where we came from. Even if you have a nontraditional family, a strong family unit is essential to a vibrant community. In this Good Ideas issue, we focus on ways to build a family-friendly community, how to raise a genius child, alternatives to traditional families and styles of parenting.

How to Raise a Really Smart Kid

Start early.

by Donna Ladd

Believe from day one that your baby will grow up to be extraordinary, no matter what your circumstance.

All kids should not get a trophy. They should strive for it. Model persistence, resilience and patience.

Laugh a lot with your baby, looking into his eyes. Babies pick up your moods and learn them.

Embrace your child’s failure; use it to teach. Don’t teach a win-lose mentality.

Support, don’t smother.

Know that a baby’s “emotional intelligence” begins in the cradle.

Set limits and high expectations.

Play good music for your baby: not violent. Yes, Mozart or Coltraine works.

Teach how their actions make others feel; not that they’re “naughty.” Kids need to learn to soothe themselves.

Nature v. Nurture: Can any child be a genius?

Myths “Either you have it, or you don’t.” “No! Geniuses are born! Some kids are born low achievers.” “Poets and musicians are both born with artistic talent.”

Realities “Anyone can do well in schools with the right effort.” “Talent is not the cause, but the result.”

“Skills are specific.” “The brain drives the brawn.”

May 11 - 17, 2011

“Bad genes = bad grades.”

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Does your child pass the marshmallow test? Researchers found that kids who grab one marshmallow when told they can wait and have two are more prone to behavior problems later in life. Delayed gratification is a life skill; impulsiveness is not.

“The brain is plastic; it will adapt.”

Create Healthy Adults • Teach them to be present with activities they enjoy: to be fully “in the flow.” • Don’t make work easier or do their school project for them. Ever. • Teach kids time management: not to multitask, to schedule work and fun. • Model curiosity about the world. (Stop and read historic markers with kids.) • Make sure your kids have adult mentors outside the family. • Cook healthy food together. • Teach them to help others. Volunteer with them. • Good sleep and healthy food help genius minds develop. • Organize family activities that challenge their minds. • Cut kids slack and help lower their stress. Teach them to breathe. • Invite kids to smart adult events. • Ask kids their opinions.


Cigarette Smoke + Poor Nutrition

= Several Generations of Lower Intelligence

Studies have shown that smoking (including secondhand smoke) and bad diets lead to several generations of less intelligent offspring.

Physicist Albert Einstein

Kenyan longdistance runner

Young Asian scholar

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

They practiced their faces off to be great!

A Place Called HOPE

Suzuki method violinists

Childhood chess champion

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motional intelligence expert Daniel Goleman says children need to have hope to be great and avoid troubled lives. “Students with high hope set themselves higher goals and know how to work hard to attain them.” How can every adult help? Mentor a kid, and never, ever generalize about kids from certain schools or communities. You are destroying their hope and, thus, their potential. Looking at you, too, media.

Baseball player Ted Williams

How to instill hope: 1. Volunteer to mentor. 2. Help with community events. 3. Teach “self-efficacy” (a can-do attitude). 4. Challenge stereotypes. 5. Write letters to the editor of papers that bash teens. 6. Never call a group of kids a “gang.” 7. Talk to young people; don’t hide from them. 8. Don’t mistake a nervous kid as a dangerous one. 9. Sound smart and talk “adult” with kids who don’t expect it. 10. Show kids what a smart and successful adult looks like (as in: them some day).

“Talent develops talent.” — Suzuki motto

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ver the last two decades, emerging neuroscience findings have disproved a popular misconception that has led to prejudice and stereotyping over the years, as well as dangerous self-perpetuating violent cycles: that one is born smart or dumb. That is, in the whole “nature v. nurture” debate, nurture is winning in a landslide. Yes, genetics plays a role in intelligence, but a much smaller one than once thought. Researchers now know that much of intelligence—probably 80 percent or more—comes strictly from what happens starting all the way back in the cradle. (And the brain must be exercised into old age so it doesn’t atrophy.) Not to mention, there is no difference in boys’ and girls’ competitive biology. The good news is that most anyone can be a genius. The tougher news is that it is hard work. A flood

Highly Effective Kids

ver get frustrated by young adults who can’t manage their time, complete projects or take criticism well? Then, join the “The Leader In Me” campaign to teach children leadership skills from an early age, the brainchild of management guru Stephen R. Covey (of “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” fame). His model school is A.B. Combs Elementary School in Raleigh, N.C., which was a low-performing school in 1999 in danger of being closed. Teacher and parent morale was low. The school’s turnaround came after principal Muriel Summers approached Covey for help, and the school became a leadership magnet school where little kids (many non-white) develop goal lists for themselves and learn how to follow through with positive actions: a “work first, play later” character ethic, as Covey calls it. The strategy has turned the school around. The kids learn these habits: 1. Be Proactive: You’re in charge. 2. Begin with the end in mind: Have a plan. 3. Put first things first: Work first, then play. 4. Think win-win: Everyone can win. 5. Seek first to understand, then to be understood: Listen before you talk. 6. Synergize: Together is better. 7. Sharpen the saw: Balance feels best. See www.theleaderinme.org for more information.

In the FLOW, In the FLOW

D COURTESY FREE PRESS

E

of recent books have heralded the research that many hours of “deliberate practice”—10,000 seems to be the magic number—is what it takes to be great, often with a strong mentor and/or parent pushing you. And, yes, that applies to everyone from those little Suzuki violinists to Mozart (and his determined daddy) to baseball great Ted Williams to Albert Einstein to Olympic medalists to all the Asian kids whose parents push much more homework than do American counterparts. The research proves it: Your kid (and you) can be great at something. The question is, can you focus on a skill or craft long enough, through many drafts and retries, to be great? Will you? As Einstein said, “It’s not that I’m so smart. It’s just that I stay with problems longer.” Another hint: Turn off the TV.

aniel Goleman urges parents to help kids learn to be “in the flow” or, as he calls it “self-forgetfulness.” Most kids are in the flow at play, but many lose the skill as they approach work that requires sustained attention (especially with their phones buzzing). Find a task they’re skilled at, and make sure they engage in it beyond their comfort zone. They must learn not to be fueled by worry; to do and think one thing at a time. They must learn absorption to be brilliant.

Books to help you raise a genius (or become one): “The Genius In All of Us,” David Shenk (Anchor Books, 2010, $15.95) “Outliers: The Story of Success,” Malcolm Gladwell (Little Brown, 2008, $27.99) “Building Emotional Intelligence: Techniques to Cultivate Inner Strength in Children,” Daniel Goleman (Sounds True Inc., 2008, $22.95) (and his other EI books) “The Leader in Me: How Schools and Parents Around the World Are Inspiring Greatness, One Child at a Time,” Stephen Covey (Free Press, 2008, $24.95) “The Myth of Ability,” John Mighton (Robinson Publishing, 2006, $14.99)

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15


Parenting Styles

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our child may not have come with a handbook on how to be a good parent, but you can learn nevertheless. Many factors determine how you choose to parent. The best parenting, like everything else in life, is about balance.

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by Donna Ladd

firmly believe that anyone can be a good writer. Writing leads to clear thinking, and reading and writing feed each other. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give up on yourself or your child, or think that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have writing â&#x20AC;&#x153;talent.â&#x20AC;? Just like anything else, writing is a craft that needs to be developed and practiced. No surprise: Children mirror their parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; interest in the written word. Now, that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean you have to be a great writer, or even educated, to inspire young writers: My own mother was illiterate but thrust encyclopedias and notepads in front of me and showed me her passion for the words she couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t write. I write because she couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Start early to nurture writing in whatever ways you can. The delightCOURTESY TRUMPETER BOOKS

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.EGLECTFUL

The idea of authoritarian, authoritative and permissive parenting styles was introduced by Diana Baumrind about 1966. In the 1983 edition of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Handbook of Child Psychology,â&#x20AC;? Eleanor Maccoby and John Martin added the fourth: neglectful parenting.

!UTHORITATIVE

!UTHORITARIAN

by ShaWanda Jacome

ful book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Write Start,â&#x20AC;? by pediatric occupational therapist Jennifer Hallissy (Trumpeter Books, 2010, $20.50) gives 52 ways to nurture writing in your child (one a week). All are simple and fun such as building a â&#x20AC;&#x153;family treeâ&#x20AC;? out of real leaves and making your own books. First, though, you must create an environment where the written word is valued. Have books front and center in your home, and make sure you and your child have a place to write and play with the written word, stocked with pens, paper, crayons, markers, stamps, index cards, erasers, glue, scissors, an alphabet chart and much more. From there, get creative with your child and words: â&#x20AC;˘ Help your child start a writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scrapbook filled with pieces of their

writing, drawings, pictures, etc. (and notes to you, report cards, etc.). â&#x20AC;˘ Teach your child to make listsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from what they do when they wake up, to their goals (this will also teach them to start managing their time) and play lists of songs they like. â&#x20AC;˘ Every kid should have a diary or journal (I started one in the second grade). Little bitty kids can start with â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Color Was Your Day?â&#x20AC;? and just scribble on a page with a different chosen crayon or pencil that day. Young storytellers can write about the high point of their day and the low point (adults should do this, too). â&#x20AC;˘ Teach them to write fun, creative thank-you (or â&#x20AC;&#x153;You rock!â&#x20AC;?) notes. They can make them, too, in their cool little writing/creative corner. Most importantly, Hallissy warns, kids need to see you writing stuffâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from lists to journals to letters. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be the parent who can never find a pen. Use one, and they will, too.


From At-Risk to OK by Ronni Mott puts additional enormous stress on families and children. Many kids turn to defiant behavior or alcohol and drug abuse in an effort to gain control over something in their lives, putting them at-risk for failure or worse. At-risk kids frequently suffer from

What Works â&#x20AC;˘ Teach and model self-control. Nemoursâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; KidsHealth.org states that teaching self-control is one of the most important things parents and teachers can do for kids, and provides age-appropriate guidelines for infants to teens. â&#x20AC;˘ Teach mindfulness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mindfulness creates space, changing impulsive reactions to thoughtful responses,â&#x20AC;? states MindfulSchools.org. Mindfulness is a secular practice based on Eastern principles of calming the mind, and includes breathing and focusing exercises. Proponents, such as the Association of Mindfulness in Education (www.mindfuleducation.org), say the techniques improve attention and concentration, provide social-emotional awareness, heighten body awareness and coordination, and expand interpersonal skills. Maurice Elias, Rutgers University psychology professor (writing on Edutopia.com, the website of the George Lucas Educational Foundation), has identified four basic ingredients to help at-risk youth: â&#x20AC;˘ Caring, sustained relationships. At-risk kids frequently have never known anyone they trust, and just being an authority figure doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold any weight for them. Trust has to be earned, and creating a strong, caring and sustained relationship will do that. â&#x20AC;˘ Reachable goals. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to want the things our culture says to want, but not every kid can be a top-of-charts rapper or a super model, especially not overnight. Through strong relationships, we can teach kids to channel their energy to achieve challenging school, career and personal goals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The most motivating goals are those within our reach if we exercise some effort,â&#x20AC;? Elias writes. â&#x20AC;˘ Realistic, hopeful pathways. We must show kids the way to reach their goals, and let them know that going off the path sometimes doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t destroy their dreams. Merle Schwartz of the Character Education Partnership calls it â&#x20AC;&#x153;leeway and forgivenessâ&#x20AC;?: Prepare our kids for obstacles, teach them that actions have consequences, then support them when they have problems, even when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s challenging to do so. â&#x20AC;˘ Engaging school and community settings. Provide opportunities for kids to make positive contributions and gain recognition. Encourage teamwork, and help kids learn new skills that they find valuable. This includes after-school activities and community programs like the Boys and Girls Clubs, Scouting, Big Brothers and Sisters and faith-based groups.

How to Raise a Bully or a Criminal â&#x20AC;Ś

L

ike geniuses, criminals arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t born, either. Society and their own families create them, un-nurtured into anti-social patterns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Children who are anxious, angry or depressed donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t learn,â&#x20AC;? writes Daniel Goleman in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emotional Intelligence.â&#x20AC;? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how to prod kids toward a downward spiral: Â&#x2021;6KXWWOHDQXQZDQWHGFKLOGIURPKRPHWRKRPH Â&#x2021;(PRWLRQDOO\DEXVHKHUZLWKPHDQQHVVWKUHDWVEHOLWWOHPHQWDQG LQVXOWKXPRU Â&#x2021;3K\VLFDOGLVFLSOLQH6RUU\UHVHDUFKGRHVQÂśWDSSURYHRIWKHÂłWRXJKORYH´DWWLWXGHRIÂł,ÂśPQRW KXUWLQJWKHFKLOGMXVWVKRZLQJORYH´ Â&#x2021;,QVWLOOQRHPSDWK\IRURWKHUVXQOLNH RUZRUVHRIIWKDQ KLPWKXVKHZLOOKDYHQRDELOLW\WRIHHO YLFWLPVÂśSDLQ Â&#x2021;8VH79RUYLGHRJDPHVDVFRQVWDQWEDE\VLWWHUV7KH\OHDGWRDQJHUGHSUHVVLRQDQGORQHOLQHVV Â&#x2021;$OORZ\RXUFKLOGWREHRYHUO\VK\DQGDQWLVRFLDO

post-traumatic stress disorder similar to that seen in combat soldiers. It is not inevitable that these kids will spiral out of control or continue cycles of poverty and violence (and fill our prisons) but it does take a different approach to reach and teach them.

Is Your Teen At Risk? At-risk.org, a resource website for parents and the general public, states that if a child displays four or more of the following behaviors, they could be at-risk. Â&#x2021;%HLQJVXVSHQGHGH[SHOOHGWUXDQWRUKDYLQJKLVRUKHUJUDGHVGURS Â&#x2021;%HLQJYHUEDOO\DEXVLYH Â&#x2021;6WUXJJOLQJZLWKEDVLFIDPLO\UXOHVDQGH[SHFWDWLRQV Â&#x2021;3UREOHPVZLWKWKHODZ Â&#x2021;,QGDQJHURIGURSSLQJRXWRIVFKRRO Â&#x2021;$VVRFLDWLQJZLWKDVXVSHFWSHHUJURXS Â&#x2021;/RVLQJLQWHUHVWLQDFWLYLWLHVVSRUWVKREELHVRUFKLOGKRRGIULHQGV Â&#x2021;'LVSOD\LQJVXLFLGDOWHQGHQFLHV Â&#x2021;6HHPLQJGHSUHVVHGRUZLWKGUDZQ Â&#x2021;'LVSOD\LQJYLROHQWEHKDYLRU Â&#x2021;%HLQJVH[XDOO\SURPLVFXRXV Â&#x2021;&KDQJLQJDSSHDUDQFHRUSHUVRQDOK\JLHQH Â&#x2021;%HLQJGHFHLWIXODQGPDQLSXODWLYH Â&#x2021;6WHDOLQJPRQH\RUSHUVRQDOLWHPVIURPKLVRUKHUIDPLO\ Â&#x2021;6HYHUHO\ODFNLQJLQPRWLYDWLRQ Â&#x2021;/\LQJDERXWKLVRUKHUDFWLYLWLHV Â&#x2021;'LVSOD\LQJRXWEXUVWVRIWHPSHU Â&#x2021;/DFNLQJVHOIZRUWKDQGVHOIHVWHHP Â&#x2021;'HI\LQJHVWDEOLVKHGUXOHVUHJDUGOHVVRIFRQVHTXHQFHV Â&#x2021;+DYLQJSUREOHPVZLWKDXWKRULW\ Â&#x2021;3DUHQW V KDVGLIÂżFXOW\JHWWLQJWHHQWRGREDVLFFKRUHVDQGKRPHZRUN Â&#x2021;3DUHQW V PXVWSLFNZRUGVFDUHIXOO\WRDYRLGDYHUEDODWWDFNRUUDJH Â&#x2021;3DUHQW V IHHOVSRZHUOHVVZKHQGHDOLQJZLWKWKHWHHQ Â&#x2021;3DUHQW V VXVSHFWVWKHWHHQLVXVLQJGUXJVRUDOFRKRO

Never Too Late for Social Skills

S

tudies show anti-social kids are much more likely to get in trouble. Emory University psychologist Stephen Nowicki says: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Children who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read or express emotions will constantly feel frustrated.â&#x20AC;? 4EACHANDMODEL Â&#x2021;1RWWRLQYDGHSHUVRQDOVSDFH Â&#x2021;7RUHDGQRQYHUEDOFXHV Â&#x2021;7RORRNDQGVSHDNGLUHFWO\WRRWKHUVZKHQVSRNHQWR Â&#x2021;7RLQLWLDWHVRFLDOFRQWDFWQRWDOZD\VZDLW Â&#x2021;7RFDUU\RQDFRQYHUVDWLRQQRWXVHRQHZRUGUHSOLHV Â&#x2021;7RDVNRSHQHQGHGTXHVWLRQVVWDUWZLWKÂłWHOOPHDERXWÂŞ´ Â&#x2021;7RH[SUHVVJUDWLWXGHWRDQGLQIURQWRIWKHPFRQVWDQWO\ Â&#x2021;7ROHWRWKHUVZDONWKURXJKGRRUVÂżUVW Â&#x2021;7RVD\WKDQNVDQGSOHDVH FDUHIXORYHUXVHRIÂłVLU´DQGÂłPDÂśDP´ FDQVHHPDQWLVRFLDO  Â&#x2021;7KDWUHDGLQJFDQFKDQJHWKHLUOLYHV²DQGVORZWKHPGRZQ

â&#x20AC;Ś But They Can Be Saved Fortunately, destructive behavior can be reversed. Start now. Â&#x2021;/HDUQVRFLDOLQWHOOLJHQFHÂż[\RXURZQZHDNQHVVHVDQGPLUURULW1RZ Â&#x2021;6KRZFRQFHUQIRUWKRVHXQOLNH\RX Â&#x2021;([SRVHNLGVWRWKRVHOHVVIRUWXQDWHDQGÂżQGDZD\WKH\FDQKHOSDQGHPSDWKL]H Â&#x2021;7HDFKWKHPWRPHGLWDWHWRVLWTXLHWO\ZLWKWKHLUWKRXJKWV Â&#x2021;0DNHVXUH\RXUNLGVDUHDURXQGVWURQJUROHPRGHOVLQFOXGLQJWKRVHRIWKHLUJHQGHUDQGUDFH Â&#x2021;/HDUQWRDUJXHLQWHOOLJHQWO\ZLWK\RXUVSRXVH.LGVFRS\\RX Â&#x2021;*HW\RXUFKLOGUHQRXWRIYLROHQWVLWXDWLRQV Â&#x2021;/HDUQWRGLVFLSOLQHZLWKRXWKLWWLQJ-XVWEHFDXVH\RXVXUYLYHGVSDQNLQJVDQGEHDWLQJVXQVFDWKHG GRHVQÂśWPHDQ\RXUFKLOGZLOO Â&#x2021;7DONWR\RXQJSHRSOHGRQÂśWKLGHIURPWKHP Â&#x2021;'RQÂśWPLVWDNHDQHUYRXVNLGDVDGDQJHURXVRQH Â&#x2021;6RXQGVPDUWDQGWDONÂłDGXOW´ZLWKNLGVZKRGRQÂśWH[SHFWLW Â&#x2021;6KRZNLGVZKDWVPDUWDQGVXFFHVVIXOORRNVOLNH DVLQWKHPVRPHGD\ 

jacksonfreepress.com

C

onstant, intense stimulation, pressure to do more and better, media and peer pressure, and lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s everyday changes bombard kids from all directions. Living in atmospheres of poverty, crime and abuse

17


NATURAL GROCERY

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Steps to Adoption by ShaWanda Jacome

START

maintaining genetic and psychological connections to their birth family,â&#x20AC;? according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service, Administration for Children and Families (childwelfare.gov/adoption). The agency offers extensive resources on the adoption process, summarized below:

Cross-cultural, Cross-racial Adoptions

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Prepare yourself and your family Before you make the first call, ask yourself why you want to adopt and if you are ready. Discuss your thoughts with family, friends or church members. Research the different types of adoptions, and adoption expenses and assistance. Make a plan Depending on if you are adopting a healthy infant, a child from overseas or a waiting child, the process can take six months to several years. Select an appropriate agency for the type of adoption you wish to pursue, and determine if you will need a facilitator or an attorney as well. With a plethora of adoption laws, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need someone to help guide you through them. Home study and paperwork The purpose of the home study is for the adopting entity to gather information about you and your family, evaluate your reasons, desire and commitment for adoption, and help you begin your paperwork. Pre-adoption classes or parenting classes In response to the home study or as required by the adopting entity, you will need to take preadoption or parenting classes. These classes will help prepare you to add a new member to your family, and connect with others who have adopted or are going through the same process.

he Howard M. Metzenbaum Multiethnic Placement Act of 1994 prohibits agencies receiving federal funding from delaying or denying placement of a child because of race or ethnicity. Therefore, the focus can be on finding a loving home for a child, regardless of the race of the child or adoption family. Debra G. Smith, former director of the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse, offers these tips for cross-cultural, cross-racial adoption: â&#x20AC;˘ Make sure that you have examined your beliefs and attitudes about race and ethnicity. You must be prepared to have these types of conversations with people around you and your adopted child. â&#x20AC;˘ Look at your lifestyle. It is vital that you value diversity in the various aspects of your lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;neighborhood, social activities, food, friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and essential to strongly model that in your home. It is important to surround yourself with a supportive community of family and friends. â&#x20AC;˘ Create a safe environment for your child where no racially or ethnically biased remarks will be tolerated. â&#x20AC;˘ Be open. Talk about race and culture in your family. Celebrate holidays and customs from various cultures and expose your child to positive role models from his or her ethnic group. Find more help in, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Chocolate, Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World,â&#x20AC;? by Marguerite Wright (Jossey-Boss, 2000, $15.95)

Be matched or locate a child There are many different ways of being matched with a child. The most important aspect of the process is that the child and family are the right fit for one another, and that what you have to give is what that child needs.

Books on Adoption

Your childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrival You are at the home stretch, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to welcome your new child into his or her new home. If your adopted is an infant or toddler, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to make all the preparations any new parent-to-be would. If your child is older or has special needs, make sure to enroll him or her in school and line up all the necessary services. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to determine how to integrate your new child into daily routines. Take lots of pictures to start building memories right away. Be patient. It might be slow going at first; attachment is a process built on trust.

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by Ronni Mott

f you are a child with aging parents, or a caring parent with foresight for your children, here are some of the documents that will help you deal with end of life decisions. As difficult as they may be to complete, they will be a comfort during times of high stress and crisis. â&#x20AC;˘ Power of Attorney. This document allows someone else to make binding legal decisions on your behalf. This may include signing checks and other financial instruments, or selling and acquiring property and other assets. It can be general or specific, depending on your wishes and needs. A Medical Power of Attorney gives someone else the power to make medical decisions on your behalf if you are temporarily or permanently unable to do so. A Durable Power of Attorney stays in effect even if you become incapacitated. Download Power of Attorney forms from sites such as www.uslegalforms.com, or have a lawyer draw them up. â&#x20AC;˘ Advance Health Care Directive or Living Will. This document instructs your family and medical personnel on the kinds of life-saving treatments to use if you become incapacitated. Among the instructions you can leave are your wishes to use (or not use) cardiopulmonary re-

suscitation when your heart or breathing stops, or artificial nutrition and hydration when you are no longer able to eat or drink by mouth. You can also sign a Do Not Resuscitate, or DNR, order, which is a physicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s order that prevents the health-care team from initiating CPR under certain circumstances, and a Do Not Intubate, or DNI, to prevent doctors from placing a tube into your nose or mouth to help you breathe. Download Mississippi Advance Health Care Directive documents from the state Department of Health website (www.msdh.state.ms.us). â&#x20AC;˘ Will. This document spells out how your assets will be divided among your descendants and can include your wishes for your body after death (organ donation, burial, cremation, etc.). Make this document as specific as possible, and update it to reflect major life changes such as a divorce or a change in your financial situation. When my dad died, I found that his 25-year-old will was basically null and void. That will caused some dissention among my siblings. We could have avoided some pain with an updated will. Generally, a lawyer should draw up your will; how19 ever, a hand-written will is legally binding in Mississippi. FILE PHOTO

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Finalize adoption This step may happen before or after your child arrives in your home. To finalize your adoption, you must attend a court hearing where a judge orders that the adoptive parents become the childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal parents. Depending on the needs and circumstances of your child, this can be a large family gathering or a small intimate affair.

Resources

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Hard Decisions

Post-adoption services Remember that you are not alone; you are now part of a larger family. Research adoptiveparent support groups, workshops, conferences and social activities in your area. If your new child is struggling to adjust, seek a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support group or therapy.

jacksonfreepress.com

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hoosing to adopt is a major decision that can reap rewarding and unfathomable benefits of giving an orphaned child a place to call home. Adoption is â&#x20AC;&#x153;the social, emotional and legal process in which children who will not be raised by their birth parents become full and permanent legal members of another family while


Co-housing Now

by Lacey McLaughlin

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Evaluate Your Commitment Co-housing usually requires each tenant to purchase property and make a long-term commitment. Much like buying a home, owners are responsible for repairs and the overall day-to-day management of a property. Co-housing works best when the work is divided between its owners. If you aren’t ready to make a long-term investment, consider similar forms of cohabitation such renting a house with roommates or sharing yards or common spaces with your existing neighbors.

Form a Core Group It’s important to build a co-housing community with people you know and trust. Hold interest meetings and take the time to get to know the people. Owen says a lot of people were interested in the idea, but the group eventually narrowed to a about a dozen committed citizens who had the money and time to invest in the project.

Establish Community Rituals Create rituals that will define and unite your community. Co-housing provides opportunities for neighbors to share common interests. In one co-housing community, Charles Durrett designed a common room specifically for dancing. Now each night after dinner, neighbors clear the room, bring up the lights and dance. Other events can include weekly pot-

May 11 - 17, 2011

FELDER RUSHING

he decrease in the number of Americans participating in bowling leagues since 1950 is just one example of America’s movement toward isolated communities. Robert Putnam uses this example in the book “Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community” (Simon and Schuster, 2001, $10.99) to demonstrate that American’s decline in social activity is detrimental to a strong democratic society. Putman writes that modern technology such as the Internet and TV as well as the increase in working parents is to blame for a society in which neighbors and community members aren’t engaging in face-to-face interactions. Co-housing is perhaps one solution for establishing family-friendly and communal neighborhoods. While co-housing can take on a variety of forms, it’s defined as collaborative housing in which residents participate in the design and operation of their own neighborhoods. In its purest form, a group of people purchase land together, agree on the architectural plans and participate in each stage of the development’s formation. Retrofitting existing buildings and creating homes around open shared spaced and common facilities are other co-housing options. Co-housing allows families to have private homes or townhouses but buildings are connected to common spaces such as courtyards and playgrounds. Co-housing can also include shared kitchens, dens pools, basketball courts and clubhouses, all within walking distance of a tenant’s doorstep. For the past two years, a group of about 20 Jackson residents have been planning their own co-housing community. In March, sisters Marie and Hilda Owen and various sponsors hosted “Intentionally Building Community,” a three-day workshop with architects Charles Durrett and Katie McCamant, who brought the concept of co-housing to America in the 1980s after living in Denmark. “We live too far apart now. I see my neighbors’ cars more than I see my neighbors and (co-housing) is a way to get a close, caring community,” Owen says. During the workshop, Owen and other residents looked at prospective sites to building their own co-housing community. She estimates that it will take about two years to build. If you’re thinking about building your own co-housing community, Owen offers some advice:

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Growing herbs in recycled containers is a kid-friendly family project.

lucks, wine-tastings, holiday parties or welcoming ceremonies for new members. Learn to Let Go Learning how to make group decisions by consensus is vital to establishing a co-housing community. As residents work with architects to design plans they will have to collectively agree on amenities such as pools, the size of spaces and how much they are willing to share. In one co-housing community for seniors, the group could not afford to build an entire single-story development. Many seniors were worried about what would happen if they could no longer access stairs or had to recover from surgeries. The co-housing members formed an agreement that disabled seniors, or seniors prone to falls would have priority on the bottom level. For more information, visit www.cohousing.org, the website of the Cohousing Association of the United States.

Growing Herbs: Kid-Friendly Gardening by Felder Rushing

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handful of culinary herbs are easy to grow and useful in the kitchen—even for new gardeners with little space and for those (including kids) who are too busy to learn about “real” gardening. • Basil, rosemary, oregano and chives are the easiest and most kitchen-friendly. • Herbs can be grown alongside regular flowers. • Recycled buckets and other containers are perfect for planting with herbs. Growing a few of your own herbs is a delightful experience for new gardeners, and a surprisingly easy way to introduce

children to useful skills they can transfer to larger ideas later in life. Plus, it connects us with our food while fostering a nurturing attitude toward life in general. No need to have an herb “garden” to grow a handful of easy, useful, healthful culinary herbs—especially where space, time and gardening skills are in short supply. The easiest kitchen-friendly herbs for summer include rosemary, basil (several interesting types and colors), oregano, bay, and chives or garlic chives. All are easy to go directly from the garden into soups, spaghetti sauce or onto cheese pizzas. Throw in bell pepper

plants for extra interest and vitamins. These most commonly used kitchen herbs grow quite well when mixed in with flowers in a sunny bed, or in medium to large containers filled with a mixture of potting soil and bark mulch (for drainage), with a little compost or old leaf mould thrown in to add life to the soil mix. A slow-release potted plant food such as Osmocote, or regular light feeding with Miracle-Gro will keep the plants growing all season. Felder Rushing hosts MPB’s “Gestalt Gardener” Friday at 9 a.m. and Saturday at 10 a.m. Visit his website, felderrushing.net.


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Super Veggie Super Hero Ridgeland

Jackson

Madison

WWW.BEAGLEBAGELCAFE.NET

Southern Beverage Presents

AMERICAN CRAFT BEER WEEK Monday, May 16

Mint the Restaurant

Tuesday, May 17

Martin’s Lounge

Wednesday, May 18

Scrooges

Thursday, May 19

Georgia Blue

Saturday, May 21

Bonny Blairs Irish Pub

featuring these fine brews

HAPPY HOUR M-F 4p-7p

$1 off domestic bottles, well drinks and house wines

All for only

$7.98

WEDNESDAY 5/11

SHERMAN LEE DILLON (Blues)

THURSDAY 5/12

Dead Irish Blues (Irish Blues)

FRIDAY 5/13

The Bailey Bros. (Blues)

SATURDAY 5/14

The Joe Carroll Gang (Acoustic Rock)

SUNDAY 5/15

CÉILÍ & JACKSON IRISH DANCERS MONDAY 5/16

May 11 - 17, 2011

Karaoke w/ Matt

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For more information visit: www.craftbeer.com, www.southernbeverage.com or www.facebook.com/SouthernBeverage

TUESDAY 5/17

Open Mic with Jason Bailey


How to Live in a Multi-Generational Household by ShaWanda Jacome and Latasha Willis

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â&#x20AC;˘ Caretaking: Discuss long-term care options and living wills with aging parents. Plan how to share. â&#x20AC;˘ Intimacy: Schedule time alone at home or another location, and make arrangements with other family members to ensure privacy.

BILL WARD

he number of people living in multi-generational households has steadily increased over the last three decades, according to the Pew Research Center. As of 2008, 49 million Americans lived in households consisting of adult children living with their parents, grandchildren living with their grandparents or all three generations living under the same roof, up from 28 million in 1980. Reasons for such arrangements include financial difficulty, caring for an aging parent, cultural trends and adult children waiting longer to get married. Grandparents.comâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dr. Georgia Witkin says older adults living with extended family lower their risk of depression because their contributions to the household make them feel needed. On the other hand, living in a multi-generational household can be stressful. Women who live in a multigenerational household increase their risk of heart disease because they often have to act as caregiver and parent, reported health experts in a 2009 British Medical Journal article. They are members of what caregiver.com calls the sandwich generation, caring for both children and parents. Here are some ways to cope with a fulfilling (and complicated) living arrangement:

â&#x20AC;˘ Transportation: If you share a vehicle, be willing to share fuel and maintenance costs. Have a candid talk with an aging parent when it is time to give up the keys. â&#x20AC;˘ Chores: Make a chart showing who does what and when. Even the younger ones can do something as simple as cleaning the bathroom sink. 2ECOMMENDED2EADING

â&#x20AC;˘ Food: Contribute to the grocery bill regularly. Clearly label food that you wish to keep to yourself, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eat someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food if it is labeled. â&#x20AC;˘ Finances: Divvy up the utilities, and be consistent when it comes to rent.

Family Communication

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â&#x20AC;˘ Discipline: Unless the grandparents are their grandchildrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guardians, they should let the parents handle behavior issues until they are asked for advice. Parents should teach the children to respect and not take advantage of their grandparents.

by Lacey McLaughlin

amilies live farther apart than ever. Several tech tools can help you keep in touch from afar. Here are some tips for staying in touch.

Virtual Cards Getting a card in the mail is a fun surprise. But if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re busy, it can be difficult to buy one and make a trip to the post office. Try sending a virtual card to someone you love by using sites such as bluemountain.com or virtualgreeting.com. YouTube Does your father live too far away to take him out on Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day? Grab your camcorder and videotape a heartfelt message, or perform a song and upload it to YouTube. Send the link to him. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost as good as being together.

Skype It Grandparents and great-grandparents all over the world can visit their favorite babies from a distance. Using voice and video chat services, such as Skype, they can do this for free. If both parties have the Skype service, it costs nothing to place a call using only your computer terminal

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

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with a microphone. If both have video cameras in the computer, the visit can include visual contact. More than two computers can join the conversation, turning a conference video call into a virtual family reunion. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as easy to sign up for Skype as it is Twitter or Facebook. Skype users can also call land lines and cell phones for a small monthly fee. Visit skype.com for information. Social Media Facebook and Twitter have gone from being social networking sites among friends to an important way that families can keep in touch, share photos and plan events. Need to organize a family reunion? Just create a Facebook event site. Pick Up the Phone Having a real conversation with a family member is a great way to reconnect and keep in touch. Try to have a regularly scheduled time to make calls.

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Planning an Ideal Neighborhood for Kids

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by Valerie Wells

n ideal neighborhood for children begins with including children in the planning process. This doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean families, developers or planners put in an amusement park with ice cream stands on every block. It means professionals and adults take childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ideas seriously and pay attention to common concerns that both children and adults have. Children share neighborhood concepts with planning professionals, a 1999 study published in the Journal of Planning Education and Research reported. Children prefer a variety of land uses and want places to interact, visit, play and relax.

They want a microcosm of society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Children tended to favor diversity and accessibility, as opposed to homogeneity and privacy. Further, the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans were different in terms of age and particularly in terms of gender,â&#x20AC;? the study shows. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Children were able to conceptualize neighborhood even at the kindergarten level, and many of their conceptualizations were not dissimilar from the traditional view of neighborhood espoused by planners.â&#x20AC;? Internationally, city planners include children early in the process. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happened recently in war-torn Iran. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNICEF Iranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Child Friendly Cities Initiative aims to ensure the rights

of children, ages 6-13, to access quality basic services, through promoting the development of a sustainable and child-friendly environment,â&#x20AC;? a UNICEF report from 2005 states. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first phase of planning for the CFCI in Bam (Iran), focused on community participation, using children as key planners of their environment. UNICEF Iran takes the view that if children are involved in planning cities, the results will be more sustainable and child-friendly than current urban development practices allow.â&#x20AC;? Many American planners have come to the same conclusions and encourage involving children early in the process.

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Groups That Support Families

May 11 - 17, 2011

Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Services P.O. Box 1078 , Jackson, 39215 601-352-7784 MCHS provides a range of programs and services to help meet the needs of children and families across the state such as adoption services, comprehensive family-support services, foster care, counseling and emergency shelters for abused children.

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Operation Shoestring 1711 Bailey Avenue 601-353-6336 Operation Shoestring primarily serves students and families in the Lanier High School feeder pattern with a free after-school program with activities and tutoring. Shoestring is also a referral resource for parents who need medical services, food assistance, GED classes and general support services.

Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum 2145 Highland Drive 601-981-5469 The childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s museum offers an array of interactive exhibits for children and parents to enjoy together as well as special activities such as summer camps, puppet shows and a splash-pad fountain. YMCA Corporate Office: 826 North St. 601-948-0818 In addition to serving the community with fitness facilities, the YMCA also offers family-support services, job training, a responsible-fatherhood program and marriage counseling. Mississippi Department of Human Services 750 N. State St. 1-800-345-6347 This agency provides subsidized child-care assistance to eligible low-income parents, anti-child

by Lacey McLaughlin and Jordan Lashley abuse campaigns, child-protection services, parenting programs, adoption and foster parent assistance. Rise Above for Youth 2389 N. Midway Road, Clinton 601-922-4968 This nonprofit child-welfare organization serves youth ages 14-24 transitioning from foster care, homelessness and juvenile justice in Mississippi. Mississippi Museum of Natural Science 2148 Riverside Drive 601-354-7303 The museum offers exhibits and activities for families such as hands-on fish feedings, a discovery room for preschoolers and curriculum for kids. The Arc of Mississippi 7 Lakeland Circle, Suite 600 601-982-1180 The Arc of Mississippi provides an assortment

of programs for families with individuals with cognitive, intellectual and developmental disabilities. The objective of these family-oriented programs is to give disabled individuals and their families adequate support to lead an â&#x20AC;&#x153;ordinary, decent American Life,â&#x20AC;? according to its website (arcms.org). Mid Jackson Family Resource and Referral Center 329 Adelle St. 601-354-5373 This organization, a host to the Mississippi Child Care Resource Center and Referral Network, provides services to early care and education professionals, parents and children who seek information and services in quality child care. It maintains a database of information and material resources for parents, children and families to access. MORE GROUPS, see page 26 >


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Wed, May 11

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Making An Urban Family by Ward Schaefer

Tradition:

An urban family shares old traditions while forging new ones. “That’s the dynamic: being able to share what’s been important to you and being open to the new traditions that you’re creating with your urban family,” Kander says.

KIT LOGAN

W

hen Beth Kander moved to Jackson in 2003, she hardly knew anyone. Kander, an author and playwright who has also written for the Jackson Free Press, was far from her family in the Midwest and her college friends in the Northeast. About five years ago, Kander decided to host an “Urban Family Thanksgiving” for her friends in Jackson—not a replacement for the holiday she would spend with her own family but a new tradition. “I wanted to acknowledge and celebrate the fact that the friends and community we have here really do become our family,” Kander says. The event was a hit, and she has made it an annual occurrence. Kander’s insight—that city-dwelling adults without families of their own can use networks of friends as a surrogate family—is well supported by sociological and other research. Sociologist Claude Fischer has documented how the social networks of city-dwellers rely more on friends and coworkers than the kin-heavy groups in rural areas. And medical research by epidemiologist Lisa Berkman, among others, has shown that the health benefits that come from having strong social ties are just as attainable through friendships as through families. But how to cement those bonds? The following are some thoughts what makes an urban family event a success.

Food:

There’s a reason so many holidays and family memories revolve around food. Breaking bread together is an easy demonstration of community.

Collaboration:

W h e n people come together for a project, something as simple as a meal, they trust one another to contribute their part.

Expectations:

An urbanf a m i l y gathering is different from a party, because everyone involved knows they’re there to build community.

MORE ORGANIZATIONS, from page 24 > National Alliance on Mental Illness Mississippi 411 Briarwood Drive, Suite 401 601-899-9058 NAMI is dedicated to improving the lives of individuals with mental disabilities and providing services to their families. It conducts fundraisers to promote awareness and raise money for research on severe disabilities. NAMI also provides educational courses for consumers, families and caregivers whose lives are touched by severe brain disorders. The Jackson Zoological Park 2918 W. Capitol St. 601-352-2580 The Jackson Zoo provides attractions, activities and camps for families to enjoy together. It animal-education programs include animal programs, summer camps, wild classrooms, safari slumbers and field trips where parents and children can engage to learn more about wildlife. Division of Aging and Adult Services 750 N. State St. 1-800-345-6347 As a division of the Mississippi Department of Human Services, they help to protect the rights of the elderly and provide access to services.

May 11 - 17, 2011

The Volunteers of Gleaners 601-956-4740 Gleaners is a non-profit organization that collects food that would otherwise go to waste and donates it to charitable agencies that operate on a familyneeds basis. Donated food comes from wholesale food distributors and retail establishments such as supermarkets.

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Mississippi Craft Center 950 Rice Road, Ridgeland 601-856-7546 The Mississippi Craft Center, an operation affiliate of the Craftsmen’s Guild art gallery, is a museum, and an educational center. They provide art classes, weekly events, and artistic attractions.

VSA P.O. Box 2364 601-965-4866 VSA is a non-profit organization that promotes and provides arts opportunities for adults and children with disabilities. Greater Jackson Arts Council 255 E. Pascagoula St. 601-960-1557 The Arts Council is a non-profit organization that provides outreach programs, educational initiatives, grant opportunities and special events to advance and bring together the art community in Jackson. The Center for Violence Prevention P.O. Box 6279, Pearl 39288 601-932-4198 Partnered with many community organizations, the CVP provides crisis assistance for families, women, children or anyone who faces violence and needs help. This agency has a 24-hour crisis and referral line to assist families in immediate need. Afterschool Alliance Mississippi Mississippi Department of Education Office of Innovative Support 359 N. West St., 601-359-3499 This organization works to ensure that families have access to affordable, quality child care via afterschool programs. Its mission is to raise public awareness of the need for affordable after-school programs and raise public will to invest, personally and monetarily, in such programs. Parents for Public Schools 200 N. Congress St., Suite 500 601-969-6015 PPS promotes parental involvement and works with Jackson Public Schools parents and students through a number of initiatives, such as the Parent Leadership Institute, which provides training to parents and people who

care about children, and the Ask for More Arts program, a school-community-arts partnership designed to help elementary students learn through the arts. Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum National Agricultural Aviation Museum 1150 Lakeland Drive 601-432-4500 The museum has a multitude of attractions and events that families in Jackson can enjoy together, such as the Bison Cotton Gin and the train exhibit. The Ag museum also rents facilities for birthday parties and family events. The International Museum of Muslim Cultures 201 E. Pascagoula St. 601-960-0440 The IMMC offers a wide range of educational programs, including teacher-training workshops, is offered for this exhibition. Special activities in the Learning Laboratory offer hands-on experiences. Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center 528 Bloom St. 601-960-1457 The museum celebrates the work, lifestyle and contributions of African Americans through art, artifacts and photography, evoking a greater understanding of the black experience in the South. Following are public libraries in the JacksonHinds Library System: Eudora Welty Library 300 N. State St. 601-968-5811 Jackson’s main library is named after the Pulitzer Prize-winning Jackson native and world-renowned author Eudora Welty. Its resources include the Mississippi Writers Room, interlibrary loans, information resource center, CABA Law Library, and various youth services and programs.

Fannie Lou Hamer Library 3450 Albermarle Road 601-362-3012 Margaret Walker Alexander Library 2525 Robinson Road 601-354-8911 This collection is comprised of literature with themes of African American experiences, culture and descent. Medgar Evars Boulevard Library 4215 Medgar Evars Blvd. 601-982-2867 Charles W. Tisdale Library 807 E. Northside Drive 601-366-0021 This facility hosts the Young People’s Project and has a teen center on site. Richard Wright Library 515 W. McDowell Road 601-372-1621 Willie Morris Library 4912 Old Canton Road 601-987-8181 Ella Bess Austin Library 420 W. Cunningham Ave., Terry 601-878-5336 R.G. Bolden/Anna Bell-Moore Library 1444 Wiggins Road 601-922-6076 Beverly J. Brown Library 7395 S. Siwell Road 601-372-0954 The Quisenberry Library 605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton 601-924-5684 Add more groups at www.jfp.ms.


by Lacey McLaughlin

Musicians play instruments at FIGMENT on Governor’s Island, N.Y., in 2009.

A

As a research associate at the Jackson Community Design Center, an urban research laboratory at Mississippi State School of Architecture in downtown Jackson, Grant had recently helped design concept plans for The Plant on 80. The 143,000 square-foot factory served as the Coca-Cola Bottling Company on U.S. Highway 80 in south Jackson until it closed its doors in 2007. Gil Sidi, an entrepreneur, bought the property in 2009 with plans for development. Grant had big ideas for the space. She and other JCDC architects proposed the idea of turning the space into loft and studio spaces with amenities for artists. She envisioned it as a space that could host community events, grow community gardens and revitalize the U.S. 80 corridor. Bringing Sidi and Koren together, Grant proposed hosting FIGMENT Jackson at the former plant. Koren initially had doubts about having FIGMENT at a site that would essentially benefit a real estate developer and counter the festival’s principle of no commerce. But when Sidi invited Koren to visit Jackson to meet with the community, city department heads, arts organizations and other key players, Koren was impressed with what he saw. “It was an actual project that there was a real need for in Jackson,” Koren says. “I started to learn of the important role that the plant could play in bringing energy to a part of the city that really needed it. “It became clear that it was not about creating a realestate development that would bring profit to one investor. Sidi was really doing this for the right reasons.” In April, FIGMENT board members met with Melvin Priester Jr. at his family’s law office on North Street. The majority of the board members are young professionals who might not have a lot of time or money, but have big ideas. They are busy tackling logistics of the event such as renting port-a-potties, organizing volunteers and fundraising. The Jackson group will pull off the entire event with $5,000

COURTESY WHITNEY GRANT

s he flipped through a slideshow of a “Wizard of Oz”inspired golf course, an outdoor living room made of grass and children jumping in a bed of flower petals, David Koren emphasized that FIGMENT is not an art exhibit, but a participatory arts event that has the potential to change Jackson’s landscape. Koren, FIGMENT project executive director, first floated the idea of bringing FIGMENT to Jackson from New York in a November 2010 presentation at the North Midtown Arts Center. In 2007, Koren founded FIGMENT and hosted the first major arts showcase on Governor’s Island in New York. Similar to Arizona’s Burning Man, FIGMENT has defined principles that set it apart from a typical arts festival or exhibit. FIGMENT does not involve any commerce, because putting a price tag on events ultimately limits participation. Admission is free, artists cannot sell their work, and corporate sponsors are not allowed. Other principles are inclusion, self-reliance, giving, communal effort, civic responsibility, leaving no trace, gratitude, immediacy and, most importantly, participation. “We were looking to open up some opportunities and create a new kind of arts event that was open to anyone to participate in and to really build community,” Koren says about the New York project. This year, Detroit, Boston and Jackson will host FIGMENT events for the first time. The requirements for participating in FIGMENT are simple: If you have a creative idea, bring it. Artists can bring their own materials and set up shop, as long as they don’t leave anything behind. FIGMENT is meant to be organic, spontaneous and inclusive. In fall 2010 Whitney Grant learned about FIGMENT through an American Institute of Architects design competition listing she found. She fell in love with the idea. “FIGMENT is like a potluck party for art,” Grant says. “You can bring everything you need. It’s about the experience.”

from private donations and a grant from the Greater Jackson Arts Council. Examples of the projects include a water drums station, a life-size camera obscura, wearable sculptures and a 50-foot interactive model of the Pearl River. One of the most elaborate pieces is the Samplotron, a Mobius sculpture made from reclaimed metal and wood. As people explore the space, they can press buttons to hear original music and song compilations. Priester collaborated with several local artists as well as artists from across the country on the project. Since November, Grant and the board members have worked tirelessly to promote all things FIGMENT and rebrand the old cola plant. In January, more than 1,000 of people attended the Jackson Free Press Best of Jackson Party at the plant. Since then, local filmmakers have used to the space to film music videos, artist have painted murals, and the community has pitched in to make repairs. Sidi said he hopes the energy FIGMENT Jackson brings will define how the community uses the plant. FIGMENT can inspire people and communities to envision a better future. Koren says the first step to changing things is simply imagining them happening. “(FIGMENT) is a great springboard for people who want to get in touch with their own creativity. It helps us, as individuals, in all kinds of ways—(by) being able to have that outlet, being able to access our imaginations and access that reality,” Koren says. FIGMENT Jackson is from 10 a.m. to midnight, May 14 and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. May 15 at The Plant on 80 (1421 Highway 80). For more information, visit jackson.figmentproject.org.

Volunteers help prepare The Plant on 80 for FIGMENT Jackson May 14-15.The former Coca-Cola bottling plant has been vacant since 2007.

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LOGAN GRENDEL

Art Revival

8 DAYS p 28 |MUSIC p 33

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BEST BETS May 11 - 18, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 5/11

COURTESY SKIPP COON

The Jackson 2000 luncheon featuring the Panel of American Women Reunion at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.) is at 11:45 a.m. $12; email bevelyn_ branch@att.net to RSVP. … Jason Bailey performs during F. Jones Corner’s blues lunch. … Author Araminta Stone speaks during History Is Lunch at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.) at noon. Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Business After Hours with the Mississippi Braves is at 5:05 p.m. at Trustmark Park (1 Braves Way, Pearl) $5; call 601-948-7575. … The McCoy House Fundraiser at is at 7 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. $15 in advance, $25 at the door; call 601-946-0578. … Poets II has music with DJ Phingaprint. … Dreamz JXN hosts Wasted Wednesday.

FRIDAY 5/13

Brandon Day at Shiloh Park (Shiloh Road, Brandon) kicks off at 5 p.m. and continues through May 14. Performers include Sunny Sweeney, Rachel Adora, Randy Houser and Justin Moore. $15 in advance, $20 at the gate; visit brandonday. org. … The Sunset Series with Raphael Semmes and Hunter Gibson is at 5 p.m. at Underground 119. Free. … The Paranormal Celebration at Java Ink (420 Roberts St., Pearl) kicks off at 7:30 p.m. and continues May 14 from 11 a.m.6 p.m. Free; call 601-397-6292. … DeVille YMCA’s Luck of the Draw fundraiser is at 7 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $35 admission, $100 Art Chance ticket; call 601-7093760. … Frankie Bones and DJ Proppa Bear perform at the “Sprung” concert starting at 8 p.m. at Dreamz JXN $15. … Train performs at 8 p.m. at the Jackson Convention Complex. $30, $50; call 800-745-3000. … Kenny Hollywood is at Queen of Hearts. … Suite 106 hosts Back to Basics Friday.

SATURDAY 5/14

The Great Big Yam Potatoes Music Gathering and Fiddle Contest at Historic Jefferson College (Highway 61 N., Natchez) starts at 8 a.m. Performers include Jack Magee and Sound Wagon, The Dead Fiddlers’ Collective and the Cane Grinders. Free; call 601-898-8265; visit bigyampotatoes.com. … The FIGMENT art festival at The Plant on 80 (1421 Highway 80 W.) kicks off at 9 a.m. and runs through May 15. Free; visit jackson.figmentproject.org. … Shop and get free ice cream at the Scooper Bowl at Good Samaritan Center (114 Millsaps Ave.). $5. $2, $1 children ages 4-12, children 3 and under free; call 601-355-6276. … Diane Williams’ “Walking the Path” exhibit at Smith Robertson Museum (528 Bloom St.) ends today. $4.50, $3 seniors, $1.50 children under 18; call 601-960-1457. … The Blondes v. Brunettes football game at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.) is at 2 p.m. $25; e-mail elizabethmhamilton@hotmail.com. … Better Than Ezra plays at Fire at 8 p.m. $20. … Pelican Cove has music by Otis Lotus. … Larry the Cable Guy performs at Golden Moon Hotel and Casino at 8 p.m. $10-$95; call 800-745-3000. Rapper Skipp Coon performs at the Vicksburg Hip-Hop Show May 12 at the Upper End Lounge at 9 p.m.

May 11 - 17, 2011

The Brain Injury Association of Mississippi hosts its annual Bowl-A-Rama from 6-8 p.m. at Paradise Lanes (820 Cooper Road, Suite 2). Dinner included; prizes awarded. Free for brain or spinal cord injury survivors; $250 team or lane sponsor; call 601-981-1021, or email dpierce@msbia.org to RSVP. … The D’lo Trio performs at 6:30 p.m. at Cherokee Inn. Free. … The “We Sing a World of Music” concert is at 6:30 p.m. at Murrah High School (1400 Murrah Drive). $3; call 601-960-5380. … UMMC honors Dr. John D. Bower at the celebrity roast fundraiser at 6:30 p.m. at the Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). $75; call 601-815-9463. … The Vicksburg Hip-Hop Show at Upper End Lounge (1306 Washington St., Vicksburg) includes music by ZeeDubb, 28 Skipp Coon and more. $5; call 601-630-6598.

Howard Jones performs at the King Edward Hotel’s jazz brunch. … See the ballet film “Copelia” at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoua St.) at 2 p.m. $16; visit msfilm.org. … The reception for the Mississippi Artists’ Guild exhibition at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.) is at 2 p.m.; the show hangs through June 30. Free; call 601-960-1557. … See the film “Freedom Riders: American Experience” at Masonic Temple (1072 John R. Lynch St.) at 5 p.m.; limited seating. Free; call 601-979-3935. … Apocalyptica is at Fire. .. Pub Quiz at Hal & Mal’s.

MONDAY 5/16

“Freedom Riders: American Experience” airs on Mississippi Public Broadcasting (broadcast channel 29, Comcast channel 7) at 8 p.m. Visit mpbonline.org/freedomriders. … Tommie Vaughan performs at Char at 6 p.m. … Martin’s hosts Open-mic Night. … Karaoke at Fenian’s and Irish Frog.

TUESDAY 5/17

Mauri Armstrong Davis’ art exhibit at St. Andrew’s Lower School (4120 Old Canton Road) hangs through May 24. Free; call 601-987-9300. … Expressions of the Orient at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) featuring curator John Keefe is at 5:30 p.m. Free; call 601-960-1515. … Jackson Browne performs at Thalia Mara Hall at 8 p.m. $47.50 and up; call 800-745-3000.

WEDNESDAY 5/18

Historian Vince Venturini speaks during History Is Lunch at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.) at noon. Bring lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Karaoke at Ole Tavern and Pop’s. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

Sunny Sweeney performs at Brandon Day May 14 at Shiloh Park. at 7 p.m. COURTESY ERIN BURR/BIG MACHINE LABEL GROUP

THURSDAY 5/12

SUNDAY 5/15


Revealing Heaven On Earth 8:30 a.m. A Service of Word and Table 9:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Service Live Streaming at www.gallowayumc.org Televised on WAPT Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church Ages 4-Kindegarten Nursery Available Ages 6 weeks-3 years

305 North Congress Street Jackson, MS

jacksonfreepress.com

601-353-9691 English 601-362-3464 Spanish www.gallowayumc.org

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jfpevents Radio JFP on WLEZ ongoing, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from -1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. JFP sports writer Bryan Flynn also gives commentary at 12:45 p.m. Listen to podcasts of all shows at jfpradio.com. Free; call 601-362-6121, ext. 17. Jackson 2000 Luncheon May 11, 11:45 a.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). The topic is “Panel of American Women Reunion.” Members of the panel share their experiences of fighting against racism and prejudice in the 1950s. Please RSVP. $12; e-mail bevelyn_branch@att.net. Zoo Brew May 13, 6 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). The theme is “Wingin’ It with the Macaws.” Sample more than 40 specialty beers from Capital City Beverage, margaritas by Paco’s and chicken wings from the Tyson’s Wing Cook-off competition. The Sole Shakers will perform. Park and ride from Coffee Bus at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.) or Barnes and Noble at Renaissance (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland) for $10. Show ticket stub for free admission to the 9 p.m. after-party at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.). $25, $20 members; call 601-352-2500. JFP Chick Ball July 9, 6 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). The fundraiser benefits the Center for Violence Prevention. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. More details: jfpchickball.com and follow on Twitter @jfpchickball. Get involved, volunteer, donate art, money or gifts at chickball@jacksonfreepress .com. Be a sponsor for as low as $50. Call 601-362-6121, ext. 16 Mississippi Happening ongoing. Guaqueta Productions program features special musical guest. Download free podcasts at mississippihappening.com.

Play the Wild Side Golf Tournament May 12, 11:30 a.m., at Live Oaks Golf Club (11200 Highway 49). Registration is at 11:30 a.m., lunch and the putting contest is at 11:45 a.m., and tee time is at 1 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Clinton Community Nature Center. $75, $300 four-person team, $5$10 putting contest; call 601-926-1104. Clutter and Hoarding Community Forum May 12, 6 p.m., at Hinds Behavioral Health Services - Region 9 (3450 Highway 80 W. Jackson, MS 39209). Dr. Andrew Bishop gives insight on the negative effects of physical and mental clutter. Free; call 601-321-2400. New Vibrations Network Gathering May 12, 6:30 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church (4866 N. State St.). Bring business cards and brochures to share. Email newvibrations2003@hotmail.com. National Alliance on Mental Illness Family Support Group May 12, 7 p.m., at St. Dominic Hospital (969 Lakeland Drive), in the St. Catherine Room. NAMI Mississippi offers a support group for families with an adult relative with a mental illness on second Thursdays. Free; call 601-899-9058.

FREEDOM RIDERS “Freedom Riders” Film Screening May 15, 5 p.m., at Masonic Temple (1072 John R. Lynch St.). See the film that airs on Mississippi Public Broadcasting May 16 at 8 p.m. A question-and-answer session follows. Seating is limited. Free; call 601-979-3935.

Brandon Day May 13-14, at Shiloh Park (Shiloh Road, Brandon). The festival includes carnival rides, food, arts and crafts, and music. Hours are 5-11 p.m. May 13 and 10 a.m.-11 p.m. May 14. $15 in advance, $20 at the gate; visit brandonday.org.

“Freedom Riders: American Experience” May 16, 8 p.m., on Mississippi Public Broadcasting (broadcast channel 29, Comcast channel 7). The documentary contains footage and interview of civil-rights activists who participated in the Freedom Rides in 1961. Visit mpbonline.org/freedomriders.

Luck of the Draw May 13, 7 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Enjoy refreshments, a silent auction and an art drawdown in which each Art Chance ticket holder selects artwork to take home. Proceeds benefit the DeVille YMCA. $35 admission, $100 Art Chance ticket; call 601-709-3760.

Breach of Peace: Portraits of the 1961 Freedom Riders through June 12, at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The exhibition shares journalist and photographer Eric Etheridge’s project of the same name. 328 mugshots are displayed alongside 15 contemporary portraits of Freedom Riders. Free; call 601-960-1515.

Jackson Audubon Society Spring Migration Field Trip May 14, 8 a.m., at Vicksburg Military Park (Clay St., Vicksburg). Learn about migratory birds from expert birder Bruce Reid. Participants meet in parking lot at 7:30 a.m. Bring snacks, lunch and water. $3 park entrance fee; call 601-956-7444.

COMMUNITY

May 11 - 17, 2011

Connect 1 Disability Disaster Preparedness Summit May 12-13, at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The event highlights the needs of the disabled during disasters, and helps prepare emergency responders and other relief workers. Hours are 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. both days. Registration required; space is limited. Free; call 601-432-6377.

Arts Alive! May 13-14, at Smith Park (302 Amite St.). The event features food, art and performances by the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra’s woodwind quintet, Ballet Mississippi, the Mississippi Opera and more. Free admission; call 601-326-3450.

“The Freedom Rides: Journey for Change” May 16-Oct 31, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). The exhibit examines the arrival of the Freedom Riders in Jackson, their incarceration at the State Penitentiary at Parchman and their impact on the Civil Rights Movement. Hours are 8 a.m.–5 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m.–1 p.m. Saturdays. Free; call 601-576-6850.

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Business After Hours with the Mississippi Braves May 11, 5:05 p.m., at Trustmark Park (1 Braves Way, Pearl). The Tri-county Council of Chambers provides food, door prizes and a ticket to the Mississippi Braves game. $5; call 601-948-7575.

Dragon Boat Regatta May 14, 9 a.m., at Ross Barnett Reservoir (100 Reservoir Park Road). The Madison County Chamber of Commerce hosts boat races and a free festival on shore with live music, a children’s village and food. $1,200 team of 25, $1,000 members; call 601-605-2554. Scooper Bowl Flea Market and Ice Cream Festival May 14, 9 a.m., at Good Samaritan Center (114 Millsaps Ave.). Enjoy an outdoor flea market, food and free Blue Bell ice cream. Early-bird shoppers welcome at 7 a.m. for $5. $2, $1 children ages 4-12, children 3 and under free; call 601-355-6276.

MIRA Advocacy Meeting May 11, noon, at Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance (MIRA) (612 N. State St.). The Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance will meet in the conference room. Bring lunch; drinks provided. Call 601-968-5182.

Preview Picnic and Block Party May 14, 10 a.m., at Madison River Oaks Medical Center (Nissan Parkway, Canton). Picnic lunch, guided tours of the new hospital, music and a visit from The Backyardigans. Free; visit careformadison.com.

“History Is Lunch” May 11, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Author Araminta Stone Johnson will talk about and sign copies of “And One Was a Priest: The Life and Times of Duncan M. Gray Jr.” Bring lunch; coffee/water provided. Free; call 601-576-6850.

Small Business Success Seminar May 16, 5:30 p.m., at Venture Incubator (City Centre Building, 200 S. Lamar St., 10th floor, south tower). The program for entrepreneurs provides information on how business incubators can help grow small businesses. RSVP. Call 601-906-4868.

An Eye for an Eye

S

by Lacey McLaughlin

et against the backdrop of Argentina’s military regime in 1982, “Invisible Eye” tells the story of a young schoolteacher who falls prey to her supervisor’s trap of sexual abuse. The film’s plot parallels the historical events in Argentina during the 1980s. In 1982, during the Falklands War, Argentina fought Britain for control of the Falkland Islands under Argentinian dictator Leopoldo Galtieri. Galterieri was later prosecuted for human rights abuses during the war. The man who Crossroads Film Society presents “Invisible Eye” May 15. is the teacher’s boss is representative of a dictator who runs the school like his own regime at all costs. Crossroads Film Society and the Global Film Initiative present “Invisible Eye” during the “Sunday Matinees in May” series at 2:30 p.m. May 15 at Mississippi Public Broadcasting (3825 Ridgewood Road). A discussion about rape and war will follow the screening. Admission is $5. For a complete schedule of films, visit www.crossroadsfilmsociety.com.

COURTESY GLOBAL LENS INITIATIVE

JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

Events at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.), in Hederman Cancer Center. Registration required. Free; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262. • Breast Cancer Support Group May 16, 5:30 p.m. The topic is “Why Exercise During Cancer Treatment?” with physical therapist Ginger Stover. • Learning How to Relax May 17, 11 a.m. In the seminar for cancer patients and caregivers, certified massage therapist Barbie Lyn teaches relaxation techniques including massage, breathing and the use of soft music. $5 optional lunch. Nature Nuts Preschool Program May 18-Nov. 16, at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton). The program is for children ages 2-5. Sessions are held on third Wednesdays from 10-11 a.m. Registration required. Receive a $2 discount for each additional child. $8 per session, $5 members; call 601-926-1104. MARL Summer Camp Enrollment, at Mississippi Animal Rescue League (5221 Greenway Drive Ext.). Campers will help take care of shelter animals and have discussions will animal experts and staff. A T-shirt and a snack are included. Sessions are June 7-10 and June 14-17 from 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. with a 13-child limit per session. Register by May 20. $125; e-mail samanthag@msarl.org.

and Saturdays. Free admission; call 601-987-6783. Old Fannin Road Farmers’ Market (1307 Old Fannin Road, Brandon), through Dec. 24. Farmers sell produce Monday-Saturday from 8 a.m.-7 p.m. and noon-6 p.m. Sunday. Call 601-919-1690.

STAGE AND SCREEN Dinner and a Movie May 13, 7:30 p.m., at Rainbow Whole Foods Co-operative Grocery (2807 Old Canton Road). Enjoy Oscar-winning “Inside Job” and vegetarian dinner from High Noon Cafe. $13, $10 members, $8 stockholders; call 601-366-1602. “What About the Children?” May 14, 6 p.m., at Forest Hill High School (2607 Raymond Road). The play by director-playwright Felicia Brookins is about a young man who ignores his mother’s advice about relationships, and suffers the consequences of his decisions. Seating is at 5 p.m. $10 in advance, $15 at the door; call 769-220-2677. “The Case of the Birthday Surprise” Dinner Theater May 14, 6:30 p.m., at Yogi on the Lake/Jellystone Campground (143 Campground Road, Pelahatchie). The play by Mississippi Murder Mysteries includes a three-course dinner. Seating is at 6 p.m.; please RSVP. $38.50; call 601-613-8554.

Free Mental Health Screenings For Adults through May 31, at Hinds Behavioral Health Services, Region 9 (3450 Highway 80 W. Jackson, MS 39209). The clinic offers this during National Mental Health Month. Free; call 601-321-2400.

The Intellectual Bulimics May 14, 10 p.m., at Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St.). The local stand-up comedy troupe performs. $7; e-mail ghettohippie1@hotmail.com.

Jackson Inner-city Gardeners Call for Volunteers through Aug. 30. JIG needs volunteers 5:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 8 -11 a.m. Saturdays at the corner of W. Northside Drive and Medgar Evers Blvd. Call 601-924-3539.

MUSIC

FARMERS’ MARKETS Byram Farmers Market (20 Willow Creek Lane, Byram), through Oct. 29. The market is open Monday-Saturday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Products include fresh produce, wildflower honey, roasted peanuts, jams, jellies, birdhouses, baskets and gourds for crafting. Call 601-373-4545. Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.), through Dec. 17. Shop for fresh locally grown fruits and vegetables, specialty foods, and crafts from local artisans, including the Greater Belhaven Market. The market is open 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Call 601-354-6573. Jackson Roadmap to Health Equity Project’s Farmers’ Market (2548 Livingston Road) through Dec. 17. Buy from a wide selection of fresh produce provided by participating local farmers. WIC vouchers are accepted, and chefs will be on hand to give cooking demonstrations with WIC products. Market hours are 9-6 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays

“We Sing A World of Music” May 12, 6:30 p.m., at Murrah High School (1400 Murrah Drive). Murrah High School Choir, the Murrah Concert Singers, the Murrah Madrigals and the Chastain Middle School Choir. $3; call 601-960-5380. The Vicksburg Hip-Hop Show May 12, 9 p.m., at Upper End Lounge (1306 Washington St., Vicksburg). Performers include 5th Child, ZeeDubb and Calico Panache, Rashad Street, Skipp Coon, Ulogy and DJ Sean Mac. $5; call 601-630-6598. “Sprung” Concert May 13, 8 a.m., at Dreamz JXN (426 W. Capitol St.). Performers include Frankie Bones, DJ Proppa Bear and more $15; e-mail speakerfreakerproductions@gmail.com. Sunset Series with Raphael Semmes May 13, 5 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.), on the outdoor stage in the parking lot. Semmes performs with the 119 Rock Machine featuring Hunter Gibson. Free; call 601-352-2322. Train May 13, 8 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Tickets available through Ticketmaster. $30, $50; call 800-745-3000.

More EVENTS, see page 32


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jacksonfreepress.com


6A0=3E84F

jfpevents

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS

South of Walmart in Madison

Events at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619.

ALL STADIUM SEATING

• “Pain Unforgiven” May 11, 5 p.m., at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Randy Pierce signs copies of his book. $24.95 book.

Listings for Friday, May 13th - Thursday, May 19th Priest 3-D Bridesmaids Thor 3-D

PG13 R PG13

Thor (non 3-D) PG13 Something Borrowed

PG13

Jumping the Broom PG13 Fast Five

PG13

Hoodwinked Too 3-D PG

Prom

• “What There Is to Say We Have Said” May 12, 5 p.m. Suzanne Marrs signs copies of her book; reading at 5:30 p.m. $35 book.

PG

Madea’s Big Happy Family PG13 Water For Elephants

G

Rio 3-D

G

Rio (non 3-D)

G

Soul Surfer Insidious

• “Hidden History of the Mississippi Blues” May 13, 5 p.m. Roger Stolle signs copies of his book; reading at 5:30 p.m. $19.99 book. • “The Magician’s Elephant” May 15, 1 p.m. Kate DiCamillo signs copies of her book. $6.99 book.

PG13

African Cats

• “The Tender Mercy of Roses” May 17, 5 p.m. Anna Michaels signs copies of her book; reading at 5:30 p.m. $22.99 book.

8IJUBLFS&TUIFUJDT

• Facials • Waxing • Permanent Makeup • Brazilian Bikini waxing

PG PG13

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

Movieline: 355-9311

Break the Binding Book Club May 12, 5 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). The club, for ages 12 and up, reviews the book “Incarceron” by Catherine Fisher. Refreshments provided. Call 601-932-2562. Bernice McFadden Book Signing May 14, 2 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). McFadden is the author of books such as “Sugar,” “The Warmest December” and “This Bitter Earth.” Refreshments served. Free, book prices vary; call 601-750-6511.

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

from page 30

“We just want hot wax!”

CREATIVE CLASSES Ballet Magnificat! Summer Dance Intensive Registration through May 20, at Ballet Magnificat! Studios (5406 Interstate 55 North). Meetings also held at Belhaven University (1500 Peachtree St.). The focus is the technical and spiritual aspects of dance. For ages 11-24. Two- and four-week sessions available June 25-July 23. Register by May 20; late applicants incur a $100 processing fee. $50 registration fee, tuition $711.55 and up; call 601-977-1001. Oil Painting Class May 12, 6 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Topics include still life, interior, floral and landscape painting. Students are welcome to paint with acrylics. The eight-week class is on Thursdays from 6-9 p.m. through June 30. $145 plus supplies; call 601-974-1130. Visiting Artist Workshop May 15, 1:30 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). At 1:30 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4:30 p.m., Anthony DiFatta shows how to make a collage out of recycled and reclaimed materials. Free with paid admission; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-5437. High School Journalism Workshop Call for Applications, at University of Southern Mississippi (118 College St., Hattiesburg). The School of Mass

Communication and Journalism is accepting applications for the Southern Mississippi High School Journalism Workshop June 5-10. May 16 is the application deadline. Call 601-266-4258. Brownie Workshop May 18, 9 a.m., at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Learn the best techniques to bake brownies from scratch. $69; call 601-898-8345.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Mississippi Artists’ Guild Juried Fine Arts Exhibition May 12-June 30, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Approximately 120 paintings are featured in the categories of oils, acrylics, watercolors, pastels and mixed media. The May 15 reception is at 2 p.m. Free; call 601-960-1557. Paranormal Celebration May 13-14, at Java Ink (420 Roberts St., Pearl). The costume contest is May 13 at 7:30 p.m.; prizes awarded at 10 p.m. May 14 from 11 a.m.-6 p.m., enjoy ghost-hunting discussions, a haunted gallery, a haunted attractions seminar and more. Free; call 601-397-6292. “Walking the Path: The Evolution of Diane Williams” through May 14, at Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center (528 Bloom St.). The textile exhibit shows the evolution of African American life. Hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-1p.m. Saturdays. $4.50, $3 seniors, $1.50 children under 18; call 601-960-1457. Art Exhibit through June 30, at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). See glass works by Donna Davis, and artwork by clients of Mississippi State Hospital and Jaquith Nursing Home through June 30. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. The May 17 reception is from 2-4 p.m. Free; call 601-432-4056. FIGMENT Art Festival May 14-15, at The Plant (1421 Highway 80 W.). Hosted by the nonprofit organization Action Arts League and the Greater Jackson Arts Council, artists showcase original works including sculpture, performance and workshops. Free; email jackson@figmentproject.org. Expressions of the Orient May 17, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). After hors d’oeuvres, the program begins at 6 p.m. New Orleans Museum of Art curator John Keefe explores Japonisme and the decorative arts. Galleries open until 8 p.m. Free; call 601-960-1515. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE Parent/Guardian Education Advocacy Trainings May 14, 11 a.m., at Lumpkin’s BBQ (182 Raymond Road). Sessions are second Saturdays. Lunch provided. RSVP. Free; call 877-892-2577. McCoy House Fundraiser May 11, 7 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). Music by Chris Gill, Todd Thompson and the Lucky Hand Blues Band, and a silent auction. Proceeds benefit the McCoy House for Sober Living. $15 in advance, $25 at the door; call 601-946-0578. Celebrity Roast Fundraiser May 12, 6:30 p.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The honoree is nephrologist Dr. John D. Bower. Proceeds benefit kidney patients at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. $75; call 601-815-9463.

May 11 - 17, 2011

Sickle Cell 5K Walk May 14, 7 a.m., at University of Mississippi Medical Center (2500 N. State St.). The theme is “Put A Spring In Your Step.” registration is at 7 a.m. at the Student Union, and the walk begins at 8 a.m. Proceeds benefit UMMC’s Pediatric Sickle Cell Clinics. Door, prizes, T-shirts and refreshments included. $20; call 601-366-5874.

32

Blondes vs. Brunettes May 14, 2 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Two teams of women, divided to reflect the age-old rivalry between blondes and brunettes, compete in a powder-puff football game. Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association. $25; e-mail elizabethmhamilton@hotmail.com. CARA Recycling Program, at Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (960 N. Flag Chapel Road). CARA is collecting empty laser or toner cartridges and used cellphones to send to FundingFactory in exchange for cash. Donations welcome; e-mail sadiecat17@comcast.net.


DIVERSIONS|music

RICK OLIVIER

by Tim Roberson

I-55, Revisited

Do you think the way technology and the record industry has changed has affected the way musicians are looking at their craft? Our first record was on cassette. I wish we’d had the tools then that we do now. This was really before the Internet was around. Well, it was around, but nobody was using it the way we use it now. It was before Facebook and MySpace and that social-networking aspect. Now if you really want to work it, you can go out there and work it from your little laptop, which is much different than the way we did it, which was to get in the van and go to a city six or seven hours away, and play for pizza and some beer, and then head on to the next one. I don’t know that it’s necessarily easier now, but it’s definitely different. Maybe what they’re after is a little bit different than what we were after. You can sell a lot fewer records now and be hugely popular. How have those shifts affected you? We’ve sold more than 2 million records. We know what it’s like to sell records. We also know the expectation isn’t there now for people to sell that many records anymore. It’s just about multiple impressions, whether it’s on TV or film or radio. When we first started, it wasn’t cool to have your song in a commercial. Now, it’s like the objective.

Is the objective still to be signed with a huge label? No, but there’s some appeal to that. Now don’t get me wrong, a major label can make you. They’re still doing that. There are just fewer major labels and fewer prominent artists on those labels. There are other ways to go about it now. You can sell far fewer records on your own label and make as much or more money than if you were on a major label. Better Than Ezra heads to Jackson soon (May 14) and will be doing Jazz Fest the weekend before … I was thinking about this. Jackson, really, has been one of the markets we’ve been playing since the beginning. We’ve played so many places there. W.C. Don’s, Hal & Mal’s, The Depot, The Midnight Sun. We’ve done Jubilee!JAM when it was around. We played a lot of shows in Jackson over the years. We have a lot of fun in Mississippi. When we first started, it was a short enough drive for us to play Jackson or maybe Ole Miss or Mississippi State. We’re very familiar with I-55. As a whole, Jackson has been a place that musicians skip over on their way from New Orleans to Memphis. Why do you think people skip Jackson? Typically, if that’s what you’re seeing, then it’s a venue issue. The right venue is not in town. It’s not that the people aren’t there to support it; just for whatever reason, the facility is not up to par. One of the reasons we’ve played so many venues (in Jackson) is because they keep changing. Some of the venues are there, and the next time we come around they aren’t there anymore. Where’s the consistency? Tell us about the Better Than Ezra Foundation to help New Orleans and southern Louisiana. Essentially, we’ve always done some charitable sorts of things. Prior to Katrina, we used to do a golf tournament, and proceeds went to the National (Multiple Sclerosis) Society.

Natalie’s Notes

Better Than Ezra is (left to right) Tom Drummond, Kevin Griffin and Michael Jerome. See them May 14 at Fire.

Post-Katrina, we felt that we needed (to help) the Gulf Coast recover and focused on that. We’ve raised a lot of money over the years—over a million dollars. We do all sorts of things: We’ve helped the Audubon Zoo, and we built a playground at Bethune Elementary School in the Holly Grove District of New Orleans that needed one. They didn’t have a playground for their young kids. We’ve helped the fire department. We try to spread it around. The next event will be in early September where we’ll do a concert and a silent auction. Are you getting back in the studio? We keep saying we are going to. Kevin and I are both so busy. We have to say “we are going to take this month off and work on a record.” He’s really busy writing songs for the likes of James Blunt and Carrie Underwood, and I am literally producing every day. I have more work right now than I can handle in New Orleans because I own Fudge Recording Studios. Free time? There is no free time right now. At some point we will get it together, and yes, we will have a new album.

Schoolhouse Rock

Jambeauxx and piano man Chalmers Davis. Guitarist, mandolin player, singer and any musicians here live an almost banjo picker Edwin McAlister, who often “Hannah Montana” lifestyle—go- plays with Soundwagon and other bluegrass ing to school daily as a teacher, yet bands in the South, teaches English at Belrocking the masses at night. I’ve haven. Singer-songwriter David Womack been teaching 11 years in Jackson Public teaches music at Galloway United MethSchools, and even my one-man band Clin- odist Church’s preschool program, and his ton started out as a teacher. children’s songs can pass Singer-songwriter for “grown folks’ music.” Taylor Hildebrand (Horse Former Hal and Mal’s Trailer, Passenger Jones) general manager Charly taught second grade in JPS, Abraham is now at Delta and returns to the classroom State University teaching next year. Songwriting simusic industry studies. ren Emma Wynters has Jazz saxophonist Russell also taught middle school Thomas Jr. is a professor in JPS, where teenage girls of music, director of jazz ooh and ahh over her songs studies and coordinator and the fabulous heels she of music theory at Jackson wears to her many gigs. Jazz musician Russell State University. Thomas Thomas Jr. teaches at Baby Jan Smith taught ex- Jackson State University has played with such acts ceptional education in JPS, such as Dizzy Gillespie, and now teaches remeThe Little Milton Band, dial reading at St. Therese Catholic School. and the Montreaux Jazz Festival, as well as all Smith is a member of the all-girl group The over the U.S. and the world. Earth Angels, and now sings with the band Hattiesburg also has teacher rockers. by Natalie Long

M

JSU

Justin Martin from Fling Hammer teaches radio production at USM and administers the college radio station, WUSM. Casey Phillips, who has played with one of my idols Suzy Elkins, The Hounds, and Chris Sartin’s Soulshine All-Star Band, formerly taught in JPS and now teaches at Forrest County Agricultural High School. Check out these awesome educators when they play at a venue near you. Check the listings here in the JFP so that you can make plans to hear these talented teachers! This week’s lineup of music is impressive. On Wednesday, Fenian’s has Sherman Lee Dillon playing at 9 p.m. Burgers and Blues hosts Jesse “Guitar” Smith from 5-9 p.m. Also, F. Jones Corner has Virgil Brawley, Poets II has DJ Phingaprint, Centerstage has Doug Frank’s Wednesday Nite Jam and Dreamz, Jxn has Wasted Wednesdays. Thursday night is Ladies Night at Martin’s and Ole Tavern, The D’Lo Trio play at The Cherokee Inn at 6 p.m., Adam Faucett plays at Hal and Mal’s, Underground 119 has John Wooten Caribbean Funk, Burgers and Blues has Mark Whittington. Country music legend George Jones plays at MSU’s Riley Center in Meridian.

On Friday, kick off the weekend with Cary Hudson with Grayson Capps and the Lost Cause Minstrels at Fire. The doors open at 8, so get there early for a good seat because this show is going to be a fab one. Get a great steak and hear some blues at Kathryn’s when the Lucky Hand Blues Band plays at 7 p.m. Rockers Train pay a visit to the Jackson Convention Center. Call for ticket prices and start time for the show. Also check out Underground 119’s Sunset Series with Raphael Semmes. Each week he has a different “machine” playing with him from 5-8 p.m. This week he has “Rock Machine” Hunter Gibson, so come out for some great music from two awesome performers. It’s Back to Basics Friday at Suite 106 and Dreamz Jxn has SPRUNG. Saturday night Reed Pierce’s has Fade 2 Blue, Otis Lotus is playing at Pelican Cove, Brady’s has karaoke, Cultural Expressions has Gospoetry and Suite 106 has Back to Basics: Away Team Edition. Sunday, Semmes starts a jazz brunch gig at the new restaurant Table 100 in Flowood. Have a good one, and support teachers who rock! Visit the music calendar at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

B

etter Than Ezra burst onto the national rock scene in 1995 with the hit single, “Good.” Formed while its members attended Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge in 1988, Better Than Ezra has been a rock staple for more than 20 years. The band rolls into Jackson May 14for a show at Fire. Founding members Kevin Griffin and Tom Drummond recently added drummer Michael Jerome. I spoke with Drummond on the phone about his life in music.

33


livemusic MAY 11 - WEDNESDAY

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED WEDNESDAY

5/11

LADIES NIGHT

LADIES PAY $5, DRINK FREE FRIDAY

5/13

Weekly Lunch Specials

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm thursday

MAY 12

LADIES NIGHT LADIES DRINK FREE

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

friday

MAY 13

Sun Hotel w/ Rooster Blues saturday

GOOD ENOUGH FOR GOOD TIMES SATURDAY

5/14

STEVIE J & THE BLUES ERUPTION

SUNDAY

5/15

KARAOKE MONDAY

5/16

OPEN MIC JAM TUESDAY

5/17

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE

$2 MARGARITAS $1 HIGHLIFE & PBR WEDNESDAY

5/18

LADIES NIGHT

LADIES PAY $5, DRINK FREE

May 11- 17, 2011

SATURDAY

34

5/21

ROUNDHOUSE GROOVE

214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

MAY 14

Intellectual Bulimics w/ The Sart Up monday

MAY 16

PUB QUIZ

2-for-1 Drafts tuesday

MAY 17

ELEGANT TRAIN WRECK PRESENTS:

Taylor Hildebrand

2 for 1 PBR/High Life

wednesday

MAY 18

KARAOKE w/ KJ STACHE thursday

MAY 19

LADIES NIGHT LADIES DRINK FREE

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

friday

MAY 20

Jason Turner Band w/ Logan Mason FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Kitchen open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

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Wednesday, May 11th

SWING DE PARIS

(Gypsy Jazz) 8-11, No Cover Thursday, May 12th

JOHN WOOTEN CARIBBEAN FUNK

(Funk) 8-11, No Cover Friday, May 13th

SUNSET SERIES WITH RAPHAEL SEMMES & THE 119 ROCK MACHINE FEATURING HUNTER GIBSON

(Outside Event) 5-8 No Cover

HONEY ISLAND SWAMP BAND (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, May 14th

LUCKY HAND BLUES BAND FEATURING NORMAN CLARK (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover Wednesday, May 18th

BILL & TEMPERANCE

(Bluegrass) 8-11, No Cover Thursday, May 19th

BLUE MOTHER TUPELO (Funk) 8-11, No Cover Friday, May 20th

VASTI JACKSON

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

venuelist

35


LUNCH SPECIALS EVERY DAY starting at $7.95

VOTED BEST SPORTS BAR AND BEST JUKEBOX!

Thursday, May 12

- BEST OF JACKSON 2011 -

PULL FOR RONALD MCDONALD DailyHOUSE LunchCHARITIES Specials - $9

WED. MAY 11 LADIES NIGHT & KARAOKE

The McDonald house is a temporary â&#x20AC;&#x153;home away from homeâ&#x20AC;? for families with seriously ill children being treated at nearby hospitals.

THUR. MAY 12 BUDWEISER GAME NIGHT PRIZES & SWAG

SAT. MAY 14

BRIAN JONES BEER BUCKET SPECIAL

MON. MAY 16 IN-DA-BIZ NITE

LETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WATCH SOME BASEBALL

TUES. MAY 17

20 FLAT SCREEN TVS

SUN. MAY 15 NBA BASKETBALL

BEER BUCKET SPECIAL + 1/2 OFF BLOODY MARYS

2-FOR-1 SPECIAL

JACKPOT TRIVIA

Order a canned beverage. Give the tab to your server. Help a child in need.

friday, may 13th

Ladies Night

Norman Clark

Ladies drink free until midnight well drinks only Guys drink 2-4-1 well drinks and domestic beer until 10:00

Jesse Robinson & The 500 lb.Blues Band w/ Sherman Lee Dillon

Friday, May 13

10PM NO COVER UNTIL Midnight $10 Cover after midnight

&

(blues Lunch)

Saturday, may 14th

Saturday, May 14

BUDLITE, MILLERLITE, BUDWEISER, COORSLITE

Daily Lunch Specials $9

Sherman Lee Dillon

Happy Hour

Featuring Norman Clark

& The MS Sound

Everyday 4pm-7pm

Sunday - Thursday 10pm - 12am

Tragikly White

601.978.1839

6107 Ridgewood Rd Jackson, Ms www.electriccowboy18.com

LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR 2-FOR-1, YOU CALL IT!

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211

10PM NO COVER UNTIL Midnight $10 Cover after midnight

LIVE MUSIC DURING LUNCH

MON - FRI, 11AM - 2PM OPEN LATE - SECURITY PROVIDED

8/19A=<ÂşA@3/:@=19AB/B7=<

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B=>B3< A=<5AB67AE339

May 11 - 17, 2011



36

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A719>C>>73AÂľ@W^bWRS @7A3/5/7<AB6SZ^7a=\BVSEOg A33B63@Âľ1]c\b`gA]\U /@B=42G7<5Âľ2WSB`gW\U 4==4756B3@AÂľ@]^S B6@332/GA5@/13:]abW\G]c A7FF/;Âľ:WSa]TbVS0SOcbWTcZ>S]^ZS 27ABC@032EO``W]` A/D7<5/03:;Waa/[S`WQO G3/@A4Wf;S

THURSDAY - May 12 LADIES NIGHT DRINK FREE 9-11

Karaoke

FRIDAY - May 13 Snazz

SATURDAY - May 14 Asphalt Cowboys SUNDAY - MAY 15 OPEN MIC JAM 7-11 MONDAY - MAY 16

BAR OPEN TUESDAY - MAY 17 2 for 1 Domestics Free Pool from 7-10

Saturday, May 14

LIVE MUSIC Dr.Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Band 9pm - 1pm

Happy hour

Mon - Sat | 2pm - 7pm 2 for 1 All Mixed Drinks, $1 Off Draft & Wine and 50¢ Boneless Wings

Email matt@jacksonfreepress.com or call 601-434-4025 if you are interested in this job.

WEDNESDAY - MAY 18 KARAOKE 2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

for Jackson Free Press and BOOM Jackson. We need hardworking self-starters with valid insurance and reliable transportation for metro-area delivery.

1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com


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es night if you have to.

dining

Simple Suppers

Ladies Night

$1.00 off Well Drinks 2 for 1 Well Drinks Weekdays 4pm - 7pm Every Wed. 8pm - Close

FILE PHOTO

HAPPY HOUR

by Robin O’Bryant

BACON CHEESEBURGER QUICHE

Good Paper

May 14 | 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover now hiring experienced servers 601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

DONATE NOW!

To Help Stop Local Domestic Abuse Items Needed: Original Art • Gift Certificates • Corporate Items Gifts, Big & Small • Monetary Donations

7th Annual Saturday, July 9

Hal & Mal’s Red Room Sponsorships Available:

Imperial Highness $5,000 Diva $2,500 • Goddess $1,000 Queen $500 • Princess $250 • Chick $50 Call 601.362.6121, ext. 16 or e-mail chickball@ jacksonfreepress.com. Make checks payable to Center for Violence Prevention or use your credit card at http://www.mscvp.org.

Tom Head, Kimberly Griffin, Carter Jewelers, Fondren Nails

I

don’t know if the sky has always been this blue, or if the long and unusually harsh winter this year has made me enjoy the sunshine that much more. But lately, I’ve felt very much like Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz” when she wakes up after the twister and finds that her life has gone from shades of gray to Technicolor in the blink of an eye. Clouds seem puffier and lighter. The grass is impossibly green, and the sky is matched in brightness only by the light in my children’s eyes as they play outside until the sun goes down. The warmer weather has brought with it memories of my childhood. I remember the first few days of summer vacation as a little girl growing up in Alabama: the lazy days of waking up when your body told you it was time instead of being roused by an alarm clock and rushed off to school. I remember the simple joy of not worrying about my clothes, but throwing on cutoff blue jeans, a T-shirt and flip-flops to walk on the dirt path to my friend’s house next door. My feet would be covered with dust and mosquito bites by the time I got there, and my hair would be a halo of frizz from the humid honeysuckled air. I remember going to the farmer’s market with my mother for fresh fruits and vegetables—peaches so juicy we had to lean over the sink to eat them to keep the juices from running all over our clothes. My grandfather called them “bathtub peaches” because that’s where you needed to go directly after eating one. After a day of playing outside, it didn’t matter what my mom had made for dinner. We were ravenous, and anything homecooked was a hit. With longer days, warmer

weather and school about to end for the year, I am always looking for recipes that I can prepare quickly and pop into the oven. Less time in the kitchen means more time to play outside with my kids. My goal for summer cooking is simplicity. I want to make nutrient-rich and filling dinners with as few dishes as possible. I don’t want to be stuck in the kitchen cooking when I could be enjoying the sunshine. Once the kids collapse in their beds at night, I want to snuggle on the sofa with my husband instead of washing stacks of dirty dishes. The following recipes are a quick and easy to prepare. In addition, they are delicious, family friendly and a snap to clean up. Hopefully, they will buy you a few extra moments to spend time with the people you love.

1 pound lean ground beef 1/2 medium onion, chopped 4 slices of bacon, cooked and chopped 3 eggs 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup half and half 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese Garlic salt and pepper, to taste (1/2 teaspoon of each is a good place to start)

Brown the meat and onion in skillet. Drain well and mix in bowl with chopped bacon, breaking up any large pieces of meat. Press meat and bacon mixture into the bottom of a deep-dish pie pan or 9-by-9-inch baking dish. Set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine remaining ingredients until smooth; use a mixer if desired. Pour egg mixture over beef and bake for 40-45 minutes until the top is brown and “set.” (No longer jiggles if you shake the pan.) Serve with a side salad or green beans for a hearty meal. Serves four to six.

SIMPLE STIR-FRIED GREEN BEANS 1-1/2 pounds of green beans, washed and rinsed with ends trimmed 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil Lemon pepper seasoning and garlic salt to taste 1/4 cup slivered almonds

In a large skillet, heat olive oil on medium high heat. Add green beans and cook, stirring occasionally, for eight to 10 minutes. Sprinkle with garlic salt and lemon pepper seasoning and cook for three more minutes. Add slivered almonds and cook for 3 more minutes or until almonds are lightly browned. Serves four.

CROCKPOT RANCH CHICKEN 1 package dry Ranch dressing 1/4 cup white cooking sherry or white wine 1 8-ounce block of cream cheese 1-1/2 to 2 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts, trimmed 1 can cream of mushroom soup

Place all ingredients into crock pot and cook on high for four to six hours, or until chicken is fork tender. Remove breasts from crock pot and shred with two forks. Put shredded chicken back in the pot. Serve over fettuccini or steamed rice. Serves four to six.

Spring in a cup! DAISY MAE A vanilla frappe sweetened with all natural strawberry Monin. TRIPLE CHOCOLATE FRAPPE A latte frappe made with Ghirardelli white chocolate, Hershey’s chocolate and all natural swiss chocolate Monin. Topped with whipped cream and Hershey’s chocolate.

SUGAR FREE ALMOND COOKIE LATTE Non fat cafe latte made with sugar free almond and sugar free vanilla Monin. BANANA CREAM PIE AU LAIT Cafe au lait sweetened with Ghirardelli white chocolate and all natural banana and vanilla May 11 - 17, 2011

Monin. Topped with whipped cream.

38

PRALINE TURTLE AU LAIT

Cafe au lait sweetened with creamy caramel, Hershey’s chocolate and all natural praline Monin. Topped with whipped cream and drizzled with caramel and chocolate.

HONEY VANILLA LATTE

A cafe latte made with all natural vanilla Monin and honey.

Hurry! Cups Spring drinks are only available for a limited time.


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GOOD

BRUNCH

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977

Lunch: Fri. & Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

Thanks For Voting Us BEST FRENCH FRIES IN JACKSON!

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SUNDAY

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Cof fee!

Every Coffee Bean We Brew Supports Non-profi ts Worldwide.

Jackson

1801 Dalton Street (601) 352-4555

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Byram

5752 Terry Road (601) 376-0081

Monday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.

VASILIOS AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

est Bar(a very high-class pig stand)

• Fresh Seafood Daily

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g i p e h t d ou trie

Have y

Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street • Madison, MS • 601.853.8538

2003-2011, Best of Jackson

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

M-F -, - S - C A

.. |  H M

PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

I

f you haven’t been to Arby’s lately, you might be mistaken to think they only serve roast beef and curly fries. Arby’s has been a front-runner for fast food or “quick service” innovation since the beginning. What may surprise most people is that Arby’s, from the start, wanted to give customers a quick-service option other than hamburgers. Arby’s was started in 1964 by two brothers, both foodservice veterans, who believed that quality food shouldn’t come at a premium cost. Pioneers in franchising a business, Arby’s opened its first franchise a year after the original restaurant opened. Today, Arby’s heritage is rich with multi-generational franchise Arby’s owners. What makes Arby’s an outstanding corporation is their dedication to making a difference in the communities they serve. Founded on the belief that every individual has the power to make a difference, Arby’s established the Arby’s Foundation, Inc., in 1986, which supports leadership, education and youth-mentoring activities. For any business to survive and thrive, they must change and adapt to the times. For Arby’s, that change involved predicting the health-food moment in the fast food industry. Arby’s was the first fast food chain to implement a lite menu, complete with salads and sandwiches under 300 calories. There is something for everyone on the Arby’s menu. Feeling like a fresh-cut roast beef sandwich? How about a fresh, crisp salad made with farm-fresh lettuce? In the mood for chicken? Give one of the all-white-meat, prime-cut chicken sandwiches a try. You’d be remiss to leave out one of the market fresh sandwiches. With a blend of grilled chicken, diced red apples, crunchy pecans and grapes, the market chicken salad at Arby’s will leave you feeling full without the guilt of the usual fast food fix. Perhaps you’re looking for something different in your lunch routine? Do you really know what goes into an Arby’s roast beef sandwich? How does slow-roasted for three hours in-store everyday roast beef sound? Add a side of euphoria and call it spicy curly fries. Don’t make the mistake of not leaving room for dessert. Be it a cherry turnover, vanilla shake or gourmet chocolate chunk cookies, there’s much to satisfy a sweet tooth. Arby’s goes by the slogan, “Good Mood Food.” So when you’re ready to take your lunch to the next level, stop by your local Arby’s for a break from your ordinary fast food.

jacksonfreepress.com

Madi(601)

39


www.thepizzashackjackson.com

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May 11 - 17, 2011

Colonial Mart Shopping Center Off Old Canton Rd Behind Great Harvest Bread Co. 5046 Parkway Drive

40

!! WINNER !! BEST PIZZA IN JACKSON 2009 - 2011

Dine-In / Carry-Out

Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm Sun: 11am - 9pm

601-352-2001 1220 N. State St.

(across from Baptist Medical Center)

CATERING AVAILABLE


Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille

Congratulations to Our Staff Award Winners

Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

By popular demand, we have added Shrimp Scampi to our menu!

March 16 - April 27

Grand Opening Kick Ass Award

[Chosen by the Publisher and Editor-In-Chief]

Falcon Award

[Chosen by the Jackson Free Press Staff]

Thursday, May 12th ¡Lunch Specials Served Everyday! Mon-Sat | 11-2 & 4-10 3716 I-55 N Jackson, Ms phone: 601-487-8370 fax: 601-487-8371

5A44 FX5X

Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

Ladies Night

is Thursday Night

Buy 1 Get 1 Free Martinis

Ad Director

Valerie Wells Assistant Editor

JSU

Super Card 4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-12AM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

#USTOMER3ERVICE2EP

0DJHH5HVRXUFH*URXSKDVDQRSHQLQJIRUD&XV WRPHU6HUYLFH5HS7KLVFDQGLGDWHPXVWKDYHDWOHDVW VROLG\HDUVRIXSGDWLQJDFFRXQWLQIRUPDWLRQDQG SURFHVVLQJSD\PHQWVH[SHULHQFH$ERYHDYHUDJHZULW WHQDQGYHUEDOFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOVUHTXLUHG([FHO OHQWNH\ERDUGLQJVNLOOVLVDOVRUHTXLUHG&DQGLGDWHV PXVWDOVREHIDPLOLDUZLWK0LFURVRIW2I¿FHVRIWZDUH SURGXFWV&DQGLGDWHPXVWDOVRKDYHDJRRGH\HIRU GHWDLOVVFDQQLQJDOOSDSHUGRFXPHQWVUHTXHVWHGDQG WDNLQJ,QYHQWRU\3OHDVHVHQG\RXUUHVXPHGLUHFWO\WR UREKUVHUYLFH#DROFRP

(OSPICE0OSITIONS

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No cover.

Friday May 13:

Shatto Boys

Saturday May 14:

Karaoke

6720 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland | 601.812.6862

3TARTYOUROWNBUSINESS

(DUQELJE\VHOOLQJ$YRQ&RQWDFWPHWRGD\VR, FDQVKDUHWKH$YRQRSSRUWXQLW\ZLWK\RXEHUU\URVH# DWWQHW  

(OME#LEANING

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!-EANINGFUL#AREER

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'!)..!4)/.!,%80/352%

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jacksonfreepress.com

Kimberly Griffin

Live Music

41


A Rez-olution. E

very year about this time I start thinking about vacation. The only hang up is that I’m a working girl with vacation days, and they’re limited. So I’ve begun negotiations. What use am I really when I spend the days dreaming of the sun and sand? But until I get the boss man to see things my way, I will compromise and spend my weekends at The Rez. So why don’t you bring your blanket and join me? I’ll bring the fashion magazines!

by Meredith W. Sullivan

Elizabeth and James “Madison” sunglasses, $192, 4450 Large woven hat, $24, Libby Story

Quilt, $8, N.U.T.S.

Pink floral tunic, $36, b. fine art jewelry

AG denim shorts, $178, Red Square Clothing Co.

Burlap tote bad, $25, Oleta’s Gifts & Baskets

Jean-Michel Cazabat Safari wedges, $245, 4450

Where2Shop:

4450, 4450 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-3687; b. fine art jewelry, 215 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-607-7741; Libby Story, 120 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-717-3300; N.U.T.S, 114 Millsaps Ave., 601-355-7458; Oleta’s Gifts and Baskets, 579 Highway 51, Ridgeland, 601-856-8886; Red Square Clothing Co., 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 9004, Ridgeland, 601-853-8960

SHOPPING SPECIALS

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com.

Mozingo Clothes (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 140, 601-713-7848, www.facebook.com/mozingoclothiers) Visit Mozingo’s Facebook page for a chance to win Ian Flaherty cuff links. Ends May 12.

The Everyday Gardener (2905 Old Canton Road, 601-981-0273) Local delivery available to any destination within 20 miles of The Everyday Gardener for $12. Contact store for delivery deadlines.

N.U.T.S. (114 Millsaps Ave., 601355-7458) Get 25 percent off purses, 30 percent off linens and 50 percent off Christmas items the entire month of May.

Sal and Mookie’s New York Pizza and Ice Cream Joint (565 Taylor St., 601-368-1919) Receive 15 percent off your take-out order every Wednesday from 4:30 to 9:30 p.m. Take advantage of curbside pick-up.

May 11 - 17, 2011

Alex & Lele (1481 Canton Mart Road, Suite C, 601-206-7720) Get custom, one-of-a-kind jewelry with vintage charm and modern style for your summer wedding or event.

42

Check out flyjfp.com for information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


New! Full-service salon dedicated to providing great customer service. We offer excellent services using products of the highest quality. Our mission is to promote healthy hair at an affordable price! Stylist Needed Call and schedule an appointment. 1775 Lelia Drive, Ste F | 601-982-7772

Aqua Terra Jasper Pendants 398 Hwy. 51 â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 â&#x20AC;˘ www.villagebeads.com

#DRSN

E +@BJRNM



We offer foils, Greatlengths Hair Extensions and Brazilian Blowouts. 5352 Lakeland Dr ste100B | 601 992-7980

jacksonfreepress.com

622 Duling Ave. #206 Jackson, MS in Historic Fondren 601-982-5313 Tues. - Fri.: 10a.m. - 7p.m. Sat.: 10a.m. - 5p.m.

43


%NCUUKHKGFURCIG

Look Fabulous For Summer

UP  Security Cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;˘ Free Wi-Fi

1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

File Ch. 7 & 13 Bankruptcy for $900 + Federal Filing Fee! Just $400 Down

'SFF .*$# *OKFDUJPO

Flexible Payment Plans Available

Now Accepting Visa, Mastercard, and PayPal!

*ODMVEFT/VUSJUJPOJTU .FEJDBM $POTVMU &,( 1FSTDSJQUJPO.*$ #*OKFDUJPOT &BTZPOMJOF TDIFEVMJOH'PMMPXVQ7JTJUT

Neil B. Snead

Aď?´ď?´ď?Żď?˛ď?Žď?Ľď?š ď&#x153;Ś Cď?Żď?ľď?Žď?łď?Ľď?Źď?Żď?˛ Aď?´ Lď?Ąď?ˇ Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ (601) 316-7147

Call 601-487-6670 /BUVSBM"QQFUJUF4VQQSFTTBOUT

FEDERALLY DESIGNATED DEBT RELIEF AGENCY FREE BACKGROUND INFO. AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

XXXFTUFFNIFBMUIBOEXFMMOFTTDPN

69,500

adults in the Jackson metro read us in print or online.

$PODFSU5FFT $MPUIJOH 4BOEBMT .PDDBTJOT 1PTUFST +FXFMSZ 'VO OPWFMUZJUFNT

Our multimedia promotion offers aggressive rates on a combination of print, web and JFP Daily advertising.

For more informations, call 601-362-6121 x11 or write ads@jacksonfreepress.com!

DVcgZ_X;RT\d`_Ă&#x20AC;d4`f_eVc4f]efcV_VVUddZ_TV#!!%

&%"(9hj#&DfZeV67]`h``U>d '!"*"*$%(! hhheYVWRc`fe]VeT`^ Calling Musicians and Music Lovers

Morrison Brothers Music presents

HOME FOR SALE

/PEN-IC!COUSTIC (OSTEDBY"URGERSAND"LUES

  -AYTH #OUNTY,INE2OAD 2IDGELAND -3 Promoted by MS Madness Music Managment

Located at 1722 Topp Avenue Jackson, MS 3 BR / 1 BA Single Family Fixer-Upper Owner Financing or Cash Discount $500 Down, $215 a Month Call 1-803-403-9555 or 1-803-929-1117

We now have over 40 artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work in our gallery!! manager

owner/artist

Sandy Ford

601-981-9222

Thomas Wilson

Pat Marbury

Darryl Anderson

601 Duling Ave.


v9n35 - Good Issue: Family Ideas  

Good Issue: Family Ideas How To Raise A Genius Kid Also: Adoption, Creativity, Spaces that Work FIGMENT is Here! Better Than Ezra My Rez-Cat...

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