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February 9-15, 2011

jacksonian

VOL.

9 NO. 22

contents JAVRO VACEK; FILE PHOTO; SHAWANDA JACOME; FILE PHOTO

WRIJOYA ROY

8 Commission Hell The city of Jackson wants control over how it spends its tax revenue. The Legislature has other ideas.

Cover photo of Marsh and Daphne Nabors by Daphne Nabors

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THIS ISSUE: Live, Work, Love

31 31 33 34 36 37 41 42

A trio of Jackson couples who live and work together share their secrets for successful relationships.

.............. Editor’s Note ............................. Talk ...................... Editorial ...................... Opinion ....................... Hitched .................. Diversions ............................. Film ......................... 8 Days .................. JFP Events ............................. Slate ............................. Slate .......................... Music ........... Music Listings ............................ Astro ............................ Food .................. Body/Soul ... Girl About Townw

parveen kapoor An Indian man with a medium build, dressed in a mauve polo shirt, khaki pants and a black apron, carries white napkins and silverware while he serves five customers in his restaurant. His soft brown eyes wear a warm smile. Parveen Kapoor, a native of Delhi, India, owns Bombay Bistro, which opened in December in Jackson. This Jacksonian is putting a distinctive spin on traditional Indian eateries in Mississippi. “I want to make this a unique Indian restaurant where you get food, but it should be like Disneyland,” he says. Kapoor, 50, says he wants to incorporate entertainment into his restaurant, such as karaoke nights. “I want to think outside the box,” he says. A neighbor in Delhi introduced Kapoor to the restaurant business when he was a teenager and told him he could be successful. What began as a job opportunity ended up fueling Kapoor’s passion. The youngest of six took his first job as a waiter at the Maurya Sheraton Hotel in Delhi. He went on to earn a bachelor’s in hotel and restaurant management from Delhi University. After spending years working in Delhi, with a stint catering for the James Bond film “Octopussy” and a 13-year career at the Maharaja Indian Restaurant in Tokyo, Japan, life had become enjoyable

but stressed. His children‘s school tuition was expensive, and he and his wife worked tirelessly. “I realized I was turning 42, and I had to either change my job or go back to India or do something where I can see my future,” he says. He decided to come to the United States and began applying for jobs. Kapoor moved to Mississippi to work at Western Sizzlin Steak and More Restaurant in Canton in 2003. He says when he first arrived in Jackson, he wasn’t used to the slower pace, but he realized he was “missing the chirping of birds” and nature after years living in metropolitan cities. “I can walk on grass without my shoes on. I can water my flowers out here. Doing business is pretty easy out here,” he said. After working at several restaurants in the metro area, Kapoor wanted his own restaurant. He opened a Quizno’s in Brandon in 2008, but that wasn’t enough. Having his own Indian restaurant was his ultimate dream. “This was one thing I wanted to do before I (die),” Kapoor says. The married father of two has now made Jackson his home, where, he says, he loves the people, and the plates of turnip greens and cornbread. —Dorian Randall

24 Love for Sale Admit it: You’re stumped beyond roses and chocolate. The JFP Valentine’s gift guide to the rescue!

41 First, Love Thyself Don’t feel guilty. Taking the time to relax, refresh and renew yourself is a must in your busy life.

jacksonfreepress.com

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editor’snote

ShaWanda Jacome Assistant to the editor ShaWanda Jacome is learning to pray without ceasing, to trust in the Lord completley and to have hope and faith in his timing. She coordinated the Valentine’s Day and food stories.

Daphne Nabors Daphne Nabors is a freelance photographer with a home and studio in Belhaven Heights. She also plays in two local bands, bass in Overnight Lows and drums in the Party Dots. She took the cover photograph.

J. Ashley Nolen JFP editorial intern J. Ashley Nolen has studied English and print journalism. Among many identities, she’s a lover, a deep thinker, a dreamer, a traveler, a writer, a student and a teacher. She wrote Valentine’s Day stories.

Dorian Randall Editorial intern Dorian Randall is a Jackson native. She has degrees in journalism and media studies. She hopes someday to write a New York Times bestseller, win an Oscar, and marry a Dolce and Gabbana male model. Maybe. She wrote the Jacksonian and a Valentine’s story.

Katie Bonds Former editorial intern Katie Bonds has a master’s degree from the University of Memphis and a bachelor’s degree from Rhodes College. She enjoys reading everything, writing, and running the hills of Belhaven. She wrote the Hitched piece.

Garrad Lee Garrad Lee is working on his Master’s in history at Jackson State University. He grew up in south Jackson but now lives in Belhaven with his wife, dog and cat. He wrote Valentine’s Day music pieces.

Sahil Grewal Sahil Grewal, a native of New Delhi, India, is a management intern at the Jackson Marriott. When not mixing drinks or perfecting his bartending skills, you may find him sky diving, playing squash or rapping. He wrote a food feature.

February 9 - 15, 2011

Latasha Willis

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Events Editor Latasha Willis is a native Jacksonian, a graduate of Tougaloo College and the proud mother of one cat. Her JFP blog is “The Bricks That Others Throw,” and she sells design pieces at zazzle.com/reasontolive.

by Lacey McLaughlin, News Editor

Facing the Truth

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n Friday night, I made the road trip to my aunt and uncle’s Flowood home to finally see “Mississippi ReMixed,” a documentary by Jackson native Myra Ottewell who examines her personal beliefs about relationships between blacks and whites in Mississippi. Ottewell, who is a teacher in British Columbia, had set out to show how far the state has come in race relations since the 1960s. Her quest, however, revealed aspects of history of which she was unaware. On the way home, I was overwhelmed with emotion as I thought about my own lack of civil-rights education and the narrow perspective I once viewed the state with. While I didn’t grow up in Mississippi, my roots are here. I spent summers in Starkville and was oblivious to the rich stories and heart-breaking history that was at the tip of my fingers. I don’t remember discussions about the Civil Rights Movement in my family. The first time I became aware of the inequalities that blacks faced was in grade school when I noticed that my sister’s friend, London, who was black, used a yellow crayon to draw herself and her family because she wanted to be white. “She’s ashamed,” my mother replied without going into further details when I asked her why. When I first interviewed to work at the Jackson Free Press, Managing Editor Ronni Mott asked me a question I’ll never forget: How familiar are you with civil-rights history? I looked up at the Emmett Till poster behind her, embarrassed that I didn’t know who he was. “I don’t have as much knowledge as I’d like to have,” I said. “But I am interested in learning more.” My understanding of the civil-rights era then went something like this: Rosa Parks got tired of sitting in the back of the bus, switched her seat and got arrested; more blacks began to challenge Jim Crow laws; Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke out against injustices and led marches, and then segregation was no more. While that is a simplified version of my personal history, it misses not only several milestones and struggles, it also demonstrates my ignorance. Now, a year and a half later, I feel like I have embarked on a journey of not only civilrights history but also a journey of ongoing self-discovery. The lens in which I view the world has dramatically changed since I learned about the Freedom Riders, the 1964 murders of three civil-rights activists—James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner—and heard the personal stories of Jackson residents who were arrested for challenging Jim Crow laws and leading protests. On a trip to the Delta last October with the Mississippi Center for Justice, I experienced what it was like to be a Freedom Rider through Hank Thomas’ personal narrative. Thomas gave a detailed account of how the Ku Klux Klan had tried to kill him during the ride from Washington, D.C., to Jackson.

He stood up on our tour bus and talked about the fear he felt as a young boy in Wadley, Ga., after he accidentally touched a white woman in a grocery store. I bit down on my bottom lip and tried to blink away the pool of tears forming in my eyes. “To you, it’s just an academic narrative,” he said, referring to Emmett Till’s murder as the bus left Money, Miss. “But to me, I just relived it.” When people say that rehashing civilrights stories is irrelevant because we have moved past that time period, it’s hard not to get angry and frustrated. Last year, I had the opportunity to interview Jackson civil-right activist Dr. Gene Young who had been arrested countless times since the age of 12 for standing up for his beliefs. He wore a T-shirt with a portrait of Dr. Martin Luther King on one side and President Barack Obama on the other. He was still in disbelief that a black man had become president. Last week, Jackson resident A.M.E. Logan, who gave Freedom Riders a safe place to stay and even cooked in her west Jackson home for Dr. Martin Luther King, passed away at age 96. I found out about her death on The Clarion-Ledger’s website—my heart aching when I discovered I would never get the chance to personally meet her and hear her stories. At the end of the article, two comments belittled Logan and her life’s work. For each step of progress our state makes, there are always a few ignorant people who get up on an anonymous podium to spew hatred. The civil-rights era is over, but the struggle is ongoing. I hope that each time someone tells their story, they have an opportunity to help end

ignorance and deepen another person’s understanding. As the Freedom Riders’ 50th anniversary nears, it’s encouraging to see plans and funding for the long-awaited civil-rights museum gain momentum. Next year, the state will also require social-studies teachers to teach the history of civil rights in Mississippi. The curriculum is meant to go beyond the basics and include the institutional and structural nature of racism. The Mississippi Development Authority is in the beginning stages of forming a commission to oversee a state civil-rights trail—like the existing blues trail—that marks significant civil-rights events with markers and historical context, drawing tourist and school trips. When interviewed for “Mississippi ReMixed,” JFP Editor in Chief Donna Ladd eloquently described why it is important to acknowledge civil-rights history and understand our past: “In order to move forward we’ve got to look backward. To me that’s the Mississippi riddle. That’s what I call it. … People always want you to pick. They always want you to say, ‘Well, you know, we need to look forward, not backward. All you want to do is look backward.’ … I mean, our young people need pride in how far we’ve come. … If you don’t understand how bad it was—you don’t know how far we’ve come.” I’m grateful for the opportunities that have given me a front-row seat to civil-rights history, but I know that not everyone is exposed to the same narrative. I hope that more people, young and old, will take the time to look beyond their own preconceived ideas and challenge themselves to seek the truth. Comment at www.jfp.ms.


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jacksonfreepress.com


news, culture & irreverence

Not Without A Fight BRYANT HAWKINS

Wednesday, Feb. 2 Senate Democrats block an attempt by Republicans to repeal President Obama’s healthcare law. ... Mississippi Treasurer Tate Reeves announces that he will run for the office of lieutenant governor this fall.

Saint Valentine is the Catholic patron of love, young people and happy marriages. History is unclear as to whether the saint is one person or several martyred priests of the early Christian church. Pope Gelasius first marked Feb. 14 as a celebration in his honor in 496 AD.

Thursday, Feb. 3 Unsealed court documents show that Bernie Madoff’s bank, JPMorgan Chase, sometimes steered clients away from him due to his suspicious activities, but it failed to alert regulators. Madoff pleaded guilty in March 2009 to 11 federal felonies regarding his wealth management business that defrauded investors of billions. ... Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour says the House’s budget proposal would deplete too much of the state’s financial reserves and ultimately hinder economic development. Friday, Feb. 4 Hundreds of thousands fill Cairo’s Tahrir Square in protest of President Hosni Mubarak. Some thought the opposition movement might be waning, but the sheer number of people present put those hopes to rest. … The state Senate passes a bill that prohibits texting while driving. Saturday, Feb. 5 Sarah Palin accuses the Obama administration of withholding who will be Egypt’s next President. … Steve Simpson announces he will step down from his position as public safety commissioner Feb. 15 to run for Mississippi attorney general. Sunday, Feb. 6 The Tehran Revolutionary Court in Iran begins the trial of two American citizens it has accused of being spies. The Americans, Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal, maintain they were hiking and crossed into Iran inadvertently. ... Christina Aguilera botches the singing of the National Anthem at Super Bowl XLV.

February 2 - 8, 2011

Monday, Feb. 7 The Mississippi Supreme Court delays inmate Frederick Bell’s execution to determine if he is mentally fit for execution. … AOL announces that it will buy the Huffington Post for $315 million.

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Tuesday, Feb. 8 The Chinese government raises interest rates again in an attempt to slow their fast economic growth and temper inflation. … New Census data reveal that Jackson has lost 10 percent of its population over the last decade, nearly 11,000 people, while neighboring counties gained residents.

Mississippi Sierra Club Director Louie Miller opposes bills to bury carbon dioxide in oil wells. p 11.

JPS Superintendent Lonnie Edwards is challenging the school board’s decision not to renew his contract.

J

ackson Public Schools Superintendent Lonnie Edwards won’t go quietly. Edwards announced Feb. 5 that he would appeal the JPS Board of Trustees’ decision to let his three-year contract expire with the current school year. Since disclosing its Dec. 7 vote at a Jan. 26 meeting, the board has come under fire from several City Council members and some residents who have argued

by Ward Schaefer

that Edwards’ personal charm, visibility in the community and concern for JPS students should justify his renewal. Under state law, Edwards is entitled to a hearing in front of the board or a boardappointed hearing officer within 30 days of his request, or by March 6. The board will meet this week to set a hearing date, JPS Board Attorney Dorian Turner said. Before the hearing, Edwards and the board will exchange documents detailing their respective arguments. The documents, as well as the hearing itself, will be closed to the public, unless Edwards decides to request a public hearing. That appears unlikely, however, as Edwards cited the confidentiality of personnel matters in a brief comment to The Clarion-Ledger Feb. 5. Following the hearing, the board has 30 days to render a decision on Edwards’ appeal. If it still decides to not renew Edwards’ contract, he has the option of appealing the case to chancery court, where the proceedings would become public record. Supporters of the board’s decision have pointed to JPS’ lackluster performance on a variety of statewide accountability measurements under Edwards’ tenure. Last year, 14 schools in the district received the “At Risk of Failing” rating from the Mississippi Department of Education. The state’s rating system for

schools and districts tracks performance on standardized test results, year-to-year growth in those test scores and—for high schools—graduation rates. Of the district’s 37 elementary schools, 18 did not meet state growth targets for the 2009-2010 school year. In six of those schools (Isable, Johnson, Smith, Timberlawn, Wilkins and Woodville) test scores have dropped every year, from 2008 to 2010. Only two of the district’s 10 middle schools met state growth targets, though none have seen their test scores drop for two consecutive years since MDE introduced the new accountability system in 2008. Out of eight high schools, only two met growth targets, with three showing drops in their test scores from the previous school year. There are some bright spots in the district. Forest Hill High School’s test scores have risen every year from 2008 to 2010, and this year, the school earned a “Successful” rating, with the district’s third-best high-school graduation rate. Similarly, Rowan Middle School’s scores have improved each year since 2008, as have four JPS elementary schools (Baker, Bradley, French and Green). The furor over Edwards’ contract comes during a standoff in City Council over Mayor Harvey Johnson’s nominees EDWARDS, see page 7

Dateline: Disaster

respon- W sible

hat was your worst date ever? Blocking that memory, are you? In honor of Valentine’s Day we asked @jxnfreepress Twitter followers to tell us about their worst date in 140 characters or less:

Double date with the guy’s wife and her boyfriend. I was 16. I had no idea he was married until that V-Day date. I fled . —@haimerlad “Wanna come back to my apartment? I only have an air mattress and a night stand, but we could make it work.” —@flipflops

“We feel like we’re being very responsible with the reserves. And to do otherwise would cut essential services even more,” House Speaker Billy McCoy, D-Rienzi, regarding the upcoming House version of the state budget that uses some reserve funds for education, mental health and other programs.

Had a date that talked about himself and how he got kicked out of class at Millsaps constantly for being a smartass. Sexy? No. —@sophiemcneil

Worst date was named Edith, yes Edith. Enough said. —@lstnm022 My worst date was a funfilled romp through a theme park where we ran into the wife I didn’t know he had ... and her girlfriend. —@eggvip First date with this guy: Took me to Ryan’s, sat down to eat, and he took his teeth out, set them on the side of his plate. —@Sealyme


news, culture & irreverence

Patricia Ice

EDWARDS, from page 6

for two additional seats on the JPS board. Council President Frank Bluntson has been unable to assemble a quorum to vote on Johnson’s picks: Mississippi Housing Partnership Executive Director Tim Collins and Jackson State University administrator Linda Rush. Ward 5 Councilman Charles Tillman has refused to be present for the vote because, he claims, Johnson did not consult him on Collins’ nomination. Tillman told the Jackson Free Press Feb. 7 that he favors a different candidate, but he would not divulge the name. “We work to be inclusive in government, but we’re getting back to the old ways of when we weren’t included,” Tillman said. “It’s supposed to be government of the people, to look after their welfare, and education is so important.” Tillman said that he believes that the board should give Edwards more time to turn the district around.

“It takes more than three years to get something done,” Tillman said. “You’ve got some issues that have been with the city a long, long time, and since he got here, they changed the rating system. Some of the schools that were doing well under the old rating didn’t do so well under this. You’ve got to get adjusted for the system.” Collins said that he has not spoken to the mayor or any council member about how, if confirmed by the council, he would vote on Edwards’ contract. “I certainly wouldn’t want my opinion regarding the superintendent to be swayed by one side or the other,” Collins said. “I think it would be fair to Dr. Edwards … that I give myself ample time to look at the same documents that (current) board members looked at in making their call. I have not been privy to documents right now.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.

‘She Never Met a Stranger’ by Lacey McLaughlin COURTESY WLBT

Elect

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emaining fearless and determined even into her late 90s, civil-rights activist A.M.E. Logan would frequently attend community meetings and drive herself around Jackson delivering Avon products to her clients. Logan died Saturday at age 96. Logan, who many considered the “mother of the Civil Rights Movement,” turned her home into a refuge and cooked meals for civil-rights workCivil rights activist A.M.E. Logan, who ers, Freedom Riders and Dr. Martin provided a safe place for Freedom Luther King Jr. In the late 1950s, she Riders and civil rights workers in her west Jackson home, died Saturday at joined the NAACP and knocked on age 96. doors in area neighborhoods, asking others to join. Dr. Alferdteen Harrison, who retired from Jackson State University’s Margaret Walker Alexander Research Center in 2008, says Logan never showed any fear even though the work could have put her in danger. “In the late 1950s, it would have one of those things that you wouldn’t have wanted to get caught doing—selling memberships to the NAACP—because you could have lost your job,” Harrison says. “She was an independent person.” Logan was born in Myles, Miss., and her father named her A.M.E, short for African Methodist Episcopal. Harrison says Logan’s independence is symbolic to her name. In 1816, Rev. Richard Allen founded the A.M.E. church in Pennsylvania out of several black Methodist congregations that wanted independence from white Methodist churches. “That meant a lot to her. It was an independent African American church that didn’t have ties to the white Methodist churches,” Harrison says. “I think she just grew up with that sense of independence.” The Jackson Advocate reported in 2009 that Logan and her late husband, S.L. Logan, moved to Jackson in the 1940s. S.L worked for a railroad company, and A.M.E. was self-employed as a hairdresser and seamstress. She also worked as an assistant manager at the former Williams Grocery Store. She was an Avon consultant until her early 90s. “She never met a stranger,” Harrison says. “She was always smiling, always an outgoing person who was willing to help out in any way that she could.”

February 15th City Council Ward 1

L.Patricia Ice has spent her l i f e t i m e s e r v i n g o t h e r s. N o w s h e ’s r e a d y t o s e r v e t h e r e s i d e n t s o f Wa r d 1 . S h e ’ l l f i g h t f o r w h a t ’s r i g h t and for you.

Paid for by the Campaign Fund of L. Patricia Ice P.O. Box 31807 Jackson MS 39286-1807 Contact us at 769.218.8544

Follow Mississippi Happening on Twitter and Facebook.

jacksonfreepress.com

talk

7


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by Ward Schaefer

The Unkillable Tax Commission

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February 9 - 15, 2011

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The bill could still change form on the Senate floor or, if passed, in the House of Representatives. Mims said it was too early to say whether the mayor would support the sales-tax bill in its current incarnation. JARO VACEK

1935 Lakeland Dr. 601.906.2253

ity leaders have only one major request this legislative session, but that doesn’t mean they’ll get it. Jackson lawmakers are pushing to revise a 2009 salestax bill that offered a stream of funding for public safety and improvements to the city’s flagging road, water and sewer infrastructure. The bill came with a requirement that the city establish a commission—stocked with non-city appointees—to oversee spending of the money, a mandate that Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. rejected as too onerous. The bill called for a nine-member commission: one appointee each from the governor and lieutenant governor, three mayoral appointees and another four appointees the mayor selects from a list of nominees provided by “the local chamber of commerce.” Johnson never offered the tax proposal up for the public referendum necessary to approve it. “Mayor Johnson has always maintained that the commission is not palatable,” city spokesman Chris Mims said. “People elect the mayor and (other) elected officials to oversee city funding. We don’t need another body to tell us how to spend the money.” This year, Jackson Sen. John Horhn introduced a bill that would delete the commission requirement, dedicate more of the sales-tax revenue to infrastructure, and extend the tax’s lifespan from five years to 20 years. SB 2839 changed substantially in the Senate Finance Committee, however, where committee members reinserted the oversight provision. The Finance Committee also increased the share of tax revenue going to infrastructure from 79 percent—with the remainder for public safety—to 99 percent. Horhn said that oversight by the commission was a sticking point in getting his bill out of committee. “I gathered from some informal conversations with my colleagues that that was a deal breaker,” Horhn said. “The more conservative, outside-of-Jackson, rural legislators who are in the Senate tend to favor a commission.”

The prospect of a state-mandated commission still stands between Jackson and millions needed for infrastructure.

“First of all, I think we should the let the legislative process carry on,” Mims said. “Number two, a commission is really moot until the voters of Jackson decide whether or not they want to be taxed in the first place.” An extended expiration date for the sales tax would give the city the assurance of a long-term source of revenue, as much as $15 million annually, Mims estimates. The city could use that money to float bonds to pay for infrastructure work. Those improvements will carry “a hefty price tag,” Mims said, with estimates of required upgrades on the sewer system alone around $76 million. The cost of sewer improvements could go much higher, however, when the city enters a consent decree with the federal Environmental Protection Agency this year. Mims said that the city is “negotiating” with EPA about the state of its sewer and wastewater treatment system and will likely have a federally mandated plan of action “later this year.” The city’s main legislative request isn’t the only item to get warped in the Finance Committee. Another proposal from Horhn also appears headed for a vote by the full Sen-

ate, but in a form drastically different from its original. As Horhn introduced it, SB 2950 would have allowed the state to transmit blighted properties in Jackson from its control directly to the Jackson Redevelopment Authority, bypassing city government. Currently, when an owner stops paying taxes on property in Jackson, the Hinds County Tax Collector’s office puts the property up for auction. If no one buys the property, however, ownership reverts to the state. The state typically cannot grant property directly to an urban renewal agency like JRA; it must offer the land to local county or city government first, which must accept the land and then vote separately to hand it over to an economic development agency. JRA Executive Director Jason Brookins said that the process of placing a property transfer on the City Council agenda and then obtaining council approval can take months. Brookins said that he did not know of any specific state-owned properties that JRA was interested in acquiring but that the authority would welcome the change. “It would reduce steps in the process (for) any redevelopment authority whose goal is to redevelop slum or blighted areas,” Brookins said. “It makes it easier to get that property back in the hands of taxpayers.” Nevertheless, the version of SB 2950 that the Finance Committee approved last week lacks any of the provisions about state property. Instead, it purports to offer Jackson city government the option of selling blighted property to JRA, something the city can already do. Horhn said that objections from Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Dean Kirby, R-Pearl, doomed the original language in the Senate, but the House could still restore the bill’s original intent. “The chairman said that he just felt more comfortable not involving the state in it,” Horhn said. “I don’t think that he has a real understanding of what we’re trying to do. Rather than argue with that, I made the decision to not oppose the chairman at this point and see if we can work on it in the House.” Comment at www.jfp.ms.


Legislature: Week 5

by Adam Lynch

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Immigrants, Lawsuits and Juvenile Justice

The Mississippi Senate passed a bill that Attorney General Jim Hood said will curtail his ability to sue big corporations for malfeasance.

T

hree bills targeting the state’s immigrant population survived the Senate Judiciary A Committee last week. Senate Bill 2249, authored by Sen. Joey Fillingane, R-Sumrall, requires adult applicants to verify their U.S. citizenship or lawful residence to be eligible for public services from the state division of Medicaid and the Department of Human Services, the Office of Employment Security or the Mississippi Housing Authorities. Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance Executive Director Bill Chandler said undocumented residents already do not qualify for state services beyond emergency health care such as that offered in an emergency room. (The bill does not attempt to demand a citizenship requirement for emergencyroom treatment.) “You’re dealing with extremely ignorant legislators,� Chandler said. “They shoot from their hip because these issues are popular among some of their constituents for that.� The Senate Judiciary A Committee passed another Fillingane bill, SB 2255, which would create a $5 fee on wire transfers of money sent out of the country, plus 1 percent of the amount of the transfer over $500, to assist in funding construction of a border fence be-

Lawsuits and Care Homes State employees face removal from personnel-board job protection for two years if the Legislature passes SB 2570. Currently, employees fired from state positions can appeal their firing through the state-personnel system. But SB 2570 deems all state employees as “nonstate service,� a designation that Mississippi Alliance of State Employees President Brenda Scott says “means you have no property rights to your job.� The designation will not apply to new employees brought on after the effective date of SB 2570 in 2011, however. Scott said she doubts the Senate bills survival in the House. Curtailing Attorney General Jim Hood’s ability to hire outside counsel to pursue civil suits against alleged corporate wrongdoers is the aim of Senate Bill 2618. The bill puts contracts worth more than $500,000 before the Personal Service Contract Review Board, which could cancel the contract. The bill also mandates that the attorney general must submit case bid proposals to at least three separate law firms or individuals where the anticipated attorney fee for the work is more than $500,000. Hood says that some of his most profitable cases against corporate malfeasance arrive via proposals from attorneys with inside knowledge of the misconduct. Hood said an attorney with knowledge of a potentially lucrative case will not likely submit their proposal if other attorneys could outbid them for the contract. The House passed HB 798, putting

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small personal-care homes under the purview of the State Department of Health. Currently, the Mississippi Department of Health oversees the minimum standards for businesses providing residents with one or more daily assistedliving services, but personal-care homes donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be licensed if they have three or fewer occupants, said Nancy Whitehead of the Mississippi Department of Healthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Regulation and Licensure Division. Juvenile Treatment Under Review The way the state processes and detains youth in detention centers would change under House Bill 1232, also known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Juvenile Detention Reform Act of 2011.â&#x20AC;? The bill requires a decision by a youth-court judge to take a juvenile into custody. It also mandates new licensing requirements for juvenile-detention centers and outlines new laws regarding detaining youth. In addition, the law establishes the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Task Force and its advisory group, which will establish which agency will be responsible for licensing the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s detention centers on an annual basis by July 2015. Jody Owens, director and managing attorney of the Mississippi office of the Southern Poverty Law Center, said standards are necessary to avoid lawsuits like the ones making news in Mississippi over the last few years. The American Civil Liberties Union and SPLC filed a federal class-action lawsuit against Geo Group Inc., the for-profit operator of the Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility last November, arguing that â&#x20AC;&#x153;children there are forced to live in barbaric and unconstitutional conditionsâ&#x20AC;? and that the children are â&#x20AC;&#x153;subjected to excessive uses of force by prison staff.â&#x20AC;? The Juvenile Detention Alternatives Task Force would impose new rules upon the facilities governing everything from telephone and mail privileges to sanitation and inmate diet. Each center will have to make available a manual stating the policies and procedures for operating and maintaining the facility, which the task force will annually review and revise as needed. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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tween the United States and Mexico, a border that does not touch the state of Mississippi. The third immigrant-related bill is an open slap to the city of Jackson, which passed an ordinance last year restricting police officers from inquiring about residency status of people with whom they interact at routine traffic stops and other public interdictions. Senate Bill 2941 prohibits local governments like Jackson from restricting law enforcement officers from enforcing federal immigration law.

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Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

February 9 - 15, 2011

www.ppsjackson.org

10

justicetalk

by Dylan Watson

Nathan’s Law Struggling

O

n a cold afternoon two weeks before Christmas in 2009, Laurel resident Lori Key stood outside her home like she did every day and waited for her son, Nathan, to get off his school bus. As the bus pulled up in front of her house, several cars came to a stop behind it, as is required by state law. Then, one of the drivers behind the bus, Dominic Gebben, 23 at the time, whipped around the bus quickly and, in the process, hit Nathan. Gebben then fled the scene. Nathan Key died shortly afterward. Soon after Jones County deputies captured him, prosecutors charged Gebben with culpable negligence manslaughter. In June 2010, a jury returned with a guilty verdict and sentenced him to 22 years in prison. Until now, prosecutors have used various statutes, such as aggravated assault and manslaughter, to prosecute drivers who have defied school-bus laws and hit children. The attorneys have used these statutes with varying degrees of success. Jones County prosecutors successfully tried Gebben for culpable negligence manslaughter, a felony, but his actions were on the extreme end of the spectrum: He killed Key and fled the scene afterward. Currently, Mississippi law does not contain any language that pertains directly to the penalties for hitting a child who is disembarking a school bus. State school-bus safety law (Section 63-3-615) only states that drivers must stop behind a stopped school bus that is receiving or discharging children. The law provides fines for violators from $200 to $500; it also states that the violator may be imprisoned for no longer than one year, if at all. In the 2010 legislative session, Sen. Chris McDaniel, R-Ellisville, introduced Nathan’s Law. The bill created a specific felony provision for offenders who pass stopped school buses and, in doing so, hit children. The bill proposed a 15-foot buffer zone around school buses, making it illegal for bus drivers to talk on cell phones while driving and creating school-bus safety classes for students. The Senate unanimously passed the bill and transmitted it to the House. The bill went to House Judiciary A Committee, chaired by Rep. Ed Blackmon, DCanton. The committee members then made proposed changes that, according to McDaniel, would have weakened existing law. McDaniel did not agree with the House’s amendments to the bill, so he called a conference. Six legislators were in the conference, McDaniel and Blackmon among them. “Representative Blackmon was very reluctant to cooperate with us. He was just not inclined to negotiate,” McDaniel said. McDaniel said he continued to support the bill because the Key family wanted to honor their son. According to McDaniel, all that was left was for the two houses to draft their compromised, agreed-upon bills, send them to the other side of the Capitol and pass them.

COURTESY LAUREL LEADER CALL

Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Nathan Key died after a driver struck him while he was getting off his school bus.

The House, however, sent the Senate the bill with changes that, if enacted, would have weakened existing state law. While the House’s version increased the maximum fine for passing a bus by $250 (up to $750), it removed the minimum fine of $200, which had been Mississippi law for almost 40 years. McDaniel said that these changes were not expected. The House bill also removed Nathan’s Law’s most important feature: the specific felony provision for offenders who hit a child while passing a bus. Under the House bill, prosecutors would have had to refer to Mississippi’s aggravated-assault statute. “That was the breaking point,” McDaniel said. “District attorneys all across the state have told me that they cannot get prosecutions under that aggravated-assault section.” Ultimately, Nathan’s Law died in the 2010 session. McDaniel re-introduced the original bill this year, and the Senate passed it. The House has also passed a version of the bill—the exact version that it sent back to the Senate last year—that, if passed, will weaken existing law. McDaniel said that bill will likely go to conference in March. In January, Rep. Earle Banks, D-Jackson, said he didn’t see a need for the Legislature to create a specific felony provision for hitting a child because of existing state law. “We already have criminal statutes to take care of all those situations. How much of a penalty do they want?” he asked. During a press conference at the Capitol last month, Nathan Key’s mother, Lori Key, spoke out against the House bill, calling it “insulting to her child.” Blackmon defended his bill in January, telling the Associated Press that regardless of a specific felony provision, a person who killed a child while passing a school bus would likely face felony charges. House Judiciary Vice Chairwoman Angela Cockerham, D-Magnolia, deferred questions about the bill to Rep. Blackmon who did not return several calls for this story. Comment at jfp.ms.com


environmenttalk

by Adam Lynch

Mississippi a CO2 Dump?

Mississippi Sierra Club Director Louie Miller said two bills seeking to sequester carbon dioxide will invite contamination and lawsuits.

and (that) the injection well’s operator could be held liable for nuisance, trespass or another tort,” the report states. Mississippi’s twin bills, in their current form, legally hold the landowners responsible in the event of long-term groundwater contamination or other consequence. It also sets up a $2.5 million Carbon Storage Fund to finance legal damages should local well water become fizzy and undrinkable. The bills also imply that not every property owner must be a willing participant to

having a sequestration chamber under his or her home. Lines 274-278 of both bills make possible approval of reservoir storage if “a majority interest, as provided in this chapter, (has) consented to such use in writing.” That language, Miller said, means not all landowners have to be onboard with the prospect of a carbon well to have one in their backyard. The argument could generate opposition this year as eminent-domain issues command the news. The Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation successfully passed a ballot initiative that, if approved by a majority of voters during the November election, would restrict government’s use of eminent domain to public projects such as road and bridge construction. Farm Bureau spokesmen Greg Gibson and Mark Morris did not return phone calls. Rep. Brandon Jones, D-Pascagoula, said the bill could generate new revenue for the state and help utility companies manage carbon output into the atmosphere. “We have anywhere from 3,000 to 4,000 existing jobs that are connected with oil recovery in Mississippi, and obviously this bill is attractive from that standpoint in that is has the potential to revitalize this industry,” Jones said. “Industries … are trying to find out what to do with (carbon dioxide), and this will create a format whereby carbon can be stored.”

PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

Y

ou’re craving a burger. Not the runof-the-mill fast food kind…something different. Something you need two hands to handle. A burger with more taste and flavor to keep you satisfied well past dinnertime. When only the best will do, there’s only one, the original, Stamps Superburger. Nestled near the Jackson State campus at 1801 Dalton Street, Stamps Superburger exudes an old-school feel with no frills, just the basics, and Algernon Stamps the basics are what locals have known about for years and come from all over to experience: the Superburger. With huge portion sizes and wallet-friendly prices, Stamps offers not only an incredible value but an experience in culinary mastery. To have the “Stamps experience” is to partake in a piece of Jackson history. Algernon “Al” Stamps and his wife started the business back in the ’70s. Looking for a place to eat after church, and having a craving for a burger, the Stamps decided to create their own when no decent burger could be found around town. “They went into their test kitchen and perfected a uniquely great-tasting gourmet burger for a reasonable price,” says Tim Stamps, one of Al’s six children who now operate Stamp’s Superburger. Al Stamps instilled the hard work and honest ethic learned after 13 years in the Air Force to his children, who all spent time behind the grill. Tim Stamps and his two brothers took a special interest in the business and set to create different spices and menu items that today make Stamps such a unique experience. With lemon pepper, spicy, or Stamps secret seasoned fresh-cut Idaho fries, sweet potato fries, wings and sauces, and other sandwiches, Stamps has something for everyone. Part of what makes the “Stamps experience” so special is Mr. Al himself. A minister by trade, Stamps believed in influencing people to live their lives in a certain way. He would drive around the neighborhood and pick up kids and take them to church and keep them off the streets. Tim Stamps remembered one day when his father packed 28 kids in the family station wagon. The values of hard work, great customer service, and to love and live life exemplify Mr. Al, his sons, and his business. There may be many a burger joint in Jackson, but there is only one Stamps Superburger. Open seven days a week and located in a small house on a corner, Stamps offers made-to-order, your way, beef or turkey burgers in a size that rivals a flying saucer. Add on fries with the secret seasoned salt or lemon pepper and the best sweet tea in the State, and you have a meal fit for a king at the price for a pauper. Come visit Stamps and try the amazing food they have to offer at 1801 Dalton Street in Jackson, MS today! For more information, call 601.352.4555.

jacksonfreepress.com

abilities. But Miller said the science behind carbon sequestration is not a proved technology, and that carbon dioxide could “bubble back up” to the surface, reversing the positive benefit of carbon removal and posing a risk to property and people. The U. S. Government Accountability Office said that the threat of lawsuits would likely stifle the field of carbon sequestration. “Stored (carbon dioxide) could migrate underground and endanger underground sources of drinking water, leading to liability under the Safe Drinking Water Act for the party responsible. According to EPA, (carbon dioxide) migration into drinking water can cause the leaching of contaminants, such as arsenic, lead and other compounds, into the water. (Carbon dioxide) migration could also result in changes in regional groundwater flow and the movement of saltier fluids into drinking water, causing its quality to degrade,” the September 2008 GAO report stated. It added that electric utilities and oil and gas company stakeholders remain leery as to who would be responsible for the resulting damage years after a carbon repository is capped. Stored carbon dioxide “could also migrate beneath adjacent lands,” and could possibly interfere with “the adjacent mineral owners’ abilities to extract (mineral) resources,

ROY ADKINS

M

ississippi would become a reservoir for carbon-dioxide storage under Senate Bill 2723 and House Bill 1098—both of which survived their respective Oil, Gas and Other Minerals committees this month. If passed, the bills will allow oil companies to inject concentrated carbon dioxide into non-productive or exhausted oil and natural gas wells with permission from the land’s owners. In theory, the concentrated gas should fill the depleted reservoir and squeeze any remaining oil or gas to within reach of a pump. Utility companies’ coal-burning power plants would supply the carbon dioxide, which they will capture through a new reclaiming process, akin to the process planned for the coal-burning power plant in Kemper County. Mississippi Sierra Club Executive Director Louie Miller argues that the technology is untested and represents a health risk. “That’s a lot of crap to pump under the ground, and they don’t know where it’s going to go. And they’re going to let the Oil and Gas Board oversee this,” Miller said. “It’s total complete nonsense.” In 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency classified carbon dioxide as a pollutant worthy of regulation, due to its heat trapping and potentially climate-changing

1


jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

On Feb. 15, Vote Ice for Ward 1

T

he Jackson Free Press’ readership is diverse in many ways, and we get criticized from the left and right for editorial stances and endorsements. Our editorial board believes in groups of people with varying opinions getting together to debate and discuss and, thus, find a better solution due to diversity of opinion. For that reason, we rather like the idea of a City Council with varying viewpoints, much as we like the fact that President Obama has shown a willingness to compromise and reach out to the business community. To that end, we wish we could feel more comfortable with the thought of well-funded Republican Quentin Whitwell taking over Jeff Weill’s Council seat in the special election on Feb. 15. We wish we believed he would partake in a healthy dialogue with other Council members and vote independently from what his funders might want, should the situation merit it. We’d like to think he would think for himself more than Weill, who seemed to treat the seat as a Republican stepping stone to higher office, and take often-not-wellconsidered positions just because they were against the mayor. But Whitwell has a huge warning sign hanging over his head: his own resume. He is a tried-and-true corporate-conservative lobbyist—with clients from United Healthcare to U.S. Smokeless Tobacco to Ashbritt (Google it with “Katrina” and “Barbour”). His firm has lobbied the state Legislature on behalf of a national charter-school group (we understand discussing them, but lobbying is something else) and for power companies such as Entergy that want customers to pay now for possible nuclear and coal plant construction in the future. We’re also concerned about his not-subtle ties with “Two Lakes” supporters; the spokesman for that project, Dallas Quinn, is his campaign manager; vocal “Two Lakes” supporter Ben Allen is his treasurer. The Ward 1 council member should look carefully at all flood-control options—and look out for constituents who are concerned about higher property taxes to pay for expensive development, not to mention the use of eminent domain to take property. This is a complicated issue that deserves more than a lobbyist’s approach to it. Besides, we are dismayed to see Whitwell marching out the same tired Morgan-Quitno “dangerous city” rhetoric of failed local candidates to try to scare people into voting for him. This is a very bad omen. As for opponent Patricia Ice: We know her as a person, an advocate for the less fortunate and an immigrants-rights attorney. She is a smart family woman, and she cares about the residents of Jackson. We believe she will think independently, but with an ear toward the rights of people over corporations. We’re glad she decided to run, and we believe she would represent the people of Ward 1, and the entire city, better than her opponent. Please turn out and vote for Ice on Feb. 15.

KEN STIGGERS

‘There is a Season’

February 9 - 15, 2011

B

12

rother Hustle: “Another season is here, and it makes me reflect on the words wise ol’ King Solomon wrote thousands of years ago: ‘To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose, under heaven: A time to gain, a time to lose; a time to rend, a time to sew.’ “I wonder what he would say in 2011? ‘A time to pay your bills, a time to be broke; a time to be unemployed, a time to hustle or train for a new career.’ “Perhaps, King Solomon would add: ‘A time to have your tax return prepared at Money Hustle’s Financial Services, and a time for your rapid refund money to pay off those overdue bills.’ “This is a shameless plug for my cousin Money Hustle’s new business. Hard times forced him to re-invent himself—after he lost his bookkeeping job at the chemical processing plant when the Environmental Protection Agency shut it down for polluting the Cootie Creek River. “Money’s new hustle is to prepare taxes and secure immediate and sufficient refund money for the financially challenged. And I’m proud to mention that my cousin hired Aunt Tee Tee, unemployed members of the Ghetto Science Community and me to do some part-time promotional work for Money Hustle’s Financial Services, Inc. “So, when driving around the ghetto and other areas, look for the Money Hustle Street Corner Team, wearing lime-green uniforms covered with fake dollar bills and carrying the Money Hustle Financial Services promotion sign.”

YOUR TURN by Carl Gibson

The Secession Bandwagon

I

t seems Mississippi Sen. Joey Fillingane, RSumrall, is out to prove an election-year point by appealing to the most extreme fringe of the far right. Since the start of the 2011 session, the chairman of Mississippi’s Senate Judiciary A Committee has brought forth several tea-soaked bills that reek of partisan pandering and paranoia contrived by right-wing media. Some of the more egregious ones include SB 2179, which essentially replicates Arizona’s SB 1070. Another dubiously xenophobic race-baiting measure authored by Fillingane includes SB 2255, which forces providers of international monetary wire transfers to levy a tax that goes toward financing the construction of a border wall on the U.S./Mexico line, instead of, say, the drastically underfunded Mississippi Department of Public Safety. Fillingane also attempts to reinforce the patently false narrative of Christian oppression in public schools with SB 2101, the so-called “Mississippi Student Religious Liberties Act of 2011.” Although children are free to pray in public schools whenever they please, this bill subtly implies that the civil liberties of students in an overwhelmingly Christian state are under attack. The icing is SB 2224, a bold appeal to the “tenther” vote. If passed, this legislation would effectively create a six-member House and Senate panel, called the “Restoring the Tenth Amendment Committee,” with the explicit job of pointing out any federal law or “unfunded mandate” they deem to be “unconstitutional.”

Fillingane makes no bones about which “unconstitutional” laws his proposed committee would focus on: “This definition shall specifically include legislation relating to health care, financial reform, and gun control, or any other legislation not provided for or sanctioned by the Constitution of Mississippi or the Constitution of the United States,” he writes in the bill. I’m sure Sen. Fillingane wouldn’t use the term “secession,” but states choosing to ignore federal law carry out the same intent as seceding. Besides, the mere attempt to dismiss existing federal law is unconstitutional, so says the Supremacy Clause in Article 6, section 2 of the U.S. Constitution: “This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made ... the supreme law of the land.” The U.S. Constitution refutes the tenthers yet again in the Privileges and Immunities clause in the 14th Amendment: “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States.” Progressives, be warned: The tea virus is seeping into the halls of our statehouse this year. Mississippians thirsty for real solutions to hemorrhaging jobs, rapacious income inequality, declining public health and lackluster public education should focus on electing leaders that act in the interests of working families, not in the interests of Fox News viewers. Carl Gibson is a 23-year-old Methodist preacher’s son from Kentucky and a former MPB reporter. His most recent venture is the Gibson Group, a lobbying firm.

E-mail letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


TOM HEAD

Hazardous Civility

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I

n 2009, I spent 48 minutes on Paul Galloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SuperTalk radio show. I wanted to persuade Gallo to help me expose the mainstream resurgence of the Council of Conservative Citizens, a segregationist group patterned after the 1960s-era white Citizenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Councils that had recently received public support from a state senator; Gallo, who had put in some time on Google, thought it would be more fun to ridicule my amusingly left-wing online bio. After the first 15 minutes, as we paused for a commercial break, a friendly sounding young man piped in: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have you had enough, or do you want to play some more?â&#x20AC;? I told him I had all morning free; he chuckled and gave me the go-ahead. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember most of what Gallo said (he did eventually acknowledge, on the air, that he found the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s platform offensive), but the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;playâ&#x20AC;? still sticks in my crawâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and what it implies about the emotionally detached way the conservative white political establishment in Mississippi tends to assess policy issues that affect women, the poor and people of color. I thought about this spirit of â&#x20AC;&#x153;playfulnessâ&#x20AC;? last week as the Mississippi Legislature debated SB 2179, conservative legislatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attempt to export Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anti-immigration bill into our state. Lawmakers had obviously not written the bill with Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s underfunded law-enforcement community in mind. They then patched up the bill with amendments that, in some cases, made it even less practical to implement. Some legislators, understandably, wanted to know what this increasingly messy and bizarre piece of legislation would do if enacted. But the billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s principal sponsor, Sen. Joey Fillingane, R-Sumrall, wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any of that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy this whole argument about needing more time,â&#x20AC;? he told detractors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You all know how youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to vote.â&#x20AC;? The bill passed the Senate 34-15; a different version passed the House, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re being debated in committee. For its supporters, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;gameâ&#x20AC;? continuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but the question of what the bill would actually accomplish, if enacted, is not one that its legislative supporters feel any apparent need to answer. There are plenty of other examples of impractical laws in the 2011 session, and we will probably have the opportunity to vote on one in November. The proposed Personhood Amendment would establish that everyone becomes a human being at the moment of fertilization, which at first glance sounds like a fairly orthodox conservative position intended to restrict abortion. The trouble is that most anti-abortion conservatives have historically taught that life begins at conception, not fertilization, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a difference: the uterus naturally rejects most fertilized eggs prior to conception. This means that, if the law were actually enforced, any woman who has unprotected sex could

potentially be charged with manslaughter. But the proponents of the Personhood Amendment, like the proponents of the equally nonsensical anti-immigration law, clearly arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t thinking about enforcement. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking about the potential political benefits of publicly espousing opinions that they believe will be popular with their constituents, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having fun cornering more intellectually honest legislators who oppose these popular legislative â&#x20AC;&#x153;opinion piecesâ&#x20AC;? for practical policy reasons. Meanwhile, they seem to have little concern for what effect their proposed laws, and the movements behind them, might have on the lives of women and Latinos. In the wake of the Tucson massacre, I have heard the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;civilityâ&#x20AC;? ooze from every pore of our political establishment. But the danger is violenceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;actual harm to othersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and not, strictly speaking, incivility. The civility of irresponsible lawmakers at playâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;locking themselves into votes on half-baked legislation in an environment of collegial backslapping so that they can be seen as friendly to their constituencies and each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is a hazardous civility. In that sort of environment, legislators should be a little less civil toward those around them and a little more concerned about the well being of people who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in the room. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m emotionally prepared to care about civility in a country where 45,000 people die every year due to disparities in health-insurance coverage, but an effort to repeal federal health-care reform just passed the U.S. House by a landslide. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m emotionally prepared to care about civility in a world where 1.6 million children die every year of preventable pneumonia, 3,000 die per day in Africa of preventable malaria, and lawmakers want to cut foreign aid. And the civility of Mississippi lawmakers who are willing to haphazardly criminalize womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural reproductive processes and haphazardly pass Jim Crow-style legislation directed at Latino immigrantsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just because these lawmakers are so darned friendly to each other that they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel the need to critically analyze the bills they supportâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is also a dubious civility. We need to reject the prevailing whiteconservative attitude that portrays politics as a sport, and we need to clearly establish that meeting worthwhile policy goals usually means hard work, not play; complex decision making, not marketable sound bites; damaged friendships, not collegiality. We need to acknowledge that making ourselves popular with peers at the expense of targeted communities indicates gross cowardice, not maturity. Freelance writer Tom Head is a lifelong Jacksonian. He has authored or co-authored 24 nonfiction books on a wide range of topics, is a civil liberties writer for About.com, and volunteers as a grassroots progressive activist.

CORRECTION: In the Best of Jackson issue (Vol. 9, Issue 20, Jan. 26 to Feb. 1), we listed an incorrect phone number for Greenbrook Flowers (Best Flower Shop). The correct phone number is 601-957-1951. The Jackson Free Press apologizes for the error..

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jacksonfreepress.com

Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

13


Live, Work, Love

S

ome relationships work because both individuals have the freedom to attend to their own agendas throughout each day. What happens, though, when couples live and work together? More so than ever before, many couples now spend close to 24 hours, seven days a week togeth-

Daphne and Marsh Nabors

when she was part of another band, and agrees it is much better with him now, because they can share such rich experiences. The couple started dating in 1996 and, three years later, shared an non-traditional wedding experience. In 1999, on Daphneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday, Dec. 31, the eager couple eloped to a courthouse in Butler, Ala., where a judge married them and served as their only witness. Though the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s band entertains both local and distant audiences, they have day jobs, too. Marsh works at Pearl River Glass Studio restoring stained glass while Daphne owns a freelance photography business (the Jackson Free Press is one of her clients). They agree that they enjoy having the band as their side job instead of a full-time responsibility. The couple says that one reward of working together is having the comfortable freedom to criticize one another without wondering how the other is going to respond. They sometimes argue, but ultimately get over their frustration, and they do not hold grudges. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is great to be able to put 100 percent trust in someone else and both be able to watch over the other,â&#x20AC;? Marsh says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She is more like my guardian angel.â&#x20AC;? Daphne values trust, too. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can trust what he says as the truth,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When he approves of something, I

COURTESY BALLET MAGNIFICAT!

Keith and Kathy Thibodeaux

Kathy and Keith Thibodeaux

I

14

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&ORTHE,OVEOF2EADING

February 9 - 15, 2011

n 1976, Keith Thibodeaux proposed to Kathy after only three months of knowing one another. Kathy, only 19 at the time, was hesitant at first, but she joined Keith to pray over their situation. In an effort to comfort Kathy, Keith urged her to open the Bible and point to a verse. Ironically, Kathy pointed

6

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by J. Ashley Nolen DAPHNE NABORS

D

aphne and Marsh Nabors know the importance of being laid back and enjoying life. The couple formed â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Overnight Lows,â&#x20AC;? their punk-rock band, under unusual circumstances back in 2000. The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name has nothing to do with the weathermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estimation of dropping temperatures in the middle of the night but, instead, refers to a challenging time in the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationship. During this stressful time, Marsh had a few sleepless nights where he felt especially burdened. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a negative time, but just captures a negative moment,â&#x20AC;? Marsh says. The band started up that summer. Daphne, 37, plays the bass, and Marsh, 35, the guitar; both sing original songs they write together. They write songs that they would want to hear, not for a specific fan base. The three-person band includes a drummer, Bryan Roberts, who just started. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Overnight Lowsâ&#x20AC;? is under record label Goner Records, based in Memphis, where they often perform. For the first 10 years, the group only played around the South, but within the last year they toured around the West Coast, featuring their new album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;City of Rotten Eyes.â&#x20AC;? Marsh says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to have someone with him that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close to when heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really far from home traveling. Daphne remembers touring without Marsh early on in their relationship

er. To some couples, such a schedule is overwhelming to even think about. For other love birds, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only way they can imagine living their lives. We found three unique couples who live and work together in different capacities.

Marsh and Daphne Nabors

know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for real.â&#x20AC;? Her advice is to value honesty and always be available to re-examine yourself. Marsh says that he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the person to come to for advice but later adds that it is important for couples to constantly be willing to improve and grow. Marsh and Daphne were friends before their romantic relationship developed, and the couple says it is their deep-rooted friendship that keeps their 11-year-old marriage strong today.

by J. Ashley Nolen

to and read aloud the story of Ruth telling Boaz to make her his wife according to Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holy ordinances. The couple eloped on Oct. 26 that same year. Keith and Kathy are both extraordinarily talented. Keith, originally from Louisiana, was first in the spotlight, playing Little Ricky on the television sitcom â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Love Lucy,â&#x20AC;? and then Opieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friend on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Andy Griffith Show.â&#x20AC;? Later, he was a drummer, singer and songwriter for the Gospel Music Association Dove Award-nominated David and the Giants; he traveled with them for 10 years. In 1982, Kathy, who was born in Memphis but moved to Jackson when she was 3, won a silver medal at the USA International Ballet Competition that is held every four years in Jackson. Her final dance was to Sandi Pattyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Shall Behold Him.â&#x20AC;? Her dancing and a desire to combine her career with her faith is what spurred Kathy to open Ballet Magnificat! in 1986, where the

goal is: â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś to restore dance as a means of worship to the church and to disciple dancers to spread the gospel to all nations.â&#x20AC;? As the founder and artistic director of Ballet Magnificat!, Kathy says the company started out small but has grown dramatically. Since opening, the company has performed in front of more than 12 million people. Keith is the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive director, overseeing the business aspect of their dance company, handling all the paperwork and scheduling performances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We ride in to work together and leave together,â&#x20AC;? Keith says. In 2011, Ballet Magnificat! celebrates its 25th year in business. While the couple works in the same business every day, they say it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too challenging for them because they are in two different sides of the company. When the ballet company travels, the couple spends almost all day together, but it bothers neither of them. In fact, they are appreciative for the time they have

together because early on in their marriage, Keith traveled away from Kathy and their daughter, Tara, while playing in David and the Giants. Together, the couple has traveled to a variety of places including South America, Singapore, Israel and all around Europe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now we can enjoy the fact that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re traveling together,â&#x20AC;? Keith says. Both from broken families, Keith and Kathy recognize marriage as a covenant. Their advice is to never let anything offend you that will cause a root of bitterness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re wrong, be big enough to recognize it,â&#x20AC;? Keith says. Kathy says she can trust Keithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decisions. Laughingly, she adds that she likes him because heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cute, too. Keith adores Kathyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith, patience and her gift of mercy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I might say something is the last straw, but she demonstrates mercy,â&#x20AC;? Keith says. Kathy is laid back, and Keith is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;go getter.â&#x20AC;? They will celebrate their 35th wedding anniversary this year.

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by Dorian Randall She walks in unconditional love toward people. She has a way of handling stressful situations with a lot of grace. I love her loyalty and faithfulness,â&#x20AC;? Joseph said. He said new couples should be patient with each other and understand that â&#x20AC;&#x153;reality is a little bit different than the way theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve idealized each other.â&#x20AC;? Alice says her husband didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to do much to woo her when they first met. It was his maturity that impressed her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were in the 11th grade, and he was so far [more] advanced than all the other young men, even male friends that I knew at my school and my neighborhood. â&#x20AC;Ś And he had dreams,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He had a goal in life.â&#x20AC;? After 39 years of marriage, Alice said she cherishes the time they spend together. She said couples who work together should respect each other, especially if one of them is in a position of leadership. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to respect your spouse as the boss. You have to respect an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talent and not expect them to be perfect, but expect them to do the very best they can,â&#x20AC;? she said. Alice says she loves her husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foresight, his leadership, his caring heart and â&#x20AC;&#x153;his desire to stop at nothing to take care of us.â&#x20AC;?

FILE PHOTO

Keep The Fires Burning

by Robin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bryant

must explain how to operate your TV, VCR, DVD player and your microwave. This requires at least a 30-minute monologue during which your babysitterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes will glaze over. Leave your parenting persona at home. My husband, Zeb, and I have always been pretty good about having a regular date night. What we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so great about is leaving our parenting personas at home. With three children born in four years, it was hard to find a convenient time to argue, to discuss our parenting differences and to fight about the important things that really make a marriage lastâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; like which direction toilet paper should be hung (with the roll facing forward) who took the trash out last (probably him) and who unloaded the dishwasher last. (Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t listen to a word he says; it was me.)

B

eing romantic once you have children can be nearly impossible. Going on a date with your spouse can require so much preparation that it may seem easier to stay at home in your sweatpants and eat frozen pizza. But if you like your spouse (and I realize you might not), you need time away from the kids to unwind and reconnect. Throughout my 13 years of marriage Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found two sure-fire ways to keep the home fires burning: date night and lingerie. Schedule a regular date night. Date night can be a gigantic pain in the butt because it requires so much planning. You must find a babysitter, who is hopefully a responsible(ish) adult, and explain every nuance and bedtime routine. You have to explain how to make bottles the way your baby likes them, how much toothpaste your 5year-old prefers versus how much your 3-year-old prefers. You

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Keep it simple. If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been on a date with your spouse in awhile, you might want to keep things simple. My husband and I spent an expensive evening at a Charleston, S.C., restaurant, arguing through appetizers and hissing at each other as the waiter cleared away plates. We realized over dessert that it had taken us the entire meal to start acting like we liked each other, and now it was time to go home and endure another three weeks of parenting bootcamp before weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have another chance to be alone. My husband made a brilliant suggestion. He proposed that we should get a babysitter on Friday nights, go to Taco Bell, and for less than $20, we could fight like a couple of rednecks over bean burritos and fountain Mountain Dew. Then on Saturday, we could go on a nice date where we could act like the civilized adults, without scaring the wait staff.

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Joseph and Alice White

Double date. Going on a date with another couple is a great way to ensure you both stay on your best behavior. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to fight with your spouse if you have an audience, and you are less likely to keep all the conversation focused on your kids and family business. Spice it up with some lingerie. Your other option, if date night just seems too complicated, is to buy some fun, flirty new lingerie. But hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my very best piece of advice concerning your skivvies: Hide them from your children. I was doing laundry one morning and left some of my lingerie (think several steps up from your basic maw-maw nightgown and several steps down from Frederickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Hollywood) to lie flat on the counter to dry. Aubrey, my 5-year-old, walked into the laundry and immediately picked it up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Momma! What is this? Is it your babing suit?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, honey. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my underwear.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, I want to see you try it on. It looks so fancy!â&#x20AC;? I was not about to have a Victoriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Secret fashion show for my kindergartener so I blurted out the first thing that popped in my head. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still wet. It needs to dry.â&#x20AC;? Aubrey got a mischievous look on her face, waggled her eyebrows at me and asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Want me to hang it up outside for you?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;NO! I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t!â&#x20AC;? I said as I snatched my unmentionables out of her hand. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not quite ready for all of my business to be wafting in the Mississippi breeze.

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jacksonfreepress.com

D

r. Joseph White, an anti-aging specialist and general medicine physician, was once a star basketball player as a high-school junior in Missouri. His future bride, Alice, was an interested spectator who admired his maturity. Now years later, they work together at the Optimum Health Wellness Center in Jackson. The couple has been in Mississippi for 21 years and has enjoyed adding to their love story in what has become their home. The proud parents of two children and six grandchildren are still madly in love. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, I was very interested at first sight,â&#x20AC;? Joseph, 57, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take long before love really kicked in, and I was experiencing something I had never experienced before,â&#x20AC;? he added with a laugh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are still in love, so thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good thing.â&#x20AC;? He enjoys working with his wife, too. Alice White, 57, is vice president of their company, Optimum Health Wellness Center Inc., and oversees its finances. Joseph said that not only does it allow them to see each other more often despite their hectic schedules, but he also feels he has someone he can trust on his team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are multiple benefits of working with my spouse.

COURTESY JOSEPH AND ALICE WHITE

Joseph and Alice White

15


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T

he best part about the Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day season is the music. Popular culture has provided us with an endless number of songs that deal with love, given the fact that love is excruciatingly indefinable, yet always tantalizingly within our reach. To be sure, some of the best love songs are of the traditional ilk, such as ballads that extol the virtues of the object of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desire. On the other side of love exists a world that is not so traditional, where the meanings of love can be a bit obscured. Thus, I present to you a non-exhaustive list of some of my favorite songs about the unconventional, other side of love, in no particular order.

by Garrad Lee

guyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lack of game are all represented here. And we all know those girls.

Âą)"ELIEVE ²6WHYLH:RQGHUÂą4ALK ING"OOK² Stevie Wonder is a musical genius. With â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Believe,â&#x20AC;? he takes the listener on a journey that starts with utter heartbreak and despair: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shattered dreams, worthless years, here am I encased inside a hollow shell.â&#x20AC;? The song ends with the triumphant feeling that accompanies hope: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe when I fall in love with you it will be forever.â&#x20AC;? Stevie deftly represents humanÂą$IRTY 'IRL ² 0856 DQG 6OXJ kindâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most befuddling dichotomy: love and heartÂą&ELT!4RIBUTETO,ISA"ONET² break. And it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt that the arguably funkiest Every so often, love is 30 seconds of Stevieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career are tucked away at the end found in unusual places. In of the song, proving that, even if hope fails, funk will â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dirty Girl,â&#x20AC;? Slug falls for an always save the day. auto mechanic, despite the fact that she is covered in oil. Slug Âą/NE.IGHT!FFAIR ²(VWKHU3KLOOLSV raps, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would love to touch you, rub you/ see whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Âą7HATA$IFF´RENCEA$AY-AKES² covered up under that greasy blue jumpsuit.â&#x20AC;? Similarly, I find it refreshing to hear MURS falls for a sweaty grill cook: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heat from the grill a woman sing: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hit and run, made her mascara drip/the sweat on her face showed gonna be a son of a gun/hit and the fuzz on her lip/them work pants couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hide the run but it could be fun/I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t love in them hips.â&#x20AC;? To be honest, I am not sure whether wanna love nobody/donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want this song is intended to be homage to non-traditional us to get anything/I just may not be ready/to fly down beauties, or the fact that most men can create complex with a wedding ring.â&#x20AC;? Hey, one-night stands have been sexual fantasies in any time or place. Either way, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say- known to be fun, just as much for the ladies sometimes, ing something. as Esther Phillips shows.

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The Candy Heart: A History

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e Mine,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kiss Me,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet Pea,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;Ś â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tweet Me.â&#x20AC;? Sweethearts Conversation Hearts have been one of the most popular American ways to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Love You,â&#x20AC;? on Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day since Abe Lincoln was in office. Brainchild of Daniel Chaseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; brother of NECCO (New England Confectionery Company) founder, Oliver Chaseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the offbeat, yet evercharming (and oddly chalky) candies stamped with heartfelt sayings have become almost synonymous with Feb. 14. But donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect to pick up a box of the same NECCO hearts youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve become accustomed to gobbling since you were a kindergartner dropping Looney Tunes Valentines into your classmateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s red and pink-bedecked shoeboxes. The all new Conversation Heart has re-

ceived a makeoverâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and not just with updated pop-culture sayings like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Text Me,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;So Fineâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chill Out.â&#x20AC;? The most recent version of the famous confection has a new set of colors, flavors and even a softer texture. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m admittedly heartbroken at the thought of losing old quirky favorites like wintergreen and banana, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so much love the thought of a chewy blue version of what used to be pleasantly crunchy pastel hearts lightly dusted with powder. Part of the appeal of the candy has always been its endearingly old-fashioned flair. But learn to accept strawberry, grape, green apple, lemon, orange and blue raspberry into our 2011 Sweetheart repertoire we must. Because the oldest multi-line candy

by Brandi Herrera COURTESY NECCO

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Âą0ASSIN´ -E "Y ² 7KH 3KDUF\GH Âą0OISON ²%HOO%LY'H9RH Âą"IZARRE2IDE))Âą Âą0OISON² Bootie Brown, Slimkid3, We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always fall for the Imani and Fatlip, the four emcees perfect person. In fact, from time who make up the West Coastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to time we know that person is favorite off-kilter hip-hop group completely wrong, and we fall for of the 1990s, use this song to rethem anyway, like the members count crushes from their younger days that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end in of Bell Biv DeVoe do in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poison.â&#x20AC;? Plus, this song contrue love. The teacher, the girl with the cooler boyfriend tains my favorite line ever in any song: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Never trust a and the girl who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay attention because of the big butt and a smile.â&#x20AC;? That is invaluable advice.

company in the United States produces 100,000 pounds of Conversation Hearts a day from late February through mid-January each year. And someone, maybe even your â&#x20AC;&#x153;soul mate,â&#x20AC;? is going to have to buy them, because historically, the entire annual production sells out in a mere six weeks.


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our back deck with great food, lots of friends, a steady flow of wine and perfect spring evening weather. My friend Anne Scott (a big hot mess of a hippie Southern belle) had left a ridiculously huge plastic “diamond” ring in our kitchen, and it caught my eye while I was making a run to the icemaker. I slipped it into my pocket, made my way back to the deck, turned off the music and got everyone’s attention. I pulled the ring out of my pocket, showed it to everyone and announced: “A friend of mine once said, ‘If there’s a problem with the ring ... the problem ain’t the ring.’” I got down on one knee and took Kitty’s hand. As I slipped the pre-school jewelry on her finger, I said simply: “In front of all these people, Kitty: Will you marry me?” The crowd, all of whom had heard the speakerphone story at least once, let out a cheer. She said yes. Again. COURTESY CORBIS

hen it comes to marriage proposals that are pure genius, I have just one word for you: speakerphone. That’s right ladies and gents, Mr. Romantic here proposed to his lovely wife, Kitty, on a speakerphone. I had recently changed the focus of my job, and my calendar was getting really, really full. So when I noticed a two-week hole in October, I figured I would check on those dates with Kitty and see if she was also free. I reached over to the desk phone and hit the top speed-dial button. When she answered, I half-shouted: “Hey baby. Got your calendar handy?” “I’ll get it open. What’s up?” she asked. “How does Saturday the 8th of October and the following week look for you?” I asked. “It’s open,” she answered. “Why?” “I was just checking to see if that weekend would work, you know … for getting married,” I said. “Well, are you asking me to marry you?” she asked. “Yeah. So that week after is fine, too? You know, for the honeymoon?” I asked. “Looks fine to me,” she said. “OK, baby. I guess you need to go ahead and put in for vacation that week. I love you! See you at home tonight,” I said, reaching to hang up the phone. “OK,” she answered. And that was it—no flowers, no ring at the bottom of a Champagne flute, no flashing sign at a baseball game. Speakerphone. Believe it or not, it worked. We got married, and we’re still married. For years, I would sit and listen to other people prattle on about sunsets on the beach or romantic restaurants, and I would wait until they finished before pulling out the proposal story trump card of a lifetime: speakerphone. When Kitty turned 44, we had a birthday party for her on

How to Do It the Right Way Although the speakerphone was efficient, it just didn’t have the oomph that the occasion called for. This memory is something that will keep her around long after you have thick ear-hair, a snoring problem, and many other annoying habits or attributes, so get it right. Don’t try to be cute or clever; just be sincere. Go to a place with significance to your relationship such as a favorite restaurant (even if that place is the KFC buffet). Don’t wait for the perfect moment. You’ll only end up making yourself more nervous. Once you are settled in to a good conversation, look her right in the eyes, place your hand on hers and repeat this phrase exactly: “(insert name), I can’t imagine how I could live the rest of my life without you. Will you marry me?” When she starts to smile or cry, and you are certain the answer will be “yes,” then get on one knee and slip the ring on her finger. If you take a knee too soon, she’ll know what’s com-

F

by Lorie Wilson*

should not participate unless she wears football padding. The baby shower is another highly visible situation. At baby showers, estrogen levels are extra high, and the mothers (usually every woman in the room) share their favorite baby stories and offer advice. On those topics, the 30-and-single has absolutely nothing to contribute. As her discomfort becomes obvious, the mothers pry into her personal life. “Are you dating anyone?” they ask. “Are y’all going to get married?” One sweet, well-meaning mother will almost always say: “I bet men are intimidated by you.” In terms of “invisible” situations for the 30-and-single gal, consider her professional male acquaintances and how they disenfranchise her. They ignore her when their wives or girlfriends are around but will eagerly engage in conversation when they’re not. They avoid inviting her to socials and gatherings that are open to the married friends in the group. While recognizing this, the 30-and-single is always cordial and understanding, as the men are presumably simply trying to avoid friction with their significant others. Further, and most regrettably, they automatically exclude her from consideration for employment with them; thus, she misses valuable career opportunities. Oh, and how I love the hip-hop community. The hip-hop community celebrates the woman who is doing well on her own. In her song, “Single Ladies,” Beyoncé sings about an independent woman who does not dwell on being single. She says, “If you liked it, then you should’ve put a ring on it.” In his song, “I-N-D-E-P-E-N-D-E-N-T,” rapper Weebie

ing next, and the words will be lost in the expectation. Plus, if she runs away, you’ll look like a jerk kneeling there on the restaurant floor while some hot lady bursts through the front door hailing a taxi. You may (at your own peril) ignore all the tips and rules about getting engaged and “do your own thing,” but there is one rule you should adhere to as if it was the law of gravity: This is her event, not yours. You can plan it, rehearse it and flawlessly execute it, but if you think for one second that you own it, you have missed the point entirely. If you can remember this one fact, the “big day” and all your days to follow will be much easier. Dressing Tips This will be a well-documented event so wear something classic: blazer, white shirt, tailored trousers and good shoes. I’m sure you’ve seen pictures of your parents or other relatives sporting leisure suits, crushed-velvet jumpsuits or poodle skirts—you don’t want be remembered as “Crazy Uncle Bobby who wore the Ed Hardy shirts.” Drinks for the Occasion Champagne (or sparkling wine) is really your only option for this event. That doesn’t mean you need to break the bank to enjoy yourself and impress your soon-to-be bride. Besides, if your choice of Champagne could possibly alter the answer to your question, then you have picked the wrong girl. If you can afford it, go big. After all, this is a truly special occasion. Dom Perignon, Krug and Perrier Jouet are obvious choices for a big budget. If you are looking for something with plenty of pop for less money, go with non-vintage Cavas or Proseccos. Montsarra Cava and Zardetto Prosecco Brut are great choices in the lower price points. If you are unsure about what may be on the wine list where you are going, call ahead and ask the sommelier to help you out. They love to do this and might even bump you up a notch or two as their way of saying “congratulations.” FILE PHOTO

Single and 30 our years ago, while casually walking in the mall, a familiar voice yelled my name. I turned and saw a high-school friend. We said our hellos and, in a surprised tone, he said: “You’re not married? I figured someone would’ve snatched you up by now!” I am 30, and it’s true: No one has snatched me up. All told, 42 percent of African American women are unmarried, along with 23 percent of white women. The debate about successful black women struggling to find compatible black men is widespread. Soulful R&B singer Lyfe Jennings says in his song, “Statistics,” that only 10 percent of black men are worthy. He explains that the other 90 percent are either unfaithful, unstable, liars or gay. While I do not accept Lyfe’s lyrics as facts, in 2000, the U.S. Census concluded that African American women outnumber black men by 1.8 million. Regardless, while some folks perceive being 30 and single a black epidemic, the stigma and disenfranchisement that go along with it are not exclusive to African Americans. A recent MSNBC article said that the 30-and-single woman is both “highly visible” and “invisible.” The author used the example of the bouquet toss at a wedding. All the single women gather behind the glowing bride, hoping to catch her tossed bouquet. This is a vital event: The woman who catches the bouquet will be the next bride-to-be. It is often quite dangerous. To catch that bouquet, single bridesmaids and cousins of the bride will leap over tables and chairs and tackle anyone in their way. Out of precaution, one

by Tom Ramsey

applauds the independent woman. Rappers have traditionally been disrespectful of women in their choice of lyrics, but in this instance, the independent woman is, to some degree, valued. Finally, lifelong friends of the 30-and-single feel remorse for her and spend much of their time trying to analyze why her long-term boyfriend has failed to propose. Even worse, they play matchmaker with her and eligible bachelors in the community. I do not intend to be cynical on this subject. These are just my perceptions, and I am positive that many women can relate. For most, marriage is inevitable, but women should not allow themselves to be forced to comport to society’s timeline. A woman should take time to be independent and not feel compelled to be “snatched up” until she is ready. As for why it has not happened for me? I have been busy being an independent woman! 17 * Lorrie Wilson is a pseudonym. jacksonfreepress.com

‘Will You Marry Me?’


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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You Are My Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; COURTESY OF AILEEN MORAN

by Katie Bonds

Aileen Moran and Rudy Daghmach were married Dec. 11, 2010, at the Cathedral of St. Peter the Apostle in Jackson. The couple now resides in Madison.

by Jeffrey Yentz

Films of Love

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Syria about her, and bought her and himself matching rings. Matching rings in Syrian culture means you are engaged. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was engaged to her in my country before we were engaged here,â&#x20AC;? Daghmach says. But Daghmach wanted to honor Moranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culture as well. He had a friend who owned a jewelry store in Syria handcraft Moranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s engagement ring and wedding band. Six months after he got the rings, he proposed. The couple had looked at rings together in the past, and Moran was worried about what he would pick. She wanted one of her sisters to go with Daghmach to help him, so Daghmach was forced to tell Moran that he already had the ring. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told her: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Too late. I have it, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not from here, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ugly,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? he says. Daghmach is Greek Orthodox and Moran is Catholic, and they decided to get married at the Cathedral of St. Peter the Apostle in Jackson. Moran admits she has always loved the architecture of the cathedral, and they felt an immediate connection to Rev. Jeffrey Waldrep who went out of his way to make Moran and Daghmach comfortable. He even went so far as to help Daghmach with his English. The couple held the rehearsal dinner at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church in Madison where Daghmachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother attends and Moranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family has attended since she was in middle school. The Knights of Columbus catered the meal, and because Daghmach and Moran both come from large families (they each have seven siblings), 65 guests attended the rehearsal dinner. A hand-made, traditional Syrian tablecloth covered Moran and Daghmachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s table at the dinner, and a slide show of pictures of Moran and Daghmach played during the meal, which made everyone cry. The color scheme at the wedding was snow white and gold. The flowers included large calla lilies and white roses with feather accents. Because Daghmachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents could not make the journey from Syria due to their age and health, Moran and Daghmach held a rosary while they were blessed, and they plan to send the rosary to Daghmachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents.

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Rehearsal Dinner: St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, 4000 W. Tidewater Lane, Madison, 601856-5556 (catered by Knights of Columbus) Reception: Northepointe Red Barn, 201 Northpointe Parkway, 601-991-9461. Wedding Cake: Jennifer Skirtech (a friend of Daghmach) Flowers: Green Oaks, 5009 Old Canton Road, 601-956-5017. Photography: Badia Daghmach (one of Daghmachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cousins) Videography: Azod Abedikichi (one of Daghmachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friends) Catering: Daniel Caron (former chef at Atlantica) Invitations: The couple did their own invitations with materials purchased at Hobby Lobby. Wedding and Bridesmaidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dresses: Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bridal 1039 E. County Line Road, 601-957-0505. Tuxes: Suit City, 4102 Highway 80 W., 601-922-1515. Moranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sister, Michelle, a bridesmaid, sang â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, Perfect Loveâ&#x20AC;? and a song based on Psalm 28. Another of Moranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sisters, Julie, was the maid of honor, and one of Daghmachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brothers, Refat, was the best man. The wedding reception was held at the Northpointe Red Barn. There, guests had fun dancing to traditional Syrian dances, ate tons of good food catered by former Atlantica chef Daniel Caron and drank excellent wine. Moran and Daghmach danced to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stand By Me,â&#x20AC;? by Ben King, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Habibiâ&#x20AC;? (which means my love), by Majida El Roumi. Moran and Daghmach recently returned from their honeymoon. They went on a cruise to Cozumel, Mexico and are now living in Madison.

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jacksonfreepress.com

E

ven though Aileen Moran and Rudy Daghmach both worked at the former Atlantica Grill in Madison through part of 2008 and part of 2009, they did not speak to each other for six months. Because Daghmach, 33, worked in the kitchen, was quiet, and looked like he was from another country, Moran simply assumed he did not speak English. They were married Dec. 11, 2010. Looking at them now, you would think they had known each other all their lives. They gaze into each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes when they speak, and Moran often sweetly and gently corrects Daghmachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s English. Daghmach, originally from Syria, moved to Madison in 2007, and began working at Atlantica where one of his brothers, Zoffee Daghmach, was an owner. His brother offered him a job there until he could figure out what he wanted to do. Today, he is co-owner of Ridgeland Discount Wine and Spirits. For Moran, who has lived most of her life in Madison, waiting tables at Atlantica was also a transitional job. It was a source of income for her while she attended the Mississippi Institute of Aesthetics. Moran now works as an aesthetician at the Reynolds Center in Jackson. Though Moran was clueless about Daghmach, she did think he was extremely handsome. Even so, she never tried to strike up a conversation with him. And Daghmach was too shy and reserved to talk to the beautiful Moran. However, during those six months of silence, unbeknownst to Moran, Daghmach was falling in love. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I started to watch her,â&#x20AC;? Daghmach says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I liked her manner with people and how she talked about her family all the time.â&#x20AC;? Finally, Moran realized that Daghmach could speak English, and they became friends. One weekend, they went to New Orleans with a group of acquaintances. In New Orleans, they held hands and danced together for the first time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just felt natural,â&#x20AC;? Moran recalls. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been together ever since. After about six months of dating, Daghmach knew Moran was the one for him. He started telling his parents in

19


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To Die or Not To Die (for Love) by Shannon Barbour

RYAN MALLADY

8FIBWFFWFSZUIJOH $VQJEOFFET GPS7BMFOUJOFµT%BZ

Literary critics and everyday folks have heralded Shakespeare’s romantic tragedy “Romeo and Juliet” as the quintessential love story for centuries. It has found its way into the way we think, our music and even into bronze as a statue in New York City’s Central Park.

love—under one condition: He was to walk in front of her and not look at her face until they reached sunlight. Overcome by joy and anticipation, Orpheus turned his gaze a second too soon, and the gods violently pulled Eurydice back to the underworld forever. Unlike Romeo and Juliet, Orpheus sought neither poison nor dagger. He turned, rather, to music. His mourning created a hauntingly plaintive song, one he repeated without end until his own death years later. Now that is love. To mourn, Sigmund Freud said, is not a task entered into with a deadline or end point in mind. It is work itself—the work of a lifetime. Prior to Juliet’s perceived death, Romeo angrily proclaimed that no life existed beyond Verona’s walls, which, quite literally, kept Juliet captive. It’s not surprising, then, that he succumbs to the desire to join her in death. Juliet had already proved the strength of her desire to be reunited with Romeo when she willingly drank an unknown substance in the hopes it would feign her death until Romeo could rescue her. Remaining true to herself, when she finds his dead body lying beside her, she immediately reaches for an instrument of death. Neither Romeo nor Juliet could bear the enormous burden of mourning. An entire lifetime passed in the few moments they spent in the company of the other’s corpse. Which is, I suppose, why I am annoyed with the likes of Bruno Mars. Offering to die for your love is a completely selfish act, one lacking the honor it seemingly commands. A more genuine act would be to protect your partner from grief’s unbearable weight. So Bruno, should someone throw a grenade in your direction, for whatever unimaginable reason, do your love a favor: Lob it toward her, then run like hell.

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I

have a problem with Bruno Mars. More specifically, I have a problem with the music producers and executives who heard his lyrics and instantly thought, “hit record,” and with the listening public for so eagerly agreeing with them. The cynical side of me hears him sing, “her hair, her hair, falls perfectly without her trying,” and wants to scream: “Are you blind? Don’t you see the hair products on your bathroom counter?” If the clichés ended with that one song, I would probably give Mars a pass. Who among us hasn’t giddily yelled an exhausted phrase when love is new? But in “Grenade,” the singer vows he’d “catch a grenade” for the woman he loves. A grenade? Really? Where is he taking this girl that grenade catching would even become a reality? This vow to die for love begs the question: Has he not heard about Romeo and Juliet? When Romeo hears of Juliet’s untimely passing, he searches out an apothecary who deals in death, but he waits to consume the poison until he sees Juliet’s cold, listless body. Moments later, Juliet awakens to find Romeo’s lifeless corpse by her side and, without a moment’s pause, drives her lover’s dagger directly into her heart. “Romeo and Juliet” is a tragedy. Why, then, is this the quintessential tale of love— the gold standard against which all other anecdotal love stories are compared? Shakespeare knew what purveyors of pop culture don’t: When a couple is torn apart by death, the one left standing, alone, is the real victim. Before “Romeo and Juliet,” the Greeks gave us Orpheus and Eurydice, ripped apart when Eurydice, trying to flee a would-be attacker, stepped on a poisonous snake and died. Heartbroken, Orpheus played such sorrowful music the gods all wept and agreed to let Orpheus visit the underworld to retrieve his

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Digital Home Advantage plan requires 24-month agreement and credit qualification. If service is terminated before the end of agreement, a cancellation fee of $17.50/month remaining will apply. Programming credits will apply during the first 12 months. Free HD valid for life of current account; requires 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;month Agreement and AutoPay with Paperless Billing. HBO/Showtime offer requires AutoPay with Paperless Billing; credits apply during the first 3 months ($72 value); customer must downgrade or then-current price will apply. Must maintain continuous enrollment in AutoPay and Paperless Billing. Free Standard Professional Installation only. All equipment is leased and must be returned to DISH Network upon cancellation or unreturned equipment fees apply. Limit 6 leased tuners per account; lease upgrade fees will apply for select receivers; monthly fees may apply based on type and number of receivers. HD programming requires HD television. Free HD channels will vary based on package. 200 HD channels require subscription to additional packages and ViPÂŽ 922 receiver. All prices, packages and programming subject to change without notice. Local channels may not be available in all areas. Offer is subject to the terms of applicable Promotional and Residential Customer Agreements. Additional restrictions may apply. First-time DISH Network customers only. Offer ends 1/31/11. HBOÂŽ and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME and related marks are registered trademarks of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company.


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WEDNESDAY 2/9

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THURSDAY 2/10

Spirits of the House (Traditional Irish) FRIDAY 2/11

Jason Turner Band (Rock/Blues)

SATURDAY 2/12

The Bailey Bros. (Bluegrass)

SUNDAY 2/13

Open 11am - Midnight MONDAY 2/14

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TUESDAY 2/15

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23


From the Heart

S

ome men are wonderful gift-givers, while others need a little help. Women are complicated creatures and finding the right Valentine’s gift for us can be challenging. We’ll let you in on a little secret: The thought really does count. Some of the best

by ShaWanda Jacome gifts are not been expensive, but show that you really pay attention. Whether your sweetie is a lover of jewelry, flowers or chocolate, or could use a little pampering; you’re sure to find the perfect something in the Jackson metro area to express your love and appreciation.

1 Radiantly Red Tulips, $32.95, Whitley’s Flowers 2 Swedish massage, $50-$115, LaCru Salon 3 Large magenta fabric flower on satin elastic with feather accent, $32, MOLLYGEE Designs 4 Glass pendants, prices vary by design, Donna Davis Glass Designs 5 “Love Box” (4 cupcakes), $9.99, Gigi’s Cupcakes 6 Rings, $25 each, Alex & LeLe 7 Pink and purple earrings, $64, Alex & Lele 8 Flower pins by Candace Ballard (assorted colors), $12, Mississippi Crafts Center 9 Butterfly box by Jeri Smith (Creations in Glass), $50, Mississippi Crafts Center 10 Handmade cards, $5.75 each, circa. 11 Vintage wallet, $38, circa. 12 Leather bracelets, $24-$28, circa. 13 Hot pink sunglasses, $9.99, Beemon Drugs 14 Measuring spoons, $18.95, Beemon Drugs 15 Ms. Manicure products, $1.99-$8.65, Beemon Drugs

February 9 - 15, 2011

Where2Shop

24

Alex & Lele (1481 Canton Mart Road, Suite C, 601-206-7720); Beemon Drugs (Maywood Mart, 1220 E Northside Drive, Suite 315, 601-366-9431); circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road, 601-362-8484); Donna Davis Glass Designs (www.donnadavisglassdesigns.com, dldavis10@bellsouth.net); Gigi’s Cupcakes (730 Mackenzie Lane, Flowood, 601-919-1566); LaCru Salon (5352 Lakeland Drive, Suite 100, Flowood, 601-992-7980); Mississippi Crafts Center (2906 N. State St., 950 Rice Road, Ridgeland, 601-856-7546); MOLLYGEE Designs (www.mollygeeclothing.etsy.com, 601-421-2565)*; Whitley’s Flowers (740 Lakeland Drive, 601-362-8844) *MOLLYGEE Designs headbands are also available at Libby Story & Company (120 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601-717-3300)


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25


FILM p 29 | 8 Days p 30 | MUSIC p 33

Local Art, Open HeARTS WILLIAMSPAIN

NATALIERAY

by J. Ashley Nolen

William Spain offers bright colors, flowers and whimsical birds in “Paradise.”

Natalie Ray’s untitled abstract on canvas currently hangs at Mimi’s Family & Friends, but the highest bidder can take it home Saturday night.

February 9 - 15, 2011

TONYDAVENPORT

26

“Green with Envy” is one of Tony Davenport’s three pieces with the artist’s signature style in the auction.

W

here can a potential art buyer find pieces from Bewey Bowden, Jason Anderson, Tony Davenport and Stephanie Marie Robertson, to name a few, under one roof? A pop-up art gallery, of course: the 19th annual MS HeARTS Against AIDS. MS HeARTS Against AIDS volunteers have worked to improve education and awareness about the disease that claims the life of five people every 60 seconds. Just six years ago, the Mississippi Department of Health reported 8,330 people were living with HIV; 4,224 of them received little or no health care in 2005. The nonprofit, an entirely volunteersupported organization, sponsors events every year to raise financial support for other groups that also invest in AIDS education and awareness, such as the South Mississippi AIDS Task Force, Sacred Heart Southern Mission and Mississippi AIDS Episcopal AIDS Committee. Since 1993, the organization, which has raised more than $900,000 to date, gives grants to groups working to raise AIDS awareness and focuses particularly on requests for funding specific capital and client services. Potential grantees can apply for funding through Feb. 28. Laura DiStefano, HeARTS chairwoman, says: “I work with a great group of people and am passionate about AIDS education throughout Mississippi. The organization hosts events each year that bring in financial support for the cause, but none is as large as our annual silent and live art auction benefit.” One hundred percent of the proceeds go toward the mission of the organization and those it supports. Artists have donated more than 200 pieces of artwork for a silent and a live auction. Musicians Scott Albert Johnson, Eric Stracener and The Frustrations, Mama’s Black Sheep, Natalie Long and Clinton Kirby join the artists represented in the silent auction to provide entertainment throughout the evening of Feb. 12 at Hal & Mal’s. Another way the organization raises money and celebrates the work of local artists this year with the color T-shirts emblazoned with Jackie Ellen’s “Too Soon” painting (also the selected work for this year’s promotional materials) on the front. Image Gallery and Southern Breeze Gallery have the shirts available for purchase. For a sneak peak of the art featured in the silent auction and to purchase tickets for the evening, visit the MS HeARTS Against AIDS website at mississippihearts.org. The event is Saturday, Feb. 12, at 6 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.).


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27


7:30PM

Jackson’s Thalia Mara Hall http://ticketmaster.com 800.745.3000

February 9 - 15, 2011

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Gluten free pizza available by request

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by Anita Modak-Truran

6A0=3E84F

COURTESY LES BLANK

The Reel Oxford

Documentary filmmaker Les Blank is among the several guests on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thacker Mountain Radio,â&#x20AC;? Oxfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;original music and literature radio show.â&#x20AC;?

E

very year, Oxford, Miss., holds a festival that reels filmmakers and movie buffs into a uniquely authentic southern experience. One can see firsthand William Faulknerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and other extraordinary Mississippi artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; inspirations. Faulkner and those Mississippi creative whizzes found their voices in the tranquil setting of one of the most picturesque parts of the Deep South. From Thursday, Feb. 10, through Sunday, Feb. 13, moviemakers, industry professionals and film lovers gather in the small and always-charming college town for the annual Oxford Film Festival. The festival kicks off with a special â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thacker Mountain Radioâ&#x20AC;? show from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday evening with special guests Les Blank (documentary filmmaker), Michael Adams (author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Showgirls,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teenwolvesâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Astro Zombiesâ&#x20AC;?), and musical guests Robert Belfour and Kenny Brown, among others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Oxford Film Festival is pleased to be teaming up with Thacker again for our opening night. We are excited to introduce our guests to one of our local treasures,â&#x20AC;? festival Executive Director Molly Fergusson said in a release. The first feature film to screen, which

Films of Love

by Jeffrey Yentz

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A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison opened the Austin Film Festival, is the mockumentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Justice,â&#x20AC;? directed by Dax Shepard (who is also one of the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stars) and David Palmer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Werner Herzog Eats His Shoeâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spanola Pepper Sauce Company,â&#x20AC;? two shorts, precede the feature. The festival line-up offers a wide range of themes and genres, with a particularly appealing documentary section. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi Innocence,â&#x20AC;? directed by Joe York, tells the story of Levon Brooks and Kennedy Brewer, two Mississippi men who, between them, spent more than 30 years in prison for crimes they did not commit. In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beijing Taxi,â&#x20AC;? three taxi drivers connect a morphing cityscape through Beijing as the city undergoes a radical transformation for the 2008 Olympic Games. Rachel Julkowskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s short documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Square Mileâ&#x20AC;? tells the candid story of a Jersey shore town struggling to balance its Christian heritage while embracing diversity. And on the lighter side, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worst in Show,â&#x20AC;? directed by Don L. Lewis and John Beck, follows four canine contestants in an ugly dog competition. Besides documentaries, the festival screens narrative and experimental films, animations and music videos. Panel discussions, master workshops and parties round out this unique festival. Hotty toddy, gosh almighty, flim flam, bim bam, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oxford Film Festival will be grand! Festival tickets are $20 for all Thursday night, no student discounts; $30 for multi-day Friday, Saturday, Sunday passes, $25 for students with valid ID; $15 one-day pass (cannot be used on Thursday), $12 for students with valid ID; $15 for Saturday night party, no student discount; $8 for individual film pass, $6.50 for students with valid ID. For more festival information and a complete film schedule, visit oxfordfilmfest.com.

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Friday, Feb. 11th - Thursday, Feb. 17th 3-D Justin Bieber: Never Say Never G Just Go With It PG13 3-D Gnomeo And Juliet G

THE GREEN ROOM FOR SERIOUS BILLIARDS

Voted Best Place to Play Pool! Best of Jackson 2010 & 2011

The Eagle

PG13

Blue Valentine R 3-D Sanctum

R

Handicapped

The Roommate PG13

Starts Feb. 8 & 9

The Rite

$25,00ou0t 8-Ball League Total Pay

Gnomeo And Juliet (non 3-D) G

JOIN A LEAGUE NOW! Handicapped In-house League Call 601-718-POOL to find out how you or your team can win big bucks! 444 Bounds St in Jackson www.greenroomms.com | greenroomms@yahoo.com

PG13

The Mechanic

R

No Strings Attached

R

3-D Green Hornet PG13 The Dilemma

PG13

The Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speech R True Grit Black Swan

PG13 R

Tron Legacy (non 3-D) PG Yogi Bear (non 3-D) PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

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DIVERSIONS|film

29


BEST BETS February 9-16, 2011 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 2/9

BILL GRACEY

Freedom Rider Hank Thomas speaks at the Jackson 2000 luncheon at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.) at 11:30 a.m. $12; e-mail bevelyn_branch@att.net to RSVP. … Freedom Rider Fred D. M. Clark Sr. speaks during History Is Lunch at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.) at noon. Bring a lunch; call 601576-6998. … Mississippi Improv Alliance’s Winter Wednesday at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.) is at 7 p.m. Free; call 601-497-7454. … The play “Cheaper by the Dozen” at Black Rose Community Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon) debuts at 7:30 p.m. and runs through Feb. 13. $12, $10 seniors/students with ID; call 601-825-1293.

FRIDAY 2/11

Salsa Mississippi’s Valentine’s dinner and dance at Crossroads of Life Church (6775 S. Siwell Road, Byram) is at 6:30 p.m. $15 singles, $25 couples in advance, $30 couples at the door; call 601-213-6355. … New Stage Theatre presents “Twelfth Night” at Jackson Academy (1908 Ridgewood Road) is at 7:30 p.m.; additional shows at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 12 and 3 p.m. Feb. 13. $15, $7 students; call 601-948-3533. … Watch the “Oscar Shorts” films at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) at 7 p.m., animated films at 9 p.m.; encore showings Feb. 12. $9 per showing; visit msfilm.org. … Suite 106 hosts Suite Life Friday. … The ¡Los Buddies! CD release party is at Ole Tavern. … Pop Evil is at Fire. … February Fright Fest kicks off with MissHippy’s Black Hearts Ball at The Commons at 9 p.m. $5; call 601-397-6292.

SATURDAY 2/12

February Fright Fest continues at The Commons at 10 a.m. with horror film screenings and discussion panels. Free; call 601-397-6292. … The Mississippi HeARTS Against AIDS benefit at Hal & Mal’s is at 6 p.m. $30 in advance, $35 at the door; call 601-668-6648. … The Dirty Dozen Brass Band plays at Martin’s. … The Ignite the Night Gala at the Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive) is at 7:30 p.m. $100; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-KIDS. … The Way of Blues Revue at Underground 119 includes music by King Edward and Mickey Rogers. $15 in advance, $20 at the door; call 601-613-7377 or 662-347-2869.

SUNDAY 2/13

Knight Bruce plays during the 11 a.m. brunch at Sophia’s, Fairview Inn (734 Fairview St.). … See the opera film “La Traviata” at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) at 2 p.m. $16; visit msfilm.org. … The Detectives Mystery Dinner theatre presents “Live, Love, Laugh … Die” at Giovanni’s (640 Grants Ferry Road, Flowood) at 6:30 p.m. $39; call 601-937-1752 to RSVP. … Cultural Expressions has openThe 46th annual Dixie National Rodeo is at the Mississippi Coliseum Feb. 10-16.

February 9 - 15, 2011

The “Sahara Zoo” puppet show at the Mississippi Schools for the Blind and Deaf (1252 Eastover Drive) is at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. $7, $5 per person in groups of 10 or more; call 601-977-9840. … The opening reception for the “Canvas and Clay No. 2” exhibit at The Cedars (4145 Old Canton Road) is at 5 p.m.; exhibit hangs through March 3. Free; call 601-981-9606. … The JPS All-City Honors Band performs at Belhaven University Center for the Arts at 7 p.m. Free; call 601-965-7044. … Dreamz Jxn hosts Centric Thursday with Akami Graham and DJ Finesse. … The Oxford Film Festival at Malco Oxford Studio Cinema (1111 Jackson Ave. W., Oxford) begins at 8 p.m. and runs through Feb. 13. $8-$30, $6.50-$25 students; visit oxfordfilmfest.com. 30 … Shaun Patterson performs at Brady’s Bar and Grill.

MONDAY 2/14

Surprise your loved one with a singing Valentine and a rose from the Mississippi Chorus Chamber Choir. $50; call 601-278-3351. … The exhibit “Walking the Path: The Evolution of Diane Williams” at Smith Robertson Museum (528 Bloom St.) opens today and shows through May 14. $4.50, $3 seniors, $1.50 children under 18; call 601-960-1457. … Mississippi Murder Mystery presents “Convicted of Love” at Petra Café (104 W. Leake St., Clinton) at 6:30 p.m. $38.50; call 601-925-0016 to RSVP. … Fenian’s has karaoke.

TUESDAY 2/15

Jesse “Guitar” Smith performs at Burgers and Blues at 6:30 p.m. … The piano duo Quattro Mani performs at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.) at 7 p.m. $10; call 601-974-1130. … The musical “Mamma Mia” at Thalia Mara Hall is at 7:30 p.m.; encore show Feb. 16. $27.35-$70.95; visit kesslerbroadway.com. … Rodney Atkins performs at the Dixie National Rodeo at the Mississippi Coliseum at 7:30 p.m. $15 and up; call 800-7453000. … Clay Caldwell is at C-Notes.

WEDNESDAY 2/16

The “Nudes and Figurative Works” exhibit at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St., Suite 101) hangs through Feb. 28. Free; call 601-291-9115. … Mississippi Improv Alliance’s Winter Wednesday at Belhaven University, Bitsy Irby Recital Hall (1500 Peachtree St.) is at 7 p.m. Free; call 601-497-7454. … Barry Leach is at Hal & Mal’s. … The Dillonaires perform at Underground 119. More events and details at jfpevents.com.

King Edward, Rick Lewis, Dr. Alphonso Sanders, Bill “Howl-N-Madd” Perry and Mickey Rogers (pictured l-to-r) perform at the Way of Blues Revue at Underground 119 Feb. 12 at 9 p.m. COURTESY PEGGY BROWN

THURSDAY 2/10

mic poetry. … Sherman Lee Dillon performs at Burgers and Blues. … Mama’s Black Sheep performs at Vicksburg Auditorium (901 Monroe St., Vicksburg) at 6:30 p.m. $14.25; call 800-745-3000.


jfpevents Radio JFP on WLEZ ongoing, at WLEZ 100.1 FM and wlezfm.com. Join Donna Ladd and Todd Stauffer every Thursday from noon-1 p.m., where they discuss vital issues and play local music. Listen to podcasts of all shows at jfpradio.com. Free; call 601-362-6121, ext. 17. Mississippi Happening ongoing. The monthly broadcast is hosted by Guaqueta Productions and features a special musical guest. Download free podcasts at mississippihappening.com. Mississippi HeARTS Against AIDS Feb. 12, 6 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.). The benefit is a huge live and silent auction of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best-known artists with live entertainment headlined by Scott Albert Johnson and cuisine catered by dozens of local restaurants. $30 in advance, $35 at the door; call 601-668-6648. Ignite the Night Gala Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The event includes interactive exhibits such as the Mississippi Climbing Map, food, cocktails and prize giveaways. Choose an outfit from the costume closet and have your picture taken as a memento. $100; call 601-981-5469 or 877-793-KIDS.

HOLIDAY Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dinner and Dance Feb. 11, 6:30 p.m., at Crossroads of Life Church (6775 S. Siwell Road, Byram). Salsa Mississippi is the host. Dinner and dessert is served at 6 p.m., Sara Upshaw gives foxtrot lessons at 7:30 p.m., and open dancing is from 8:30-10 p.m. $15 singles, $25 couples in advance, $30 couples at the door; call 601-213-6355. Singing Valentine Feb. 14. Have the Mississippi Chorus Chamber Choir deliver a song and a rose to your loved one. $50; call 601-278-3351.

COMMUNITY Events at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). â&#x20AC;˘ Adult 3-On-3 Basketball League Registration. Interested individuals can register between 8 a.m.5 p.m. The deadline for registration is Feb. 11. There is a limit of seven players per team. $200 per team; call 601-960-0471. â&#x20AC;˘ Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spring Basketball League Registration. Interested individuals can fill out registration forms between 8 a.m.-5 p.m. The deadline for registration is Feb. 18. There is a limit of 12 players per team. $325 per team; call 601-960-0471. â&#x20AC;˘ Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Summer Youth Employment Program Registration, at the Department of Human and Cultural Services, Suite 311-A. The City of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Family and Youth Division is accepting applications from youth ages 16-19 who are enrolled in school. Applicants must provide a birth certificate, Social Security card, a driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license or state ID, and the parent or guardianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proof of income. Applications accepted weekdays from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. through March 4; space is limited. Call 601-960-2174 or 601-960-0326. Dixie National Rodeo and Livestock Show through Feb. 16, at Mississippi State Fairgrounds

(1207 Mississippi St.). The 46th annual event kicks off with horse shows and livestock competitions leading up to the Dixie National Rodeo Feb. 10-16. The rodeo includes clowns, bullfighters, barrel racers, bull doggers and ropers all competing in various events. The entertainment lineup includes Easton Corbin, Little Big Town, Marty Stuart, the Bellamy Brothers, Josh Turner, Rodney Atkins and Craig Morgan. $15 and up, free livestock shows; call 601961-4000.

is the guest speaker. Drs. Kenneth Barraza and Grace Shumaker provide updates on early detection and treatment. Registration is required. $5 optional lunch; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262. New Vibrations Network Gathering Feb. 10, 6:308 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church (4866 N. State St.). The mixer is held every second Thursday. Bring business cards and brochures to share with others. E-mail newvibrations2003@hotmail.com.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black History: Road to the Voteâ&#x20AC;? through Feb. 24, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). This program offered to school groups provides a glimpse of African American history in Mississippi and the struggle for voting rights. Sessions are at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Reservations are required. Free; call 601-576-6920.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Right Way to Start a Nonprofitâ&#x20AC;? Workshop Feb. 11-12, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (921 N. President St., Suite C). Learn how to get state and federal approval, the requirements for registering, completing the IRS application and how to legally solicit funds. Paperwork for establishing the nonprofit organization will also be completed. $249; call 601-968-0061.

Mississippi Urban Forest Council Conference Feb. 9-10, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sustainable Choices for Today, Planting for Tomorrow.â&#x20AC;? The keynote speaker is conservation planner Randall Arendt. Seating is limited; registration required. $25 and up, $15 students; call 601-672-0755.

Homebuyers Workshop Feb. 12, 9 a.m., at Medgar Evers Library (4215 Medgar Evers Blvd.). Mississippi Home of Your Own is the sponsor. HOYO empowers people with disabilities to become homeowners through grants and support systems. Residents with and without disabilities in Hinds and surrounding counties are invited to attend. Free; call 601-432-6876 or 866-883-4474.

Events at Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). Call 601-9828264. â&#x20AC;˘ Women in Sports Day Feb. 9, 10 a.m. School groups will be tested for flexibility, body mass index, endurance and strength and will participate in aerobics. Well-known female sports figures and others will speak on the positive influence and strong impact sports has played in their lives. â&#x20AC;˘ Black History Week Feb. 10, 10 a.m. School groups will hear from former professional athletes and coaches who have continued to make contributions in their community since their playing and coaching days. Among the speakers will be Walter Reed, W.C. Gorden, Eddie Payton, Leon Seals, Ben Williams and many more. Contact the museum for specifics.

Parent/Guardian Education Advocacy Training Feb. 12, 11 a.m., at Lumpkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BBQ (182 Raymond Road). Sessions are held the second Saturday of each month, and the topic varies. Lunch provided. Please RSVP. Free; call 877-892-2577. Mississippi Association of Coaches All-Star Soccer Games Feb. 12, 5 p.m., at Clinton High School (401 Arrow Drive, Clinton), at Arrow Field. The girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; game is at 5 p.m., and the boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; game is at 7 p.m. $5, free for MAC members and immediate family; call 601-924-3020. Leadership/Personal Development and Life Skills Seminar Series Feb. 15, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at Operation Shoestring (1711 Bailey Ave.). Operation Shoestring and Kuumba Promos host the seminars on first and third Tuesdays during the school year. The series is intended to introduce leadership and life management skills to local youth. Enrollment is required. Free; call 601-353-3663 or 601-957-2969.

Blood Pressure Checks for Seniors. The City of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Human and Cultural Services and the staff of St. Dominic Health Serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care-A-Van outreach program will be providing blood pressure checks and fall prevention information to qualifying individuals ages 55 or older living within the Jackson city limits. Free; call 601-960-0335. â&#x20AC;˘ Feb. 9, 10:30 a.m., at Golden Key Multi-purpose Senior Center (3450 Albermarle Road). â&#x20AC;˘ Feb. 10, 11 a.m., at Tougaloo Multi-Purpose Senior Citizens Center (318 Vine St.).

â&#x20AC;&#x153;So In Loveâ&#x20AC;? Contest through Feb. 28, at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Submit an entry form with the title or author of your favorite book and be entered into a prize drawing. For adults only. Call 601-932-2562.

FARMERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MARKETS Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market through Dec. 17, at Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.). Shop for fresh locally-grown fruits and vegetables from Mississippi farmers, specialty foods, and crafts from local artisans, including the Greater Belhaven Market. Open Saturdays from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. During the peak-growing season, hours are 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Call 601-354-6573.

Jackson 2000 Luncheon Feb. 9, 11:30 a.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Freedom Rider Hank Thomas is the guest speaker. Please RSVP. $12; e-mail bevelyn_branch@att.net. â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Is Lunchâ&#x20AC;? Feb. 9, noon, at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Freedom Rider Fred D. M. Clark Sr. of Jackson shares memories of his experiences. Bring lunch; coffee/water provided. Free; call 601-576-6850.

STAGE AND SCREEN

Drawing from Your Strengths: Fight Skin Cancer Feb. 10, 11:45 a.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.), at Baptist for Women. Political cartoonist and melanoma survivor Marshall Ramsey

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New Stage Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twelfth Nightâ&#x20AC;? through Feb. 16, at Jackson Academy Performing Arts Center (4908 Ridgewood Road). One of Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest comedies, the play ponders love lost and found. 7:30 p.m. nightly except for a 2 p.m. matinee Sunday. $15, $7 students; call 601-948-3533. Mississippi Improv Alliance Winter Wednesday Feb. 9, 7 p.m., at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). The series brings together various ensembles of musicians, dancers, visual artists and wordsmiths to participate in real-time creative improvisation actions. Free; call 601-497-7454. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheaper by the Dozenâ&#x20AC;? Feb. 9, 7:30 p.m., at Black Rose Community Theatre (103 Black St.,

More EVENTS, see page 32

Doctor S sez: That was an awesome weekend of English Premier League games, huh? That Super Bowl was pretty good, too, I guess. THURSDAY, FEB. 10 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college basketball, Alabama at Vanderbilt (8 p.m., ESPN): Two of the SECâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best collide in Music City. FRIDAY, FEB. 11 Movie, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forrest Gumpâ&#x20AC;? (9 p.m., TCM): A mentally challenged man plays football for Alabama, becomes a ping-pong star and runs across the country, among other things. SATURDAY, FEB. 12 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college basketball, Ole Miss at Alabama (3 p.m., Tuscaloosa, Ala., Ch. 12, 97.3 FM): Can the resurgent Rebels catch the Crimson Tide in the SEC West? â&#x20AC;Ś Mississippi State at Auburn (6 p.m., Auburn, Ala., Fox Sports South, 105.9 FM): The Bulldogs should beat the woeful Tigers easily. Be afraid, MSU fans, be very afraidâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and stay off of Twitter. SUNDAY, FEB. 13 NBA basketball, Miami at Boston (noon, Ch. 16): Now that the NFL season is over, we can turn our full attention to hoops. The Heat and Celtics meet in what could be a preview of the Eastern Conference finals. MONDAY, FEB. 14 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college basketball, Prairie View at Jackson State (8 p.m., Jackson, ESPNU, 620 AM): The Tigers are suddenly looking vulnerable. TUESDAY, FEB. 15 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college basketball, Mississippi State at Kentucky (8 p.m., Lexington, Ky., ESPN, 105.9 FM): The Bulldogs and Wildcats played a pair of great games last season. Neither side is as good this year, but State always plays well in Lexington. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 16 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college basketball, Auburn at Ole Miss (7 p.m., Ch. 12, 97.3 FM): Rebel fans: See warning with Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mississippi State game, above. The Slate is compiled by Doctor S, who is leading an effort to make Root Boy Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday a national holiday. Boogie till you puke over at JFP Sports on jacksonfreepress.com.

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Brandon). Lydie Vick directs the play about a large blended family. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Feb. 9-12 and 2 p.m. Feb. 13. $12, $10 seniors/students with ID, discounts on Sunday; call 601-825-1293.

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Sahara Zoo: A Collection of African Folk Tales Feb. 10-11, at Mississippi Schools For The Blind and Deaf (1252 Eastover Drive). The puppet show is a production of Puppet Arts Theatre and presented by the Mississippi Puppetry Guild. Shows are at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. $7, $5 groups of 10 or more; call 601-977-9840. Oxford Film Festival Feb. 10-13, at Malco Oxford Studio Cinema (1111 Jackson Ave. West, Oxford). The celebration of independent cinema includes showing films such as “25K,” “Smokes and Ears,” “Mississippi Innocence” and “The Hanging of Big Todd Wade.” A speed-pitch panel and an awards ceremony will also take place. $8-$30, $6.50-$25 students; call 877-560-3456. A Night of One Acts Feb. 11, 6:30 p.m., at Power Academic and Performing Arts Complex (1120 Riverside Drive). The Theater Arts Department will present the comedies “Final Dress Rehearsal” and “This is a Test!” $5, $3 students; call 601-960-5387. Events at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Visit msfilm.org. • Art House Cinema Downtown Feb. 11-12. Films include Oscar Shorts (Animated) and Oscar Shorts (Live Action). $9 per film; visit the website for show times. • Verdi’s “La Traviata” Feb. 13, 2 p.m. The film from La Scala is presented by the Mississippi Opera and the Mississippi Film Institute. $16.

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10-Minute Play Festival Feb. 11-12, 7:30 p.m.at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Students and alumni will direct each play. $5; call 601-974-1422. Dance Ministry Ensemble Concert Feb. 11-12, at Belhaven University, Bitsy Irby Visual Arts and Dance Center (1500 Peachtree St.). The dance presentation is aimed to bring inspiration and encouragement to the soul. Doors open at 7 p.m.; performance begins at 7:30 p.m. both nights. Free for children and Belhaven faculty/staff/students. $10, $5 seniors/students; call 601-965-7044. February Fright Fest (F3) Feb. 11-12, at The Commons at Eudora Welty’s Birthplace (719 N. Congress St.). A celebration of the horror genre in the arts. Feb. 11, 9 p.m. MissHippy’s Black Hearts Ball, attendees dress in Gothic costumes and enjoy all that is dark and creepy. A prize goes to the best devilish pin-up look. Artists welcome to sell creepy artwork. Feb. 12, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., meet horror artists and authors, and enjoy Q&A discussion panels. Independent horror films show until 11:30 p.m. $5 Feb. 11, free Feb. 12; call 601-397-6292. “Convicted of Love” Dinner Theater. Mississippi Murder Mystery presents a comedy about an exconvict who meets his pen pal by Alahna Stewart and Lauri Trott. The show includes a three-course dinner. Seating is limited; please RSVP. $38.50. • Feb. 12, 6:30 p.m., at Yogi on the Lake/Jellystone Campground (143 Campground Road, Pelahatchie). Call 601-613-8554. • Feb. 14, 6:30 p.m., at Petra Cafe (104 W. Leake St., Clinton). Call 601-925-0016. • Feb. 15, 6:30 p.m., at Rossini Cucina Italiana, W. Jackson St. (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Call 601-856-9696. “Live, Love, Laugh ... Die” Dinner Theater. The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents a play about murder during an internet dating meet-up at a lake house. The meal includes a salad, an entree and dessert. Please RSVP. $39; call 601-937-1752. • Feb. 13, 6:30 p.m., at Giovanni’s Pizza (640 Grants Ferry Road, Brandon). • Feb. 14, 6:30 p.m., at Kismet’s Restaurant (315 Crossgates Blvd., Suite G, Brandon).

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“Mamma Mia!” Feb. 15-16, 7:30 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). Writer Catherine

Johnson’s sunny, funny tale unfolds on a Greek island paradise. On the eve of her wedding, a daughter’s quest to discover the identity of her father brings three men from her mother’s past back to the island they last visited twenty years ago. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster. $27.35-$70.95; call 601-981-1847 or 800-745-3000.

MUSIC Jackson Public School All-City Honors Band Feb. 10, 7 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts Concert Hall (835 Riverside Drive). JPS’ middle school and high school instrumentalists will perform. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Free; call 601-965-7044. Way of Blues Revue Feb. 12, 9 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 South President Street). The performance features three legendary Mississippi guitarists—King Edward, Mickey Rogers and Bill “Howl-N-Madd” Perry—along with Dr. Alphonso Sanders on horn and Rick Lewis on drums. $15 in advance, $20 at the door; call 601613-7377 or 662-347-2869. Quattro Mani Feb. 15, 7 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Alice Rybak and Susan Grace, members of the piano duo, will perform contemporary music. The program is part of the Millsaps Arts and Lecture Series. $10; call 601-974-1130. Chris Austin Songwriting Contest. The contest recognizes winners in four categories—country, bluegrass, gospel/inspirational and general. To be eligible to enter, a songwriter must not derive more than 50 percent of his or her total income from songwriting or music publishing. All entries must be received by Feb. 18. Twelve finalists will be announced during the first week of April and will compete at MerleFest in Wilkesboro, N.C. $30 entry fee; call 800-799-3838 or 336-838-6158.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Break the Binding Book Club Feb. 10, 5 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). The club for teens age 12 and up meet once a month to discuss a specified book. This month’s book is “The Maze Runner” by James Dashner. Refreshments provided. Call 601-932-2562. The Luckless Age Feb. 10, 5 p.m., at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.). Steve Kistulentz signs copies of his book; reading at 5:30 p.m. $16.95 book; call 601-366-7619.

CREATIVE CLASSES Events at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Call 601-898-8345. • Basic Knife Skills Feb. 9, 9 a.m. Learn the proper chef knife techniques for chopping, mincing, slicing, dicing, julienning and cutting into chiffonade. $49. • Premium Wine Tasting and Reception Feb. 10, 6:30 p.m. Meet Randy Lewis of Lewis Cellars and sample five of his premium wines, including Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon. A wine and cheese reception will follow at The Viking Store next door. $75. • Kids’ Heart-Fluttering Valentine’s Treats Feb. 13, 1 p.m. For children ages 7-12, students will learn to crack eggs, sift flour, melt chocolate and decorate. Recipes include chocolate-dipped strawberries and sugar cookies. $49. • Classic Steakhouse Feb. 15, 6 p.m. Learn to create classic steakhouse recipes with a contemporary twist. Techniques includes working with fresh crab meat, pan-searing and roasting filet mignon, making a classic French sauce, stuffing potatoes, roasting vegetables and flambéing a dessert. $99. How Not to Be a Starving Artist, Part 2 Feb. 12, 9 a.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.).

This workshop will help artists create and implement a business plan. $40, $10 materials fee; call 601-974-1130. Jewelry Making Class ongoing, at Dream Beads (605 Duling Ave.). This class is offered every Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon. Free; call 601-664-0411.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS “Canvas and Clay No. 2” Feb. 10-March 3, at The Cedars Historic Home (4145 Old Canton Road.). The group show features works by painters Ginny Futvoye and Carol Sneed, and ceramics from Wolfe Studios. The show hangs through March 3. Exhibit hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Opening reception Feb. 10 from 5–8 p.m. The exhibit is part of the Four Seasons of the Cedars Performing and Visual Arts Series. Free; call 601-981-9606. “I Love My Pet” Contest through Feb. 13, at Fondren Art Gallery (601 Duling Ave.). Bring a headshot of your pet to the gallery. A drawing will be held Feb. 13, and the winner will receive a free portrait of their photo painted by Richard McKey. Free; call 601-981-9222. Mississippi Celebrates Architecture Photography Contest. The Mississippi chapter of the American Institute of Architects Mississippi Chapter is calling for photographic submissions for an upcoming exhibition highlighting Mississippi’s modern architecture. The competition is open to amateur and professional photographers, with a special portion of the exhibit reserved for student photographers through the 12th grade. The submission deadline is Feb. 15. Selected prints will be exhibited at the Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.) March 31April 30. E-mail john@ccdarchitects.com. “Walking the Path: The Evolution of Diane Williams” Feb. 14-May 14, at Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center (528 Bloom St.). The exhibit is composed of approximately 30 pieces that show the evolution and journey of African American life. Hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-1p.m. Saturdays. The exhibit is on display through May 14. Opening reception is Feb. 18 at 6 p.m. $4.50, $3 seniors, $1.50 children under 18; call 601-960-1457. Craft Exhibit through Feb. 28, at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). See creations by Sharon Williams. Free admission; call 601856-7546. Nudes and Figurative Works through Feb. 28, at Fischer Galleries (3100 N. State St., Suite 101). Works from artists such as Paul Fayard, Susan Russell, Robert Crowell, Ron Lindsey, Stacey Johnson, Bebe Wolfe, Ellen Rodgers and James Patterson is on display. Free; call 601-291-9115. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, e-mail all details (phone number, start/end date and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE Community Blood Drives. The MBS Donor Coach will be in the parking lot. Donors must be at least 17 (16 with signed parental consent), weigh at least 110 pounds and have valid ID. All donors will receive a T-shirt and be registered for a chance to win a 2011 Ford Fiesta. Donations welcome; call 800-817-7449. • Feb. 9, 9 a.m., at Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (515 E. Amite St.). • Feb. 13, 9 a.m., at Cade Chapel M.B. Church (1000 W. Ridgeway St.).


COURTESY KRISTI FLAKE

by Jesse Crow

Tugging the Harp Strings

M

usic is an undeniable part of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culture, so much so that the state brands itself the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Birthplace of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music.â&#x20AC;? Mississippi transplant Kristi Flake wants to add another element to the Magnolia Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich musical heritage: the harp. When Flake, 31, moved to Jackson last August to attend Wesley Biblical Seminary, she became the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only active professional harpist. Mandy Mangrum, who is also based in Jackson, has recently joined her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was really fun to come to an area and fill the need of a harpist,â&#x20AC;? Flake says. The harp is the oldest stringed instrument, and most cultures have some variation of it. The modern concert grand harp has 47 strings and seven foot pedals, and harpists play the instrument with both hands and both feet. Music played on the harp has a different feeling than music played on other instruments, with its light, whimsical and airy sound. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize how versatile the harp is,â&#x20AC;? Flake says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People so often hear it at the symphony or ballet and just hear the same type of music. You can play any style. I love playing jazz and blues.â&#x20AC;? Born and reared in Dallas, Texas, Flake started her musical endeavors on the piano at age 8. Even then, Flake knew she wanted

to continue cultivating her musical knowledge and decided she wanted to learn at least one other instrument. Thanks to a school system with a strong arts program, Flake began to play the harp in the fifth grade when she was 11. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was fascinated by it. I knew I wanted to play, and fortunately, I have a very supportive family,â&#x20AC;? she says, laughing. Flake started her professional harpist career in high school. Her childhood piano teacher was also a church organist, and Flake played weddings in the Dallas area with her. In 1997, Flake received a music scholarship to study with renowned harpist Gail Barber at Texas Tech University. Although Flake ended up majoring in history, she studied with Barber throughout her collegiate career and played both professionally and in the Texas Tech ensemble. Flake is well versed in many different genres of music, including classical, swing, jazz and Celtic. She never thought she would make a career of playing the harp and considers herself lucky to be able to do so. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think if you have musical talent, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to express it some way or another, whether you make a living doing it or not,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m fortunate to be able to do this professionally and earn money

Harpist Kristi Flake plays not only the music one might expectâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;classicalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on her large, 47-string instrument, but she plays a little jazz and blues, too.

doing something I enjoy and I love.â&#x20AC;? Flakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite part of being a professional harpist is the reactions she gets at eventsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whether it is words of encouragement or thanks, or being able to play along

with jazz pieces at more informal events. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You get blisters on your fingers; you get tired,â&#x20AC;? Flake says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But when you get that feedback, it encourages you to keep playing.â&#x20AC;?

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friday

FEBRUARY 18

THE VIDRINES WITH WOODEN FINGER FREE WiFi Open Mon-Sat, Kitchen open Mon-Fri 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

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THURSDAY - FEBRUARY 10 LADIES NIGHT: DRINK FREE 9-11PM FRIDAY - FEBRUARY 11

GHOST TOWN

Wednesday, February 9th

NAT SMITH, JIMMY JARRATT & DMAR (Jazz) 8-11, No Cover

Thursday, February 10th SATURDAY - FEBRUARY 12

HILLBILLY DELUXE SUNDAY - FEBRUARY 13 8 BALL TOURNAMENT MONDAY - FEBRUARY 14

BAR OPEN

TUESDAY - FEBRUARY 15

POOL LEAGUE NIGHT WEDNESDAY - FEBRUARY 16 MIKE MOTT KARAOKE 2636 S. Gallatin Jackson, MS 39204

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

ALLISON JENKINS & SWING STATION

(Gypsy Jazz) 8-11, No Cover Friday, February 11th

THE FEARLESS FOUR (Funk) 9-1 $10 Cover

Saturday, February 12th

WAY OF BLUES REVUE

$15 in advance, $20 at door Wednesday, February 16th

THE DILLONAIRES

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover Thursday, February 17th

SCOTT ALBERT JOHNSON (Blues) 8-11, No Cover

Sherman LEE DILLON and

HIS MISSISSIPPI SOUND

Friday, February 18th

MEMPHIS BLUZ

(Blues) 9-1 $10 Cover

Fri, Feb 11th & Sat, Feb 12th cover $5, $10 after Midnight

PAT BROWN & THE MILLENIUM FriDAY, FebRUARY 18th @ 10PM cover $5, $10 after Midnight

Saturday, February 12th

WAY OF BLUES REVUE

$15 in advance, $20 at door

JASON BAILEY W/ HOLLYWOOD SaturDAY, FebRUARY 19th @ 10PM cover $5, $10 after Midnight

Friday, February 25th

PINETOP PERKINS & WILLIE “BIG EYE“ SMITH $20 in advance, $25 at door

SERVING LUNCH MON - FRI, 11AM - 2PM OPEN LATE - SECURITY PROVIDED

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

venuelist

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by Lisa LaFontaine Bynum

6 to 8 small red potatoes, washed, quartered 1/2 to 3/4 cup warm milk 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

LISA LAFONTAINE BYNUM

Hungry for Love BISTRO ROAST BEEF WITH RED WINE PAN SAUCE

I

f your family is like mine, the economy has caused you to tighten your purse strings. Add a new baby to the mix, and well, going out on Valentine’s Day just isn’t in the cards. That doesn’t mean you are doomed to spend an unromantic evening with your significant other eating frozen pizza and watching reality TV. An elegant, restaurant-quality meal prepared at home doesn’t have to break the bank. Bistro roast beef stemmed from a craving for thinly sliced roast beef when I couldn’t afford pricey beef tenderloin. I was unsure what I would end up with by preparing my pot roast this way: Would I get a chewy cut of meat that would be hard to swallow? The secret is cutting the meat across the grain. But what does that mean? Take a good look at your meat. You will notice long lines, called fibers, running along its length. Distinct fibers usually mean a tougher cut of meat and, therefore, harder to chew. Try and tear a single muscle fiber by stretching it along its length, and you’ll have a difficult time. However, if you slice your meat on the opposite grain, or across those lines rather than in the same direction, the meat is much more tender. Pulling individual muscle fibers apart is relatively easy. The red-wine pan sauce has a luxurious flavor and adds a nice touch to the meat. (If you don’t have red wine, deglaze the pan with beef stock instead.) Throw in some low music and a few strategically placed candles, and you’ve got yourself a romantic dinner without having to worry about reservations, crowds or whether you left a big enough tip. What’s important is spending quality time with the one you care about.

GARLIC MASHED POTATOES

2 tablespoons olive oil 3 to 4 pounds English roast (or roast of your choice) Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup red wine 1 tablespoon butter

Heat olive oil in a large skillet or sauté pan with a metal handle over medium heat. Season both sides of meat with kosher salt and black pepper. Gently pat salt and pepper into the meat. Brown roast in hot oil, about five minutes per side (or until meat no longer sticks to the bottom of the pan). Place meat under broiler, about five inches below element. Leave oven door slightly ajar to prevent overcooking. Cook until an instant-read thermometer reads 120 degrees for medium rare, about 20 minutes. Remove meat from pan and allow it to rest for 15 minutes. In the meantime, deglaze skillet with red wine, scraping any browned bits off the bottom. Add butter and stir to melt. Slice roast against the grain. Serve drizzled with pan sauce. Serves four.

RED VELVET TRIFLE

1 package red velvet cake mix 2 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened to room temperature 2 cups granulated sugar 3 tablespoons lemon juice, or juice of one lemon 1 tablespoon lemon zest 1 8-ounce container frozen whipped topping, thawed 1 pint raspberries (if using frozen, thaw before using)

Prepare cake mix according to package directions in a 10-1/2 by 15-1/2 by 1-inch sheet plan. Let cool completely.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add potatoes. Cook until tender, about 15 to 20 minutes. Drain potatoes. Return to pot. Over low heat, add milk, butter, salt and garlic powder. Combine ingredients and mash using a potato ricer. Serves four.

Love Drinks

by Sahil Grewal

ME FOR U

4 ounces fresh coconut water 1/2 ounce of Midori (melon-flavored liqueur) 1-1/2 ounces vodka Splash of fresh lime juice Melon slices (for garnish)

Fill a tall glass with ice and add the coconut water, Midori and lime juice. Top it off with vodka. Garnish with melon slices.

SAUTÉED GREEN BEANS 1 pound fresh green beans, trimmed 1 tablespoon chopped onion 4 cloves garlic, pressed 6 thin ginger slices 3 tablespoons sesame oil 1 tablespoon sugar 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1/4 cup water

Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil. Add beans to boiling water, reduce heat to medium, and cook for three minutes. Drain beans and immediately plunge into a bowl of ice water. Drain. In a large sauté pan over medium heat, sauté scallions, garlic and ginger in hot oil for one minute. Add sugar and soy sauce. Stir continuously until sugar has dissolved. Add beans and water. Reduce heat and stir-fry for three minutes until beans are crisp-tender and well coated with the sauce. Serves four.

In the meantime, combine cream cheese, sugar, lemon juice and lemon zest on medium speed with an electric mixer until smooth. Gently fold in whipped topping. Invert cooled cake onto a cutting board. Trim and discard edges. Cut sheet cake into bite-sized squares. In a trifle bowl or large glass bowl, layer a third of the cake squares. Spread one third of the cream-cheese mixture over the cake squares. Repeat layers, spreading the last of the cream cheese mixture over the top. Top with raspberries. Serves eight to 10.

LOVE BUBBLES

1/2 ounce vodka 1/2 ounce tequila 1 to 2 teaspoons caster sugar (superfine sugar) 5 to 6 lemon wedges 5 to 6 fresh mint leaves A bottle of sparkling wine

Add lemon wedges, mint leaves, sugar, vodka and tequila to a bar shaker. Muddle (mash with a spoon or muddler) all ingredients gently to bring out the flavor and smell of the mint. Add ice cube and shake. Strain into a chilled martini glass. Top with sparkling wine and garnish with a fresh mint spring.

CU

1/2 ounce Sambuca (Italian aniseflavored liqueur) 1/2 ounce Galliano 1/2 ounce crème de cacao 1 scoop vanilla ice cream 2 teaspoons fresh pomegranate juice

Add the Sambuca, Galliano, crème de cacao and vanilla ice cream to tall shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a tall glass. Top with fresh pomegranate juice. Garnish with fresh whipped cream. *A splash or dash equals 4 to 5 drops.

jacksonfreepress.com

dining

37


Feb 4 - Larry Brewer 5A44 FX5X

Ladies Night

is Thursday Night Feb 10 - Shawn Patterson Free Apple Martini or Cosmo

NOW Serving Wings!

Feb 11 - Emma Wynter

Hot | Teriyaki | House Blend Many More... 4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-12AM, Sunday 11AM-5PM

Live Music

No cover.

Thurs. 2/10 - Shawn Patterson Friday 2/11 - Emma Wynters Saturday 2/12 - Karaoke

6720 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland | 601.812.6862 601.812.6862

Eslava’s Grille Seafood, Steaks and Pasta

with special guest

Smell of Diesel Feb. 12 | 9:00pm | $5.00 Cover Danilo Eslava Caceres, Executive Chef/GM 601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

Open on

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

Kebobs • Kurries • Naan

VALENTINE’S

DAY

A Metro-Area Tradition Since 1977 Lunch: Fri. & Sun. | 11am-2pm Dinner: Tues. -Sat. | 5pm-9pm

February 9 - 15, 2011

38

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BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution featuring a full breakfast, blue-plate specials, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys and wraps. Save room for something from their famous bakery! For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events. Beagle Bagel (4500 I-55 North, Suite 145, Highland Village 769-251-1892) Fresh bagels in tons of different styles with a variety of toppings including cream cheese, lox, eggs, cheese, meats and or as full sandwiches for lunch. Paninis, wraps and much more! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) Pizzas of all kinds, munchies, calzones, grilled hoagies, salads and more make up the extensive and “eclectic” menu at Mellow Mushroom. Award-winning beer selection. The Pizza Shack (1220 N State St. 601-352-2001) 2009 and 2010’s winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. Creative pizza options abound along with sandwiches, wings, salads and even BBQ. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the local favorite: fried ravioli. Best Chef, Best Dessert, Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2010 Best of Jackson.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes. Now with liquor license! Fratesi’s (910 Lake Harbour, Ridgeland, 601-956-2929) “Authentic, homey, unpretentious” that’s how the regulars describe Fratesi’s, a staple in Jackson for years, offering great Italian favorites with loving care. The tiramisu is a must-have!

BARBEQUE

LUNCH BUFFET $7.99 -All You Can Eat-

Authentic Indian Cuisine

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

OPEN MON-SAT Located at 3716 I-55 N Jackson, MS in the old Last Call location

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

a Th

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer high-end Arabica beans, a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Wired Espresso Café (115 N State St 601-500-7800) This downtown coffeehouse is a true gathering place, featuring great coffee and a selection of breakfast, lunch and pastry items. Wi-fi.

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork sandwiches along with burgers and po’boys. Lumpkins BBQ (182 Raymond Rd. Jackson 866-906-0942) Specializing in smoked barbeque, Lumpkin’s offers all your favorites for on-site family dining or for catered events, including reunions, office events, annivesaries, weddings and more.

601-919-2829

u! o k Y2003 •

Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

PIZZA

Rodney & Gerald Moore

2481 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS 39232

%*/&+BDLTPO

601-487-8370

n” 1 g us ks o t i n n Ja c • 201 o V i r 0 o e 1 F ecu • 20 b Ba r 2009 t s • “ Be 2008 6• 200

Best Butts In Town!

since 1980

601-956-7079

1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson

Brady’s Bar and Grill (6720 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-812-6862) Everything you’d expect from a bar and grill, from classic pub fare to their Krispy Sweet Pepper Chicken. Burgers, seafood baskets, salads, steaks and lunch specials. And, ladies get one free Apple Martini or Cosmo during Brady’s Thursday Ladies Night! Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and tons more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) A Best of Jackson fixture, Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Stamps Superburgers (1801 Dalton Street 601-352-4555) Huge burgers will keep you full until the next day! The homestyle fries are always fresh. Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Last Call (3716 I-55 N. Frontage Road 601-713-2700) Burgers, sandwiches and po-boys, plus sports-bar appetizers and specialities. Pay-per-view sporting events, live bands. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of poboys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection and live music most nights. Time Out Sports Café (6720 Old Canton Road 601-978-1839) 14 TVs, 1 projector and two big-screens. Daily $9 lunch specials, pub-style appetizers, burgers, seafood and catfish po-boys, salads, and hot entrees including fish, steak and pasta.


Paid advertising section.

That’s Amoré. 2003-2011, Best of Jackson

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Open 11am-2pm, Sunday thru Friday

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland | 601-956-2929 Monday - Saturday | 5 - until

ASIAN

Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stirfrys using fresh ingredients and great sauces.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar complete with multiple televisions for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Danny Eslava’s namesake feature Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino. Parker House (104 South East Madison Drive, Ridgeland 601-856-0043) European and Creole take on traditional Southern ingredients. Crawfish, oysters, crab and steaks dominate, with creative option like Crab Mac ‘n Cheese, Oysters Rockefeller and Duck Jezebel.

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The Strawberry Café (107 Depot Drive, Madison, 601-856-3822) Full service, lunch and dinner. Crab and crawfish appetizers, salads, fresh seafood, pastas, “surf and turf” and more. Veggie options. Desserts: cheesecake, Madison Mud and strawberry shortcake. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) 2010 Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a sumptious buffet of your choice of veggies, a salad bar, iced tea & one of three homemade desserts. Lunch only. Mon-Friday, Sun. Sugar’s Place (168 W Griffith St 601-352-2364) Hot breakfast and week-day lunch: catfish, pantrout, fried chicken wings, blue plates, red beans & rice, pork chops, chicken & dumplings, burgers, po-boys...does your grandma cook like this? Located downtown near MC Law School.

Thanks For Voting Us BEST FRENCH FRIES IN JACKSON!

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SOUTHERN CUISINE

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Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7pm Monday through Friday. Poets Two (1855 Lakeland Drive, Suite H-10, 601-364-9411) Pub fare at its finest. Crabcake minis, fried dills, wings, poppers, ultimate fries, sandwiches, po-boys, pasta entrees and steak. The signature burgers come in bison, kobe, beef or turkey! Sportsman’s Lodge (1120 E Northside Dr. in Maywood Mart 601-366-5441) Voted Best Sports Bar in 2010, Sportman’s doesn’t disappoint with plenty of gut-pleasing sandwiches, fried seafood baskets, sandwiches and specialty appetizers. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Jumbo lump crabcakes, crab quesadillas, beef tenderloin parfaits, orange-garlic shrimp, even “lollipop” lamb chops. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing wings in a choice of nine flavors, Wingstop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order; check out the fresh cut seasoned fries!

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High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant.

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jacksonfreepress.com

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or for long evenings with friends. Kristos (971 Madison Ave @ Hwy 51, Madison, 601-605-2266) Home of the famous Greek meatball! Hummus, falafel, dolmas, pita sandwiches, salads, plus seasoned curly fries (or sweet potato fries) and amazing desserts. Mezza (1896 Main St., Suite A, Madison 601-853-0876) Mediterranean cuisine and wood fired brick oven pizzas. Come experience the beautiful patio, Hookahs, and delicious food. Beer is offered and you are welcome to bring your own wine. Vasilios (828 Hwy 51 in Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic Greek dining featuring fresh seafood daily along with gyros, greek salads, appetizers and signature Mediterranean desserts. Their redfish is a standout, earning rave reviews.

39


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Happy and Healthy


by Brandi Herrera

read more Body&Soul stories and the blog at jacksonfreepress.com

Love Thyself from too much caffeine, which is dehydrating and inhibits deep sleep. But if you must, try a low-caffeine green tea instead of coffee. Lunch and dinner should be equally clean and calming foods: grilled fish, steamed vegetables with brown rice, or a savory bowl of miso soup. Keep sodium to a minimum, and avoid foods with refined sugars and saturated fats. Mindful Movement Contemplative activities, which also gently raise your heart rate, are a good way to reconnect with your sense of self. Try taking a walk in the woods, or through a nearby park. Mentally take note of the natural wonders you encounter and feel gratitude for—one of spring’s first robins, or the soft rays of sun on your face.

Welcome Tranquility Begin your morning, or end your day, with some healing and rejuvenating yoga poses. Be gentle with yourself—this isn’t the time to feel competitive or self-judgmental. Try a series of forward-bending poses, which are known to aid introspection and meditation: reclining bound-angle pose, half happy-baby pose, reclining head-to-big-toe pose and child’s pose.

Nap Happy Cuddle up in a comfy spot, and take a short nap. Can’t sleep? Get cozy with a warm blanket, a cup of tea, and read a few chapters in a new book, or old favorite. Or, sit down with a journal and record your most positive thoughts from the morning. Make sure to address the things you feel most proud of, and acknowledge the people and things you’re grateful for.

FILE PHOTO

alentine’s Day was originally conceived as a way to express gratitude for our beloved companions with small tokens of affection—so it’s also completely appropriate to reserve the day to take care of, and show love for, the most important person in your life: you. What better way to honor thy self than with a DIY at-home spa retreat filled with rest, contemplation, indulgent spa treatments and heart-centered activities? Try to take a full weekend before or after the holiday to pamper yourself, but if schedules and other commitments make that impossible, you can work any number of the following treatments and activities into a quiet weekend afternoon, or peaceful weekday evening. The most important thing to remember: Let go a little bit, and unwind fully.

Detoxify Rid your body of harmful toxins by starting your day with a seasonal fruit smoothie or fresh-squeezed orange juice. Herbal teas made with chamomile, peppermint and ginger are also healthy (and warming!) alternatives. Try to stay away

Jesse Gallagher Sarah J Griff Howard Lori Carpenter Scroggins Ginger Rankin Brock Freeman

Heart Chakra Mood Mist

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se one drop each of the following essential oils to stimulate the center of the chakra system where love, compassion

Now a Paul Mitchell signature salon.

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hat would an at-home retreat be without a little DIY pampering? We recommend this menu of sweet spa treatments to round out your weekend of Valentine’s bliss. Some of the recipes listed require essential oil “infusion” time, so be sure to plan enough time for their preparation. Citrus-Sugar Body Scrub Infusion Time: 1 week 1-1/2 cups raw sugar 1/2 cup coarsely ground organic whole oats 2 tablespoons crystallized ginger, finely chopped Zest of 1 small orange and 1 small lemon 45 drops lemon essential oil 2 tablespoons warmed honey 1/2 cup sweet almond oil

Flowering Facial Steam 1/3 cup dried lavender blossoms 1/3 cup dried calendula blossoms 4 to 5 drops geranium essential oil

In a large bowl: Combine sugar, oats, ginger and the zests. Place half the mixture in a large jar. Add lemon essential oil, then the remaining mixture. Cap, shake well, and allow mixture to infuse for one week, shaking occasionally. For the scrub: Combine honey and sweet almond oil in a measuring cup. Drizzle the mixture into the sugar and oats. If it’s too grainy, add more oil. If it’s runny, add more sugar. Apply the scrub to wet skin, starting at the feet and working up. Use a circular motion toward your heart. Since scrubbing and heat can increase the absorption of essential oils, use warm, but not hot, water.

Add dried lavender and calendula (plus any additional herbs of your choice) to a large French press. Pour two cups of boiling water over herbs and steep for 10 minutes. When steeped, fill a clean bathroom sink halfway with very hot water. Pull up a chair that will allow you to hang your head over the basin, about 6 to 8 inches from the water. Press or strain the herbs, then add the herbal infusion to the water. Add geranium essential oil. Drape a large towel over your head and shoulders, and steam your face and neck for three to five minutes. If the water cools, add hot water as needed to produce more steam. After steaming, splash your face and neck with lukewarm water and pat dry with a clean towel. A post-steam facial massage helps keep skin moist and soft: Apply a few drops of a light oil (such as avocado or apricot kernel) to your fingers, then gently massage your forehead, cheeks, chin and neck using small, inward circles.

and spirituality are united: Rosewood, Patchouli, Geranium, Petitgrain, Orange and Ylang Ylang Complete. Fill a clean, dry, mini spray bottle with four ounces of distilled water. Use a

dropper to add the essential oils directly into the bottle. Tightly close the bottle, and shake vigorously. Spray the air around you, mist hair and skin, or spritz on linens.

jacksonfreepress.com

V

Tasty [Treat]ments

41


MEREDITH NORWOOD

Jake Sessums, manager of Julep, furrows a brow and twists his growing mustache for the cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and for Stewpot.

Phingaprint providing the soundtrack, the party combined all my favorite things under one cool-looking, industrial space. Since the party was Sunday night, I stayed low-key the rest of the weekend. That didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do HH (thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happy hour in laymanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terms) Friday after work with some of my go-to folks at our usual spot, Parlor Market. I have plenty to say about that, but will save it. What I will say is if you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tried the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preprohibition cocktails, get yourself there and order a Corpse Reviver No. 2 immediately. So about the Best Of party, two things at the outset: First, any party that includes purple uplights that inspire at least two of my companions to reference a strip club gets a thumbs up from me for go-for-it-ness. Second, it was raining. I had a â&#x20AC;&#x153;do I or donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Iâ&#x20AC;? debate about wearing suede boots (I did). Weather is no excuse to slack on fashion, unless itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bad enough for Al Roker and the Weather Channel crew to roll into town. Before heading to the party, I watched some Screen Actors Guild red-carpet action. The ladies I loved at that event employed pops of color with their looks. The same held true for what caught my eye at the party. Basic black may feel safe, but I saw so much of it in the room I felt my seasonal affective disorder kick into overdrive. The one exception was the très chic JFP Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin, who shares my love of one-shouldered tops. She wore a perfectly draped black top and pants with sleek hair. The look was simple and modern but let her work the event comfortably. Other than that, Best Of night is a great time to boldly declare your signature style, as did one hot mama, Caroline Crawford, who always reminds me of a vintage pinup girl, with her dark hair and bright-red lips. She was a refreshing burst of vibrancy in a short satin royal-blue dress with black tights and a vintage-inspired cameo necklace that she made herself. Much like ladies in black, for the guys,

A diverse crowd of Jacksonians danced, ate and drank at the old Coca-Cola plant to celebrate the best the city has to offer. Kimberly Griffin (left) was tres chic in off-theshoulder black.

generic social-event attire of any old blazer just wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do for Best Of. One of my favorite renaissance men (designer, cocktail expert and musician Arthur Jones) combined style and practicality perfectly for the occasion, wearing a dapper fedora, turtleneck and a vintage brown jacket that appeared to be leather. He later told me it was â&#x20AC;Ś wait for it â&#x20AC;Ś vinyl: stylish and waterresistant. Smart fellow! The house held a number of hat-donning guys, and I give pretty much all of them a thumbs up. More hats, I say! (But not baseball caps. They are distinctly and importantly different.) On the opposite end of the vintage route is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a special event, so go all outâ&#x20AC;? approach to things. I support both approaches with equal enthusiasm. I give the chefs who ditched their white coat uniform in favor of blazers from Great Scott full approval. They get bonus points for pocket squares, too. Lastly, a word on a trend that was in full effect at the party and will continue for the remainder of the month: facial hair. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asking yourself, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Did I miss a memo? Is the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s porn-star look in for spring?â&#x20AC;? The answer, dear reader, is yes, and no. Good-hearted (and good-humored) gents across the metro are growing â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Staches

February 9 - 15, 2011

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for Stewpot. (Learn more at the Facebook page or stachesforstewpot.org.) Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a rivalry growing between the crews of Mint the Restaurant and Parlor Market. While my pledge is, as of yet, uncommitted, the PM crew is looking pretty solid at this point. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping to see a sweet handlebarstyle before the end of the month. So there you have it: my take on Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most recent red-carpet event. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll continue to take you along as I get out and about town. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never know if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m packing a camera, so dress to impress while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re out. Who knows, you may be next columnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best-dressed! MEREDITH NORWOOD

M

y entire life is pretty much a â&#x20AC;&#x153;staycation.â&#x20AC;? I live downtown, where thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always something happening nearby. I know a lot of really interesting people, and Jackson has a lot going on these days. I take full advantage of that. Add to that, I love clothes and use any excuse to dress up and go out. So Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m out and about a lot. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what leads me here, typing. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the deal: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to take you along as I navigate Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nightlife and fashion landscape. I hope youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn about some cool places and people, and I want to prompt you to get out and explore a bit yourself. This past weekend was one of the parties I anticipate all year: the Jackson Free Press Best of Jackson. Every year, the party always has a true mix of Jacksonians: young and old; public figures and the girl and guy next door; entrepreneurs and artists. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect place to people watch. With the usual bounty of food and drink, and DJ

MEREDITH NORWOOD

by Julie Skipper

The Best of Jackson

The always fashionable Caroline Crawford wore bold blue to the party, and let her husband, Ray, don the black.


BcT[[PFX[[H^d 1T<X]T. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a thing of beauty. Visit www.stellaartois.com for history of the brewery, history of Belgian beer, proper way to pour, a virtual tour and downloads. F IND U S O N F ACEBOOK

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Ask for this beer at stores & restaurants in Central Mississippi. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find these beers? Call 601-956-2224 for more information.

43


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v9n22 - JFP Love Issue: What's Love Got To Do With It?  

Valentine's Day 2011: What's Love Got To Do With It? Lonnie Edwards Fights Back Hitched: Aleen and Rudy Daghmach