Page 1


Business Law Construction Law Government Contracts Commercial Litigation Economic Development Carson Law Group, PLLC Capital Towers 125 S. Congress Street Suite 1336 - Jackson, MS 601.351.9831 thecarsonlawgroup.com

Let the little children come to me. Fondren Presbyterian Church USA the church with open doors   

         Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

3


%',%$) ())#& %$( & )-'%+ #)% &')  ) #(

*')$ ),($)%'$#& %$) )%%!-'(%*)(()# $" $ , )()## "(%'%,%'!/$ $ $' "(*&&%')'%*&% (&'$)( %"'( " $(%($)##)( -)'- ((*&&%')'('%+ # )%&') ' #%$,' '  #)).$ (" $"" $ #"" ),-)%%*'())) )"())%'  (( (( &&  %-( '%(( %*$)'-*$$' %'),%%$(*) +-'($) %*)()'$ %$'$)( 0-

          


Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

5


erator: 750 wa g i fr

tts

Re

WATTS ARE INVISIBLE UNTIL YOU SEE THEM ON YOUR BILL.

Entergy Mississippi is committed to giving you new ways to lower the cost of energy. Our new Entergy Solutions program gives you exciting, new ideas to help manage energy, conserve energy use and put money back in your pocket, one watt at a time. Learn more at EntergySolutionsMS.com.

A message from Entergy Mississippi, Inc. © 2015 Entergy Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ;OL,U[LYN`:VS\[PVUZWYVNYHTPZHULULYN`Lɉ JPLUJ`WYVNYHTHUKUV[Hɉ SPH[LK^P[O,U[LYN`:VS\[PVUZ33*

6

JulyEMI - August 2015 // The City’s1 Business 10560 Entergy LightingWay 7.75x10.25.indd

and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com

5/19/15 1:22 PM


“We have to brag about the people who stay (in Jackson). The more homeowners we have, the more wealth we build so we can fix some of those streets y’all always talk about.� —Chokwe Lumumba, 2013

IMANI KHAYYAM

48

11 JXN Passport to the World JSU students go abroad. 12

20

In Our Defense Area instructors teach you to defend yourself. 14 EXPAT Kudzu and Molecules David Doggett’s life from civil rights to medical research.

Mother and daughter Molly Hughes (left) and Hope Lovelace (right) own The Pine Cone.

30

BRICE MEDIA

26

18 New Jax City New developments around Jackson.

51 Young and Bright Jackson’s best BOEJOĂ&#x;VFOUJBM

20 BIZ Pine Cones and Trinkets This local mom-and-daughter shop delights.

58 ARTS Find this Actor Julian Walker’s path to Hollywood.

22 WELLNESS Medical Discoveries The magic of the Jackson Medical Mall.

58 Curtain Call New Stage Theatre celebrates 50 years. 60 MELODIES Neo-Soul Woman Destiny Stone wants to be successful artist and businesswoman. 60 Sleeping on the Job Read about one of Jackson’s newest music venues.

26 Happy Healing The owners of Massage Revolution want you to heal.

62 DO GOODER

28 SHOPPING Healthy Shopping Work out in new duds.

66 EVENTS What to do?

30 Best Medicine Best of Jackson mini ballot’s doctors and dentists.

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

49 Strange Food, Drink Afoot Try unique teas and popsicles. 49 Supporting Community Agriculture The Choctaws know how to grow, and sell, produce.

23 Helping from Afar What exactly is telehealth?

51

48 BITES Miller’s Life A downtown classic resurfaces in Brandon.

16 A Different Kind of Chess Learn about the Mississippi Fencing Club.

20 Feed the Animals The Jackson Zoo has a master plan.

28

35 MENU GUIDE Paid advertising.

Helping Families This coalition leads on domestic violence resources.

70 LOCAL LIST Dr. Quinn, Medicine Man What does Dr. Timothy Quinn like to do around Jackson?

7


boomjackson.com

editor’s note

The Truth About Millennials

Art Director Kristin Brenemen Managing Editor Amber Helsel Assistant Editor Micah Smith Editorial Assistant Adria Walker Copy Editor Ronni Mott Editorial Writers Tommy Burton // Dustin Cardon // Genevieve Legacy // R.L. Nave // Zachary Oren Smith // Kendra Wright Listings Editor // Latasha Willis Editorial Interns Joshua Clayton // John Creel Brian Gordon // Deja Harris // Guy King Maya Miller // Jordan K. Morrow // Miles Thomas Emerald Alexis Ware // Nia Wilson Photography Imani Khayyam // Brice Media Ad Design Zilpha Young Design Interns // Joshua Sheriff // Tabitha Yarber Business and Sales Advertising Director // ,JNCFSMZ(SJGÞO Account Executive // Brandi Stodard Marketing Coordinator // Natalie West Distribution Manager // Richard Laswell Bookkeeper // Melanie Collins Assistant to the CEO // Inga-Lill Sjostrom Operations Consultant // David Joseph President and Publisher Todd Stauffer CONTACT US Story ideas and pitches // editor@boomjackson.com Ad Sales // ads@boomjackson.com BOOM Jackson 125 S. Congress St., #1324, Jackson, MS 39201 p 601.362.6121 f 601.510.9019 Would you like copies of BOOM Jackson for recruiting, welcome packets or other corporate, institutional or educational uses? Call 601.362.6121 x16 or email natalie@jacksonfreepress.com. BOOM Jackson is a publication of Jackson Free Press Inc. BOOM Jackson, which publishes every other month, focuses on the urban experience in Jackson, Miss., emphasizing entrepreneurship, economic growth, culture, style and city life. © 2015 Jackson Free Press Inc.

Cover photo of Ebony Lumumba Brice Media, fashion info, p 57 8

T

his morning I had a PR email called gaged team members who value collaboration over eye-rolling. I’m pinching myself at “12 Millennials Actually Doing Something.” I shook my head at what that how lucky we are with our current staff. My advice to millennials (and every“actually” implied about a group that one) is to slow down and learn to be present is often maligned; we usually have at least that many Gen Y-ers doing amazing work at any now so that voice in your head doesn’t tell you for the rest of your life that it’s always one time right here at BOOM Jackson. greener somewhere else. I I do get where it comes watch many young workers from, and every employer I not be able to sit still long know has funny millennial enough to hone their craft stories: the ones offended (thanks, tech), or who are at having to tell co-workers so impatient that they end where they are; ones who up in much browner grass. suddenly demand raises, Successful people have sabbaticals or permission a learning mindset through to work from home on the life. We never know everyvery day everyone else is thing, and we can learn from trying to make a huge deadothers of all generations. line; ones who think staying Donna Ladd, We must seek to be positive at a job a whole year is exCEO & Editor in Chief because a negative echo cruciating; ones who want chamber gets boring fast, to spend a third of the day regardless of your skills. on breaks; ones who think When I see someone work is a perpetual party with them at the center; ones whose parents of any age who seeks out rich experiences, regularly shifts the focus away from themcall to demand one of the above. I won’t lie: These things do happen a selves, enjoys engaging with people youngbit too often with some millennials. I blame er and older, and who eagerly wants to learn something every day, I know they will go parents in most instances; I’ve heard a stunning number of situations where parents are far and do big things (and it’s the recipe for being a good journalist). They are building telling their kids they shouldn’t have to “pay dues,” work hard or be questioned. One lasting, lifelong relationships that will help them climb steps to the top of their field. young woman who freelanced for me once For too many millennials, warped exput out her hand when I was explaining why pectations are leading to depression and deadlines and honoring story length (and anxiety. A good antidote to this scathing being nice to my editors) were important self-focus is to turn outward to helping the and said, “I don’t take criticism.” Well, then. world, which most millennials say they want The good news you don’t always hear amid the horror stories is that not all mil- to do, anyway. Learn from the 2015 Young Influentials in this issue—most of them lennials were raised this way (and there are older folks who do the same things, even if Generation Y—and go make a difference. Maybe that’s in your job, maybe it’s after not told to by their parents). work, or both. The best way to stop thinking The BOOM offices are literally filled with people under 40 who are positive, work about yourself is to get outside your head hard, want to learn from others, embrace and truly embrace other people, what they feedback, and are too busy to think about need and what they can help you learn. And themselves all the time or specialize in com- when you assist others, the universe returns the favor. Try it and see. plaining. They are building good products with an eye toward changing the world and working to build their craft over time. When I returned from a recent reporting trip in New York City, I was delighted when several staffers asked when we’re having our summer Saturday team retreat and even suggested locations. These are en-

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

TRIP BURNS

Editor-in-Chief and CEO Donna Ladd

// by Donna Ladd

boomjackson.com


contributors

Congratulations

Morgan Miller ACLU of Mississippi Director of Communications BOOM Jackson Young Influential 2015

www.aclu-ms.org 601.354.3408 PO Box 2242, Jackson, MS 39225

Joshua Clayton Editorial Intern Joshua Clayton is the reincarnation of Junior Kimbrough. He loves to act like Stephen A. Smith when he’s questioned about the Pittsburgh Steelers and can talk to you about Muddy Waters or Rae Sremmurd anytime you’d like. He wrote a Best of Jackson blurb.

Amber Helsel Managing Editor Amber Helsel’s favorite things in life are eating and figuring out how to be more nosey. She loves Buffalo wings and superheroes. This superwoman coordinated this entire issue of BOOM.

Talamieka Brice Photographer Talamieka Brice is an award winning artist and CEO of Brice Media. In between diaper changes, she slays the dragons of bad design and poor font choices. Her husband and business partner, Charles Brice, aids her in her quest.

Emerald Alexis Ware Editorial Intern Emerald Alexis Ware is a senior at the University of Southern Mississippi. She has raging wanderlust and an obsession with Pinterest and all things 20-something. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter @imemeraldalexis. She wrote a Young Influentials story.

“Where office flexibility meets functionality” We specialize in office solutions that are designed to meet your individual business needs… Professional Office Solutions fully furnished professional offices Virtual Business Solutions professional appearance for virtual offices Meeting Solutions convenient, cost effective, full service meeting space CALL TRIAD BUSINESS CENTERS TODAY!

www.triadbusinesscenters.com info@triadbusinesscenters.com (601)-709-4610 460 Briarwood Drive | Suite 400

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

9


Workplace Solutions specializes in hospital and doctor’s office furniture from Steelcase.

Call (601) 354-4960 or stop by our full showroom for a visit.

t8FTU4PVUI4USFFUt+BDLTPO .4tCBSFmFMEBOEDPNQBOZDPN


COURTESY CHARLES A. SMITH/JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY

IN OUR DEFENSE p 12 // ACTIVISM AND RESEARCH p 14 EN GARDE p 16 // PROGRESS p 18

Priscilla Slade, the Jackson State University special assistant to the provost for international studies and community colleges, says she is excited about JSU’s Passport to the World program.

James C. Renick (standing left), provost and senior vice president for academic and student affairs, James P. Pellow, president and CEO of the Council on International Educational Exchange (seated left), Jackson State University President Carolyn W. Meyers (seated right) and Mary M. White, interim vice president of JSU’s Division of Institutional Advancement (standing right), celebrate after signing an agreement to provide 200 free passports for Jackson State University’s Passport to the World program.

B

TRAVEL THE WORLD // by Guy King

onjour. Hola. Ni hao. About 80 Jackson State University students and faculty learned how to say hello when they greeted people from all over the world as part of JSU’s new program, Passport to the World. From May 27 through June 11, program participants traveled outside the United States, including to Paris; Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; Shanghai; Rio de Janerio; Madrid, Spain; and Salvador da Bahia, Brazil. The program consists of two weeks of studying abroad and two weeks of oncampus study. Students received six credit hours for their participation. This is the first year the university has held a summer study-abroad program. Priscilla Slade, special assistant to the provost for international studies and community colleges, played a huge role in making Passport to the World a reality. “I called (the Council on International Educational Exchange) to see what countries they could provide, because they are all over the world,” Slade says. “CIEE brought a representative to Jackson State and presented what they could offer. I was very impressed in what they had … and from there, we began to negotiate.” CIEE was founded in 1947 as a nonprofit and non-governmental organization that promotes international education and exchange. CIEE agreed to pay for 100 student passports. Slade brought the Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

program proposal to Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs James Renick. He matched CIEE’s offer, which gave a total of 200 students the opportunity to travel, although some ended up not participating. Slade says JSU President Carolyn Meyers agreed to give university funds to support the program, a tremendous help with the cost of participating in the program, which was $2,300 for each student, including room and board in the countries. “The JSU Global office was instrumental in getting students registered, providing passports, providing visas, scheduling orientation and scheduling classes,” Shirley Harrison, interim director of the office, says. One student in the program is Jasmine Williams, an early childhood education major and Olive Branch, Miss., native. Williams traveled to Madrid, Spain. “I’ve been outside of the United States before, but I have never stayed for a long period of time,” she says. “My major is education, and I am really interested in learning how other countries teach their children. With JSU being a historically black (university), I feel that JSU wanted to give students a free opportunity to experience different parts of the world. “I am so grateful that they started this program.” For more information, visit jsums.edu. 11


JXN // safety

The Art of Self-Defense // by Dustin Cardon

EXSAIL PHOTOGRAPHY

PLACES TO PRACTICE IN JACKSON

Marshall Arts MMA Academy owner Marshall Lee Thompson Jr. says not looking like a victim is the key to staying safe.

%R[HUV5HEHOOLRQ 7KXUVGD\VDW 6DOVD0LVVLVVLSSL 'XOLQJ$YH  ER[HUVUHEHOOLRQRUJ

*UDFLH6RXWK 1RUWK 7RZQ'ULYH JUDFLHVRXWKFRP

0DJQROLD0L[HG0DUWLDO$UWV )ROH\6W PDJQROLDPPDFRP

0DUVKDOO$UWV00$ $FDGHP\ :KHDWOH\ 6W PDUVKDOODUWVPPDFRP

1R/LPLW-LX-LWVX  $OEHUWVRQV'ULYH )ORZRRG QROLPLWNLOOHUEHHVFRP

*UDFLH-LX-LWVX0DGLVRQ ,QGXVWULDO'ULYH6 0DGLVRQ JUDFLHPDGLVRQFRP

6LIX7UH\&UDNH¡V $FDGHP\RI.XQJ)X 5LGJHZRRG5RDG 5LGJHODQG DFDGHP\RINXQJIXFRP

SOME DIFFERENT FORMS OF MARTIAL ARTS *IU JITSU LIRFXVHV RQ JUDS SOLQJDQGJURXQGÂżJKWLQJ,W SURPRWHVWKHFRQFHSWWKDWD VPDOOHUZHDNHUSHUVRQFDQ VXFFHVVIXOO\GHIHQGDJDLQVW DELJJHUVWURQJHUDVVDLODQW ZLWKWKHXVHRISURSHUWHFK QLTXHDQGOHYHUDJHDQGWDN LQJWKHÂżJKWWRWKHJURXQG WKHQ DSSO\LQJ MRLQW ORFNV DQGFKRNHKROGV 12

M

ost days of the week, Jacksonians of every walk of life practice kickboxing and mixed martial arts in a small gym located at New Horizon Ministries at 3565 Wheatley St., #5C. Marshall Lee Thompson Jr. founded the school, Marshall Arts MMA Academy, in 2013 as a way to help locals get healthier through fitness boot camps and learn how to defend themselves through the classes. And self-defense is one of the keys to staying safe. While learning a martial art for safety is important, experienced practitioners such as Thompson agree that the first step to staying safe is to avoid

+ARATE LV D -DSDQHVH VWULN LQJEDVHG DUW XVLQJ SXQFK LQJ NLFNLQJ NQHH VWULNHV HOERZ VWULNHV DQG RSHQ KDQG WHFKQLTXHV 6RPH PRGHUQ VW\OHV LQFRUSRUDWH JUDSSOLQJ WKURZV MRLQW ORFNV UHVWUDLQWV DQG WKH VWULNLQJRIYLWDOSRLQWV -UAY 4HAILVDFRPEDWVSRUW RI7KDLODQGWKDWXVHVVWDQG XS VWULNLQJ DORQJ ZLWK YDUL RXV JUDSSOLQJ WHFKQLTXHV 7KHGLVFLSOLQHLQFOXGHVFRP

confrontations and potentially dangerous situations to begin with. Being cautious and aware of your surroundings while traveling is critical, as is the way you carry yourself. “Always make eye contact while walking around, and don’t keep your head down,� Thompson says. “Not looking like a victim is key to staying safe. ... Many people won’t try to attack someone they don’t think they can overcome.� Being calm and in control in the face of a conflict is also important for personal safety. Experienced instructors teach that mental and emotional control is equally important to physical training

and combat techniques. When looking for a venue to learn self-defense, it’s important to do your research and look into the background, credentials and experience of a location’s instructors. “Potential clients need to first find out whether a particular instructor has practiced martial arts competitively and if they’re successful,� Jeremiah Liddell, owner of Magnolia Mixed Martial Arts, says. “Look at the level of their success and look at the skill of their students and what level they end up competing at. Inquire if instructors have certifications or degrees from universities in physical exercise science.� Finally, seasoned martial-arts instructors agree that practice and genuine experience are critical. Watching YouTube videos on selfdefense won’t give you real experience, and just learning one or two techniques isn’t going to help in a fight or other dangerous situation. Dedicated training and learning a wide variety of techniques for different situations are the keys to defending yourself, if you need to. “Technique needs to be second nature to you, an instinct,� Gracie South Manager Chance Sheppard says. “Practicing a move one or two times isn’t going to do that for you. Repetition is the key.�

EDW RQ VKLQV DQG LV NQRZQ DV ³WKH DUW RI HLJKW OLPEV´ EHFDXVHLWLQFRUSRUDWHVWKH XVH RI ¿VWV HOERZV NQHHV DQG VKLQV DORQJ ZLWK WKH DUPVDQGOHJV

XVHV VWDQFHV WKDW DUH QDU URZHU DQG OHVV VWDEOH WKDQ WKRVHXVHGLQRWKHUPDUWLDO DUWV VXFK DV NDUDWH 7KH VWDQFH WUDGHV VWDELOLW\ IRU LQFUHDVHGDJLOLW\

4AEKWONDO LV D .RUHDQ PDUWLDO DUW ZLWK D KHDY\ HPSKDVLV RQ NLFNV LQFOXG LQJ KHDGKHLJKW NLFNV MXPSLQJ DQG VSLQQLQJ NLFNVDQGIDVWNLFNLQJWHFK QLTXHV 7R IDFLOLWDWH IDVW WXUQLQJ NLFNV WDHNZRQGR

-IXED MARTIAL ARTS LV D IXOOFRQWDFW FRPEDW VSRUW WKDWDOORZVWKHXVHRIERWK VWULNLQJDQGJUDSSOLQJWHFK QLTXHV ERWK VWDQGLQJ DQG RQWKHJURXQGIURPDYDUL HW\ RI RWKHU FRPEDW VSRUWV DQGPDUWLDODUWV

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

*UDO LV D PDUWLDO DUW DQG 2O\PSLF VSRUW ZKHUH WKH REMHFWLYH LV WR HLWKHU WKURZ RUWDNHDQRSSRQHQWWRWKH JURXQG LPPRELOL]H RU RWK HUZLVH VXEGXH KH RU VKH ZLWK D SLQ RU IRUFH DQ RS SRQHQW WR VXEPLW ZLWK D MRLQW ORFN RU D FKRNHKROG 6WULNHV DQG WKUXVWV DUH D SDUWRIMXGREXWRQO\LQSUH DUUDQJHGIRUPVDQGDUHQRW DOORZHG LQ FRPSHWLWLRQ RU IUHHSUDFWLFH   ²'XVWLQ&DUGRQ

boomjackson.com


5,301 hearts.

Making history. Changing the odds. &('''($)& &# "&# $"")#(,%&()!&!,&$$& ,&'( #*&'(,$''''%%!#(& '!%!(!&'(&('''(), *&$)'$# &# "&#' '$# &((),'$!!$&($#(+#  '$#((#*&'(,#$)!$$$!! ,"$#($&#  ''''%%#'#$!!(# ($#*&,(#&$"(($$"")#(, #*$!*"#(&'&&'*'$*& ,&'  ($&'!# ($$(!(#'$!$#($#' '&$)#& #($)!!($( *!$%"#($#+(&("#('#%&*#($# "($' '$#&((),%&$*' *(!&'$)&$&&'&&'&$)#(+$&! #!)#(,$!# )(&'(#$&"$'( ('##!*'#$)&$"")#(,.($, &#"$&()""!($"'

UMMC Research. Tomorrow. Every day.

-  

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

13


JXN // expat

Kudzu to Molecules

COURTESY DAVID DOGGETT

From

// by Micah Smith

F

COURTESY DAVID DOGGETT

newspaper with stories about the rom activist to medical researcher, David Doggett, civil-rights and anti-war fronts, to continue spreading the word. 67, has made great strides Doggett continued the pubboth in and out of Missislication until 1972, when he says, sippi, but neither career was without its difficulties. When he was “things had sort of played out,” growing up, his father, Rev. Blanton as the Vietnam War wound down, Doggett, was a Methodist minister and the Civil Rights Movement entered a more political stage. in Oxford and Tupelo and a secret At that point, the staff had supporter of the civil-rights effort. The son’s beliefs began to clash dwindled to about three people, and he realized The Kudzu with his father’s quiet activism. “I was just getting more into wouldn’t provide a living for him. After a few years in Nashville, the whole national and internaTenn., doing construction work and tional Civil Rights Movement, playing blues and country-rock muanti-imperialism and anti-war,” sic on dobro and steel guitar, DogDoggett says. “That was all about gett returned to college. In 1977, getting out in the streets and he received a bachelor’s degree in demonstrating, and he thought biology from the University of Tenthat was counter-productive.” After graduating from high nessee in Knoxville, intending to go to medical school. school in 1964, But he soon beDoggett studcame more interied sociology at ested in research Millsaps College, than practice. where his friend “I got the feelLee Makomson ing that doctors introduced him were sort of like to Jackson civilglorified electrirights leaders. cians,” he says. He soon joined “They practice a the Southern trade based on Student Organizwhat they learn in ing Committee, medical school. an affiliate of the But when they national Students David Doggett started The come up against for Democratic Kudzu in 1968, a Jacksonsomething they Society. After based newspaper covering can’t fix, that’s Doggett gradu- the Civil Rights Movement the end of it ated in 1968, and anti-war efforts. for them. I just both organizathought that would be constantly tions collapsed into faction fights and disbanded, so he created The frustrating for me.” Doggett earned his doctorate Kudzu, a Jackson-based statewide

14

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Retired activist and medical researcher David Doggett says he may move back to Jackson at some point. degree in molecular biology from the University of Southern California in 1983, after which he completed three post-doctoral fellowships, including studies on virology and cancer biology at Harvard University in 1985, on molecular aging at the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology in Philadelphia, and on molecular aging at the University of Pennsylvania in 1990. Then, the grant money dried up. “It was like our research was too far ahead of its time,” he says. “People that awarded grants basically kept saying: ‘We shouldn’t be studying aging. It’s too complicated. We need to go back and do basic research on normal tissue.’” In 1994, he accepted a position with the nonprofit Emergency Care Research Institute in Plymouth Meeting, Pa., and entered the field of medical technology assessment, creating comprehensive reports on

new procedures, drugs and medical devices. He worked at ECRI for 11 years before moving to a private company, Hayes Inc., in 2005. Then, in 2009, Doggett accepted a contracted position at Johns Hopkins University’s Evidence-Based Practice Center in Baltimore, thanks to funds from the Obama Recovery Act. He retired in 2013. Thus far, Doggett has enjoyed the free time, as he’s been able to play more music in Maryland, Philadelphia, Pa., and Mississippi. He returned to Jackson to stay with friends in March and April, and the local blues scene impressed him. Doggett has also recently partnered with fellow Jackson expat Kay Sloan on a book about white activists of the Civil Rights Movement. “Yeah, Mississippi has gotten pretty interesting now,” Doggett says. “I’m thinking seriously about moving back there at some point.”

boomjackson.com


Honda

SALES EVENT Happening Now!

M i s s i s s i p p i ’ s # 1 Vo l u m e H o n d a D e a l e r s h i p

555 Sunnybrook Road Ridgeland, MS 39157 (601) 957-3400 www.pattypeckhonda.com


JXN // games

Chess With a Sharper Edge // by Brian Gordon

Yet, the real battle lies between the ears. “All fencers have certain weaknesses that keep them from succeeding,” Quarles says. “And most of those are in their own head. Watching (the students) work through those barriers on their own is a joy to witness.” In one class, Quarles teaches a retreating tactic to siblings Bella, 12, and Philip, 11, of Ridgeland. They absorb the lesson as a dozen or so other fencers spar all around them, filling the studio with metal-on-metal clanks at a furious pace. Bella and Philip grew enchanted with sword fighting from watching films and wanting to emulate cinematic heroes Zorro and Inigo Montoya of “The Princess Bride.” “It was a dream learning how to fence,” says Bella, who has transferred many of the footwork movements she picked up as a dancer to the sport, adding that her goal is to compete in the Junior Olympics. Because flourishing in fencing is less dependent on brute force than cunning acumen, the club provides a space for female fencers to gain confidence by competing one-on-one with the male fencers. “For the most part, gender simply doesn’t matter in this sport until you get to very high levels,” Quarles says. “We have female fencers that regularly defeat grown men. This helps develop confidence and mutual respect.” For more information, find the Mississippi Fencing Club on Facebook.

"5 +L 34 OOD U

"/ /-

\ 5D &OLQ FK WRQ H &R O'RO IIH H] DO H :K 5RD V ROH WH U .D %XU \ WULQ JH %H D U UQL 6LQ 5H H6 NK YLVL R R &D DQG %X OHV QLVP LWO\ HUV VK QHQ 3R 'U QHU RO .D 3LH LS S WULQ FH 'UR ´+ DUWLH D5 R· S DWH V HP %X U 6X Vµ HP UJH PP E U 5R UDQ 7UL HUZ XQ FHV OEL HG GD HV GLQ ER $E JV XW V ULG JH ´ +L  $ PH 3R HE V QDP KH ULF SV HG U DQ LFO ´& )D IR H  F U RQ $LU 3KDU V VWD HER )UDQ  R R FR :R QWL N N0 QG DKµ OYH QHµ SDJ HO W HV RQ %O LWLRQ +R ULQH RV LQ VR J XV P HZ )UH LYH +L 2II KDWV V V %H HP R KH DW I UE -; 5R LXPV $Q\W DWK 1 \D KLQ OV U J % ´' RRP )LO HWV DVHE ´2 DUH V UDQ RI DOO G )D )LV JH &K HYLO UP K LV WK HZE µ HU· H1 DF V7 DQ HZ FD  $S %ODFN SOH µ 3K 5R 0XV LOD \D H& O% LF RP DEL HW HV /D QG 2Y HU HUD OOV

IMANI KHAYYAM

I

“A one-time cost of $150 can get you all the n the lower level of the Jackson Baptist Healthplex, people gather each Thursday evening gear needed to prosper,” Quarles says. Quarles stresses the mental aspect of fencand Saturday morning to play chess with swords. The Mississippi Fencing Club is comprised of more than 20 regulars—half adults, half youth—who come first to learn, and then to refine the skills needed to win a fencing match. Stewart Quarles, one of the coaches, is an information security analyst for C Spire Wireless in Ridgeland who has helped the club on and off since its start in 1999. While at Mississippi College working on a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and Christian religious studies, which he received in 2000, he took a fencing class at the college. Because of the class, his friend, Richard Jones, started the Clinton Fencing Club 16 years ago. Jones, who now lives in Wyoming, moved the club from the Clinton Baptist Healthplex to the more centrally located Baptist Healthplex (717 Manship St., 601.968.1766) in 2008. The third coach, David Williams, has been fencing for 40 years and, like Quarles, helped on and off since the start of the club. The club had a Stewart Quarles is one of the instructors in the few name changes before finally becoming Mississippi Fencing Club. the Mississippi Fencing Club last year. Fencing is historically tied with aristocracy. The sport’s roots date back to Euing. No doubt the sport is physical. Three gruelrope at the start of the Renaissance, where being ing rounds underneath a mask with a white bib good with a sword was the mark of nobility for a burgeoning middle class full of noble aspirations. and a black metal screen, heavy white uniforms, and for certain types of the sport, a soft metal vest The sport still gets identified as an activity for the called a lame, will have any fencer flushed. upper crust, yet this label may be undeserved.

16

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


Pay far less for AMR’s service‌ with a member discount. &$%"$!   '!!'&  $&+!)$%+!'$ !'& ! "!&*" %) "$!(%+!')&+ %%$+"$ !$' %$(   !($%($+!  +!'$!'%!   ,&%""+&!#',' &$ %"!$&%"$!(% +)$  %%%%""!$!'%  

     $ %   $%"%*%&%!+&!%('%&!$%! + $%"! %&!%)&&% %" $($% (% #'" & $$%%!$%" 

 

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

17


JXN // progress

L

ong before Dick Hall was a commissioner for the Mississippi Department of Transportation, he remembers being a boy standing on Capitol Street in downtown Jackson facing a choice: Spend his pocket change on a movie at the Paramount Theater or shoot pool at the 20th Century Club. Over the decades, the number of options for entertainment, shopping and dining diminished as businesses left downtown and chased shoppers away. It didn’t help that, at some point, Capitol Street stopped being a main artery with

down traffic and landscaping. The original plan called for a two-way street all the way to State Street, but the city met with financing challenges. It will cost another $1.5 million to finish the project, city officials said. Yarber called the completion of Phase I a testament to the city and a sign of things to come. “It’s a testament that Jackson’s trek to greatness is not going to be an easy one,� Yarber said. “It’s a testament that it will not happen overnight. It’s a testament that it will be frus-

constituency relations departments. Jackson State moves in August, officials said. Michael Thomas, JSU’s chief financial officer, said in March that the university and its development foundation have been acquiring property around west Jackson, but he emphasized that there would be no “quick take,� referring to a 2008 effort that would have allowed the historically black university to take property through eminent domain. The so-called quick-take plan met fierce blowback from community groups, and the bill died beIMANI KHAYYAM

New Str eets, Ne w City // by R.L

. Nave a

nd Zach

ary Oren

Smith

$JUZBOETUBUFPGĂžDJBMTBOEMPDBMCVTJOFTTMFBEFSTDVUBSJCCPOBUUIFHSBOESFPQFOJOHPG$BQJUPM4USFFU.BZ

traffic traveling in both directions and became a one-way street, which, downtown civic boosters say hurt commerce on the street. It also didn’t help that a plan to revert Capitol Street to two-way traffic, which the city announced in the fall of 2012, took a year longer than anticipated. But after years, orange cones, construction noise, a water main break and threats of legal action from businesses, Capitol Street is again two-way. A throng of officials that included Hall, Mayor Tony Yarber, Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon, and Gov. Phil Bryant cut the ribbon May 19. “It has been very gratifying to see everyone working together to improve the city,� said Leland Speed, chairman of EastGroup Properties Inc. The $10 million project, using city and federal funds, included water and sewer-line upgrades, new lighting, roundabouts to slow 18

trating at times, but it’s also a testament that if we do not quit, (if) we stick to our guns, that if we continue to step ahead despite the negativity, despite what the naysayers may say, this city is one we will all celebrate one day like we are celebrating Capitol Street today.�

JSU: Thinking of a Master Plan Jackson State University recently got the OK from the state college board on its master plan, which includes two new schools and a stadium, as well as extending the main west Jackson campus all the way to downtown, where the school is finishing renovating a building to house its departments of Urban and Regional Planning and Public Policy and Administration as well as the Institute of Government. The building, located at 101 West Capitol St., will also house the Mississippi Urban Research Center and the school’s alumni and

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

fore it got out of committee. “We’re looking to have conversations with people looking to sell,� Thomas said in March. JSU’s master plan aims to give the campus a more collegiate feel by lining the outside with trees and a more pedestrian-friendly experience by pushing parking to the edges of the campus. Renderings show that the proposed School of Social Work would sit near the overpass at Pearl and Gallatin streets. Ideally, Thomas said, students will one day be able to take the approximately 20-minute walk from the downtown building to the heart of the west Jackson campus. The school sought an appropriation from the Legislature last session but was unsuccessful; Jackson State will ask lawmakers for funding again in 2016. boomjackson.com


A Note on Camp Camping World, the Bowling Green, Ky.based retailer of new and used RVs, RV parts and accessories, camping gear and outdoor supplies, has rolled into south Jackson at Interstate 55 S. Frontage Road near Elton Road. It’s the second Mississippi location for Camping World, which has another store in Olive Branch. That a $1.5-billion company with more than 2,000 employees located in south Jackson shows the economic-development potential of the area, said Jackson Ward 6 Councilman Tyrone Hendrix, who represents the area. “It instills confidence in other businesses looking to move to Jackson,� said Hendrix, who believes the store could serve as a magnet for other types of businesses as well.

Housing Party With the national growth outlook for housing looking better and better, developers are busy increasing the housing stock in Jackson. At the Meridian at Fondren, under construction across the street from University of Mississippi Medical Center on Lakeland, crews are working on the foundation for a $30 million 241-unit luxury apartment building. SKD, a joint venture between John Ditto of State Street Group, Stewart Speed and Tyler Kassinger, is developing the 4.4-acre mixed-use site they hope will attract young professionals and empty nesters. Ditto said construction is scheduled to be complete by next spring or summer. Apartments will range from $650 per month for a studio to $1,300 for a three-bedroom. “We think it’ll be a great recruiting tool for Jackson,� Ditto told an audience for the civic booster organization Team Jackson at the Capital Club in May. Additionally, a number of projects using the state’s housing-tax credit are also rumbling along. Also in Fondren, a six-apartment development from Bob King, developer and president of Triangle Construction Company, is under way. Amenities include ceiling fans, perimeter fencing, tankless water heaters, and washers and dryers in each unit. Plans also include a business center, fitness center, security cameras and 24-hour security. LEDIC Management Group, based in Memphis, will manage the apartments near Taylor Street, Oxford Avenue, Downing Street and Lorenz Boulevard. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

Vivian Taylor, Instructor

Martha Millsaps, Instructor

Renew Your Spirit and Your Body See our Groupon offer at www.groupon.com/deals/pilates-v-studio-2 $SBOF3JEHF%S +BDLTPOtQJMBUFT7XPSLT!HNBJMDPN XXXQJMBUFT7TUVEJPXPSLTDPNt

Next Up: Fall Food, Fashion and Football Best Lawyers and Law Firms

Sept.-Oct. 2015

Reserve your ad space now!

Stylists: Nikki Henry,

Brock Freeman, Lori Scroggins, Liz Torres, & Claire Kinsey Mayronne 147 Hwy 51 N. Suite H, Ridgeland, MS 39157 601-856-4330 Like Us on Facebook

Due by July 31 601-362-6121 ext 11 ads@jacksonfreepress.com

19


BIZ // charm

Small Business, Big Personality // by Kendra Wright

IMANI KHAYYAM

Loyal customers of The Pine Cone, which Molly Hughes and Hope Lovelace own, have made the store part of the Jackson community for more than 30 years—even through multiple moves.

F

or Hope Lovelace, who owns The Pine Cone with her mother, Molly Hughes, the shop has been a part of their family for nearly as long as its more than 30 years in business in Jackson. “It started out with two schoolteachers who decided to sell gifts in 1983, and within that year, one of the ladies died,� Lovelace says. “My mother started working in 1984 and just instantly

// by Tommy Burton

A

WWKH-DFNVRQ=RRFKLOGUHQKRS DURXQGLQVSXUWLQJZDWHUVOLGH GRZQDJLDQWWLJHUZLWKDODUJH WRQJXHDQGSOD\DWWKH6SODVK3DGEH VLGHWKHIURQWHQWUDQFH5HFHQWO\WKH ]RRDGGHGDQDUHDZKHUHSDUHQWVFDQ NHHSFRROLQDORXQJHZLWKFKDQJLQJ URRPVDQGVKDGHZKLOHNLGVSOD\  ³:HZDQWWRVXUSULVHJXHVWVIURP \HDUWR\HDU´VD\V$QJHOD+DUULVWKH ]RRœVPDUNHWLQJDQGFRPPXQLFDWLRQV PDQDJHU³:HUHDOL]HWKLVLVDQROGHU 20

]RREXWZHDOVRZDQWLWWRVWD\SURPL QHQW2QHRIWKHXQLTXHWKLQJVDERXW LW LVLWVVRXWKHUQFKDUP:HZDQWWKDW SHUVRQDOLW\WRVKLQHWKURXJK´  $QRWKHU UHFHQW DGGLWLRQ LVQœW LQVLGH LWœV DURXQG -DFNVRQ 7KH ]RR KDV SODFHG QHZ ORFDWLRQ VLJQV DQG EDQQHUVDURXQGWKHPHWURDUHD/RFDO DGYHUWLVLQJ¿UP0DG*HQLXVGHVLJQHG WKH VLJQV 7KH &LW\ RI -DFNVRQ DQG WKH=RR$UHD3URJUHVVLYH3DUWQHUVKLS %RDUG DQ RUJDQL]DWLRQ GHGLFDWHG WR LPSURYLQJWKHQHLJKERUKRRGVDURXQG WKH]RRKHOSHGSODFHWKHQHZVLJQV  /LNH WKRVH VLJQV WKH ]RRœV IRU PHU WURXEOHV DOVR VHHP OLNH IDLQW PHPRULHV ,Q 0DUFK  SDUN DQG FLW\RI¿FLDOVDQQRXQFHGWKDWWKH$VVR FLDWLRQRI=RRVDQG$TXDULXPVZRXOG OHWWKH]RRNHHSLWVDFFUHGLWDWLRQPDN LQJLWWKHRQO\$=$DFFUHGLWHG]RRLQ 0LVVLVVLSSL7KDW DQQRXQFHPHQW ZDV

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

COURTESY JACKSON ZOO

Zoo It Better

became the buyer, the merchandiser and the fulltime person with the owner. So, (she) has basically been there since the beginning.� Lovelace began working there full-time in 1993, and then, in 1999, she and her mother purchased the store. After five years living in Aspen, Colo., she moved back to Mississippi in 2009 to help Hughes run The Pine Cone. “She’s had two knee replacements since

I’ve left, and my dad says he hasn’t seen her because she hasn’t left the store,â€? Lovelace says. “So, I came back to make her life easier and mine, too.â€? The Pine Cone has been in six locations since opening, moving to Deville Plaza just before Easter, though Lovelace believes this one will stick. She attributes The Pine Cone’s longevity to its loyal patrons. “We’re very appreciative of all of our long-time customers,â€? she says. “We’ve had some customers for at least 22 years, and I still see people in here every single day.â€? Of course, no store could be a success without good products on the shelves. Lovelace says The Pine Cone has a huge variety of items, but the things its known for are Peter’s Pottery, which is made in Mississippi, and the Ronaldo Designer Jewelry. It also has a full-time floral designer who does wreaths, table arrangements, seasonal decorations, and custom mantle, dining-room table, mailbox or front-door dĂŠcor. For The Pine Cone, though, a friendly atmosphere is always the key ingredient. â€œâ€Ś We don’t do everything as fancy as everybody else, but we just focus on doing it right,â€? Lovelace says. The Pine Cone (5056 Interstate 55 N., 601.713.1421) is open Monday-Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For more information, find the shop on Facebook and Instagram.

City of Jackson workers place new directional signs for the Jackson Zoo around the city. WKHFRQFOXVLRQRIDVDJDWKDWEHJDQLQ 6HSWHPEHUZKHQWKH$=$GHQLHG DFFUHGLWDWLRQ DPLG TXHVWLRQV DERXW WKH ]RRœV ¿QDQFLDO VWDELOLW\ WRXFKLQJ RII VSHFXODWLRQ²DQG FRQWURYHUV\²

WKDWWKHZHVW-DFNVRQLQVWLWXWLRQPLJKW PRYHDFURVVWRZQ  :LWK WKRVH SUREOHPV EHKLQG LW WKH ]RR LV ORRNLQJ WR WKH IXWXUH )RU H[DPSOHWKH]RRMXVWUHFHLYHGDJUDQW IURPWKH'HSDUWPHQWRI$UFKLYHVDQG +LVWRU\WRUHQRYDWHWKHUKLQREDUQ  )URP XSGDWLQJ VLJQDJH WR LP SURYLQJFXUUHQWH[KLELWVWKH]RRKDV EHJXQ LWV PDVWHU SODQQLQJ SURFHVV 7KH SURMHFW ZLOO WDNH EHWZHHQ ÂżYH DQG\HDUVDQG+DUULVVD\VVRPH WKLQJVPD\WDNHDOLWWOHORQJHUEHIRUH SHRSOHVHHELJGLIIHUHQFHV  7KH-DFNVRQ=RR :&DSL WRO6W LVRSHQ0RQGD\WKURXJK6XQ GD\IURPDPWRSP$GPLVVLRQ LVIRUDGXOWVIRUFKLOGUHQ DJHV  WR   IRU VHQLRUV DQG IUHH IRU FKLOGUHQ XQGHU  DQG ]RR PHPEHUV)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQYLVLW MDFNVRQ]RRRUJ

boomjackson.com


Duvall Decker  Architects  P.A. Architecture . Planning . Interiors

(design)

W W W . D U V A L L D E C K E R . C O M .   6 0 1 -­ 7 1 3 -­ 1 1 2 8

Dumas Hall  Renovation,  Alcorn  State  University

VoIP solutions  for  your  business

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

21


WELLNESS

Medical Mall:

Rocking & Rolling // by R.L. Nave

A

IMANI KHAYYAM

small woman wearing green scrubs and pulling a wheeled suit- center, primary care physicians’ offices, specialty clinics, as well as the Myrlie Evers-Williams Institute for the Elimination of Health Disparities. The case stops at one of the hand-sanitizing stations at the Jackson Jackson Heart Study, Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Clinics, Hinds County Medical Mall and squirts a dollop of gel into her palm. Health Department and Mississippi State Department of Health also have a “All you need is a drop,” she tells a stranger seated nearby, presence at the mall, and the location is a convenient headquarters for non before grabbing her luggage and hurriedly rolling away. profit organizations that work on health In some ways, the medical mall’s issues, such as the Mississippi Sickle own renaissance has had a similar efCell Foundation. fect over the past two decades. But plans are in the works to It was once a bustling shopping spread the mall’s mission beyond area that, like so many inner-city the walls. malls, went dark and could have fall“We always said our mission en to blight and threatened the health has to be bigger than the building of the neighborhood. But the hard because if you focus on the buildwork and dedication of supporters ing, you’ll end up with another empty prevented that from happening. mall,” Wheeler says. Instead of becoming a drain on the community, the Jackson Medical Mall is helping to revive it by providA Rebirth ing vital services both inside and out. After witnessing what used to be Primus Wheeler, executive dia thriving retail mall in Jackson worsen, rector of the Jackson Medical Mall the late pediatrician and civil-rights activFoundation, which owns and runs ist Dr. Aaron Shirley had a vision of what it, and has been developing the surthe former Jackson Mall could become. rounding neighborhood, says its In fact, being a man of medicine, Shirley mission is two-pronged: to serve the knew exactly what he wanted the mall medically underserved and promote to be. In 1995, he started working to creeconomic development. ate a facility that would provide quality The footprint, according to the health opportunities for the urban poor medical mall’s master plan, is west to of Jackson. Holmes Street, east to the train tracks, To begin the project, Shirley met south to Dewitt Street and north with former Mississippi Supreme Court to Mayes Street. The mall takes up Justice Reuben Anderson and present900,000 square feet and sits on more ed him with a proposition. Anderson Primus Wheeler, executive director of the Jackson Medical than 80 acres. Home to local retail wanted Shirley to serve on the board for Mall Foundation, says the organization’s mission is to outlets and medical services the UniTougaloo College, and Shirley needed serve the medically underserved and promote economic versity of Mississippi Medical Center Anderson’s help getting the mall started, development. provides, the medical mall is also an so the pair struck a deal. economic engine. Shirley, Anderson, Dr. WalInformation from the foundation lace Conerly and Dr. Ted Woodnell of shows that the building has a more than 97 percent occupancy rate and repUMMC were the original members of the team that helped bring together resents $83 million in assets. The 1,500 or so full-time employees make up partners to finance the $3 million building and $20 million renovations. an annual payroll of approximately $25 million. Apart from funding the project, the first step of reconstructing the mall UMMC has at least four units housed at the mall, including a cancer was to find other health-related organizations to become part of the project. 22

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


WELLNESS The University of Mississippi Medical Center was among the first to commit, making UMMC’s Ambulatory Care clinic the first business there in 1997. In the mall’s early days, both Tougaloo College and Jackson State University agreed to move some of its public-health classes to the new facility. Over time, the mall became home to clinics, medical-support firms, government offices, classrooms and retail stores. The Jackson Medical Mall was the first of its kind in the country and worked as a model for similar facilities throughout the nation. In 2001, the Jackson Medical Mall was renamed the Jackson Medical Mall Thad Cochran Center, after Mississippi’s senior senator and current Senate Appropriations chairman; Dr. Shirley passed away in November 2014, but Wheeler says the foundation is carrying on the vision. “We miss him, but we’re bound to make his legacy bigger than life,” Wheeler says.

Beyond the Walls The Jackson Medical Mall has also been a progenitor of development. Nearby, there are two banks, Liberty Bank and Trustmark, and Hope Enterprises Corporation has office space inside the mall. Other developments have included a Save-a-Lot grocery store and the Mississippi Roadmap to Health Equity, an organization that seeks to achieve health equity in the state through avenues such as mobile farmers markets and a fitness center. In addition to JMMF’s own acquisition of property in the neighborhood, two groups have also invested in housing developments: Cade Chapel Senior Housing and East Village Estates, a 44-townhome community from Chartre Consulting. These homes are about 1,500 square feet and come

with two-car garages, two to four bedrooms and nine-foot ceilings. The company is building with housing tax credits, which allow taxpayers to subsidize the construction of the market-rate homes; after 15 years, the renters have the option of buying the home for $50,000. Clarence Chapman, president of Oxford-based Chartre, says the idea is to create a stable neighborhood where people can raise families in a nice, affordable and stable area. Late Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba helped break ground on the development at an indoor ceremony at the mall in late 2013. “We have to brag about the people who stay (in Jackson),” Lumumba said at the time. “The more homeowners we have, the more wealth we build so we can fix some of those streets y’all always talk about.” Chapman says work crews are finishing up mechanical work, such as installing heating and air-conditioning systems and doing electrical wiring. The plan is to have residents move in by late July or August. Chapman says the company plans to build another 50-home development in the area when the East Village project is complete. In addition, a new 10,000-square-foot retail building recently broke ground and, in six months, will be home to pediatric dental and optometry offices as well as a Subway and Cricket Wireless. “We’re rocking and rolling,” Wheeler says. Additional reporting by Emerald Alexis Ware.

“If you focus on the building, you’ll end up with another empty mall.”

A Healthy, Techy Cocktail

// by Amber Helsel

T

he ceiling fell in last year at Winston County General Hospital as physicians at the Center for Telehealth at the University of Mississippi Medical Center watched from here in Jackson. Tornadoes had just torn through many parts of Mississippi, including Winston County. When Kristi Henderson, chief telehealth and innovation officer at UMMC, had gotten notice that the tornado was headed toward Louisville, she called into the telemedicine workstation at UMMC and told the physicians there to check on the hospital. They turned on Winston County General’s emergency-room camera and watched as the ceiling fell in. Henderson says the center knew Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

of the damage before anyone else did because UMMC was already providing telemedicine to the hospital, meaning that the staff could see what was going on as if they were there. UMMC sent first-responders and paramedics with Google glasses. When the team got to Winston County General, they turned the devices on, and the Center for Telehealth could see how bad the damage was and what the patients needed. Telehealth basically means that through avenues such as laptops, UMMC can provide health care to areas that don’t have access to a hospital like that one. When Henderson worked in the hospital’s

emergency department as a clinical director of nursing and a nurse practitioner, she’d see patients come in from all over the state who may have had better outcomes had they been treated earlier. The Huntsville, Ala., native moved to Jackson 40 years ago. She got her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Mississippi College in 1995, her master’s degree in nursing from Mississippi University for Women in Columbus in 1997, her postmaster’s degree in nursing from UMMC in 1999 and her doctorate degree in nursing from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 2010. more TELEHEALTH, see page 24 23


WELLNESS from page 23

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER

“As long as I can remember, I’ve always the center, where Henderson manages the any physical interaction, such as rashes or pink been drawn to emergency medicine and helping patients while they’re outside the clinic eye, employees can use an app on their phone, and the doctor can see them and prescribe mediand hospital. people with acute injuries and illnesses,” Hencation. For those who require a more extensive The Center for Telehealth even gives care derson said in a January 2015 interview with the exam, they can plug in devices that allow doctors Jackson Free Press. “I’ve always had a love to be to workplaces. For businesses who have impleto do such things as listen to hearts and lungs. mented the program, there’s an app for that. around that environment.” Not all the businesses with the telehealth pro“What happens is we all put it off and put it Henderson got her first job at UMMC as gram have that capability, but many do. a student assistant in anatomy and physiol- off until either it gets worse or we have to take off While the center hasn’t encounogy in 1991 and also volunteered in tered any major problems this year, the emergency room. She started such as Winston County General her first nursing position in 1995, Hospital’s crisis in 2014, Henderson eventually becoming the clinical said it’s always prepared in case of a nurse practitioner. disaster. If we have another breakout In that position, Henderson nolike Ebola, the center can still interact ticed that the hospital was getting with affected patients, but through many patients who could have had technology, it limits how many people different outcomes had they had betgo in and out of the room. ter health care in their communities. “That same equipment is in the Around 2000, she began crafting the size of a rolling suitcase, carry-on bag idea of merging technology and health that pops open a clinic, and it has evcare and, in 2003, she and a group of erything it needs in it, so that’s what others started their first project, a we use for disaster, as well,” she said. video telehealth program, in October The center has also trained disaster2003 with pilot hospitals in Port Gibresponse teams at the Mississippi son, Belzoni and Lexington. Department of Health on how to use Almost 12 years later, the UMMC the equipment so in case of a disaster, Center for Telehealth has contracts they can deploy their own. with 171 hospitals, clinics, businesses, Next year, Henderson said the schools, and now it even provides sercenter will move into the old McRae’s vices to colleges. building on Meadowbrook Drive in “We provide telepsychiatry, or Jackson. “That’s really going to afmental health, to (Mississippi State ford us the space we need to not only University) now so that students can continue to expand our telehealth ofhave access to a psychiatrist at the ferings, but to also create a living lab college instead of having to travel to and innovation center. We will partner get that care,” she said in an interview with technology vendors to test new with BOOM Magazine. technologies to make sure we conThe center can also help people tinue to bring the best models to Miswith chronic diseases who don’t have sissippians,” she said. “I think that’s access to the health care they need. Kristi Henderson helped start the University of Mississippi going to be really, really exciting, and Patients with illnesses such as diabeMedical Center’s Center for Telehealth in 2003. a center for excellence for the rest tes receive an iPad or tablet, and with of the world to look at and hopefully that, they get devices to monitor bodily want to replicate.” stats such as glucose levels and blood Henderson is thrilled with how telehealth from work and go to the emergency room and pressure. They can interact with their health-care affects those with chronic illnesses. providers through video chat and watch videos get something taken care of,” she said. “(We’re) really helping to give patients the While employees don’t get to physically that educate them on their disease. tools they need and the resources they need “(Chronic diseases are) the most exciting interact with a doctor, they don’t have to leave when they need them in a very convenient way,” work. Most of the businesses in the program will area (for telehealth), as Mississippi has some of set up a dedicated area for the clinic. Employees she said. “As we continue to perfect the technolthe highest numbers of chronic disease in the naogy and make it more mobile, it just allows pawho are sick simply log into the app on a comtion,” she said. “It really becomes a daily health tients to be empowered to manage their health. coach to help people manage their disease and puter, wait in a virtual waiting room where they talk to the telehealth coordinator, and then see a From what we’ve been doing, we’re getting instay out of the hospital.” credible feedback from patients around the state, physician, just like at the doctor’s office. The devices have Bluetooth capability, saying that it’s changing their lives.” For those with illnesses that don’t require which allows them to feed information back to 24

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


Commercial Space for Lease

THE BELHAVEN BUILDING 1200 NORTH STATE STREET JACKSON, MS 39202

Thank You For Nominating Me! I appreciate the opportunity to provide high quality surgical oncology care to patients in Mississippi

Dr. Phillip Ley Finalist: Best Surgeon Best of Jackson 2015

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Phillip Ley, please call

601-200-7465

Class A mixed-use Building with Retail and Medical Office space for Lease. Located on the Baptist Medical Center campus in the heart of the Greater Belhaven neighborhood. Retail space features outdoor signage, outdoor patio area and significant foot traffic. Office space offers customized build to suit and asbuilt suites. Enclosed pedestrian bridges connect the Building to its dedicated parking structure and to the Hospital. Competitive rental and flexible lease terms. Professionally managed. Interested parties please inquire.

PLEASE CONTACT PAMÉLA PLANTE FOR LEASING INQUIRIES: (800) 801-7001 | pplante@lhf.biz Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

25


WELLNESS

// by Amber Helsel

F

or the owners of Massage Revolution, massage isn’t just a luxury or another way to relax. It’s a way to improve your overall health. “Massage is so basic and so simple,” coowner Abraham Santa Cruz says. James Rader, 25, met Laura Manning, 28, and Santa Cruz, 32, while the three were studying at the Mississippi School of Therapeutic Massage. Manning and Santa Cruz had met at the University of New Orleans. “What we wanted to do was more on the medical side of things, sort of getting people to view massage as preventative health care,

IMANI KHAYYAM

The three owners opened Massage Revolution in its current location in the Regions Plaza on Capitol Street in downtown Jackson in November 2012. rather than just a luxury for people who have a ton of money,” Manning says. “Along with that, we wanted to make it more accessible financially and geographically to more people.” Rader says that the process of opening the business was like running blindfolded 26

diseases; those with disabilities and injuries; athletes and Hollywood actors; and the list goes on. One client is a woman with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2—a disease characterized by progressive problems with movement—who, because of her condition, has lost a lot of brain

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

IMANI KHAYYAM

So Basic and So Simple

through the woods. “It was rough, three different personalities coming into one thing,” he says. “I think we all grew from it, and it’s been an amazing experience.” After graduating from massage therapy school in summer 2012, the three opened Massage Revolution at first in a location on Ridgewood Road. “It was the first space we found that we could afford, and we thought would work for what we needed,” Manning says. “Now, we kind of describe it as a stepping stone that got us to where we were really meant to be.” A month after opening on Ridgewood Road, the three got an opportunity to bring their business to downtown Jackson. “This was a much better fit for us in terms of growth and what we wanted to do and who we wanted to reach,” she says. Rader says that what he likes about massage therapy is helping clients solve health problems without medicine, though all three emphasize that their goal isn’t to trump modern health care. Massage Revolution helps people of every age and place in life—children, adults and the elderly; those with common and rare

James Rader (left), Laura Manning (center) and Abraham Santa Cruz (right) of Massage Revolution want people to think of massage as preventative healthcare.

function. Because of that, the signals her brain sends to her muscles are sporadic. Due to her lack of control, her muscles atrophied. The combination of massage and physical therapy has helped her gain better control of them. When she first came to Massage Revolution, she wasn’t responsive, but now, Manning says she smiles when people walk into the room, which shows awareness, and she can now move her tongue on command. Besides the traditional types of massages such as Swedish and deep tissue, Massage Revolution also does modalities such as shiatsu, which can help break up scar tissue, and neuromuscular therapy, where the therapist applies static pressure to specific points on the body to relieve pain. The parlor offers chair massages at $1 per minute with a minimum of five minutes, and table massages. Santa Cruz says that two 15-minute chair massages per week can help emotionally and physically and can increase productivity at work. One of its programs is its Worksite Wellness program, which brings chair massages into businesses, and allows them to educate people about massage therapy. “I can’t think of any other way I can heal my body from a full day’s work,” he says of it. “… It should be a blast not getting sick.” Massage Revolution (210 E. Capitol St.) is open Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. by appointment only. It also does massages from 5 to 8 p.m., with advance notice. For more information, visit massagerevolutionjackson.com or call 601.918.1853. boomjackson.com


There is someone in your life who means more to you than anything. Someone you live for. Fight for. Pray for. The reason you get up in the morning. Your reason for being. For us at Baptist, that someone is you, the patient.

BAPTIST

TOP 2%

IN THE  NATION Patient Safety & Experience™ 2015

Turner Care Congratulates Justin Turner, MD Finalist, Best Doctor Olurotimi Badero, MD Finalist, Best Surgeon Best of Jackson 2015 5240 Robinson Road Ext. (601) 398-2335 turnercarems@gmail.com www.turnercarems.com Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

www.mbhs.org/quality | 800.948.6262 27 The Following Is Not For Print/For Information Only Placement: BOOM Jackson magazine. 06/2015. 3.6875” x 10.125””. Commissioned by Robby Channell. (eMac/Users/mbhs/Documents/PROJECTS/Medical Center/Ads/Someone Generic ad)


Fashionably Well // by Amber Helsel, photos by Imani Khayyam

S

FlipBelt StinkyFeet Athletics

o many of us hate to exercise, but it’s an important part of a healthy lifestyle. Why not have fun with it? Here are some wellness goodies you can find in stores around the metro area.

$64

Aasics running shoes StinkyFeet Athletics

$64

$140

Aasics running shoes StinkyFeet Athletics

$20

Men’s metal venttech short sleeve Studio Chane t-shirt Lululemon Athletica Swell-o-Phonic

evamor water Rainbow Natural Grocery Co-op $155

$99

New Balance 990s unisex running shoes Earth Walk

Nike men’s sneakers Swell-o-Phonic

$45

$40

Pure Barre T-shirt Pure Barre

$78: mat, $18: strap

$2.49

Men’s In Motion shorts Lululemon Athletica

$140

$98

$25

Pure Barre tank Pure Barre

$12

Pure Barre grip stick socks Pure Barre

Reversible yoga mat and strap Lululemon Athletica

Pure Barre leggings Pure Barre

:KHUH6KRS 4UJOLZ'FFU "UIMFUJDT  5LGJHZD\ 6XLWH & )ORZRRGVWLQN\IHHWDWKOHWLFVFRP  -VMVMFNPO"UIMFUJDB ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH   OXOXOHPRQFRP  3BJOCPX /BUVSBM(SPDFSZ$PPQ 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG UDLQERZFRRSRUJ 4XFMMP1IPOJD  1 6WDWH 6W  FKDQHFRP  1VSF#BSSF ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH$  SXUHEDUUHFRP  &BSUI 8BML ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH HDUWKZDONVKRHVFRP

Thank You

Let Fleet Feet’s proven marathon training get you to the finish line!

UĂŠ Ă?ÂŤiĂ€Âˆi˜Vi`]ĂŠViĂ€ĂŒÂˆwi`ĂŠ VÂœ>VÂ…iĂƒĂŠĂœÂ…ÂœĂŠÂŤĂ€ÂœĂ›Âˆ`iĂŠ>ĂŠ ÂŤiĂ€ĂƒÂœÂ˜>Â?ĂŠĂŒÂœĂ•VÂ… UĂŠĂ“Ă¤Â‡ĂœiiŽÊ“>Ă€>ĂŒÂ…ÂœÂ˜Ă‰ Â…>Â?vʓ>Ă€>ĂŒÂ…ÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂŒĂ€>ˆ˜ˆ˜}ĂŠ ÂŤÂ?>Â˜ĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠ>ĂŠ`>ˆÂ?ÞÊ ĂœÂœĂ€ÂŽÂœĂ•ĂŒĂŠÂŤÂ?>˜ UĂŠ Â˜ĂŒÂ…Ă•ĂƒÂˆ>ĂƒĂŒÂˆVĂŠÂŤ>ViĂ€ĂƒĂŠ ĂŒÂ…>ĂŒĂŠÂ“>˜>}iĂŠÂŤ>ViĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ `ÂˆĂƒĂŒ>˜VioĂƒÂœĂŠĂžÂœĂ•ĂŠ`ÂœÂ˜Â˝ĂŒĂŠ Â…>Ă›iĂŠĂŒÂœt

F IN A L I ST Best Dentist Best Dental Practice Best of Jackson 2015

Bring your questions and your friends to one of our informational meetings on August 18 and August 20 at 7 p.m. 5800 Ridgewood Road #104, Jackson MS Ă‡ĂˆÂ™Â‡Ă“x£‡x™ä™ÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°ĂŒĂœ>Ă€i``ĂƒÂ°Vœ“ 28

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


.*44*44*11*

# 3 "7 & 4

"--(".&5*.&4"3&$45"/%46#+&$550$)"/(&

-*45&/"--4&"40/-0/(0/'.8:"#

 C >D H >H B 9 6 A 6 G : C <:

 C > < : 7  H I : @ I>8  +   H 6  L D A  6H

CSBWFT

#USTOM $ESIGNED %YEWARE

Keep Cool at the Sweetest Spot in Town

9OUR 3HAPE 9OUR #OLOR Your Style.

NANDYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CANDY

Mon-Sat Sat 10a.m. 10 a.m. to 6p.m. 6 p.m. t 601-362-9553 1220 E. Northside Dr. #380, Jackson, MStOBOEZTDBOEZDPN MS tOBOEZTDBOEZDPN

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

Dr. Rebecca Cox Patton, Dr. Lauren R. Eaton, Rebekah Evans, Optician  )  .ORTH 3TE  s (IGHLAND 6ILLAGE    s INFO SPECTACLESMSCOM 29


Best of Jackson Health Care Jackson is one of the coolest places to live, so we have plenty of reasons to smile. Of course, it helps to have great dental professionals polishing our pearly whites. Here are Jacksoniansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; choices for the best people to keep your smile beaming.

5800 Ridgewood Road, Suite 104, 769.251.5909, twaredds.com Everyone deserves to love his or her smile, and for almost 10 years, Jackson EFOUJTU %S 5FSSBODF 8BSF IBT PGGFSFE dental care for the young and the old. Ware received his doctorate degree JO EFOUBM TVSHFSZ GSPN UIF 6OJWFSTJUZ PG 5FOOFTTFF JO  "GUFS EFOUBM TDIPPM  Ware practiced in Memphis and Grenada. In 2011, he opened Crystal Springs Dental Center, which he maintains alongside 5FSSBODF 8BSF %%4 1--$ )JT +BDLTPO PGĂ&#x17E;DFPGGFSTTFSWJDFTTVDIBT$MFBS$PS-

$0635&4:%3+*.&%8"540/

Dr. Jim Ed Watson

rect Alignment and Invisalign systems, dental implants and trauma care.  8IFO IFnT OPU JO UIF PGĂ&#x17E;DF  8BSF enjoys spending time with his wife, Zandrea Ware, and two children, Yasmin and Jacob Ware, along with leisure activities like reading and vacationing. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Alexandria Wilson

Best Dentist

Finalists Michael Carter (Carter 4MFEHF%FOUBM -BLF)BSCPVS%SJWF 

Suite 2, Ridgeland, 601.607.7876, cartersledgedental.com) / LaMonica I. Davis (Smiles on Broadway, 5442 Watkins Drive, 601.665.4996) / Jim Ed Watson (Jackson Center for Smiles, 1437 Old Square Road, Suite 203, 601.366.7645)

Best Dental Practice

Finalists Carter Sledge Dental (772 -BLF )BSCPVS %SJWF  4VJUF   3JEHFland, 601.607.7876, cartersledgedental.com) / Jackson Center for Smiles (1437 Old Square Road, Suite 203, 601.366.7645) / Smiles on Broadway (5442 Watkins Drive, 601.665.4996, smilesonbroadwaydental.com)

Dr. Terrance Ware

Best Cosmetic Dentist: Jim Ed Watson Jackson Center for Smiles, 1437 Old Square Road, Suite 203, 601.366.7645, jxnsmiles.com Helping Jacksonians with their smiles isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t an easy job, but Jim Ed Watson is up for the challenge. A Yazoo City native, Watson moved to Jackson in 2001 BGUFSĂ&#x17E;OJTIJOHEFOUBMTDIPPMBUUIF6OJWFSTJUZPG5FOOFTTFF $PMMFHF PG %FOUJTUSZ )F JT BMTP B HSBEVBUF PG 5IF 1BDJĂ&#x17E;D Aesthetic Continuum, which aims to help dentists around UIFXPSMEGVSUIFSUIFJSQSBDUJDF8BUTPOJTDFSUJĂ&#x17E;FEJONBOZ areas, such as periodontal therapy, implant dentistry, orthodontics and practice management. In his free time, Watson enjoys cycling, hunting, run-

Smiles by Design, 5800 Ridgewood Road, Suite 103, 601.957.1711; 125 Jones St., Ridgeland, 601.427.9252 For Eugene C. Brown, the top priority is giving Mississippians the highest-quality orthodontic care. 5ISPVHI4NJMFTCZ%FTJHO XIJDIIBTPGĂ&#x17E;DFTJO+BDLson, Madison and Grenada, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s making his state a better place one smile at a time. Brown received his pre-dental degree from Mississippi College in 1976 and his dental degree GSPN UIF 6OJWFSTJUZ PG 5FOOFTTFF $PMMFHF PG %FOUJTUSZJO)FDPNQMFUFEBSFTJEFODZBUUIF65

OJOHBOEDPMMFHFGPPUCBMM)FJTBNFNCFSPGUIF'JSTU1SFTbyterian Church of Jackson. He says Jackson Center for Smiles values its relationships with its customers, and the practice is dedicated to giving Jacksonians comprehensive dental care. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Joshua C. Clayton Finalists: Greggory Tharp (Smiles in Jackson, 2695 Flowood Drive, Suite A, Flowood, 601.939.4100, smilesinjackson.com) / Elijah Arrington III (Fondren Dental, 4562 N. State St., 601.981.4322)

(SBEVBUF0SUIPEPOUJD1SPHSBNJO#SPXOBMTP UBVHIUTUVEFOUTBUUIF65$PMMFHFPG Dentistry Department of Operative %FOUJTUSZ BOE UIF 6..$ 4DIPPM PG Dentistryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s orthodontic program. He grew up around the McComb area, moved to Jackson in 1969 and has practiced in the capital since 1981. He served as vice president of the Mississippi Association of Orthodontists for two years and was elected president in 2014. He is also a member of the Jackson Dental Society, Jackson Dental Study Group, Mississippi Dental Eugene C. Brown Association, the Southern Association of Orthodontists and the American Association of Orthodontists.

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

When not at work, Brown is a deacon and Sunday school teacher at Colonial Heights Baptist Church (444 Northpark Drive, Ridgeland, 601.956.5000). His hobbies include riding his motorcycle and attending car shows. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Joshua C. Clayton

$0635&4:&6(&/&$#308/

Best Orthodontist: Eugene C. Brown

30

IMANI KHAYYAM

Best Dentist; Best Dental Practice: Terrance Ware, Terrance Ware DDS PLLC

Finalists: Priscilla Jolly (Jolly Orthodontics, 1000 Highland Colony 1LXZ  3JEHFMBOE   / Camille Sandifer (Sandifer Orthodontics, 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 247, 601.981.5004) / Kenneth Walley (Kenneth Walley DDS, 2174 Henry Hill Drive, 601.922.3888; 208 Key Drive, Madison, 601.898.1788)

boomjackson.com


Bringing The Community Together: Promoting Racial Harmony and Facilitating Understanding

Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021; Monthly Luncheons Second Wednesday each month Join Jackson 2000 for our monthly discussion luncheon at the Art Center of Mississippi, covering issues related to racial harmony, economics, health, education and more. Visit our website for topics and to receive e-mail updates.

TIFICATI ON CER L A

CY EN AG

NAT IO N

PHLEBOTOMY

 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;ŠCERTIFICATION

BECKSFORD HEALTH SERVICES

All workshops are 1 Day and 100% Hands-On Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it to a workshop? Already trained but need to be certified? Our online exams can have you certified in 3 hours or less!

REGISTER NOW!

twww.becksford.com

5IPNBT%SJWF 4VJUFt1BOBNB$JUZ#FBDI '- 

Let Skin by MD rejuvenate your skin for summer!

2015 Golf Outing Date TBA, see website Our annual fundraiser offers an opportunity for a diverse group of individuals to enjoy a round of golf while meeting new people and learning a little more about our organization. Both experienced and novice golfers are welcome!

2015 Dialogue Circles Ongoing for adults and youth, see website Jackson 2000 presents dialogue circles, a series of facilitated, curriculum-based discussion sessions that can open minds, change hearts and build lasting friendships.

TM

by Bellus Medical

SkinPen by Bellus Medical is the latest in medical treatments for treating the appearance of scars, VWUHWFKPDUNVĂ&#x20AC;QHOLQHV and wrinkles.

Call for a Special Offer!

THE PERFECT DERMAâ&#x201E;˘ The Perfect Dermaâ&#x201E;˘ Peel will rejuvenate your skin and leave it looking younger and healthier after just one application.

Now 20% Off!

Thanks to The Nissan Foundation for their generous support.

www.jackson2000.org Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

Diane Henson | Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021; +LJKODQG 9LOODJH 6XLWH  WWW.DIANE.SKINBYMD.COM 31


Best of Jackson Health Care Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re under the weather or just need a check-up, the capital city has plenty of health-care options. Here are Jacksoniansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; top picks to keep you in top shape.

Richland Primary Care Center, 1201 U.S. 49, Suite 4, 601.932.6400 Like physicians and doctors, nurse practitioners play a tremendous role in health care. Nurse practitioners are similar to nurses, but they also have masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees and manage some treatments, among many other things. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Nurse Practi-

tioner winner, Greg Ross, has been at Richland Primary Care Clinic for about 17 years. The Clarksdale native relocated to Jackson after serving in the National Guard and U.S. Army from 1982 to 1988. He earned a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in biology in 1991 from Bel-

haven University, a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in science and nursing from Vanderbilt University in 1994, and a master of business administration degree from Belhaven in 1999. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Guy King

Best Local Nurse Practitioner Finalists: Shelita Lewis (Quinn Healthcare, 768 N. Avery Blvd., Ridgeland, 601.487.6482) / Kaye Killings (North Jackson Medical Clinic, 5160 Galaxie Drive, 601.713.0890)

KIM TOWNSEND

Best Chiropractor: Leo C. Huddleston Natural Wellness Center, 6500 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601.956.0010, nutritionalhealthtesting.com With 33 years of experience at his own private practice, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no wonder Dr. Leo C. Huddlestonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clients at the Natural Wellness Center chose him as Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best chiropractor. A native of Nashville, Tenn., Huddleston moved to Decatur, Miss., in 1981 to start his practice, and moved to Jackson in 1983. He is a graduate of the National Academy

of Sports Medicine and an American Red Cross â&#x20AC;&#x153;Protect Your Backâ&#x20AC;? certiĂ&#x17E;FE JOTUSVDUPS )VEEMFTUPO JT BMTP B DFSUJĂ&#x17E;FEQFSTPOBMĂ&#x17E;UOFTTUSBJOFS XBUFS safety instructor and clinical nutrition master and teacher. He is the Mississippi representative for the Foundation for Athletic Research and Education. This year, Huddleston was even elect-

St. Dominicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Martin Surgical Associates, 971 Lakeland Drive, Suite 211, 601.200.4350 Jacksonians have plenty of doctors at their disposal, but Dr. Reginald W. Martin of Martin Surgical Associates at St. Dominic Hospital is one of the capital cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standouts. With nearly 30 years of experience, Martin specializes in general surgery under the affiliation of St. Dominic Hospital in Jackson. Martin completed his undergradu-

Leo C. Huddleston

Best Surgeon

Reginald Martin

Finalists: Philip Sandifer (University

JESSICA KING

1225 N. State St., 601.968.1489, mbhs.org

32

Finalists: Andrew Cefalu (Foxworth Chiropractic, 2470 Flowood Drive, Suite 125, Flowood, 601.932.9201) / Joe Clay (Elite Healthcare Alliance, 350 N. Park Plaza, Suite B, 601.987.0067) / Stanley Sims (Sims Chiropractic Clinic, 500 E. Woodrow Wilson Ave., Suite F, 601.982.0988)

ate studies at Alcorn State University in 1984, received his medical degree from Meharry Medical College in 1988 and completed his residency at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in 1993. In his spare time, Martin enjoys golf and spending time with family. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Alexandria Wilson

nation in patient safety and experience. Healthgrades also named Baptist Health Systems one of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 100 best in orthopedic surgery, prostate surgery and joint replacement. Baptist organizes events such as Cancer Survivors Day, Super Sitters, a program that trains teenagers to be safer babysitters, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Girl Talk,â&#x20AC;? an on-

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

ed president of the board for Rainbow Natural Grocery Co-op (2807 Old Canton Road, 601.366.1602) in 2015. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Joshua C. Clayton

Best Chiropractor

Best Hospital: Baptist Health Systems Jacksonians have many great hospitals to choose from, and Baptist Medical Center is the top vote-getter this year. Its parent company, Baptist Health Systems, has been around since 1911. The medical center opened in its current location in 1976. This year, Healthgrades placed the hospital in the top 2 percent in the

Greg Ross

COURTESY OZIOMA NEWS

Best Surgeon: Reginald Martin

(MIXED PERSPECTIVE PHOTOGRAPHY)

Best Nurse Practitioner: Greg Ross

of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 N. State St., 601.984.1000) / Philip Ley (Mississippi Breast Center, 106 Highland Way, Suite 200, Madison, 601.200.7465) / Anthony Petro (The Surgical Clinic Associates, 501 Marshall St., Suite 500, 601.948.1411) / Olurotimi Badero (Cardiac Renal & Vascular Associates, 5240 Robinson Road Extension, 601.398.0904)

also has locations across the state, including in Attala and Leake counties. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Joshua C. Clayton

Best Hospital

Baptist Health Systems line service where women get answers on topics including birth control and menopause. Baptist Health Systems

Finalists: Merit Health River Oaks Hospital (1030 River Oaks Drive, Flowood, 601.932.1030, merithealthriveroaks.com) / St. Dominicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital (969 Lakeland Drive, 601.200.2000, stdom. com) / University of Mississippi Medical Center (2500 N. State St., 601.984.1000, umc.edu)

boomjackson.com


ZZZEFEVPVFRP Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi, A Mutual Insurance Company is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ® Registered Marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.

FRAMED

OR

UNFRAMED JEA SOLVES IT! If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been searching for the solution to your vision dilemma JEA has solved the case. Comprehensive sight investigation by RXU ERDUGFHUWLÈ´HG SK\VLFLDQV FORVHV WKH FDVH ZLWK HYLGHQFH WR LPSURYH\RXUIXWXUHRXWORRN$QGZKLOH\RXÈ&#x2021;UHRQVFHQHYLVLWRXU -($2SWLFDO%RXWLTXHSURIHVVLRQDOVWRÈ´QGIUDPHVRUFRQWDFWVWKDW VSHDNWR\RX)UDPHGRUXQIUDPHGÈ&#x201A;-($VROYHVZKDW\RXFDQÈ&#x2021;WVHH Î&#x2013;QYLWH-($WRVROYH\RXUH\HFDUHFDVH0DNHDQDSSRLQWPHQWZLWK RXUFOLQLFRURSWLFDOERXWLTXHDQGZHÈ&#x2021;OOJHWULJKWRQWKHFDVH

JACKSON 601.353.2020

CLINTON 601.924.9750

MADISON 601.853.2020

WWW.JACKSONEYE.COM | ©2015 JEA

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

33


34

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


4th & Goal Aladdin Babalu Bonny Blair ’s BRAVO! Broad Street Baking Company Chimneyville Smokehouse Fenian’s Pub Fusion Hal & Mal’s Hickory Pit The Iron Horse Grill ISH Grill Jaco’s Tacos Mangia Bene Manship Wood Fired Kitchen Mellow Mushroom Ole Tavern The Penguin Pig & Pint Rooster ’s Sal & Mookie’s Sal & Phil’s Steve’s Surin of Thailand T’Beaux’s Table 100 Underground 119 Zeek’s

p 47 p 39 p 38 p 47 p 42 p 42 p 45 p 47 p 44 p 40 p 43 p 41 p 46 p 40 p 42 p 39 p 45 p 43 p 41 p 37 p 44 p 42 p 46 p 44 p 42 p 45 p 38 p 36 p 46

Menu Guide (pages 35-47) is a paid advertising section. For these and more visit

www.jfpmenus.com


M36

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jfpmenus.com


VOTED IBEST IBIBQ | IBEST NEW RESTAURANT IB E S T O F J A C K S O N 2 0 1 5

SMALL PLATES

SALADS

Boudin Balls…6.99 Pork Belly Corn Dogs …7.99 Pimento Cheese…6.99 Sausage & Cheese Plate…8.99

BLT Salad …8.99 House Salad ...5.99 Smoked Chicken Caesar ...9.99

NACHOS

Pulled Pork BBQ Tacos (2)…6.99 Smoked Chicken BBQ Tacos (2) …6.99 Brisket BBQ Tacos (2) …7.99 BBQ Taco Sampler (3) …9.99

Cheddar Cheese / Smokehouse Beans Pickled Onions / Pico de Gallo / Mississippi “Sweet” BBQ Sauce / Sour Cream Pulled Pork Nachos…8.99 Smoked Chicken Nachos…8.99 Brisket Nachos…9.99

IB U R G E R S & SANDWICHES

Choice of 1 side: Collard Greens / Fries / Smoked Tomato Cole Slaw Potato Salad / Pasta Salad / Baked Beans Pork Rinds / Side Salad / Fried Green Tomatoes BBQ Sandwich…8.99 (Choice of Pulled Pork or Smoked Chicken) Brisket BBQ Sandwich...9.99 The P&P Reuben ... 9.99 Fried Bologna Sandwich ... 8.99 Fried Green Tomato BLT… 8.99 Smoked Chicken Salad Sandwich…8.99 The Bacon Melt…10.99 Boudin Burger…10.99

TACOS

‘QUE PLATES

Choice of 2 sides: Collard Greens / Fries / Smoked Tomato Cole Slaw Potato Salad / Pasta Salad / Baked Beans Pork Rinds / Side Salad / Fried Green Tomatoes Pepsi-Cola Glazed Baby Back Ribs Full Slab …25.99 Half-Slab …14.99 Pulled Pork Plate …11.99 Brisket Plate …14.99 1/2 Smoked Chicken Plate …13.99 ‘Que Sampler Platter …16.99 Pulled Pork / Brisket / ¼ Chicken

DESSERTS Bananas Foster Pudding …3.99 “Parker House” White Chocolate & Cranberry Bread Pudding …3.99

3139 N STATE ST, JACKSON PIGANDPINT.COM (601) 326-6070

Jackson Menu Guide

M37


M38

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jfpmenus.com


#ALL 5S &OR !LL 9OUR

#ATERING .EEDS

Soup & Salad 5HG/HQWLO6RXS *UHHN6DODG *UHHQ6DODG )DWRXFKH 7DERXOL 7]HNL6DODG $UDELF6DODG 6KDZDUPD6DODG *ULOOHG&KLFNHQ6DODG 6KULPS6DODG

2.95 5.49 3.75 4.49 4.49 4.49 4.49 7.59 7.59 8.59

Add meat on your salad for $3.50 Add feta on your salad for $0.50

Appetizers

$ODGGLQ·V6SHFLDO 14.69 +XPPXV'LS 3.95 %DED*DQXM'LS 4.50 0XVDEDKD 4.50 )RXO 4.50 4XGVLD (mixed hummus & foul) 4.50 /HEQD 4.50 )ULHG.LEE\ 4.50 0HDWRU9HJJLH'ROPDV 4.50 3LFNOHVDQG2OLYHV 2.50 )HWD&KHHVHDQG2OLYHV 3.50 6SLQDFK3LH   4.00 )ULHG&KHHVH 5.95 )DODIHO   3.50 %DVPDWL5LFHZ6DIIURQ 2.50 )UHQFK)ULHV 2.50

7HO )D[

Sandwiches

)DODIHO *\URV /XOD.DEDEchicken or lamb 6KLVK.DEDEbeef or lamb &KLFNHQ.DEDE &KLFNHQ6KDZDUPD %HHI6KDZDUPD +DPEXUJHU &KHHVHEXUJHU 3KLOO\6WHDN

Desserts )UHVK%DNODYD %XUPD %DNODYD)LQJHUV %LUG1HVW 7LUDPLVX

3.99 4.99 5.49 5.49 5.49 5.99 5.99 4.79 4.99 5.49

1.95 1.95 1.95 1.65 3.69

Entrees Happy Hour Monday-Friday 3-6pm 1/2 off Pizzas :HOOVÂ&#x2021;RII&UDIW%HHU

1200 N STATE ST #100, JACKSON, MS 39202 (601) 398-4562

served with salad, hummus, rice and white or whole wheat pita bread

&RPELQDWLRQ3ODWH 12.99 6KDZDUPD 11.69 &KLFNHQ/XOD 10.69 &KLFNHQ7HFND 11.69 &KLFNHQ.DEDE 11.69 6KLVK.DEDE        12.69 /XOD.DEDE 12.69 &RPELQDWLRQ.DEDE 15.99 *\UR3ODWH 11.69 /DPE&KRSV 16.99 /DPE6KDQN 15.99 %LJ&RPER 17.69 )ULHG.LEE\ 10.99 +XPPXVZLWK/DPE 10.69 6KULPS3ODWH 12.99 7LODSLD3ODWH 11.69 %DUUDPXQGL 15.99 0HDW*UDSH/HDYHV3ODWH 9.69

6WRSE\RXUJURFHU\VWRUH WRWU\RXU1RQ$OFRKROLF %HHUVDQG-XLFHV

$INE IN OR 4AKE /UT #ATERING $ELIVERY 6XQ7KXUVDPSP)ULDQG6DWDPSP DODGGLQLQMDFNVRQFRP

 ,AKELAND $R &ONDREN

$ODGGLQ*URFHU\ )RQGUHQ /DNHODQG'U 7HO)D[ Jackson Menu Guide

M39


APPETIZERS

Dips Chile con Queso . . . . . .5.25 Add Chorizo . . . . . . . . . .0.95 Guacamole . . . . . . . . . . .7.95 Jacoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dip . . . . . . . . . . . .9.95

318 Sout

h State S



treet



Bites Street Corn . . . . . . . . . . . .4.00 Stuffed JalapeĂąos . . .7.25 Chicken Tenders . . . . .8.25 Fried Broccoli . . . . . . . .6.95 Campfire Chili . .9.95 . . 4.95

TACOS

Philly Cheese Steak

. . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)14.00 . . . (1)5.00

BURRITOS

Grilled Steak . . . . . . . .14.25 Fried Chicken . . . . . . . .13.25 Mojave Pork . . . . . . . . .13.25 Veggie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13.25 Grilled Chicken . . . . .13.25 Alamo Beef . . . . . . . . . .13.50 Surf and Turf . . . . . . . . .19.25

ENCHILADAS

Spinach . (3) 12.25 . . . (2)10.25 Cheese . . (3)12.25 . . . (2)10.25 Grilled Veggie . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)12.25 . . . (2)10.25

Roasted Chicken

. . . . . . . . . . . .(3)12.25 . . . (2)10.25

Ranchero Chicken

. . . . . . . . . . . .(3)12.25 . . . (2)10.25

Baja Fish Taco

Mojave Pork

Grilled Steak

Alamo Spicy Beef

Grilled Chicken

Grilled Steak

Fried Chicken

Grilled Shrimp

. . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)17.00 . . . (1)6.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)14.00 . . . (1)5.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)9.50 . . . (1)3.50 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)9.50 . . . (1)3.50

Mojave Pork

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)9.50 . . . (1)3.50

Alamo Beef

. . . . . . . . . . . . (3)11.00 . . . (1) 4.00

Grilled Shrimp

. . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)17.00 . . . (1)6.00

Veggie Taco

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)9.50 . . . (1)3.50

FAJITAS

Grilled Chicken 15.25 . 27.50 Steak & Chicken . 18.25 . 31.50 Grilled Steak . .19.25 . 33.50 Grilled Shrimp 22.95 . 39.95 Pollo Fiesta . . . . . . . . . .16.95

. . . . . . . . . . . .(3)12.25 . . . (2)10.25 . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)13.25 . . . (2)11.25 . . . . . . . . . . . .(3)15.25 . . . (2)13.25

. . . . . . . . . . . .(3)15.95 . . . (2)13.95

DAILY SPECIALS

Tuesday Half off our Large Chicken & Steak Fajita Wednesday 5FDBUFtGPS)PVTF Margaritas All Day Thursday $1 Pint Night Saturday $10 $10 All you can drink Mimosa and Bloody Mary Bar! With an EntrĂŠe! From 11 to 5

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST! Monday-Friday Starting at 7AM

4PVUI4UBUF4USFFUt

WWW.JACOSTACOS.NET M40

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jfpmenus.com


P ENGUIN DAILY SPECIALS S ERVED FROM 11:00 AM -3:00 PM $10 ( INCLUDES ICED TEA ) TUESDAY

Fried chicken, turnip greens, macaroni and cheese

WEDNESDAY

Beef Brisket, mashed potatoes and butter beans

THURSDAY

Smothered Pork, rice and southern green beans

FRIDAY Fried Catfish, cole slaw and French fries Neck Bones, turnip greens and macaroni & cheese BBQ Baby Back Ribs, baked beans and potato salad $13 Half Rack/$20 Rack

APPETIZER FAVORITES

BURGERS & SANDWICHES

Gulf Shrimp Crab Cakes Tomatoes Juanita Chicken Drummettes Smoked Jerk Chicken Wings Spinach Roasted Red Pepper Quesadilla Crawfish Eggplant Napoleon Pork Dumplings

“Hot Dog Special” Pulled Chicken Wrap The Penguin Dog Pressed Club Sandwich Penguin Burger Turkey Burger

SALADS Tossed Caesar Salad Penguin Salad Vegetarian Salad

DINNER ENTREES Hickory Smoked Apple Pork Chop Roasted Chicken Vermicelli Pasta Duck Confit in Orange Sauce Herb Encrusted Sirloin Chicken Neely Blackened Catfish Roasted Garlic Encrusted Salmon Ribeye Steak

SOUPS Gumbo Soup of the day

PENGUIN DESSERTS Turtle Cheesecake New York Cheesecake Bourbon Pecan Pie Strawberry Shortcake Brownie w/Ice Cream, Red Velvet Cake Bread Pudding

LUNCH ENTREES Roasted Chicken Vermicelli Pasta Chicken Neely Blackened Catfish Chicken and Waffle Roasted Garlic Encrusted Salmon Country Fried Ribeye Steak Consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish or eggs may increase your risk of food borne illness. Please inform your server if you have any food allergies or special dietary needs. The Penguin Restaurant adds an automatic 18% gratuity to all parties of 7 or more. Please allow additional time to close out separate checks for large parties.

1100 John R. Lynch Street Suite A | Jackson, MS 769.251.5222 thepenguinms.com

Jackson Menu Guide

M41


Starters -----------

Egg Rolls . . . . . . . . . . . 4.25 Pot Stickers with Red Curry t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.00 Fresh Basil Rolls . . . . 5.00 Chicken Larb tt . . . . . 7.00 Namsod tt . . . . . . . . . 7.00 Satay Beef . . . . . . . . . . 7.00 Crab Angels . . . . . . . . 4.25

Soups --------------

Hot & Sour Shrimp t . 6.00 Thai Coconut t Shrimp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.00 Chicken/Tofu . . . . . . . . . 5.00

Fresh Thai Stir Fry

Veggie Delight . . . . 10.50 Pad Prik Pork ttt . . 10.50

Thai Curry --------

Chicken Panangtt 12.00 Masaman Chicken . 15.00 Beef Masamant . . . 15.00 Chicken Curry t . . . . 12.00 Shrimp Curry tt . . . 15.00 Sweet & Sour Chicken 12.00

Noodles and Rice

Thai Chicken Fried Rice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.00 Spicy Beef Noodlet12.00 Pad See U Tofu . . . . 12.00 Thai Noodle . . . . . . . 12.50

Special Entrees

Shrimp Masaman . . 22.00 Thai Sea Bass . . . . . 24.00 Mixed Seafoodttt 22.00 Succulent Catfish . . 17.00 Thai Barbecued Chicken 17.00 Basil Duckt. . . . . . . . 21.00 Roasted Duck w/ Red Curryt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.00 Tiger Crytt. . . . . . . . 22.00 Ka Proud Lambt . . . 21.00 Nam Tok Beef tt . . . 21.00

Maki----------------

California Roll . . . . . . . 5.00 Rock and Roll . . . . . . . 5.00 Kappa Maki . . . . . . . . . 5.00 Yasai Maki . . . . . . . . . . 5.00 Negihama Roll . . . . . . 5.00 Spicy Hamachi . . . . . . 5.00 Spicy Tuna Roll . . . . . . 5.00 Tekka Maki. . . . . . . . . . 5.00

Maki Mono -------

Bagel Roll . . . . . . . . . . 10.00 Double Shrimp . . . . 12.00 Ebi Ten Maki . . . . . . . 10.00 Kaboom Maki . . . . . . 15.00 Rainbow Roll. . . . . . . 12.00 Spicy Shrimp Roll . . 12.00 Spider Roll . . . . . . . . . 12.00 Submarine Roll . . . . 13.00 Super Crunch . . . . . . 11.00 Tokyo Roll . . . . . . . . . 10.00 Tuna Avocado Roll . . 9.00 Volcano Roll . . . . . . . 15.00 Wasabi Maki . . . . . . . 15.00 Yummi Yummi Roll . 15.00

3000 Old Canton Road, Suite 105, Jackson (601)981-3205 Like us on Facebook! www.surinofthailand.com M42

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

VDO PRRNLHV:+(1,1)21'5(1+DOI3DJH35(665($'< :HGQHVGD\-XQH30

jfpmenus.com


We sell BBQ Pork, Beef, Ribs, Chicken, Ham & Turkey by the pound! Sandwiches Extra Fixinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BBQ Chicken (chopped w/ slaw relish) Garlic Bread ............................. .95 ..................................................... 6.35 Brunswick Stew w/ homemade BBQ Pork (chopped w/ slaw relish) cornbread: 1/2 pint - 5.45, pint - 9.10, ..................................................... 5.45 1/2 gallon - 29.05, gallon - 54.45 BBQ Beef (chopped w/ slaw relish) .................................................... 5.80

Assorted Potato Chips .......... 1.10

Special Sandwich Platter ...... 9.45 (BBQ Chicken, Pork, Beef, Ham, Hamburger, or Turkey Sandwiches. &KRLFHRIWZRÂż[LQVJDUGHQVDODGVODZ tater salad, home fries, sweet potato fries, onion rings or baked beans)

Homemade Pies

Lemon or Pecan ..................... 4.80 Hershey Bar ............................ 5.45 Carrot Cake ............................. 5.45 Coconut Cake .......................... 5.45

BBQ Plates

We also sell Whole Pies and Coconut Cake!

Onion Rings ........................... 3.90 Smoked Ham (lettuce, tomato & mayo) ..................................................... 6.35 Home Fries (fresh cut taters) ... 3.60 with cheese ................................ 7.95 Regular or Sweet Potato Smoked Turkey (lettuce, tomato & mayo) Small Garden Salad .............. 4.70 ..................................................... 6.35 (Come Back, Ranch, or Raspberry with cheese ................................ 7.95 Vinaigrette) Hamburger ............................. 4.75 Chef Salad ............................. 12.55 (lettuce, tomato, mayo, mustard, pickles & onion) with cheese ....... 5.99 (topped with cheddar and swiss cheese, boiled egg, smoked chicken or Double Hamburger ............... 5.99 smoked ham & turkey, with a choice with cheese ................................. 7.99 of Come Back, Ranch or Raspberry Po-Boys your choice of Pork, Chicken, Vinaigrette) Beef, Ham or Turkey (lettuce, tomato, PD\R 5XIĂ&#x20AC;HV) .......................... 10.45 Tater Salad, Cole Slaw, Baked with cheese ............................... 11.99 Beans, BBQ Sauce: single - 2.45, 1/2 pint - 3.25, pint - 5.45, Grilled Cheese ........................ 4.15 1/2 gallon - 18.50, gallon - 32.95 extra cheese ................................ 1.40

&KRLFHRIRIRXUGHOLFLRXVÂż[LQV JDUGHQVDODGVODZWDWHUVDODGKRPH IULHVRUEDNHGEHDQVDQG7H[DVWRDVW BBQ Pork (chopped) ............. 12.95 BBQ Beef (chopped) .............. 13.50 Pork Ribs (wet or dry) 1/2 slab ..................................... 16.45 whole slab ................................ 28.55 BBQ Chicken (1/2 cluck) .......... 13.15 Combination (1/2 cluck, 1/2 slab) .................................................. 24.95 BBQ Nachos ........................... 8.99

Party Packs Serves 10 Adults .................. 49.85 (2lb. pork or beef or 2 whole chickens; 2 pints beans, 2 pints slaw & 6 slices of Texas toast or 10 buns) 1/2 Party Pack ....................... 26.15 Rib Party Pack (serves 4) ....... 57.35 (2 slabs ribs, 1 pint beans, 1 pint slaw, 1 pint potato salad, 4 slices of Texas toast)

Ask About Our Catering!

Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best BBQ JFPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best of Jackson

Â&#x152;Â&#x152; Â&#x152;!Â&#x152;Â&#x152;Â&#x152;

Jackson Menu Guide

M43


Fondren Corner | 2906 N. State St. 601.982.2001 | Monday - Saturday 11:00am-9:00pm roostersfondren.com

Sandwiches All sandwiches are served with fresh

lettuce, tomato, pickle, and onions with your choice of white, wheat, or jalapeno cheddar buns baked fresh daily.

BEEF Hamburger

6oz. 8oz.

Cheeseburger Bacon Cheeseburger Mushroom Swiss Burger Jalapeno Cheeseburger

CHICKEN Grilled Chicken Sandwich

6.5 6.75 7.25 7.25 7.25

Fried Chicken Sandwich Chicken Club Chicken Mushroom Swiss Chicken Jalapeno

7.75 8 8.5 8.5 8.5

6 6 6.5 6.5 6.5

Bacon, melted cheddar, and topped with two onion rings

11.25

Sautéed mushrooms, butter, and parmesan

Mushroom Chicken Cutlet

STEVE’S BOX LUNCHES

Made from the freshest ingredients and include a sandwich or wrap of your choice, side item, and one of our famous fresh-baked cookies.

Side Item Choices

Miss Vickie’s Chips, Baked Lay’s Chips, Pretzels, Sugar-Free Fruit Cup, Lemon Dijon Pasta Salad, or Cole Slaw.

Oven-roasted turkey breast, smoked ham, or chicken salad sandwich on house-baked focaccia, croissant or wheat bread.

One 1/2 lb. Angus ground chuck hamburger steak with choice of two sides Classic Hamburger Steak 10.75 Brown gravy and sautéed onions Swiss Steak 10.75 Sautéed mushrooms and melted Swiss Bacon Cheddar Steak 11

Plates

DON’T WORK HARDER FOR LUNCH.

Metro Deli Box | $8 per person

Hamburger Steaks

Parmesan Steak

YOU WORK HARD.

Club Box | $9.75 per person

Oven-roasted turkey breast, smoked ham, bacon & provolone on house-baked focaccia, croissant or wheat bread.

Wrap Box | $9.75 per person

Chicken Club Wrap, Smoked Brisket, Sausalito Wrap, Area 51, or Mediterranean Wrap on wheat or sun-dried tomato tortilla

QUICHE BOX LUNCHES

Thinking outside the box? Looking for a sandwich alternative? How about a slice of our hand-made quiche with a salad or a cup of one of our famous soups. Vegetarian options always available.

Quiche & Greens Box | $10.75 per person

9.75

5 oz. pan-broiled chicken breast topped with sautéed mushrooms and Swiss. Choice of two sides.

One slice of quiche; field greens salad with dressing; and a fresh-baked cookie.

Quiche & Soup Box | $10.75 per person

Country Fried Steak 10.75 Topped with white gravy. Choice of two sides Chicken Tenders 9.75

One slice of quiche; 8 oz. cup of soup; and a fresh-baked cookie.

Red Beans & Rice

Small Sandwich Tray | $50

Three tenders with honey mustard. Choice of two sides.

9.5

Topped with smoked sausage, jalapenos and onions. Served with side salad.

Side Orders

Homemade Banana Pudding Cookies M44

Eight cut deli sandwiches (turkey breast, ham, chicken salad). Feeds 8 – 12

Large Sandwich Tray | $73

Twelve cut deli sandwiches, Feeds 12-18

2 Curly Fries 2 Cole Slaw Green Beans 2 Mac & Cheese 2.75 Onion Rings 2.75 Mashed Potatoes 2 Baked Beans 2 Extra Toppings .5 Side Salad 3.25 Red Beans & Rice 2 .5 Rice & Gravy 2 Extra Sauces

Desserts

SANDWICH TRAYS

2.25 1.25

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Custom Catering | Starts at $12 per person Hot lunches served buffet style with tea and desert. 125 S. Congress St. | Capital Towers T:601-969-1119 F: 601-969-7058 200 S. Lamar St. | City Centre North T: 601-714-5683 F: 601-714-6989 www.StevesDowntown.com Steve@StevesDowntown.com Catering@StevesDowntown.com jfpmenus.com


PLATE ORDERS

All Lunches Include Beverages Lunch Special - $9.95 Combo Plate - $12.95 Sampler Plate - $14.95 Regular Pork Sandwich Plate Reg $9.95 Lg. - $10.95 Regular Beef Sandwich Plate Reg. $10.95 Lg. - $11.95 St. Louis Style Rib Plate - $12.95 St. Louis Style Ribs for Two - $26.95 Daily Special Vegetable Plates THREE $7.00 FOUR $8.00

DAILY SPECIAL $9.95 MONDAY - Country Fried Steak, Red Beans & Rice, Turnip Greens, Macaroni & Cheese, Green Beans, Rice and Gravy, Niblet Corn, Steamed Cabbage, Stewed Squash, Fried Broccoli, and Roll or Cornbread. TUESDAY - Baked Tilapia, Fried Pork Chop, Turnip Greens, Macaroni & Cheese, Green Beans, Lima Beans, Twice Baked Potatoes, Niblet Corn, Fried Green Tomatoes, Grilled Cabbage, and Roll or Cornbread. WEDNESDAY - Stuffed Bell Peppers, Chicken Tetrazzini, Turnip Greens, Macaroni & Cheese, Green Beans, Purple Hull Peas, Baked Sweet Potatoes, Niblet Corn, Fried Squash, Rice & Gravy, and Roll or Cornbread. THURSDAY - Meatloaf, Fried Chicken, Turnip Greens, Macaroni & Cheese, Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes & Gravy, Niblet Corn, Fried Okra, Lima Beans, Sweet Potato Casserole, and Roll or Cornbread. FRIDAY - Fried Catfish, Hamburger Steak, Turnip Greens, Macaroni & Cheese, Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes & Gravy, Niblet Corn, JoJoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Purple Hull Peas, Broccoli Rice & Cheese Casserole, and Roll or Cornbread. In addition to the above specials, every day we have Smoked Chicken, Pulled Pork, Beef Brisket, Smoked Sausage, Baked Beans, Potato Salad & Cole Slaw.

Desserts $3.00

t#BOBOB1VEEJOH t.JTTJTTJQQJ.VE -FNPO.FSJOHVF  Pecan, or Cookies & Cream Pie t1FBDI$PCCMFS .PO 8FE 'SJ  t1FDBO$PCCMFS 5VF 5IVS

BULK ORDERS AVAILABLE! Let Us Cater Your Next Event!

601-352-9492 On Site & Off Site Cooking

"WBJMBCMFt%FMJWFSJOH#SFBLGBTU  -VODI%JOOFS%BZTB8FFL

www.chimneyville.com

Jackson Menu Guide

M45


Appetizers HUMMUS TRIO . . . . . . . . . . .8.50 FALAFEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.25 DOLMADES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6.00 FETA CHEESE PLATE . . . . . . . .6.75 MUSHROOMS . . . . . . . . . . . .6.35 PITADILLA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.95 CUCUMBERS . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.65 ARTICHOKE HEARTS . . . . . . .6.25 PITA MOZZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.45 PITA FETA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.45 PITA JACK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.45

Pita Wraps GYRO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.45 CHICKEN GYRO . . . . . . . . . . .7.75 SOUVLAKI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.85 THE BLUES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.50 PEPPERJACK GYRO . . . . . . . .8.75 SMOKED TURKEY . . . . . . . . .7.45 THE ALMOST FAMOUS . . . . . 8.45 FALAFEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.25 GRILLED CHICKEN . . . . . . . . .7.85 SHRIMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.75 CLUB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.50 BLT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.25 MAGIC MUSH . . . . . . . . . . . .7.25 PHILLY CHEESE . . . . . . . . . . .7.85 TUNA MELT . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.25 STEAK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.99 VEGGIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.25 BBQ FETA GYRO . . . . . . . . . .8.75

Salads GREEK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8.95 JR GREEK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.35 TOSSED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.49 ARTICHOKE HEARTS . . . . . . . 7.25 GRILLED CHICKEN . . . . . . . . .9.95 GYRO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9.95 TUNA SALAD . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.95

132 Lakeland Heights Suite P, Flowood, MS 601.992.9498

www.zeekzhouseofgyros.com M46

Lunch Specials $7.99

   ! 

Appetizers Fried Pickles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Chips and Queso . . . . . . . . . . . .8 ISH Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 ISH Crawtails . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Breakfast ISH Breakfast Platter . . . . . . 10

Salads, Wraps, Burgers, & More ISH Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISH Wraps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISH Burger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beef Nachos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISH Nachos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

10 10 12 12 13

EntrĂŠes ISH Tilapia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fish Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shrimp and Grits . . . . . . . . . . Shrimp Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISH Pasta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ISH Pork Chop . . . . . . . . . . . . ISH Steak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12 13 13 14 15 16 18

Side Items Broccoli, Braised Spinach, . . . . 6 Green Beans, Yellow Rice, Mini Corn Cobs, Red Potatoes, Side Salad French Fries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Desserts Lemon Pie, Peach Cobbler, . . .7 Brownie, Pecan Pie Vanilla Ice Cream . . . . . . . . . . .5

,1RUWKÂ&#x2021;-DFNVRQ06 ZZZ,6+JULOODQGEDUFRP 769-257-5204

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

.6- 0&7*= 35/-34 0&7* 5.00*)"2&44*5=5.*)81'3"-5.14 !*)*&26!.(*=-.(/*25.*)"7*&/ "78++*)0382)*5 Po-boys         "3+7"-*005&'&5/*7 5.(* "&06"845*1*.50 !3&67**+&1 5.*) 5.00*)!*)?6- .95 -**6* 5.*) 5.00*)5384*5 .95 !3&67**+.50 5&'&/*.75 %-**6*'85,*5.75 "13/*)"&86&,*.75 &1-**6*.75 37"&86&,* &77;.25 ;67*5 .95 8>80*77& "-5.14.50 &0+<. $-30*< .50 &7?6-.50 "*&+33)8>80*77& 5&:?6-#&.06.50 &0+< .95

 3'3;$ 84+"384 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7.99

Plates

Served w/ French Fries or Baked Potato, Hushpuppies And Salad

.2, 0&7* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.99

10 Fried Shrimp, 10 Boiled Shrimp, 8 Fried Oysters, 3 Catfish Filets

"-5.1439*56 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21.99 20 Boiled Shrimp, 20 Fried Shrimp

81'35.*)"-5.14. . . . . . . . . . . .13.99 10 Fried Jumbo Shrimp

"*&+33) 0&77*5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16.99 8 Fried Shrimp, 6 Oysters, 2 Stuffed Shrimp And 3 Catfish Filets

82,*2*65&'6 . . . . . . . . &5/*7 5.(* Served With Corn And Potatoes

!3;&0!*)"-5.1461. $12.0, .99 Served With Corn And Potatoes

3.0*)"-5.14 . . . . . . 7.99 . . . . . . . . . 7 .99 . . . . . . 7 .99 . . . . '*5* .99 Served With Salad Bar

;67*56 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . &5/*7 5.(* Raw, Chargrilled, or Grilled

"23:5&'6 . . . . . . . . . . . . &5/*7 5.(* Served With Corn And Potatoes

( $# $! $!%!( ( & !" #( (#!%# ( ( " $# $! )#!#'!'"(

$ "!!"! !$ $ !"!# #  "  !  $ ::44?'? )"*)?* ?Ă&#x17D;?:45P=9;P55<< 7XHV7KXUVDPSPÂ&#x2021;)UL6DWDPSP 6XQDPSPÂ&#x2021;&/26('021'$<6 TAKEOUT: &DOO  OR )D[   jfpmenus.com


Appetizers

Appetizers Fried Pickles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chili Cheese Fries . . . . . . . . . . . Fried Mushrooms . . . . . . . . . . . Cheese Sticks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Onion Rings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicken Tenders . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicken Bites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nachos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fried Buffalo Shrimp . . . . . . . .

6.99 6.99 6.99 6.99 6.99 6.99 7.99 7.99 7.99

Wraps Chicken Ceaser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grilled/Fried Chicken . . . . . . . . Buffalo Chicken . . . . . . . . . . . . . Philly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6.99 6.99 6.99 6.99

Burgers Served with Fries American . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chili Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BBQ Bacon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Three Chees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mushroom Swiss . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sandwiches

Served with Fries Pulled Pork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turkey Melt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Philly Cheese Steak . . . . . . . . . . Chicken Tenders . . . . . . . . . . . . BLT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shrimp Poboy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sausage Dog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9.99 9.99 9.99 9.99 9.99

8.99 8.99 8.99 8.99 8.99 8.99 8.99 8.99

Pizzas Buffalo Ranch Chicken Turkey Melt with Bacon  +,($%! Small 8.49 Medium 13.99 Large 18.99 ' #)%&," %# Chicken Fajita Small 7.99 Medium 12.99 Large 17.99 , * Small 6.99 Medium 11.99 Large 16.99 ($%&, '!'$$%#" Small 6.49 Medium 10.99 Large 14.99 %!$ %#,(& Small 8.99 Medium 14.99 Large 19.99

5 1 0 0 I - 5 5 N Jackson,MS

769-208-8283 Jackson Menu Guide

Scotch Egg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5 "USBEJUJPOBM$FMUJDTUBQMF "MMPXNJO  Irish Nachos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8 Chicken & Chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6 Fish & Chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7 Fried Cheese Balls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6 Bacon Wrapped Stuffed Jalapenos . . $6 Fried Dill Slices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4 Grilled Sausage & Cheese Platter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Slider Basket. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7 Corned Beef Slider Basket . . . . . . . . . . $7 Basket Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Okra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3 Basket Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3

Salads

House Salad -BSHF. . . . . . . . . . . $8 "EEBHSJMMFEDIJDLFOCSFBTU . . . . . . . . $3 Chef Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Caesar Salad -BSHF . . . . . . . . . . $7 "EEBHSJMMFEDIJDLFOCSFBTU . . . . . . . . $3

Entrees

Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10 Corned Beef & Cabbage . . . . . . . . $10 Grilled Tilapia Plate . . . . . . . . . . .$9 Grilled Chicken Plate . . . . . . . . . .$9

Irish Boxties

Reuben Boxty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10 Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pie Boxty . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10 Veggie Boxty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Grilled Tilapia Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9

Burgers

Pub Burger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8 Mushroom Swiss Burger . . . . . . . . $9 Chilli Cheese Burger . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Bleu Cheese & Bacon Burger . . . . . . . . $9 Fried Egg Burger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Western Burger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Scotch Egg Burger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pie Burger . . . . . . . . . .$10 Reuben Burger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10

Sandwiches

Chicken & Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8 Buffalo Chicken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8 Hawaiian Chicken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Pub Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8 Bookmaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Blackened Tilapia Sandwich . . . . . . . . $9 Reuben . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 Portabella Sandwich. . . . . . . . . . . . . $10

Desserts

Irish Bread Pudding . . . . . . . . . $5 Dirty Ice Cream Sandwich . . . . . . . . $6

HEARTY FOOD. STOUT LIBATIONS . A HUNDRED THOUSAND SALUTATIONS. KITCHEN HOURS .POÉŠ  VSQNt'SJQN.JEOJHIU 4BUVSEBZQN.JEOJHIU 901 E Fortification Street 601-948-0055twww.fenianspub.com

Starters

Blairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Own Chips & Cheese $6 Irish Nachos $6 Buffalo Cheese Sticks $6 Fried Green Beans $6 Pub Pickles $6 Bonnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crabby Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Patties $7 Potato Skins $7 Sausage & Cheese Plate $9 Blarney Stones $7 Fried Mushrooms $6 Starters Sampler $11 Wexford Wings $5

N   :     N % Chopped Chicken Salad $8 Steak Salad $9 Chef Club Salad $8 Crab Cake Salad $10 Caesar Salad $6 Half Size House Salad $4 Soup Of The Day $3/$5 Red Beans & Rice $7

N-*" The Dubliner $11 The Ruben $9 The Londoner $9 Poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Boys $9 Belfast Buffalo $8 Cork Club $8 Gouda B.L.T $8 Beli Melt $7 The Farm Boy $9

Burgers

Buddha Gouda $9 Bacon Cheese Sliders $10 Smokehouse $$9 Jerk & Jack $9 Paddy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Melt $9 Ploughman $9 Jack & Shroom $9 Black & Bleu $9

I, P+ Fish & Chips $10 Bonnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Horseshoe $10 Chicken Tenders $7 Shrimp Basket $9 Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pie $10 Hamburger Steak $10 Guinness Pot Roast $9 Corn Beef & Cabbage $10 Bangers & Mash $9

1149 Old Fannin Rd. Brandon (769) 251-0693 11:00am - 12:00am M47


IMANI KHAYYAM

BITES // happy food Mark Miller opened Miller’s 471 Grill & Pizzeria in 2012.

N

ear the Highway 25/Highway 471 interchange sits a red-brick influence what they like,” he says. “We try to make people smile. I love to building. Its sign, in bright yellow, funky letters, says “Millers make people happy with good food.” Owning two restaurants became difficult after the economic crisis in Grill & Pizzeria.” The inside looks like a modern-style diner the late 2000s. In 2008, he took a job as a seller for the U.S. Food Service with red and black walls, golden yellow tables and an open just to keep the restaurant afloat. The Capitol Street location kitchen. Upon entrance, diners can smell and see the kitchclosed in December 2011, but 10 months later, Miller en cooking items such as pizza and burgers. opened Miller’s 471 Grill & Pizzeria in Brandon. The owner, Mark Miller, 52, says the idea Since then, Miller says it’s been like a dream. “It’s for a pizzeria came to him when he traveled to not an easy business,” he says. “We love our New York and saw that many places sold pizza customers, and we need our customers, but by the slice. “It was a novelty,” he says. “I’d it’s through the hard work of my team that never seen pizza being sold by the slice (in // by Maya Miller we’ve made it this far.” a downtown area). … I thought, ‘Jackson In addition to Miller’s 471, Miller needs a place where they can buy pizza by partnered with Chad Horton and opened the slice.’” a seafood restaurant off of the main Miller took the concept of sinbuilding called The Back Porch. In gle-serve pizza, combined it with May, Miller opened a second locathe fast-casual dining concept of tion in Ridgeland, which offers a restaurants like McAlister’s Deli few new dining options, such as and opened Miller’s Grocery in Saturday brunch and a full bar. 1998—named for his family’s Miller’s 471 Grill & Pizzeria now demolished grocery store (2146 Highway 471, Brandon, in Stringer, Miss.—and served 601.829.0013) is open Monday pizza, salads and sandwiches through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 downtown. In 2004, he opened a Miller’s 471 Grill & Pizzeria serves menu items such as p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to second location, Miller’s Grill, afpizza, salads and burgers. 10 p.m., and Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. ter its address at 224 Capitol St., Miller’s Uptown (810 Lake Harbour Drive, Ridgeland, with a new menu that had items 601.957.1377) is open Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., such as Philly cheesesteaks, burgers, chicken strips and plate Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m. to lunches. Miller says the inspiration for his menus come from the food he 9 p.m. For more information, visit millers471.com. likes to eat, as well as suggestions from his customers. “We let customers

48

The Miller Life

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


Choctaw-Supported Agriculture

Strange + Delicious E\-RUGDQ.0RUURZ

// by Genevieve Legacy

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

at $496 for 12 weeks of organically grown produce. Compared to an equivalent amount of produce purchased at the grocery storeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; approximately 8 to 10 pounds a week for fruit and 3 pounds for leafy harvestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the share price is marginally higher. The farm sold 107 shares in the spring harvest. With a large waiting list for the fall season, people are willing to pay the price. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The average conventionally farmed vegetable sold in Mississippi grocery stores has traveled about 1,800 miles,â&#x20AC;? Hoy says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t charge much over the conventional, so people are getting a bargain; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting organically-grown produce that was picked two days ago rather than two weeks ago, at a conventionally grown price.â&#x20AC;? For more information, visit choctawfreshproduce.com.



7U\ D VWUDQJH EUHZIURP+LJK%LV FXLWV 7HD 5RRP 2OG&DQWRQ 5RDG5LGJHODQG   7KH EORRG RU DQJH EODFN LV D EODFN WHD WKDW KDV SLHFHVRIRUDQJHZLWK EODFNEHUU\ OHDYHV DQG Gunpowder VDIĂ&#x20AC;RZHUSHWDOVZKLFK teas, which High JLYHWKHWHDLWVVRXUDI Biscuits Tea WHUWDVWH +LJK %LVFXLWV Room carries, DOVRKDVVHYHUDOÂłJXQ are named for UIFJSJOEJWJEVBMMZ SRZGHU´ WHDV²RQHV SPMMFEUFBMFBWFT  ZKHUH WKH WHD OHDYHV DUH UROOHG LQGLYLGXDOO\ which resemble DQG UHVHPEOH JUDLQV gunpowder. RI EODFN JXQSRZGHU *UHHQDQGRRORQJWHDVDUHPRVWRIWHQIRXQG LQWKLVIRUP)RUVRPHWKLQJVZHHWRUGHUDSRW RI %OXH /DJRRQ D GHFDIIHLQDWHG KHUEDO WHD PDGHRIDSSOHKLELVFXV URVHKLSRUDQJHDQG FRUQĂ&#x20AC;RZHU SHWDOV  )RU D FROGHUWUHDW 3RS &XOWXUH ,FH 3RSV VWDQGZKLFK PRVW RIWHQ VHWVXSLQIURQW RI WKH 3L[&DSUL 7KHDWHU LQ )RQGUHQ 16WDWH6W RI Pop Culture IHUV Ă&#x20AC;DYRUV \RX ZRQÂśW Ice Pops many ÂżQG DQ\ZKHUH HOVH EJGGFSFOUĂ&#x;BWPST 7DVWH WKH SHDFK URVH of the frozen PDU\RUWKHSOXPPLQW treats, from DOOQRQGDLU\DQGPDGH mundane ones ZLWK IUXLWV DQG KHUEV like chocolate 3RS &XOWXUH DOVR KDV to more exotic SRSV PDGH RI PRUH options like XQXVXDO LQJUHGLHQWV sweet potato. LQFOXGLQJRQHPDGHRI DYRFDGRDQGRQHRIWKHLUPRVWSRSXODUVH OHFWLRQVWKHVZHHWSRWDWRSRS  )ROORZ WKH VWDQG RQ ,QVWDJUDP DW #LFHSRSFXOWXUHWRNHHSXSZLWKWKHLUYDU\LQJ GDLO\VHOHFWLRQV

49

IMANI KHAYYAM

crops come in, members can get a portion of the harvest. Choctaw delivers shares to a designated pick-up location on a weekly basis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The CSA began about five years ago,â&#x20AC;? the CSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general manager, Eldridge Hoy, says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the time, I was growing all the seasonal (flowers) for the resort properties and tribal grounds. One of the managers from The Pearl River Resort asked if I could grow vegetables for the restaurants. â&#x20AC;? While Hoy wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t positioned to grow vegetables at the time, it planted the idea for the CSA in his mind. With the help of federal grant funds and a couple of smaller grants along the way, by 2012, the farm was up and running on a number of levels. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things we focus on is education,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most children donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where food comes from. We built facilities close to schools

COURTESY CHOCTAW FRESH PRODUCE

Eldridge Hoy began Choctaw Fresh Produce Ă&#x17E;WFZFBST ago.

so we could educate childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially the tribal childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but everybody is invited to visit the farm. If we educate them about whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s handling and growing their food, hopefully they will learn the value of farming and farmers.â&#x20AC;? The farm has grown from six high tunnels, also known as hoop houses, which are a type of greenhouse that is unheated, to 15 tunnels at five farm locations in the state. Though not yet certified organic, the CSA has adopted all the necessary practices and standards. The next step was a rigorous farm inspection in early June. Shares for the fall 2015 season are priced

COURTESY KAREN GORDON

I

f youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve walked into Banner Hall recently, you might have noticed sealed white boxes sitting on a table by the entrance. Each Thursday, Choctaw Fresh Produce staff members drop off boxes of fresh fruits and vegetables. Choctaw is farm-to-table agriculture at its bestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;locally grown, high quality, fresh and full of flavor. Unlike traditional farms that sell goods at farm stands and markets, the Choctaw tribeowned enterprise is a form of community-supported agricultureâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a way to buy local, seasonal food directly from a farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that sells seasonal memberships. The members purchase a share in advance of each growing season. When the

 7KHUHÂśV QR EHWWHU ZD\ WR H[SDQG \RXU SDODWHWKDQE\WDVWLQJVRPHWKLQJQHZDQG ZKDWEHWWHUZD\WKDQWHDDQGLFHSRSV"


Delicious

Community

is in our DNA.   

Delicious

Flickr

Flickr DeliciousFacebook Twitter Flickr

Twitter

MySpaceRetweet TwitterStumbleUpon

Retweet

Digg Retweet

acebook

Slash Dot Mixx MySpace StumbleUpon Facebook MySpace

lash Dot

Mixx Slash DotReddit Skype Mixx

eddit

Newsvine SlideShare Google FriendFeed YouTube LinkedIn Reddit FriendFeed YouTube

Google Talk LinkedIn

Yahoo Google Yahoo Buzz Netvibes SlideShare Google Talk Newsvine SlideShare Google

AOL Google Talk

Microsoft MSN Yahoo Buzz Netvibes Yahoo Yahoo Buzz

AOL

Newsvine

ahoo

Microsoft

pp Store

Qik

umblr

ehance

riendster

SS

MSN

App Store Apple Microsoft MSN

Qik Amazon App Store

Last.fm

CM&I HIGH SCHOOL Apple Netvibes

LinkedIn Technorati

MobileMe

Enroll Today

Discover Academic, Athletic and Biblical Excellence Founded in 1887

Vimeo Mister Wong Viddler Amazon Last.fm

WordPerss Virb

BehanceBlogger

Tumblr

Mister Wong MobileMe

Virb Mister Wong

Design Float Posterous

RSS

Email

RSS

Deviant Art

Blogger

Posterous

Virb

Design Bump

Posterous

UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x2030;Â&#x2DC;v>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;i UĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x17E;V>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x2030; >Ă&#x20AC;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â?`Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152; UĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;wĂ&#x160;i`Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>vv UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;i`Ă&#x2022;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC; UĂ&#x160; Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C; UĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;>VĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;V>Â&#x201C;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC; UĂ&#x160;>VĂ&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; i}Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x203A;i

Friendster Deviant Art

Friendster

Blogger

Viddler

WordPerss

Behance

Bebo

AOL

AmazonMobileMe Last.fm Apple

Vimeo

Design Float

Digg Technorati

Offering Your Child Excellence in:

Qik

WordPerss

Skype StumbleUpon

FriendFeed Technorati Skype YouTube

Tumblr Viddler

Vimeo

Digg

Bebo

Design Float

Email

Squidoo

Bebo

Design Bump Squidoo

Deviant Art

Share This

Design Bump

Share This

Squidoo

Share This

Features Finalists And Winners 2015 Best Of Jackson

Email

CM&I is a ministry of the Believers of the Church of Christ (Holiness) USA â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;? Accredited by MAIS/AdvancED/SACS

       s WWW C M A N D I O R G 50

ANNOUNCING...

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

For Advertising Call 601.361.6121 Ext. 11

BESTOFJACKSON.COM boomjackson.com


2015

YOUNG

INFLU

ENTIALS

Photos by: Brice Media

Coordination: Amber Helsel Hair & Makeup: Amy Robinson (Beaute Hair Salon), Richye Johnson Styled by: Ebony Robinson Location: Fondren For fashion info, see page 57 Photography assistant: Imani Khayyam

C.J. Lawrence

SOCIAL ENGINEER // by Miles Thomas

C

harles Hamilton Houston once said, “As an attorney you are either a social parasite or a social engineer.” Lumumba & Associates attorney C.J. Lawrence wants to be that social engineer for his community. He believes that being a lawyer is only half the job needed to get the newly established firm where it wants to be. Lawrence, 34, graduated from Tougaloo College with a bachelor’s degree in English in 2003 and the Thurgood Marshall School of Law at Texas Southern University in 2007. He gets his love for law from his father, Charles Lawrence, who is an attorney in his hometown of Hattiesburg. Soon after news outlets focused its attention on the police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., Lawrence saw the opportunity to take to Twitter to discuss a pressing topic. “I saw a tweet where a person tweeted a picture of Michael Brown lying on the ground after he was shot and said, ‘Look at his sagging pants, I don’t feel sorry for him at all,’” he says. “After I saw that, I saw the opportunity to shed some light on the topic.” Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

He began the hashtag #iftheygunnedmedown with two pictures of himself, one speaking at his graduation ceremony at Tougaloo College and another of him impersonating a famous rapper with a liquor bottle in his hand, which he says was filled with cola for a joke he was trying to make. The hashtag became the No. 1 worldwide trending topic within a day of Lawrence starting it. “Within a couple of hours after I started the hashtag, I was blown away with where it was going,” he says. “It blew up quickly.” He says he had no intention of starting a worldwide discussion, but once it began, he was glad everyone was talking about it. He wanted to educate young, black men in Jackson and across the nation and their communities on how mass media can give a false image of the African American community in the U.S. and to teach them how to have a strong voice. Lawrence finds little down time between his work and social activism, but when he does, he likes to watch his favorite TV series, “Game of Thrones,” or go to the gym. 51


YOUNG INFLUENTIALS 2015, FROM PAGE

51

For fashion info, see page 57

Morgan Miller ACTIVIST

// by Miles Thomas

M

organ Miller says Jackson felt like home as soon as she stepped off the plane from Atlantic City, N.J. She moved to Jackson after graduating from Cornell University in 2010 with a bachelor’s degree in atmospheric science to start working for the WJTV Channel 12 meteorologist team, where she was the weekend meteorologist and also occasionally did mornings. Her time working in Jackson and traveling around the state helped Miller realize that Mississippi was the right fit. Due to her strong foundation in activism at Cornell, she left WJTV in September 2013 and started working for the American Civil Liberties Union of Mississippi as the communications director in December of the same year. “It was hard to get rid of my activist spirit once I got to Mississippi, and it was hard to be the activist

I wanted to being a public figure, so the ACLU seemed like the right place for me,” she says. One of Miller’s most recent projects with the ACLU is its new app, Mobile Justice Mississippi, which allows users to video police, and then send it directly to the staff at the organization. The ACLU’s main focus is to inform the people of their constitutional rights and civil liberties and protect those. “Working around Mississippi with WJTV ... I saw how much could be done and needed to be done in Mississippi,” she says. In her free time, Miller, 27, teaches at Butterfly Yoga and the MTheory Yoga studios. She is also on the event committee for the Jackson Zoo and the communications committee for Women’s Foundation of Mississippi. “Being in Mississippi puts a fire under me,” she says.

Joshua Quinn BLOGGER

// by Emerald Alexis Ware

I

n the span of one month, humanrights activist Joshua Quinn did what most bloggers only ever hope to accomplish: He went viral. The Jackson native launched his blog, DRJSapio Civil/Human Rights, in February 2015. After the release of the infamous video from Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity at Oklahoma State University, in which members of the fraternity sang a racist chant, Quinn wrote a response on his blog titled “There Will Never Be A N****r In SAE; Why Black Greeks Don’t Care.” “We don’t need acceptance from white fraternities and sororities, because we have our own issues and struggles to deal with,” Quinn wrote. For Quinn, that post, as well as the other content on his blog, is not to grab attention. “You can use writing to redirect the way people think. … People call it controversial; I call it thinking,” Quinn says.

52

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Quinn, 28, is a member of black fraternity Kappa Alpha Psi and graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi with a bachelor’s degree in psychology in 2010. His studies and his time spent traveling helped him learn to think more deeply about race, religion and politics, which are the focuses of his writing. When it comes to these issues, Quinn says that he wants people to not be afraid to think about the opposing views. He works as the behavior support specialist for children with autism at the Mississippi Children’s Home Services. He also volunteers with Kappa League, where he mentors young, black males in the community. “The goal is to redirect certain behaviors. … Even with my writing, you can use writing to redirect behaviors to change the way people think, changing how they view things to change how they live or how they behave,” he says. boomjackson.com


Steven O’Neill

For fashion info, see page 57

ENTREPRENEUR

// by Emerald Alexis Ware

S

teven O’Neill, who turns 33 in July, started working in restaurants when he was 15, but that has not been his only work pursuit. He studied accounting at Mississippi State University, starting in 2000 until the events of 9/11 happened during his sophomore year in 2001. After that tragedy, he left school and joined the U.S. Army in 2003 as a rifleman in Iraq. When his tour ended in 2006, O’Neill dabbled in real estate while continuing some restaurant work. Realizing that he was more successful at working in the food industry, he soon committed to it. O’Neill worked with chef Louis Bruno at Bruno’s Eclectic Cuisine from 2002 until he joined the Army. In 2008, he helped open The Bulldog’s Jackson location, where he worked for three years. Then, in 2011, O’Neill decided he wanted to open his own place: The Manship Wood Fired Kitchen, which

opened its doors in 2013. “It’s one of those surreal moments,” O’Neill says. “… It’s amazing to see everything you’ve poured your blood, sweat, and tears into for a year and a half to come to fruition.” The restaurant specializes in dishes from European countries that are along the Mediterranean belt. For some of its more authentic dishes, the restaurant imports products from Europe, but he and his business partner Alex Eaton work to get as many products as possible from local farmers. O’Neill, a Texas native, has lived in Jackson for 22 years and volunteers with the Greater Jackson Chamber’s Vision 2022 10-year plan (his father is Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership President & CEO Duane O’Neill) working to help make Jackson an even better city. “We’ve made a commitment to the city to try to better to make it a place where our children can grow up in,” O’Neill says.

Ebony Lumumba PROFESSOR

// by Alexandria Wilson

J

ackson native Ebony Lumumba is using her passion for literature to develop a platform to educate those around her. As an assistant professor and head of the English department at Tougaloo College, Lumumba teaches both lower- and upper-level literature courses to students. She educates them on literary works that provide a variety of perspectives from people all over the world. “If I can use the instruction of literature to very tangibly and positively impact people’s lives, that would be my end goal,” she says. “I don’t know if I can call it an end goal because I don’t really want it to end.” Lumumba uses independent research as a way to further her own knowledge. She is an advanced doctoral student at the University of Mississippi; she has finished her coursework and is now doing independent

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

research and writing her dissertation, “Disenfranchised Mothering in Texts of the Global South.” In it, Lumumba focuses primarily on the experiences of mothers in oppressed communities. “It encompasses this trifecta of the American South, South Africa—or Southern African because I include Botswana as well— and then South Asia,” she says. Lumumba, 32, says that readers, especially students, should be exposed to stories of the unheard and those habitually excluded from common history books. “What troubles me most are really singular narratives,” she says. “Whereas, often times, curriculum calls on us to teach a very one-sided narrative of any place of history.” Lumumba married Chokwe Antar Lumumba, son of late Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, in 2013. The couple had their first child last year, Alaké Maryama. 53


YOUNG INFLUENTIALS 2015, FROM PAGE 53

For fashion info, see page 57

Theron Wilkerson POET

// by Guy King

H

e is a poet, Jackson Public Schools substitute teacher, freelance educator and 23 years old. Theron Wilkerson is a native of Carthage who graduated from Jackson State University with a bachelor’s degree in history in 2014. Wilkerson says he wanted to be an attorney for the majority of his early life. During his senior year of high school, he volunteered at The Boys and Girls Club, and he then thought that a career in elementary education was his calling. But he soon changed his mind again. “I read the ‘Autobiography of Malcolm X,’ and later enrolled in a course entitled, ‘Blacks in American History.’ I hated history in high school, but this particular course was challenging and intriguing,” Wilkerson says. “I then decided to major in history, and I’ve loved it ever since. Soon after I declared a new major, I went to a lecture by Nikki Giovanni, and (I) found out that she was a history major while in school.” That helped him realize he could combine his love of history and poetry in his own career. Recently, Wilkerson performed a poem at a Unita Blackwell Leadership Institute for Young Women of Color silent auction, which raised money to help young girls in the South travel to Peurto Rico. The poem is called “When a Great Tree Grows.” Wilkerson says he wrote the poem, inspired by Maya Angelou’s “When a Great Tree Falls,” to celebrate African American women, He also performed a poem for a class at JSU composed mostly of student athletes. He says that many of the athletes came to him after the class expressing that his poem was so genuine and that they could relate to it. “I am driven, and I have a direction,” Wilkerson says. “To have drive and a direction is needed to reach my goals, which at times seem difficult to obtain.” He is involved with the student poetry organization, Outspoken, on the campus of Jackson State. He admires poet Langston Hughes, saying, “Langston Hughes taught me how to dream.” Wilkerson’s love for poetry began when he was in elementary school. “We wrote poems and got to see our poems published in a book. My parents purchased a copy, and ever since then, I’ve been writing poetry.” Besides poetry, Wilkerson is a playwright and mentor. He is involved in the Mississippi Historical Society, as well as the MADDRAMA Performance Troupe at Jackson State. “I consider myself a freelance organic educator. I stop to have conversations with people of different ages, and I try to light sparks in their lives,” Wilkerson says.

54

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


John Morgan Hughes

For fashion info, see page 57

LOBBYIST

// by Kristen Simmons

J

ohn Morgan Hughes is a Mississippi State University and University of Mississippi graduate, lobbyist and political consultant. At age 24, he has run 45 campaigns, managed a trade association and is the director of political development at Hayes Dent Public Strategies. When he was 12, Hughes’ first job was bussing tables. In 2005, he worked as a warehouse manager for a meat-selling business. The following year, Hughes started selling meat for it, and, later, he ended up owning the company. He decided to sell it when he was 20. He graduated from MSU in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in political science and from the University of Mississippi in 2013 with a master’s degree in business administration. In 2008, Hughes started an internship with Republican U.S. Sen.

Roger Wicker during the senator’s inaugural campaign, which 50-year political operative Steve Guyton arranged for Hughes. Then in 2009, after seeing an under-served market for small- to mid-sized campaigns, Hughes created Magnolia Tide LLC. In August 2013, he sold Magnolia Tide to Hayes Dent Public Strategies, a non-partisan governmental-affairs firm, for the purpose of growing Dent’s political division. At Hayes Dent, Hughes serves as the director of political and business development, which means he oversees the Republic Group, HDPS’ campaignservices subsidiary. He also works with external development projects on behalf of the firm’s clients. “I’ve always been the most apolitical person making a living in politics,” he says. His advice to youth? “Sometimes you’ve just got to pick up your foot and kick the door in,” Hughes says.

Rim Marghli EDUCATOR

// by Maya Miller

R

im Marghli knows a thing or two about international affairs and world relations. Marghli, 27, is an exchange student from La Chebba, Tunisia, a small city in North Africa on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. She moved to the United States in 2010 as a member of the Middle Eastern Partnership Initiative at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. There, she learned about law reform, democracy and racial inequality across the US. “I learned injustice is injustice, no matter how you label it,” she says. “The struggle is the same, the purpose may be different, but one struggle does not outweigh the other.” In 2010, Marghli joined the Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistant program, teaching Arabic and critical thinking to students. She included a workshop and social justice and cultural representation, due to the Tunisian revolution occurring in 2010,

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

the same year she moved to Mississippi. Marghli earned her master’s degree in English from Jackson State University this past May. She currently serves as a graduate assistant at the Institute for Mulitmodal Transportation at JSU’s Mississippi e-Center. Marghli is a strong supporter of education reform and democracy. She emphasizes learning new languages and the histories of each. She is fluent in Arabic, French, English and Spanish. She says students need to know the conditions of other countries and their societies and how their social issues relate to the U.S., such as wealth and resource distribution. “Democracy is not a universal term,” Marghli says. “We have to find a way to educate people without elitism getting in the way.” She says that when education is free, it can evolve the social classes. Education can come from anywhere and will benefit students in the long run, she adds. 55


YOUNG INFLUENTIALS 2015, FROM PAGE 53

/BUBMJF0GÞBI

For fashion info, see page 57

ADVOCATE

// by Maya Miller

A

s a first-generation Nigerian American, Natalie Offiah found her calling as an advocate for social-justice issues at the young age of 17. Now 23, the Jackson native serves as one of three board members for the Mississippi Safe Schools Coalition, an organization dedicated to creating safe environments for LGBT youth in schools. As a freshman at Jackson State University, Offiah and fellow student James Cook founded Spectrum, an LGBT organization on campus. Cook transferred in fall 2010, leaving Offiah to act as president throughout her entire undergraduate career. Offiah graduated in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in biology with a minor in chemistry, and is now pursuing a master’s in biology at JSU. She has also joined many organizations, serving as a member of Southerners on New Ground, a radical activist group. S.O.N.G. began as a LGBT organization and now fights for

all types of equality, such as immigration reform and individuals with disabilities. With the MSSC, Offiah works with local schools to provide administrative training for teachers, as well as organizing gay-straight alliances where LGBT youth and allies can talk openly without fear of being judged or silenced. “There is a space for parents and adults to support and be allies toward the movement, but if you don’t give youth the tools they need, how can they fix the problems of their future?” she asks. Offiah is an alumnus of Queer Youth Leading the South, an organization where southeastern youth come together to discuss issues such as white supremacy, economic disparity and the “web of oppression.” Offiah says it’s impossible to tackle one social issue without dealing with others, such as rights for women and equal pay.

Ryan Brown POLITICIAN

// by Zachary Oren Smith

M

any people don’t make the switch from Republican to Democrat, but Ryan Brown did. Brown, 30, was born in 1984 in Jackson. He and his family first moved to Brandon in 1995. He graduated from Northwest Rankin High School in 2003. In 2006, Brown got his bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Mississippi, and later worked as an intern in Republican Sen. Thad Cochran’s offices in Jackson and Oxford. He then moved to Washington, D.C., to do political work that included working on Democrat Glenn Nye’s 2010 campaign for a Virginia congressional seat. “My job was to be an intern and learn from what they taught me, so I basically did the work and checked my beliefs at the door,” Brown says. Now, he is back in Brandon and working on a master’s degree in pub56

lic policy and administration at Jackson State University. In addition to serving as chairman of his county’s Democratic executive committee, he is the treasurer for the state party and president of the Young Democrats of Mississippi. “It’s exciting to see what I think is a new Democratic majority forming in Mississippi,” Brown says. As proof, he points to CNN exit polling data that shows 55 percent of voters ages 18 to 29 and the 51 percent of voters ages 30 to 44 voted for President Obama in the 2012 election. “I’m sure you know as well as I do that the last presidential campaign did not invest resources in Mississippi,” Brown says. “... There is something happening in Mississippi with our younger voters, and it’s exciting to see what is going to happen in our elections and next year’s elections and how this new Democratic majority will affect Mississippi.”

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


YOUNG

IN FLU ENT IALS 2015 FASHION

C.J. Lawrence p 51

John Morgan Hughes p 55

,%,=$EOD]HU7KH5RJXH 'DYLG'RQDKXHGUHVVVKLUW7KH5RJXH 5RJXHSDQW7KH5RJXH 0DUWLQ'LQJPDQEHOW7KH5RJXH 'DYLG'RQDKXHSDLVOH\WLH7KH5RJXH 6LONSXUSOHSRONDGRWSRFNHWVTXDUH7KH5RJXH 3HWHU0LOODUVXHGHELWORDIHUV7KH5RJXH

(Q]RVHHUVXFNHUVXLW7KH5RJXH 'DYLG'RQDKXHZKLWHGUHVVVKLUW7KH5RJXH 'DYLG'RQDKXHPHORQWLH7KH5RJXH 0DUWLQ'LQJPDQEHOW7KH5RJXH 6HEDJR1RUZLFKWDXSH2[IRUGV7KH5RJXH

Rim Marghli p 55

Morgan Miller p 52

6DJHGUHVV0DWHULDO*LUOV 'URSQHFNODFH0DWHULDO*LUOV 1LQH7DLOQHFNODFH0DWHULDO*LUOV

6DQFWXDU\FUDIWVKHOO5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R 6XJDUOLSVWDQN5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R 6DQFWXDU\WULEDOMRJJHU5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R %HG_6WX0DULO\QZHGJHV5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R 6W\OLVW¶VMHZHOU\

/BUBMJF0GÞBI p 56

6WXGLR&KDQH7VKLUW6ZHOOR3KRQLF 9DQVDFLGGHQLPWHQQLVVKRHV6ZHOOR3KRQLF 0RGHO¶VSDQWV

Joshua Quinn p 52

%LOO\5HLGEXWWRQGRZQVKLUW7KH5RJXH -RH¶VFODVVLF¿WMHDQV7KH5RJXH 0DUWLQ'LQJPDQZRYHQEHOW7KH5RJXH 3HWHU0LOOHUVXHGHSHQQ\ORDIHUV7KH5RJXH

Ryan Brown p 56

7HG%DNHU6SRUW&RDW5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R 7HG%DNHU%XWWRQ'RZQ5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R $GULDQR*ROGVFKPLHG*UDGXDWH7ZLOO3DQW 5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R 7HG%DNHU%HOW5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R -RKQVWRQ 0XUSK\&UHVZHOOVOLSRQV 5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R

Steven O’Neill p 53

5REHUW7DOERWW070VKLUW*UHDW6FRWW 5REHUW7DOERWWVHYHQIROGWLH*UHDW6FRWW &ULWWHQGHQVVLONOLQHQYHVW*UHDW6FRWW -%UDQGGDUNGHQLPMHDQV*UHDW6FRWW 0RGHO¶VVKRHV

Where 2 Shop

Ebony Lumumba p 53 &\QWKLD5RZOH\GUHVV5HSHDW6WUHHW 0RGHO¶VMHZHOU\VW\OLVW¶VVKRHV

Theron Wilkerson p 54

'LDPRQGV1DY\&KHFN6KLUW5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R +XGVRQ%\URQ¿YHSRFNHWVWUDLJKW NKDNLV5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R %HG_6WX'ULIWHUEHOW5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R -RKQVWRQ 0XUSK\&DPSWRQ/DFH8S  2[IRUGV5HG6TXDUH&ORWKLQJ&R

2ED 3QUARE #LOTHING #O ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH$ +LJKODQG&RORQ\3NZ\6XLWH 5LGJHODQGUHGVTXDUHFORWKLQJFRFRP

3WELL O 0HONIC 16WDWH6WFKDQHFRP

4HE 2OGUE ,QWHUVWDWH1 WKHURJXHFRP

'REAT 3COTT 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG JUHDWVFRWWQHW

-ATERIAL 'IRLS 0DFNHQ]LH/DQH)ORZRRG +LJKODQG&RORQ\3DUN ZD\6XLWH5LGJHODQG

2EPEAT 3TREET +LJKZD\15LGJHODQG

      

  )LQG\RXU-R\ *RZLWKWKH)ORZ

THANK YOU

IRUVXSSRUWLQJXVDVȴQDOLVWVIRU Best Dental Practice in Jackson and Best Dentist in Jackson!

IiıNnTtEeGgRrAaTtEe ERG\aPLQGaVSLULW 

  





 

DR. LaMonica  DAVIS  TAYLOR

zŽŐĂΘtĞůůŶĞƐƐĞŶƚĞƌ 



ŝƐĐŽǀĞƌLJŽƵƌůŝƐƐĂƚ



ǁǁǁ͘ũŽLJĨůŽǁLJŽŐĂ͘ĐŽŵ Λ:ŽLJĨůŽǁzŽŐĂtĞůůŶĞƐƐ

ϳϬϰϴKůĚĂŶƚŽŶZŽĂĚ͕ZŝĚŐĞůĂŶĚ 5442 WATKINS DRIVE JACKSON, MS 39206

601.665.4996

 





GD\V ĨŽƌĂůŝŵŝƚĞĚƚŝŵĞ

SmilesOnBroadwayDental.com ©2015 SMILES ON BROADWAY DENTAL

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

57


ARTS // celebrate

TAYO OLA

J

ulian Walker never considered acting as a career path growing up, but now, at 22, the Jackson native

Julian Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ă&#x17E;STUGFBUVSFĂ&#x17E;MN  o#MBDLCJSE p BMTPTUBSSJOH 0TDBSXJOOJOH BDUSFTT.P/JRVF and Isaiah 8BTIJOHUPO XJMM be released on %7% J5VOFTBOE 0O%FNBOEUIJT "VHVTU

is forging a path for himself all the way to Hollywood. His first feature film, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blackbird,â&#x20AC;? in which Walker plays Randy Rousseau, a 17-year-old

landing his breakout role, he decided to pursue a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in theater with a minor in radio and television production at the Univer-

teen pregnancy and suicide, I feel like these are definitely stories that need to be told,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are so many people out there living with this, so many people out there who think that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the only person that feels this way, and so when they see this message of someone whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dealing with the same thing and got over it, and how they feel like a better person now, I feel like it can help so many people.â&#x20AC;? In the future, Walker says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to speak on panels and create his own events where important issues can be discussed in an open and positive way. He plans to move from Hattiesburg to Georgia at the end of the summer to pursue more acting opportunities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love making films or working on projects that speak volumes, that people can relate to,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is definitely something I want to continue.â&#x20AC;?

'JOEJOH+VMJBO8BMLFS // by Maya Miller

growing up in a strict Southern Baptist community who struggles with his sexual identity and religion, was released in select theaters in April. The film also stars Oscar winner MoNique and Isaiah Washington as his parents, whom he battles with along the way. Walker says he considered going into broadcast journalism or fashion marketing as a career, but after

sity of Southern Mississippi, graduating this past May. Filming while attending school in Hattiesburg was a struggle, but Walker says he had a team of people supporting him along the way. As an actor, Walker says he likes sharing stories that need to be told. Working on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blackbirdâ&#x20AC;? was important to him, not only as his first major role, but as an opportunity to shed light on issues that he thinks need to be addressed, like depression, sexual identity and suicide. He says he only wants to create work that can change lives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When it comes to issues like

Plays of the Heart KLV IDOO 0LVVLVVLSSLÂśV RQO\ SURIHVVLRQDO WKHDWHU FRP SDQ\ ZLOO FHOHEUDWH LWV WKVHDVRQ  1HZ6WDJH7KHDWUHRSHQHGLWV GRRUVLQ-DQXDU\$WWKHWLPH LW ZDV LQ D UHSXUSRVHG FKXUFK DW WKH FRUQHU RI *DOODWLQ DQG +RRNHU VWUHHWV,QVSLWHRIWKHKXPEOHIDFLO LW\ WKH Ă&#x20AC;HGJOLQJ WKHDWHUÂśV SUHPLHU SURGXFWLRQRI(GZDUG$OEHHÂśV 7RQ\ $ZDUGZLQQLQJ SOD\ Âł:KRÂśV $IUDLG RI 9LUJLQLD :RROI"´ SOD\HG WR D IXOO KRXVH RI DXGLHQFHV 1HZ 6WDJHSURGXFHGVHDVRQVLQWKDW ORFDWLRQ DQG PRYHG WR LWV FXUUHQW %HOKDYHQRQHLQ  %HJLQQLQJWKLV6HSWHPEHUWKH WKHDWHU ZLOO PHOG LWV SDVW ZLWK LWV SUHVHQWDQGIXWXUH  Âł$V,ZRUNHGRQWKHSURJUDP PLQJ IRU WKH VHDVRQ , WKRXJKW DERXW RXU SDVW VXFFHVVHV´ VD\V $UWLVWLF 'LUHFWRU )UDQFLQH 7KRPDV5H\QROGVÂł,DOVRZDQWHGWR 58

/FX4UBHF5IFBUSF XIJDIIBT QFSGPSNFEQMBZTTVDIBTo5IF (SFBU(BUTCZ pDFMFCSBUFTJUT UITFBTPOUIJTGBMM

ORRNIRUZDUGDQGUHFRJQL]H0LVVLV VLSSLœVULFKVWRU\WHOOLQJDQGOLWHUDU\ WUDGLWLRQV ,WœV D JRRG WLPH WR FHO HEUDWHWKHEHVWRIRXUSDVWDQGWR PDNHDVSLUDWLRQVIRUWKHIXWXUH´  3URGXFLQJ D PL[ RI QHZ DQG

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

COURTESY NEW STAGE THEATRE

T

by Genevieve Legacy

FODVVLFDO ZRUNV WKH VHDVRQ RSHQV LQ 6HSWHPEHU ZLWK ³&ULPHV RI WKH +HDUW´ WKH 3XOLW]HU 3UL]HZLQQLQJ FRPHG\ E\ 0LVVLVVLSSL SOD\ZULJKW %HWK +HQOH\ 7KH UHJLRQDO SUHPLHU RIDQHZSOD\DGDSWDWLRQRID-RKQ

*ULVKDPœV VXVSHQVH WKULOOHU  ³$ 7LPHWR.LOO´LVLQ2FWREHU  ,Q 'HFHPEHU ³$ &KULVWPDV &DURO´ ZLOO UHWXUQ IRU LWV HYHU\ RWKHU\HDU SURGXFWLRQ ,Q -DQX DU\ WKH DQFKRU RI WKH DQQLYHUVDU\ VHDVRQZLOOEHDUHWXUQSURGXFWLRQ RI $OEHHœV FODVVLF SOD\ DERXW PDU LWDO VWULIH ³:KRœV $IUDLG RI 9LUJLQLD:RROI"´  ,Q $SULO WKH 1HZ 6WDJH ZLOO SUHPLHU ³D FRPSOH[ OD\HUHG SOD\ DERXW WKH DUWLVW 0DUN 5RWKNR´ DV 5H\QROGV VD\V -RKQ /RJDQœV  7RQ\ $ZDUG ZLQQHU ³5HG´ ZKLFK ZLOOKDYHDWZRSHUVRQFDVW  7KH ¿QDO VKRZ RI WKH VHDVRQ LV ³7KH 5REEHU %ULGHJURRP´ D EOXHJUDVV PXVLFDOFRPHG\ EDVHG RQ (XGRUD :HOW\œV QRYHOOD RI WKH VDPHQDPH  )RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ RQ 1HZ 6WDJH 7KHDWUH  &DUOLVOH 6W   YLVLW QHZVWDJH WKHDWUHFRP

boomjackson.com


Always right there.

Always right.

With locations in Fondren and Ridgeland, the Cabot Lodge conveniently accommodates any Jackson trip. Wonderfully appointed rooms feature pillow-top bedding and cloud-soft down comforters. The exceptional comforts also include complimentary full southern breakfast and nightly hospitality reception. No matter whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on your agenda, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re rested and refreshed. Millsaps!! 2375 North State Street Jackson 800-874-4737 cabotlodgemillsaps.com Jackson North/Ridgeland ! 120 Dyess Road Ridgeland 800-342-2268 cabotlodgejacksonnorth.com

Thank You For Voting Us Best Place To Buy Antiques!

NOW ON VIEW Support for George Wardlaw, A Life in Art: Works from 1954 to 2014 is provided by The Bernice Flowers Hederman Fund and through the Meyer and Genevieve Falk Endowment Fund for Culture and Arts of the

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT MSMUSEUMART.ORG 380 SOUTH LAMAR STREET JACKSON,MISSISSIPPI 39201 601.960.1515 1.866.VIEWART @MSMUSEUMART

Booths available for rent! Call today to reserve your space. 601-953-5914     

    $1 Admission Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

GEORGE WARDLAW: RECENT WORKS Also on view at Fischer Galleries 736 President Street Downtown Jackson

George Wardlaw (born 1927), Apple Blossom 1, (detail), 1965. oil on canvas. 81 3/4 x 68 in. Copyright Š the artist.

59


MELODIES // breaking out COURTESY DESTINY STONE

New Voice in Old Soul // by Brinda Fuller Willis

A

t 18 years old, Holly Springs native and neo-soul artist Destiny Stone is well on her way to a future in the music industry. On May 9, the singer-songwriter won first place during a talent competition at the Mississippi Spring Festival & Fair at the Lincoln County Arena. On April 16, Stone released her debut album, “All Original,” though only her single, “Colorblind,” is available on iTunes and Spotify. Stone, who is often seated behind her piano, pulls from R&B and jazz influences, and her sound is reminiscent of Jill Scott, Alicia Keys and John Legend. Her original music isn’t a simple mirror of classic or modern artists, though.“My music is not just for my generation, I want my music to last,” Stone says. “I put serious thought into my lyrics, ensuring a positive message is promoted that’s not always found in culturally centric music that is identified with my age group. I reach for another level that even has a hint of blues that

// by Micah Smith

T

en years ago, Caleb Rowe scrolled through his Facebook feed, wishing he could set up concerts in a space of his own. “Someone give me money for a venue,” Rowe typed in a status. Then, he received a response from his friend, P.J. Pankey: “What did you have in mind?” Now, Rowe, 24, and Pankey, 27, are continuing that conversation with Big Sleepy’s (208 W. Capitol St., 601.863.9516), an all-ages 60

Holly Springs neo-soul artist Destiny Stone has plans for a future in the music industry, even though she’s only 18. and creating a professional image. For her, being a successful artist and a successful businesswoman is one and the same.

works for the River Hills Club in music venue downtown. Jackson. Their desire to create a The business partners met in venue hadn’t disappeared, though. 2005 at Pocahontas Baptist Church In April, Rowe approached Pankey in Clinton, connecting through a about leasing a Capitol Street buildmutual love of “music that my mom would tell me to turn down,” Pankey says. While Pankey soon left for the U.S. Navy, serving until 2012, Rowe booked shows anywhere he could—skate parks, houses and, finally, his own venue, The Carter, at the corner of South and Farish streets— which he operated off and on from 2010 to 2012. “You want to talk Caleb Rowe (left) and P.J. Pankey (right) about road bumps, The opened Big Sleepy’s last May. Carter was a road bump,” Rowe says. “… (I) learned all the wrong ways to do it. (I) ing that once housed The Joint. The space required heavy realso learned how to do things ourpairs. The duo had to rebuild the selves, though. It’s 999,000 ways bathroom, repaint walls and remove not to make a light bulb.” bricks, tile and excess materials. Today, Pankey works for Hope Enterprise Corporation, and Rowe The cost of hiring contractors and

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

paying for the proper licenses soon pushed the planned $2,000 budget toward $5,000, but with the added expense came legitimacy. “Instead of us patching things together and trying to figure it out, we’re actually going to lawyers, and we’re actually finding contractors and doing everything by the books, the right way,” Pankey says. After opening May 15, Rowe and Pankey want to expand Big Sleepy’s. They are considering opening a café and holding special events. In the meantime, the plan is to book shows for crowds of every kind. “I don’t think Jackson is just one genre. We’re a mix of everything,” Pankey says. “… It’s not us saying, ‘You have to listen to the music we’re going to provide.’ We’re here wanting to find out what people want to listen to.” IMANI KHAYYAM

Road Bumps to Big Sleepy’s

I mix with in-depth contemporary themes that reflect the social issues of my generation.” Stone is putting plenty of thought into her future in music, as well. Having graduated from the Mississippi School of the Arts in Brookhaven in May, Stone will begin her secondary educational journey at Catawba College in Salisbury, N.C., this fall. She plans to arm herself with a degree in popular music with a minor in music business. “I want to take things slow and get my college education before I jump into the industry,” Stone says. “I’ll be able to gain the business acumen that I know I need because I’m young in a world that requires you to be business savvy. … I know there is a lot that I have to learn, so I’ve got my mother and auntie lending their combined business and marketing skills to direct and guide me at this early stage of the game.” Stone says her ultimate goal is to have a lasting career in music, which includes having a full understanding of her financial interests

boomjackson.com


Jackson, Mississippi

www.msbluesmarathon.com

Presented by:

Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi, A Mutual Insurance Company, is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ÂŽ Registered Marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.

Runner's World Top 10 Marathon for 2015

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

IUIVOLGH%220+DOI+RU]35(665($'< )ULGD\-XQH30

Top 25 Finisher's Medal 4 Years Running

Register today!

61


Do-Gooders // survive

Take the Pledge, Support â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Chicksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; // by Nia Wilson

O

COURTESY MISSISSIPPI COALITION AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

ference and helping families several ways. have financial resources in place such as n Oct. 1, 2014, a man beat and cut â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re important because we support a emergency funds for survivors. his wife with a machete. Today, Miscause that is more widespread than people reâ&#x20AC;&#x153;These are things to empower and better sissippi Coalition Against Domestic alize or want to even acknowledge,â&#x20AC;? she says. individualsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It goes beyond Violence Executive Director Wenâ&#x20AC;&#x153;The coalition can be the vehicle to get shelters and counseling. We try to give them dy Mahoney says the woman is a survivor. people to the right resources Thanks to the local shelter and information. If we are proprograms that provided reactive with intervention stratesources and encouragement gies and resources, you know to her, she not only helped there is hope, and you know herself, but her children. there is help.â&#x20AC;? MCADVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is In 1980, domesticto inspire social change violence advocates and comthrough advocacy, techmunity leaders came together nical assistance and to found the MCADV with public awareness. the goal of advocating for batThroughout Mississiptered women and all victims pi, only 13 shelters provide of domestic abuse. Since its assistance to the 82 counties beginning, the organization in the state. Each shelter has committed itself to ending program provides services domestic violence and aiding to victims in its local commuvictims of the crime. nity. While the coalition does Mahoney says the money not directly oversee the shelraised by sponsoring, donatters, it offers training, techniing to or attending the JFP cal assistance and education Chick Ball can be used to take to aid them. care of lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obstacles that are The 11th Annual JFP often taken for granted, such Chick Ball is again raisas fixing survivorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; vehicles, ing money and awareness paying for ACT tests or even about this issue, this year financing medicationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the benefitting the coalition kinds of essentials necessary and, thus, all the shelters it for victims to start over. supports. In its Take the Pledge People can help the campaign, MCADV charges cause by making a donamen in the community to tion to the JFP Chick Ball â&#x20AC;&#x153;be a stand-up guy and not a silent auction, becoming a stand-by guy.â&#x20AC;? Instead of vicsponsor or by giving money tim blaming or excuses, the directly to MCADV through coalition wants men to chalvisiting its website. lenge stereotypes, address Mahoney says the sexist attitudes, stand up money raised through the Wendy Mahoney is executive director of the Mississippi Coalition against domestic violence JFP Chick Ball will be an im"HBJOTU%PNFTUJD7JPMFODF CFOFĂ&#x17E;DJBSZPGUIF+'1$IJDL#BMM and express that it is never portant effort to improve the an option. shelter programs. The JFP Chick Ball is Saturday, July 18, from what they need to live a more productive and â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are a resource, and those funds 6 p.m. to midnight. The event is for ages 18 viable life.â&#x20AC;? will support our 13 domestic shelter proand up, and admission is $5. For more inforMahoney says domestic violence is a grams throughout the state,â&#x20AC;? she says. mation, visit mcadv.org or jfpchickball.com. real issue, and the coalition is making a difThe funds will also ensure the programs

62

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


Eugene C. Brown, Jr., D.D.S.,M.S.

Adolescent And Adult Treatments Since 1982

3 Locations to Better Serve You!

*ACKSON

5800 Ridgewood Rd., Suite 103, Jackson, MS 39211 601-957-1711

-ADISON 'RENADA

+POFT4U .BEJTPO .4t601-853-0303 )JHIXBZ8FTU (SFOBEB .4t 662-226-7640 %PXOMPBEPVS"QQtXXXESFVHFOFCSPXODPN

HEDERMAN Â BROTHERS DIGITAL

Where quality, short runs and quick turnarounds meet! Our Digital Department has five presses including our newest addition, the Indigo press with enhanced capabilities. We offer greater efficiencies, faster processing of complex variable jobs and advanced color quality. 5

Variable Print

5

Single or multiple colors

5

Short Runs with High Quality Printing

5

Quick Turnaround

5

Mailing

5

Affordable

Hederman has the print and software solutions essential to delivering excellence for your business.

Hederman Brothers, your marketing partner 500 Steed Road Ridgeland, Mississippi 39157 601.853.7300 1.800.844.7301 www.hederman.com PRINT

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

DIRECT

DIGITAL

GREEN

CROSS MEDIA

DESIGN

63


Stressed? Overworked? Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a break? If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it here, then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll come to your job!

Call Us Now! 601-918-1853 Conveniently Located in Downtown Jackson! 210 E. Capital St. in the Regions Plaza Building See all our rates online www.massagerevolutionjackson.com LMT #â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1462, 1840, 2025, 2026, 2027, 2275, 2319

Local. Fresh. Friendly. Download our new app!

At McDadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, we pride ourselves on working with local Mississippi growers whenever we can, bringing you high quality watermelons, corn, tomatoes, blueberries and more that are fresh and in season. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go Localâ&#x20AC;? every chance we get!

Maywood Mart Woodland Hills Belhaven English Village 1220 E. Northside Dr. Shopping Center Fondren ,-VY[PĂ&#x201E;JH[PVU:[ 601-366-8486 601-366-5273 601-355-9668

64

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Westland Plaza 2526 Robinson Rd. 601-353-0089

Yazoo City ,HZ[[O:[YLL[ 662-746-1144

boomjackson.com


Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

65


Events // culture

Farm Bureau Watermelon Classic July 4, 7:30 a.m., at Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum (1152 Lakeland Drive). The annual race includes a 5K run/ walk, a one-mile fun run and a Tot Trot for children ages 3 and under. Costumes welcome. Watermelon and beverages served after the race. Registration in advance required. $30 5K, $20 fun run, $90 family rate, $130 team (register by June 30 for a $5 discount); call 601.982.8264; msfame.com.

BomBassic July 8, 8 p.m., at Offbeat (151 Wesley Ave.). The Asheville, N.C., duo of Captain Hyperdrive and Brucey B. combines hip-hop, electronic and soul music. For ages 18 and up. $5; call 601.376.9404; email veryoffbeat@gmail.com; offbeatjxn.com.

Ice Cream Safari July 11, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Sample more than a dozen ice cream Ă&#x;BWPSTTDPPQFECZMPDBMUFMFWJTJPO SBEJP and print media celebrities, and vote for ZPVSGBWPSJUFĂ&#x;BWPSBTXFMMBTGBWPSJUF celebrity scooper. $12.25, $9.75 children, $3 members (includes zoo admission); call 601.352.2580; jacksonzoo.org.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go Set a Watchmanâ&#x20AC;? Kickoff Event July 14, 5:30 p.m., at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). The celebration of the release of Harper Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newly discovered book includes a reading of UIFĂ&#x17E;STUDIBQUFSBOESFGSFTI A Night of One Acts by Local Playwrights July 23-25, ments. Pre-orders available. $27.99 7:30 p.m., July 26, 2 p.m., July 26, 4 p.m., at Black book; call 601.366.7619; email info@lemuriaRose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). Shows include books.com; lemuriabooks.com. Becky Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deja Brew,â&#x20AC;? Joshua Pirtleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The

Case of the Headmistressâ&#x20AC;? and Jonathan Dixonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grace Renewal.â&#x20AC;? The Black Rose Youth Theatre Ensemble performs July 25 at 4 p.m. Reservations recommended. $10 (cash or check); call 601.825.1293; blackrosetheatre.org.

Museum After Hoursâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mississippi Pop Art July 16, 5:30-8 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Enjoy pop art from Mississippi artists Big Dan Magee and Adrienne Domnick, a special â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;sipp Sourcedâ&#x20AC;? menu from Chef Nick Wallace and a cash bar. Free, food and drink prices vary; call 601.960.1515; msmuseumart.org.

Legally Blonde Jr. July 9-11, 7 p.m., July 12, 2 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). The musical adaptation of the popular Ă&#x17E;MNGFBUVSFTZPVOHQFSGPSNFST  ages 12 and under; call 601.948.3533, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com.

K. Michelle: Up Close and Personal July 25, 8 a.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The R&B singer performs to promote her album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anybody Wanna Buy a Heart?â&#x20AC;? Doors open at 7 p.m. $35-$45; call 800.745.3000.

11th Annual JFP Chick Ball July 18, 6 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). Includes food, door prizes, a silent auction, QPFUSZBOEMJWFNVTJD#FOFĂ&#x17E;UT the Mississippi Coalition Against Domestic Violence. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. $5; call 601.362.6121, ext. 16; email natalie@jacksonfreepress.com; jfpchickball.com.

Cruising the Community July 31, 8 a.m.-noon, at Jackson State University, Walter Payton Recreation and Wellness Center (32 Walter Payton Drive). Youth ages 18 and under enjoy a one-to-three-mile ride around the JSU campus. Bikes, scooters, wagons, tricycles, skates, roller blades, wheelchairs, skateboards or anything on wheels without motors are welcome. Register by July 24. Free; call 601.979.5828; cruisingthecommunity.eventbrite.com.

JACKSON AREA EVENTS UPDATED DAILY AT JFPEVENTS.COM.

POST YOUR OWN EVENTS OR SEND INFO TO EVENTS@BOOMJACKSON.COM

66

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com

ALL STAR CREATIVE MEDIA LLC; FLICKR/TIM SACKTON; FLICKR-EVA RINALDI;FLICKR/BLU_PINEAPPLE3;COURTESY HARPERCOLLINS; ADRIENNE DOMNICK; FLICKR/MICHAEL COGHLAN; JIMMY FONTAINE;

LeFleur East Foundation Flash Dash July 2, 7-10 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). The annual glow-in-thedark 5K includes local food, face painting, BSPDLXBMM MJWFNVTJDBOEĂ&#x17E;SFXPSLT Registration required. $30 through June 15, $40 after; fun run: $15 through June 15, $20 after; $100 family (four or more) through June 15; call 601.720.8343; eventbrite.com.

Sweetest Chefs of the South July 21, 7-8:30 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Enjoy desserts from female pastry chefs, cocktails, music and door prizes. Proceeds go towards establishing the Mississippi Culinary Arts Guild. $34, $49 VIP (includes entry at 6:30 p.m.); call 601.852.3463; email info@eatyall.com; sweetestchefs. brownpapertickets.com.


Join the JFP Chick Ball in celebrating 11 years of helping metro families break the cycle of domestic abuse.

Become a Sponsor!

*NQFSJBM)JHIOFTT t&NQSFTT&NQFSPS  2VFFO,JOH t1SJODFTT1SJODFt%VDIFTT%VLF $PVOUFTT$PVOUt$IJDL3PPTUFS Make checks payable to Mississippi Coalition Against Domestic Violence or use your credit card at mcadv.org

1SPDFFETCFOFGJU.JTTJTTJQQJ$PBMJUJPO"HBJOTU%PNFTUJD7JPMFODFBOEUIFTFSWJDFTJUQSPWJEFTUPIFMQCSFBLUIFDZDMFPGWJPMFODF

Write natalie@jacksonfreepress.com or call 601-362-6121 ext. 16 to get involved. +'1$IJDL#BMM]4BUVSEBZ +VMZ ]QNUPNJEOJHIU])BM.BMT


Events // craft

Whistle Stop Cabaret: 2015 Summer Showcase Aug. 1, 6:30-9:30 p.m., at Union Station (300 W. Capitol St.). The fundraiser for the Mississippi $IPSVTJODMVEFTEJOOFS BSBGĂ&#x;F  a wine bar and entertainment. Admission TBA; 601.278.3351; email mschorus@gmail.com; mschorus.org.

Jackson Rhythm and Blues Festival Aug. 1415, at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). The festival features more than 30 QFSGPSNFSTPOĂ&#x17E;WFTUBHFTJODMVEJOH Macy Gray, Chaka Khan, The Isley Brothers and NPSF"QPSUJPOPGQSPDFFETCFOFĂ&#x17E;UTUIF.JT sissippi Blues Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Musicians Benevolent Fund. $40 Aug. 14, $55 Aug. 15; call 800.745.3000; jacksonrhythmandbluesfestival.com.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Story of Land and Seaâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 4, 5 p.m., at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Katy Simpson Smith signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $15.99 book; call 601.366.7619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com.

Fondrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Thursday Aug. 6, 11 a.m.11 p.m., at Fondren. Studio Chane hosts the mostly monthly neighborhood event formerly known as Fondren After 5. Includes shopping, food vendors, live music, open houses, a pet adoption drive and more. Free; call 601.720.2426; fft.city.

Mississippi Book Festival Aug. 22, 10 a.m., at Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.). A literary lawn party celebrating authors and their contributions to the culture of literacy, ideas and imagination in Mississippi. Includes events in categories such as Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Illustrated Books, African American History, Civil Rights History, Cooking and Foodways, Poetry and more. Admission TBA; email info@ msbookfestival.com; msbookfestival.com.

Mississippi Craft Show Aug. 22, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Aug. 23, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). The fourth annual event includes handmade art and crafts for sale, FOUFSUBJONFOUBOENPSF1SPDFFETCFOFĂ&#x17E;U-JWFT Cat Rescue, Mississippi Horses and Copiah Animal Shelter. Tickets sold at the door. $7 (cash only), children 12 and under free; call 601.790.0654; email admin@mscraftshow.com; mscraftshow.com.

Magnolia Roller Vixens Roller Derby Aug. 15, 7 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The Jackson-based roller derby team takes on the Cen-Tex Rollergirls. Doors open at 6 p.m. $12 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601.960.2321; magnoliarollervixens.org.

Music in the City Aug. 18, 5:15 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). In Trustmark Grand Hall. Enjoy a cash bar at 5:15 p.m., and music from harpsichordist John Paul at 5:45 p.m. Free, donations welcome; call 601.960.1515; msmuseumart.org.

AIA Movie Night Aug. 27, 6:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). In the Art Garden. AIA .JTTJTTJQQJQSFTFOUTBĂ&#x17E;MN screening with an architectural theme. Lawn chairs and blankets welcome. Cash bar with refreshments for sale. Free; call 601.360.0082; aiamississippi.org.

Todd Rundgren Aug. 29, 8 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The poprock multi-instrumentalist is known for songs such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bang the Drum All Day.â&#x20AC;? Standing room only. Doors open at 7 p.m. $40 in advance; $45 at the door; call 601.292.7121; email jordan@ ardenland.net; ardenland.net.

JACKSON AREA EVENTS UPDATED DAILY AT JFPEVENTS.COM.

POST YOUR OWN EVENTS OR SEND INFO TO EVENTS@BOOMJACKSON.COM

68

July - August 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

FLICKR/MAEGAN TINTARI;COURTESY HARPER COLLINS; FONDREN; COURTESY ARDENLAND; FLICKR/KINGARTHUR_AUS;COURTESY SUMATI THOMAS: FLICKR/RED JUNASUN; FLICKR/STELLA BLACKBURN;JERRICK SMITH;ESOTERIC RECORDINGS

Stilettos on the Pavementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;What IFâ&#x20AC;? Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Empowerment Conference Aug. 1, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). Another Family Gathering is the host. The keynote speaker is Oleta Garrett Fitzgerald of the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Defense Fund. The award recipient is L. Sherie Dean, CEO and founder of The L. Sherie "MFSU#FOFĂ&#x17E;UTUIF$VSF Sickle Cell Foundation. $50 until June 30, $60 after, vendor tables and sponsorships available; call 601.699.3123; email anotherfamilygathering@yahoo.com; stilettosonthepavement.com.

Jill Scott Aug. 11, 7:30 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter performs on her summer tour, and her latest single is entitled, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Foolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gold.â&#x20AC;? Doors open at 6:30 p.m. $46.5-$86.5; call 601.292.7121; ardenland.net.

boomjackson.com


i t â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s  l i v e ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON

TH E ISL EY BR OT HE RS CHA KA KHA N

FEATUR ING RO NA LD ISL EY & ERN EST ISL EY

MA CY GR AY

Many more artists to come! Catch the latest lineup @ SEBAST IAN MIKAEL

J AC KS O N R H Y T H M AN DB LU ES F E S TI VA L . C O M TM

JCV8655-14 R&B Festival Creative Boom Mag.indd 1

5/27/15 11:20 AM

Exclusive KĂŠrastase salon

william wallace salon

2939 Old Canton Rd 601-­982-­8300

          

Find us on Facebook

facebook.com/WWSalon



               

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

69


9

MY LOCAL LIST

The r Docto Is In

3 4

2

1

5

9 6

Best Doctor; Best Clinic: Timothy Quinn, Quinn Healthcare 768 N. Avery Blvd., Ridgeland, 601.487.6482

Best Doctor

Finalists: Kimberley Smash (Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center south clinic, 145 Raymond Road, 601.372.1800, jackson-hinds.com) / Justin Turner (TurnerCare, 5240 Robinson Road Ext., 601.398.2335, turnercarems.com) / Walter Wolfe (Magnolia Woman’s Clinic, 970 Lakeland Drive, Suite 43, 601.200.8201)

1. Courthouse Racquet and Fitness in northeast Jackson (46 Northtown Drive, 601.956.1300) This gym has superb equipment, top-of-the-line weight accommodations and a friendly environment. A lot of the members in the weight room compete on a professional level and are willing to share their knowledge and help motivate people to get the best workout ever. 2. Message Envy Spa in Maywood Mart (1220 Northside drive, 601.709.4300, massageenvy.com) This spa has reasonable prices with the option I chose for a monthly membership fee, which has resulted in even lower costs for services. The spa has a relaxing environment that is 70

professional and accommodating to all my relaxation needs. 3. Cups Espresso Café in Fondren (2757 Old Canton Road, 601.362.7422) 'XULQJP\UHFHUWLßFDWLRQ preparation for my boards, I found myself returning to this sanctuary of studying. The atmosphere is very conducive for that and for meeting very interesting people from vast backgrounds. 4. Olive Garden (6347 Interstate 55 N., 601.978.3407) This is Mom’s favorite restaurant because of the food and atmosphere. She especially likes the Italian music and cuisine, which make this restaurant one of my favorites for meals out with this wonderful lady.

July - August 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

7

PHO TOS BY IMA NI K H AYY AM ; CO URT ESY D R. T IMO THY QUIN N

I

t takes years of schooling and experience to make a good doctor, and Timothy Quinn is no exception to that. He got his medical degree from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn., in 1999 and completed his residency at Martin Luther King/Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles in 2003. He started Quinn Healthcare that year. After years of treating all kinds of people, he’s now an accomplished doctor in Jackson. With his reputation, it’s no wonder Jacksonians voted him as Best Doctor and voted his clinic Quinn Healthcare as Best Clinic. Here are some of his favorite places in the metro area.

8

Best Clinic

Finalists: MEA Medical Clinics (various locations, meamedicalclinics.com) / Richland Primary Care Center (1201 U.S. 49 S., Suite 4, Richland, 601.932.6400, richlandprimarycare.com) / TurnerCare (5240 Robinson Road Ext., 601.398.2335, turner carems.com)

5. M-Bar Sports Grill (6340 Ridgewood Court Drive, 601.398.0999) I enjoy hanging out at this spot because of its great atmosphere and because it often has live music or a killer DJ. 6. Wasabi Sushi and Bar (100 E. Capitol St., Suite 105, 601.948.8808) For insanely good Asian cuisine, this is the destination. It’s also a great place to meet friends, but be careful because the bartender can be a little heavy handed. 7. Visions Physical Therapy (various locations, visionspt.com) This is where I repeatedly send all my patients with aches and pains for their therapy needs. In

addition to traditional therapy, this facility provides lifestyle lessons, such as incorporating diet and exercise to help control joint pain and stress 8. The Penguin Restaurant & Bar (1100 John R. Lynch St., 769.251.5222, thepenguinms.com) I enjoy the great southern cooking in this restaurant. I also enjoy the opportunity to network with Jackson’s elite while listening to live music. 9. My Home in Northeast Jackson After a long day of providing health care to many patients, I return to my home. This place, which is my favorite, provides a place for rest and relaxation. boomjackson.com


Summer. Refresh. Relax. Northeast Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest Showroom % %    %$# %   %! % ! "

Download our new app!

Please Drink Responsibly

"!   #  

 #  !!!! 

Subscribe for

Only $18*! PLUS Subscribe to BOOM Jackson and receive $20 in local gift cards from restaurants like:

To sign up visit boomjackson.com/subscribe or call 601-362-6121 x16 * $18 covers shipping and handling for six bimonthly issues of BOOM Jackson magazine.


BOOM Jackson V8n2 - Young Influentials 2015  

Changing the Narrative: Young Influentials 2015 pp 51-57 Best of Jackson Dentists p 30 Health Caere p 32 Doctor & Clinic p 70 Business of We...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you