Page 1


Class Is In Session

ANATOMY NO. 1

March 30 - April 5, 2011

Always Drink Responsibly

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(Next door to McDade’s Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 • www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com


March 30 - April 5, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

9 NO. 29

contents

Profs on the Census JSU professors say U.S. Census data can point us in a direction for urban revitalization.

KRISTIN BRENEMEN; COURTESY OF CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL; COURTESY SKIPP COON; FILE PHOTO

AARON PHILLIPS

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Cover photograph by Christina Cannon

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THIS ISSUE: Festival Films

The JFP staff provides a small sampling of what to expect at this weekend’s Crossroads Film Festival.

........ Editor’s Note .............. Slowpoke ...................... Talks ................ Editorial .................. Stiggers ...................... Zuga .............. Kamikaze ................ Opinion ............. Diversions ................... 8 Days ............ JFP Events .................... Music ...... Music Listings ...................... Astro ................... Puzzles ...................... Food ....... JFP Shopping

robby piantanida Just over five years ago, Belhaven University art student Robby Piantanida borrowed a camera and equipment to shoot a short film for his college film festival. Today, the 23-year-old makes his living producing video and motion-graphics projects in the Jackson area as the owner of Borrowed Productions. And yes, he still occasionally has to borrow equipment. “I didn’t even own a camera until a year and a half ago,” Piantanida says. “When we first started, we literally borrowed everything.” On a day-to-day basis, standard jobs for Piantanida are commercial and music video shoots, with occasional work in logo animation, motion graphics and short films. But beyond the jobs that pay the bills, he has big dreams for the future of his company. “My goal is to eventually shoot features,” Piantanida says. “I’m constantly seeing stories played out as movies in my head.” Asked whether his dream might take him out of Jackson, the filmmaker shakes his head. “My eyes aren’t set on big-budget Hollywood,” Piantanida says. “I want creative control, and I want to work with people who know how to use creative control. Besides, the experience of a local or low-budget shoot is addicting—moms providing the food, the crew inventing props. … I love it. It’s a very tactile experience.” The Tyler, Texas, native already has one

feature under his belt: “The Sound of a Dirt Road.” Piantanida produced the film for under $1,000 and shot it on mini-DV, yet it still placed as a finalist beside big-budget productions at the San Antonio Independent Christian Film Festival. Bridgestone Media Group selected the film for distribution. The Crossroads Film Festival has featured several of Piantanida’s productions, including the music video for Taylor Hildebrand’s song “After the Fall,” which won “Best Music Video” last year. This year, Piantanida debuts his documentary “Jackson Is Art,” which follows the art education of attendees at a Jackson Community Design Center summer camp, and two music videos. As an artist and a businessman, Piantanida is ready to accept and adjust to whatever opportunities come his way. “Ten years ago, I didn’t see myself here,” he says. “It’s a great lesson that you’re not in charge of your life. It just comes down to how you act on your life.” If anything can be said for Piantanida’s outlook on life, it’s that he always has room for one more dream. “If I could see myself anywhere in 10 years, I’d see myself on the moon,” he says with a grin. “Seriously. Don’t fail at your dream of being an astronaut if you really want to be an astronaut.” For examples of Piantanida’s work, visit his website at borrowedproductions.com. —Bret Kenyon

34 MS at SXSW Mississippi musicians had a hometown advocate at the annual Austin, Texas, music festival.

38 Bodacious Berries One of the best things about spring is having fresh, local strawberries in abundance.

jacksonfreepress.com

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editor’snote

by Valerie Wells, Assistant Editor

Jackson Emerging

A

March 30 - April 5 , 2011

s I walked through the parking lot in front of the Mississippi Museum of Art on a cold, wet Monday morning, it was hard at first to visualize the same space as a vibrant garden with water fountains, blooming flowers, free Wi-Fi and laughing babies just a few months from now. Construction workers arrived in pickup trucks continue building the structures that will contain The Art Garden at the Mississippi Museum of Art. A polite young woman working for the construction company let me into the museum for an early morning meeting with Betsy Bradley, director of the museum. I was a little early and got to wander through the Orient Expressed Exhibit and realized it was so much more than I had imagined. Besides the gorgeous, large paintings and the delicate glassware, I discovered an anime corner with graphic novels to pick up and compare to classic Japanese prints. I ambled alone around the quiet exhibit, remembering all those books I had read and documentaries I had seen about how Japanese art influenced Europe and the United States in the 19th century. I leaned in to read some details when I heard Bradley’s heels echoing. I almost got lost in the maze of gallery walls trying to find her. In the boardroom, she showed me a presentation with the impressive plans for The Art Garden scheduled to open this August. The proposed activities for the museum’s “front yard” include after-work get-togethers, music concerts and family lunches. One great idea is to use inflatable screens for outdoor movies. For future Crossroads Film Festivals, Bradley expects at least one screening, if not more, at the museum.

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Crossroads, like the museum, seemed to me just a year ago like a breathing institution caged inside the Malco Grandview Theatre in Madison. The truth is that the festival spreads beyond the workshops and screenings in Madison with events at Jackson restaurants and a children’s workshop at MMA, right smack downtown. The three-day festival includes dozens upon dozens of films, at least 50 filmmakers, about a dozen workshops, receptions, awards and parties. Short documentaries, feature-length movies and music videos fill the schedule. In between film blocks, festival-goers can take in excerpts from two Mississippi programs about regional music, the Hattiesburg-produced “Green Couch Sessions” and Oxford’s “Music in the Hall.” Festival-goers can attend workshops on cinematography, simulated worlds, acting, music videos and the business of the moviemaking business. Herman Snell, the former Jackson Free Press music editor, died last year, far too soon. He was a big part of Crossroads’ creation, evolution and success. This year’s festival is dedicated to him, and a new tradition begins with one film chosen as “Herman’s Pick,” the name of his JFP music column. Any film involving time travel, alternate realities or ambiguity is eligible to win. Essentially, it has to have one of those “fatal flaws.” “If a movie contains any of these elements, I am going to like the movie based on concept alone. That’s why I call them fatal flaws,” Snell once said. It’s a lot to take in, all the things that Crossroads offers. And it’s been a lot to plan and organize for Michele Baker, coordinator of the festival and its only paid employee.

Overseeing the logistics, mailing out sponsor packets and getting photographs to newspapers keeps her hopping. She even worked to get a sneak-peak screening of an excerpt from “The Help,” the movie shot partly in Fondren as well as other parts of Mississippi. “The distributor said no,” she said with a frown, leaning back in a folding chair at Malco during a media event to promote the festival. “The Help,” based on the 2009 best seller by Kathryn Stockett, took advantage of film incentives Mississippi offers producers and studios. The biggest incentive is a direct cash rebate of 25 percent for local spending and non-resident payroll with an additional 5 percent for employing Mississippi residents. Filmmakers have to spend at least $50,000 in the state, and rebates are capped at $8 million per project and at $20 million each year. Not only does this incentive give our state on-screen time in Hollywood productions as well as independent films, it gives folks who want to work in the film industry jobs and meaningful experience. Crews need the education and the experience to get these jobs. Jay Woods, acting executive director of Mississippi Public Broadcasting, says he knows where independent filmmakers and crews can get that experience. Maybe. As MPB looks at producing more programs for other state agencies, they will need freelance talent. With only four cameramen and two producers—not to mention more potential budget cuts—the staff can only do so many films, public service announcements and specials before they need outside help. “We have to hire freelancers,” Woods told me during a recent interview. “We use them as much as we can afford them. The more work we get, the more can hire freelancers.” I used to come to Jackson frequently as a teenager for debate tournaments, Youth Congress sessions and to watch the University of Southern Mississippi beat Ole Miss in football. Then, as an adult, I only came to drab government offices in stark fascist-style architectural structures. I had forgotten the side streets, the pretty college campuses, the shaded neighborhoods and the smart, open-minded people who made things happen in my state. It’s great to know the Mississippi Museum of Art will spill over into a garden, to watch the Crossroads Film Festival run over into much of the metro area and to hear Mississippi Public Broadcasting plan to use Mississippi filmmakers. It’s as if Jackson came out of hibernation, and I’ve arrived for the spring. I just want to hug all of you. Valerie Wells is the new assistant editor of the Jackson Free Press and BOOM Jackson. She lives in Jackson and Hattiesburg. Email her at valerie@jacksonfreepress.com.

Natalie Collier Style editor Natalie A. Collier is originally from Starkville and a graduate of Millsaps College. She lived in Chicago for a while, but is now back in Jackson. She’s not easy to impress. She coordinated the spring fashion photos.

Christina Cannon Christina Cannon is a Jackson native. Her studio, Photography by Christina, and gallery, One Blu Wall, are located in Fondren Corner. In her spare time she lingers downtown where she is a new resident. She photographed the spring fashion photos.

Adam Lynch Award-winning senior reporter Adam Lynch is a Winona native and graduate of Jackson State. He and his family live in North Jackson. E-mail tips to adam@ jacksonfreepress.com, or call him at 601-362-6121, ext. 13. He wrote Talks.

Ronni Mott Ronni Mott came to Jackson by way of D.C. in 1997. She’s a writer, photographer and the JFP’s managing editor, where she practices her hobbies of herding cats and curmudgeonliness. She teaches yoga in her spare time. She wrote Crossroads film reviews.

Lacey McLaughlin News editor Lacey McLaughlin is a Florida native who enjoys riding her bike around Jackson. She is always on the hunt for news tips. E-mail Lacey@jacksonfreepress. com or call 601.362.6121 x. 22. She wrote Crossroads film reviews.

Andrea Thomas Advertising designer Andrea Thomas is a native of Ridgeland and is a recent Antonelli College graduate. She loves to sing, dance and write poetry in her free time. She wrote Crossroads film reviews.

Crawford Grabowski A veteran teacher who recently earned her masters degree, Crawford Grabowski is discovering the joy and sleep deprivation of being a new parent. She lives with her husband, Jim, daughter Daise and too many damn cats. She wrote a food feature.

Kimberly Griffin Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.


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The Fifth Annual McAlister’s Deli

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TEA FOR TOTS SOUTHERN BRUNCH benefiting The Mustard Seed

Friday, April 8th At the home of Judy and John Chew

March 30 - April 5, 2011

$10.00 per person

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Champagne Brunch, Silent Auction, Easy Entertaining Displays and a Draw Down for a Trip to the 2011 SEC Championship Football Game For tickets, visit The Mustard Seed, Chandelier, www.mcalistersdelicares.com or call 601.613.8648


AMILE WILSON

The Superintendent Staredown

JPS Superintendent Lonnie Edwards (above right, with his attorney Dale Danks, left) knew as early as June 2010 that the school board was seriously unhappy with his performance.

I

f the Jackson Public Schools Board of Trustees decides that it does not want Superintendent Lonnie Edwards to return next school year, it will have very little time to find a replacement. Edwards requested a public hearing to appeal the board’s Dec. 7, 2010, decision not to renew his three-year contract, which expires this summer. After the first day of testimony Friday, March 25, however, the district had only gotten through two of its 13 planned witnesses. With 35 potential witnesses on Edwards’ side, the hearing could take a full week to complete, said

Edwards’ attorney, former Jackson Mayor Dale Danks. Complicating matters further is the fact that all parties—Edwards, Danks, attorneys for the school board, witnesses and hearing officer Nathaniel Armistad—must schedule additional hearing days around their regular workdays. Armistad scheduled the next day of testimony for April 18, which means that the JPS board will likely deliver its final decision on Edwards’ contract no earlier than late April. Only after that final vote would the board decide to hire a consulting firm to

The JFP Stylin’ In/Out List I

n honor of our Spring Fashion Issue, the Jackson Free Press staff has gone all out to give you the latest style in/out list. Why are some things in and other out? Because we say so. ‘Nuff said.

IN

OUT

Feather earrings Color blocking Bellbottoms Salsa Mississippi Ke$ha Scooters Strawberries Pewter S&M fashion D&D Jimmer Indies Graphic novels Cam Newton

Wearing bling to work out Goth Leggings “Dancing With the Stars” Katy Perry Hogs Cabbage Gold Brat-pack fashion Farmville Brandon Davies Hollywood Comic book movies Jeremy Shockey

by Ward Schaefer search for JPS’ next superintendent, should the vote go against Edwards, said JPS board attorney Dorian Turner. JPS would then have only a few months to conduct a nationwide search. “Searches are relatively long-term, usually last for months and are usually fairly expensive,” Turner said. At the hearing Friday, Danks pressed board President Kisiah Nolan and board member George Schimmel about documents that the board received in June 2010 advertising the services of three different search firms. Cross-examining the two separately, Danks asked whether the board had begun seeking a replacement for Edwards that early. Schimmel downplayed the significance of the documents, calling them “standard pamphlets,” and said that the board did not formally vote to request proposals from the firms. Both said, however, that they had reservations about Edwards’ performance by June. In fact, Schimmel told Danks that he made a motion to terminate the superintendent’s contract at a March 2010 board meeting, less than four months after his appointment to the board. The motion died for lack of a second. “I began to sense that Dr. Edwards did not provide the leadership the district needed,” Schimmel said. In June, though, the board dispatched EDWARDS, see page 8

swagger

“We aren’t proud of ourselves. We need swagger. If we don’t define ourselves, the press will define us for us,” —Downtown Jackson Partners President Ben Allen at a March 28 meeting regarding the importance of Hinds County rebranding its image.

Wednesday, March 23 Madison police officer Jimmy Brooks is killed in an accident while riding his personal motorcycle on U.S. Highway 51. … Radiation leaking from Japan’s damaged nuclear power plant causes Tokyo’s tap water to become too dangerous for babies. Officials urge pregnant women and new mothers to use bottled water. Thursday, March 24 U.S. Navy Secretary and former Mississippi Gov. Ray Mabus visits the state Capitol to urge lawmakers to make education funding a priority. … Workers break ground on a $7.75 million affordable housing development near Northside Drive. Friday, March 25 Gov. Haley Barbour cancels a trip to New Hampshire to manage the state Legislature’s budget battle. … The U.S. Navy announces that it will name a ship after the city of Jackson. … The Jackson Public Schools District begins hearing over Superintendant Lonnie Edward’s contract. Saturday, March 26 Hundreds of people attend the inaugural Zippity Doo Dah parade in Fondren. … America’s first female candidate for vice president, Geraldine Ferraro, dies at 75. Sunday, March 27 Mississippi State University’s baseball team beats Auburn 15-8… The University of Kentucky, the University of Connecticut, Butler University and Virginia Commonwealth University head to the NCAA final four. Monday, March 28 The state Legislature passes a law that could allow the city of Jackson to increase its sales taxes by 1 percent to fund massive infrastructure improvements. … President Barack Obama defends the United States’ military action in Libya during a speech to the nation. … The Mississippi ACLU and other social-justice organizations call for the state to reform prisons. Tuesday, March 29 Leaders of 40 countries vow increased international pressure on Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi with continued airstrikes while providing humanitarian aid to Libyan citizens. ... Five hundred protesters head to the state capitol to advocate for Gov. Haley Barbour to fully fund public education and other social services. Get breaking news at jfpdaily.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

news, culture & irreverence

Tate Taylor and Brunson Green, director and producer of “The Help,” debuted their first feature film “Pretty Ugly People” at the Crossroads Film Festival in 2008.

MDOC Commissioner Chris Epps has greatly improved conditions at Parchman. p 12.

7


talk

news, culture & irreverence

EDWARDS, from page 7

Nolan to discuss the end of Edwards’ contract with him and broach the possibility of his not seeking a renewal of his contract, allowing the board to avoid an outright vote not to renew his contract. Nolan and Schimmel testified that Edwards initially asked for more time to think. Nolan approached Edwards again in August, and Edwards again demurred, saying he wanted to focus on the start of the school year. When they spoke again, later in the fall, Edwards rejected the proposal. After learning of the board’s Dec. 7 non-renewal vote, Edwards and Danks brought their own compromise offer to the board. Edwards offered to decline an appeal, in exchange for a two-year renewal of his contract, with the added stipulation that he would submit his retirement letter in advance, guaranteeing that the additional two years would be his last as superintendent. The board, at a meeting with new board members Linda Rush and Timothy Collins, declined the settlement offer. Danks’ questions focused on allegations of micromanagement by the board and turnover in board members, which, Danks suggested, kept Edwards from implementing his plans. Schimmel told Danks that the board’s concerns about Edwards’ performance were primarily about his lack of leadership

in academic matters. Under Edwards, the district has seen an increase in the number of schools rating less than “Successful” on the state’s academic rating system, even as statewide trends have moved in the opposite direction, with more schools reaching grades of “Successful” or above. “The problem that the board is seeing is that we are not making any progress,” Schimmel said. “In fact, we are moving backwards. We don’t have time to see how long it might take (to turn around). If we continue to move backwards, we jeopardize the future of over 30,000 kids. This is not about Dr. Edwards; this is about the 30,000-plus kids and how well we prepare them for tomorrow. We, as a board, feel that we are not fulfilling our responsibilities. We are then obligated to search for someone who then can lead us forward.” Schimmel said that he was keeping an open mind about a second vote on Edwards’ contract and “looking forward to being proven wrong.” “No one is arguing that Dr. Edwards is not a likable individual,” Schimmel said. “As I’ve mentioned before, he has done a wonderful job in the community, healing wounds. We appreciate that contribution. What the board is now facing is looking for someone with more depth in academic skills and administrative skills.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

Former Jackson TV Personality Dies by Lacey McLaughlin

March 30 - April 5, 2011

W

8

COURTESY JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY

hen he was 84, Jobie Martin rector Bob Braddy said. “… What hapwas still working as a substitute pened was the football coach at the time teacher, but told him he could be on long before that, the team if he promoted Martin was well known for the football games on his hosting James Brown, Joe radio show.” Louis and Mahalia Jackson Martin, whom friends on his commercial TV procalled “Flash,” was also an gram in the 1970s. entrepreneur who started On March 26, Marhis own restaurant, Jotin, 93, died during a car bie’s Fried Chicken, and accident on Interstate 220 worked as a special eduin Ridgeland near Hanging cation teacher at Westside Moss Road. Martin was Junior High School. driving northbound in the The Hattiesburg native southbound lane when he grew up in Gulfport. He struck two other vehicles. was a World War II veterJobie Martin, the first black Martin hosted “The Mississippian to host a an and served as a member Jobie Martin Show,” commercial TV show, died in of the Hinds Community which aired on WLBT a car crash March 26. College Board of Trustees and WAPT in the 1970s. for 22 years. He was the first black Mississippian to host “Jobie Martin was an original,” Hinds a commercial TV show. He also hosted a CC President Clyde Muse said in a March weekly radio show at the station WOJK 28 statement. “A smile, a bow tie and a in the 1960s, where he promoted Jackson fresh flower in his suit lapel were trademark State’s football team. His loyalty to JSU ath- traits. He could spin words that connected letics earned him an honorary position on with everyone, no matter their age or backthe university’s football team when he was ground. He was a dear friend for more than 35, and, in 2009, the university inducted 40 years, and he will be missed, both as a Martin into its sport’s hall of fame. member of the Hinds Community Col“He was the best publicity that JSU lege Board of Trustees and as a much loved got at the time,” former JSU Athletic Di- member of our community.”


censustalk

by Lacey McLaughlin

Changing Perceptions

GALLOWAY UMC 305 North Congress Street | Jackson, MS www.gallowayumc.org

KRISTIN BRENEMEN

South. Atlanta now has the second highest black population of any metro area, exceeding Chicago. But blacks are also moving to suburbs and smaller towns. The Associated Press reported March 17 that 58 percent of blacks who live in large metropolitan areas in the South live in the suburbs. Orey also said that while Jackson has more crime than the surrounding suburbs, it has a higher population. The highMost crimes reported in Jackson are property crimes, not est incidents of crime in the violent crimes, as this chart shows. city are property crimes such as burglaries, not murders or awn Macke has been a Jacksonian for rapes, he said. The Jackson Police Department most of her adult life. Eight years ago, reports 499 auto burglaries and 720 house the Cleveland, Miss., native bought a burglaries citywide so far this year, compared house with her then-husband in Bel- to 15 rape incidents and six homicides. haven Heights—at a time when she believes Along with JSU visiting professor Lecrime was more prevalent in the neighbor- Niece Davis and sociology professor Thomas hood than it is today. Then, after a short stint Kersen, Orey suggested that community in Las Vegas, she decided to move back to the members create a coalition made up of city city and settled in Fondren. officials, business elite members, social justice Macke, 42, says she frequently defends advocates, and citizens of various ages and ethher choice of residence from people outside nicities to rebrand the city. the city limits. “You can’t live your life afraid, Kersen cited the most recent “Cities and if we run from Jackson, then there are no Ranked and Rated” book from 2007, using good people left, and all the bad people win,” data from Sperling’s BestPlaces.net, which she says. “... To me Fondren just couldn’t be shows that Jackson’s violent crime was below any more perfect.” the national average. Jackson scored high for It can be hard to understand why some- its low cost of living, and its arts, culture and one would move to Jackson looking only health care. Overall, the city ranked 98 out of through the window of local media’s barrage 373 cities, based on an composite score in nine of crime and blight coverage. categories: arts and culture, leisure, transportaWith the release of 2010 U.S. Census tion, crime, health and health care, education, numbers, many residents are taking opportu- climate, cost of living, and economy and jobs. nities to proactively address the city’s populaDuring the meeting, community memtion decline. The data show Jackson’s popula- bers suggested that the city make measurable tion dropped 5.8 percent in the last decade— goals for the next decade, such as increasing from 184,256 to 173,514—a trend that has Jackson’s population to 200,000. actually slowed from the previous decade. The Hinds County Economic DevelopJackson State University professor ment Authority is making efforts to rebrand B. D’Andra Orey, speaking at Koinonia Coffee the county by hiring community planning, House’s Friday Forum March 25, told the au- branding and historic preservation firm Arnett dience that negative perceptions about crime, Muldrow and Associates. The Greenville, S.C., education and socio-economic problems must firm has conducted rebranding campaigns change for the city to increase its population. throughout the country and community plan“You might know (people) who actually ning sessions in Carthage, Holly Springs and moved out of the city, but those are anecdotal Ocean Springs in Mississippi. cases, and you can’t make those inferences The city of Jackson has partnered with based on those few cases that you know,” Orey the Jackson Chamber of Commerce to prosaid about conclusions drawn from the 2010 duce rebranding materials for the city. While Census. “It’s the same with crime.” the county’s and the city’s rebranding may Various media coverage has focused on appear to overlap, Hinds County Economic the increase of Jackson’s black population. Development Authority Executive Director Since 2000, Jackson added 7,976 black resi- Blake Wallace said it’s important to unite the dents. Orey pointed out that Jackson was not county and increase collaboration between orthe only city in the metro area to see a trend ganizations and municipal governments. of increased black populations: From 1990 “We are really beginning to link togethto 2010, Madison County reported a 53 per- er,” Wallace said about Hinds County. “When cent increase in black population, and Rankin people put their shoulder to the grindstone County reported an 83 percent increase. and start pushing together—this process that The percentage of blacks living in the we are going through right now—is just going South is at its highest point since 1960. To- to make that stronger.” day, 57 percent of American blacks live in the Comment at www.jfp.ms.

All are invited to join us in worship.

9:30 a.m. Palm Sunday Parade for the whole family! 11:00 a.m.

Galloway’s Annual Church on the Grounds Worship on the Capitol Lawn under the Oak Trees across from the Church! Bring a blanket and/or chairs and dress for a picnic. Picnic lunch to follow the 11 a.m. Worship

Easter Sunday, April 24 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Easter Worship Service Rev. Drs. Connie and Joey Shelton

jacksonfreepress.com

D

Palm Sunday, April 17

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Best Salon & Best Hair Stylist - 2010 & 2011 Best of Jackson -

economytalk

by Adam Lynch

M

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ississippi could be losing incalculable millions in revenue through legal corporate tax-dodging. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really calculate the amount the state is missing out on,â&#x20AC;? said Mississippi Economic Center Policy Director Ed Sivak. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really come up with a number. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t one.â&#x20AC;? Last week, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advocates protested the fact that most of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest corporations with the biggest payrolls duck out of paying potentially millions of dollars in state corporate income tax, while the governor and legislators toy with the idea of cutting the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public-education and mental-health budget by more than $70 million. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a slap in the face of people who work every day, who provide for their families and who pay their taxes,â&#x20AC;? said Mississippi Revenue Coalition spokesman Gary Anderson, who joined members of the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Defense Fund and the Mississippi Economic Policy Center, among others, at a March 23 Capitol press conference. Desperate to combat annual budget shortfalls and revenue decline, legislators asked the Mississippi Legislature Joint Committee on Performance Evaluation and Expenditure Review Committee to answer five specific questions related to potential corporate tax dodgers in the state. Tallying reports from the state Department of Revenue, the investigative committee responded that 80 percent of corporations with the biggest payrolls doing business in Mississippi paid no state corporate income tax in 2006, 2007 and 2008. The same report revealed that 81 percent of corporations paid zero state income tax in 2009. PEER reports that many corporations take advantage of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s generous assortment of tax credits that allow them to decrease their tax liability up to 50 percent, including a jobs tax credit, a skills-training tax credit and a broadband-technology tax credit. Other, more generous tax incentives include a Growth and Prosperity Program credit, which allows companies that create jobs in high-unemployment areas to enjoy a full state-tax exemption.

ADAM LYNCH

State Losing Millions to Tax Dodgers?

Mississippi Revenue Coalition spokesman Gary Anderson, center, and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advocate groups protested corporate tax dodgers last week at the Mississippi Capitol.

Anderson said some multi-state corporations with branches in Mississippi may use other tax-manipulation methods, such as placing their corporate headquarters in a different state, and then paying employees of their Mississippi subsidiaries through dividends, which are not taxed in Mississippi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Corporations have accountants who work all day trying to find ways to save them money,â&#x20AC;? Anderson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very good at it.â&#x20AC;? WorldCom used a similar scheme involving subsidiaries to bilk the state out of taxes. For years, WorldCom packaged company leadersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; brainpowerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;called â&#x20AC;&#x153;management foresightâ&#x20AC;? as a commodity that could be bought and sold, similar to selling a patent. WorldCom sold â&#x20AC;&#x153;management foresightâ&#x20AC;? to its subsidiaries all over the country for an amount of money almost equal to its net profits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Management foresight,â&#x20AC;? the company claimed, was nontaxable because the transfers were royalty payments, only taxable in Mississippi if the money was actually earned in Mississippi. Attorney General Jim Hood disagreed, and he sued WorldCom. The company paid more than $120 million in cash and property to the state in a 2005 settlement. PEER was unable to determine exactly how much money the state is losing from corporations exploiting the accounting loopholes legally available in the state. Much of the infor-

mation it received from the Mississippi Department of Revenue, PEER explained, falls under the purview of Internal Revenue Code 6103(d), which PEER says â&#x20AC;&#x153;allows the use of information for tax administration purposes only.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The IRC does not permit state tax agencies to furnish federal tax information to other state agencies, tax or non-tax, or to political subdivisions, for any purpose ... absent explicit legislative authority,â&#x20AC;? PEER states in its review. A 2003 John C. Stennis Institute of Government report, commissioned by the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Defense Fund, noted corporate taxes comprised 6.89 percent of the total revenue going to the state tax commission in 1998, and that this figure had dropped to 5.65 percent by 2003. Had corporationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; share remained at 6.89 percent in 2003 they would have contributed an extra $65,290,759 to state coffers. Mississippi Association of Educators Executive Director Frank Yates told the Jackson Free Press that the state of Alabama has a lesson to teach us. Alabama closed some of its corporate tax loopholes in 2001 and 2005 and, as a result, has since generated between $150 million and $200 million annually from national corporations such as Target, Walmart and Home Depot. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley is considering a proposal to close even more loopholes this year. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


Legislature: Week 12

by Adam Lynch

BRYANT HAWKINS

Passing Deadlines

Gov. Haley Barbour said he was fine with missing a critical budget deadline if it meant reducing the state’s spending.

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session extension or a special session is on the horizon after the Mississippi Legislature went past a critical March 26 budget deadline without adopting a budget. House leaders refused to agree to Gov. Haley Barbour’s plan to cut more than $100 million from the state’s K-12 public education funding, and from mental health and other state services. “He wanted $280 million in the reserves. Last night, we cut $37 million out of our budget, and we have $211 million in reserves, plus another $47 million in the Katrina fund. That’s $258 million in reserves,” Mississippi House of Representatives Appropriations Committee Chairman Johnny Stringer, D-Montrose, told the Jackson Free Press March 25. “He rejected our proposal, said that we spent too much on K-12 and mental health.” At stake is $30 million that the governor wants allocated to the state’s savings account, but that House members want allocated to K-12 education. Stringer and House Education Committee Chairman Cecil Brown, D-Jackson, say legislators don’t want to have to explain the cuts to their constituents. Barbour allowed for sufficient funding of the Mississippi Adequate Education Program,

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adults in the Jackson metro read us in print or online.

which levels state funding for public schools, but wants schools to surrender money from other areas, including funds for classroom teaching materials, and building and bus maintenance. “People are not stupid,” Stringer said. “They’ve learned that if we don’t fund school on the state level, it’s going to have to be funded back home.” Barbour also wants to cut funds from the State Department of Mental Health by about $17 million, which Central Mississippi Residential Center Director Debbie Ferguson said could close her mental-health facility and many others. “These endangered mental-health facilities are all small facilities which don’t use much money. We’re only getting $6.6 million in funds this year,” said Ferguson, whose Newton facility provides an adult day-care program for Alzheimer’s patients as well as quarters and treatment for the mentally ill. The facility gets most of its funding from the state. Arizona Outtah-here Local and state law enforcement will not be legally stopping Latinos and inquiring about their residential status this year. A bill forcing state and local law enforcement to adopt federal immigration duties died this week when Mississippi House of Representative members and Mississippi Senate members could not hash out their differences. “The only point of contention I know of was the fact (House members) wanted monetary fines against employers,” said Sen. Joey Fillingane, R-Sumrall, who authored the bill, adding that states may not legally impose fines upon businesses for employing undocumented residents. Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance Executive Director Bill Chandler called the death of the bill “a great victory for the people of Mississippi, particularly immigrants,” and said its death will hopefully stem what Chandler described

as a slight increase in statewide racial profiling of Latinos by police.

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Consistent Mental-Health Care Mental health in Mississippi might get some consistency this year if the governor signs on. The House and Senate passed a bill creating a new statewide program for offering mental-health services to patients. Senate Bill 2836, the Rose Isabel Williams Mental Health Reform Act, creates a program to oversee the state’s many mentalhealth facilities. Mary Troupe, executive director of the Coalition for Citizens with Disabilities, said the state currently provides no consistency of services between its mental-health facilities. “People have to travel across three or four counties to get their proper care, and they can’t afford it,” Troupe said. “... People throughout the state need consistent care.” Troupe added that the bill could mean that all state-financed mental health facilities will have to offer a wider variety of services or risk getting shut down and their services contracted out to private companies.

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The Museum That Wasn’t A plan to build a civil-rights museum is dead after senators and representatives failed to agree in conference on its location, among other things. House Bill 1463 would have funded construction of a national civil-rights museum, a museum of Mississippi history and a related parking garage in Jackson, although legislators appeared somewhat divided on where the civil-rights museum should be. One legislator attempted to locate the museum on Jackson’s Mill Street, while a second tried to place the building in Leflore County. The governor personally restarted the effort to build the museum this past January, weeks after critics spanked him for describing the white-separatist Citizens’ Council merely as an “organization of town leaders” who opposed the Ku Klux Klan, and described 1960s civil-rights problems in Yazoo as not “being that bad.”

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prisontalk

by Ward Schaefer

COURTESY MDOC

Parchman’s Past, Prison’s Future

Corrections commissioner Chris Epps has overseen reforms that brought Parchman out from under court supervision.

March 30 - April 5, 2011

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t’s a strange month when the Parchman Farm comes out looking better than a county jail. On March 10, a federal judge finally dismissed the bulk of Gates v. Collier. A 1972 decision on this longstanding court case mandated a slew of reforms at the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman, then the only state prison in Mississippi. Federal Magistrate Judge Jerry Davis dismissed all portions of the case dealing with state institutions but not the portions regarding Mississippi counties’ correctional systems. Less than two weeks later, Hinds County Sheriff Malcolm McMillin fired eight corrections officers from their posts at the county’s detention center in Raymond for allegedly using excessive force on a group of inmates. McMillin has asked the FBI to look into the March 6 incident. Surveillance footage captured officers, whose names have not been released, using what McMillin termed “inappropriate” force on a group of inmates in a holding cell. Days after McMillin confirmed the officers’ firings, he suspended a ninth corrections officer without pay for allegedly beating another inmate, Charles Johnson, in a separate incident. The two incidents underscore the pressure placed on county jails following courtordered reforms in the state prison system. In 1971, when Parchman inmate Nazareth Gates filed his lawsuit against John Collier, then superintendent of the prison, conditions at Parchman were still as cruel and starkly unequal as they were when immortalized in blues songs from the early 20th century. Prisoners lived in separate, racially segregated camps on the sprawling Delta property farming cotton and other crops. They were watched not only by prison guards but also by gun-wielding prisoners called trusties. The “trusty” system—distinct from the current system of inmate workers also called “trusties”—was in part a result of understaffing at Parchman. The number of civilian guards at the camps was not enough to maintain order, Judge William Keady wrote in his Oct. 20,

1972, decision in the Gates case. In the place of “free world personnel,” prison staff picked inmate trusties and a variety of other inmate positions—including “cage bosses,” “floorwalkers” and “hallboys”—to perform administrative duties and supervise their fellow inmates during non-work hours. Without evaluating the inmates for violent tendencies or mental instability, the prison staff allowed these trusties to physically punish, and in some cases shoot at, other inmates. Keady also found that inmate housing at Parchman was “unfit for human habitation under any modern concept of decency.” “The facilities at all camps for the disposal of human and other waste are shockingly inadequate and present an immediate health hazard,” Keady wrote. “Open sewage is a breeding ground for rats and other vermin.” Because of a shortage of medical staff, inmates sometimes performed medical procedures despite not having medical training. Not surprisingly, perhaps, historian David Oshinsky titled his 1997 book on the prison, “Worse Than Slavery.” In 1971, the U.S. Department of Justice joined Gates’ class-action lawsuit on the side of the inmates, the first time the federal government had done so. Keady’s ruling ordered the abolition of Parchman’s trusty system, and ultimately ended similar systems in Texas, Arksansas, Alabama and Louisiana. Reform at Parchman came slowly but then picked up, especially with the construction of additional state prison facilities and the corresponding increase in state funding for corrections. The prison ended its censorship of inmates’ mail, stopped corporal punishment and upgraded living conditions. In his order finally dismissing the case, Davis commended current Corrections Commissioner Chris Epps for implementing many of the reforms necessary to comply with Keady’s ruling. Under Epps, who became commissioner in 2002, the state’s prison system earned accreditation from the American Correctional Association, making Mississippi only the 14th state to earn the recognition. Attorney Ron Welch, who has represented the Gates’ class plaintiffs since 1978, also praised Epps’ involvement. The next frontier in improving the state’s treatment of inmates is in the counties, where Gates still applies. Part of the problem in reforming county jails is that there is little continuity or institutional knowledge among jail staff. With every county sheriff’s election, the arrival of a new boss at the county jail can erase any progress made in the procedures for handling inmates. “When there’s a turnover in the sheriff, everything turns over,” Welch said. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


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he great thing about fast food is, generally speaking, you know what to expect…a burger is a burger is a burger. But if you can get a burger anywhere, what makes a fast food chain stand out from the rest… other than a great burger? Just add fresh salads, natural-cut fries with sea salt, and chili simmered for four hours, with a frosty on top and you have the recipe for success over 40 years in the making: Wendy’s. The idea of great customer service plus square (because they don’t cut corners), grilled, fresh-ground, not-frozen Wendy’s hamburgers and a thick frosty was Dave Thomas’s plan when he opened his first restaurant in Columbus, OH in November 15, 1969. Quality was the key ingredient to Thomas, who put the phrase “Quality is our Recipe®” on the logo. Thomas’ inspiration to open a restaurant came from humble beginnings. Adopted as a child, Thomas moved around a lot and his real exposure to family life came from eating in restaurants. He was closest to his adoptive grandmother, who taught him to “never cut corners” or compromise on quality. Those traits were woven into the business and today Wendy’s features fresh, never-frozen ground beef, hand-sliced tomatoes, and the 100% real cocoa from the Ivory Coast of Africa which flavors the one and only frosty. But to survive in today’s competitive fast food marketplace, where new restaurants pop up frequently offering new menu items, Wendy’s has evolved to include hearty chili, boneless wings, fresh salads, and baked potatoes, just to name a few. For the healthconscious eater, Wendy’s offers fresh salads, some with handpicked apples and real blue cheese. Add on a healthy side such as fresh, store-made chili that stews for four hours or a real baked potato and you have a healthy, fast meal to keep both your waistline and your wallet happy. If you are looking for the more traditional fast food fare, look no further than a Wendy’s Deluxe Value Meal. Choose from either a Double Jr. Cheeseburger Deluxe or Crispy Chicken Deluxe, add an order of fresh, hand-cut fries seasoned with sea salt, and wash it all down with a Coke®, all for just $2.99. Value, quality, and taste, the same ingredients Thomas started with in 1969, are still served up daily at Wendy’s. No stop at Wendy’s would be complete without a world-famous frosty: cool, creamy, and refreshing, made from real cocoa imported from Africa and Grade A fresh milk, a classic offered for just $.99 on Wendy’s Everyday Value Menu. Looking for a little sweet for your sweet? Take the frosty to the next level with a strawberry frosty milkshake, a twisted frosty loaded with your choice of four favorite classic treats, or a frosty float that rivals any root beer float. Anyway you shake it; Wendy’s is the smart choice for classic fast food fare, healthy, fresh salads, and innovative items sure to please everyone. After all, it’s hip to be square.

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PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

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jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Sure, ‘Rebrand,’ But Don’t Stop There

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group of city and county leaders got together this week to hear a South Carolina company explain how it is going to spend three days talking to citizens and then present us with a plan to “rebrand” Hinds County. This effort comes on the heel of weeks of conversation, and some hysteria, about the U.S. Census showing that Jackson’s population has shrunk 5.8 percent in a decade, with more whites than blacks moving beyond the city limits. (Both the city and metro communities saw increases in black residents, following a national trend of African Americans moving to the South and to U.S. suburbs.) The Hinds County Economic Development Authority is paying for the three-day session, which should result in marketing plans, a new logo, a tagline and such that the county can use to help attract visitors and new residents to the county. So far, we see nothing that tells us this is a particularly bad idea other than the outsourcing part. And we like the idea of some of our suburban communities coming together with the capital city to get the area’s positives out to a larger audience. We’d like to see that on an even larger scale, with more cooperation between all three local counties and the city. That doesn’t mean, of course, that the city goes along with whatever the others want; it means working together to support the entire area and overcome the city-v.-suburbs division that is, honestly, our biggest PR challenge. We want to see that everyone who ought to be is pulled up to the table, not another case of non-elected leaders and the mayor’s office going two directions. When asked, the mayor’s office said they were “notified of this presentation”— which doesn’t sound a lot like an effort to make sure the city is fully on board with the rebranding. And, this week, the mayor said the city is working with the Jackson Chamber to figure out how to better brand the city of Jackson. We’re just not convinced that two separate branding campaigns are the answer. Jackson State political science professor Byron D’Andra Orey made a smart presentation at Koinonia’s Friday Forum last week, saying the city needs to overcome perceptions of inadequate public education and a high violent-crime rate in order to attract more people to the city—both myths that need to be exploded. In fact, crime is below the national average, and Jackson has a number of highranked public schools. “I think we, in Jackson, need to do a better job of branding the fact that we don’t have these murders and rapes taking place,” he said. Orey also wants the city to grapple with the real elephant in the room: poverty. High poverty leads directly to crime, and the lack of local jobs and job training leads to poverty. It’s a vicious cycle that rebranding will not repair, however well meaning. So, brand away, but don’t lose sight of the big picture.

KEN STIGGERS

Forget the Mess

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March 30 - April 5, 2011

udy McBride: “Over the past two years, I’ve noticed more people coming to my office in need of psychological counseling. Folks are just stressed out over the economy, jobs, unemployment and education. Frustrated commuters are freaking out while riding public transportation. “The demand for my service was just too much. As a dedicated, committed and concerned community psychologist, I had to create a more practical way to serve my community. So, I started the “Judy McBride Mass Patient Stress-Reduction Clinic.” “‘Lady Fancy’ McBride (my third cousin, and health and fitness guru) and D.J. Old School Pete will conduct the mass patient stress reduction clinic. They will require patients to read books and to attend reading and critical-thinking discussions, followed by diet and exercise seminars. Then, Lady Fancy will use her sweet personality, positive affirmations and deep breathing exercises to calm your frazzled nerves. “The stress reduction clinic will show you how to get away from the hustling crowds and all that rat-race noise down in the street. And when mean, old nasty attitude people around you are giving you pressure, you’ll enjoy D.J. Old School Pete’s message music and meditation sessions. “The Mass Patient Stress-Reduction Clinic takes place daily, one hour before the ‘Hot Wing Happy Hour’ at the Clubb Chicken Wing MultiPurpose Complex. “Don’t allow the troubles of this world to ruin your peace of mind. All you need is a comfortable exercise mat or your favorite blanket, and your imagination. 14 “Forget the mess and reduce stress.”

Jackson, Waking Up

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KAMIKAZE

ome of you may be familiar with the tale “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” It’s a short story written in the 1800s by the Danish author Hans Christian Andersen that gives some amazing insight into human nature. In this fairy-tale, two swindlers pose as weavers and convince an emperor to let them create a grand new outfit for him. They promise the emperor a new suit of clothes that are invisible to those who are incompetent or unworthy of their positions. Up to that point, the emperor only cared about his appearance, so naturally new garb was appealing. However, the weavers didn’t actually “dress” the emperor at all. They only pretended to dress him. But his pride wouldn’t allow the emperor to admit he saw nothing. He remained silent for fear of appearing unfit, and his ministers around him did the same. The emperor and his court marched in a procession, proudly walking before his subjects. Suddenly, a child exclaimed, “But he isn’t wearing anything at all.” Then the crowd took up the cry. The emperor felt uncomfortable, yet continued to proudly march in the procession. This story has been translated into more than a hundred languages and interpreted in hundreds of different ways. Is it a story about having courage in your convictions? Is it a metaphor for hypocrisy or collective denial? Or is it, as Andersen once said himself, a story that will give children the courage to challenge authority and to speak truth to power? Regardless of how you interpret this story, it always amazes me when tales told long ago can still hold relevance today. Agreed? That noise you hear is the collective awakening of our great city. Some of us have been up and at ‘em longer than others. But whether it was an article, an event or a speech that motivates you to get up

every day and push this city forward, use it. Let whatever your muse or motivation is now be your guide. I’m more encouraged now than I’ve ever been because I see those among us who were once disenfranchised asking questions. I see those among us who have been inadvertently uninformed beginning to seek knowledge. Yes! There are plenty of exciting things to do in this city if you just ask. Yes! There are thousands of great people here who will have a positive word for you. They don’t want your purse or your car. They want you to know the love that we have for Jackson. Yes! We’re finding ourselves. We’re getting our swagger back, but be leery of the storm clouds ahead. We’ve traditionally been a city of lotus-eaters, lulled by suits, signs, turkeys, tea parties, proclamations and self-imposed limitations. But no more. Be leery of those who try to stifle your concern. Beware of those who will call you fanatical, who tell you that you don’t deserve access even though they now enjoy it. Our being lucid endangers their business deals, their contracts, their invites to the swanky parties, their advertisers and their reserved seats in the front pew. It upsets the status quo. Listen: For us to restore confidence in the people, we must restore their faith in truth. We must be real with them. Someone will surely cherry-pick these words and try to discredit them. But too late. Jackson has had its moment of clarity. The people believe again. The people are passionate again. The people are wearing their pride on their sleeves now. And figuratively all it took was that one small child to innocently exclaim the truth: “The emperor has no clothes.” And that’s the truth … sho-nuff.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


TOM HEAD

Rebels Without a Cause

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Lacey McLaughlin Assistant Editor Valerie Wells Senior Reporter Adam Lynch Reporter Ward Schaefer Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Assistant to the Editor ShaWanda Jacome Style Editor Natalie Collier Writers Quita Bride, Lisa Fontaine Bynum, David Dennis Jr., Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Carl Gibson, Brandi Herrera, Garrad Lee, Lance Lomax, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Chris Nolen, Robin O’Bryant, Casey Purvis,Tom Ramsey, Doctor S, Ken Stiggers, Jackie Warren Tatum, Byron Wilkes Editorial Interns Laney Lenox, Holly Perkins, J. Ashley Nolen, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2011 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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coverage centering on the anniversary, this could be an ideal time to revisit the flag issue and finally drive old Dixie down. I see several reasons to believe that we could get a different outcome this time: • We’ll have a better alternative flag design. The 2001 vote was arguably as much a referendum on the new flag as it was on the Confederate battle flag. The new, proposed flag was bland, generic and had no clear connection to Mississippi’s history, outside of its vague similarity to the obscure Confederate First National Flag. This time, we can crowd-source a design until one specific proposal has visible support and momentum, then organize grassroots efforts in support of that proposal. • We’ll have different voters. Young voters energized by the 2008 Barack Obama campaign gave him 44 percent of the vote in this state, a figure difficult to imagine seven years earlier, and thousands of new voters will have come of age by the time any new referendum comes up. • We’ll actually talk about the old flag’s racist symbolism. Media coverage of the 2001 flag referendum vote documents a campaign that had low young voter turnout and, in the words of The New York Times, “deliberately shied from the issues of racial history surrounding the Confederacy, and focused instead almost entirely on the economic argument.” It’s difficult to effectively address a racism issue by sweeping the subject of race under the rug. With more media outlets (online and offline), Mississippians will be better situated to educate each other about how the flag has been used in the past and why it is so widely regarded as a racist symbol. It’s true that taking down the Dixie flag will not eliminate the effects of racism, but symbols are important. Ten years ago, an overwhelming majority of white Mississippians stood together to support a flag design that is harmful to the state’s reputation, economy and culture; that excludes a third of the population; and that identifies the state as belonging to a pro-slavery military coalition that was soundly defeated well over a century ago. By overturning that decision, the voters of Mississippi can finally declare victory over it—and put a little bit more of our state’s Confederate history behind us. Freelance writer Tom Head is a lifelong Jackson native. He has authored or co-authored 24 nonfiction books on a wide range of topics, is a civil liberties writer for About.com, and is a grassroots progressive activist.

It’s difficult to effectively address a racism issue by sweeping the subject of race under the rug.

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Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

pril 17 marks the 10th anniversary of the flag referendum vote, when 65 percent of Mississippi voters decided to keep the Confederate battle flag in the official state flag of Mississippi rather than adopt a new flag design. The vote was decided on racial lines, with 90 percent of white voters supporting the old flag and 95 percent of black voters supporting the new one. The last Confederate veteran died in 1959, so no living voter would have been in a position to have ever seen the battle flag used in a proper military context. But it had become a symbol of defiance during the segregationist era, a way white southerners could remind everybody else—nonwhite southerners, allied northerners and so forth—of the high price they had been willing to pay to maintain the old racial system referred to euphemistically as “the southern way of life.” My sense as a Mississippian is that by 2001 that same spirit of defiance led many whites to oppose what they saw as a national “political correctness” movement to eliminate the Confederate battle flag from other state flags, an effort that would ultimately prove successful everywhere but here. I suppose it could have been that same spirit of defiance that recently motivated Gov. Haley Barbour to wobble on the issue of whether he would be willing to unequivocally oppose a proposed Sons of Confederate Veterans license plate honoring Confederate general and first grand wizard of the KKK Nathan Bedford Forrest. Barbour’s deferential attitude toward the Sons of Confederate Veterans had been noted in the past, particularly in his willingness to declare April Confederate History and Heritage Month in annual letters his office sent to the SCV (but, curiously, did not release to the press). And it was something like that spirit of defiance that may have led Barbour to praise the racist old Citizens Council of Yazoo City, or to have himself photographed with representatives of its modern-day counterpart, the white nationalist Council of Conservative Citizens, in 2003. I can’t say for sure why Barbour did these things, and I don’t think he’s likely to go in front of a microphone and tell us anytime soon. But we’re going to hear an awful lot of defiant speech about the Confederacy over the next month from other public figures as the flag-vote anniversary is preceded by what is likely to be a much more high-profile anniversary on April 12: the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War. With state-sponsored events and media

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Lunch Bunch Ask for More Arts Brings Innovative Teaching and Learning to JPS Schools Join us for an exciting presentation about Ask for More Arts, a school-community-arts partnership that believes today’s Jackson Public School students need arts learning to improve their academic performance, graduate, and prepare them to become engaged and productive 21st Century citizens. Come listen to teachers, students, and artists as they relate their experiences in a residency and see the artwork their students created over the past several months. The residency program connects teaching artists with schools to create collaborative teaching and learning arts experiences that integrates the arts with academic learning. We will also reveal exciting details about the forthcoming student exhibit in April!

Date:Wednesday, April 6, 2011 Time:11:45 a.m. Where: Jackson Medical Mall Community Room Lunch Bunch is generously sponsored by

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March 30 - April 5, 2011

Contact Linda Cockrell at 601-969-6015 ext 320 or lcockrell@parents4publicschools.org to reserve a $5.00 lunch.

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Last year, United Way’s VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) Program put more than $4 million back into our community in the form of tax refunds, credits, and savings.


Spring Flings by Natalie A. Collier and Meredith W. Sullivan

photos by Christina Cannon

Nude Story (from left:)

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Models: (front) Libba Woolfolk; (back, left to right) Nameeta Mota, Michael Morris, Ebony Archie.

ne of the best things about dressing for spring is that we have the chance to carry over a few of our favorite fall pieces to a new season. Even better is that in the spring, we have the opportunity to indulge in trends galore. And this year, styles are especially fun and delicious, because there’s hardly a look that isn’t on-trend. From laces and sheers to camouflage and utilitarian-inspired looks, if you already own it, or see on the racks in a consignment shop, boutique or

department store, you’re probably going to look like you know what’s going on in the world of fashion. On a recent Sunday afternoon, when the breeze was nice and the skies clear, four models played dress up and told color stories—fashion stories wearing envy-invoking spring looks. There’s really no need to be jealous, though; every chic look the models are wearing came from a locally owned store. Go forth, shop, and be fabulous.

jacksonfreepress.com

On Nameeta One-shouldered ruffle dress, B. Liles, $92 Orange braid, wrap bracelet, Libby Story, $18 On Michael Cantaloupe polo, Kinkade’s Fine Clothing, $75 Seersucker pants, Kinkade’s Fine Clothing, $95 On Libba Distressed jeans, Libby Story, $98 Beaded, sheer lace blouse, Libby Story, $58 Nude cami, Libby Story, $16 Silver cuff bracelet, Libby Story, $24 On Ebony High-waist leather shorts, Posh Boutique, $39.99 White sheer blouse, B. Liles, $66 Silver ring, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $190

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SPRING FLING, from page 17

Safari Story (from left:)

March 30 - April 5, 2011

On Libba Olive shirt dress, B. Liles, $45 Leopard print sandals, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $100 Teardrop earrings, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $60 Gold cuff, B. Liles, $159 On Ebony Gray tank, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $55 Brown wide-leg pants, Orange Peel, $12 Brown beaded belt, Orange Peel, $5 Mustard-flats with gold embellishment, Lipstick Lounge, $19.99 Bangle, Posh Boutique, $15 On Nameeta Yellow-print blazer (worn as dress), Repeat Street, $30 Studded gladiator sandals, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $110 Brown belt with gold buckle, B. Liles, $98 Brown leather bag, B. Liles, $225 Necklace, B. Liles, $145

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Betty, Kayla, & Flirt

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SPRING FLING, from page 18

Bold Story (from left:)

March 30 - April 5, 2011

On Nameeta Yellow one-shoulder ruffle blouse, Libby Story, $78 Teal shorts, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $135 Hot pink patent wedge with studs, Lipstick Lounge, $40 On Libba Watercolor jumpsuit, Posh Boutique, $120 Gold espadrilles, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $85 Pink ring, Lipstick Lounge, $40 Turquoise and gold bangle, Lipstick Lounge, $60 On Ebony Pink floral dress, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $175 Green wedge, Libby Story, $54

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“When in doubt, wear red.” —Bill Blass


LARGE SELECTION OF COLORS ONLY $7.99 EACH

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SPRING FLING, from page 20

“The finest clothing made is a person’s skin, but, of course, society demands something more than this.” —Mark Twain

March 30 - April 5, 2011

Americana Story (from left:)

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On Libba Red and white striped pants, Orange Peel, $22 White tank, model’s own Gold circle necklace, B. Liles, $175 Denim and diamonds ring, Lipstick Lounge, $30 Black straw hat with bow, Libby Story, $22 On Ebony Gold espadrilles, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $85 White skinny jeans, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $75 Gold bangles with red stones, Lipstick Lounge, $20 Blue striped racer-back tank, Posh Boutique, $52.99

On Michael Blue flat-front pants, Great Scott, $255 V-neck Tee, model’s own Rubber-bottom loafers, Kinkade’s Fine Clothing, $188 Brown leather belt, Kinkade’s Fine Clothing, $65 On Nameeta Navy and tan silk romper, Posh Boutique, $59.99 Red wood platforms, Shoe Bar at Pieces , $110 Red snake bracelet, Shoe Bar at Pieces, $25 Brown and gold grommet bracelets, S hoe Bar at Pieces, $25


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SPRING FLING, from page 22

“I don’t know who invented the high heel, but all men owe him a lot.” —Marilyn Monroe Sunshine, happy faces and freshly picked corn— nothing says spring like yellow. Brighten up your feet and practically any wardrobe (you can wear yellow like a neural in warmer months; goodbye, black!) with this yellow and wood sling back. And with the closed toe, even on the days when you haven’t had a chance to get your pedicure retouched, no one has to know your secret. Shoe Bar at Pieces, $98

Delicate gold teardrop-shaped earrings with a little something extra hanging from the middle says, “I’m classy, I’m fun and ready to flirt.” Handmade by a local jewelry designer for the Miss Monk line, you’re bound to get plenty of attention for your ear jewelry. Shoe Bar, $60

Roomy, bold and gold, oh, my! From its trendy top handle to the cutouts that make even a bag airy for spring, this mustard-yellow handbag will carry just about everything you may need while you’re out. There’s even enough space for a change of clothes, should you need it. Lipstick Lounge, $55

Spring means florals and billowy fabrics; this skirt offers both. The side elastic waistband allows a fashionista to pull it on and wear it as a high-waist skirt or a bit lower on her natural waist. Pair the skirt with any top (a tank, vintage blazer or blouse) any shoe (from Chuck Taylors to peep toes) and an unexpected accessory, and you’re liable to be stopped for a certain newspaper’s new street-style feature. Just saying. Libby Story, $44

March 30 - April 5, 2011

When spring turns summer scorcher, remind yourself of the beautiful spring days with this hand-painted, toggle-clasp bracelet. The bracelet’s greens, blues and yellows on your wrist are sure to lift your spirits and get you a compliment or two. B. Liles, $125

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Where2Shop:

Libby Story, 120 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-717-3300; Posh Boutique, 4312 N. State St., 601-364-2244; B. Liles, 215 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-6077741; Shoe Bar at Pieces, 425 Mitchell Ave., 601-939-5204; Kinkade’s Fine Clothing, 120 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-898-0513; Repeat Street, 626 Ridgewood Road, Ridgeland, 601-605-9393; Great Scott, 4400 Old Canton Road #101, 601-984.3500; Lipstick Lounge, 304 Mitchell Ave., 601-366-4000


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jacksonfreepress.com


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Crossroads Film Reviews The Journey of Innocence and face raised to release 16 years of grief in a flood of tears and gratitude. On that mild and sunny February day in Macon, Miss., Brewer and Brooks became the first and second post-conviction DNA exonerations in Mississippi. “Mississippi Innocence” chronicles Brewer’s and Brooks’ ordeal through their own words, tracing the cases from Brooks’ arrest to Brewer’s joyful wedding in the year after his exoneration. It also chronicles the journey of the men and women—many working for little or no pay—who dedicated themselves to seeking freedom for the two wrongly convicted men. Among them are Innocence Project attorneys Peter Neufeld and Vanessa Potkin; Jackson attorney Rob McDuff; and André de Gruy of the Mississippi Office of Capital Defense Counsel. Tucker Carrington, director of the Mississippi Innocence Project based at Ole Miss, is the documentary’s co-producer. The documentary takes viewers into the bowels of Mississippi’s flawed justice system, where identical crimes in the same county a mere year and a half apart failed to alert officials that one man may have been the perpe-

trator. It’s a world where, by simply changing his theory of the crime, prosecutor Forrest Allgood kept Kenny Brewer in prison for seven more years after DNA proved he did not rape little Christine Jackson. And where forensic “experts” Dr. Stephen Hayne and his consulting dentist Dr. Michael West can “elaborate” “Mississippi Innocence” their evidence enough to send the accused to their death without any DNA testing. story that makes the film. As unbelievable as In a final piece of drama in the cases, the some of the details are, you just can’t make this same DNA testing that excluded Brewer as a stuff up. For those who aren’t familiar with the suspect in Christine Jackson’s rape also clearly cases, be prepared for a narrative that is tragic pointed to the actual killer of both toddlers, in scope yet optimistic in spirit. You may be Justin Albert Johnson, who confessed to both shocked and outraged at the ineptitude and crimes when confronted with the evidence. base dishonesty that resulted in two innocent Officials had Johnson’s DNA on file for both men losing 32 years of freedom. Hopefully, crimes and had never tested it. you’ll also walk away with renewed faith in the It’s a testament to the high-quality work possibility of justice. of the film’s producers that the documentary “Mississippi Innocence” screens at 6:50 held my full attention despite my familiarity p.m., Friday, April 1. with the cases. Ultimately, though, it is the —Ronni Mott

It’s a Dream; It’s a Plane Seduction with Bubble Bath

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COURTESY CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL

his German film about a poor guy who fate pulls into a bizarre and surreal experience takes a while to get started. It begins with long scenes of him moping about his novel—“a detective story without a detective”—and how he can’t get anyone to publish it. With homages to “The X Files,” “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” “Final Destination” and possibly even “Adaptation,” our poor guy seems to be lost in time or the object of a cruel joke. Flat monotones dominate many of the scenes with flat acting. Someone had an idea here—perhaps a J.J. Abrams-inspired plot that may sound juvenile but when done right resonates with the kid in all of us. Unfortunately, this is not that story. As you watch this film, you will wonder if it’s about alien abduction or if our poor guy has died and no one bothered to tell him. He might be dreaming, or he might be on a plane. If it’s the latter, then it’s a plane going nowhere. How bad is this feature? Let’s just say it’s not ready for the SyFy Channel. “22:43” screens at 8:50 p.m. Saturday, April 2. —Valerie Wells

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h. My. Gosh! I’m embarrassed for its star Christine Elise to say it, but “Bathing and the Single “Bathing and the Single Girl” Girl” was terribly boring. But, if you are a single, middle-aged woman, this one might make you cry. A lonely and, for lack-of-opportunity, a celibate brunette, Elise makes a sad and unsuccessful attempt at stand-up comedy. She tries to amuse us with her tales from Cougarville. She tells story after story of failed attempts of getting young men into her bubble bath or seducing them into a sexual escapade. I was not amused at all. Maybe the comedienne-who’s-notfunny-at-all could have gotten a laugh out of me if the film had offered visuals of some of the men her character spoke about. But she didn’t. The only part of the film that caught my attention was when I heard the name “Sarah Palin,” but then I zoned back out from boredom. The actress did have a nice narrative voice and great facial expressions, but the film simply needed more. “Bathing and the Single Girl” screens at 9:20 p.m. Friday, April 1. —Andrea Thomas

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istorians have referred to the 1955 murder of Emmett Till as the spark that lit the fuse of the Civil Rights Movement. The widely told story of the black 14-year-old boy whose body was found in the Tallahatchie River six days after he allegedly whistled at a white woman in Money, Miss., unfolds in a new format from director Rob Underhill. Using historical records and interviews, Underhill recreates reporter William Bradford Huie’s 1956 interview in Look Magazine with Roy Bryant Jr. and J.W. Milam, who were acquitted of Till’s murder. The short film (8 minutes) is an adaptation of a play, and actor Mike Wiley, who is black, plays the part of all three men. Initially, it may be a little confusing, but by the end of the film, Wiley’s skin color is anything but a distraction as he provides a glimpse into the minds of Bryant and Milam. Wiley is a powerful actor who is able to identify with Till’s murderers and tell their story with remarkable candor. The film does not imply that the viewer should sympathize with the killers, but, instead, seek to understand the way of thinking that was typical of many white southerners during that time. “Wolf Call” screens at 6:50 p.m. Friday, April 1. “Wolf Call” —Lacey McLaughlin

COURTESY OF BATHING AND THE SINGLE GIRL

Typical Thinking

he Crossroads Film Festival is screening dozens of movies April 1-3 at Malco Grandview Theatre in Madison, in addition to holding workshops, after-parties and other related events all over town. The Jackson Free Press reviewed a few films to give you a sampling of what you’ll find at the festival. For a full schedule of screenings and other festival events, go to www.crossroadsfilmfestival.com.

COURTESY OF CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL

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was privileged to be in the Noxubee County courtroom Feb. 15, 2008, when Judge J. Lee Howard exonerated Kennedy “Kenny” Brewer and Levon Brooks. The two men had spent a combined 32 years in prison for crimes they did not commit. Two separate cases stemmed from gruesome crimes that occurred in Noxubee only 18 months apart. In both cases, 3-year-old little girls were abducted from their homes, brutally raped, strangled and left in bodies of water. In both cases, police arrested the boyfriend of each girl’s mother, and both were subsequently convicted of capital murder when two separate juries found the men guilty of raping and murdering the toddlers. Brooks got life without parole in 1992, and Brewer went to death row in 1995. The problem was that both men were innocent of the crimes. Watching “Mississippi Innocence” brought it all back, especially seeing Annie Brewer, Kenny’s momma, wailing after Howard declared her son was free to go. “Thank you, Jesus!” she shouts. “Thank you, Jesus,” she says again from her wheelchair, her hands

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Crossroads Film Reviews, from page 29 It’s in the Captions COURTESY CROSSROADS FILM

“Hey Boo”

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f you made it through the American public-school system, you’ve probably read Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.” The Pulitzer Prize-winning book opened the world’s eyes to the realities of racial injustice in a small Alabama town in 1936 through the eyes of 6-year-old Scout Finch. Filmmaker Mary Murphy explores the impact of “Mockingbird” and Lee’s life through her documentary titled “Hey Boo.” The film is named for the book’s character Boo Radley, whom Lee resembles with her mystic reclusiveness. Stylistically, the film weaves scenes from Robert Mulligan’s 1962 film adaptation with interviews including Rick Bragg, Oprah Winfrey, Wally Lamb and Tom Brokaw. Lee, now 80, has declined media interviews for decades. The film focuses on the impact of fame on the author, her relationship with novelist Truman Capote and the role her work played in the Civil Rights Movement. Murphy provides insight into Lee’s life and the impact of her novel. The screening of “Hey Boo” is at 4:25 p.m. Saturday, April 2. —Lacey McLaughlin

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little Haitian boy on a cot in a temporary hospital tent lies flat with his legs at odd angles inside a geometric puzzle of a monster cast. “The earth started shaking,” he tells his visitor. “That’s what made the house fall on me.” Azod Abedikichi, a Mississippi filmmaker, went to Haiti soon after the devastating January 2010 earthquake and shot this beautiful black-and-white documentary. An early, powerful scene cuts from smiling people, coping, to what seems to be a burning pile of trash. A floating caption informs us that the pile is amputated legs and arms. The film is full of strong images like this with creative captions. The majority of the captions, however, are scripture verses. You’ve seen this type of film before, probably in Sunday school classes when people want you to donate money. Then they talked more about how great the missionaries are than about the actual people in need. During a montage of Haitian children laughing, singing and dancing, Abedikichi mutes their sounds while we hear sentimental violin music. Few are identified in this film. Maybe that is what the filmmaker wanted to convey: the confused moment in time of wandering into a situation. Perhaps he can go back and profile the boy who gave the film its title. The screening of “That’s What Made the House Fall on Me” is at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, April 2. —Valerie Wells

hen my eyes saw “Angola” in the one-sentence an appreciation for music, watching the prisonerdescription of “Music from the Big House,” comprised bands practice to make perfect, you’re in I immediately thought for a musical treat. From the gosAfrica, not a state penal farm in “Music from the Big House” pel-meets-blues original “These Louisiana. Imagine my surprise Tired Bones” to Stevie Wonder’s when I saw a man on a boat riding classic “Isn’t She Lovely,” the guys through the swamps of Louisiana behind bars sing like Maya Angeexplaining how Angola Penitenlou’s caged bird. tiary came to be. While some folks Every now and then, the men might find that information interseem so free, but their testimonies esting, for me, it was an obstacle remind you quickly of their realbetween the music and me. ity. At least for one day, there was Canadian blues singer Rita Chiarelli decides plenty of music in the big house. she’ll help the prisoners at Angola make their own The screening of “Music from the Big House” is music instead of putting on a concert for them. The 5:40 p.m. Sunday, April 3. prisoners took the challenge seriously. If you have —Natalie Collier

his offbeat comedy was not crazy-funny, but it did make me chuckle. Dylan Bradley, the protagonist for whom the film is named, had a strange childhood that led her to see life a little differently than others. A freak accident left little Dylan with a special handicap: She can see the world in two different ways, simultaneously. This double vision caused Dylan to make bad choices throughout her lifetime. (If you are a teenager—or delusional adult—who cannot separate fact from fiction, this one is not the film for you. You don’t need any new ideas.) Because of her special vision, Dylan, creates all sorts of schemes to seduce her love interest. Their first encounter was an unpleasant one, but they somehow made the relationship work. This film is a mix between “She-Devil” and “Juno,” filled with scandalous and fairly entertaining schemes. If you want to see a light-hearted film, this is one to put on your list. The screening of “The Visions of Dylan Bradley” is at 9:20 p.m. Friday, April 1. —Andrea Thomas

COURTESY OF MUSIC FROM THE BIG HOUSE

Seduction 101

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young woman lights the tips of a krathong, a colorful floral creation about the size of a dinner plate with deep green banana leaves folded around bright yellow and pink flowers. When she sets this offering on the water, she hopes it will stay lit like the one in an old Thai fairy tale. Loy Krathong, the festival of lights celebrated every year in Thailand, at its heart is as much a love story as a religious holiday. The short film “Loy Krathong” suggests the holiday is a festival for lovers, and the gorgeous cinematography translates the whole experience as an explosion of colors. Jeffrey Waldron’s saturated and luscious travelogue could entice anyone to visit Thailand and linger. Teenage boys in Boy Scout uniforms and teenage girls with small red ribbons in their ponytails color vivid images with crayons, drawing flames and flowers floating on the water or lofting in the sky. Waldron’s sister teaches in Thailand, which might explain not only his access but also the relaxed, comfortable atmosphere of the school scenes. At under eight minutes, the film seems like a trailer to a longer documentary. The charming tuk-tuk driver’s poignant story deserves a little more time so we can take it all in, let it sit there for a while and, like the people in the film, eventually let it go. The screening of “Loy Krathrong” is at 1:30 p.m Saturday, April 2. —Valerie Wells

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A Personal War

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istory buffs, especially those interested in to-day stage. “Vanquished” fully takes advantage the history of World War II in Europe, of Vanderhooft’s personal experiences, giving will appreciate the 41-minute documen- viewers new insights into the difficulties faced tary “We Were the Vanby the men and women who quished.” The film tells the kept up resistance movements story of Pieter Gerard Vanin every country touched by derhooft as a member of the the Nazis. Dutch Resistance fighting Samson effectively uses the Nazis in Holland. His camera angles to create empagrandson, the films director thy by putting the viewer in Joshua Samson, combines “We Were the Vanquished” his grandfather’s shoes, lookhistoric photos, interviews ing into the face of his interand dramatic re-enactments to create a rich tap- rogator or up the barrel of a rifle. “We Were the estry for the documentary. Vanquished” is Vanderhooft’s own retelling of So often, documentaries about that era fo- his story, a modestly told narrative of one man’s cus on its larger, more well-known aspects, the spirit in the face of overwhelming odds. Holocaust chief among them. It can be more il“We Were the Vanquished” screens at luminating when a film delves into the smaller, 1:30 p.m. April 2. individual dramas played out on the war’s day—Ronni Mott COURTESY CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL

Festival for Lovers

March 30 - April 5, 2011

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ith its toe-tapping jazz compositions and French New Wave vibe, “God of Love” is a simple, short film (18 minutes, 30 seconds) that masters style and technique. “God of Love” The film, which won the 2011 Academy Award for best short film, tells the story of awkward Raymond Goodfellow (played by director Luke Matheny), who is on a quest to woo his crush and bandmate, Kelly. Trapped in a love triangle of sorts, Goodfellow prays to God that Kelly will fall in love with him instead of pining for the band’s guitarist Fozzie. When a box of love darts is anonymously delivered to Goodfellow, giving him the power to make girls fall in love with him for six hours at time, he learns a lesson about what it means to let go and be selfless. Matheny shot the film in Brooklyn, New York, while he attended film school at New York University. The nostalgic compositions, Goodfellow’s goofy, yet endearing persona, and the film’s quirky and upbeat pace are a few of its highlights. Matheny wrote the role of Goodfellow for himself, and as the character comes to terms with his own heartache, he finds helping others fall in love is just as rewarding as finding it. The screening of “God of Love” is 7 p.m. Friday, April 1. —Lacey McLaughlin

Strike Up the Band

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Love Darts COURTESY CROSSROADS FILM FESTIVAL

Mockingbird News


BEST BETS March 30-April 6, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

JARO VACEK

Author Teresa Nicholas speaks during History Is Lunch at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.) at noon. Bring a lunch; call 601-576-6998. … Humanities Festival Week at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo) runs through April 3. Free; call 601-977-7870. … Gayle and Lee McCarty’s mixed-media and pottery exhibit at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive) shows through April 29 Free; call 601-432-4056. … Doug Frank’s Wednesday Nite Jam at Center Stage is at 7:30 p.m. Free. … Poets II has music with DJ Phingaprint. … Ralph Miller is at the Irish Frog.

FRIDAY 4/1

The annual Crossroads Film Festival is April 1-3 and includes film screenings at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison) and after-parties at Hal & Mal’s. $8 per film block, $6 students, all-access passes available; visit crossroadsfilmfestival.com. … Ballet Magnificat! performs at the Jackson Academy Performing Arts Center (4908 Ridgewood Road) at 6 p.m. April 1 and 2. $15 upper level, $20 orchestra; call 601-977-1001. … An Evening of Singin’ and Storytelling at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive) includes dinner at 6 p.m. and music by Jim White, Caroline Herring and Sam Baker at 8:15 p.m. $18 in advance, $20 day of show, $12 dinner; call 601-981-5000. … Art House Cinema Downtown at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) presents independent films starting at 7 p.m. tonight and tomorrow. $7 per film; visit msfilm.org. …The spring dance concert at Belhaven University (1400 Peachtree St.) in the Bitsy Irby Center is April 1-2 at 7:30 p.m. $10, $5; call 601-965-1400.

SATURDAY 4/2

Animaze Me! at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) is at 9 a.m. $8, $6 MMA or Crossroads members, free for children 3 and under; call 601-960-1515. … The Renaissance Fine Arts Festival at Renaissance (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland) starts a 9 a.m. and runs through April 3. Free, call 800-468-6078. … The Mississippi Puppetry Guild performs at the Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive) at 10:30 a.m. $8, members and children under 12 months free; call 601-9815469. … Dreamz JXN presents Destination Saturday. … The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra presents “Chamber IV: Chamber in the Chapel” at Tougaloo College, Woodworth Chapel (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo) at 7:30 p.m. $15; call 601-960-1565. … Iron Feathers hosts a DJ Scrap Dirty spins hits at 6 p.m. April 3 during The Blast at North Midtown Arts Center.

The Urban League of Greater Jackson golf tournament at Lake Caroline Golf Club (118 Caroline Club Circle, Madison) starts at 8 a.m. $125, $400 team of four, $700 team of four and hole sponsorship; call 601-720-6835 or 601-9410993. … The annual Puppetry Jam at Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive) is from 9 a.m.-noon and continues through April 1. $6, $5 children; call 601-977-9840. … Tonya Youngblood performs during Centric Thursday at Dreamz JXN. … Art for the Park at Laurel Street Park (1841 Laurel St.) is at 6 p.m. and includes a silent auction and music by Swing de Paris. $40; visit greaterbelhaven.com. … Jed Marum is at Fenian’s. … Stile Antico performs at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church (5400 Old Canton Road) at 7:30 p.m. $25, $5 students; visit ancientmusic.org.

SUNDAY 4/3

Howard Jones Jazz plays at the King Edward Hotel’s jazz brunch at 11 a.m. … The Sk8 Jam and Hip-Hop Slam at Swell-O-Phonic (2761 Old Canton Road) is at 1 p.m. Free admission; call 601-981-FLIP. … See the opera film “Il Trittico” at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) at 2 p.m. $16; visit msfilm.org. … The Blast at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.) includes music from Hot & Lonely, DJ ScrapDirty and more. Free.

MONDAY 4/4

The music department recital at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.) is at 3 p.m. Free; call 601-974-1422. … The artist reception for Carolyn Ford Brownell at Fitness Lady North (331 Sunnybrook Road, Ridgeland) is from 5-7 p.m. Free; call 601-354-0066. … Irish Frog has karaoke with Kokomo Joe.

TUESDAY 4/5

The exhibit “Pieces of the Past: Casualties of War” at the Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.) shows through April 10. Free; call 601-576-6920. … Music in the City at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) is at 5:15 p.m. Free; call 601-354-1533.

WEDNESDAY 4/6

Robert Luckett of Jackson State University talks about Margaret Walker Alexander during History Is Lunch at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.) at noon. Bring a lunch; call 601-576-6998. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

Jim White performs at 8:15 p.m.April 1 at St. James Episcopal Church. ROBIN BROWARD

THURSDAY 3/31

CD release party at Ole Tavern. … Grady Champion’s CD release party is at Underground 119.

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WEDNESDAY 3/30

31


jfpevents JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS Thursday, March 31st

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2 for 1 All Mixed Drinks, $1 Off Draft & Wine and 50¢ Boneless Wings

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Evil SUNDAY - APRIL 3 OPEN MIC JAM 7-11 MONDAY - APRIL 4

March 23 - 29, 2011

BAR OPEN

32

TUESDAY - APRIL 5

POOL LEAGUE NIGHT WEDNESDAY - APRIL 6 MIKE MOTT KARAOKE 1428 Old Square Road in Jackson 601.713.2700 lastcallsportsgrill.com

Crossroads Film Festival April 1-3, at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). The three-day festival includes dozens of independent films and workshops. Related activities include events for children at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.); after-parties and music at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.) April 1-2 at 9 p.m;. and an awards ceremony at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.) April 3. Afterparty performers include Strange Pilgrims, Hank Overkill, Taylor Hildebrand and 7even:Thirty, and pass-holders get in free. $8 film block/after-party, $6 members; $55, $45 all-access pass; visit crossroadsfilmfestival.com.

Events at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Call 601-960-0471. • Summer Enhancement Program Registration through March 31, in the Parks and Recreation Administrative Office from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. Youth groups ages 6-12 and 13-16 will take part in cultural activities. Parents must provide a copy of their child’s shot record or a birth certificate upon registration, and provide transportation each day. Lunch and a snack are provided. Registration for placement in Jackson Public School locations takes place May 5 at 6 p.m. $70. • Adult Summer Softball League Registration through April 4. The Department of Parks and Recreation is conducting registration for the upcoming season. Interested individuals can fill out registration forms between 8 a.m.-5 p.m. There is a limit of 20 players per team. $350 per team. “History Is Lunch” March 30, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Teresa Nicholas talks about her memoir of growing up in Yazoo City, “Buryin’ Daddy: Putting My Lebanese, Catholic, Southern Baptist Childhood to Rest.” Bring a lunch; coffee/water provided. Free; call 601-576-6998.

PPV Event:Wrestlemania

Mon - Sat | 2pm - 7pm

Intentionally Building Community April 1-3, at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Architects and authors Charles Durrett and Katie McCamant present “Cohousing: Neighbors Building Neighborhoods/Maximizing a Southern Sense of Place.” The April 1 presentation is at 7 p.m., and those interested in forming a group in their community can participate in the April 2-3 workshop. $15 in advance, $20 at the door for presentation; $300 workshop; visit intentionallybuildingcommunity.org.

COMMUNITY

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

Radio JFP on WLEZ ongoing, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from noon-1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. This week’s guests are architect Katie McCamant and representatives from Art for the Park. Listen to podcasts of all shows at jfpradio.com. Free; call 601-362-6121, ext. 17.

2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

JROTC Review Ceremony March 30., 6 p.m., at Hughes Field (Ellis Avenue and Oakmont Drive). More than 1,100 cadets in the Jackson Public Schools’ JROTC program will participate. Outstanding students and others in the program will be honored for their scholastic achievements, and will showcase their teamwork and leadership. Free; call 601-960-8935. Urban League of Greater Jackson Golf Tournament March 31, 8 a.m., at Lake Caroline Golf Club (118 Caroline Club Circle). On-site registration is at 8 a.m., and the shotgun start is at 9 a.m. The 18-hole tournament is a four-person scramble format.,with prizes for first, second and third place winners. $125, $400 team of four, $700 team of four and hole sponsor; call 601-720-6835 or 601941-0993.

Minority Business Network Meeting March 31, 6 p.m., at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.), in the Community Meeting Room. The event is a networking opportunity for small and minority business owners, future entrepreneurs and small business advocates. Bring brochures and business cards. The first five people or companies to RSVP can give a three-minute presentation. Free; call 601750-2367 or 601-316-5092. Art for the Park March 31, 6 p.m., at Laurel Street Park (1841 Laurel St.). The fundraiser features music by Swing de Paris, hors d’oeuvres and beverages, and a silent auction of local art. Park fence pickets will also be for sale for $50 each. Proceeds will be used for renovations at the front of the park. $40; visit greaterbelhaven.com. LGBT Support Group for Youth/Young Adults March 31, 6:30 p.m., at A Brave New Day (Fondren Corner, 2906 N. State St., Suite 204). Rise Above for Youth welcomes youth and young adults age 14-24 to connect with others in the community and to share experiences and resources. The meeting is held the last Thursday of each month. Free; call 601-922-4968. Business E-Waste Day April 1, 8 a.m., at Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.). Bring any unwanted electronics such as computers, computer components, radios, televisions, copiers, fax machines, VCRs, DVD players, desk phones, cell phones and smoke alarms. $1 per monitor, $10 per TV, free disposal for other items; call 601-948-7575, ext. 230. Events at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). • Criminal Justice Reform Conference April 1-2, in the Liberal Arts Center. The theme is “Women In Prison.” Speakers Asha Bandele, Joyce Ann Brown and Louis Armstrong. Free; call 601-3543408. • Community Health Symposium April 2, 9 a.m., at the College of Business. The event includes health screenings and information about asthma, hypertension, diabetes and cancer. Free; call 601317-1908. Business Expo April 2, 8 a.m., at Mississippi e-Center (1230 Raymond Road). Entrepreneurs will lead training sessions, and participants have access to procurement opportunities and funding for small businesses. Registration required. The event is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) through the Mississippi Department of Employment Security and the U.S. Department of Labor. Free; call 601-366-8301. Community Health Fair April 2, 9 a.m., at Neighborhood Christian Center (417 West Ash St.). The fair includes health screenings for adults and information about health professions for children. Free; call 601-352-9049. Million Dollar Golf Shoot-out Call for Qualifiers through April 2. Amateur golfers compete in a shot contest to hit a hole-in-one from a distance of 165 yards. Sign up at Quality Inn & Suites (400 Greymont Ave.) or Arby’s (1260 High St.) by April 2. The shoot-out is April 23 at the Sonny Guy Golf Course (3200 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.) at 10 a.m. Proceeds benefit CPR for Education, which gives scholarships to high school students. $100 one ball, $175 two balls, $200 three balls; call 504-400-3477. Financial Peace University Preview April 3, 10 a.m., at The Church Triumphant (Odyssey North, 731 S. Pear Orchard Road, Suite 43, Ridgeland). The event is a sneak peek of the 13week course taught by Dave Ramsey through a DVD series and additional materials. Classes begin April 26 and are on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Free preview, $99.51 registration; call 601-977-0007. Sk8 Jam and Hip-Hop Slam April 3, 1 p.m., at Swell-O-Phonic (2761 Old Canton Road, Suite 103). Celebrate the store’s redesign with skateboarding and local music. Free; call 601-981-FLIP.


LITERARY AND SIGNINGS

Events at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). • Art House Cinema Downtown April 1-2. Films include “Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead” April 1 at 7 p.m., “Certifiably Jonathan” April 2 at 7 p.m. and “Tiny Furniture” April 1-2 at 8:55 p.m. Popcorn and beverages served. $7 per film; visit msfilm.org. • “II Trittico” April 3, 2 p.m. The Mississippi Opera and the Mississippi Film Institute present the opera film from La Scala. $16; call 601-960-2300.

Jennifer Luckett Presentation and Book Signing March 31, 9:30 a.m., at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo), at Berkshire Cottage, room 107. The author of “Caught in the Middle” gives a lecture and signs copies of her book. Free admission, $15 book; call 601-977-7870.

25th Annual Puppetry Jam March 31-April 1, at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). See the Puppet Arts Theatre in “The Princess and the Pea” and the Paul Mesner Puppets in “The True Story of the Three Little Pigs.” Visit Inky the Clown and Hilda Faye Hill of Puppet Factory. Show times are 9 a.m.-noon both days. $6 adults, $5 children; call 601-977-9840. Ballet Magnificat! Spring Performance April 1-2, at Jackson Academy (4908 Ridgewood Road), in the Performing Arts Center. April 1, the Alpha Company presents “Ruth” and “The Arrival.” April 2, the Omega Company presents “Prodigal’s Journey” and “Basic Instructions.” $15 upper level, $20 orchestra; call 601-977-1001. Puppetry Jam April 2, 10:30 a.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The Mississippi Puppetry Guild presents “The True Story of the Three Little Pigs.” $8, members and children under 12 months free; call 601-981-5469.

Events at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Call 601-366-7619. • “Ladybug Girl and the Bug Squad” March 31, 11 a.m. David Soman signs copies of his book. $16.99 book. • “Biologically Bankrupt: Sins of the Fathers” April 2, 2 p.m. Adair Sanders signs copies of her book; reading at 2:30 p.m. $11.95 book. • “Evil Eye” April 6, 5 p.m. Jason Goodwin signs copies of his book; reading at 5:30 p.m. $26 book.

CREATIVE CLASSES “Discovering Ourselves Through Yoga” Workshop April 1-3, at Butterfly Yoga (3025 N. State St.). Desiree Rumbaugh is the instructor. Classes include “Hip Openers” April 1 at 6 p.m., “Backbends” and “Forward Bends” April 2 at 10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., and “Arm Balances and Inversions” April 3 at 10 a.m. $160 by March 18, $175 after, $50 single session; call 601-594-2313.

“A Soldier’s Play” April 5-17, at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). The mystery-thriller tracks the investigation of a murder in 1944 at Fort Neal, a segregated army camp in Louisiana. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. $25, $22 seniors/students; call 601-948-3533.

Animaze Me! April 2, 9 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). In conjunction with the Crossroads Film Festival, experience a day of workshops and activities related to animé films. Activities include a steampunkery jewelry and accessories workshop ($10 supply fee), a drawing workshop in the style of chibi, an animation workshop and tips on pursuing a career in animation. $8, $6 MMA or Crossroads members, free for children 3 and under; call 601-960-1515.

MUSIC

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS

Stile Antico March 31, 7:30 p.m., at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church (5400 Old Canton Road). The 12-member English choral group performs music from the Renaissance of texts from the Old Testament Song of Songs. $25, $5 students; call 601594-5584. An Evening of Singin’ and Storytellin’ April 1, 6 p.m., at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive). Jim White, Caroline Herring and Sam Baker perform as part of the Love to be Loved Concert Series. Dinner is at 6 p.m., doors open at 7:30 p.m., and the show is at 8:15 p.m. Tickets available at BeBop and the church office. $15 in advance, $18 day of show, $12 dinner; call 601981-5000. Chamber IV: Chamber in the Chapel April 2, 7:30 p.m., at Tougaloo College, Woodworth Chapel (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). Enjoy music by the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra’s woodwind quintet, brass quintet and string quartet. $15; call 601-960-1565. Chamber Singers Concert April 3, 6 p.m., at Christ United Methodist Church (6000 Old Canton Road). Millsaps College’s 20-voice auditioned touring choir presents a concert of a cappella and accompanied choral music. Free; call 601-974-1422. The Blast April 3, 6 p.m., at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.), in the courtyard. The theme of the outdoor party is “Cool, Hip, Diverse.” The event’s purpose is to promote the Millsaps Arts District. Enjoy music from Hot & Lonely, DJ ScrapDirty and more. Free; e-mail thevdj@aol.com. “For the Beauty of the Earth” April 5, 6:30 p.m., at Power Academic and Performing Arts Complex (1120 Riverside Drive). The vocal music department presents their spring music program. Free; call 601-960-5387.

Mississippi Celebrates Architecture Exhibit March 31-April 30, at Jackson Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.). The exhibit features works of art by members of AIA Mississippi, K-12 students, and professional and amateur photographers. The March 31 opening reception is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wear business attire; please RSVP. Free; e-mail joe@ aiamississippi.org. Renaissance Fine Arts Festival April 2-3, at Renaissance (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). The juried two-day festival features top artists. Live music and children’s activities included. Hours are 9 a.m.-6 p.m. April 2 and 11 a.m.-6 p.m. April 3. Free; call 800-468-6078. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE The Art of Life: Expotential 2011 March 31, 6 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). The fundraiser showcases artisans with significant disabilities. The art show includes a silent auction, refreshments, raffles, artwork for sale and live entertainment. Proceeds benefit LIFE of Mississippi. $15, $25 for two; call 601-201-6735. Scott Sisters March and Rally April 1, 10 a.m., at the corner of Farish and Hamilton streets. The march ends at the Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.). Participants rally in support of a full pardon for the Scott sisters. Call 601-353-4455.

Doctor S sez: You can hear Southern Miss baseball on 1590 AM this season. Check it out. John Cox always calls a good game. THURSDAY, MARCH 31 MLB baseball, Atlanta at Washington (noon, SportSouth, 930 AM): The Braves begin the post-Bobby Cox era against the Nationals. Opening day is always one of the sweetest days of the year.

MONDAY, APRIL 4 Men’s college Basketball, NCAA Final Four championship, teams TBD (8 p.m., Houston, Ch. 12, 930 AM): An underdog is going to battle a member of college hoops royalty. Let’s hear it for the underdog.

FRIDAY, APRIL 1 College baseball, Ole Miss at LSU (7 p.m., Baton Rouge, La., 97.3 FM): The Rebels and Tigers open a big SEC series for both teams.

TUESDAY, APRIL 5 College baseball, Belhaven at Mississippi College (6 p.m., Clinton, client. stretchinternet.com/client/mc.portal#): The battle for the Maloney Trophy continues. … Mississippi State vs. Southern Miss (6:30 p.m., Trustmark Park, Pearl, 105.9 FM, 1590 AM): Two hot teams meet in a potential dandy at the TeePee. … Women’s college basketball, NCAA Women’s Final Four championship, teams TBD (7:30 p.m., Indianpolis, ESPN): National interest in college basketball peaks on Monday. Naturally, the biggest women’s game happens the next day.

SATURDAY, APRIL 2 Men’s college basketball, NCAA Final Four semifinals, Butler vs. Virginia Commonwealth (5 p.m., Houston, Ch. 12, 930 AM): The Bulldogs and the Rams meet in the battle of the underdogs. … Kentucky vs. Connecticut (7:45 p.m., Houston, Ch. 12, 930 AM): CBS hopes to recoup the ratings disaster of the first game with this battle of college hoops heavyweights. SUNDAY, APRIL 3 Women’s college basketball, NCAA Women’s Final Four (6 p.m. and 8 p.m., Indianapolis, ESPN): We’ll see the best in big-time women’s college basketball. How come the college game is sometimes compelling and the WNBA is so awful?

Curses, Foiled Again Two men entered a convenience store in La Mirada, Calif., picked up an 18-pack of beer and assorted snack items and ran out the door without paying. Four uniformed sheriff’s deputies standing inside the store drinking coffee chased after them and arrested Jacob Wallace, 29, and Robert Martin, 19. Los Angeles County sheriff’s Capt. Patrick Maxwell noted that the suspects also failed to notice the deputies’ two marked patrol cars parked outside the store before they entered. (San Gabriel Valley’s SGV Tribune)

Trial Separation British authorities reported that when a woman visited family in Pakistan, her husband, an immigration officer with access to security databases, added her name to a list of terrorist suspects banned from boarding flights into Britain. As a result, the woman was stranded in Pakistan for three years without being told why. The husband’s action went undetected until he applied for a promotion with the U.K. Border Agency. During the vetting process, his wife’s name was discovered on the suspects list. When questioned, the officer admitted what he’d done and was fired for gross misconduct. (Britain’s Daily Mail)

Kool-Aid’s off the Menu A restaurant chain in South Bend, Ind., pulled its billboard ads that made reference to People’s Temple leader Jim Jones and to the mass suicide he orchestrated in 1978. After coming up

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6 MLB baseball, Atlanta at Milwaukee (7 p.m., SportSouth, 930 AM): The Braves face the Brewers in Beer City. For some reason, Doctor S is thirsty. The Slate is compiled by Doctor S, who can’t get enough of that cat and dogs insurance commercial. For more guilty pleasures, go to JFP Sports at www.jacksonfreepress.com.

with the theme “You belong,” leaders at Hacienda brainstormed ways to show how clubs, teams and restaurants can develop cult followings of like-minded people. Using Jones’s cult “went the wrong direction,” admitted Jeff Leslie, Hacienda’s vice president of sales and marketing. “We lose the core message.” (South Bend Tribune)

Wise Guy, Huh? When computer scientist David N. Cox and some of his neighbors in Raleigh, N.C., lobbied city and state officials to add traffic signals at two intersections, the city hired an engineering consultant, who said the signals weren’t needed. Cox and the North Raleigh Coalition of Homeowners’ Associations responded with their own eight-page analysis. After seeing the maps, diagrams and traffic projections, Kevin Lacy, chief traffic engineer for the state Department of Transportation, declared the report “appears to be engineering-level work” and accused Cox of practicing engineering without a license. “When you start applying the principles for trip generation and route assignment, applying judgments from engineering documents and national standards and making recommendations,” that’s technical work a licensed engineer would do, Lacy said after he called on the N.C. Board of Examiners for Engineers and Surveyors to investigate Cox, who never claimed to be an engineer but now faces misdemeanor charges. (Raleigh’s The News & Observer) Compiled from mainstream media sources by Roland Sweet. Authentication on demand.

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STAGE AND SCREEN

33


DIVERSIONS|music

RON BLAYLOCK

by Lacey McLaughlin

Rocking Crossroads

T

AMILE WILSON

Coma Boy “Coma Boy” by Jackson musician TTOCCS REKARP (pronounced tox rekarp), aka Daniel Guaqueta, is an upbeat and funky song using electronic cumbia, a Latin American rhythm. The video, produced by Amile Wilson and directed by Clay Hardwick, follows a hairdresser, a sciencelaboratory worker, a landscaper, an office worker and a pizza maker—all with familiar faces— through their daily routines at work. Coma Boy The employees are all on the clock at their jobs. As the office

Mental Needles An animated love story between a dinosaur and a man might seem a bit abstract, but that is Mental Needles exactly what Jackson illustrator Justin Schultz had in mind when he created the music video for Spacewolf’s “Mental Needles.” The song is about finding a person who makes life so interesting and full of adventures that it’s as if they have stimulated your brain with needles. Schultz, owner of illustration company The Flying Chair, spent 40 hours drawing the animation on his Wacom tablet and piecing the story together in Flash. The animation that follows the rock song is a fun and fast-paced ride in which a large, green dinosaur and his friend go from sightseeing in Paris to throwing TVs off balconies.

Red Clay

“I wanted people to watch it again,” the 28-year-old Brandon native says. “I wanted it to be a full story from front to back, and I crammed that whole idea into 2.5 minutes.” “Mental Needles” is Schultz’s first video but, hopefully, not his last. Red Clay Filmed in Edwards, Miss., “Cold Red Clay” takes a serious tone with its dark southern gothic storytelling. Jackson photographer Ron Blaylock shot the video for songwriter and musician Tommy Bryan Ledford who is releasing his solo album, “Butcher Bird,” this spring. The video, which won Best Music Video at the Oxford Film festival last month, tells the haunting story of a man who may or may not have killed his pregnant wife. Shot in black and white in an old cabin in the woods, the strong images evoke nostalgia and bring Ledford’s folkbluegrass song to life. Blaylock says that he wanted to tell a story in line with Ledford’s upcoming murder-ballad album while creating a loose plot line. “We didn’t want to write it out too clearly, but leave it up for interpretation,” Blaylock says. “We wanted something a little creepy.” The Crossroads Regional Music Video Showcase is at 7:15 p.m. Friday, April 1 on Screen A.

COURTESY SKIPP COON

Natalie’s Notes

worker stamps papers on his desk over and over again, and the pizza maker places yet another pepperoni on his pizza, they begin to lose it. The office worker’s plain tie changes to cartoon characters while the hairdresser, played by SMoak Salon owner Suzanne Moak, begins to cut hair with garden shears. By the end of the video, the workers are splashing in a pool, while women decorated with body paint linger around the pool’s edges. The video is incredibly colorful and embodies a youthful rebellion that makes you want to get up from your desk chair and dance.

JUSTIN SHULTZ

he competition at this year’s Crossroads’ Regional Music Video Showcase will be fierce. Throughout the past year, local filmmakers and musicians have spent hours filming, editing and producing videos aiming to outdo other Crossroads’ opponents and even their own work from last year. Crossroads gives local and regional artists an outlet to showcase to their work, and the showcase is usually one of the most packed events at the festival. Last year, Jackson filmmaker Robby Piantanida won Best Music Video for “After the Fall,” by Taylor Hildebrand. This is the first year a panel of judges will select the best music video and the viewers’ choice award. Audience members selected the winners in previous years. While there are too many entries to mention them all, here is a sneak peak of some of the local videos you can expect to see this year:

The South and SXSW

by Natalie Long

A

March 30 - April 5, 2011

COURTESY SARAH MCNALLY

nna Kline is one busy girl. The Jackson singer, song- nation and fortitude, she met with another festival booking writer, writer and Crossroads Film Festival member agent who loved her idea about a Mississippi showcase and also serves as special projects officer for the Missis- was ready to take the necessary steps to get this showcase off sippi Development Authority. Between singing with the ground. her band and enjoying life as a newlywed, Kline coordinated With the help of the Mississippi Division of Tourism, the Mississippi music showcase at this year’s South by South- Kline got the ball rolling and finally the showcase, themed west Festival in Austin, Texas, featuring homegrown musi- “Find your True South,” was intact. cians Bobby Rush, Cary Hudson, Shannon McNally, Skipp While in Austin, she passed out Mississippi Blues Trail Coon, Charlie Mars and the Homemade maps and harmonicas to concert goers. Kline Jamz Blues Band. said many attendees had tales of our state, or Kline, a Hernando native, got the idea were Mississippi natives who had been transfrom the Memphis Music Foundation that planted to other parts of the world. Many in showcased bands such as the North MisAustin who had Mississippi roots looked at sissippi Allstars, whose band members are the showcase as a “musical homecoming.” all from the Magnolia State. Kline decided Oklahoma’s Taddy Porter, the band that it was time we had a singer-songwriter playing just before the Mississippi Showcase, spotlight on our state for a change. She even commented on stage that they love our wanted Mississippi’s musicians to play a state and claimed that they were from Stilllarge venue with maximum exposure and Country-music vocalist Sarah water, Miss. went to work immediately to put together McNally performed at SXSW The Mississippi Showcase was a hit, March 20. a showcase for the next SXSW. bringing a fairly large crowd to the Hilton Since she began the project in May Garden Inn of Austin. To everyone’s enjoy2010, Kline had many statewide bands ment, blues legend Pinetop Perkins make and artists submit albums to her for consideration, and a special appearance at the showcase. He passed away two she pitched many of them to the SXSW folks. They only days later. picked one Mississippi artist out of the dozens Kline tried to Kline happily reports that while her week in Austin promote. It almost deflated her efforts. But with determi- was pretty busy, the music brought to SXSW by some of

34

A local rapper with a lot to say about the world around him, Skipp Coon also represented Mississippi.

Mississippi’s finest musicians was a treat for the festival goers and promoters. Because of Kline’s hard work, promoters plan to continue the “Find Your True South” showcase at future festivals. If you’re interested in being considered for next year’s South by Southwest Festival in Austin, email Kline at anna@ gritsandsoul.com.


MARCH 30 - WEDNESDAY

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LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR

ALL SHOWS START AT 10PM UNLESS NOTED WEDNESDAY

3/30

LADIES NIGHT

WITH JASON BAILEY 10 PM LADIES PAY $5, DRINK FREE FRIDAY

4/1

SATURDAY

4/2

SUNDAY

4/3

MOON TAXI PURPETRATOR

MONDAY

KARAOKE

4/4

OPEN MIC JAM TUESDAY

4/5

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE $2 MARGARITAS $1 HIGHLIFE & PBR

SATURDAY

APRIL

9

MARTINS

2011

SOLDIER SALUTE

FESTIVAL FEATURING

IVAN NEVILLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DUMPSTAPHUNK, BOOMBOX, LYRICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BORN, FLOW TRIBE, GOOD ENOUGH FOR GOOD TIMES + MORE BOILED CRAWFISH BY Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;BEAUXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S jacksonfreepress.com

livemusic

35


venuelist

Weekly Lunch Specials

Wednesday, March 30th

BILL & TEMPERANCE

(Bluegrass) 8-11, No Cover

Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm thursday

March 31

Thursday, March 31st

LADIES NIGHT

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM friday April 1

Friday, April 1st

THE WHIGS With Company of Thieves

THE RHYTHM PRIESTS

CHRIS GILL & THE SOLE SHAKERS

LADIES DRINK FREE

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Saturday, April 2nd

GRADY CHAMPION CD RELEASE PARTY (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Wednesday, April 6th

saturday

April 2

monday

April 4

THE IRON FEATHERS With Swamp Babies PUB QUIZ

2 FOR 1 DRAFTS tuesday

April 5

OPEN MIC with Cody Cox

*DOLLAR BEER* wednesday

SWING DE PARIS

(Gypsy Jazz) 9-11, No Cover Thursday, April7

LISA MILLS

(Jazz) 8-11, No Cover Friday, April 8th

GEORGE PORTER

March 30 - April 5, 2011

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

36

Saturday, April 9th

BOOKER WALKER

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover 119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

April 6

KARAOKE w/ KJ STACHE thursday April 7

LADIES NIGHT LADIES DRINK FREE

WELLS & PONIES 9PM-2AM

friday

April 8

WOODEN FINGER With Callooh! Callay! FREE WiFi

Open Mon-Sat, Kitchen open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

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37


dining

Spring Equals Strawberries

March 30 - April 5, 2011

EASY STRAWBERRY SAUCE

1 pint sliced strawberries 1/4 cup orange juice

E

PH O TO

Dissolve gelatin in hot water. Add strawberries, nuts, bananas and pineapple. Pour half of the mixture into an 8-by-8-inch pan and chill until firm (see gelatin package directions for timing). Spread sour cream evenly on congealed gelatin. Cover with remaining gelatin. Chill until set. Serves eight to 10.

Macerate strawberries in orange juice for at least an hour. Reserve about a quarter of the berries. Put the remaining strawberries and juice in the blender and puree. Mix puree and sliced berries. This is yummy served over angel

STRAWBERRY PIE

1 9-inch pie crust, baked 2 to 2-1/2 cups mini-marshmallows 1 tablespoon milk 1-1/4 cups strawberry puree (use the easy strawberry sauce, below) 1/2 to 1 cup sugar 1 cup whipping cream

In a saucepan, dissolve marshmallows in milk over low heat, stirring constantly. Add strawberries to melted marshmallows. Taste and add sugar as needed to reach desired sweetness. Whip cream into soft peaks and fold in the strawberry mixture. Pour filling into baked pie shell and refrigerate four to six hours, or until set. Garnish with fresh strawberry slices.

food cake, pound cake or ice cream. To get more elaborate, dress up a boxed yellowcake mix. Prepare and bake the cake in a 9-by-13-inch pan according to directions. While the cake is still warm, poke holes in it about 1 inch apart with a wooden spoon. Pour sauce over the cake and let it sit for about an hour so the berries can soak into the cake. Ice the cake with homemade whipped cream.

STRAWBERRY-BANANA ICE CREAM by Katie Stewart

P

repare this recipe using your ice cream maker of choice. I recommend the KitchenAid mixer attachment—it’s simple, easy and doesn’t require hand cranking that old-fashioned ice cream makers do. 5 cups half-and-half, separated 8 egg yolks 3/4 cup sugar 4 teaspoons vanilla 1/8 teaspoon salt 2 cups chopped strawberries 2 bananas, mashed

Over medium heat, heat two-and-ahalf cups half-and-half until very hot, stirring constantly. Do not allow the half-and-half to boil. Take the saucepan off the heat and reserve the half-and-half for the next step. In a medium bowl, whisk egg yolks and

sugar for thirty seconds, or until Kick off spring with some well blended and homemade ice cream. slightly thickened. Gradually add the hot half-and-half until the mixture is smooth. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and heat until the edges are bubbly. Again, don’t let the mixture boil and stir constantly to avoid sticking. Pour the mixture, which will now resemble custard, into a bowl and add twoand-a-half cups half-and-half, vanilla and salt. Cover and chill for at least eight hours. Follow the manufacturer’s directions for your ice cream maker. In the last few minutes of the freezing process, add fruit. You will likely need to freeze the ice cream for a few hours longer to ensure the right texture and adequate stiffness. Serves eight.

FROM OUR ROASTERY, TO YOUR CUP. voted best coffeeshop in jackson 2003-2010

KATIE STEWART

38

her house to the restaurant was always exciting. My father, stepmother and I would jam into the back seat of my grandfather’s mint-green Ford, with my grandparents and great-aunt sitting up front. My stepmother and I would giggle the entire ride as we listened to my father use words he typically saved for his old MG or events causing him physical pain. His rather colorful language stemmed from my grandfather’s problem with driving speeds. Papaw tended to get his speeds backward, driving at about 10 miles per hour on the highway and about 60 in neighborhoods and parking lots. He’d whip into a space at the restaurant, and we’d all pile out. As we waited to be seated, I remember staring anxiously at the strawberry pies on display, knowing that I would later get a piece for dessert. These pies, with their almost varnishlike shiny red filling and their chemical-tasting whipped topping, were just what I craved. I thought they were fancy and special. These days, I appreciate plain old strawberries and desserts where the berries appear in their expected color. Like my momma, I prefer to simply eat the strawberries by themselves, but I do have some recipes I use when the fridge is overladen with them. Below you will find recipes for my grandmother’s strawberry salad and one for strawberry pie. The pie is sweet and creamy, and has a color found in nature. More importantly, it doesn’t look like the berries have been set in resin. If you know you won’t have time to use all your strawberries before they go bad, they freeze easily. You can freeze them whole, but I prefer to freeze them sliced and in a little orange juice. These are awesome in homemade smoothies, but they can be defrosted and used in any recipe. Now if the Strawberry Lady would just hurry up and get here.

2 small packs strawberry gelatin 2 cups boiling water 2-1/2 cups sliced strawberries 1-1/2 cups crushed pineapple 2 large bananas, sliced 1 cup sour cream 1/2 cup chopped pecans

FIL

F

or me, the official sign of the shift to a warmer season is the Strawberry Lady. Each year she brings her ripe, juicy Louisiana strawberries to my husband’s business, and we inevitably end up with several flats. Family members will only take so many pints, and, as a result, I’ve had to find various ways to use the sweet berries before they go bad. Growing up, we served the strawberries at my house simply; we either ate them whole, or sliced and put them on our shredded wheat or yogurt. Occasionally, my momma would make strawberry shortcake, but that was a rare treat. I understand now that my mother just wanted to savor the sweetness of the berries themselves. As a kid, however, that wasn’t enough; I wanted something more. Fortunately, trips to either set of grandparents provided the strawberry treats I craved: unnaturally red, strawberry goodies. My maternal grandmother’s strength wasn’t her cooking skills. She enjoyed the summer heat on the golf course over the heat of a kitchen. The only items she prepared that the family unanimously found palatable were pimento cheese, icebox cake and what she called her strawberry salad. This “salad” was not her typical iceberg-lettuce wedge with her mayonnaise and ketchup Thousand Island dressing. It was a rich, fruit-laden gelatin concoction with layers of nuts and sour cream. To this day, this is the only gelatin that I enjoy, and I’m sure that this is partly due to the memories it holds. On the other side of the family, my paternal grandmother was a good cook, but she preferred restaurants. Easter trips to her house in Greenwood ensured a visit to a certain wellknown chain restaurant, one not necessarily known for its fine cuisine but rather for its enormous buffet. As a child, the five-minute drive from

MAMMAW’S STRAWBERRY SALAD

by Crawford Grabowski


%*/&+BDLTPO Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar complete with multiple televisions for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rockyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;polished casualâ&#x20AC;? dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino. Parker House (104 South East Madison Drive, Ridgeland 601-856-0043) European and Creole take on traditional Southern ingredients. Crawfish, oysters, crab and steaks dominate, with creative option like Crab Mac â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n Cheese, Oysters Rockefeller and Duck Jezebel.

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Butts in Townâ&#x20AC;? features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A â&#x20AC;&#x153;very high class pig stand,â&#x20AC;? Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie. Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Rd. Jackson 866-906-0942) Specializing in smoked barbeque, Lumpkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offers all your favorites for on-site family dining or for catered events, including reunions, office events, annivesaries, weddings and more.

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso CafĂŠ (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Wired Espresso CafĂŠ (115 N State St 601-500-7800) This downtown coffeehouse is a true gathering place, featuring great coffee and a selection of breakfast, lunch and pastry items. Wi-fi.

PIZZA

The Pizza Shack (1220 N State St. 601-352-2001) 2009 and 2010 and 2011â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the local favorite: fried ravioli. Best Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks... and a grown-up vibe.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK/INDIAN

Petra CafĂŠ (2741 Old Canton Road, 601-925-0016) Mediterranean and Lebanese Cuisine. Everything from Stuffed Grape Leaves, to Spinach Pie, Shrimp Kabobs, Greek Salads, Hummus and more. Now Open in Fondren! Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends. Bombay Bistro (3716 I-55 N - 601-487-8370) Bombay Bistro is Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest source for authentic, tasty Indian food. Their lunch buffet runs everyday and features an assortment of Kebobs, Kurries, and Naan for only $7.99. Dinner options abound, with fresh ingredients, authentic spices and big-city flair. Kristos (971 Madison Ave @ Hwy 51, Madison, 601-605-2266) Home of the famous Greek meatball! Hummus, falafel, dolmas, pita sandwiches, salads, plus seasoned curly fries (or sweet potato fries) and amazing desserts. Mezza (1896 Main St., Suite A, Madison 601-853-0876) Mediterranean cuisine and wood fired brick oven pizzas. Come experience the beautiful patio, Hookahs, and delicious food. Beer is offered and you are welcome to bring your own wine. Vasilios (828 Hwy 51 in Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic Greek dining featuring fresh seafood daily along with gyros, greek salads, appetizers and signature Mediterranean desserts. Their redfish is a standout, earning rave reviews.

www.thepizzashackjackson.com

<2:=1/B7=< =>3<7<5A==< Colonial Mart Shopping Center Off Old Canton Rd Behind Great Harvest Bread Co. 5046 Parkway Drive

!! WINNER !! BEST PIZZA IN JACKSON 2009 - 2011

Dine-In / Carry-Out

Mon - Thur: 11am-10pm Fri - Sat: 11am-11pm Sun: 11am - 9pm

601-352-2001 1220 N. State St.

(across from Baptist Medical Center)

CATERING AVAILABLE

jacksonfreepress.com

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Ceramiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license! Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (910 Lake Harbour, Ridgeland, 601-956-2929) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Authentic, homey, unpretentiousâ&#x20AC;? thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how the regulars describe Fratesiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, a staple in Jackson for years, offering great Italian favorites with loving care. The tiramisu is a must-have!

39


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BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Brady’s Bar and Grill (6720 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-812-6862) Everything you’d expect from a bar and grill, from classic pub fare to their Krispy Sweet Pepper Chicken. Burgers, seafood baskets, salads, steaks and lunch specials. And, ladies get one free Apple Martini or Cosmo during Brady’s Thursday Ladies Night! Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Stamps Superburgers (1801 Dalton Street 601-352-4555) Huge burgers will keep you full until the next day! The homestyle fries are always fresh. Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner for Live Music Venue for multiple years running. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and poboys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Poets Two (1855 Lakeland Drive, Suite H-10, 601-364-9411) Pub fare at its finest. Crabcake minis, fried dills, wings, poppers, ultimate fries, sandwiches, po-boys, pasta entrees and steak. The signature burgers come in bison, kobe, beef or turkey! Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing wings in a choice of nine flavors, Wingstop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stirfrys using fresh ingredients and great sauces.

SOUTHERN CUISINE

Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) 2010 Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a sumptious buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of three homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun.

March 30 - April 5, 2011

BAKERY

40

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution featuring a full breakfast, blue-plate specials, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys and wraps. Save room for something from their famous bakery! For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Mmmm... Bagels. Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more!

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant.


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Eslavaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

By popular demand, we have added Shrimp Scampi to our menu!

Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland | 601-956-2929 Monday - Saturday | 5 - until

2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

VASILIOS

5A44 FX5X

AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

â&#x20AC;˘ Fresh Seafood Daily

M-F ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď?Ą-ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď?°, ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;-ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď?° Sď?Ąď?´ ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;-ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď?° Cď?Ąď?˛ď?˛ď?šď?Żď?ľď?´ Aď?śď?Ąď?Šď?Źď?Ąď?˘ď?Źď?Ľ

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-12AM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

ď&#x2122;&#x2030;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x201E;.ď&#x2122;&#x2039;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x2020;.ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2039; | ď&#x2122;&#x2039;ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x2039; Hď?ˇď?šď&#x2122;&#x2C6;ď&#x2122;&#x201E; Mď?Ąď?¤ď?Šď?łď?Żď?Ž

Ladies Night

BRUNCH

11 a.m. - 2 p.m. A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977

Lunch: Fri. & Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

Buy 1 Get 1 Free Martinis

Live Music

No cover.

Wednesday 3/30 - Kenny Davis Thursday 3/31 - Shaun Patterson Friday 4/1 - Larry Brewer Saturday 4/2 - Karaoke

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Come Try the Best BarThanks For Voting Us BEST FRENCH FRIES IN JACKSON!

856 Main Street Madison, MS 39110 - (601)

Jackson

1801 Dalton Street (601) 352-4555

Byram

5752 Terry Road (601) 376-0081

Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, 10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 p.m.

6720 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland | 601.812.6862

LIVE MUSIC

IS

BACK!

2003-2011, Best of Jackson

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

LIVER MOUSSE

(a very high-class pig stand)

Have you

g? i p e h t d trie

Come Try the Best Bar-B-Que In Madison 856 Main Street â&#x20AC;˘ Madison, MS â&#x20AC;˘ 601.853.8538

THURSDAY, MARCH 31ST |6:30PM $5 FEATURED COCKTAIL

HAPPY HOUR 5 - 7 NIGHTLY $2 OFF WELL DRINKS AND WINE BY THE GLASS

,$,*"",% #!&,#,* #,+,',"&&

FACEBOOK.COM/PARKERHSE

TWITTER @PARKERHSE 104 S O U T H E AS T M A D ISO N D R I V E RIDGELAND, MS 601.856.0043 W W W . T H E PA R K E R H O U S E . C O M

jacksonfreepress.com

SUNDAY

is Thursday Night

41


Spring Flower Power

1

S

by Natalie A. Collier

pruce up for springtime with all the spiffiness the season has to offer. Spring cleaning isn’t just about airing out your space and your life. It’s also all about cleaning out your closets to make room for all the wonderful pieces that will take the place of your wooly winter wardrobe. After you’ve done a little cleaning with your couture apron from Orange Peel (they’re so cute), bring in the newness of spring with pops of color throughout your house and closet, from vintage to handmade by local artisans. Then balance it all with a gauzy, charcoal gray maxi dress. Maxi dresses make everything about the spring (and especially summer) better.

2 3 1 Gray crinkle, racer-back maxi dress, Libby Story, $98 2 Zipper clutch with kiss-lock frame front, Libby Story, $118 3 Blue flower fascinator, Repeat Street, $12.50 4 Coral flower-power earrings, Red August, $11.50 5 Urban Garden fabric-covered button magnets, Sunday Rookery, $8

4

5

Where2Shop:

Libby Story, 120 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-717-3300; Red August, shopredaugust.com; Repeat Street, 626 Ridgewood Road, Ridgeland, 601-605-9393; Sunday Rookery, etsy.com/ shop/SundayRookery

SHOPPING SPECIALS

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com.

Treehouse (3000 N. State St., 601982-3433) Find the summer dress you need on the $99.99 and up rack. If you need something sporty, check out the $29.99 and up sportswear rack.

Azul Denim (733 Lake Harbour Drive, Suite E, Ridgeland, 6016051066) Feathers, jewels and zippers make for adorable headbands, and they’re all $14 to $16.

Forty-Four Fifty (4450 Interstate 55 N., 601-366-3687) has Facebook Fridays—every Friday. That means a oneday-only sale that the store announces on Friday. Wonder the mystery sale item will be this week?

N.U.T.S. (117 Wesley Ave., 601-3557458) Every single piece of clothing is 50 percent off. Anyone can do math that simple. Go rack up.

March 30 - April 5, 2011

Lipstick Lounge (304 Mitchell Ave., 601-366-4000) If you see a shoe you like, we guarantee you it will be $19.99. Sky-high heels and flat sandals alike, all footwear costs you an Andrew Jackson.

42

Check out flyjfp.com for information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


NATURAL GROCERY Get it in black and white

Spring Fashion Tip: Neutral Naturals Carry You From Day to Night

3931 Hanging Moss Road in Jackson 601-397-6133 | Tues.- Sat. 11am-7pm

Buy local and give a handmade gift

Fashionista Facial A fabulous sixty minute oxygenating treatment facial with a dermaplane and vitamin C refresher.

Just $65 398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

113 W. Jackson St., Ste 1-A Ridgeland, MS, 39157 601-605-0452 www.bodyanewmedicalspa.com

601.853.8110

rainbow natural grocery 2807 old canton rd • 366-1602 at lakeland & old canton w w w. r a i n b o w c o o p . o r g

jacksonfreepress.com

[Z_ UXe

Fashion Boutique

43


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The Empty Hamper â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prompt, Personal Serviceâ&#x20AC;?

622 Duling Ave. #206 Jackson, MS in Historic Fondren 601-982-5313 Mon. by Appointment, Tues. - Fri.: 10a.m. - 7p.m. Sat.: 10a.m. - 5p.m.

washed, dried & folded Mon. - Thurs. â&#x20AC;˘ 8am - 6pm Located in Fondren Corner 2906 N. State St. â&#x20AC;˘ (601) 982-9728

Security Cameras â&#x20AC;˘ Attendant On Duty Drop Off Service â&#x20AC;˘ Free Wi-Fi

1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

$OYOUKNOWYOURRISKFORSKINCANCER Other Services:

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Dr. Faucett is offering FREE skin cancer screenings thru 4/30/2011.

Botox â&#x20AC;˘ Juvederm â&#x20AC;˘ Fillers â&#x20AC;˘ Eyelid Surgery â&#x20AC;˘ Liposuction â&#x20AC;˘ Acne Psoriasis â&#x20AC;˘ Rosacea â&#x20AC;˘ Skin tag removal â&#x20AC;˘ Other conditions of the skin â&#x20AC;˘ Facials â&#x20AC;˘ Waxing Massage Therapy *INSURANCE½LEDFORMEDICAL

Donald C. Faucett, M.D. at Trio Medi Spa 4812 Lakeland Dr. Flowood, MS. 39232 601-608-3223 Follow us on Face book


v9n29 - Spring Fashion: Time to Show Some Skin Again  

Spring Fashion: Time to Show Some Skin Again Fly: Flower Power Edwards v School Board From Census to Rebranding Crossroads Reviewed

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