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THE

RELEVANCETHE OF

OLD TESTAMENT HEAD, PP 16 - 17 HEAD, PP 16-17

CHILDREN OF FAITH KINNISON, P 18 FROM THE (BROOM) CLOSET STORMBENDER, P 22 BE HERE, NOW HERRERA, P 23

BANNING EARMARKS LYNCH, P 7

LET’S TALK ARENA,

JACKSON SCHAEFER, P 11

GIFT GUIDE

LOCAL, EDIBLES, SPIRITUAL JACOME, PP 42-44


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November 24 - 30, 2010


No ve m be r 24 - 30, 2010

jacksonian

VOL.

9 NO. 11

contents

“Barbaric” Prison Youth and civil-rights advocates take on a private facility for alleged inhumane conditions.

CLIPART; CHRISTINA CANNON; LACEY MCLAUGHLIN; NATALIE A. COLLIER AND SHAWANDA JACOME

JERT-RUTHA CRAWFORD

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Cover photograph of Sandra Richter by Christina Cannon

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THIS ISSUE:

Needs of the Heart .............. Editor’s Note

7

............................. Talk

14

...................... Editorial

14

........................ Stiggers

14

............................ Zuga

15

...................... Opinion

26

.................. Diversions

28

......................... 8 Days

31

.................. JFP Events

33

.......................... Music

34

........... Music Listings

36

............................. Slate

36

.......................... Books

37

............................ Astro

38

............................ Food

42

................................ Fly

Old Testament scholar Sandra Richter provides modern relevance to the ancient books of the Bible.

bruce wimberley Rev. Bruce Wimberley is a man with fierce, brown eyes. Despite his intense gaze, he exhibits a calm demeanor. His leather sandals reveal his casual nature and appreciation for comfort, while his age-chiseled face testifies to a life of service and sacrifice. When I first refer to Wimberley as “Reverend,” he quietly corrects me. “My name is Bruce,” the 71-year-old says with a laugh. Wimberley, who is the pastor at Vineyard Church in Flowood, insists on dealing with people as equals, and refuses to distance himself from others. The Amarillo, Texas, native decided at age 13 after attending a church camp, that he wanted to devote his life to ministry. He moved to Jackson in 1997 to work with a discipleship group and, in 1993, be became the pastor of Vineyard Church. While serving as pastor, Wimberley worked with church member Bill Dunham to establish a drug-and-alcohol rehabilitation center for men, called My Father’s House of Freedom. The center, located in Jackson, combines a 12-step program with Christian teachings to provide a structured program for men to face and overcome their addictions. In October, My Father’s House celebrated its 15th anniversary. “It changed my whole perspective on what was an addict when I began to deal with addicts,” he says. “Really, addiction is the symptom, it’s not the problem. There’s always a deep-seated hurt somewhere, and really you

have to deal with that heart problem, or all you have is a dried-out drunk.” At the center, Wimberley listens to the confessions of the men who are undergoing rehabilitation. “Generally, I’m their pastor. There’s something about repenting and getting your sins out in the open that remove their power over your life,” he says, pausing briefly to reflect. “It seems like we treasure bad things,” he says, as he touches his heart with both hands. “You know, we’re not going to let anybody know about these, we treasure them.” Wimberley says that helping men who have sought refuge in My Father’s House to rebuild their lives is a long and difficult process. Because most of these men are at the lowest stage of their life and often have nothing left, the center helps them find employment. Wimberley acknowledges that finding work has been difficult lately because of the down economy. “We’re having some difficulty now finding jobs,” he says. “Probably our greatest need now is for people who will hire the guys.” Wimberley’s baritone voice carries a touch of sadness for what he has witnessed, but his eyes shine with hope. “Jackson is important to me because that’s where God sent me. I think the reason that we were (all) sent here is to model the kingdom of God, and what it looks like,” he says. —Galen Orion

26 Flip My Hair A white chick learns what the Mississippi Hair Battle is all about: hair, fashion and creativity.

46 Hat Grandeur Church hats just might separate the women from the girls. Dare to deck out your head this Sunday.

jacksonfreepress.com

4

3


editor’snote

Tom Head Freelance writer Tom Head is a lifelong Jacksonian. He has authored or co-authored 24 nonfiction books, including the “Absolute Beginner’s Guide to the Bible” (2005), and is a grassroots progressive activist. He interviewed Sandra Richter.

Christina Cannon Christina Cannon is a Jackson native. Her studio, Photography by Christina, and gallery, One Blu Wall, are located in Fondren Corner. In her spare time she lingers downtown where she is a new resident. She photographed Sandra Richter.

Latasha Willis Events editor Latasha Willis is a native Jacksonian, a graduate of Tougaloo College and the proud mother of one cat. Her JFP blog is “The Bricks That Others Throw,” and she sells design pieces at zazzle.com/reasontolive.

ShaWanda Jacome Assistant to the editor ShaWanda Jacome is learning to pray without ceasing, trust completely in the Lord and to have hope and faith in His timing. She coordinated the gift guides and FLY.

Byron Wilkes Freelance writer Byron Wilkes enjoys swashbuckling his way through the Mississippi countryside. He graduated from Middle Tennessee State University in 2009 and currently works parttime at the Meridian Star. He wrote a book review.

Lacey McLaughlin News editor Lacey McLaughlin is a Florida native who enjoys riding her bike around Jackson. She is always on the hunt for news tips. E-mail Lacey@jacksonfreepress. com or call 601.362.6121 x. 22. She wrote a Talk.

Carl Gibson Fresh out of Kentucky, Carl Gibson is a recent college graduate. He enjoys playing drums on Farish Street, seeing local bands, buying local and riding his bike around the reservoir. He still has yet to perfect his southern drawl. He wrote a music CD review.

November 24 - 30, 2010

Kimberly Griffin

4

Advertising director Kimberly Griffin is a Jackson native who likes yoga, supporting locally owned businesses and traveling. In her spare time she plots how she can become Michelle Obama’s water holder.

by Ronni Mott, Managing Editor

An Ache in Our Souls

A

few years ago, I made what was, for me, a radical step: joining the Unitarian Universalist Church of Jackson. For a minute or two, I was on the board and even sang in the choir. I expect that for most Jacksonians, joining a church isn’t radical, but rather as normal as breathing. For me, however, it was a leap. Just a couple years earlier, I had vowed never to set foot in a church again. In 1998, my father retired from teaching at 78, and my parents, lured by Mississippi’s low cost of living, decided to move to Jackson. Both lapsed Catholics—stories for another day—they had raised their daughters in the Lutheran church. But the last day we attended church as a family was the day I was confirmed at age 14, nearly 30 years earlier. When papa asked me to find a church for him in Jackson, I teased him that he was hedging his bets by going back to church at the end of his life, but it wasn’t long before he needed a chauffeur to Sunday services, and I happily obliged. For a while, I attended services with him, finding solace in the familiar Bible verses, liturgy and old hymns, which, as an adult, took on new, deeper meanings, often moving me to tears. But I never felt comfortable. I made my vow never to return when I heard the preacher saying that anyone not “saved” through an exclusive belief in Jesus Christ as the only Son of God was damned and going to hell. It’s a concept I could never wrap my head around, not at 14, not at 42, and still not today. God, whoever or whatever he or she or it might be, simply couldn’t be so vindictive as to condemn more than 5.5 billion people (and growing) to eternal damnation through a religion unrevealed to humanity for millions of years. It just doesn’t make sense to me. In 2006, I took an Internet test on a whim: “What religion are you?” Fully prepared for even this innocuous test to pass judgment on my lack of Christian faith, I was surprised when it revealed the answer: 74 percent Unitarian Universalist. “Well, well,” I thought, and immediately began my due diligence. I had never heard of Unitarians outside of “A Prairie Home Companion,” where Garrison Keillor often makes gentle fun of the sect and its preference for sheet cakes. What I found was a Christianbased denomination, which advocates tolerance for all faith traditions and a “free and responsible search for truth and meaning.” I began spending Sunday mornings at the little church on Northside Drive, politely making my beliefs known, and politely listening to others. The church made it a point to bring in speakers of diverse faiths, from Judaism to Buddhism to atheism and humanism, and its congregation didn’t refrain from taking stands on social-justice issues including a woman’s right to choose and the death penalty. For about a year, it was engaging and fun. Then, it began to feel a bit flabby. I wanted to debate theology, not to simply nod my head in polite acquiescence to viewpoints I didn’t

agree with. My questions felt more and more strident, and I grew frustrated with the UUs insistence on civility above all else. I felt like Barbra Streisand in “Yentl,” wanting desperately to know “the truth” but prevented from a rousing debate with other believers. About the same time, I began a yearlong yoga teacher-training course, and something had to give. What gave was my participation with the UUs. Yoga completely engaged me from my first class, and I saw that through its diligent practice, I would not only train my body, but also my mind. Studying the ancient philosophies and Hindu-based texts, my personal theology began to take shape. Reading the Sutras of Patanjali (150 BCE) and the Bhagavad Gita (fifth to second century BCE), I heard the poetry and delicious imagery reminiscent of the poetry of Sufi Muslims Hafez (14th century) and Rumi (13th century). I also heard echoes from the Bible’s Old Testament books of poetry, including the Psalms and the Song of Solomon, and Buddhism’s Noble Truths. What struck me with the most force was how these Hindu and yogic teachings, most of which pre-date Christianity, still have such relevance in the modern world. I love that in the Bhagavad Gita, Krishna says, in effect, that worshipping God in any manner is still worshipping God. Tantric yoga, the branch from which the specific form of my practice, Anusara (flowing with grace), springs, begins with the premise that all things are divine. “Everything in this world is an embodiment of Supreme Consciousness, which at its essence pulsates with goodness and the highest bliss,” Anusara founder John Friend writes. “All of creation is divinely danced into existence for the simple delight and the play of embodying

the Supreme’s own blissful nature.” Now this was a premise I could play with and explore, starting from a place where I personify the divine as much as you or anyone else in my sphere. We are all manifestations of the divine, made for its pleasure. The common greeting namaste embodies the premise that I recognize the divine in you, which also exists in me. But this is not an essay designed to change your beliefs, dear reader. What I have found is that going back to the ancient texts of any religion is a journey toward common human desires and beliefs. That premise was brought home to me again this week as I read through the stories submitted for this issue. As Old Testament scholar Sandra Richter points out in the cover story, the average person in Abraham’s day was concerned with many of the same issues the average person deals with today: the next meal, the rent, whether our children will turn out well and “the eternal ache” in our souls. Through knowledge of other religions, we can begin to see our common “eternal ache” for the spiritual aspects of life, becoming tolerant of other faith traditions. Study and understanding of those traditions may, like it did for me, offer a new, personal theology. But it may also strengthen your already closely held beliefs. Either way, it’s perfect. Understanding need not threaten. As it is stated in numerous sacred texts, ignorance is a root cause of suffering. Knowledge alleviates our suffering. I invite you to read the various pieces in this issue with an open mind and a generous spirit, regardless of your faith. You may find something that informs and surprises you. Blessed be. Namaste. Shalom. Assalamu alaikum. Amen.


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jacksonfreepress.com

Cleta Ellington, Patti Henson, Sara Jane Alston, Diane Jacobs

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Curing Hico’s Hiccups ADAM LYNCH

by Adam Lynch

The promise of Lake Hico remains out of reach as Entergy officials, the city of Jackson, Hinds County and local development enthusiasts await a business survey of the area.

L

ake Hico, in Jackson’s Ward 2, triggered a brief flare-up between Ward 2 Councilman Chokwe Lumumba and Council President Frank Bluntson at the Nov. 16 regular council meeting. Ward 3 Councilman Kenneth Stokes put a discussion item on the council agenda concerning the lake, which serves as a cooling pond for Entergy Mississippi’s nearby Rex Brown natural-gas power plant. Entergy officials say the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency closed the lake— which sits on 16th Section land—soon after the agency was formed due to a potential for high bacterial content, thanks to estimations of unnaturally warm water temperatures. In the

late 1960s, the Mississippi secretary of state’s office, which oversees 16th Section land, also recommended closing the lake to recreation because of potential insurance issues and lagging usage following the opening of the Ross Barnett Reservoir. “In 1970 the EPA was formed, and it considered if the body of water was safe for recreational use. An industrial cooling pond doesn’t fall under the EPA’s guidelines for good recreation use,” said Entergy Mississippi spokeswoman Mara Hartmann. “It has to do with—from what I understand for that body of water—it has to do with the level of bacteria that not necessarily is created, but that could be created under those conditions. The EPA

says it has a high probability of being bad.” Since the closing, however, City Council members—particularly those from Ward 2—have advocated reopening the lake to recreational use and using the promise of lakeside development to coax new tax revenue. Lumumba encourages the city to pressure various agencies to reopen the gated lake for use. Lumumba defended Stokes’ order authorizing the city of Jackson to, in his words, “get someone to open it.” “All this does is authorize someone to do it. It doesn’t say someone’s got to do it,” Lumumba said. “There are people in Ward 2 saying the council isn’t doing anything to get the lake open. That’s really not true, but it’s fair to put this resolution forward showing we are fully in support of it.” Other council members noted that the agenda item Lumumba referenced was an order, rather than a resolution, and were unclear on what kind of commitment supporting the order would mean for the city. Ward 6 Councilman Tony Yarber said he was confused as to whether the city had the authority to commit to any kind of order concerning 16th Section land, which are outside city jurisdiction. Bluntson, a council veteran now serving his second term, dismissed the need to discuss the issue, arguing that nothing was going to come of the discussion: “Councilman, we’ve been through this. We’ve had a man to work a year and a half on this. We don’t need to make HICO, see page 8

False Idols

Thursday, Nov. 18 Hong Kong reports its first case of bird flu in seven years. Health officials suspect the patient contracted the bird flu during a trip to mainland China. … MDOT Executive Director Larry Brown accepts a plea deal to take anger-management classes for a charge of public intoxication. Friday, Nov. 19 NATO officials announce a plan to begin removing troops from Afghanistan next July, and have all its troops out by 2014 at the latest. … Two Mississippi oilrig workers, James Robertson from Silver Creek and Jeffrey James from Winona, return home after being held hostage for a week in Nigeria. Saturday, Nov. 20 Pope Benedict XVI says condoms can be used in some cases to stop the spread of AIDS. This is the first exception the Vatican has made in its anti-contraceptive stance. … Mississippi State falls to the University of Arkansas, 38-31. … Jackson State defeats Alcorn State, 27-14. Sunday, Nov. 21 Russia and NATO agree to cooperate with missile defense—particularly in the construction of a missile defense shield throughout Europe and a new START treaty aimed at reducing nuclear weapons in Russia and the U.S.

In honor of the spirituality issue, the JFP staff has come up with a list of things, and people, folks tend to love a little too much—false idols, you might say. Do you see yourself on the list?

Apple Computers Inc. Guns Carbon neutrality Deficit erduction Economic development TIF bonds Consensus Tuesday lunch Sentences ht at make sense Trickle-down economics Em dashes Sandy Middleton Intelligent design Bill Minor Curtis Wilkie Hodding Carter Purity Boiled peanuts Industrial/military complex

Wednesday, Nov. 17 Alaskan re-elects incumbent Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski, who ran as a write-in candidate after tea partier Joe Miller defeated her in the primary. … The National Center on Family Homelessness releases a study on child homelessness in Mississippi. The study, based on data from the 2008-2009 school year, found more than 12,000 children in the state are homeless.

irrelevan t “What something costs is irrelevant. It’s relative to the wealth it creates.” —Jackson Downtown Partners President Ben Allen speaking last week about a proposed arena in Jackson.

Monday, Nov. 22 Deliberations begin in the trial of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay for money laundering. He allegedly funneled $190,000 of corporate donations through the RNC to Texas legislative elections in 2002. … Stewpot re-opens its day shelter, the Opportunity Center. . Tuesday, Nov. 23 South Korea goes into “crisis status” after North Korea fires at the South Korean island of Yeonpyeong. … The Jackson Police Department is investigating five officers caught on tape mistreating two owners of a convenience store, who they were arresting.

jacksonfreepress.com

news, culture & irreverence

Mississippi has the highest percentage of Protestant (nonCatholic, non-Morman) Christians in the United States: 81 percent, according to a 2009 Gallup poll.

Curnis Upkins, program manager at JSU’s Center for University-based Development, tours west Jackson. p. 9

7


talk

news, culture & irreverence

HICO, from page 7

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a long speech about this.” Lumumba accused Bluntson of debating from the chair, sparking a bitter denial from Bluntson and a vehement demand by the president to move on to the next topic. Before the debate tumbled into bickering, however, Lumumba brought up a valid argument. While the EPA makes clear to Entergy its concern over bacterial issues, the local fauna do not appear to have gotten the memo. For a lake inside the city limits of a heavily populated state capitol, it appears infused with bio-diversity, according to department statements and news reports. Hartmann said Entergy has surrounded the lake with a fence to discourage visitors, but admits that some of the more determined fishermen cut through the fence to take advantage of the lake’s untapped bounty. The fence appears equally ineffective at discouraging aquatic reptiles and rodents. Officials with the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks say they have had to drag alligators from the lake within the last 10 years. Furthermore, the city of Jackson had to contend in January with a flooding event on neighboring Northside Drive after a beaver obstructed a run-off drain from the lake. Hartmann said Entergy has joined a group effort to re-evaluate the lake for future opportunities. “We’re part of a working group that includes the city, Jackson Public Schools, (the Jackson Redevelopment Authority), the secretary of state’s office and the Hinds County

®

Economic Development District, and we’re doing a highest and best use land survey to figure out, for economic development purposes, what could be best used for the lake and the land around it,” Hartmann said. The group contracted JBHM Architects to conduct the land survey. JBHM Marketing Director Kiley Ham said JBHM is only weeks away from delivering the results of their survey to the group. “Part of this has been driven by what is already a natural business corridor on I220,” Ham said. “You’ve got Hawkins Field Industrial Park, you’ve got Echelon Business Park, the Northwest Industrial Park, and you’ve got this northwest Jackson area— with Lake Hico right in the middle—filled with people interested in the potential for their neighborhood.” Ham said JBHM is surveying development opportunities surrounding the 16th Section land as well as potential revenue generation directly from the property—although development directly on the lake would still have to be limited to EPA-mandated restrictions for a cooling pond. JBHM is not conducting bacteriological tests on the water, but is instead working within the assumed constraints of EPA restrictions. “I think everyone understands that the lake itself is still used as part of a cooling mechanism for the Rex Brown Facility, and there are EPA guidelines about what can and cannot occur on that property,” Ham said, adding that JBHM hoped to present its findings to the committee within “the next couple of weeks.” Comment at jfp.ms.

he board of trustees for Mississippi’s universities announced Nov. 22 that it had selected Carolyn W. Meyers to serves as the next president of Jackson State University. Meyers is the former president of another historically black institution, Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Va., and would the first female JSU president. During her four-year tenure at Norfolk State, the school’s freshmen enrollment increased 19 percent in one year. The university opened an honors college, additional degree programs, and a school of graduate and professional studies. Before coming to Norfolk State, Meyers served as a professor, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at North

Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in Greensboro, N.C. Meyers received her bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Howard University. She received her master’s degree in mechanical engineering and doctorate in chemical engineering from Georgia Tech. She took the Norfolk State job in 2006 and served until June 2010, when she resigned after four years of a five-year contract. In November 2009, she was a finalist for the president’s position at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Md. The Norfolk Virginian-Pilot reported that she submitted her resignation to Norfolk State that same month with the understanding that it would not be publicized until 2010. The Virginian-Pilot also reported that Meyers’ relationship with the university’s board had grown increasingly tense in the fall of 2009. An internal audit found that the university had granted admission to “a significant number” of under-qualified students, the paper reported. Meyers will visit JSU’s Student Center on Dec. 1 for listening sessions with various campus constituency groups. Immediately following those meetings, the state college board will convene a meeting for a final vote on Meyers’ appointment.


citytalk

by Lacey McLaughlin

Not a Ghost Town the property for the majority of the year once restoration is complete. The tour started at Koininia Coffee

Before

After

West Jackson resident deborah Rae Wright used a Federal Housing Administration loan to renovate her early 1900s home on Grand Avenue.

Jackson State University’s Center for University-Based Development Program Manager Curnis Upkins and Director Kimberly Hilliard organized the tour along with mortgage financing expert Bo Smith from Cornerstone Home Lending Inc. The 203(k) loan can cover energy-efficiency improvements, room additions and painting but not luxury improvements. While several investors attended the tour, the program is designed specifically to bring residents into an area. Homeowners must live at

House and showcased homes on Grand Avenue, Buena Vista Boulevard, West Valley Street and Pecan Boulevard. Mississippi Department of Archives Architectural Historian Todd Sanders also attended the tour. The van stopped at a white boarded-up cottage on Rose Street. “Looking past cosmetics, this is a good house that just needs to be restored,” Sanders said. “You can’t get the material that these houses are made of anymore.” Even though most of the homes look as though they should be condemned, Sanders

I

said they are actually built from better materials than modern homes. In today’s homes, wood no longer comes from tree farms that use a “slow growth” method that gives the wood more strength and durability. Several of the houses range from $5,000 to $10,000, and Upkins estimates they need about $60,000 to $80,000 in renovations. Sanders said a person must have a vision for the home’s potential. “The problem is a lot people aren’t able to see past peeling paint, (broken out) windows and overgrown yards and see the beauty that is there,” he said, pointing to a home selling for $12,000. “You couldn’t even begin to buy the material in that house for $12,000.” The 203(k) program dates back to 1978 but had seen little use until recently. The number of HUD-approved 203(k) loans rose from roughly 3,400 in 2007 to around 22,000 last year, Smith said. Cornerstone has issued 43 loans through the 203(k) program in Jackson this year. Upkins, who lives in the Pecan Park neighborhood, said west Jackson needs residents to help restore vacant properties. “We want to see people living in these vacant properties to make it safer. It’s much better to have a family next door than to have an abandoned home,” he said.

PA I D A DV E RT I S E M E N T

f you are a grab-it-and-go kind of person, especially when it comes to food, then Little Caesar’s will satisfy you on many levels. They have a hot-n-ready attitude about their pizza, which is come-and-go as quick as you are. “We are the value and quality choice,” says Little Caesar’s of Mississippi owner Mike Naylor. “We make our dough fresh every day along. Also, the other guys deliver, we don’t. You Mike Naylor, owner can order three different large pizzas —pepperoni, sausage or cheese— for $5.55 each hot and ready to go as soon as you walk in.” Little Caesar’s bright and clean lobbies staffed with friendly employees will make you forget that you are getting food to go. Oh, and get ready, you will always hear an enthusiastic, “Welcome to Little Caesar’s!” Jackson has two locations: 4525 North State St. (601-362-7743) and 2847 McDowell Rd. (601-373-4408).  6IaTWZ W_V[ [M^MV QV \PM UM\ZW IZMI IVL [XMV\ \PM ÅZ[\  aMIZ[ WN  PQ[ career running Pepsi Cola plants as the Division Vice-President of the Mid-South Division of Pepsi Americas, based in Memphis, Tennessee. When the company decided to merge and the prospect of moving to Chicago almost became a reality, Naylor decided to start a new business venture. “I’m a Southern boy, and I wanted to stay here,” says Naylor. “I really like Little Caesar’s Hot-N-Ready concept, where you can walk in, get a large pizza for $5.55 in under 30 seconds. That’s when I decided to own the franchise.” Besides the three various large pizzas at the $5.55 value, other specialties include a supreme and three meat treat (it’s pepperoni, bacon and sausage) as well. The cheese bread and crazy bread are popular among customers as are the wings. The one common factor? They are all ready to go as soon as you are. If you bring your little ones with you, they’ll receive cookies and a balloon _PQTM \PMZM 4Q\\TM +IM[IZ¼[ LMÅVQ\MTa IQU[ \W OQ^M \PM ¹_W_ K][\WUMZ [MZ^QKM quickly,” says Naylor. “Everyone on our team knows the importance of making high-quality pizzas at the best value in America. Little Caesar’s Pizza is open from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. at each location.

jacksonfreepress.com

also qualify for historic tax credits. “I don’t want to leave my neighborhood; I just want to upgrade it,” Lyons said.

COURTESY DEBORAH RAE WRIGHT

A

s Betty Lyons rode through neighborhoods in west Jackson during a recent tour, she envisioned the boarded-up homes along Grand Avenue and Rose Street occupied with residents and creating a vibrant community. Lyons, 66, has lived in west Jackson since 1961 and is among a dedicated group of residents who want to see their neighborhoods restored after decades of blight. On Nov. 13, Lyons and about 50 others attended the “WESToration Initiative” tour to learn more about the Federal Housing Administration 203(k) program, aimed at facilitating the purchase of houses that need repairs or modernizing. Typically, a homebuyer seeking to repair an older home has to acquire three separate loans: an initial mortgage to complete the purchase, separate financing for renovations and a permanent mortgage once the repairs are complete. The 203(k) program bundles financing for the acquisition and renovations together, giving buyers a lower interest rate than they would have otherwise. Lyons, who lives in Presidential Hills Park next to Jackson State University, said she went on the tour because she is looking for funds to restore her home. In addition to the FHA program, several homes in west Jackson could

9


justicetalk

by Ward Schaefer

Private Youth Prison Under Fire

B

November 24 - 30, 2010

CLIPART

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of punishment, the suit alleges. Inmates in the cell are stripped naked except for a paper gown, confined for 24 hours a day and given only a blanket for the cell’s mattress-less steel frame bed. While guards assign inmates to the suicide-watch cell despite the juveniles’ protestations that they are not suicidal, they have also ignored threats by actually suicidal inmates. In October 2009, inmate Victor Allen committed suicide by hanging himself from a light fixture in his cell. The suit alleges that staff ignored Allen’s repeated threats to kill himself. Over the course of several hours, Allen cut his arm and showed it to a nurse and officer and reiterated his threat to four other officers. At one point, a supervisor ordered Allen to untie an object around his neck and told an officer to leave him alone. Staff found Allen’s body found hanging two hours later, the suit alleges. In the first half of 2010, Walnut Grove recorded nine suicide attempts by inmates, the suit states. Staff do not dispense medications regularly and delay responding to requests for medical attention, the plaintiffs argue. They also claim that Jackson-based Health Assurances LLC, which handles medical care for the facility, violates its contract with MDOC by providing fewer mental-health employees for less time than it is contractually obligated to provide. A request for comment to The Geo Group’s corporate offices was not immediately returned. MDOC spokeswoman Suzanne Singletary told the Jackson Free Press, “We make our comments in court.” The MYJP lawsuit comes only weeks after the U.S. Department of Justice informed Gov. Haley Barbour that it was opening an investigation into conditions at Walnut Grove. In a letter dated Oct. 25, Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez notified the governor, Epps and Walnut Grove Warden Walter Tripp that DOJ investigators would begin looking into “systemic violations of the Constitution” and “focus on the protection of juveniles from harm, suicide prevention and the provision of medical and mental health care.” A similar combination of federal investigations and civil lawsuits led the state to close it Columbia Training School for girls in 2008. In 2003, DOJ investigated conditions at the facility for female juvenile offenders and found evidence of cruel and unusual punishment, leading to a 2005 consent decree. The Youth Justice Project filed a suit in 2007 on behalf of a group of the girls, arguing that conditions at the facility had not improved. CLIPART

1935 Lakeland Dr. 601.906.2253

y corporate standards, the Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility has been a success. Since opening in 2001, the private prison has generated roughly $100 million for the companies that have operated it. The prison has grown from 500 beds to 1,500, and has expanded from holding juveniles between 13 and 19 years old to keeping prisoners until they are 22. A new lawsuit suggests, however, that the facility is a failure on a human level. In a class-action lawsuit filed Nov. 15, the Mississippi Youth Justice Project, along with Jackson civil-rights lawyer Rob McDuff and the ACLU’s National Prison Project, condemns “barbaric” conditions at Walnut Grove. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court, presents a litany of allegations, ranging from unsafe conditions and malicious treatment by prison guards to inadequate health care and educational services. The suit alleges that, beyond not providing adequate supervision, prison guards actually facilitate violent attacks between prisoners. “Many correctional officers knowingly instigate fights and attacks by purposefully opening cell doors to allow youth who are in conflict to leave their cells at the same time,” the suit states. “Some officers order or persuade youths to attack other youths. Many officers also facilitate attacks by intentionally leaving cell blocks unsupervised and cell doors unsecured.” In January 2010, one inmate, referred to in the suit as “John Doe,” warned prison supervisors that he feared an attack by a cellmate assigned to him by guards. Prison staff ignored the inmate’s warnings. The suit alleges that on Jan. 23, the cellmate raped and physically assaulted the inmate over the course of almost 24 hours before officers intervened. In August, another inmate, Christopher Coleman, requested a separation from his cellmate because of fears for his safety. The suit alleges that a prison guard later encouraged and then watched as the cellmate beat Coleman. A massive fight that broke out Feb. 27 and nearly killed two inmates was also due to staff negligence, the suit argues. The fight started when an understaffed crew of officers in one unit of the facility failed to lock the cells of one group of inmates before letting another group out for recreation. In other cases, the suit alleges, guards themselves use excessive force, including the use of mace, in unprovoked or malicious beatings. The suit assails Walnut Grove’s lack of proper and adequate mental-health care. Prison guards use a suicide-watch cell as a form


by Ward Schaefer

COURTESY VERIZON ARENA

Downtown Arena, Anyone?

Inspired by North Little Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 18,000-seat arena, city business leaders are pushing for a similar facility in Jackson.

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s become a rite of passage: The rebounding city builds a sports-and-entertainment arena, a shiny mark of maturity and status, like a 16-year-oldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new car. Birmingham, Baton Rouge, Memphis and Little Rock, Ark., have all built arenas, and a contingent of business leaders in Jackson have pledged their support for one here. A steering committee of supporters for a downtown arena hosted a presentation Nov. 16 at the Jackson Convention Complex. The dominant message at the event was that Jackson can support an arenaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even that it deserved one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fact of the matter is that this has been done all over the country,â&#x20AC;? Jackson Chamber of Commerce President Jonathan Lee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And while it may be true that the early bird gets the worm, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also true that the second mouse gets the cheese.â&#x20AC;? Downtown Jackson Partners President Ben Allen said that the luster has worn off the 48-year-old Mississippi Coliseum, which can accommodate up to 10,000 people. The arena push in Jackson takes its inspiration from North Little Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 18,000seat Verizon Arena. The arenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general manager, Michael Marion, said that he believed Jackson needed a major entertainment venue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You should be getting the same shows that we are,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that this area needs a new building, a big building.â&#x20AC;? Speaking to the Jackson Free Press later, Lee said that the appeal of an arena is ultimately economic, not aesthetic or cultural. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a

proven economic generator,â&#x20AC;? Lee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why we should have one. I like a good concert as much as the next guy, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an opportunity for us to create foot traffic in our town.â&#x20AC;? While North Little Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arena itself is not a â&#x20AC;&#x153;cash cowâ&#x20AC;? for the city and county, it provides economic benefits in sales taxes and increased revenue for surrounding businesses, Marion said. It pays roughly $1 million in property taxes per year and maintains 22 full-time employees. The arena typically hosts around 120 events per year, with roughly 20 being the major concerts that account for the bulk of the arenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s income. Marion said that the arenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s management did not have any estimates of the facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall economic impact. Neither the North Little Rock Visitors Bureau nor the Little Rock Convention & Visitors Bureau has completed comprehensive studies of the arenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impact. The economic benefits of an arena vary from by city, according to a June 2010 study by the University of California-Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MBA Consulting Center. The center assembled case studies of arenas in other cities for the city of Sacramento, which is eyeing a new sports and entertainment arena in its downtown. Previous academic research has shown that arenas tend to displace economic activity from other parts of a city and sometimes cannibalize revenue that would go to surrounding businesses with their own concession stands. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This does not discount the possibility that new synergies between an (arena) and existing assets can potentially increase the visi-

tor base above that of former levels. It is this concept that provides much of the potential value to Downtown Sacramento,â&#x20AC;? the studyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s authors found. Marion cautioned in his presentation that Verizon Arena has only been profitable in six of its 10 years of operation. In 2000, 2001, 2005 and 2008, the arena lost money, and it is projecting a small loss this year. The arena was a publicly supported project, which supporters marketed as part of a larger â&#x20AC;&#x153;river project,â&#x20AC;? spanning both sides of the Arkansas River and including a $20 million expansion of Little Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s convention center. The arena cost $82 million to complete, with $20 million coming in private sector contributions and $20 million pledged by the Arkansas state Legislature. The bulk of the cost, $52 million, came from a one-year, 1-cent tax increase Pulaski County voters approved in a referendum. Allen said that he expects Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arena to cost more than the Little Rock facility but that cost is not the main concern. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What something costs is irrelevant,â&#x20AC;? Allen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relative to the wealth it creates. Do people complain about how much Trustmark Park (in Pearl) cost today? No.â&#x20AC;? In July 2009, the steering committee selected Populous Sports, a design and consulting firm specializing in sports venues, to handle the feasibility study. Allen emphasized that the steering committee has made its activities as transparent as possible, posting detailed timeline and fundraising data on its website. The committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original request for proposals, Populousâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; winning proposal and the committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract with Populous are all available for download on the website. By Nov. 19, the committee had raised more than $60,000 of its $80,000 goal. With that target, Lee is optimistic that the Central Mississippi Planning and Development District will provide a matching $80,000 grant to fund the full cost of the study. The studyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second phase, which would end by mid-March, would assess possible locations and develop financing possibilities.

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398 Highway 51, Ridgeland | 601-853-3299 www.villagebeads.com

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jacksonfreepress.com

developmenttalk

11


statetalk

by Adam Lynch

Earmark ‘Kings’ Pledge Ban

Jesse Gallagher Sarah J Griff Howard Lori Carpenter Scroggins Ginger Rankin Brock Freeman

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Now a Paul Mitchell signature salon.

November 24 - 30, 2010

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ADAM LYNCH

775 Lake Harbour Drive #H in Ridgeland 601.856.4330 | fax: 601.856.4505

ississippi’s two U.S. senators signed Tea party-backed Sen. Jim DeMint, Ronto a pledge last week by fellow Re- S.C., pushed the idea of the moratorium to publicans to refrain from requesting reduce government waste. Senate Republiearmark funds for their home state cans unanimously passed the non-binding during the upcoming 112th Congress. Sens. moratorium by voice vote Nov. 16, although Thad Cochran and Roger Wicker—ranked they could still continue the practice without as the No. 1 and No. 3 “earmark kings” in suffering anything more than criticism. Two the U.S. Senate—announced they would days later, Republican House members unanigo along with the Senate Remously extended a voluntary publican Conference’s call to earmark ban they adopted temporarily halt federal “porkearlier this year. barrel” spending, which is the Although earmarks have long-time practice of sendgained notoriety for funding ing congressionally budgeted seemingly pointless projects, funds to specific local projects Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. from highway construction in says most of the money goes the Delta to Hurricane Katrina to legitimate projects, such as restoration projects. Pork acroad construction and unicounts for about 1 percent of versity development. Johnson the federal budget. said he and every other Mis“Banning earmarks now U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker has sissippi mayor should be neragreed to a moratorium on is an important first step dem- earmarks, even though the vous about losing a potential onstrating that we are serious senator helped bring the influx of investment during a about the debt and runaway state almost $368 million in time when local sales revenues spending,” stated Wicker, who pork in 2009. are steadily dropping. helped bring $368 million in “During these tough ecopork home to Mississippi in fiscal-year 2010. nomic times, cities across our nation are beWhile some money is budgeted through ing called upon to do much more with less,” a committee process (like a plan to use federal Johnson said. He said the earmark system promatch funding to finance a feasibility study vides funding for “vital infrastructure needs,” for flood control on the Pearl River), earmarks including the city’s water and sewer systems, do not go through the Appropriations Com- and “crucially important” funding for techmittee process but instead gets assigned by a nology and equipment for the city’s police and specific legislator’s directive. Congress appro- fire departments. priates money for a general cause, but it is a “We view our federal requests for fundsenior legislator who says whether or not that ing as imperative and would hope that Conspecific cause should serve a particular project. gress would make every effort to consider Cochran, the Senate Appropriations every request we put forward on the merits,” Committee’s ranking Republican, gets con- Johnson said. siderable access to the $1.2 trillion in discreThe Taxpayer for Common Sense’s tionary spending allowed in the federal bud- 2009 State by State Breakdown of Earmark get. FOX News labeled Cochran the “king Value showed that only California and Texas, of pork” in April, based on Citizens Against which earned $568 million and $370 milGovernment Waste’s “2010 Congressional Pig lion, respectively, in earmarks in 2009, beat Book,” which reported that Cochran helped Mississippi’. 240 projects costing $490 million in earmarks Cochran revealed uncertainty even as he for his state. Since fiscal-year 2008, CAGW heeded the Republican call: “I remain unconfound that Cochran “obtained” more than $2 vinced that fiscal prudence is effectively adbillion in pork for the state and beyond.. vanced by ceding to the Obama administraWicker said in his statement that Con- tion our constitutional authority to determine gress needs a “timeout” from earmarks: “I am federal expenditures, but an earmark moracommitted to cutting spending and getting our torium is the will of the Republican Conferfiscal house in order, and that means chang- ence,” Cochran said in a statement. ing the way business is done in Washington.” Flint said Cochran and Wicker’s refusal Notsurprisingly,stateandcitylobbyistssay to earmark money will not kill the process, or the senators’ decisions to forego earmarks will save significant money. “Earmarks will never, hurt the state’s competitive edge when it comes never, never be eliminated—never,” Flint said. to pulling down federal dollars for projects. “It is not going to happen. That’s political re“If the state of Mississippi does not com- ality. They say this is all about saving money, pete for earmarks, then other states will get that but they’d save more money requiring better money. It’s as certain as the mathematic domi- mileage on cars. This is money that has already nance of populated states in the House,” said been appropriated,” Flint said. Stan Flint, a lobbyist with Southern Strategy “It won’t save the federal treasury one Group. “That’s why seniority is so important dime, because all the money has been approto small states, and that’s why earmarks are so priated to be spent. It’s all a matter of whether important to low-population states, because we get it or somebody else gets it, and somewe don’t often have the votes to compete with body else will end up getting it.” more populous states for federal revenue.” Comment at jfp.ms.


Public schools do more than educate children. They measure a city’s pride. They reflect community. They predict the social and economic well-being of a city’s future. For 20 years, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson has worked to keep our public schools strong, to empower parents as leaders for positive change, and to engage community support of our public schools.

Join us. For our city. For our children. For our future.

Founding Chapter, Parents for Public Schools, 1989 200 N. Congress, Suite 500, Jackson, MS 39201

www.ppsjackson.org



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jfp op/ed

opining, grousing & pontificating

EDITORIAL

Fix the Earmarks Process

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ississippi’s U.S. Sens. Cochran and Wicker, whipped to a fury by Republican deficit hawks, have committed themselves to the idea of no longer sending earmark money back to their home state. The issue with earmarks is easy to dismiss: They account for less than 1 percent of the federal budget, and they contain money that’s already been allocated by the federal treasury, and won’t go back into the treasury if unclaimed. Abruptly abandoning the use of earmarks allows other states—with legislators not committed to the ban—to sop up the money our group leave lying on the floor. But earmarks are also easy to attack. Only recently, Congress passed a law demanding politicians attach their names to earmark funds they’ve requested in appropriation bills. Prior to that, it wasn’t so easy to determine who was begging for money to build a toxic-waste dump or fund corporate tax breaks. At the least, dispensing with earmarks may improve the chances of vetting numerous “bridges to nowhere” if the funding must be debated in a committee process. Life without earmarks will create a different world for some lawmakers. Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., told reporters this month that he was supporting the moratorium, but would be working with the president to make sure that his state was still able to get federal funding for highways, bridges and universities. Udall is a Democrat. Wicker and Cochran, on the other hand, are on a team that has made clear that it values Obama failing as a president above almost anything else, so there’s no reason for the president to make nice with them. Jim Harper, director of Information Policy Studies at the CATO Institute, told the Washington Independent this month that getting rid of earmarks means legislators will have to adopt a more nationally based outlook on funding. He said it’s time for legislators to start saying, “any community with these particular needs should get funding, not just my community should get this project.” Those are easy words to say in a state with a dense population and a high number of representatives looking out for it. Southern states with our low populations and numbers of representatives may suffer in this kind of process. The problem with earmarks is that we have a system that is fairly dependent upon them. We’ll soon find out just how dependent over the next couple of budget years if our delegation doesn’t find alternative ways to fund local projects. We need more than a vocal opt-in oath to no longer use earmarks. That’s as uninspiring as demanding a reduction in the deficit while pushing to extend a tax cut for the top 2 percent of wage-earners—adding an extra $700 billion to the deficit by all accounts. What we need is a whole new system that allows a more seemly means to get local funding. This will take considerably more work and less partisanship. We’ll be watching your progress, senators.

KEN STIGGERS

Unemployed and Broke

November 24 - 30, 2010

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Langston Hughes-inspired poem by Scooby “Angry Black Man” Rastus: “You’ve taken my unemployment insurance benefits and gone. You’ve blocked the extension of unemployment insurance and screwed up my life for the holidays. Now I can’t pay my bills and have to deal with eviction, repossession and collection. It’s like you poured acid on my face and called me ugly. You place me in the middle of nowhere and tell me I’m lost. Your unregulated financial institutions charge numerous overdraft fees to my already depleted bank account. Yep, you done taken my unemployment insurance benefits and gone. “You also took my dignity and gone. My children are depressed because I cannot provide for them. My wife is annoyed, and I am desperate and frustrated. And I don’t have health insurance. “Now that you’ve screwed up the lives of many people during the holidays, I suggest you secure your possessions and property, because financial desperation and retaliation will soon follow. A poor person you denied benefits to might break the windows of your Volvo to take that iPhone you left on the passenger seat. Look out for those people who have nothing to lose to start a revolt by attacking your plush, gated communities. Will it be me? I reckon it might be me, or many others affected by your callousness. I guess we’ll see. “Yes, it could be me.”

KAMIKAZE

Race, Again

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y late mother always encouraged me to face problems head on. To this day, I’ve never let issues fester. Problem? You’re going to know about it immediately, and I’m going to begin working on solutions and actions. Right now, my beautiful, blossoming city is like that person who uses alcohol or drugs to escape their pains. Great moments, great people, great development can help you forget a problem for a fleeting minute but when morning comes, the problem is still there. And it’s going to continue to be there until someone decides to begin chipping away at it. Donna Ladd’s editor’s note last week about VIP Jackson’s lack of diversity raised a lot of people’s ire. Controversial as it may seem, in my opinion it was an appropriate salvo to begin really addressing the demon of race in Jackson. It puzzled me that so many folks were up in arms; it wasn’t as if she conjured up some falsehood. She spoke on something a lot of laypeople in the city talk about around water coolers and in barbershops citywide. I get the question almost daily. Perhaps folks were condemning the messenger. It’s difficult for white folks to hear a white person with a different opinion on race. It’s sometimes offensive to black folks to hear a white person express disdain at racism. Such is life. But as an African American male in Jackson who operates among the people and in corporate Jackson, perhaps I can add some perspective. The common-sense moderate in me agrees and disagrees with the issue on a couple fronts. I’m not a big fan of harping on the actions of others. My motto is, “if there’s an entity in your city that you think is inefficient, just be better than them, and your works will speak for you.” Next, in free enterprise, businesses are free to

operate as they wish. Their practices may be inherently wrong, but ultimately our dollars will dictate whether a business with bad policy succeeds or fails. But they have a right to be what they wish and cater to whom they wish. Char wants to give you a different dining experience than Roosters, but that doesn’t necessarily make them racist. But on the flip side, Jackson, I’ve found way too many folks, white and black—who are extremely uncomfortable when race is brought up, uncomfortable to the point of anger. Why is Donna talking about race again? Why is Kaz writing about race again? Why is Chokwe Lumumba harping on race again? Despite what you may believe, the issue has never been resolved. We ignore it and act like it’s not there. We vilify those who bring it up because it disturbs the status quo and the peace of the affluent. We act like it’s over, but when issues like VIP magazine or downtown development come up, whispers return. Folks, because you think race issues are resolved doesn’t mean all agree. That you don’t want to talk about it definitely doesn’t mean the issue isn’t there. In fact, your defiance is condescending to the intelligent among us who want a dialogue. And guess what, the dialogue is going to make you squirm. It’s like talking to your kids about sex. It’s going to make you sweat and swallow hard, but it’s a conversation you better have, lest it come back to bite you. This isn’t coming from a white newspaper editor; it’s coming from a regular black guy who loves his city and all the people in it. A guy who has been called a sell-out because I work side-by-side with white folks, and a troublemaker because I still identify injustices in this town. I’m an equal opportunity pain. And that’s the truth ... sho-nuff.

E-mail letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.


NATALIE A. COLLIER

Editor in Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Ronni Mott News Editor Lacey McLaughlin Associate Editor Natalie A. Collier Senior Reporter Adam Lynch Reporter Ward Schaefer Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Assistant to the Editor ShaWanda Jacome Writers Quita Bride, Lisa Fontaine Bynum, David Dennis Jr., Scott Dennis, Bryan Flynn, Carl Gibson, Garrad Lee, Lance Lomax, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Chris Nolen, Robin O’Bryant, Brandi Herrera, Casey Purvis, Tom Ramsey, Doctor S, Ken Stiggers, Jackie Warren Tatum, Valerie Wells, Byron Wilkes Editorial Interns Jesse Crow, Julia Hulitt, Holly Perkins Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Lydia Chadwick Production Designer Latasha Willis Editorial Cartoonist Chris Zuga Photographers Christina Cannon, Jert-rutha Crawford, Josh Hailey, Charles A. Smith, Amile Wilson,Tom Beck,William Patrick Butler Design Interns Michael Brouphy, Holly Harlan, Chanelle Reneé

SALES AND OPERATIONS Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Account Executive Randi Ashley Jackson Account Executive and Distribution Manager Adam Perry Events and Marketing Coordinator Shannon Barbour Accounting Montroe Headd Marketing Interns Xavia McGrigg, Nikki Williams Distribution Lynny Bradshaw, Cade Crook, Clint Dear, Linda Hamilton, Matt Heindl, Aimee Lovell, Steve Pate, Jim Poff, Jennifer Smith

ONLINE Web Producer Korey Harrion

CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Releases releases@jacksonfreepress.com Queries editor@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Internships interns@jacksonfreepress.com

Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2010 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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ear Persons Who’ve Had Bad Experiences with Religious People, I know sometimes you’re confused. You come across people who say one thing and do another. In one breath, they talk about how much they love God, and then they go and do or say something even the vilest sinner would be embarrassed to admit. It’s sad, but we’re not all like that. Seriously. We’re not. Much of who I am can be attributed to not only my family but to the people at the church I grew up in. While there is a strange one or two among the group, much of my spiritual foundation was laid within the oak-lined walls of the small church with the cranberry red carpet that sits just a few blocks away from the campus of Mississippi State University’s entrance: First Church of Christ (Holiness). In the summers, we would have vacation Bible school, like most churches. Children from across the city would come, and we’d sit and hear stories about Jesus. “You mean to tell me when they took the woman who cheated on her husband to Jesus, all Jesus said to the crowd was if you’ve never sinned, be the first to throw a stone at her?” we marveled. “Five thousand people?! He fed 5,000 people with two fish and five loads of bread for real?” The list of lessons we learned goes on and on, and at the end of our time together, we’d usually go on a trip. Six Flags in Atlanta was always our preference, but sometimes we’d end up at Libertyland in Memphis. Those were the times, looking back, when I see how important it is to give and it shall be given. I realize now that many of the people I grew up with were poor. Most had less than the little I now realize my family had, but when it was time to do or go or learn, we were all right there together. The people at church made sure of it. That’s what Christianity looks like. At least it should, I think. That’s how Islam, Judaism, Buddhism and the list goes on should look, too. But I know they don’t always. One of the scariest things to me, just like for you, I’m sure, is people who use their faith or a higher power to justify crimes against humanity. Honestly, I don’t understand it, and it embarrasses me. You can’t show someone light when you’re harming him, casting a shadow of darkness on him. That’s not how it works. I know that, and there are plenty more people like me who know it. Increasingly, I find myself referring to myself as a Christ follower, not a Christian. Those two should be the same thing, but in

today’s society, they’re not quite. These socalled “Christians” include the pastor who wanted to have a “Burn the Quran Day,” jerks that kill doctors who perform abortions, and there are even more egregious examples. Christ followers, however, can say: “I disagree with you, and here’s why. But even though I disagree, I’m interested to know the reasons you believe what you believe.” It is, after all, the Lord who said in Isaiah—the Old Testament, no less—“Come, let us reason together.” As I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to be known at church as one who asks a lot of questions. I’m not content to sit and swallow things just because you feed them to me. I want to know the how, the why and for how long. I don’t ask questions to put leaders on the spot or to cause dissent; I do it because I want to understand. They say that’s half the battle. One of the things I understand is that it’s not God who does ridiculous and hurtful things. It’s humans. For all the times some religious person dismissed you because you were different (poor, homosexual, brown-skinned or white) or whatever they decided your ailment was, I apologize. I apologize for the wounds they caused you. I’m sorry for their misrepresentation of God, and I hate they chose not to see you through God’s eyes rather than their own. I know it hurts. They’ve hurt me, too. But what I want you and people who think like you to understand is that God—if you still believe in one—didn’t like that they hurt you, either. The purest expressions of God’s love I’ve ever seen never had his (or her, if that makes you more comfortable) name attached to them. It was people doing the right thing because it was the right thing to do, but there was no doubt their actions were God inspired. That’s how it was when I was growing up at my church back in Starkville. The Sunday-school teacher, the pastor, my grandmother, the neighbors didn’t say, “I’m going to help you because God told me to.” Be wary, by the way, of people who inject this phrase in sentences like that. I am. This is all to say: Don’t give up on God. Look for him in the little things, and I promise he’ll be there: a warm greeting, a stranger’s help, a word of encouragement when you need it and least expect it. God’s in there. And when you’re curious to know more, ask a sane religious person to tell you more. We’ll probably be the ones not wearing the WWJD bracelets.

CORRECTIONS: In last week’s “Hitched” feature (Vol. 9, Issue 10), the headline should have read “J.J. Luther and

Karson Williams.” Reporter Adam Lynch reported in “Water Hikes to Fund Upgrades” that the city would use fee increases to fund water and sewer upgrades. There is no connection between the upgrades and the fee hikes. Council-approved bonds fund the brunt of upgrades. In the same story, city spokesman Chris Mims said he was confident the city’s two water plants would be linked before the end of the year, believing the city can work out its issues with landowners before January. The Jackson Free Press apologizes for the errors.

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Don’t Give Up on God

15


Finding Relevance in

Ancient Teachings story by Tom Head photos by Christina Cannon

November 24 - 30, 2010

“C

hristianity,” G.K. Chesterton once remarked, “has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.” Although American religious culture is often described as “Judeo-Christian,” and random verses from the Old Testament are sometimes used as proof-texts to bolster whatever political argument a speaker might support, the fundamentally Jewish character of Christianity has been suppressed so much over the past two millennia that Christianity itself is sometimes represented as an uncomfortable and textually unrecognizable blend of Western philosophy, European colonialism and provincial bias. Sandra Richter, Wesley Biblical Seminary’s Professor of Old Testament and author of “The Epic of Eden: A Christian Entry Into the Old Testament” (InterVarsity Press, 2008, $24), is working to close the gap between the ancient words of the Hebrew Bible and the contemporary eyes and ears with which we perceive them. While she does this as a devout Christian, she is also a historian—bringing to Wesley an extensive curriculum vitae that includes numerous academic publications, a decade of teaching experience, and a doctorate from Harvard University’s Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Richter’s husband, Steve Tsoulakas, also teaches at WBS. Wesley drew the couple with their two young children to Jackson in 2009. “We had been looking for a while to be on the same faculty, and Wesley heard that was our situation,” she says. “They are a young and growing institution and wanted to expand their reach, so when they found out they could get us if they would offer us both full-time positions on their faculty, they pulled out all the stops to do it.”

What is the message we’re not hearing from the Old Testament? The message of a redemptive God, a merciful loving deity who is extending himself as far as he can to redeem humanity. We tend 16 to hear that message from the New Testament,

but we overlook it in the old. In fact, I’m often asked the question when I teach in lay circles: “Why is it that the God of the New Testament is the God of mercy, and the God of the Old Testament is the God of judgment?” I’m always partly entertained and partly aghast at that question, because I see a God who has been working since the foundation of the world to redeem humanity marching all the way through the Old Testament. And I typically have to remind the church that the Second Coming is all about judgment, so don’t think you’ve missed out on judgment just because you’ve claimed the New Testament and not the Old. Do you think God communicates in the Old Testament differently from the way he communicates in the New? No, but I think the audience is very different—and that is the great challenge. In … “The Epic of Eden,” that actually is my exact quest: to help the New Testament Christian understand the audience of the Old Testament message, so that they can hear it as it was intended. The Old Testament truly is long long ago and far far away. Just reaching back to Abraham, we’re reaching back … to 2,000 BC. … So this is ancient ancient history, and it’s an entirely different economy an entirely different social structure. These folks are nomadic pastoralists who are very wealthy, but live in an ephemeral society—meaning that they’re changing rotations regularly, that their bread and butter is raising sheep and goats, and their lifestyle is following the seasonal pasturage of their flocks. This is radically different from 20th-century westerners. Radical isn’t even a strong enough word. … [T]hen, as we march through the tribal lineage of ancient Israel, we’re introduced to a very patriarchal tribal culture in which kinship ties are everything, ... this very male, very clan-based society. Then we move into the monarchy, which is ... centralized. All this to say it’s just a very different audience, and Israel itself is geographically very dif-

“Just as in Abraham’s day, and in Peter and Paul’s day, the average citizen is worried about the next meal, the next mortgage payment, how their children are going to turn out and this eternal ache in their souls.”

ferent and economically very different. So all of this makes for a message that sounds quite foreign to the modern reader, whereas when you move into the New Testament, Hellenism has already blanketed the Middle East, and Jesus is at least at some point speaking Greek. This is a more urban environment, and people have businesses and trade; it sounds more familiar. So I think that is the essence of the change. I don’t think the message shifts that much, but I think the audience does. Are there ways we resemble the audience of the Old Testament more than the New? I think we resemble both audiences in that the needs of the human heart haven’t changed much. Just as in Abraham’s day, and in Peter and Paul’s day, the average citizen is worried about the next meal, the next mortgage payment, how their children are going to turn out and this eternal ache in their souls. I would say that is common to the Old Testament audience, New Testament audience, and contemporary audience. … I love following the stories of Abra-

ham, Isaac and Jacob, and watching them stumble through real life, bumping into their God and his expectations, messing up on those expectations, trying again. It comforts me to see that David was a bad parent, and still, the kingdom survived. So I think sometimes the details of daily life are more visible in the Old Testament, and so that would be a point of connection for a contemporary reader. What I wind up telling my students all the time is that the goal of great interpretation—and, therefore, great preaching—is for the interpreter to be able to get themselves back into the shoes of the folks whose stories are being told. I’m always challenging my students to think about these characters in the Bible, be they Old or New Testament, as real people who lived in real places and had exercised real faith. As soon as these folks become ivorytower, pedestal icons, their struggles become irrelevant to us, and their stories become distant. … I’m always trying to bridge that gap by reintroducing historical detail and anthropological detail and talking about real societal structure and the real civic laws that structured


What is something that most people don’t know about the Old Testament? I would say the structure of their society. I actually open up my introduction to Old Testament with a lecture about what it means to be a tribal society. One of the banes of biblical interpretation is something the missiologists call ethnocentrism, where we, the reader, assume that the folks in the Bible lived just like us. So we read their life interactions as though they were situated in an upper-class little suburb dangling off Madison Avenue and Highland Parks Colony. We miss half the message. … If you’re thinking American Indians or the Arab factions you see throwing rocks at each other on the television screen—that’s tribal society. And that’s what Israel was, and God chose to reveal himself in space and time to a tribal culture, and so he adapted to that culture. And if we’re going to understand the message of the Bible, we’re going to have to do our best to get back inside that culture to do proper interpretation and get around the message in real life. How can we can gain a better understanding of life in a tribal culture? [L]et me make it very clear that I’m not asking Christians to become tribal. The culture in which the story of redemption is communicated shifts regularly. We start off with tribal nomads, we move to a monarchy, we move to an exiled province, and then we move to the Hellenized, Romanized culture of the New Testament. So we’re not about canonizing their culture; we’re just about understanding their culture. I always wind up with audiences saying “Oh, so we should mimic the way they structure their economy, or the way they blessed their children.” I’m like no, no, no—you cannot become a pastoral nomad. You can’t do that. (laughs) Not in today’s economy. But you need to understand it. [T]he whole first chapter of … “Epic of Eden,” is about tribal culture and what it means to be patriarchal … and how this value system shaped all of Israel’s history, even into the New Testament, so that when Jesus names God as Father, he’s actually operating out of a patriarchal mindset. And when he speaks about his father’s house, in John 14:2, he’s talking about the family compound. And when he speaks of having come as the firstborn to share his inheritance with us, this is all tribal law—he has some very specific cargo that he’s trying to communicate to us. So our job is … to do our best to understand it so we can get a handle on the message. Is understanding the context of the Old Testament essential to understanding the meaning of what Jesus taught? I certainly believe with all the campus ministries and Four Spiritual Laws and tracts ... the simplest presentation of the Gospel message can bring someone into the Kingdom— but … that is just the tip of the iceberg. Who Jesus was, the message he came to bring, the promise he came to fulfill, the lineage that he comes as the final representative—all of these things are Old Testament messages.

I often will joke with my students that if you want to, you can listen to your favorite album on a cheap, one-speaker AM radio, or you can listen to it on Dolby surround sound. Make your choice. You can have one threestep presentation of the Roman Road, or you can come to realize that the last Adam of 1 Corinthians is the typological representation of the first Adam that stood in the Garden, and that the reason Jesus needs to be tempted by Satan in the wilderness is because the first Adam was tempted by Satan; the first Adam failed the test, and the second Adam didn’t. When Jesus stands on the mountain and declares a new law, he’s not coming up with a new idea—he’s standing on the mountain like Moses did and declaring to a new people, “I am the new lawgiver.” When he breaks his bread at communion meal, he calls himself the new Passover and tells his people, “I’ll put my blood on the lintels of your house and the death angel will pass over.” All of these messages are as old as the hills. We truncate them into this one final expression, and I think it cheapens the message. Do Old Testament Prophets have something to teach us that is not just a precursor to the coming of Jesus? Oh, yes, indeed. The Prophets actually spent most of their time confronting social injustice that specifically breached God’s covenant law. The role of the prophet, primarily, was to come to the people and to the king and to say to them, “God has given you this law by which you are required to structure your lives, and you’re ignoring that law ... so I’m going to stand in the public square and announce how you are ignoring and breaching that law.” I think our culture could definitely stand a prophet taking his position in the public square and pointing out our compromise to God’s calling. And Hosea and Amos … what they’re shouting at Jeroboam II is that you’re wealthy and you’re politically secure, and you’re using your wealth and your political security to abuse and oppress the poor. You are busy decorating your house with ivory while the widow is starving in the streets, leaving her there to die. You have folks like Isaiah standing up to the kings and saying: “You’re busy plotting out your entire national agenda without any attention to the lordship of Yahweh, of God, in your nation’s life. I’m challenging you to pay attention to his lordship before you make your national strategy. Pay attention.” All of these messages I think are quite contemporary. Today, immigration has been on the table a great deal. Do you think the Old Testament speaks to that issue? I’m more than a little aware of the political situation in which Israel found itself. … [O]ver and over again through Egyptian history and Israelite history immigration was a problem for them, too, specifically forceful, or what we would call “illegal” immigration. Egypt actually finds itself in a position where a foreign people takes over the nation simply due to an influx of such large numbers that those numbers outnumber the native populace. ... [R]ead the introduction to the story of the exodus: you read that a new king reigns over Egypt. This new king knew not Joseph,

and so he isolated and segregated the Israelites and oppressed them with hard labor. And his rationale was, “we need to control this immigrant populace, lest they become so numerous that when someone strikes against us, they join with our enemies and overturn our native control of the country.” So that would be one of many examples of a nation that’s struggling with more immigrants than it thinks it can handle. But what’s interesting in that story is that our heroes, the Israelites, are the unwanted immigrants—and the exodus is, in part, the story of a nation trying to figure out what it’s going to do with its immigrant class. Later in Israel’s history, and you bump into ... Joshua being commanded to clear out the indigenous population of Canaan, settle the territory and don’t let the Canaanites back in—that it would be a matter of sin to allow large-scale immigration. So then our heroes would be the new indigenous population (who) are keeping immigrants out. But then … read the story of Ruth the Moabitess, this wonderful young woman who is an exemplar of integrity and high-class behavior, and she’s a Moabite, and she’s unwanted by the Bethlehemites. They don’t want her there, they don’t need her there; they see her as an illegal immigrant who snuck over the border and is busy sharecropping in the fields. Yet she turns out to be this great hero, and the Bible incorporates her into David’s lineage. So I would have to say the Bible is a book about real people and real nations. … I don’t have any solutions to America’s problem—but I can say that Israel has felt our pain. Do you feel like the book of Job is well understood in our culture? No, I don’t feel it’s well understood at all, even in scholarly circles. … Job is an intentional mimicry of ancient wisdom literature, which was a Mesopotamian and Egyptian innovation. What our biblical authors are doing is taking the highfalutin philosophy and epistemology of their day and passing it through a faith-lens—what I would call a Yahwistic lens—and incorporating it into the corpus. But exactly what they intend us to gain in that transition is sometimes hard to get your head around. People often talk about the patience of Job and how he suffered without complaint and what an amazing man he is, when in reality there’s chapter after chapter … of Job yell-

“[Y]ou’re wealthy and you’re politically secure, and you’re using your wealth and your political security to abuse and oppress the poor. ... All of these messages I think are quite contemporary.”

ing at God: “Why are you doing this to me? I’m a righteous man! Why am I suffering? It’d have been better if I had never been born! I hate my life! You’re an unjust God—show up and let me argue you down!” I don’t see that as a man who’s not complaining, or a man who’s showing a very high level of patience, either. So, yeah, I think Job is misunderstood. Ecclesiastes feels like one of the most contemporary books. I found it approachable early on. Is it understood? No, I also think it’s very poorly understood, but I totally agree with you that it’s a very contemporary book. … I believe that what Ecclesiastes is doing is also quoting the wisdom literature of its day, which tends to be somewhat nihilistic, declaring that the only real satisfaction in life will come from being the most powerful, the wealthiest, the bestlooking, the most popular. … In this book, what Solomon does is he climbs to the top of the ladder; he steps to the very edge of the cliff. And with all of this success and acquisition, he looks down across the landscape and says: “Oh my goodness, there’s nothing here.” Being the most powerful, the wealthiest, the most popular, the most sexually attractive, doesn’t bring joy. And he turns around from the edge of that cliff, climbs back down the ladder, and (says): “You know what, real joy comes in honoring God, keeping his commandments, loving the wife of your youth, and being content in what God has given you. Be at peace.” We’re all living this fast-paced lie that if we’re only more accomplished, more successful—if I only made more money or were better looking or had more cosmetic surgery done or got a new wife or got a new husband—that then I’d be happy. But most of us are kept sane by the fact that we never get what we’re asking for, so we can hold on to our sanity anticipating that if we got these things, the ache in our hearts would be fulfilled. Then we look at the other part of our society—the wealthiest, the most popular, the most famous. What do these people do as soon as they get it all? They start self-medicating and self-destructing. They’re the saddest stories on the tabloids. They get it all, and then they realize that there’s nothing there, but it’s too late. In the book of Ecclesiastes, Solomon goes to the edge, sees that there’s nothing there and comes back to tell us.

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their everyday lives: what they ate, how they farmed, that sort of thing.

17


It Just Is: Nurturing A Child’s Spirituality by Jessica Kinnison

W

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November 24 - 30, 2010

Happy Holidays

18

Gift Certificates Available 1855 Lakeland Drive Jackson, Ms 601-366-6644 Add us on Facebook

hen children are born, human parents experience something spiritual just by being in the child’s presence—their fingers and toes and eyelashes, the smell of their skin, and the way their eyes fix on people and objects. Parents joke about the way their child is watching the balls above his crib, suggesting he might grow to be an astronaut or a basketball player, imposing their ideas on the nonverbal child. It’s easy then. Then the child grows, and when he points and says, “What?” parents answer: “Ball.” And the child responds: “Ball.” Later, the child asks, “Why?” The parent answers: “Because it is round, and that is its name.” The child responds: “Why?” The parent says: “Because it just is.” This is spirituality—naked and raw. It just is. In the beginning, the parent is the child’s god. He or she is the person the child questions about things that take belief and faith, including language. “Why?” “Why is it round?” But then it gets even harder: “Why do people die?” Until recently, scientists believed pre-adolescents were too self-centered to process abstract concepts but current research shows that by age 5, children have a concept that something deeper exists, but they lack the language

to express it. That’s where parents come in. Adults tend to be consumed by the here-and-now of experience, however, while children get lost in the flow of experiences. This makes the conversation more challenging. “It is difficult to acknowledge that children can and do have experiences that adults do not have, are not having or may not have had,” says Edward Robinson in his book, “The Original Vision: A Study of the Religious Experience of Childhood” (Seabury Press, 1983). Robinson says an initial step for parents is to accept that many humans have experiences that they alone identify as spiritual, especially children. “All children are born poets,” said poet Brenda Hillman on Nov. 8 at Tulane University. But our increasingly materialistic and fast-paced society doesn’t allow us to get through school and life with that wonder and curiosity we have in the beginning. Minister Jeanne Nieuwejaar says in “The Gift of Faith: Tending the Spiritual Lives of Children” (Skinner House Books, 2003) that adults can combat this problem. “We (parents and teachers) need an attitude that permits us to heed the plant that died, the seed that sprouted, the fragrance of the night, the cloud that turns a miraculous shade of amethyst, the man who cries or the fingers that tremble,” she writes. In 1991, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child declared that spirituality, free from religious context, is seen as a necessary and crucial part of human development. Children need adults to also be interested in cultivating a spiritual life more than they need the “right” answers. Parents don’t have to play God if they admit that they are curious, too.

Circle of the Sun

I

went for a walk through Belhaven with a friend one afternoon a few weeks ago. We passed people walking their dogs and some joggers. And suddenly, it was dark at 5:30 p.m. Days only get shorter from now until the winter solstice in December. The world is darker and seems gloomier. I bask in artificial lights, but it’s just not the same. The winter solstice, around Dec. 21, is the shortest day of the year and first day of winter in the Northern hemisphere. It occurs when the North Pole is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun. After the solstice, days gradually extend. The word solstice comes from the Latin words sol and sistere, meaning “sun stands still.” In the ancient world, solstice observances celebrated the return of the growing season. “When days start getting longer again, there’s more hope for crops to grow,” says Dr. James Bowley, a religious studies professor at

Millsaps College. Because people celebrated the return of crops, religions associated the winter solstice with concepts of birth and rebirth. “Any religion or culture that views life as cyclical is probably going to celebrate solstices,” Bowley says. Beginning in the third century, Romans celebrated the birth of many gods on Dec. 25. This was the day the Romans thought the sun began its movement north, the day of the sun’s rising. A century later, Christians began celebrating the birth of Jesus the same day. Other symbols now associated with Christmas, like mistletoe, holly and the Christmas tree, come from pagan solstice celebrations. Some Christian groups, such as Jehovah’s Witnesses, choose not to celebrate Christmas because of its pagan roots. “Any religion that survives adapts to take in ideas from the surrounding cultures,” Bowley says. In Judaism, Chanukkah has ties to the solstice. In the second century BCE, King An-

Help from Above

T

he child says: “I’m afraid. If I go way over there, something might happen.” His mother felt he was going to cry so she held him and said: “You should not be afraid. God is out there so you shouldn’t be afraid. He is watching over you.” He says, “Is God really out there?” The boy ran to the door but could not go out. “I’m still afraid.” He yelled, “God, if you’re out there, bring in the mop!” (from “Choctaw Stories,” (University Press of Mississippi, 2004, $22) collected and annotated by Tom Mould)

10 Principles for Spiritual Parenting 1. Know God cares for you. 2. Trust and teach that all life is connected and has a purpose. 3. Listen to your child. 4. Words are important; use with care. 5. Allow and encourage dreams, wishes, hopes. 6. Add magic to the ordinary. 7. Create a flexible structure. 8. Be a positive mirror. 9. Release the struggle; admit you are struggling. 10. Make each day a new beginning. Read more about these concepts in “10 Principles for Spiritual Parenting: Nurturing Your Child’s Soul” (Harper Paperbacks, 1998, $13.99) by Mimi Doe and Marsha Walch.

by Jesse Crow tiochus of Syria took over Judea and restricted the practice of Judaism. Chanukkah celebrates the Jews reclamation of their Temple and the light in the Temple that lasted eight days, when there was only enough oil for one day. The Zoroastrian solstice celebration of Shabe-Yalda commemorates the sun. “It is a monotheistic religion, but the sun is a primary image of God,” Bowley says. “There is still an Iranian holiday, which started in Zoroastrianism, which refers to the rebirth of the sun. It’s a leftover holiday that didn’t originate in Islam.” People light bonfires, signifying the birth of the sun, feast and share stories during the night. Some Neopagan and atheist groups are pushing to bring back traditional and non-religious solstice celebrations. Atheists, Bowley says, seek to have a celebration of the natural world, instead of a religious holiday. “Neopagans are working hard to bring back solstice celebrations and to paganize Christmas celebrations. Which is a reverse, because Christians Christianized the pagan,” Bowley says. “Now it’s come full circle for these groups.”




 

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by Galen Orion

GALEN ORION

The key to avoiding this trap is to learn to develop a healthy sense of self-worth that is in no way based upon the quality or quantity of your possessions. That might be easier said than done. But we stand a greater chance of success if we examine the deeper wisdom found within the concept of aparigraha. The root word of aparigraha is parigraha, which means to reach for something and claim it for yourself. By adding the â&#x20AC;&#x153;aâ&#x20AC;? in front of the word, it takes on the opposite definition. Aparigraha, therefore, is the act of releasing possessions. In the ancient world, when Sanskrit was a common language, those who practiced the ideal of aparigraha often took it to extremes. These ascetics endeavored to separate themselves from all but the barest clothing and simplest foods in an effort to gain spiritual purity. While that practice may be fine for the few true devotees among us, the fact of the matter is that the rest of us have obligations and responsibilities that prevent us from simply throwing all our possessions away. But brace yourself: You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to give up all you own to obtain peace of spirit. The reality is that there is nothing wrong with having nice things and taking pride in the things we have earned in our lives. The key is to understand that our possessions are accessories to who we are, not the other way around. Take a moment and consider the three possessions that you would save from your burning house. Of all you own,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shopping therapyâ&#x20AC;? may feel good for a minute, but having more stuff rarely makes an impact on our peace of mind.

R

Dancing for God

C

hurch isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t something that pops into my head when I think about dance. However, todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s society has changed its views on dance and church, and many churches integrate dance into their worship service. Liturgical dance is an expression of prayer or worship through body movement. It can be incorporated into Christian services as well as other religions and faith traditions. Tracie James-Wade is a liturgical-dance instructor at Millsaps College. She teaches and choreographs many of these dances around the Jackson area. Liturgical dance is growing in many churches; however, James-Wade suggests not all churches have warmed to the idea of dancing in the church.

MICHAEL SWAN

ecently, my life went completely down the flusher. My wife, with whom I was blissfully in love, texted me to say she wanted a divorce. That was a bad day. I decided I had two ways of coping: I could listen to every sad love song ever made and begin the great â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weepfest of 2010,â&#x20AC;? or I could shop my sorrows away. During the next six hours, I managed to spend over $300. While under the â&#x20AC;&#x153;euphoriaâ&#x20AC;? of emotional devastation, I made a significant dent in my personal savings. When I awoke the next day, I discovered that the sorrow I felt over my divorce was compounded by guilt for the $300 in impulse buying. I am not the first to fall to the seductive lure of â&#x20AC;&#x153;shopping therapy.â&#x20AC;? Every day, countless people around the world seek malls, stores and other beacons of commercialism with the sole purpose of finding succor from lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pains. But how effective is this form of coping? Does it blind us to a better alternative? Aparigraha is a Sanskrit word that describes the concept of abstention. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be embarrassed if you do not recognize this word. The idea of purposeful restraint for oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-improvement is foreign in our culture. But among many yoga traditions, aparigraha is considered a core practice to master for finding liberation or inner peace. Our capitalistic culture has created, and continually reinforces, the notion that all of lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aches and pains can be whisked away with the right merchandise. Medicines for headaches, anxiety and runny noses are available at the corner drug store. You can resolve a mid-life crisis with ample monetary expenditures. You can even dull the pain of death with the plethora of coffins, flowers and plots to purchase. What we fail to accept is the fact that these placebos do not cure our ills, they just provide momentary suppression of the symptoms. But like everything else, what you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deal with now comes back later with even greater intensity.

these three things help define you and make life worth living. They could include photos, a family heirloom or maybe an irreplaceable piece of art. Now, consider how little concern you have for the hypothetical loss of everything else you own. Strange how much we accumulate that we could easily live without. The idea that our self-worth is tied up in material objects is natural. Nature designed us to build bonds with the things we need to survive. Over the eons, we have learned to create and accumulate things that have little or no intrinsic value to our survival; yet, that same primal urge to bond with our possessions has not evolved the ability to distinguish the urge of need from the urge of want. We must learn to make a conscious effort to stop and truly consider what is important to us. When life becomes difficult, learn to draw upon what we already have: our friends, family, faith and talents. More often than not, the true source of our peace is something simple and meaningfulâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and frequently, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to do. Instead, we seek quick fixesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;medicines, substances and purchasesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to help hide our discomfort. By learning to trust our instincts and practicing aparigraha, separating who we are from what we have, we can develop a healthier lifestyle and find a greater appreciation for the things we with meaning and who we truly are.

by Lauren Collins

Dance is often considered secular or â&#x20AC;&#x153;of the world,â&#x20AC;? which is something seen in a negative light for many churchgoers. The overall purpose for liturgical dance, however, is to enhance the worship service. The dances are not set to specific music most of the time, so the musical selection is relevant to the sermon. Although liturgical dance can be seen in a positive or negative light, it can also be a beautiful thing when seen as a form of prayer through the movement of the body. It is another way of expressing oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love for the creator. In addition, it is something that people can do even if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to church. Liturgical dance simply serves as a praise vehicle, no mat-

ter what denomination or spiritual background, to achieve a better grasp of a dancerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationship with God.

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SIGHTHOUND

A View From the Broom Closet

I

am a witch. No, not the fairy-tale type with green skin and a huge crooked nose or the sexy, raven-haired teenager with dark make-up from the latest thriller. I am the real deal. Undoubtedly, my definition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;witchâ&#x20AC;? is something quite different from yours. If you are Christian, or if you believe that witches are real, then â&#x20AC;&#x153;witchâ&#x20AC;? may evoke a deeply visceral response of disdain, fear and skepticism. This is not the fault of anyone in particular. These prejudices result from centuries of misinformation and media sensationalism. Ultimately, it is intolerance of belief systems different from our own and a profound lack of love and respect for others that stunt our path to peace and the spiritual evolution of the human race. In spite of supposed beliefs for tolerance and acceptance, Christians see non-Christians as heretics, Muslims see Christians as infidels, and the pagan sees those intolerant of other beliefs, whatever their religious path, as deserving of the fates that await them. Historically, the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;witchâ&#x20AC;? comes from the Old Eng-

by Elaanie Stormbender

lish word â&#x20AC;&#x153;wicceâ&#x20AC;? which means â&#x20AC;&#x153;benderâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;wise one.â&#x20AC;? In pre-Christian societies, these wicce were the healers and wise women or men of their day. They were revered and considered invaluable contributors to their communities. Their laws were the laws of nature. Witches understood the cycles of the year, moon phases and herbal medicine. They understood natureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signs, and advised their communities in matters ranging from planting crops to finding a life partner. Witches also believed that God was in every created thing, and every created thing was in God. They believed that every word, every thought, and every deed had an impact on self and others, and that whatever you say, think, or do will come back to you three times stronger than you sent it out. Today, true â&#x20AC;&#x153;wicceâ&#x20AC;? accept roles of great responsibility through the Wiccan Rede: â&#x20AC;&#x153;An ye harm none, do as ye will.â&#x20AC;? The belief places responsibility for oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behaviors directly on the shoulders of the appropriate party: the self. No excuses. No exceptions. For some, these ways have been quietly passed down through generations of their family; for others, it is a calling. Serious students of the craft, or paganism, have a deep and abiding love and respect for all of creation. They would no sooner harm another than they would themselves. As you may have guessed, my legal name is not Elaanie Stormbender. Like many pagans, I use a pen name to protect me and my family from gossip and possible social persecution. But my name is inconsequential; we have many names, but most of us are not â&#x20AC;&#x153;weirdos.â&#x20AC;? Most of us have never painted our eyes or nails black. Many pagans, like many people everywhere, are college educated. We live in your neighborhood; we shop at your grocery store to feed our families. Our children attend school with your kids. We shop at your Walmart, when we must,

for school supplies for our children. We sit next to you in the movie theaters. Unlike Christians, most of us do not wear our beloved symbols in ways that you will ever notice them. We do not eat children, slaughter (or revere) black cats on Halloween, and we do not believe nor worship Satan. The next time you see someone wearing a pentacle, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t assume it means the wearer is a satanist. Instead, consider asking him or her what it stands for. A quick Internet search will show that the pentacle has been an important symbol to many religions, including Christianity. In the Bible belt, pagans are silent, but we are many. It is not our way to proselytize, and you have nothing to fear from your pagan neighbor. We ask that you open your heart to us as members of the human race, and ask that you respect your pagan neighbor as you would your Baptist neighbor. Humanity has no greater enemy than irrational fear driven by ignorance. We ask you to look for the good in all people. I believe society can overcome its prejudiced attitudes. The Jew, the African American, the gay, the female, the Muslim: These are a few who have endured injustice and discrimination at the hands of their communities. Fortunately, because of the bravery of a few, many of these groups now have a voice. Unfortunately, the pagan communities, especially in the South, do not. I offer my voice to inform, to reach out in perfect love and, maybe one day, in perfect trust. I want you to know who I am and a little of what I believe and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe. I want to open the door to my own freedom and that of others like me. I seek freedom to practice my faith openly for my highest good. I offer my voice even if, for now, it must come to you â&#x20AC;&#x153;from the broom closet.â&#x20AC;? Blessed be.

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I

CORNELIA KOPP

’ve always wanted change. At 13, I declared to my parents that I was moving to the Caymans where I would support myself as a watercolorist. That didn’t quite work out. Soon enough, I found myself in college. But once there, I couldn’t wait to leave the country to study abroad in England. And as soon as I graduated, I just wanted to move back to Europe. A few years later, I was married and living in Germany. Our culture conditions us to measure satisfaction based on future circumstances and material items. We’re starved for the new and novel, and we want it all now. Few of us have taken a step back to try and understand what’s feeding our collective hunger. When Julia Roberts appeared in the film based on Elizabeth Gilbert’s wildly successful memoir “Eat Pray Love,” ravenous moviegoers were eager to eat up her prophecy. Newly divorced, depressed and lacking satisfaction, Gilbert decided to spend a year traveling the globe. Via Italy, India and Indonesia, she eventually found peace as a spiritual, sensual and intellectually balanced woman. She also finished her manuscript and met an attractive Brazilian man. Traveling 4,000 miles to work in an ashram, living with a quirky toothless healer, and taking Italian cooking lessons from a gorgeous Roman sounds like a grand path to contentment, but here’s a secret: Happiness already lives deep within you, and it’s free. Mindfulness—a nonjudgmental, present-centered awareness—operates on the idea that learning to recognize the potential in each moment helps us to experience a richer sense of purpose and less dissatisfaction for what we aren’t and don’t have. Historically, mindfulness played a central role in Buddhist meditation, whereby achieving a calm awareness of one’s physical body and feelings is a critical component in the path to liberation. Meditation also has secular applications. Western psychologists, including Jon Kabat-Zinn (founding director of the

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Beyond Hair by Lacey McLaughlin

I

November 24 - 30, 2010

LACEY MCLAUGHLIN

need more black friends. That was the first thing I thought as I walked into the Regency Hotel Saturday evening, Nov. 13, for the third annual Mississippi Hair Battle. Among the approximately 1,000 people who attended the event, about three of them were white—myself included. The childhood joke, “Your epidermis is showing,” rang loudly in my ears. I had never been so conscious of my race. Pure Illusion Salon owner Shalonda Quinn started the show three years ago to showcase the state’s hairstyling talent. The show has since expanded to bring in competitors from around the country. But don’t be fooled by the name: This hair battle goes beyond flat irons and shears. This is a competition of style, costumes, creativity and dance. I had no idea what was in store for me. After I arrived, one of the event organizers escorted me to a room where teams were waiting to perform. When she opened the door, my jaw dropped. Women with hairpieces resembling globes, bridges and trees cautiously applied makeup and last-minute touches. In the front of the line, Lashondra Sumrell and her team “Barbie’s Birthday” consisted of 12 young women dressed in pink lingerie with layers of pink hair and jewels. One “Barbie” had a gift sewn into her hair, another had a Barbie doll’s body. Sumrell, who is a hairstylist at Adam’s Corner Barbershop on the corner of Lynch and Valley streets, spent four weeks designing the hairpieces and props, and choreographing a routine for the show. She says she got the idea after a dream she had involving Barbie dolls. Her set included a pink lounge chair and presents wrapped in pink paper and balloons. In her day job, Sumrell specializes in weaves, so competing in her first battle gave her the opportunity to branch out and explore her creative side. “It takes more creativity, time and imagination,” she says about competing in the hair battle. Sumrell says she began with a vision and used inspiration from her customers, magazines and her own experiences to design the images. “When I started, it took me about a week to brainstorm and know what I wanted to do,” she says. “In that week, I figured out how much I wanted to spend, how big I wanted the hair to be and what colors I wanted to use. Then I started to use my imagination.” I expected a runway with models, but this was way better. Each model owned the stage, taking confident strides, dancing like they were in a Jay-Z video. The show kicked off with Cut Creative stylist Keisha Cooper’s team who resembled characters from “The Wizard of Oz,” including the Tin Man, Dorothy, the Lion and Glenda the Good Witch, whom the announcer took care to point out was sporting “manageable soft hair.” As I hugged the conference room’s wall, I watched the performances in awe. Women of all shapes and sizes confidently embraced the stage and hit every move of their choreographed routine. I was enamored with men who wore African masks and loincloths and dove into the floor. In one routine, a dancer slipped off the stage, only to jump right back up without missing a beat. I wanted everyone to know that I knew I was white—in 26 case they couldn’t tell. “I feel so white,” I texted Posh Boutique

The third annual Mississippi Hair Battle brought 500 competitors from all over the country to Jackson Nov. 13.

Hairstylist JRock prepares Tay-Tay’s hair for the battle.

owner Keisha Alexander who was in the audience. When she didn’t respond right away, I started to panic. Should I have not said that? Is this how black people feel when they are in a sea of white people? “Lacey you crazy! You good!” she responded. During the battle, Alexander came to check on me, “I just wanted to make sure you were OK,” she would say. It’s not that I’m uncomfortable around people outside my race or that I don’t have any black friends, but I’m not used

to feeling like the minority. And it wasn’t until last year, when I was editing a film review on “Good Hair,” that it became apparent just how out of touch I really am when it comes to black culture. I had no idea what a weave was, or that black women had to put chemicals in their hair to make it stay flat. JFP assistant to the editor ShaWanda Jacome patiently educated me on the debate over natural hair versus relaxed. I was shocked. How had I not known this in my 25 years of life? The show prompted me to finally watch “Good Hair” myself. Between discussing the extreme measures many black women take to achieve “good hair,” the film features stylists competing in the Bronner Bros. International Hairshow in Atlanta. When I saw the Atlanta battle onscreen, with its intense competitors and lavish hairstyles and costumes, what I’d seen a couple days before started to click: Hair battles are similar to beauty pageants, ice-skating competitions or even a season of “Project Runway.” It’s a way to showcase stylists with their best techniques, innovation and vision. Between performances, audience members gathered in a circle and danced to songs like Young Money’s “Roger That” and Willow Smith’s “Whip My Hair.” I couldn’t recall going to an event where people just stood up and started dancing. I tapped my feet and tried to imagine my white self jumping into the circle and getting down. After several more performances with themes including biker chicks, soldiers in combat and New York City landmarks, the battle ended. The judges took a few minutes to deliberate and came back with the verdict: Stylist Yvette Wright from Just White Salon from Little Rock, Ark., won the $5,000 prize for best hair styling. Clad in army fatigues, Wright cut hair on stage while dancers danced with fake guns. Quinn says she wants to see Jackson hairstylists think “outside the box” and become a southern city that attracts big names in the hair industry. For me, going to the battle was an opportunity to see beyond hair and to experience a world of creativity and imagination I didn’t know existed.


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BEST BETS Nov. 24 - Dec. 1 by Latasha Willis events@jacksonfreepress.com Fax: 601-510-9019 Daily updates at jfpevents.com

WEDNESDAY 11/24

Lori K. Gordon’s “Six Degrees: West to East” exhibit at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.) continues through Nov. 28. Free; call 601-960-1557. … Anna Kline performs at F. Jones Corner’s blues lunch. Free. … See NunoErin’s “Kinetic Vapor” exhibit in the lobby of the Jackson Convention Complex. Free. … The Mississippi Watercolor Society art exhibition at the Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.) is on display through Dec. 3. Free; call 601-960-1582. … Eddie Cotton performs at Underground 119. $20. … The Tom Petty tribute show featuring The Quills and Josh Hailey is at Hal & Mal’s Red Room. Call 601-948-0888. … Jason Turner performs at Char. Call 601-956-9562.

601-957-3744. … Metrocenter Mall (3645 Highway 80 W.) opens at 9 a.m. for holiday shoppers. Call 601354-7800. … “Safari: An Exploration of Fashion” at the Jackson Convention Complex is at 7 p.m. $35; call 601212-2340. … See the films “Get Low” at 7 p.m. and “Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work” at 9 p.m. at the Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.); also showing Nov. 27. $9 per film; visit msfilm.org. … Alvin Youngblood Heart’s Muscle Theory plays at Martin’s. Call 601-354-9712. … M.O.TO., Los Buddies and Fast Boyfriends play at Hal & Mal’s Red Room. Call 601-948-0888. … Akami Graham performs at Freelon’s. Call 601-353-5357. … Natalie Long and Clinton Kirby perform at the Whistle Stop Café. Visit natalielongandclintonkirby.blogspot.com.

COURTESY PENNY KEMP

SATURDAY 11/27

November 24 - 30, 2010

For Thanksgiving, enjoy free admission to the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Call 601-352-2580. … Restaurants open on Thanksgiving include Sophia’s (734 Fairview St.), Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road), Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.) and Petra Café (104 W. Leake St., Clinton). Visit jfpfood.com for more options. … Amazin’ Lazy Boi and the Sunset Challenge Blues Band perform at F. Jones Corner from 11:30 p.m.-4 a.m. Call 601-983-1148.

FRIDAY 11/26

Northpark Mall (1200 E. County Line Road,

28 Ridgeland) opens at 5 a.m. for Black Friday shopping. Call

TUESDAY 11/30

The Millsaps Singers perform at the Advent Lessons and Carols Service at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.) at noon. Free; call 601-9741422. … The Cellular South Conerly Trophy Presentation at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive) is at 5:30 p.m. $25-$100; call 800280-FAME. … Jesse “Guitar” Smith performs at Burgers and Blues from 6:30-9:30 p.m. Call 601-899-0038.

SUNDAY 11/28

WEDNESDAY 12/1

The annual Festival of Trees exhibit at the Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.) opens today and shows through Dec. 31. Free; call 601-960-1557. … Sonny Brewer signs copies of “Don’t Quit Your Day Job” at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N.) at 5 p.m.; reading at 5:30 p.m. $24.95 book; call 601-366-7619. … The DOXA Fall Concert at Belhaven University, Bitsy Irby Center (1500 Peachtree St.) is at 6:30 p.m. Another show on Dec. 2 is at 7:30 p.m. $5, children and Belhaven students/employees free; call 601-965-1400. More events and details at jfpevents.com. Los Buddies performs at Hal & Mal’s Nov. 26. COURTESY LOS BUDDIES

THURSDAY 11/25

Stevie J performs during F. Jones Corner’s blues lunch at noon. Free. … See the film “The Alien Who Stole Christmas” at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) at 2 p.m. The film shows through Dec. 31. $5.50, $4.50 seniors, $3 children; call 601-960-1552. … The music students’ recital at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.) is at 3 p.m. Free; call 601-974-1422. … Hunter Gibson and Rick Moreira perform at Fitzgerald’s at 8 p.m. Call 601-957-2800. … Fenian’s has karaoke from 8 p.m.1 a.m. Free. … The open-mic free jam at Martin’s is at 10 p.m. Free.

See Jeanette Jarmon’s art show at Cups in Clinton (101 W. Main St., Clinton) through Nov. 30. Artwork for sale; call 601-924-4952. … WLBT’s Walt Grayson signs copies of “Oh! That Reminds Me” at Borders (100 Dogwood Place, Flowood) at 2 p.m. $46.95 book; call 601-919-0462. … The Quills and Dent May perform at Sneaky Beans. Call 601-487-6349. … Scott Albert Johnson performs at Underground 119. Call 601-352-2322. … Zoogma plays at Martin’s at 10 p.m. Visit zoogma.net.

See Janet Akers’ pottery exhibit at the Missisippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Free; call 601856-7546. … Howard Jones Jazz performs at the King Edward Hotel’s brunch from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. … The Mississippi Film Institute and the Mississippi Opera present the film “Tosca” at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.) at 2 p.m. $16; call 601-960-2300. … Bubba Wingfield performs at Burgers and Blues from 5:30-9:30 p.m. Call 601-899-0038. … Shades of Green performs at Philip’s on the Rez. Call 601-856-1680. Eddie Cotton performs Wednesday nights at Underground 119.

MONDAY 11/29


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jacksonfreepress.com

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November 24 - 30, 2010


jfpevents Josh Hailey: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Love Mississippiâ&#x20AC;? Jackson Retrospective Dec. 2-Jan. 11, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). This will be Haileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final show in Jackson, showcasing his photographic work done in the past six years. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and noon5 p.m. Sunday. The exhibit includes an opening reception Dec. 2 at 5 p.m., which will have music from eight bands, body painting, a performance by Nicole Marquez and many other activities. Free; visit joshhaileystock.com. Young Professional Allianceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blue Tie Ball Dec. 2, 7 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.). Enjoy heavy hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres, a cash bar and music by DJ Phingaprint. Bring an unwrapped toy for Toys for Tots. $10; visit ypalliance.com.

HOLIDAY Turkey Day 8K Run/Walk Nov. 25, 8 a.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 North, Ridgeland). The event includes a one-mile fun run and a Turkey Tot Trot. $25 before Nov. 15, $30 after; $10 fun run; call 601-352-7125. Thanksgiving Day at the Zoo Nov. 25, 9 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Enjoy free admission to the zoo, a way for the Jackson Zoo to say thanks for your support. Call 601-352-2580. Community Thanksgiving Dinner Nov. 25, 2 p.m., at Bethlehem Center (920 N. Blair St.). The Beta Delta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is the sponsor. The chapter members will be joined by Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., who will assist with serving the dinner. The dinner is open to the public. Free; call 601-355-0224. International Harvest Sunday/Family & Friends Day Service Nov. 28, 10 a.m., at The Church Triumphant (Odyssey North, 731 S. Pear Orchard Road, Suite 43, Ridgeland). All nationalities are welcome to attend the annual event in recognition of the Thanksgiving holiday. Call 601-977-0007. Advent Lessons and Carols Service Nov. 30, noon, at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), in the recital hall. Join the Millsaps Singers choir, conducted by Dr. Timothy Coker, and the Campus Ministry Team in this celebration of the Advent season. Free; call 601-974-1422. Holiday Mail for Heroes through Dec. 10. The American Red Cross and Pitney Bowes are teaming up to distribute greeting cards to members of the U.S. Armed Forces and veterans during the 2010 holiday season. They encourage families, schools, youth, civic groups, scouting troops, places of worship and other groups to organize and host cardmaking events. For reasons of processing and safety, participants are asked to refrain from sending care packages, monetary gifts, using glitter or including any inserts with the cards. Cards will be accepted through Dec. 10. For more information and card requirements, visit redcross.org/holidaymail. Toys for Tots through Dec. 11. The annual event sponsored by the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves, the city of Jackson and Health Help for Kids assists families who cannot afford to purchase toys for their children for Christmas. Those who need assistance can register weekdays from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. through Dec. 3 and Dec. 11 from 8 a.m.-noon. Toy donations and volunteers are also welcome. Call 877-31GET-HELP or 601-238-2425.

COMMUNITY Events at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). â&#x20AC;˘ Senior Aerobics Class Nov. 24, 10 a.m., at center stage. Seniors have an opportunity to get in shape and have fun while doing it. Sponsored by Tougaloo College. Free; call 601-977-6137. â&#x20AC;˘ Youth Cartoon Basketball League Registration through Dec. 10. The Department of Parks and Recreation is currently conducting registration for the upcoming season. Youth ages 6-14 may par-

ticipate. The deadline for registration is Dec. 10. The league divisions are divided into four separate age divisions. The league games begin Jan. 7. Registration requirements include a copy of a birth certificate and a photograph. $10 registration fee; call 601-960-0471. Porsches & Coffee Breakfast Nov. 27, 8:30 a.m., at Broad Street (4465 Interstate 55 North). The Magnolia Region Porsche Club of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monthly meeting will be upstairs. Prospective members are welcome. Visit magnoliapca.com or email magown@yahoo.com for more information. Christmas Fitness Camp Nov. 29-Dec. 9, at Madison Central High School (1417 Highland Colony Parkway, Madison), on the football field. The two-week class will help you stay in shape during the holidays. Choose from 5 a.m. or 6 a.m. classes Monday-Thursday. $150; visit paullacoste.com. Brown Bag Luncheon Nov. 29, noon, at Sunioraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sidewalk Cafe (200 S. Lamar St., # 900N). Alice Thomas Tisdale, publisher of the Jackson Advocate, will discuss the history of the newspaper. E-mail hamilton738@hotmail.com. Jackson Touchdown Club Meeting Nov. 29, 6 p.m., at River Hills Country Club (3600 Ridgewood Road). Members of the athletic organization meet weekly during the football season and have access to meals, fellowship listen to speakers from around the country. The final meeting of the year is an awards program featuring top seniors of all 10 Mississippi collegiate programs. $280 individual membership, $1,200 corporate membership; call 601-955-5293 or 601-506-3186. Monday Night Football Mixer Nov. 29, 7 p.m., at Dreamz JXN (426 W. Capitol St.). Each week, come to watch football on the big screen television and enjoy burgers, wings and drinks. Wrestling fans can watch WWE matches in the VIP Lounge. Free admission; call 601-979-3994. Cellular South Conerly Trophy Presentation Nov. 30, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). The reception is at 5:30 p.m., and the banquet is at 6:30 p.m. Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best college football player will be revealed with the three media-selected finalists and their coaches in attendance. Seating is limited. $25$100; call 800-280-FAME (3263). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kappa Kampâ&#x20AC;? Pepsi Refresh Project through Nov. 30. Vote once a day in the $250,000 category for the Kappa Kamp Project to benefit Piney Woods School. Visit refresheverything.com. Business Development Mission Call for Participants through Dec. 1. The Mississippi Development Authority (MDA) will lead a delegation of state business leaders on a business development mission to Costa Rica and Panama from March 20-26, 2011. The trip provides opportunities to Mississippi businesses looking to expand trade and create business relationships in the two markets. Participants are responsible for travel and personal expenses. The registration deadline is Dec. 1. Space is limited. $500 per country; call 601-359-3155. Lawyer Citizenship Award Call for Nominations through Dec. 1. The Mississippi Bar has established the award to recognize outstanding lawyers and judges who have given back through service to their communities. The awards will be presented to members of the bar who have served in their communities in areas such as volunteering, educating the public about legal matters or providing pro bono legal services. The nomination deadline is Dec. 1. E-mail houchins@msbar.org. Restaurant Rave Call for Contestants through Dec. 31, at Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau (111 E. Capitol St., Suite 102). Write a rave review in 100 words or less about your favorite Jackson restaurant and submit it by Dec. 31, and you could win a dinner for four. The winning restaurant review will be featured on visitjackson.com and the Bureauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook and Twitter accounts. Email your review to info@visitjackson.com with the word

Album Releases This Week !KON´$NRQLFÂľ4HE !LCHEMIST´*XWWHU:DWHUÂľ,LOYD "ANKS´+)0 +XQJHU)RU0RUH Âľ$ARKWATER ´:KHUH6WRULHV(QGÂľ+EVIN %UBANKS´=HQ)RRGÂľ +EHA ´&DQQLEDO>(3@Âľ+ILLING *OKE ´$EVROXWH'LVVHQWÂľ .ICKI -INAJ´3LQN)ULGD\Âľ-Y #HEMICAL 2OMANCE ´'DQJHU'D\V7KH7UXH/LYHV2I7KH)DEXORXV.LOOMR\VÂľ .E 9O´/LEUD6FDOHÂľ2OBYN´%RG\7DONÂľ2OYKSOPP ´6HQLRUÂľ+ANYE 7EST´0\%HDXWLIXO'DUN7ZLVWHG)DQ WDV\Âľ#ASSANDRA 7ILSON ´6LOYHU3RQ\Âľ â&#x20AC;&#x153;RAVEâ&#x20AC;? in the subject line. Include your full name, telephone number, and email address. Entries can also be submitted through visitjackson.com by clicking on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Want Free Food?â&#x20AC;? banner on the home page. Call 601-960-1891. Cancer Rehab Classes ongoing, at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.), in the Activity Room of the Hederman Cancer Center on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2 p.m. The class helps cancer patients enhance cardiovascular strength, endurance, their immune system and bone density. It helps to increase overall strength and stamina, decrease fatigue and weight loss, and improve digestion. Registration is required. Free; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262. Work Play ongoing, at Last Call (3716 Interstate 55 N.). The networking event is held every Monday from 6-10 p.m. and includes cocktails, music, board games and video games. Business casual attire is preferred. Free admission; call 601-421-7516 or 601-713-2700.

FARMERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MARKETS Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market through Dec. 18, at Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.). Shop the Mississippi Farmers Market for fresh locally grown fruits and vegetables from Mississippi farmers, specialty foods, and crafts from local artisans. The Greater Belhaven Market is also selling local fresh produce and other specialty items. The market is open every Thursday and Saturday from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. and will be open Thanksgiving weekend. Call 601-354-6573. Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market through Dec. 24, at Old Fannin Road Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market (1307 Old Fannin Road). Homegrown produce is for sale Monday-Saturday from 8 a.m.-7 p.m. and noon-6 p.m. Sunday until Christmas Eve. Call 601-919-1690. Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market ongoing, at Jackson Roadmap to Health Equity Projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market (2548 Livingston Road). Buy from a wide selection of fresh produce provided by participating local farmers. Market hours are noon-6 p.m. on Fridays, and 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. on Saturdays. Free admission; call 601-987-6783.

STAGE AND SCREEN Events at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Call 601-960-1552. â&#x20AC;˘ Art House Cinema Downtown Nov. 26-27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get Lowâ&#x20AC;? will be shown at 7 p.m., and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joan Rivers: A Piece of Workâ&#x20AC;? will be shown at 9 p.m. The Mississippi Film Institute is the sponsor. $9 per film; visit msfilm.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Pucciniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toscaâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 28, 2 p.m. The film from Genoa, Italy is presented by the Mississippi Opera and the Mississippi Film Institute. $16; call 601-960-2300. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Alien Who Stole Christmasâ&#x20AC;? Sky Show Nov. 29-Dec. 31. The film is about an alien who kidnaps St. Nicholas. Show times are 1 p.m. weekdays and 2 p.m. Saturdays. $5.50 adults, $4.50 seniors, $3 children. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hurricane on the Bayouâ&#x20AC;? Mega-HD Cinema Nov. 29-Dec. 31. The film is about efforts to bring back the city of New Orleans and the bayou after Hurricane Katrina. Show times are 2 p.m. weekdays, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Saturdays, and 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday matinees Dec. 12 and Dec. 26. $6.50 adults, $5.50 seniors, $4 children.

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Season of Lightâ&#x20AC;? Sky Show Nov. 29-Dec. 31. Explore the origins of the Star of Bethlehem, winter traditions and celebrations around the world. Show times are 3 p.m. Monday-Saturday, and Dec. 12 and Dec. 26. $5.50 adults, $4.50 seniors, $3 children. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Safari: An Exploration of Fashionâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 26, 7 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). E. Willander Wells is the host of the fashion show, which includes music by Henry Rhodes and the Mo Money Band. $35; call 601-212-2340. Jackson Comedy Night ongoing, at Dreamz JXN (426 W. Capitol St.). Stand-up comedians perform every Tuesday night at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. $7; call 601-317-0769.

MUSIC Music Student Performance: Departmental Recital Nov. 29, 3 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Enjoy a variety of vocal, piano and instrumental music from Baroque, Classical, Romantic and contemporary periods. Free; call 601-974-1422. Christopher Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Riley Nov. 30, 8 p.m., at Gertrude C. Ford Center for the Performing Arts (100 University Ave., Oxford). Christopher Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Riley, host of National Public Radioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the Top,â&#x20AC;? is recognized as one of the leading American pianists of his generation. $20, $28; call 662-915-7411.

LITERARY AND SIGNINGS Events at Lemuria Books (202 Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 North). Call 601-366-7619. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippiansâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 26, 11 a.m. Editor Neil White signs copies of the book. $45 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Piggly Wiggly Christmasâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 26, 1 p.m. Robert Dalby signs copies. $24.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life and Artâ&#x20AC;? Nov 26, 10 a.m. Ann Biedenharn Jones signs copies of her book. $29.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Orleans Dining: 2011 Editionâ&#x20AC;? Nov 27, 11 a.m. Steven Wells Hicks signs copies of his book. $12.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Bright Midnightâ&#x20AC;? Nov 27, 1 p.m. Josh Russell signs copies of his book. $18.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Views from the 13th Floor: Conversations with My Mentorâ&#x20AC;? Nov 27, 3 p.m. Alexia Isaak signs copies of her book. $19.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Emperorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tombâ&#x20AC;? Nov 29, 5 p.m. Steve Berry signs copies of his book; reading at 5:30 p.m. $26 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Realâ&#x20AC;? Nov 30, 5 p.m. James Cole signs copies of his book. $26.95 book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh! That Reminds Meâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 27, 2 p.m., at Borders (100 Dogwood Blvd., Flowood). WLBTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Walt Grayson signs copies of his book. $46.95 book; call 601-919-0462.

CREATIVE CLASSES Events at Viking Cooking School (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Call 601-898-8345. â&#x20AC;˘ Gingerbread Workshop for Families Nov. 26, 2 p.m. or 6 p.m. Decorate pre-constructed gingerbread houses with candies, gumdrops, peppermints, sprinkles, cookies and more. Create royal icing

More EVENTS, see page 32

jacksonfreepress.com

JFP-SPONSORED EVENTS

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6A0=3E84F

jfpevents

A M A LC O T H E AT R E

snowmen and holiday trees. The class is for ages 7 and up. An adult must accompany children. $59.

South of Walmart in Madison

• Around the World Cookie Swap Nov. 27, 2 p.m. Bake classic cookies from around the world; then decorate assorted sugar cookies with whimsical decoratifs and brightly colored icings, sprinkles, and sugar crystals. Students leave with an assortment of freshly baked cookies to share with family and friends. $89.

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Friday, November 24 - Thursday, December 2 Tangled 3-D Burlesque Faster

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PG13

Megamind (non 3-D)

PG R

Due Date For Colored Girls Saw 3-D Red Secretariat

R R

PG13 PG

Life As We Know It PG13 Earn points towards FREE concessions and movie tickets! Join the SILVER SCREEN REWARDS

Megamind 3-D PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

from page 31

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Alternative Photography Nov. 29, Dec. 4 and Dec. 6, 5:30-7:30 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). This class will introduce students to large format view cameras and some alternative photographic processes. Students will explore the movements of the cameras as well as processing large format sheet film. Students will also spend some time looking at historical uses of the camera and processes as well as contemporary artists working in the medium. $100; call 601-974-1130. Teen Scene: Techie Crafts Nov. 29, 5 p.m., at Pearl Public Library (2416 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). Attendees will make CD magnets and diskette notebooks. Free; call 601-932-2562. Shut Up and Write! Donna Ladd’s creative nonfiction writing class begins Jan. 8., 10 a.m.-noon for six Saturdays. Every other week; skips spring break. $150; gift certificates available. Call 601362-6121 ext. 16 or e-mail class@jacksonfreepress. com; 10 spots available. Jewelry Making Class ongoing, at Dream Beads (605 Duling Ave.). This class is offered every Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon. Free; call 601-6640411. Bachata and Casino Rueda Class ongoing, at Salsa Mississippi/La Salsa Dance Club and Studio (303 Mitchell Ave.). Learn these Latin dances on Tuesdays from 8-9:30 p.m. $10; e-mail sujan@ salsamississippi.com. Adult Hip-Hop Dance Classes ongoing, at Courthouse Racquet and Fitness Club, Northeast (46 Northtown Drive). Learn authentic hip-hop dance techniques and choreography. Open to all ages 16 and older. Classes are offered Mondays from 7:308:30 p.m. and Fridays from 5:30-6:30 pm. $5; call 601-853-7480. Art Therapy for Cancer Patients ongoing, at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.), in the Activities Room of the Hederman Cancer Center on Wednesdays. The classes are designed to help cancer patients and provide an outlet to express feelings, reduce stress, assist in pain management, help build positive coping skills and increase self-discovery and self-awareness. Art supplies are included. Registration is required. Free; call 601948-6262 or 800-948-6262.

November 24 - 30, 2010

Dance Classes ongoing, at Central United Methodist Church Family Life Center (517 N. Farish St.). Classes for children and adults are held on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Visit jfpevents. com for a list of classes and start times. $35 registration fee, $50 per month for ages 2-17; $15 per class or $50 five-class card for ages 18 and up. $35 registration fee, $50 per month for ages 2-17; $15 per class; call 601-238-3303.

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Adult Modern Dance Class ongoing, at YMCA Northeast Jackson (5062 I-55 N.). Front Porch Dance offers the one-hour class on Fridays. Students will learn dance moves that will help them grow in strength, flexibility and coordination. A YMCA membership is not required. $10 per class; e-mail krista.bower@gmail.com.

EXHIBITS AND OPENINGS Events at Millsaps College, Lewis Art Gallery (Forld Academic Complex, Third Floor, 1701 N. State St.). • “An Instructional” through Nov. 29. Co-curators and artists Ciara Scanlan and Matthew Nevin present an exhibition that challenges the traditional roles of curator, artist and artwork and

will include a collection of North American and European artists’ work. Free; call 601-974-1762. • MART Tour through Nov. 29. The installations by MART (Media Art), an Irish/UK digital arts collective, will be featured in the art gallery and The Emerging Space. Visit mart.ie. “Six Degrees: West to East” through Nov. 28, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). The series by Lori K. Gordon incorporates digital photographic imaging, painting, and collage. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Free; call 601-960-1557. The Levi J. Brown Photograph Collection through Dec. 17, at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.), in the Margaret Walker Alexander Center. See a collection of black-and-white photographs depicting individuals, families, groups, office scenes, and special programs and events. Dating to the 1890s, they detail the stories of middleand upper-class African Americans in Mississippi and Louisiana. Hours are 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. weekdays. Free; call 601-979-3935. Craft Exhibit through Nov. 30, at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road). See pottery made by Janet Akers. Exhibit hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Free; call 601-856-7546. Mississippi Watercolor Society Art Exhibition through Dec. 3, at Municipal Art Gallery (839 N. State St.). The art exhibit highlights approximately 100 selections from members during the juried exhibition. Free; call 601-960-1582. “Adventures In Color” through Dec. 30, at Mississippi Library Commission (3881 Eastwood Drive). See paintings by Bewey Bowden. Hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. An opening reception will be held Nov. 16 from 5-7 p.m. Free; call 601432-4056. Art Exhibit through Dec. 31, at Mimi’s Family and Friends (3139 N. State St., 601-366-6111). See paintings by Cleta Ellington, mosaics by Teresa Haygood, sculptures by Bexx Hale, reclaimed wood frames by Chris Richardson, recycled material fish by Kevin McCarthy, art on canvas by Natalie Ray, watercolors by Sally Fontenot, glass jewelry by Wendy Eddleman and other diverse creations such as pottery and photography. Free. “Megalodon: Largest Shark that Ever Lived” through Jan. 9, at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). The 60-foot, 2million-year-old Megalodon looms life-size in this mega-exhibit of modern and fossil sharks. Museum hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. $3-$5, free for members and children under 3; call 601-354-7303. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, e-mail all details (phone number, start/end date and time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

BE THE CHANGE Habitat Hideaways through Dec. 5, at Habitat for Humanity/Metro Jackson (615 Stonewall St.). Buy raffle tickets for a child’s playhouse to raise money to build decent, affordable houses for families in need in metro Jackson. The winning ticket will be drawn on Dec. 5. $20, $40 for three, $100 for ten; call 601-353-6060. $20, $40 for three, $100 for ten; call 601-353-6060. Jackson Public Schools Call for Volunteers ongoing. Jackson Public Schools is seeking volunteers to be mentors for seniors enrolled in the Advanced Seminar: Employability Skills course. Call 601-960-8310.


DIVERSIONS|music

by Lance Lomax

Shadowing the Blues COURTESY EDWARD ANTOINE

The Bailey Brothers clearly honed their musical skills to learn the nuances of each genre they explored. The first two tracks, “80 on 55” and “Shadow Blues,” mirror the Hill Country sound in the particular tuning of the guitars and the almost tribal rhythms of Brad Carter on drums. The album then makes a down-tempo transition in “Devil and the Deal,” where a steady drumbeat accompanies melodic guitar leads, a noticeable shift from the crunchy distortion of the previous two tracks. And the lyrics, like most memorable blues songs, are simple and catchy: “Devil got my woman / said he won’t give her back / ain’t nothin’ but causin’ problems / you know the

W

ith the holidays coming at us like a freight train, I’m reflecting on all the things I’m thankful for in 2010. Besides my awesome unit of family and friends, I’m thankful for the intriguing people I’ve met this year at different gigs in the state, on Facebook or hosting Singers/ Songwriters Night at Hal and Mal’s. A year ago at Thanksgiving, Clinton Kirby and I had our first practice together as a duo. Since then I’ve had the chance to sing with him and Buffalo Nickel bandmate Steve Deaton, as well as perform with them at Ole Tavern two weeks ago. (It was epic. Thanks, guys!) I’ve taken poor Clinton on a begrudgingly long field trip of my old haunts and stomping grounds in southwest Mississippi to play at different venues, and he’s never complained. I’m so thankful I’m having the chance

Thank You

to sing with such a fabulous musician whose family has pretty much become my extended one. Last but not least, I’m thankful for the opportunity to work for the Jackson Free Press and for the grand opportunity to represent the music scene here in the city I call home. Thank you, Jackson, for being patient with me as I’m still learning the ropes of being a music journalist, your understanding when I was booked up already at Singers/Songwriters Night, for letting me perform for you, and for trying to make our city’s music scene a force to reckon with. Wednesday night, Nov. 24, Mississippi’s own Eddie Cotton performs at Underground 119, and The Quills and Josh Hailey’s Tom Petty Tribute show takes over Hal & Mal’s Red Room. For those of you who missed the show in September, it was electrifying and fun as all get out. Go. On Turkey Day, I hope you enjoy the holidays with your family, but please make

by Natalie Long

Delta,” sung by Jason Bailey, as he puts a slide to the neck of his dobro. The song progressively increases in dynamics as Mathus plays tremolo chords on his mandolin and howls backup vocals with Brock Bailey. The brothers are Cleveland, Miss., natives, and the lyrics are the perfect complement to the dobro: “Well a hundred miles of travel / you know I don’t mind / when I get myself to the Delta / I’ll be feelin’ mighty fine.” The album is dedicated to Jason and Brock’s deceased brother, Chris Gianini, who died of cancer in 2004. “He was a musician. He knew everything about the sound,” Jason Bailey remembers. “He was a guitar player before any of us was.” “How to Write the Wrong” was released in October 2010 and is available for $10 on iTunes and amazon.com.

room for musical dessert when Jason Turner plays at Fenian’s. And check out Jason’s most recent CD, “11 Years.” I’ve heard the demos, and that has blown me away. Friday night, Nov. 26, one of my favorite bands and some of nicest guys you’ll ever meet, Fearless Four, help you dance away the previous day’s holiday feast at Underground 119. Akami & The Key of G hit up Freelon’s; Martin’s entertains the masses with Alvin Youngblood Hart’s Muscle Theory; Hal & Mal’s hosts the fun-loving garage rockers M.O.T.O., Los Buddies, and Fast Boyfriends; and Poets II has Chasing Scarlett playing all your favorites. If you’re out of town for the holidays, Memphis hosts Mississippi homemade musicians, the North Mississippi All-Stars, at Minglewood Hall (1555 Madison Ave., Memphis) Friday, too. Continue catching up with family and friends Saturday night with Pat Brown & The Millenium at F. Jones Corner. Dent May performs at Sneaky Beans, Scott Al-

COURTESY AKAMI GRAHAM

Natalie’s Notes

devil and my woman won’t cut me no slack.” The Bailey Brothers take listeners to Texas in their next song, “Meet Me,” a fast blues shuffle with smoking guitar leads over a steady bass-guitar groove. Fans of artists like Kenny Wayne Shepherd and Stevie Ray Vaughn will appreciate the tempo and rhythm. Both “Meet Me” and the next track, “My Baby,” show the Bailey Brothers’ affinity for Texas and Chicago blues and of their experiences with failed relationships. The lyrics at the very end of “My Baby” epitomize the essence of the blues: “My baby drank all my whiskey / now my ass is all alone.” My personal favorite instrument as a fan of the blues, the slide guitar, seems to be noticeably absent from the album, although a little bit of electric slide can be heard on “My Baby.” But fans of the slide get their own song at the very end of the album on “Back to the

Akami Graham & The Key of G light up the night with their melodies at Freelon’s, Friday, Nov. 26.

bert Johnson blows it on the harmonica at Underground 119, and Zoogma takes the stage at Martin’s. Check them out beforehand at www.zoogma.net. And back up Memphis way, Steve Earle’s son Justin Townes Earle plays Tuesday, Nov. 30 at the Hi-Tone Café (1913 Poplar Ave., Memphis). Don’t forget to help me help you by posting your gigs. Send info to music@ jacksonfreepress.com. Peace, love and all the above to you and your family this Thanksgiving.

FROM OUR ROASTERY, TO YOUR CUP. voted best coffeeshop in jackson 2003-2010

jacksonfreepress.com

W

hen put under the microscope of the most discerning blues aficionado, the Bailey Brothers’ debut studio album “How to Write the Wrong” delivers the whole package in every aspect. In nine tracks, Brock and Jason Bailey, accompanied by acclaimed contemporary bluesman Jimbo Mathus on bass, mandolin and backup vocals, takes listeners on a musical tour from the juke joints and dirt roads of the Mississippi Delta, to the shuffle and swing of Chicago blues, the gritty guitar leads known throughout Texas and Louisiana blues, to the rolling hills of North Mississippi.

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LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ALL SHOWS 10PM UNLESS NOTED

WEDNESDAY

11/24

NOV. 23 - TUESDAY

THE L A ZY BOY ALLSTARS

LADIES NIGHT

LADIES PAY $5, DRINK FREE FRIDAY

11/26

ALVIN YOUNGBLOODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

MUSCLE THEORY

NOW FEATURING EDDIE COTTON ON WEDNESDAY NIGHTS! (Blues) 8-11, $20 Cover

Thursday, November 25th

CLOSED Friday, November 26th

FEARLESS FOUR

(Funk) 9-1 $10 Cover

SATURDAY

11/27

ZOOGMA SUNDAY

11/28

KARAOKE MONDAY

11/29

OPEN MIC JAM TUESDAY

11/30

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE

$2 MARGARITAS $1 HIGHLIFE & PBR

November 24 - 30, 2010

WEDNESDAY

34

Saturday, November 27th

SCOTT ALBERT JOHNSON (Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover

Thursday, December 2nd

BLUE TRIANGLE

(Blues) 8-11, No Cover Friday, December 3rd

BOOKER WALKER

(Jazz) 9-1 $10 Cover

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12/1

LADIES NIGHT

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Saturday, December 4th

JUVENATORS

(Blues) 9-1, $10 Cover 119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

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T

ammy Wynette once said, “I believe you have to live your songs,” but too often the life of this country-music superstar takes a backseat to her hit, “Stand By Your Man.” Author Jimmy McDonough, however, has written a comprehensive biographical account of Wynette’s rise and fall in “Tammy Wynette: Tragic Country Queen” (Viking Books, 2010, $27.95). What most don’t know, and McDonough reveals, is that Wynette is country music’s first artist to go platinum, with album sales over 30 million currently and more than 20 No. 1 hits. McDonough relays dozens of interviews with former Music City heavyweights and those closest to Wynette, some of which conflict with one another and others that rebut Wynette’s own accounts. From Wynette’s rural upbringing in Ittawamba County, Miss., to her last days in her Nashville home, McDonough goes to great lengths to get all sides of her life, and makes no qualms about questioning the validity of conflicting accounts. Wynette, born Virginia Wynette Pugh, was raised in the country, though not in extreme poverty, and McDonough’s chronicling of her travels—from her birthplace to Tupelo to Birmingham and finally to Nashville—provide a more detailed and vivid frame of reference than any tabloid or documentary can afford. The firsthand accounts of the people close to Wynette put into context some of her bigger hits, particularly those concerning relationships and the emotions around them. “There is no doubt Wynette cast a spell over men,” McDonough writes. “Interview those who have been involved with this dame, and their eyes glaze over as they stare into the distance.” From Wynette’s first husband, Euple Byrd (who whispered his proposal to her in church), through her destructive final, fifth marriage to George Richey, McDonough opts to provide ample biographical material on the husbands themselves. He does this with other prominent figures in Wynette’s life, such as longtime producer Billy Sherrill, but never as filler and always as exposition to depict her relationships, romantic or not, as accurately as possible. McDonough’s illustration of her marriages and their eventual declines offers insight into the singer as a wife and forlorn lover. Wynette goes onstage in her native state shortly after separating from third husband, country music legend George Jones, with whom she formed a wildly popular musical

act at the time: “Here she was in Mississippi, stumbling around onstage, besieged by hecklers yelling, ‘Where’s George?’ Jones had always handled talking and joking to the audience. All Tammy had to do was stand there and sing. ‘I didn’t find out I had a personality until I went out on my own,’ (Wynette) said.” Wynette found not only her personality and stage presence by being out her own again, but also inspiration for several of her songs, complete with powerful and haunting vocals. “‘Thank God for my music,’ wrote Wynette, maintaining that writing helped her get over the loss of Jones. ‘Now when I can’t sleep, I just go to the piano and start writing.’” Together, Jones and Wynette formed country’s first superstar couple, but their inevitable split was symptomatic of four of her five marriages. Raised in a strong Christian household, Wynette expressed more than once in her life she felt guilty for the divorces, but as each marriage grew more calamitous, her options shrank. Shortly after Jones and Wynette split (though they did perform their duet act again in later years), country music’s first lady turned to painkillers. The drugs were the result of more than 20 surgeries over the course of her life by McDonough’s count. Wynette quickly became caught in a web. Sometimes she would perform while in great pain, and other times doped nearly unconscious. Richey, her last husband, is a notorious figure in Wynette’s life, responsible for administering her drugs via intravenous injection, acting as her manager and, some say, for using Wynette for her wealth. Married to Wynette from 1978 until the time of her death 20 years later, Richey is both victimized and defended by the couple’s acquaintances. “Any analysis of the Richey-Wynette dynamic at this stage of the game is to submerge oneself in a fog of ambiguity,” McDonough writes of their marriage. But the very painkillers Wynette needed to cope were also her addiction. Some believe Richey, who died in 2010, had a hand in her death, but we’ll likely never know. One thing McDonough certainly makes clear, though: The measure of an artist like Wynette cannot be found in tabloid headlines or even record sales. So what if Wynette didn’t live the lives of her songs’ narrative? Her story is far more captivating and devastatingly compelling than any three-minute song, regardless of its popularity.

Doctor S sez: Last year, Mississippi State ruined the Rebels’ holidays with an Egg Bowl upset. Can the Rebels return the favor this year? THURSDAY, NOV. 25 NFL football, New England at Detroit (11:30 a.m., Ch. 12): Here’s a Thanksgiving tradition that nobody enjoys: watching the Lions get pummeled by a good team like the Patriots. … New Orleans at Dallas (3:15 p.m., Ch. 40, 620 AM): The Cowboys have suddenly become dangerous. The Saints are not giving thanks for that. FRIDAY, NOV. 26 College football, Auburn at Alabama (1:30 p.m., Ch. 12): Can the Crimson Tide spoil the Tigers’ title hopes before the NCAA does. … Southern Miss at Tulsa (5:30 p.m., Tulsa, Okla., CBS College Sports, 105.1 FM): The Golden Eagles still have a shot at the C-USA championship game. All they have to do is beat the Golden Hurricane and have UCF and East Carolina lose. OK, it’s not a very good shot. … High school football, Class 6A playoffs, South Panola at Madison Central (7 p.m., Madison, 105.9 FM): The Tigers, defending state champs, battle the Jaguars for a spot in the state title game. SATURDAY, NOV. 27 College football, Mississippi State at Ole Miss (6 p.m., ESPNU, 105.9 FM, 97.3 FM): The Bulldogs and Rebels meet in the Egg Bowl. Embrace the hate. SUNDAY, NOV. 28 NFL football, San Diego at Indianapolis (7:20 p.m., Ch. 3, 930 AM): Here’s the solution to what ails the Colts: The Chargers are in town. MONDAY, NOV. 29 NFL football, San Francisco at Arizona (7:30 p.m., ESPN 930 AM): This proves that “Monday Night Football” isn’t always must-see TV. TUESDAY, NOV. 30 Men’s college basketball, Florida Atlantic at Mississippi State (7 p.m., Starkville, 105.9 FM): The Bulldogs are hoping for a victory that might come in handy at NCAA Tournament time and the Owls need that check. You have to pay the bills somehow. WEDNESDAY, DEC. 1 Men’s college basketball, Jackson State at Nebraska (7 p.m., Lincoln, Neb.): The Tigers continue their fundraising tour against the Huskers. JSU has got to pay the bills somehow. The Slate is compiled by Doctor S, who is already over the “Conan’s back” thing. See the real stars at JFP Sports on www.jacksonfree press.com.


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37


Food Fight: Desserts of Vicksburg

We’re Having That Again?

BRÜCKE OSTEUROPA

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hile I know many folks are able to deftly hide last night’s dinner in some sort of casserole, I never learned the skillful art of food camouflage. The Man knows. It’s like my husband has some kind of internal detector that magically alerts him to the mere hint of food being “recycled” in any way. I can’t even freeze leftovers for later use. He inevitably finds the defrosting goods in the fridge, and the jig is up. Leftover turkey is not a problem at our house: The Man doesn’t like it, and I don’t eat it. There’s no problem with leftover dressing, either, as I could happily eat that every day without complaint. What we are always left with is an array of side dishes, usually mashed potatoes, sweet potato casserole and some random green veggie. A friend recently shared a method of using leftovers that has finally met The Man’s approval: savory pancakes. In “How to Cook Everything Vegetarian” (Wiley, 2007, $35), author Mark Bittman suggests a basic recipe, a one-to-one ratio of ingredients: mix together one cup mashed or pureed veggies with one cup flour, one teaspoon baking powder and one egg. Because I typically just eyeball when measuring, I usually add milk as needed to get the desired consistency. These are then cooked like plain old pancakes. This is a simple way to use those surplus sweet potatoes. The Man not only eats these without complaint, he now requests them.

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efore the 19th century and the mechanization of the sugar industry, desserts were consumed mainly by privileged aristocrats or as a rare holiday treat. Thank goodness for technology, or I think I would have to had led the Jay Parmegiani likes the classic way of making brûlée, with thick custard revolt to fight for equal and a caramelized-sugar shell. sweets consumption. Every culture has a dessert unique to its region that celebrates the culinary feats of its people. I set out to find such treats in our neck of the woods.

COURTESY JAY PARMEGIANI

by Crawford Grabowski

by Terri Cowart

Crème Brûlée Jay Parmegiani, the French chef with an Italian name and owner of Roca, a fine dining restaurant in Vicksburg, describes crème brûlée as the “quintessential” French dessert. “I like the classic way of making my brûlée,” he says. Parmegiani’s brûlée is thick, rich custard below a sugary, caramelized candy-like shell. Zwetschenkuchen (Plum Cake) “Its tart sweetness and jewel tones remind me of my childhood,” Debbie Gorney says of Zwetschenkuchen, a German plum cake. Gorney who was born in Idar-Oberstein, Germany, remembers German bakeries only selling Zwetschenkuchen during the fall. She and her husband, Jim, who taught German in the Vicksburg-Warren school system for 35 years, shared their recipe. Beignets Chris Fink’s accent is a dead give away. Born in New Orleans, Chris is the chef of what he calls, “a mom and pop restaurant.” Chris and his wife, Sally Bullard, own and operate Main Street Market, in Vicksburg’s historic downtown. Chris offered his personal beignet recipe that he whips up for his kids. “I don’t use a yeast dough,” he says. “I use baking powder because it’s pretty forgiving.”

MASHED POTATO CAKES

November 24 - 30, 2010

1-1/2 cup mashed potatoes 1 egg, beaten 1/4 cup all-purpose flour salt and pepper 1/2 cup grated cheese 1/4 to 1/2 cup mashed or pureed veggies (optional) Cooking spray or melted butter

38

Mix together potatoes, flour, egg and cheese. Add any other veggies you’re using. I have had the best success with broccoli, cauliflower and spinach. Season with salt and pepper. The mixture’s consistency will be based on the “stiffness” of your original mashed potatoes. The mixture will be really sticky, but if it’s too runny to work with just add a little more flour. Shape into patties on a foil-lined baking sheet. Spray patties with cooking spray or brush with melted butter. Bake at 375 degrees for about 20 minutes, then flip. Bake for about five to 10 minutes more or until golden. Makes about six to eight cakes. These freeze well, so you can later serve “leftover” leftovers.

CRÈME BRÛLÉE 2 quarts heavy cream (40 percent) 2 ounces vanilla extract 13 egg yolks 3 whole eggs 15 ounces granulated sugar

Combine heavy cream and vanilla in a non-reactive saucepan. Bring to a scald. Remove from heat. In a large mixing bowl whisk egg yolks, eggs and sugar until well blended. Continue to whisk while slowly pouring the hot cream mixture into the egg mixture and whisk until well blended. Ladle six ounces of the custard mixture into individual ramekins, making sure to lightly skim the surface to remove any air bubbles or foam (the foam will burn when caramelizing the sugar). Bake in a 200-degree convection oven for 35 minutes. The custard should tremble slightly when shaken. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for at least 30 minutes, then refrigerate. Spread a thin layer of sugar over the custards—about one tablespoon. Using a hand-held blowtorch, to lightly caramelize the sugar. The color should be a light brown. If the sugar gets to dark it will be bitter impart a bitter taste to the finished dessert. Allow to cool for at least one minute, then serve immediately.

Mochi Adrienne Eckstein, whose last name is German, lived in Hawaii for five years. She learned in Hawaiian culture, rice needed to be sticky. “One of the best compliments you could receive is if you were asked to bring the rice to an event,” she says. With a texture similar to gelatin, mochi, one of Eckstein’s favorites.

ZWETSCHENKUCHEN Filling

(PLUM CAKE)

2 pounds blue plums (halved, pitted and sliced) 3/4 cups sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon 2 tablespoon flour

Pastry

2 cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 to 2 tablespoons liquid (rum, water, milk or cream) 1 medium egg (beaten) 1 teaspoon lemon zest (the outer yellow part of the lemon; avoid the white part, the pith, as it is very bitter.) 3 tablespoons sugar 1-1/2 sticks cold butter (cut into small cubes) Pinch of salt

Combine flour, salt, baking powder and sugar. Chop butter into small pea-sized bits. Add the egg, liquid and lemon zest. Work with fingers until smooth like pie dough. Press pastry over bottom and side of 9x10 form pan. Place sliced plums in concentric circles. Sprinkle a half-cup sugar over plums. Combine remaining quarter-cup sugar with cinnamon and flour. Sprinkle over top. Bake in a 400-degree preheated oven for 30 to 40 minutes until pastry is flakey-crisp and golden, and plums are bubbling with syrup. Cool before serving.

BEIGNETS

2 cups flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon baking powder 1teaspoon ground cinnamon (or less to taste) 1 medium egg 3 tablespoons sugar 1 cup milk, warmed 1/4 teaspoon vanilla 1 quart oil for deep frying Powered sugar

Sift together the flour, salt, baking powder and cinnamon. Dissolve sugar in warm milk and let cool, then add the vanilla. Beat the egg in separate bowl and add to liquid mixture. Add the liquid mixture in small batches into the dry ingredients until it forms a dough. Kneed out dough. It should feel wet and soft like canned biscuits. Roll out and let rest for 10 minutes. Then cut and drop in vegetable oil heated to 375 degree. Remove from oil when golden brown (about 30 seconds to one minute—watch closely, they cook fast). Sprinkle with powdered sugar and eat while still warm.

MOCHI

2 cups mochiko (rice) flour 1-1/2 cups sugar 2 cups liquid (passion, orange, strawberry or guava juice) 1/2 cup potato starch Margarine

Mix ingredients in a mixing bowl using a whisk. Pour into a three-quart microwaveable dish greased with margarine. Cover with plastic wrap. Microwave on high for 8-9 minutes. Let cool, then slice and roll in potato starch.


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41


Cookin’ Up Some Christmas Gifts

by Crawford Grabowski

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ver the past few years, I’ve realized that most of the adults I know, including myself, have way too much stuff. Nobody really needs another coffee mug, picture frame or cute item to put on the shelf. The shelves are all full. Because of this, I try to give gifts that are consumable, and in my family, this means food. As a kid, my mother helped me make cakes and cookies, providing me with my own miniature baking pans. Now we make biscotti. One unforgettable Christmas, my stepmother went on a pickling frenzy. I got to help make what seemed to be vats of pickled eggs and pickled okra. I think this had something do to with her being relatively new to the South, and these items were still novelties to her. All I know is that I haven’t been able to eat either item since. In more recent years I gave my grandmother homemade frozen meals. This made cooking dinner easier for her, because all she had to do what punch the buttons on the microwave. I enjoy receiving edible gifts just as much as making them. Every year, I look forward to treats from my cousins, particularly granola and home-baked bread. I gave up on bread baking long ago because I only succeeded in making large loaf-shaped bricks. Their granola, however, is relatively simple to make. Here are recipes for a few of my holiday gift staples. You will be happy to know that I am not sharing the recipe for pickled eggs.

AMY’S BASIC GRANOLA

ORANGE AND CINNAMON BISCOTTI

3-1/2 cups old fashioned oatmeal 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons canola oil 1/3 cup real maple syrup 1/3 cup chopped nuts (almonds, pecans, and/or walnuts) 1/3 cup unsweetened coconut 1/3 cup sunflower seeds 1/4 cup sesame seeds (optional) 1/4 cup unprocessed wheat bran 1/4 cup wheat germ 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon vanilla 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (optional, but I think it tastes better with it.) 1 cup dried fruit such as raisins, cranberries, blueberries, and/or cherries

1 cup sugar 1/2 cups unsalted butter (room temperature) 2 large eggs 2 tablespoons grated orange peel 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 cups all-purpose flour 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon cinnamon

In a large bowl mix together all the dry ingredients except the fruit. Melt the butter in the maple syrup and oil; add to the dry ingredients. Mix well and bake on large jellyroll pan at 350 degrees for about 15 minutes. Take out and stir; add the fruit and bake another 15 minutes or until golden brown. You can also add the fruit after all is cooked is you prefer. The total cooking time is 30-40 minutes. Cool on wire rack. Makes about 6 cups.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter two baking sheets. Beat sugar and butter in large bowl until blended. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each. Mix in orange peel and vanilla. In another bowl, mix flour, baking powder, and cinnamon. Add to butter mixture and mix until just blended. Divide dough in half. Place each half on a separate baking sheet. Shape each piece of dough into a “log” that’s approximately 3-inches wide and about 3/4-inch high. Bake about 35 minutes or until the “log” is firm to touch. Cool for 10 minutes. Using a serrated knife, cut each log on the diagonal into 1/2-inch slices. Place slices onto baking sheets and cook about 12 minutes or until tops are golden. Turn the slices over and bake until bottoms golden. Cool and store in an airtight container. Makes about two dozen.

E

42

Candy’s Confections (1149 Old Fannin Road, Suite 7, Brandon, 601-992-9623) offers a wide variety of goodies for those with a sweet tooth. Their melt-in-your mouth petit fours are each $1.50 for plain and $1.55 if decorated.

COURTESY THAMES FOODS’

As a division of the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, the MSU Cheese Shop (Herzer Food Science Building, 925 Stone Blvd., Mississippi State, 662-325-2338, www.msucheese.com). The online store offers cheese, juice, cider, Bully’s Breakfast packs, condiments, peanuts and meat. Traditional Edam cheese is $18. You can also get a White Gift Pack for $35 or a Maroon Gift Pack for $45. Each gift box contains a sampling of many of the cheeses made by MSU.

FILE PHOTO

Fat Tuesday’s (5719 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601-9562971) offers up two great southern staples: JT’s Seasonings, a Cajun spice blend that sells for $5 a jar, and Thames Foods’ Comeback Sauce that is $6 a bottle. These make great stocking stuffers for any southern cook.

Apple Annies (106 Autumn Ridge Place, Suites 5 and 6, Brandon, 601-992-9925) has a delicious line of dip mixes. The flavors range from Baked Enchilada, which I hear is the best, to Mexican and Artichoke Parmesan. Each mix is $3.50, or you can get three for $10.

The Choppin’ Blok (500 Highway 51 N., Suite F, Ridgeland, 601-607-4121) has the perfect gift for Bulldog or Rebel fans: the Ultimate Bulldogs Pasta Salad and the Ultimate Rebels Pasta Salad. Each package sells for $7. It also sells a variety of other school-themed items.

COURTESY CANDY’S CONFECTIONS

Olivia’s Food Emporium (820 Highway 51, Madison, 601-8988333) makes and sells frozen meals including chicken pot pies, which sell for $18 per four-person serving, and Chicken Rotel which is $14 per four-person serving.

The Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland, 601856-7546) offers its own signature line of coffee made by the Mississippi Coffee Company, which sells for $10 a pound. Grab a few handcrafted coffee mugs while you’re there, and you’ve got a perfect gift.

COURTESY APPLE ANNIES

November 24 - 30, 2010

Nandy’s Candy (Maywood Mart, 1220 E. Northside Drive, Suite 380, 601-362-9553) is well known for its chocolate-covered strawberries. This time of year, try the divinity, which sells for $8.95 a bag, or the assorted chocolates, which range from $16 for a 1/2pound box to $32 for 1 pound.

COURTESY OLIVIA’S FOOD EMPORIUM

CLIP ART

dible Gifts While I prefer to make “food” gifts, I don’t always have time. I have finally accepted the fact that it’s perfectly OK to let other people do the work for me. Here are a few suggestions for edible gifts that only require the time it takes to drive to the appropriate store. --Crawford Grabowski


From the Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hands

1.â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rogueâ&#x20AC;? moonstone cuff bracelet, $585, Gabrielleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Secrets 2.â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zhugâ&#x20AC;? druzy stone and Thai hill tribe silver necklace, $215, Gabrielleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Secrets 3.â&#x20AC;&#x153;Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Play Nice... Play Derbyâ&#x20AC;? T-shirt, $15, High Voltage GraphX & Apparel 4.Blue and acrylic click pen, $25, BreakNECK Designs 5.Handspun lavender cowl with ribbon, $23, Tessacotton6.Louisa headband, $5, Art with Flair 7.â&#x20AC;&#x153;How I Rollâ&#x20AC;? T-shirt, $15, High Voltage GraphX & Apparel 8.â&#x20AC;&#x153;Turning Twentyâ&#x20AC;? Amy Butler fabric quilt, $550, Designs 4 Your 9.â&#x20AC;&#x153;just a little-salmon-sparkleâ&#x20AC;? earrings, $18, Wildflower Designs by Stacey Hansen 10.Melbourne Cup hair clip/brooch pin boutonniere, $8.99, Hair Bows Couture 11.Diaper Bag tote, $25, Proverbs 31 Creation 12.Elvis Presley photo charm bracelet, $25, Planet Love 13.Father-son ties, $25, Wrapped Up & More 14.Monogrammed metal bucket tote, $20, Imperfectly Beautiful 15.Monogrammed Christmas ornament in white and aqua-blue, $14, Imperfectly Beautiful 16.New Orleans Saints wreath, $80, Nablo2005 17.Hand painted Paris lamp, $30, Art Works by Carol 18.Personalized bottle for lotion, soap or hand sanitizer, $10.50, GIRLfriends 19.Hand painted personalized Christmas ornament, $14, Cut N Glue 20.â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brick Popâ&#x20AC;? in red or â&#x20AC;&#x153;Happy Retro Birdsâ&#x20AC;? pillow (16 inches), $18, Cotton Colors 21.â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Perfect Manâ&#x20AC;? gingerbread soap (homemade, vegan and sulfate free), $5, Bare Bumm Bathworks 22.â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wild Irisâ&#x20AC;? necklace, $145, Wildflower Designs by Stacey Hansen 23.Smoky cocktail ring, $80, Wildflower Designs by Stacey Hansen

2.

13.

14.

19. 3.

18.

7.

5. 6. 21.

1.

23.

16.

12.

10.

15.

20.

17.

22.

9.

Where2Shop

4.

11.

8.

High Voltage GraphX & Apparel (www.highvoltagegraphx.com or highvoltagegraphx.etsy.com) Bare Bumm Bathworks (barebummbath.etsy.com) Tessacotton (tessacotton.etsy.com) Wildflower Designs by Stacey Hansen (wildflowerdesigns.etsy.com) Hair Bows Couture (hairbowscouture.etsy.com) Proverbs 31 Creation (proverbs31creation.etsy.com) Wrapped Up & More (savannahwilliamson.etsy.com) Imperfectly Beautiful (imperfectlybeautiful.etsy.com)

Art Works by Carol (artworksbycarol.etsy.com) GIRLfriends (shopgirlfriends.etsy.com) Cut N Glue (cutnglue.etsy.com) Cotton Colors (cottoncolors.etsy.com) BreakNECK Designs (breakneckdesigns.etsy.com) Art with Flair (artwithflair.etsy.com) Nablo2005 (nablo2005.etsy.com) Designs 4 You (designs4you.etsy.com) Planet Love (shopplanetlove.etsy.com)

-ON 4HURS A P P P

&RI 3AT A P P P

-EDITERRANEAN #UISINE

7OOD &IRED "RICK /VEN 0IZZAS (OOKAH´S "EAUTIFUL 0ATIO 'REAT BEER SELECTION  YOU CAN BRING YOUR OWN WINE TO SHARE

 -AIN 3TREET 3UITE ! IN -ADISON Â&#x201E;    Â&#x201E; MEZZAMSCOM

jacksonfreepress.com

T

he Jackson area is filled with tons of creative folks offering handmade items that would make wonderful holiday gifts. Each item carries the essence of the person who made it. What a wonderful way to connect with community. Each piece is a labor of love that you can pass on to a special person in your life.

by ShaWanda Jacome

43


by ShaWanda Jacome

1

2

3 7

8 4 5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Guayaki Yerba Mate’ loose-leaf tea, $9.49, Rainbow Whole Foods EcoTeas yerba mate tea, $9.19, Rainbow Whole Foods Mala beads in pink, $40, Mala Madness Mala beads in burnt orange, $45, Mala Madness Imported wool rugs (4 x 6), starting at $295, Tinnin Imports Prayer candles, $1.79, Carneceria Valdez Ganesha Hindu statue, $13, Fair Trade Handicrafts Buddhist statue, $32, Fair Trade Handicrafts Friends of Uganda drum (styles vary), $55, Fair Trade Handicrafts Tibetan prayer flags (styles vary), $9-$16, Fair Trade Handicrafts Lotus tea set (with two teacups), $37, Fair Trade Handicrafts Vietnamese bamboo-design tea set, $29, Fair Trade Handicrafts “Old Rugged Crosses” by Craig Escude, small $55, large $150, circa. Stratton Menorah, $525, Simon Pearce

11

9

6

14

13

WHERE2SHOP Tinnin Imports (2089 Lakeland Drive, 601-981-5234, tinnin-

imports.com); Fair Trade Handicrafts (2807 Old Canton Road, Suite A, 601-9870002); Carneceria Valdez (6530 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601-899-6992); circa. Urban Artisan Living (2771 Old Canton Road, 601-362-8484, circaliving.com); Lemuria Books (4465 Internstate 55 N., Suite 202, 601-366-7619) Mala Madness (madnessmala.etsy.com); Rainbow Whole Foods (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-3661602); Simon Pearce (simonpearce.com)

12

10

Spiritual Exploration

C November 24 - 30, 2010

heck out these titles to learn how different people worship (or don’t) and how to co-exist harmoniously with your newfound knowledge. All books available at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55, Suite 202, 601-366-7619)

44

“Good Without God: What a Billion Nonreligious People Do Believe” by Greg Epstein (Harper Paperbacks, 2010, $14.99)

“The Goodness of God: Assurance of Purpose in the Midst of Suffering” by Randy Alcorn (Multnomah Books, 2010, $12.99)

“Do I Kneel or Do I Bow?: What You Need To Know When Attending Religious Occasions” by Akasha Lonsdale (Kuperard, 2010, $19.95)

“Oneness: Great Principles Shared by All Religions” by Jeffrey Moses (Ballantine Books, 2002, $13.95)

“City on Our Knees” by TobyMac (Bethany House, 2010, $19.95)

“The Faith Club: A Muslim, A Christian, A Jew—Three Women Search for Understanding” by Ranya Idliby, Suzanne Oliver and Priscilla Warner (Free Press, 2007, $15.99)

“The Path to Tranquility: Daily Wisdom” by the Dalai Lama (Penguin, 2002, $15)


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45


Church Lady

by ShaWanda Jacome and Natalie A. Collier

I

n times past, tradition dictated that a woman of a certain age cover her head when entering a church on Sunday mornings. It all started with the biblical apostle Paul. In a letter he wrote to the Corinthians, he said women should cover their heads during worship service. It’s a commandment many women, especially black women, have taken to heart.

“My hats crawl off ’bout every Sunday. It’s no way to hook ’em on. One of the members will just pick it up and hold it until I sit down.”

1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Red wide-brim hat with feather accent, $189, First Lady Inc. Boutique Black and white stripped hat with flower, $99.99, Dress Code Three-tiered hot pink hat with rhinestone accents, $169.99, Dress Code Handcrafted “Virtuous Woman” church fan, $3, Tender Moments Orange feathered hat, $39.99, Dress Code Purple hat with flowers and mesh brim, $179, First Lady Inc. Boutique Five freshwater pearls earrings, $36, Lil McKH Jewelry

During slavery times, one of the ways the women would spruce themselves up for worship services would be to wrap their heads in scarves or add flowers to well-worn, tattered hats. Hats may have changed, but the tradition hasn’t. From relatively modest crowns to ones adorned with rhinestones, fur and feathers, hats spruce up outfits, add allure and tell stories.

—Shirley Gaither, evangelist and pastor’s wife from the book “Crowns” by Michael Cunningham, Craig Marberry and foreword by Maya Angelou (Doubleday, 2010, $29.95)

3 4

5

2

6 7 Where2Shop:

Dress Code, Maywood Mart, 1220 E. Northside Drive, Suite 200, 601-362-3646; First Lady Inc. Boutique, 211 S. Lamar St., 601-272-5753; Lil McKH Gallery & Atelier* 200 Commerce St. (above Hal & Mal’s), 601-259-6461, www.lilmckhjewelry.com; Tender Moments, www. tendermomentsllc.etsy.com *Please call for appointment.

SHOPPING SPECIALS

Send sale info to fly@jacksonfreepress.com.

Belk (Northpark Mall, 1200 E.

Cellular South (multiple locations

Cook & Love Women’s Shoes

County Line Road, Ridgeland, 601991-2017) Make it to church

including 5260 Interstate 55 N., 601978-3015 and 125 S. Congress St., Suite 1100, 601-355-1522) Get a

(Highland Village, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 159, 601-362-6088) Win-

Samsung Galaxy S Showcase on sale for $199.99 with a 2-year contract; data plan required.

ter shoes on sale for $49.90, $69.99 and $89.90, see store for select styles included in the promotion.

Stella & Dot (601-940-8880, dparks2020@aol.com, stelladot.com/ donna) Spice up your church

dress with this Bloom Flower brooch on sale for $29, regularly $39.

November 24 - 30, 2010

on time with this Citizen EcoDrive Normandie stainlesssteel ladies watch on sale for $225, regularly $300.

Pink Lamborghini (310 Mitchell Ave., 601-366-6403) New inventory has arrived. Visit their Facebook page and mention the ad to receive 15 percent off.

46

Check out flyjfp.com for information about other sales around the city, trends and various things fly people should know.


3EE SOMETHING NEW HERE AT

75% off

Clearance Shoes

Chocolate Advent Calendars While supplies last!

Custom Optical

Friday Nov. 26 and Saturday Nov. 27 ONLY!

1220 E Northside Drive #380 Jackson, MS Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. | 601-362-9553 WWW.NANDYSCANDY.COM

.YLH[SLUN[OZ .SHTV\Y.PYS /HPY,_[LUZPVUZOHSM[OLWYPJL OHSM[OL[PTL MYLLJVUZ\S[H[PVU we also offer: Brazilian blowout - spray tan waxing - facials - mani/pedi and cool accessories... 5352 Lakeland Dr ste100B | 601 992-7980

661 Duling Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson 601.362.6675 Trish Hammons, ABOC

425 MITCHELL AVE. IN HISTORIC FONDREN

FRI 12P-7P, SAT 10A-6P â&#x20AC;˘ 601-939-5203

WWW.CUSTOMOPTICAL.NET



`SQSWdS

@3B67<90:/194@72/G 0).+ Lamborghini B L A C K  Q][SPOQY T]`SdS`g# PcQYa bVObg]ca^S\R FRIDAY A6=>03BE33<&/;/;

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310 Mitchell Ave Jackson, MS 601.366.6403

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@ Repeat Street Metro Jackson

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RegularGiftShopHours:Mon.-Fri.9am-4pm Our Gift Shop will be open Saturday, Dec. 11th 10am - 3pm -AllSalesSupportTheMustardSeed-

The Mustard Seed - 1085 Luckney Road â&#x20AC;˘ Brandon, MS 39047 â&#x20AC;˘ 601-992-3556 | Visit us on the web at www.mustardseedinc.org.

jacksonfreepress.com

A Christian Community for Mentally Challenged Adults

47


M_TU[Z_ 0MUXe

File Ch. 7 & 13 Bankruptcy for $900 + Federal Filing Fee! Just $400 Down Flexible Payment Plans Available

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Aď?´ď?´ď?Żď?˛ď?Žď?Ľď?š ď&#x153;Ś Cď?Żď?ľď?Žď?łď?Ľď?Źď?Żď?˛ Aď?´ Lď?Ąď?ˇ Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ (601) 316-7147 FREE BACKGROUND INFO. AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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1046 Greymont Ave. (behind La Cazuela) CALL US AT 601-397-6223!

Charmz Fashion Boutique

good fashion is never out of season 3931 Hanging Moss Road in Jackson 601-397-6133 | Tues.- Sat. 11am-7pm

Affordable Drug, STD and Paternity Testing

GRAND PRIZE GIVEAWAY $25 off Strand-by-Strand Hair Extensions

No purchase to enter. Must be present. Non-transferable.

1775 Lelia Drive, Ste F | 601-982-7772

$99

MS FITNESS PRO, LLC

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20 Years of Experience Tammy Thomas CPT, JD

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BELLYDANCE

NEW CLASSES begin Jan. 24 @ 6:30pm

LOWEST PRICES IN THE STATE! 6804 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland, MS 601-956-9433 | ridgelandspirits.com

>PSTPUN[VU:[YLL[ 7OVUL!

www.PetraCafe.net

ETRA CAFĂ&#x2030; & HOOKAH M

;/<9:+(@:!7(5+69(Âť:)6? -90+(@:!:<0;,30-,-90+(@:

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67?78-616 0)<<1-;*=:/

%ULQJDIULHQG*LIW&HUWLĂ&#x;FDWHV$YDLODEOH

For more info., call Millsaps College at 601-974-1130

2902 Hardy St. #50 104 W Leake Street Clinton, MS Hattiesburg, MS

  

Divorce may be painful But it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be expensive. When you agree to agree, call me. Save thousands of dollars. No Fault Divorce, Flat Fee

Arin Clark Adkins, Attorney, LCSW Jackson - 601.981.1568 Hattiesburg - 601.582.1977

:(;<9+(@:!30=,4<:0*

74(4

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v9n11 - 2010 Spirituality Issue: Relevance of the Old Testament  

Children of Faith; From the (Broom) Closet; Be Here, Now; Banning Earmarks, Let's Talk Arena, Jackson; Fly! Gift Guide