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March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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“ I literally do not see the whole picture until I’m done, and that makes it even more fun.” —Hunter Davenport, p 59 COURTESY SYNERGY NIGHTS

TATE K NATIONS

47 50

60

11 JXN Rebirth Fondren After 5’s reincarnation. 12 Derby Dames Take no prisoners. 14 Global Leaders Jackson Prep trains servant leaders. 14 Leaving a Legacy Happy 100th, Ms. Walker. 16 In the Minority More PhDs, fewer barriers.

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16 PEEKABOO Your Neighbor Peek inside Katie McClendon’s bag.

58

16

46 BITES A New Hops More beer. 47 Mystery Machine LurnyD’s Grille is on the food-truck scene. 47 Follow the Trail ... for the best barbecue in the state. 48 COOLEST OFFICES Supply, connect, engineer, play.

19 Party On, Dudes Spring parades.

53 Happy Office How to have one.

20 SECRET JXN Strict Instructor The Duling Hall namesake.

54 Fashion Spring forward.

22 BOOM/BUST Now hot, then not. 24 PROGRESS Out With the New Cool old stuff and more living space.

29 Mending Farish Fighting for a comeback. 29 Home Money Maker More moola at home. 30 Tap Technology Learn the media ropes with Raborn Media. 30 Solving the Issues Rethink Mississippi with Jake McGraw.

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33 MENU GUIDE Paid advertising.

53 Brand Yourself It’s all about image.

28 BIZ A New Fit Red Square knows its denim.

66

31 Local Entrepreneur More local money.

18 Million Dollar Man DiBiase on a mission.

22 EXPAT Gentle Gladiator Not your typical Capitol Hill politico.

28

31 Cool Toys Work + Play.

56 DO GOODER Supply and Demand Buy school supplies, give back. 56 Positive and Confident Girls running wild. 58 Literary Queen Ode to Eudora Welty. 59 Paint-by-BoomBox Weaving music through art. 60 MELODIES In Your Face Cynical Twins keeps it real. 60 Synergy in the City A fresh breath of open-mic night. 60 Musical Fusion Blend it all. 62 EVENTS What to do and see. 66 LOCAL LIST Across the City Amado Felipe’s favorite places in the metro area.

7


boomjackson.com

editor’s note

Cool At Work

Art Director Kristin Brenemen Managing Editor Amber Helsel Assistant Editor Micah Smith Copy Editor Ronni Mott Editorial Writers Fallon Brewster // Tommy Burton // Dustin Cardon Carmen Cristo // Brian Gordon // ShaWanda Jacome Genevieve Legacy // Mike McDonald // LaTonya Miller Maya Miller // Christopher Mims // LaShanda Phillips R.L. Nave // Jason Ray // Greg Pigott // Ebony Robinson Julie Skipper // Zachary Oren Smith // Kelly Stone Jake Sund // Adria Walker // Brinda Fuller WIllis Anna Wolfe Listings Editor // Latasha Willis Editorial Interns Danika Allen // Arcadia Smith // Zachary Oren Smith Photography Trip Burns // Tate K. Nations Ad Design Zilpha Young Design Intern // Joshua Sheriff Business and Sales Advertising Director // Kimberly Griffin Account Executive // Gina Haug Account Executive // Brandi Stodard Marketing Assistant // Natalie West Distribution Manager // Richard Laswell Bookkeeper // Melanie Collins Operations Consultant // David Joseph President and Publisher Todd Stauffer CONTACT US Story ideas and pitches // editor@boomjackson.com Ad Sales // ads@boomjackson.com BOOM Jackson 125 S. Congress St., #1324, Jackson, MS 39201 p 601.362.6121 f 601.510.9019 Would you like copies of BOOM Jackson for recruiting, welcome packets or other corporate, institutional or educational uses? Call 601.362.6121 x16 or email natalie@jacksonfreepress.com. BOOM Jackson is a publication of Jackson Free Press Inc. BOOM Jackson, which publishes every other month, focuses on the urban experience in Jackson, Miss., emphasizing entrepreneurship, economic growth, culture, style and city life. Š 2015 Jackson Free Press Inc.

Cover photo of Nicholas Prowell at Broadband Voice by Tate K. Nations, fashion info, p 84 8

I

’m a visual person, and little pleases me 2. Continually strive to improve my permore than a colorful workspace filled with formance and skills, and keep learning every collaboration and creativity. In fact, I paday by asking questions, listening and seeking tently refuse to work in spaces without natlearning opportunities. ural light. I’d die a million slow deaths in a dark, 3. Communicate clearly across departdreary space without windows. Seriously. ments, be fully present, listen attentively, alOften, a job applicant or a new intern will ways take notes and immediately turn notes into scheduled actions. walk into the BOOM offices like Charlie first stepping foot Now, I can see the team into the Chocolate Factory. working to hold themselves to You can see it on their faces: the standards they collectively This is a COOL office. Workset for all of us. A key meme ing here must be a constant, around our office these days chit-chatty, live-it-up party. is one that David Joseph—the general manager of Table 100 Then the hard lesson: who is also our operations A cool office isn’t just about consultant—shared with me a what’s hanging on the walls couple years back when I was or whether it has a big chalkagonizing about a talented emboard (we do). It’s about what BOOM CEO and Editor-inployee with a bad attitude. The is created in that space, how chief Donna Ladd loves nicest man in Jackson told me people interact, the attitudes her office toys to pieces, that two things are non-negopeople bring to work, and including this Yoda puppet tiable: “Every person must whether each person is acshe’s cherished for 33 years. perform, and everyone must countable and does his or her bring a great attitude to work part to help the team make deadlines—and continually strive for higher every day. Just one of those isn’t good enough. You must have both.� A hard, but vital lesson. and higher standards. And oh yeah: no drama. That focus, team spirit and work ethic are The coolest offices are where you figure what makes an office hum. We’ve spent much out how to recruit and hire people who strive time over the last eight months trying to make daily to be brilliant and to learn from each our office, and the work experience here, cooler other. (Our shared values are now the basis for than ever. Through leadership training facilitatfuture job interviews). Once positive, focused, ed by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and inspircurious employees arrive, they share the core ing executive coaching by Deirdre Danahar of values, are trustworthy and do what they say InMotion Consulting (hire her!), I’ve learned they will. The team wants to collectively create so much about workplace engagement. something bigger than any of them could do The biggest lessons for me? The staff alone—and they will work hard to get there. should decide their own shared values and They all get that it is vital to always have a plans, and then we talk about, reinforce and learning mindset, whether you’re the CEO or review based on those values every chance we the office assistant. Engage, learn, be present, get. Through a variety of fun retreats, workfix problems rather than complain, grow and sheets, workshops and meetings, our staff excel. There’s not a whole lot cooler than that. came up with a long list of values for themselves and the team. Then, over several months, they winnowed them down to 11 top ones and then to the three that are simply non-negotiable: 1. Be positive, praise others often, leave personal problems and drama at the door, and laugh at adversity. TRIP BURNS

Editor-in-Chief and CEO Donna Ladd

// by Donna Ladd

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March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


contributors

1. Adria Walker

COUPON CODE: 1503BOOM

Freelance writer Adria Walker (aka the 27th Doctor) is a senior at Murrah High School. She enjoys debating about Star Wars; reading Camus, Neruda, Kafka, and Kundera; and questioning her existence. She wrote a business piece.

2. Mike McDonald Freelance writer Mike McDonald attended the University of Montana. He enjoys listening to rap music, writing short stories and reading books about American history. He wrote a JXN story.

3. Zachary Oren Smith Editorial intern Zachary Oren Smith comes from a long line of storytellers and decided he might as well make a dime off the family business. And no, he’s probably not related to the Smiths you’re thinking of. He wrote a Do-Gooder story.

4. Ebony Robinson Ebony Robinson is a professional image coach and founder of Ebony Marchelle. She is also the lead fashion merchandising instructor at Hinds Community College. For more information about Ebony or her image coaching, visit ebonymarchelle. com. She styled the fashion in the coolest office spread and wrote a fashion piece. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

9


Hip Check p 12 // Future Leaders p 14 Walker’s Legacy p 14 // In the Minority p 16 Peekaboo p 16 // Million Dollar Man p 18 Parading Around p 19 // Tough Teacher p 20 Southern Gentleman p 22 // Progress p 24

TRIP BURNS

I

f you noticed that Fondren After 5 kicked it up a notch in December 2013, that was thanks in no small part to Fondren businessman Ron Chane, owner of Studio Chane. From the Fondren Art Mix to Fondren After 5, the event has come in various incarnations over the years. In the beginning, Chane says it built up a lot of strength, but it started to wane in popularity in late 2012 and 2013. Now, in 2015, Chane plans to revive Fondren After 5 with a new strategy and a new name: Fondren’s First Thursday. “As a merchant, I had grown to depend on it as an extra amount of commerce, and it was extra help for us in the recession,” Chane says. “It was like, ‘Well, at least I can depend on that Thursday night.’” In 2009, Chane moved his store, Swell-o-Phonic, from its former space at the current home of Fondren Public into its current location. “Once we had moved up to State Street in Fondren Corner, (Fondren After 5) was great because we didn’t have to work so hard to beg people to come to this event. … Once it started to go down, we realized that we’ve got to do something,” he says. The Jackson native toyed with the idea of organizing a few of the events. In 2014, he partnered with Fondren Renaissance Foundation, the

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

original organizers, to put some spark back into the proceedings. He planned to spearhead the event as an unpaid volunteer for about 90 days. “I really enjoyed flinging my doors open and just being here for it,” Chane says. “I had just gotten to the point where my staff had said:

Other than the fact that the previous name belongs to Fondren Renaissance, Chane says he wants to expand on past successes and also introduce new elements, such as shedding the event’s time limitations. His goal is to have Fondren’s First Thursday run from noon to midnight so that everyone can participate. Chane also wants to help local restaurants. For a few of last year’s Fondren After 5 nights, restaurants such as The Pig & Pint held pop-up events. For Fondren’s First Thursday, Chane plans to pair restaurants with local farmers. He’s also working with the Mississippi Department of Agriculture to bring the Mississippi Farmers Market to the event for those who aren’t able to make it on Saturday mornings. With Fondren’s First Thursday, Chane envisions a “night of neutrality.” “You’re not going to come here and deal with crime and politics and sad things like you see on the news,” he says. “We don’t invite black people, white people, gay, straight, rich or poor. We just invite one group called ‘people.’ Everybody is expected, and everybody is welcome.”

FROM RECESSION TO REVAMP // by Amber Helsel

‘Listen, you can quit working these now. We got this. Just go out and enjoy it.’” Soon after, Chane took on most aspects of planning the event. Now, he feels that it’s time for Fondren After 5 to turn over another new leaf. Chane announced the revamped name and game plan for Fondren’s First Thursday in February.

11


TRIP BURNS

JXN // grit

Hailey Gann, aka Olivia Ganngrene, says the Capital City Roller Girls have become a second family to her.

Rough and Tumble // by Brian Gordon

B

efore her nickname, the old Terri Smith might have passively obliged the bruises and the thrill of the track. The old Smith had been told she was worthless many times. But not the woman now known as Random Parts. She’s a Capital City Roller Girl, a player on one of two competitive roller-derby teams in Jackson. The pace and fury of roller derby, where women dodge and check each other on a concrete track, breeds a degree of resolve. “It bleeds over into life and has made me more assertive for sure,” Smith says. Compared to Jackson’s other roller-derby squad, the Magnolia Roller Vixens, Capital City is more recreational. The team holds no tryouts, accepting anyone who brings an indomitable will to compete and her own mouth guard. Entering its third season since regrouping as a player-run organization, the squad expects to build on last season’s one-win campaign. Practice, held at the Brandon National Guard Armory, features no lulls in intensity as Coach Evin “Almighty” Carlile hurries the players between scrimmages, lap sprints and workout stations. Within the derby-sphere, there is a welltraveled saying attributed to pioneering coach Bonnie Stroir: “Most seem to find roller derby in a transitional period.” One example of this is Hailey Gann, known on the team as Olivia Ganngrene. Depressed in the wake of her mother’s passing, Gann left school in 2009 to help her dad care for her three 12

younger sisters. Having skated in her youth, she sought out the Capital City team and quickly found a second family. “We are all weird and wonderful,” Gann says of the team. The teammates span from peppy to gruff, cheerleaders to Iraq War veterans. Some fit the mold of the rough-and-tumble derby girl, but it’s hard to pinpoint a common personality. While Gann found the team after a death, Lacy Hale came from heartbreak. After the “perpetually watching ‘Bridesmaids’” phase of a break-up, Hale came across Capital City through word-of-mouth. She was watching “Whip It,” the 2006 roller-derby movie, and was amazed to discover she could be in the sport. “I was a baby giraffe my first time on skates,” she says. “You’re out of your comfort zone and scared.” One player equates this soothing power with going to church, only smellier. The intensity of the sport brews a distinctive scent, which Smith labels as a mixture of “ass and corn chips.” An hour prior, Hale was sprawled on the armory’s concrete, refusing to move her shoulder. While absorbing a teammate’s body check, she heard something pop. She was in pain. Her teammates nonchalantly gathered around, chatting about everything but Hale’s well-being. “We are around each other so often, you can tell from their face if they’re really hurt,” Gann says. “Hales just needed a moment.” The physicality of a roller-derby match is raw. The objective: to get your team’s jammer to lap your opponents while impeding the oppo-

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

nent’s jammer from doing the same to your team. Bodies slam into bodies. Bruises form, and players sometimes break bones. Embracing such a sport and returning with élan time and again empower the women. Gann credits the sport with increasing her confidence. At work, she’ll morph into “Ganngrene” around a crowded office copier, using her shoulder to stake a better position. The lawyers at the firm have taken note of her beloved extracurricular. “They’ll gather around and be like ‘What!? You hit people?’ It strikes fear in a couple of them,” she says. On April 25, Capital City will have its first home game this season. The team plans to increase its wins and decrease its spreads (margins of loss), but even more importantly, to remain a sanctuary for those in transition. “Our team goes for the underdogs,” Smith says. “We attract those who don’t want to be seen and help them realize traits they didn’t know they had.” Several players mention a world-beating mentality that grips them when they strap on skates. This attitude can be a remedy for those mourning a loss or low self-esteem—providing a remedy for those in transitions. Or, as coach Bonnie Stroir explains it: “We ruin our bodies to save our souls. And for some reason, that makes perfect sense.” For more information and to find the Capital City Roller Girls’ upcoming schedule, search for the team on Facebook. boomjackson.com


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13


JXN // legacy TRIP BURNS

For Her People // by Mike McDonald

L

ike so many African Americans before and after World War II, Margaret Walker Alexander traveled across America for better opportunities. Still, her early years in Louisiana and Alabama shaped her writing, including the poem “For My People,� which won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition in 1942. Walker was the first African American woman to win a national writing award. She often wrote about the struggles of African Americans, including in her book “Jubilee,� which responded to nostalgic fiction about the Reconstruction-era South. If Alexander were alive today, she would celebrate her 100th birthday this year. The Margaret Walker Center at Jackson State University is celebrating for her with events at locations across the state. “We want to celebrate her legacy as a scholar, writer, educator (and) mentor, and increase awareness of her contributions to a state, national and even international level,� Angela Stewart, the center’s archivist, says.

Leading the Youth // by Julie Skipper

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14

Jackson State University will honor Margaret Walker Alexander’s 100th birthday with a series of events from March through July.

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TRIP BURNS

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Events include the Oxford Conference for the Book, March 25-27 in Oxford, Miss.; JSU’s 9th annual Creative Arts Festival, April 10-11, titled “This is My Century: The Life & Legacy of Margaret Walker�; and “Black Arts Movement,� a photography exhibit featuring works by Doris Derby from April 23 through the summer. “Reflecting in the 21st century on Margaret Walker (Alexander), we should recognize her belief in self-pride, promotion of the free individual who challenges events intellectually, as well as a ... reexamination of racial and gender identity,� Stewart says. “She aimed for a bettering of worlds through education, and I hope these events can honor and continue her mission and passion.� For more information about Margaret Walker Alexander and the events honoring her legacy, visit jsums.edu, call 601.979.3935, or visit the Margaret Walker Center office in Ayer Hall on the Jackson State campus. The center is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

The Global Leadership Institute at Jackson Preparatory School helps turn students into servant leaders.

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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15


JXN // growth

The Chemistry of Education // by Anna Wolfe

TRIP BURNS

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ecause non-white students face greater hurdles to receiving a doctoral degree, especially in STEM fields— science, technology, engineering and mathematics—Jackson State University’s chemistry department is finding ways to better serve these students. Hongtao Yu, a professor and chemistry department chairperson at JSU, suggested that African American students do not always enter graduate school on a level playing field with their white counterparts. “The biggest (issue) for some is the academic preparation,� Yu says. “That starts with middle school or even earlier. A lot of these students, we see that they are not well prepared for college, and of course, the college did a good job to bring them up, but (getting a) PhD is a whole other level, and there’s something lacking there.� In STEM subjects, this disparity is especially striking. Out of roughly 5,000 chemistry doctorate holders in the country, only 50 are African American. To tackle this under-representation, JSU’s chemistry department focuses on three areas of student learning: social life, academics and exposure. The department strives to build social communities for students to feel comfortable expressing their needs, whether they be social, financial or academic. “We really investigate each of the students to see where they are and, for them to make it, to become a PhD, what they need,� Yu says. Yu says he recognizes a lack of confidence in some of his students. “Although they are

Jackson State University professors such as Hongtao Yu want to boost the number of minority students who receive doctorate degrees, especially in STEM fields. bright, intelligent (and) they can do it, they just don’t feel that way,� Yu says. Many students he works with may be the first in their families to pursue higher education. The university offers opportunities to help students who have certain deficiencies so they can get up to the speed with other students in the program. Nationally, JSU ranks third for doctoral degrees in physical sciences awarded to African Americans, which mainly encompasses the school’s chemistry degrees. It is also

one of three historically black colleges with a chemistry doctoral program. A chemistry doctorate degree, Yu says, opens up the doors for students to teach chemistry, or work in government labs or in chemical industries. Yu, who is Chinese and has lived in the United States for about 25 years, says working in the JSU chemistry department increased his desire to “help people grow from where they are to where they want to be.�

Feline Friends

TRIP BURNS

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16

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JXN // mission

A New Tag Team // by ShaWanda Jacome

T

are doing out there,” DiBiase, now a Madison resident, says. “It’s actually going to be a town that’s connected to a residential area, a neighborhood called Chestnut Hill. It will be a fully organic town. You’ll be able to ride your bike or golf cart up to the mercantile store to get your milk and groceries. There will be a five-star restaurant out there. … It’s a really unique concept.” Livingston was the county seat of Madison County from 1829 to 1836. The Livingston Township project is located at Highways 463 and 22, and will feature homes, a chapel, a store (which is currently open) and office spaces. “It’s not about personal gain for me. It’s about making history for fellow Mississippians,” DiBiase says. The Delos website says that the WELL certification is the result of six years of research, development, and collaboration with doctors, scientists and industry leaders. The certification goes through the Green Building Certification Institute, the same organization that provides certification for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design buildings. The WELL standard raises the quality of air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, and comfort in commercial, institutional and residential buildings. “We’re looking at working with the state and working with low-income areas and lowincome schools and really pushing this in the state of Mississippi,” DiBiase says. “When Delos comes to Mississippi, and Ted DiBiase Jr., a former WWE villain, is now making the metro area a better place through they implement these WELL certifications and his and Nick Coughlin’s business, Dofflin Strategies. structures, that creates jobs for general contractors. It creates jobs for certification technicians. It creates jobs for the lighting providers and the different ancilClinton High School and Mississippi College classmate Nick Coughlary products that are going into these facilities,” Coughlin says. lin. Coughlin’s background includes working with the Mississippi Angel Network, the Mississippi Development Authority and Overtime Coughlin and DiBiase are helping several Mississippi companies Sports. He also had his share of TV time on NBC’s “The Apprentice” and general contractors attain WELL certification. and ABC’s “Expedition Impossible.” DiBiase wants to use the opportunities he’s been given to help Dofflin Strategies helps businesses create and implement innovabusinesses reach their fullest potential. He wants to help put Missistive strategies. One of Dofflin’s largest projects has been with Delos sippi on the map and then stay ahead of the trends. Living and Livingston Land Company, which partnered with Dofflin to “We want to work hand-in-hand with the governor and both sides bring WELL certifications to Livingston, Miss. of the aisle,” Coughlin says. “There’s not a Democrat or Republican that doesn’t want their families their children in a better living A WELL Building Standard certification for the Livingston projenvironment.” ect will be the first in Mississippi. “Our intention is to make Mississippi finally be one of the firsts, In WWE, DiBiase was in the wrestling alliance, The Legacy, and instead of dead last in everything,” Coughlin says. now he is creating a legacy of hope and excellence in his home state Delos’ website says the company strives to create “spaces that and improve the quality of living for Mississippians. nurture and promote human health and wellbeing” and “cultivating “I’ll never leave Mississippi; I’ll raise my family here,” he says. “I better lifestyle choices by helping to prevent health problems before love the people. I love the lifestyle. It’s home. I’ve traveled the world they are created.” and wrestled on six different continents. I’ve seen every major city … “It’s a beautiful piece of property, and it’s really exciting what they but there’s nothing better than Mississippi for me.”

MELANIE BOYD

ed DiBiase Jr. came on the World Wrestling Entertainment scene as a villain in 2008. The character he played—the brash and arrogant Million Dollar Man—is completely different from the real DiBiase, a humble man who’s on a mission to do great things for the state of Mississippi. Since retiring from professional wrestling in 2013, DiBiase has been flexing his entrepreneurial muscles. That year, he started strategic planning and development firm Dofflin Strategies with fellow

18

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


Parading Around

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What to Expect Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade March 20-21 Theme: %ULQJLQJ+RPH WKH*UDPP\3KRQH *UDQG0DUVKDO%REE\5XVK Friday, March 20 +DO¶V0DUFKLQJ 0$/IXQFWLRQVHFRQGOLQH SDUDGH .LQJ(GZDUG+RWHO :&DSLWRO6W

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19


JXN // secret city

M

ost would agree that educators have a powerful influence on their students, but how many teachers can say that they inspired a modern literary master, a beloved city street and a school, all within their lifetime? For 56 years, Miss Lorena Duling whipped Jackson Public Schools into shape and, in the process, became a prominent figure in the city’s history. At a time when women rarely moved from their parents’ home until they married, Duling, a Ten-

A noted perfectionist and authoritarian, Duling’s students—including a young Eudora Welty— simultaneously loved and feared her. While education wasn’t a priority for every Mississippi family, Duling was quick to disabuse any potential dropouts. In an article published in Jackson Magazine in September 1977, Welty told friend and writer Jane Reid Petty, who founded New Stage Theatre, about the principal’s reputation among schoolchildren. “You couldn’t even have left the classroom without a written excuse from home, and then you’d still have to get past Miss Duling in the principal’s office,” Welty said. “You couldn’t. Miss Lorena Duling could freeze you—maybe kill you—with the look of her eyes. She’d have stared down a dropout the way Saint Peter would if he caught one trying to get out the gates of heaven.” Duling was also known for her generosity. She was the first principal in Jackson to provide free lunches to students from low-income homes. She paid for these meals out of her own pocket for years before the school’s board of trustees agreed to finance a lunch program. Although Duling died June 18, 1949, she lived to see her name etched into Jackson’s foundation. The Lorena Duling School, located on Duling Avenue, opened in 1927. Today, the building houses several of the city’s most popular businesses, shops and eateries, including Smoak Salon, Babalu Tacos & Tapas, and Saltine Oyster Bar, and it provides a venue for entertainment company Ardenland’s various events in the school’s old auditorium. While she might not be as recognizable as some of our state’s famous former residents, Duling’s love of education and her insistence on schooling for every child undoubtedly shaped Mississippi history.

No Dropouts

at St. Peter’s Gate FONDREN RENAISSANCE FOUNDATION

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The late Lorena Duling, the JPS principal Duling Hall was named after, was a noted perfectionist and authoritarian. nessee native, went to Paris, Texas, to become an elementary school teacher. She worked there for five years before moving to Jackson in the 1890s, when she accepted a job at Central High School at West and Griffith streets in downtown Jackson. Then, in 1905, Duling accepted a position as the principal of Jefferson Davis Elementary School, a title she held for 36 years. 20

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Duvall Decker Architects P.A. Architecture . Planning . Interiors

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21


JXN // jurist

Southern Charm, Northern Efficiency // by R.L. Nave

T

wrote editorials and handled media relations for a political consulting firm, Mercury, LLC. It wasn’t exactly in the glamorous mold of K Street mover and shaker, so he took a job in early 2014 as a policy analyst for the U.S. Department of Justice, where he writes rules and regulations for the agency. In his time there, McLemore has found meaning in President John F. Kennedy’s quip about Washington being a “city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm.” He misses the warmth of encountering friendly faces at hometown haunts such as Mama Hamil’s and The Bulldog. Perks of living in D.C., on the other hand, include richer diversity. McLemore said he experienced culture shock coming from Mississippi where diversity means having equal numbers of black people and white folks in a room. Washington’s progressive bent and a large black professional scene are also breaths of fresh air. Mississippi’s never-ceasing culture wars suck up too much oxygen that could go toward problem solving, McLemore says. Five to 10 years from now, though, McLemore says he can see himself returning to Jackson and diving into early education policy, voting-rights advocacy and other justice issues. “I’ll be damned if we don’t get there eventually,” he says. Read McLemore’s occasional guest columns in the Jackson Free Press at jfp.ms/opinion.

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COURTESY LESLIE MCLEMORE II

The son of Anniece and Leslie McLemore, raining in the crucible that is the nation’s capital prepares the world’s hun- the junior McLemore passed the bar in Missisgriest ladder climbers to be the next sippi and, after working at his stepmother Betty generation of bloodthirsty Capitol Hill Mallett’s law firm in Jackson, headed east to the politicos to clash over civil rights, Obamacare, Mecca of politics and policy work. For a time, he war funding, Mideast policy and the Keystone XL pipeline. Jackson native Leslie McLemore II’s plan is to become a kinder, gentler type of gladiator. “One problem I’ve noticed that I’d like to tackle is early education. I’m a big believer in mentoring, getting to a child as early as possible,” McLemore says. While it doesn’t have the same cachet as LGBT activism, for example, McLemore believes early-education advocacy is fertile ground in Mississippi, which lags the nation in most quality-ofWashington, D.C., life indicators for young children. policy analyst Leslie Besides, he adds, it’s likely that McLemore II wants to help bring early the U.S. Supreme Court will soon childhood education render the state’s legal restrictions to Mississippi. on same-sex marriage moot in the coming months. McLemore, 30, grew up in Woodhaven neighborhood of northwest Jackson and graduated from St. Joseph Catholic School in 2002. After studying mass communication and political science at Jackson State University, he went to law school at North Carolina Central University and got his master’s of constitutional law degree from American University in 2012.

22

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


Bringing The Community Together: Promoting Racial Harmony and Facilitating Understanding

••••••••• Monthly Luncheons Second Wednesday each month Join Jackson 2000 for our monthly discussion luncheon at the Art Center of Mississippi, covering issues related to racial harmony, economics, health, education and more. Visit our websites for topics and to receive e-mail updates.

2015 Friendship Ball Saturday April 18, 2015, 7 p.m. Mississippi Museum of Art Our annual “Friendship Ball” brings members, board members and the community at large together for a celebration of our community and two honor two individuals who embody our mission. Live music, food, drink and dancing!

2015 Dialogue Circles Ongoing for adults and youth see website Jackson 2000 presents dialogue circles, a series of facilitated, curriculum-based discussion sessions that can open minds, change hearts and build lasting friendships. Thanks to The Nissan Foundation for their generous support.

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART

Civil War Drawings from the Becker Collection is curated by Judith Bookbinder and Sheila Gallagher and the traveling exhibition is organized by Curatorial Assistance Traveling Exhibitions, Pasadena, California. Drawings from the Becker Collection premiered at the McMullen Museum at Boston College in the exhibition, First Hand: Civil War Era Drawings from the Becker Collection which was organized by the McMullen Museum and underwritten by Boston College and Patrons of the McMullen Museum. The Mississippi Museum of Art and its programs are sponsored in part by the city of Jackson. Support is also provided in part by funding from the Mississippi Arts Commission, a state agency, and in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. Support for this exhibition is provided through the Thomas G. Ramey and Peggy Huff Harris Fund of the

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.MSMUSEUMART.ORG 380 SOUTH LAMAR STREET JACKSON,MISSISSIPPI 39201 601.960.1515 1.866.VIEWART @MSMUSEUMART Francis H. Schell, Rebel Calvary Officers Driving Back the Skulkers, September 17, 1862. Graphite on wove paper. Becker Collection CW-FHS-MD-9-17-62c.

VISIT THE NEWEST EXHIBIT AT THE SOUTHEAST’S BEST ATTRACTION!

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JANUARY 31 – APRIL 19, 2015

This exhibition explores the role artists played as reporters and creators who translated with pencil and pad both the chaos and daily life of the Civil War. The first-hand drawings document in lively and specific ways key developments in the history of America as it struggled to establish its national identity.

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23


JXN // vibrancy

J

ackson State University is quietly roaring with several building projects on and off campus. Recently, JSU cleared some hurdles to move forward with two multimillion-dollar projects to provide more student housing to the growing university. In January, the state college board approved Jackson State’s request to borrow up to $10 million to purchase the Palisades Apartments on the west edge of campus. Previously, Redus Mississippi LLC, a local

Partners. “Old stuff is cool.” Right now, some of downtown Jackson’s oldest—and most talked about—economic-development opportunities are finally seeing movement. Farish Street, a veritable monkey’s fist of legal and regulatory quagmires, is close to resolving at a long-standing issue related to the project. Last fall, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, after losing faith that the Farish Street revitalization project would ever live up to expectations, ordered Jackson to repay

SKD DEVELOPMENT

In With the Old

more than those two blocks,” Yarber said at a January council meeting. “We don’t hang our hats on those two blocks and say that those two blocks determine Jackson’s vitality or success.” Also downtown, the former Edison Walthall Hotel, at 225 E. Capitol St., has a new owner who plans to redevelop the property into about 100 luxury apartments. Previous plans called for a $10 million renovation, led by St. Louis-based real-estate developers Mike and Steve Roberts, but those plans stalled when water-pressure is-

// by R.L. Nave

Pre-leasing is slated to begin late spring or early summer for The Meridian in Fondren.

subsidiary of Wells Fargo & Co., owned the 444bed complex, which JSU plans to renovate. To accommodate its students now, the school leases a motel near Interstate 55 North and High Street. JSU will also construct a 628-bed dormitory near J.R. Lynch and Poindexter streets. The city’s planning and zoning commission approved the plans in September 2014. The school does not need an additional OK from the college board because private funds from the Jackson State Development Foundation will pay for the building, which will include a dining hall and computer labs. The school plans expansion of the Mississippi ECenter and the School of Science, Engineering & Technology as well, but school officials declined to provide details about those projects.

Downtown’s Cool Old Stuff “If you want something new, move to Pearl,” says Ben Allen, president of Downtown Jackson 24

funds it used to buy buildings in the historic district, which once functioned as black Jackson’s downtown. The city subsequently transferred ownership of the property to the Jackson Redevelopment Authority, an independent body that can structure financial deals for economic development projects. Faced with having to repay $1.5 million in HUD community-development block-grant funds HUD, Jackson City Council members developed a three-year payment schedule that would have tied up progress in the district for years. In January, Mayor Tony Yarber said his administration would accept, with the council’s approval, JRA’s alternative offer to pay back the $1.5 million. Yarber stressed that while it’s important to untangle the legal issues, the city and its citizens should not put all their eggs in the Farish Street basket. “Entertainment and Jackson’s survival are

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

sues damaged a number of guest rooms, forcing the hotel to close in 2010. Meanwhile, the Landmark Center, which had several suitors—including the Mississippi Department of Revenue and the University of Mississippi Medical Center—fall through in recent years, is in the hands of a new owner. Zeev Yochelman, an Israeli national, closed the deal last fall and announced plans for a mix of retail and office space and residential living in the top floors; the building is currently marketing the space and leasing to tenants.

Fondren Happenings The Meridian at Fondren is also coming along. The five-story, 240-home luxury apartment building will occupy 4.4 acres near the University of Mississippi Medical Center on Lakeland Drive. UMMC is leasing the land for the $33 million project from SKD Development, boomjackson.com


FONDREN which also includes an affiliate of Jackson-based StateStreet Group LLC and Kassinger Development Group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We anticipate that the Meridian will attract not only UMMC personnel and others from the larger medical community, but anyone and everyone who appreciates the walkable, vibrant environment of Fondren,â&#x20AC;? said Stewart Speed, a SKD Development partner, in a release. Plans call for art deco architecture, with four stories of residential apartment space and retail and office space on the ground level. The Meridian will offer studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments ranging from $900 to $1,600 per month. Each apartment will have either a full or Juliet balcony. Other amenities include a swimming pool, sun deck, gated dog park, an outdoor kitchen with grilling pavilion and televisions, and an aerobics and yoga studio inside a high-end fitness center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will have a contemporary feel, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also have a little bit of art deco and retro,â&#x20AC;? Speed said of the pool area. With 4,000 square feet available for retail and other uses, planners hope the development will make a big impact on businesses in Fondren. Additionally, a tax-credit-financed housing project is under way near Taylor, Oxford, Downing and Lorenz streets in Fondren for a housing project in conjunction with Mississippi Home Corporation. The $18.5 million development includes 163 one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments featuring amenities like washers and dryers in each unit and 24-hour security. The development will also include 300 parking spaces. One development that will not be coming to Fondren just yet is a hotel. Developers have shelved plans for a 100-room, four-story urban boutique-style Hampton Inn with an underground parking garage at the corner of Duling Avenue and Old Canton Road. Sunny Desai, president and chief executive officer of Desai Hotel Group in Jackson, said this company withdrew its application to the Mississippi Department of History and Archives for building in the historic arts district, but he said he still hopes to bring a hotel to Fondren in the future. In the meantime, pre-leasing for The Meridian is slated to begin in late spring or early summer, said John Ditto, president of State StreetGroup LLC, which also owns the Fondren Hill and Vieux Carre apartments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will be incubating future Fondren homeowners,â&#x20AC;? Ditto said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We look forward to being a part of the fabric of Fondren.â&#x20AC;? Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

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CUSTOM Make every room in your home look just like in the magazines with great furniture and accessories, plus expert help. From the latest trends to antiques, Woodland Hills accents, chandeliers, paintings, and pillows – it’s Interiors Market. Join us for lunch at Market Bites Shopping Center Fondren from 11:30 am to 2 pm, Monday thru Friday. 601.981.6020 26

November - December 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

661 DULING AVE. JACKSON in the Historic Fondren District TRISH HAMMONS WWW.CUSTOMOPTICAL.NET 601.362.6675 boomjackson.com


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open unti l 10 Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

27


BIZ

// contemporary TRIP BURNS

In Your Jeans // by Amber Helsel

Red Square Clothing Company began specializing in denim after its owner Myles Harris saw a need in the metro Jackson area for an amazing place to buy jeans.

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pair of jeans is probably one of the most versatile items of clothing you can ever own. With the right pair, you can go from day to evening, from the office to a party. As the owner of Red Square Clothing Company, Myles Harris knows a thing or two about blue jeans. The New Zealand native came to the United States in 2004, when he moved to Carthage, Miss., for family. He opened Red Square in Ridgelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Renaissance at Highland Colony six years ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I recognized a need for more of a menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing store than anything else,â&#x20AC;? he says. Looking for a market niche, Harris began specializing in menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high-end denim. Because women were asking for the same thing, four years ago, he decided to expand the business into a unisex store. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It seemed to have been the right thing to do,â&#x20AC;? Harris says. In August 2014, he opened a second location in Highland Village shopping center in Jackson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was really a privilege to be offered this particular corner by the shopping center,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This (location) had been a pharmacy for 30 years.â&#x20AC;? Harrisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; biggest challenge in opening the first loca-

March - April 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

tion was marketing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Identifying your customers is the easiest part,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s informing them that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there (that) is the most difficult part.â&#x20AC;? But over the years, Harris has established a network of clientele. Red Squareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff take pride in their denim-wear expertise. They can look at you and tell your size and the brands that will fit you best. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the small population that the Jackson greater area has, it does not and probably will never attract a luxury high-end department store like Nordstromâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Neiman Marcus,â&#x20AC;? Harris says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can be defined really as taking the entire denim department out of a Nordstromâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and putting it in a store â&#x20AC;Ś along with a large selection of menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contemporary brands.â&#x20AC;? The store carries designer denim brands such as True Religion, Citizens of Humanity and Hudson. Red Square also offers menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shirts and blouses, accessories and shoes. For more information on Red Square Clothing Company (Renaissance at Highland Colony, 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, Suite 9004, 601.853.8960; Highland Village, 4500 Interstate 55 N., 601.398.3403), you can visit redsquareclothingco.com or find the store on Facebook. boomjackson.com


Homebound Moneymaker

Farish in the Balance

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by Adria Walker

The Farish Street/Main Street Project is working to revitalize the historic district.

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istorically, Farish Street was a bustling part of Jackson. After slavery ended, it was the first place African Americans settled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a self-contained, selfsustaining community,â&#x20AC;? says James Talmadge Anderson, president of Farish Street/Main Street Project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Businesses and homeowners in that community were African American entrepreneurs. â&#x20AC;Ś (Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) first clinic, doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office, dentistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office, photographer, grocery store, taxi company, bus companyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;everything was there.â&#x20AC;? Since integration came in the 1960s, the number of Farish Street residents and the businesses have steadily declined. The current Farish Street Historical District is a shadow of its former self. Once a flourishing community of commerce and entertainment options, today only a handful of businesses operate in the district, and several buildings that once housed businesses are collapsing. Yet, the residents who remain in the Farish Street area remain committed to revitalization efforts. Members of the Farish Street/Main Street Project, founded in 2002, want to restore Farish Street to its glory days. The organization, which has on average about eight to 15 members, hopes to model the restoration of Farish Street after the booming tourist destination on Beale Street in Memphis. The two blocks between Griffith, Amite and Hamilton streets were destined to become Farish Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entertainment district before the development plan faltered, falling into legal disputes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We saw (Beale Street) as the starting point for where people and businesses would be drawn back, and life would return to the district,â&#x20AC;? Anderson says. The nonprofit lends support to those who wish to renew Farish Street by doing things such as trying to get a grant to repair the building that currently houses the Big Apple Inn and Medgar Eversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; former offices. Sadly, the effort was unsuccessful. Unfortunately for Farish Street/Main Street Project and supporters of the revival of Farish Street, this is easier said than done. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The two-block entertainment district has been over 15 years in the making,â&#x20AC;? Anderson says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every contractor that has been awarded the contract, for whatever reason, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough money (to complete the development). From what I understand now, it is tied up in litigation in the courts, so we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know when that effort is going to re-start.â&#x20AC;? News that the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has ordered Jackson to return a grant to develop the area paints an even bleaker shade over Farish Street. However, Anderson is still confident that it can be saved with a little help, hard work and a shared goal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We invite and accept all those who come in good faith and of a like mind,â&#x20AC;? he says. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

COURTESY JAMES T. ANDERSON

IMAGE: Farish_Street_Feb_2015_TB-3.jpg CREDIT: CAPTION: Image: Photo of James T. Anderson Credit:

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If you want to have a home business, selling crafts, jewelry and other items on Etsy is a great idea.

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BIZ // big ideas

Rethinking Mississippi // by Mike McDonald and Amber Helsel

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that to happen, McGraw says, people must address the problems and talk about the solutions to them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My internship got me thinking about systemic racial and educational divisions,â&#x20AC;? he says. COURTESY JAKE MCGRAW

ississippi is a state with potential, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mired in low national rankings in areas such as education, health and poverty, Jake McGraw says. He started Rethink Mississippi as a way to give Mississippians a way to engage with each other. McGraw, an Oxford, Miss., native, studied at the University of Mississippi from 2006 to 2010, earning a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in economic and social history. He became an intern at the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation at the university in 2008. The institute offered him a job in spring 2013, and he now works as its publicpolicy coordinator. McGrawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s internship with the institute sparked his desire to start the website. Rethink Mississippi, which McGraw founded in the fall of 2013, is a progressive-minded policy analysis and commentary blog. Its purpose is to provide a platform for community leaders, politicians, professionals and citizens who want to see the state improve. For

Rethink Mississippi, started by University of Mississippi graduate Jake McGraw, provides a platform to tackle Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most pressing issues, such as racism.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The biggest obstacle in our state is poverty. Childhood impoverishment is the largest predictor of obesity, high-school dropout rates (and) incarceration. Between 32 and 35 percent of Mississippi children will grow up in a household earning an income below the federal poverty line. We rarely hear stories about that on the local news, articles in the paper or policy proposals by state legislators.â&#x20AC;? Contributors have written stories on subjects such as why lower income tax means higher state and local taxes, the effects of underfunding education and Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infant mortality rates. McGraw still writes most articles for Rethink Mississippi, and its stories are exclusively online. McGraw encourages writers to include their voice and opinions, yet remain accessible and relatable to the readers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to spark a conversation,â&#x20AC;? McGraw says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to agree with everything I say. I want the reader to at least think about what is written.â&#x20AC;? For more information, visit rethinkms.org.

Tapping into Technology // by Dustin Cardon

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30

March - April 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Your Coolest Office Toys // by Amber Helsel

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e all know that working in an office can be boring, but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean it has to be. Sometimes the key to giving yourself a better office experience is to have fun, and one key to that is cool toys that either serve a function or are just there because they make you happy. We recently asked local people to show us their favorite office toys on Instagram. Here are some of the submissions.

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Now Carry McDade’s With You Wherever You Go! Join the e-Club to get our ads and specials in your InBox!

McDade’s Market App See our latest ads and specials, find out what’s cooking at our hot food bar and get special alerts.

McDade’s Wine & Spirits App Learn about new arrivals, special tasting events, live music and more.


March -April

2015 Aladdin

p 39

Bonny Blair’s Pub

p 44

BRAVO!

p 35

Broad Street Bakery

p 35

Cherokee Inn

p 42

Fenian’s

p 40

Green Room

p 41

Hal & Mal’s

p 36

Hickory Pit

p 38

Iron Horse

p 40

Jaco’s Tacos

p 39

La Finestra

p 43

Mangia Bene

p 35

McB’s

p 37

Mellow Mushroom

p 41

Mississippi Legends

p 37

Ole Tavern

p 38

One Block East

p 37

The Penguin

p 37

Pig & Pint

p 36

Rooster’s

p 42

Sal & Mookie’s

p 35

Sal & Phil’s

p 43

Steve’s

p 42

T’ Beaux’s

p 41

Underground 119

p 34

Vasilio’s

p 43

Menu Guide (pages 33-44) is a paid advertising section. For these and more visit

www.jfpmenus.com


M34

January - February 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


THE BEST LOC AL DINING — IN JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI

WHEN IN ROME… The best way to experience Jackson is to do like the locals do! For the best food, the best atmosphere, and a true taste of Jackson — the locals know the best places to go. Ask around — one of our award-winning restaurants is sure to make the list!

ITALIAN RESTAURANT & BAR

PASTA & SEAFOOD BEEF, PORK, VEAL WOOD-FIRED PIZZA SALADS & ANTIPASTO FULL BAR & LOUNGE #1 WINE LIST

NEW YORK PIZZAS PASTA & PANINI SUBS & BURGERS SOUPS & SALADS DESSERT SCOOP SHOP FULL BAR & LOUNGE

TRUE BAKERY BEST BREAKFAST SANDWICHES & SALADS QUICHES & SOUPS PASTRY & DESSERTS COFFEE SHOP WI-FI

I-55 N @ Northside Dr (E)

565 Taylor Street

I-55 N @ Northside Dr (W)

upper level

in the

downstairs at

H I S T O R I C

Fondren District Tues-Sat 11:30AM-10PM (close at 9PM Sundays)

Tues-Thurs 11AM-9:30PM Fri-Sat 11AM-10PM, Sun 11AM-9PM

Mon-Thurs, 7AM-8PM Fri-Sat 7AM-9PM, Sun 7AM-3PM

601.982.8111

601.368.1919

601.362.2900

BravoBuzz.com

SalAndMookies.com

BroadStBakery.com

INDOOR / OUTDOOR SEATING • DINE IN / TAKE OUT • CATERING

Visit our websites to view our full menus. Jackson Menu Guide

M35


VOTED IBEST IBIBQ IBEST NEW RESTAURANT IB E S T O F J A C K S O N 2 0 1 5

SMALL PLATES

TACOS

Boudin Balls…5.99 Sausage & Cheese Plate…8.99 Pimento Cheese…5.99 Pork Belly Corn Dogs…7.99

Pulled Pork BBQ Tacos…6.99 Smoked Chicken BBQ Tacos…6.99 Brisket BBQ Tacos…7.99 BBQ Taco Sampler…9.99 (One Pork / One Chicken / One Brisket)

NACHOS Cheddar Cheese / Smokehouse Beans Pickled Onions / Pico de Gallo / Mississippi “Sweet” BBQ Sauce / Sour Cream

Pulled Pork Nachos…8.99 Smoked Chicken Nachos…8.99 Brisket Nachos…9.99

SALADS BLT Salad…8.99 House Salad...5.99 Smoked Chicken Caesar...9.99

IB U R G E R S & SANDWICHES

‘QUE PLATES Choice of 2 sides: Collard Greens / Fries / Smoked Tomato Cole Slaw / Potato Salad / Pasta Salad Smokehouse Beans / Pork Rinds / Side Salad

Brisket Plate…14.99 Smoked Chicken Plate…11.99 Pulled Pork Plate…11.99 Pepsi-Cola Glazed Baby Back Ribs Full Slab…25.99 Half-Slab…14.99 ‘Que Sampler Platter…16.99 Pulled Pork / Hereford Brisket Pulled Chicken

Choice of 1 side: Collard Greens / Fries / Smoked Tomato Cole Slaw / Potato Salad / Pasta Salad Smokehouse Beans Pork Rinds / Side Salad

Boudin Burger…10.99 Fried Green Tomato BLT…8.99 ( A d d P u l l e d P o rk o r S m o k e d C h i ck e n … 1 . 9 9 A d d B ri s k e t … 2 . 9 9 ) Smoked Chicken Salad Sandwich…8.99 Bacon Melt…10.99 BBQ Sandwich…8.99 (Choice of Pulled Pork or Smoked Chicken) Brisket BBQ Sandwich...9.99 The P&P Reuben ... 9.99

M36

DESSERTS The Famous “Parker House” White Chocolate & Cranberry Bread Pudding…3.99 Bananas Foster Pudding…3.99

3139 N STATE ST, JACKSON PIGANDPINT.COM

(601) 326-6070

January - February 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


P ENGUIN DAILY SPECIALS S ERVED FROM 11:00 AM -3:00 PM $10 ( INCLUDES ICED TEA ) TUESDAY

Central Mississippi restaurant group... serving up great food, cold beverages, live music and lots of fun!

Fried chicken, turnip greens, macaroni and cheese

WEDNESDAY

s

Beef Brisket, mashed potatoes and butter beans

THURSDAY

Smothered Pork, rice and southern green beans

FRIDAY

642 Tombigbee St. Jackson, MS (601) 944-0203

Fried Catfish, cole slaw and French fries Neck Bones, turnip greens and macaroni & cheese BBQ Baby Back Ribs, baked beans and potato salad $13 Half Rack/$20 Rack

APPETIZER FAVORITES

BURGERS & SANDWICHES

Gulf Shrimp Crab Cakes Tomatoes Juanita Chicken Drummettes Smoked Jerk Chicken Wings Spinach Roasted Red Pepper Quesadilla Crawfish Eggplant Napoleon Pork Dumplings

“Hot Dog Special” Pulled Chicken Wrap The Penguin Dog Pressed Club Sandwich Penguin Burger Turkey Burger

SALADS Tossed Caesar Salad Penguin Salad Vegetarian Salad

DINNER ENTREES Hickory Smoked Apple Pork Chop Roasted Chicken Vermicelli Pasta Duck Confit in Orange Sauce Herb Encrusted Sirloin Chicken Neely Blackened Catfish Roasted Garlic Encrusted Salmon Ribeye Steak

SOUPS Gumbo Soup of the day

PENGUIN DESSERTS Turtle Cheesecake New York Cheesecake Bourbon Pecan Pie Strawberry Shortcake Brownie w/Ice Cream, Red Velvet Cake Bread Pudding

LUNCH ENTREES Roasted Chicken Vermicelli Pasta Chicken Neely Blackened Catfish Chicken and Waffle Roasted Garlic Encrusted Salmon Country Fried Ribeye Steak Consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish or eggs may increase your risk of food borne illness. Please inform your server if you have any food allergies or special dietary needs. The Penguin Restaurant adds an automatic 18% gratuity to all parties of 7 or more. Please allow additional time to close out separate checks for large parties.

815 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland, MS (601) 956-8362

1100 John R. Lynch Street Suite A | Jackson, MS 769.251.5222 thepenguinms.com

Jackson Menu Guide

5352 Lakeland Drive Flowood, MS (601) 919-1165

www.goodeatsgroup.net M37


We sell BBQ Pork, Beef, Ribs, Chicken, Ham & Turkey by the pound! Sandwiches Extra Fixin’s BBQ Chicken (chopped w/ slaw relish) Garlic Bread ............................. .95 ..................................................... 6.35 Brunswick Stew w/ homemade BBQ Pork (chopped w/ slaw relish) cornbread: 1/2 pint - 5.45, pint - 9.10, ..................................................... 5.45 1/2 gallon - 29.05, gallon - 54.45 BBQ Beef (chopped w/ slaw relish) .................................................... 5.80

Assorted Potato Chips .......... 1.10

Special Sandwich Platter ...... 9.45 (BBQ Chicken, Pork, Beef, Ham, Hamburger, or Turkey Sandwiches. Choice of two fixins: garden salad, slaw, tater salad, home fries, sweet potato fries, onion rings or baked beans)

Homemade Pies

Onion Rings ........................... 3.90 Smoked Ham (lettuce, tomato & mayo) ..................................................... 6.35 Home Fries (fresh cut taters) ... 3.60 with cheese ................................ 7.95 Regular or Sweet Potato Smoked Turkey (lettuce, tomato & mayo) Small Garden Salad .............. 4.70 ..................................................... 6.35 (Come Back, Ranch, or Raspberry with cheese ................................ 7.95 Vinaigrette) Hamburger ............................. 4.75 Chef Salad ............................. 12.55 (lettuce, tomato, mayo, mustard, pickles & onion) with cheese ....... 5.99 (topped with cheddar and swiss cheese, boiled egg, smoked chicken or Double Hamburger ............... 5.99 smoked ham & turkey, with a choice with cheese ................................. 7.99 of Come Back, Ranch or Raspberry Po-Boys your choice of Pork, Chicken, Vinaigrette) Beef, Ham or Turkey (lettuce, tomato, mayo & Ruffles) .......................... 10.45 Tater Salad, Cole Slaw, Baked with cheese ............................... 11.99 Beans, BBQ Sauce: single - 2.45, 1/2 pint - 3.25, pint - 5.45, Grilled Cheese ........................ 4.15 1/2 gallon - 18.50, gallon - 32.95 extra cheese ................................ 1.40

BBQ Plates Choice of 2 of our delicious fixins: garden salad, slaw, tater salad, home fries or baked beans and Texas toast! BBQ Pork (chopped) ............. 12.95 BBQ Beef (chopped) .............. 13.50 Pork Ribs (wet or dry) 1/2 slab ..................................... 16.45 whole slab ................................ 28.55 BBQ Chicken (1/2 cluck) .......... 13.15 Combination (1/2 cluck, 1/2 slab) .................................................. 24.95 BBQ Nachos ........................... 8.99

Lemon or Pecan ..................... 4.80 Hershey Bar ............................ 5.45 Carrot Cake ............................. 5.45 Coconut Cake .......................... 5.45

We also sell Whole Pies and Coconut Cake!

Party Packs Serves 10 Adults .................. 49.85 (2lb. pork or beef or 2 whole chickens; 2 pints beans, 2 pints slaw & 6 slices of Texas toast or 10 buns) 1/2 Party Pack ....................... 26.15 Rib Party Pack (serves 4) ....... 57.35 (2 slabs ribs, 1 pint beans, 1 pint slaw, 1 pint potato salad, 4 slices of Texas toast)

Ask About Our Catering!

Jackson’s Best BBQ JFP’s Best of Jackson

2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012

M38

January - February 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


#ALL5S&OR!LL9OUR 7HO

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2.95 5.49 3.75 4.49 4.49 4.49 4.49 7.59 7.59 8.59

Add meat on your salad for $3.50 Add feta on your salad for $0.50

Appetizers

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3.99 4.99 5.49 5.49 5.49 5.99 5.99 4.79 4.99 5.49

1.95 1.95 1.95 1.65 3.69

Entrees

served with salad, hummus, rice and white or whole wheat pita bread

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M39


Phone 601-948-0055 Fax 601-948-1195 KITCHEN HOURS Mon-Thur 4-11pm Fri 4pm - Midnight Saturday 4pm - Midnight

Appetizers

Burgers

A traditional Celtic staple.

Mushroom Swiss Burger $9

Scotch Egg $5 (Allow 15 min.)

Irish Nachos $8

Chicken & Chips $6 Fish & Chips $7

Fried Cheese Balls $6

Bacon Wrapped Stuffed Jalapenos $6 Fried Dill Slices $4

Pub Burger $8

Chilli Cheese Burger $9

Bleu Cheese & Bacon Burger $9 Fried Egg Burger $9 Western Burger $9

Scotch Egg Burger $9

Shepherd’s Pie Burger $10 Reuben Burger $10

& Cheese Platter $9

Sandwiches

Corned Beef Slider Basket $7

Buff alo Chicken $8

Basket O’ Chips $3

Pub Club $8

Grilled Sausage Slider Basket $7

Chicken & Cheese $8

Basket O’ Okra $3

Hawaiian Chicken $8

Salads

Bookmaker $9

House Salad $5 large $8

Add a grilled chicken breast $3

Chef Salad $9

Caesar Salad $5 large $7

Add a grilled chicken breast $3

Entrees

Shepherd’s Pie $10

Blackened Tilapia Sandwich $9 Reuben $9

Portabella Sandwich $10

Desserts

Irish Bread Pudding $5

Dirty Ice Cream Sandwich $6

Corned Beef & Cabbage $10 Grilled Tilapia Plate $9

Grilled Chicken Plate $9

Irish Boxties Reuben Boxty $10

Shepherd’s Pie Boxty $10 Veggie Boxty $9

Grilled Tilapia Plate $9

HEARTY FOOD. STOUT LIBATIONS . A HUNDRED THOUSAND SALUTATIONS . M40

January - February 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


E H T G

OM RO

REEN

- Pool Is Cool-

Best
of
Jackson
 Winner

Best Place to Play Pool Industry Happy Hour Daily 11pm
-2am

Daily Beer Specials 12pm
-
7pm

Pool
League Mon - Fri Night

• Drink Specials • Burgers • Wings • Full Bar • Gated Parking • Big Screen TV’s League and Team Play Beginners
to
Advanced Instructors
Available

444 Bounds St. Jackson MS

601-718-7665
 Jackson Menu Guide

M41


Fondren Corner | 2906 N. State St. 601.982.2001 | Monday - Saturday 11:00am-9:00pm roostersfondren.com

Sandwiches All sandwiches are served with fresh

lettuce, tomato, pickle, and onions with your choice of white, wheat, or jalapeno cheddar buns baked fresh daily.

BEEF Hamburger

6oz. 8oz.

Cheeseburger Bacon Cheeseburger Mushroom Swiss Burger Jalapeno Cheeseburger

CHICKEN Grilled Chicken Sandwich

6.5 7.75 6.75 8 7.25 8.5 7.25 8.5 7.25 8.5

Fried Chicken Sandwich Chicken Club Chicken Mushroom Swiss Chicken Jalapeno

6 6 6.5 6.5 6.5

Bacon, melted cheddar, and topped with two onion rings

11.25

Sautéed mushrooms, butter, and parmesan

Mushroom Chicken Cutlet

STEVE’S BOX LUNCHES

Made from the freshest ingredients and include a sandwich or wrap of your choice, side item, and one of our famous fresh-baked cookies.

Side Item Choices

Miss Vickie’s Chips, Baked Lay’s Chips, Pretzels, Sugar-Free Fruit Cup, Lemon Dijon Pasta Salad, or Cole Slaw.

Oven-roasted turkey breast, smoked ham, or chicken salad sandwich on house-baked focaccia, croissant or wheat bread.

One 1/2 lb. Angus ground chuck hamburger steak with choice of two sides Classic Hamburger Steak 10.75 Brown gravy and sautéed onions Swiss Steak 10.75 Sautéed mushrooms and melted Swiss Bacon Cheddar Steak 11

Plates

DON’T WORK HARDER FOR LUNCH.

Club Box | $9.75 per person

Oven-roasted turkey breast, smoked ham, bacon & provolone on house-baked focaccia, croissant or wheat bread.

Wrap Box | $9.75 per person

Chicken Club Wrap, Smoked Brisket, Sausalito Wrap, Area 51, or Mediterranean Wrap on wheat or sun-dried tomato tortilla

QUICHE BOX LUNCHES

Thinking outside the box? Looking for a sandwich alternative? How about a slice of our hand-made quiche with a salad or a cup of one of our famous soups. Vegetarian options always available.

Quiche & Greens Box | $10.75 per person

9.75

5 oz. pan-broiled chicken breast topped with sautéed mushrooms and Swiss. Choice of two sides.

One slice of quiche; field greens salad with dressing; and a fresh-baked cookie.

Quiche & Soup Box | $10.75 per person

Country Fried Steak 10.75 Topped with white gravy. Choice of two sides Chicken Tenders 9.75

One slice of quiche; 8 oz. cup of soup; and a fresh-baked cookie.

Red Beans & Rice

Small Sandwich Tray | $50

Three tenders with honey mustard. Choice of two sides.

9.5

Topped with smoked sausage, jalapenos and onions. Served with side salad.

Side Orders

Homemade Banana Pudding Cookies M42

SANDWICH TRAYS Eight cut deli sandwiches (turkey breast, ham, chicken salad). Feeds 8 – 12

Large Sandwich Tray | $73

Twelve cut deli sandwiches, Feeds 12-18

2 Curly Fries 2 Cole Slaw Green Beans 2 Mac & Cheese 2.75 Onion Rings 2.75 Mashed Potatoes 2 Baked Beans 2 Extra Toppings .5 Side Salad 3.25 Red Beans & Rice 2 .5 Rice & Gravy 2 Extra Sauces

Desserts

One Of The Many Reasons You Keep Coming Back!

Metro Deli Box | $8 per person

Hamburger Steaks

Parmesan Steak

YOU WORK HARD.

2.25 1.25

Custom Catering | Starts at $12 per person Hot lunches served buffet style with tea and desert. 125 S. Congress St. | Capital Towers T:601-969-1119 F: 601-969-7058 200 S. Lamar St. | City Centre North T: 601-714-5683 F: 601-714-6989 www.StevesDowntown.com Steve@StevesDowntown.com Catering@StevesDowntown.com

January - February 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

The Original

Comeback Dressing

Voted Number One by Delta magazine.

$6.99

per bottle + tax Available only at The Cherokee.

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson jxnmenus.com


Vasilios

AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

U.S. Farm Raised Catfish•All Shrimp North American Gulf Shrimp•WE ALSO SELL FRESH GAMBINOS BREAD FROM NEW ORLEANS APPETIZERS LUNCH SPECIALS Tuesday through Friday Only Crabmeat Stuffed Served 11:00 am - 2:00 pm Jalapeños (5) 5.50 with salad bar add 1.00 Fried Crabclaws 9.95 Fish Plate (french fries & Fried Crawfish Tails 8.95 hushpuppies) 7.99 Crabcakes (2 large) 7.95 Pork Chop Plate (rice Oysters on Half Shell w/gravy & squash) 7.99 1/2 doz. 6.95 doz. 10.95 Red Beans & Rice (sauFried Pickles 3.75 sage & bread) 7.99 Onion Rings 4.49 Chicken Fried Steak 7.99 SOUPS & SALADS Grilled Red Snapper (new All salads served on a bed of potatoes & squash) 7.99 lettuce with cherry tomatoes Boiled Popcorn Shrimp 8.75 Stuffed Flounder (new Fried Popcorn Shrimp 8.75 potatoes & squash) 7.99 Fried Crawfish Tails 9.50 6 Fried Jumbo Shrimp Crabmeat (Lump) 10.95 (new potatoes & squash) 7.99 Fried Chicken Salad 7.95 PLATES Oyster Salad 10.95 All FRIED and served with Seafood Gumbo french fries and salad Cup 3.95 Bowl 6.25 bar. Baked potato served after 5:00 pm. French bread Crawfish Ettoufee Cup 3.95 Bowl 6.25 served on request. Trio (8 shrimp, 4 oysters, 3 Red Beans & Rice 14.50 Cup 3.95 Bowl 6.25 catfish) Combo PO-BOYS (10 shrimp, 3 catfish) 12.95 Served on Gambinos New Orleans french bread Combo Add .50 for swiss, american, (8 oysters, 3 catfish) 14.95 or provolone cheese Shrimp (10) & Oysters (6) Sal’s Supreme (roast beef, ham & cheese) 9.50 Stuffed Shrimp (5) 13.95 11.95 Roast Beef 8.50 Shrimp (15) 12.95 Veal Cutlet 7.25 Oysters (12) 14.95 Hamburger 6.25 (6) 12.95 Ham 6.25 Catfish Stuffed Crab (2) 11.95 Ham & Cheese 7.25 Soft Crab Chicken Strip 6.75 (1 - inShell season) 12.95 Smoked Sausage 6.75 Tails 11.95 Oyster 10.95 Crawfish Popcorn Shrimp Shrimp 9.50 Chicken Strips (4) 11.95 7.50 Catfish 9.25 Seafood Platter 15.95 Crawfish Tails 9.25 (3 catfish filets, 8 shrimp, 4 Soft Shell Crab (in season) oysters, and 2 stuffed shrimp) 10.95 BEVERAGES Crab Cake 8.75 Soft Drinks, Tea, Fried Grouper or Lemonade 1.75 Red Fish 9.50 & Domestic Beer 3.00 Muffuletta 4.00 Half 7.45 Whole 12.95 Import Beer EXTRAS BOILED SHRIMP 10 Large 5.99 French Fries 1.75 18 Large 9.25 Baked Potato 1.75 30 Large (with salad bar) 1.50 13.50 Hushpuppies DESSERTS Chips 0.95 Cobbler (with vanilla ice (only after 5) 2.95 cream add 0.50) 2.25 Pasta Fried/Grilled Squash 2.49 Homemade Bread 2.95 Pudding 3.50 Salad Bar

Mon - Fri 11am - 2pm 5 - 10pm Sat 5 - 10pm

BOILED AND LIVE CRAWFISH

828 Hwy 51, Madison

6600 Old Canton Road • 601-957-1188 Tues - Thurs 11am - 9pm • Fri - Sat 11am - 10pm Sun 11am - 8pm • CLOSED MONDAYS TAKEOUT: Call ( 601) 957-1188 OR Fax: (601) 957-2939

601.853.0028

Jackson Menu Guide

M43


Starters

Blair’s Own Chips & Cheese $6 Irish Nachos $6 Buffalo Cheese Sticks $6 Fried Green Beans $6 Pub Pickles $6 Bonny’s Crabby O’Patties $7 Potato Skins $7 Sausage & Cheese Plate $9 Blarney Stones $7 Fried Mushrooms $6 Starters Sampler $11 Wexford Wings $5

Subscribe for Only

$18*!

Soups 
 
 &
 
 
 
 
 S alads Chopped Chicken Salad $8 Steak Salad $9 Chef Club Salad $8 Crab Cake Salad $10 Caesar Salad $6 Half Size House Salad $4 Soup Of The Day $3/$5 Red Beans & Rice $7

Sandwiches The Dubliner $11 The Ruben $9 The Londoner $9 Po’Boys $9 Belfast Buffalo $8 Cork Club $8 Gouda B.L.T $8 Beli Melt $7 The Farm Boy $9

Burgers

Buddha Gouda $9 Bacon Cheese Sliders $10 Smokehouse $$9 Jerk & Jack $9 Paddy ‘O’ Melt $9 Ploughman $9 Jack & Shroom $9 Black & Bleu $9

PLUS Subscribe to BOOM Jackson and receive $20 in local gift cards from restaurants like:

Pub
 Favorites Fish & Chips $10 Bonny’s Horseshoe $10 Chicken Tenders $7 Shrimp Basket $9 Shepherd’s Pie $10 Hamburger Steak $10 Guinness Pot Roast $9 Corn Beef & Cabbage $10 Bangers & Mash $9

1149 Old Fannin Rd. Brandon (769) 251-0693 11:00am - 12:00am M44

To sign up visit

boomjackson.com/subscribe or call 601-362-6121 x16

* $18 covers shipping and handling for six bimonthly issues of BOOM Jackson magazine.

January - February 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

45


DRINKS // craft

TRIP BURNS

Dylan Broome and Larry Voss opened LD’s Beer Run in December 2014.

I

n the song “Let’s Have a Party,” Elvis Presley sings, “Send ‘em to the store, and let’s buy some more.” He could have been talking about LD’s Beer Run. Owners Larry Voss, 56, and Dylan Broome, 42, are self-described “beer geeks, not beer snobs.” They opened LD’s Beer Run the day after Christmas in 2014. The store currently offers more than 300 beer options ranging from domestic brews such as Budweiser to craft beers such as those from Abita Brewing Company and Lucky Town Brewing Company. “I want people to say that if LD’s doesn’t have it, then likely no one else has it, either,” Voss says. LD’s encourages customers to buy a single beer to try it. “I think it helps people that may be unsure about spending the money on an entire six-pack, but are curious about craft beer,” Broome says.

“I love when guys come in and buy a domestic like Colt 45, then try a craft beer.” “We are trying to educate people about craft beer,” Voss says. “People read about it all the time and are curious. A few years ago, I didn’t know much about beer variety. We welcome anyone who wants to try something new, or simply just wants the beer they’ve always enjoyed.” Variety seems to be the basis for everything LD’s offers. The store has a large walk-in cooler in addition to a growler station. They even offer potato chips from Virginia called Route 11. Plus, customers can purchase kegs for parties and events. LD’s Beer Run (5006 Parkway Drive, 769.208.8686) is open Sunday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. For more information, look for the store on Facebook and Twitter.

TRIP BURNS

Dylan Broome and Larry Voss opened LD’s Beer Run in December 2014.

xx

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


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F

ood is a spiritual experience for south- sales annually, a question came to mind: If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s erners. But until Jim Hatten launched such a big business, why do you never see adverthe Mississippi BBQ Trail last June, his tisements? And how big could it be if you did? career path went nowhere near food. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The cool mom-and-pop places that everyFollowing about six years of active duty in one wants to visit canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to advertise down the street,â&#x20AC;? Hatten says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My research shows that the Air Force, Hatten attended a number of colleges, including Weber State University; Utah around 22 percent of these places have a website. State University, where he earned an avionics Some had a Facebook page, but they were not being maintained.â&#x20AC;? He maintenance license in also surveyed eight 1984; Mississippi State restaurant-review University, where he websites and found earned a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a startling lack of reof arts and sciences views. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That gap is in philosophy and rewhere the inspiration ligion in 1988; and the came to me,â&#x20AC;? he says. Iliff School of Theology, where he earned Hatten took that a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of divinity inspiration and cre// by Carmen Cristo degree in 1990. ated the Mississippi BBQ Trail, an affordIn 2009, Hatten able three-tier adveropened a consulting tising system for the firm, the Jim Hatten stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diverse beef School of Manageand pork offerings. ment, until a series of devastating injuries left Because of the him unable to work. lack of online resourcHatten was evicted es in an increasingly from his apartment digital market, the and was homeless website came first. It for four months. The contains a list of 90 U.S. Department of barbecue joints on Veterans Affairs took the â&#x20AC;&#x153;trailâ&#x20AC;? with adhim in, helped him get dresses and phone healthy and gave him a numbers. The joints scholarship to go back populate a digital barto school. This series becue map of Missisof events set him on sippi. Getting on the Jim Hatten began the Mississippi BBQ a brand-new pathâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a list is a process that Trail as a way to get the word out about trail, if you will. involves verifying a libarbecue joints around the state. cense, health departHatten enrolled ment certificate and at Hinds Community College in Raymond in 2013, graduating with an ability to give receipts. In the future, customers associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in marketing management will be able to stack up receipts to qualify for discounts and awards. The second advertising tool technologies last year. During that time, he stumbled across an he plans is a print guide with information about interesting concept while completing home- the restaurants. Selling the Magnolia Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best work. As he contemplated building a grill from a barbecue sauces online is the third component 5,000-gallon steel tank for a resort development, and the way Hatten, 55, hopes to attract visitors he found an article about the feral hog epidemic from outside the state. in the South and solutions to combat it. Hatten The ultimate goal is connecting consumers wondered how he and the barbecue-loving food with local businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to show people not culture could play a part in keeping these wild anonly how good this food is, but how fun these imals from destroying local farms and ranches. places are and how cool these people really are,â&#x20AC;? He spent months researching the barbecue Hatten says. business. When Hatten found that Mississippi For more information, visit msbbqtrail.com brought in about $75 million in beef and pork or find the Mississippi BBQ Trail on Facebook.

Follow the

Mississippi

TRIP BURNS

BBQ Trail

TRIP BURNS

Lauren Davis of LurnyDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grille serves hungry downtowners on the go.

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Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

47


Coolest Offices

Fashion info, see page 54 48

March - April 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Photographer: Tate K. Nations Stylist: Ebony Robinson Styling assistants: Amber Jefferson, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nearia Williams Makeup artist: GlamourACE Allure Artistry Hair stylist: Amy Robinson boomjackson.com


Left to right: Danielle Joseph, Shequeena Brown, Nicholas Prowell

Barefield Workplace Solutions doubles as a showroom for sleek and modern office furniture.

Fashion info, see page 54

Coolest Office Modern:

Barefield Workplace Solutions // by Tommy Burton

S

howing other offices how to become cool workspaces is at the core of what Barefield Workspace Solutions does. It stands to reason that their office serves as a model for what defines a cool workspace (and was even the setting for a BOOM Jackson “Mad Men” party a few years back). “We call our office a ‘design center,’” says owner Paul Maczka, 49. “We show clients the potential of their own offices with our own working showroom. People can imagine what tools are available to them.” Barefield offers products that run the gamut in order to achieve a better office. It has everything from lighting and flooring down to paper products and coffee. Since it opened

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

in 1946, the company has witnessed how work environments have changed. “In today’s work environment, I’ve found that people are connected through technology,” Maczka says. “But what really matters is how we connect with other people. Everything is enhanced by the spirit of collaboration.” Barefield sets an example by presenting an office that is both modern and forward thinking, as well as one that brings its employees closer together, with sleek furniture, bright colors and some of the latest office technology. “Most innovation doesn’t begin with just one person,” Maczka says. For more information, visit barefieldandcompany.com.

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Coolest Offices

Shequeena Brown’s fashion info, see page 54 Broadband Voice, in the Dickies Building in downtown Jackson, keeps a laid-back dynamic in its office with aspects such as ping-pong tournaments on Fridays and a cushy sofa to kick back on.

Coolest Office

Understated Elegance:

Broadband Voice

I

// by Micah Smith

t’s a tired saying: “The most important thing to consider is location, location, location.” But for telecommunications company Broadband Voice, finding the great office space in Jackson helped the business grow without losing its relaxed environment. When CEO Gary Watts founded Broadband in 2006, its first headquarters was in the old WorldCom building in Clinton. Once the company had taken off, though, he felt that they should be closer to the heart of Jackson. In 2013, he reached out to his friend Mike Peters of Peters Real Estate. Knowing Watts’ personality and the friendly culture of Broadband, Peters showed him the old Dickies garment factory on South President Street, even though Peters wasn’t affiliated with the property. When Watts entered the warehouse-like building, he immediately knew it was a perfect fit for his casual, customer service-

Fashion info, see page 54 48

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

focused business, which provides phone and Internet services for local businesses. Laura Johns, vice president of marketing and corporate development for Broadband, says that the office’s interesting look is a bonus, but what makes Broadband a truly great place to work is the people. “We all are friends, and we all have social outings,” she says. “We really like to come together and have a good amount of social time. We feel like that balances the work environment and makes it fun.” Broadband’s staff works hard to make sure that its clients have the best service possible, but they also have a good time when the opportunity arises. Whether it’s in-office ping-pong tournaments or Director of Reporting and Finance Christopher Goolsby’s annual funny personalized awards, Broadband Voice is every bit as lively as its hometown. Photographer Tat For more information, visit voice.ms. Stylist Ebony xxx xxx xx

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Danielle Joseph’s fashion info, see page 54 Broadband’s cavernous space gives staffers room to breathe. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

49


COURTESY IMS ENGINEERING

Coolest Offices At press time, IMS Engineers was remodeling its office, located on Amite Street.

Coolest Office

Honorable Mention:

IMS Engineers

T

// by Adria Walker

he usual trope for engineers is that they live, breathe and think technology. People might expect an office of engineers to be full of people with thick glasses and empty coffee cups hunched over their respective computers or discussing a seemingly unsolvable equation around a whiteboard. If you’re expecting this type of engineering firm, you should avoid Integrated Management Services. Since CEO John Calhoun and COO Rod Hill founded IMS in 1996, the company has simultaneously inspired innovative engineers while also pulling off the appearance of a stylish, modern workplace. “My favorite part about working here is that it’s a black-owned engineering firm,” says Ron Williams, a marketing support specialist who has been with IMS for more than a year. “I’m hands-on with 52

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

the CEO (Calhoun) and the COO (Rod Hill). At 24 years old, it’s a blessing to be able to be that closely involved in a multimillion-dollar, black-owned engineering firm.” Aside from the accessibility to his superiors, Williams praises IMS’ unique offices as one of the company’s “cool” factors. “It’s very contemporary,” he says. “If you walk around the office, you will see 100 different colors. Not everybody can be an engineer. What makes IMS different is the mindset to be able to actually design things and make the world go round by building infrastructure.” At press time, IMS Engineers was undergoing construction. The photos for this story show how the office looked before the remodel. We can’t wait to see the next version. For more information on IMS Engineers, visit imsengineers.com. boomjackson.com


Coolest Offices

Image Management: A Fundamental Key to Success // by Ebony Robinson

More Than a Gold Star // by Ronni Mott

H

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

Urban-planning gurus Ramina Aghili and Arash Ghahramani, a 2014 BOOM Jackson power couple, project a powerful image. ceive you. It is the aura and lasting impression that is either noticed or unnoticed before people know you and your potential. People make snap judgments of you on first sight. Whether this is fair or not, many doors can be opened or closed based on a stranger’s perception of you within the first

few seconds of meeting you. In other words, your image is saying something, and that something has either a positive or negative influence on your ability to achieve your personal or professional goals. Therefore, it’s smart and essential that you project a winning image and a personal brand that creates a powerful first impression regardless of your goals, occupation or background. In any kind of workplace, image can be a powerful ally. For those who struggle with style choices, an image consultant can be a valuable resource. They have become quite affordable and increasingly available. An image coach can help you clearly define your personal style and brand, and he or she can also help you build an appropriate and budget-friendly wardrobe that is fresh, current and consistent with your lifestyle, preferences and objectives. Because you are your most important business card, take the initiative to be seen, heard, and understood.

Show, don’t tell. Leaders strive to model positive behaviors while continuously improving themselves. Great companies understand that nothing is more powerful than managers who demonstrate and teach what they know— with employees who are open to learning it. “Human Resources” is more than a title. Top companies use HR people to engage management and workers and hold both accountable. Great HR folks recognize untapped

potential and are active advocates. People know what management expects. Leaders define goals in concert with their employees’ capabilities. No mission statement takes the place of achievement. People want to make a difference. Empower them to. Leaders take responsibility. It’s management’s job to ensure that its widgets meet a need and profit—and keep workers trained and focused on that bottom line. Blaming a downturn on forces outside a worker’s sphere of influence is a morale buster. Trust, support and then hold people accountable. The best people to solve issues are those dealing with them. Exemplary companies empower teams to make decisions, and then follow up on results. Reward excellence. Great companies reward examples of quality at all levels, making mediocrity the enemy. Great workplaces have terrific people. The goal of an engaged, healthy workforce requires leaders who are engaged and healthy. They To have an office full of healthy, productive people, hire good people who want to contribit’s important to continually improve the overall ute, and then help them shine. culture of the office and model a learning mindset. FLICKR/JUSTIN

ealthy, happy people are more productive. That’s a given. Over the past decades, companies have taken steps to offer workers wellness programs and incentives to take better care of themselves. But it’s not just gym memberships and heathier diets that make for happier workers. It’s also about creating a daily culture where employees are motivated to reach higher and higher goals, while engaging and enjoying the work in front of them. A great way to do that is to urge every employee to become a leader in creating that culture—and ensure that every leader, starting with the CEO, work to contribute to that healthy, engaged workplace. In April 2013, Gallup Business Journal surveyed 32 Gallup Great Workplace Award-winning companies and compared their cultures to hundreds of firms that didn’t win. Here’s what they found in winning companies.

TATE K. NATIONS

A

s we trade our warm, bulky coats for the playful, lightweight styles of the season, it is an opportune time to spring into action with new goals and plans. Instead of focusing on temporary objectives that may not last as long as the season, why not make space for a long-lasting transformation? Start by answering three very important questions: Am I getting the results I expect in life? Does my current image project who I am on the inside? Do I look like a credible (insert your occupation or passion)? If you answered no to any of those questions, don’t worry. You can take the necessary steps today to reposition yourself and your personal brand in a way that reveals individuality, builds confidence, and ultimately, produces results. The answer lies in the remarkably rewarding process of image management and communication. That leads us to the next question: What exactly is image? Image is how others per-

53


Discover

the colors of Spring at

Renaissance.

Coolest Offices

Fashion Information // by Ebony Robinson

Barefield Workplace Solutions

Great Scott Shinola watch, $550, Great Scott Linen pocket square, $75, Great Scott Chelsea boot, $290, Great Scott Moore and Giles duffle bag, $810, Great Scott

pp 48-49 Danielle Joseph Mink Pink crepe boxy tank, $49, Libby Story Bec & Bridge striped skirt, $231, Mulberry Dreams Anna & Ava earrings, $5.25, Dillard’s Steve Madden floral pump, $89.99, Dillard’s Shequeena Brown Bec & Bridge dress , $268, Mulberry Dreams Earrings, $8, Fondren Muse Gianni Bini sandals, $31.49, Dillards

Your Fashion Destination

Offering the finest national and local retailers.

Allure Plastics ■ Altar’d State ■ Angie’s ■ Ann Taylor ■ Ann Taylor Loft ■ Another Broken Egg Café ■ Anthropologie ■ The Apple Store ■ Aqua The Day Spa ■ At West End ■ BankPlus ■ Barnes & Noble Booksellers ■ Barnette’s Salon ■ BellaChes Specialty Gifts ■ Biaggi’s Ristorante Italiano ■ Brooks Brothers ■ C Spire Wireless ■ Caché ■ Charming Charlie ■ Chico’s ■ Chop’d Salad & Potato Bistro ■ Ethan Allen Furniture ■ Five Guys Burgers and Fries ■ Francesca’s Collection ■ Free People ■ The Fresh Market Gingersnaps ■ GNC ■ Amy’s Hallmark ■ The Hyatt Place Hotel I.O. Metro Furniture ■ J. Crew ■ J. Jill ■ Jolly Orthodontics Judith Lee’s ■ Justice for Girls ■ L’Occitane En Provence Learning Express Toys ■ Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry ■ Lemon Meringue ■ Libby Story ■ The Little Gym ■ Lucky Brand Jeans Material Girls ■ Merle Norman ■ Mint the Restaurant ■ The Orvis Company ■ Oswego Jewelers ■ P.F. Chang’s China Bistro Pink Bombshell ■ Portrait Innovations ■ Red Square Clothing Co Regus ■ Ridgeland Visitors Center ■ Runway Seven ■ Ruth’s Chris Steak House ■ Sand Dollar Lifestyles ■ Scottrade Seafood R’evolution ■ Sephora ■ SleepStore by Miskelly Smoothie King ■ Solstice Sunglass Boutique ■ Soma Intimates Starbucks Coffee Shop ■ Sweet Peppers Deli ■ Talbots The Headache Center ■ Traditional Jewelers ■ Vintage Wine Market ■ White House/Black Market ■ Williams-Sonoma FIND US ON FACEBOOK

I-55 at Old Agency Road, Ridgeland, Mississippi | 601.519.0900 See all our retail stores and restaurants online at www.RenaissanceAtColonyPark.com For leasing information, contact The Mattiace Company at 601.352.1818. 54

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Nicholas Prowell Eton shirt, $265, Great Scott Peter Millar pants, $125, Great Scott Martin Dingman belt, $135, Great Scott Paisley tie, $175, Great Scott Bresciani socks ,$40, Great Scott To Boot New York Milford Suede Oxfords, $350, Great Scott

Broadband Voice pp 50-51 Shequeena Brown Joy Joy striped dress, $123.99, Frolic Boutique Jessica Simpson pumps, $79, Dillard’s Nicholas Prowell Canalli blazer, $1,395, Great Scott Stone Rose multi-colored shirt, $165, Great Scott Baldwin Reed Nicholas jean, $275,

Danielle Joseph Ellison dress, $44.99, Frolic Boutique Rhinestone statement necklace, $34, Libby Story Gianni Bini wedge sandals, $98, Dillard’s Hayden satchel, $498, Arco Avenue

Styling Team Stylist: Ebony Robinson, lead fashion merchandising instructor at Hinds Community College Styling Assistants: Amber Jefferson and D’Nearia Williams, fashion merchandising students at Hinds Community College Hair: Amy Robinson Makeup: GlamourACE Allure Artistry Fashion Coordinator: Amber Helsel The fashion merchandising program at Hinds Community College prepares students for successful careers in retail, fashion marketing and styling.

Special thanks

Zilpha Young, Barefield Workplace Solutions, Broadband Voice, Tate K. Nations, Ebony Robinson, Amber Jefferson, D’Nearia Williams, Amy Robinson, GlamourACE Allure Artistry, Drew Dempsey, Graham Stauffer, Michael Rivers, Mulberry Dreams, Arco Avenue, Frolic Boutique, Dillard’s, Fondren Muse, Libby Story and Great Scott.

Where 2 Shop

Mulberry Dreams (3026 N. State St., 601.559.7074, mulberrydreams.com) Fondren Muse (3413 N. State St., 601.345.1155) Dillard’s (1200 W. County Line Road, Ridgeland, 601.957.7100, dillards.com) Frolic Boutique (110 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland, 601.856.9600) Libby Story (1000 Highland Parkway, Suite 5003, Ridgeland, 601.717.3300; 306 University Drive, Starkville, 662.232.1426) Arco Avenue (1107 Highland Colony Pkwy., Ridgeland, 601.724.4627, arcoavenue.com) Great Scott (4400 Old Canton Road, 601.984.3500, greatscott.net)

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Business Law Construction Law Government Contracts Commercial Litigation Economic Development Carson Law Group, PLLC Capital Towers 125 S. Congress Street Suite 1336 - Jackson, MS 601.351.9831 thecarsonlawgroup.com

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55


Do-Gooders // give

Training Healthy Mississippians

Living Local,

Giving Global // by Zachary Oren Smith

E\0D\D0LOOHU

TRIP BURNS

Tara Hunter directs Girls on the Run of Central Mississippi, a nonprofit that offers after-school activities and running lessons for girls in 3rd to 8th grade. EHJDQZDONLQJWKURXJKWKHLUQHLJKERUKRRG$IWHU DZKLOH+XQWHUGHFLGHGWRERRVWKHUH[HUFLVH URXWLQHDQGWU\UXQQLQJ1RZVKHKDVUXQPRUH WKDQKDOIPDUDWKRQVDQGVL[IXOOPDUDWKRQV  ³(YHU\RQHWHOOVPH¾<RXœUHDPD]LQJ<RX FDQGRDQ\WKLQJœ%XW,œPMXVWOLNH¾1R,œP VWXEERUQœ´VKHVD\V³6RPHRQHVD\V¾<RXFDQœW RUZRQœWGRLWœZHOOWKHQ,œPJRLQJWRGRLW´  ,Q0D\WKH*LUOVRQWKH5XQZLOOSDUWLFLSDWH LQWKH0DJQROLD0HOWGRZQ.LQ5LGJHODQG:KLOH WKHJLUOVZLOOVSHQGWRZHHNVWUDLQLQJIRU WKHUDFH+XQWHUVD\VLWœVQRWMXVWDERXWUXQQLQJ 6KHKRSHV*LUOVRQWKH5XQZLOOFUHDWHOLIHORQJ KHDOWK\KDELWVDQGSURPRWHVHOIFRQ¿GHQFHDQG ERG\SRVLWLYLW\+XQWHUVD\VWKHSURJUDPLVRSHQ WRJLUOVRIDQ\EDFNJURXQGDQGLQFRPHDQGKHU WHDPLVZLOOLQJWRZRUNZLWKIDPLOLHVWRFRYHUFRVWV  :LWKLQWKHQH[WIHZ\HDUV+XQWHUSODQVWR FRQQHFWZLWKORFDOVFKRROVFRPPXQLW\FHQWHUV DQGFKXUFKHVWRLQFUHDVHHQUROOPHQW'XHWR EXGJHWFRQVWUDLQWVDQGOLPLWHGYROXQWHHUV VKHFDQRQO\DFFHSWDERXWJLUOVWKLV VSULQJ6KHLQYLWHV¿UVWDLGDQG&35FHUWL¿HG YROXQWHHUVWRKHOS*LUOVRQWKH5XQJURZ  )RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQYLVLWJLUOVRQWKHUXQRUJ

56

W

hen she was in the 4th grade, Hallie Darphin loved Beanie Babies. She and her older sister, Hannah, would sit around looking at long stock lists, pointing and saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want this one and this one.â&#x20AC;? Darphin, 23, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember many of her 300 plush animals, but she recalls her motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reaction to her obsession. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My mom was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh my gosh, my kids are spoiled brats,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Darphin recalls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We need to get them out of here.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? That year, her parents took her and Hannah, along with some physical-therapy students, to work at a clinic in Belize for six months. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We went to school in a local village school (and) lived without electricity,â&#x20AC;? Darphin says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew then that I wanted to do something.â&#x20AC;? Darphin wanted to help under-served populations like her mother, Linda, who was a physical therapist. In 2009, she enrolled in Mississippi Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pre-medical program, where she was heavily involved in the campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Laguna social tribe, but after two years, she decided that planning tailgates for football games just wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the â&#x20AC;&#x153;somethingâ&#x20AC;? she was looking for. In her junior year, Darphin took a semester off to work at the Rafiki Foundation in Africa. She was stationed in a small school in southern Uganda one hour from Kampala, the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital. Darphin tutored two children, Disan and Robert, every afternoon. Disan was

March - April 2015 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

in the 6th grade, and his father was a farmer. Before the Rafiki Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free school, he attended irregularly because his family couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford it. Every day, Darphin wore a pair of average Ray-Ban sunglasses. One day, when she took her Ray-Bans off, Disan

for, the something that might define her purpose. In 2012, during her senior year, Darphin enrolled in an entrepreneurship class that required her to write a business plan. She wanted a lasting, community-focused mission. Having seen the effect of edu-

After spending time tutoring children in Uganda, Hallie Darphin decided to begin Dot Products, which sells school supplies and donate the proceeds to Rudi International.

looked at the sunglasses and then back at Darphin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teacher Hallie. Teacher Hallie, I have heard those sunglasses are very expensive. I heard they are 14,000 shillings. I could never afford that,â&#x20AC;? Disan said. Darphin did the math in her head. At the time, 14,000 Ugandan shillings was about $7. Her Ray-Bans cost 20 times that. When she told friends and family about it, they would explain that sunglasses are a luxury good. Of course, Disan couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But $7 would have paid for all the rice (Disanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family) would have eaten for a month,â&#x20AC;? Darphin says. The income inequality between her and Disan troubled Darphin, but it also began to hit on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;somethingâ&#x20AC;? she had been looking

COURTESY CHASE RICHARDSON/FOLLOWELL PHOTOGRAPHY

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cation in Uganda, whatever her company did, she wanted the profits to go toward school fees for underprivileged children. Darphin laid the groundwork for Dot Products, a for-profit business that sells school supplies to raise money for Rudi International in the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Matamoros Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home in Mexico. With each sale, Dot uses a portion of the proceeds to cover the cost of tuition, uniforms and supplies. Although her path has changed quite a bit since her familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s six months in Belize, Darphinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work with Dot helps children just like Disan and Robert. For more information, visit dotproducts.org.

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57

2/9/15 10:07 AM


ARTS // miss eudora EUDORA WELTY

Tribute to a Queen // by Ronni Mott

MMA is recreating several columns from the ruins of the Windsor plantation near Port Gibson to welcome visitors to the Welty Biennial exhibits.

I

f the city of Jackson has arts-and-letters royalty, its queen would tronic constellation sculptures of Mimi Garrard and Jacksonian James surely be Eudora Welty. Born in 1909, Welty was a Pulitzer Prize- Searight, whose mother was a schoolmate of Welty’s. winning author, photographer and keen witness to the social up“These other exhibitions and artworks illuminate things in (Welheaval of the 20th century in Mississippi. She was a steadfast adty’s) writing and really celebrate her through the impact she had and vocate of justice in a time when fair and equal treatment was hardly a the connections between the mediums that exist,” says Julian Rankin, reality for many Mississippians. the MMA’s marketing director. Beginning April 10, Jackson holds a 12-week, city-wide tribute to Mississippian and National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward’s Welty, which features not only her direct contributions, but also things commentary and storytelling accompany the exhibits. in Welty’s life that shaped her and the works of artists she influenced. The Welty Biennial also features a documentary film premiere Centered in the Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson residents and visiand numerous live performances. The film, “I Am John Clarence tors can immerse themselves in the exhibits and events Laughlin,” captures the life and images of the New Orof the first Welty Biennial at no cost. leans artist who many consider the father of surrealist photography. Under the theme “Classical Mississippi,” organizer The theme for the David Kaplan emphasizes Welty’s connection to the In May, the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra presinaugural Welty Biennial is “Classical stars and their stories. In her memoir “One Writer’s Beents “June Recital,” an adaptation of Beethoven’s Fifth PiaMississippi,” which ginnings,” Welty wrote: “The night sky over my childno Concerto setting five Welty short stories to the concert emphasizes Eudora hood Jackson was velvety black. I could see the full constage. And in June, Oscar-winning actor Olympia Dukakis Welty’s connection stellations in it and call their names; when I could read, I is on stage for a reading of Welty’s short story “Asphodel.” to those she knew their myths.” “One of the reasons we’re excited to be part of this is influenced. Mississippi’s myths—her stories and her stars—inbecause it’s not just one institution’s vision or idea,” Rankin spire the biennial. “We want to make a point from the beginsays. “It’s a collaborative effort and a city-wide celebration ning that (Welty) was a kid in Jackson and just from looking up at the sky, that involves different cultural institutions but also the public.” she thought about Greek mythology,” Kaplan told Deep South magazine. Jackson is invited to a dance party June 4, and throughout the biReplicas of the massive Corinthian columns of Windsor will stand ennial, Mississippians are urged to submit their photos to the Snapshot in the museum’s Art Garden, and inside, an exhibition of star-patterned Contest. The winners’ photos will hang in a downtown gallery during the last two weeks of the event. quilts and Clarence John Laughlin’s double-exposed photographs of ruined plantations join Welty’s own unflinching photos of her home state The Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St., 601.960.1515) and its people. Mississippian and National Book Award winner Jesmyn hosts the Welty Biennial, April 10 through July 3, in partnership with Ward’s commentary and storytelling accompany Welty’s words in the Downtown Jackson Partners, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Mississippi and exhibits. At the Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St., Magnolia Health. Events are at various Jackson venues. For additional 601.960.1552), visitors can learn about the stars and view the elecinformation, visit weltybiennial.org. All events are free. 58

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Paint-by-BoomBox TRIP BURNS

// by Greg Pigott

Subscribe for

Only $18*! Since Hunter Davenport began BoomBox Projects in 2012, his experimental painting series has expanded in popularity and scope.

A

few months ago, Hunter Davenport posted a time-lapse video on Facebook of himself creating a sculpture out of vinyl records. In the video, he forms a base of wood and chicken wire. He then begins melting records with a blow dryer onto the frame. In the end, he creates a tall floweresque sculpture made entirely of recycled materials. Davenport did not start out to be an artist. He simply wanted to decorate his apartment in an affordable way. After discovering that he could do more with his talent, he began BoomBox Projects in 2012. After only a few years of making art, he has already sold his works to a number of Jackson shops, such as Lounge Interiors, J Sims Salon and DC Guitar Studio. His love of music inspires many of his quirky creations, which include loud colors and atypical substrates. Davenport’s works at Lounge Interiors and similar venues are often abstract in nature, while other paintings, such as his mural for DC Guitar Studio, incorporate the theme of the client’s business. But even when it comes to his commissioned pieces, Davenport says BoomBox Projects is highly personal and unpredictable. “It allows me to be fun and crazy. That combination (of music and art) is what spawned the name of BoomBox,” he says. “Being featured in DC Guitar Studio has allowed my musicrelated works to (see exposure), but I’m always being spontaneous, with very little structure before I begin working. There’s no telling where I’ll end up. I literally do not see the whole picture until I’m done, and that makes it even more fun.” Davenport says that he will continue to experiment with new brush techniques, textures, surfaces and canvases. “I can be trendy and original at the same time. I can design what people want to see, but I will add my own twist to it,” he says. For more information, find BoomBox Projects on Facebook or Instagram. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

PLUS Subscribe to BOOM Jackson and receive $20 in local gift cards from restaurants like:

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boomjackson.com/subscribe or call 601-362-6121 x16

* $18 covers shipping and handling for six bimonthly issues of BOOM Jackson magazine. 59


MELODIES // spirit COURTESY SYNERGY NIGHTS

Thirty Years to Cynical Twins // by Jason Ray

C

AMBER HELSEL

ynical Twins might be new to the local music scene, but this three-piece band has a rich history that stretches back to the early â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s. Singer and guitarist Jeff Lewis, and bassist and lyricist Sherry Cothren have been writing songs together for the past 30 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any of the music that we have written, I would call it progressive pop,â&#x20AC;? Lewis says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The lyrical content is just above and beyond the usual clichĂŠ garbage.â&#x20AC;? While the members have been friends for decades, Cynical Twins is the first band where they all play together. Cothren and Partridge played in punk bands in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s called The Germans and The Windbreakers. They were kicked out of a local bar called Skidmarks for overturning chairs and playing too loudly. Drummer Joe Partridge and guitarist Jeff Lewis Cothren, Lewis and Partridge began recently joined bassist Sherry Cothren (not playing instruments while they were in pictured) to form Cynical Twins. high school in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s. While they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t retained the punk elements of previous bands, they know how to rock. But all three agree that the lyrics make Cynical Twins what it is. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the human condition,â&#x20AC;? Cothren says. Apart from its lyrics, Cynical Twins has plenty to offer. Lewisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gritty, effervescent guitar licks, infused with Cothrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s raw bass riffs, create a refreshing throwback to â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s-inspired rock. Add Partridgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seamlessly timed beats, and you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss.

Corey Armstrong: Musical Fusion // by Fallon Victoria

J

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SHARETHA JAMISON

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Maranda Joiner collaborated with musician Tiger Rogers for Synergy Nights at The Mediterranean Fish & Grill.

Synergy in the City // by Micah Smith

M

aranda Joiner wanted more from Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open-mic scene. While she enjoyed performing her poetry on occasion, the WJMI radio personality missed the spirit of the Sevens, a midtown event that ran for 11 years. When she met saxophonist Tiger Rogers three years ago, he agreed. When he later approached Joiner about organizing an open-mic event to welcome all of Jackson, Synergy Nights was born. While the turnout for the first event wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t overwhelming, every audience member stayed until midnight, telling stories, reading poems and playing music. The second night, there were 15 people, but after that, the house was packed, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stayed that way ever since. Now held on the second and fourth Saturday of every month from 9 p.m. to midnight at The Mediterranean Fish & Grill (6550 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601-956-0082), Synergy Night is a spectacle to behold. Rogers plays with a rotating quartet, artist Tony Davenport creates a live painting, and Sean Mac deejays. At its core, the event is about presenting raw talent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are going to be times where you have people that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to do so well,â&#x20AC;? Joiner says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then, there are times where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll catch a gem. Somebody will get up there and blow your mind, and you think, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Where in the world have these people been?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? For more information, find Synergy Nights on Facebook and Instagram. boomjackson.com


JOIN US TO CELEBRATE OUR 75TH YEAR

APRIL 6-18, 2015

CATFISH IN THE ALLEY®

Catfish & Blues

April 11

©

75 Years of Exemplary Historic Home Tours and Unparalleled Hospitality go to www.visitcolumbusms.org for complete listing of events 4ENNESSEE7ILLIAMS(OME7ELCOME#ENTERs-AIN3TREETs  sWWWVISITCOLUMBUSMSORG

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

61


Events // sprung

1

“One Man, Two Guvnors” March 1, 2 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). The play is an adaptation of Carlo Goldoni’s Servant of Two Masters.” $28, $22 seniors and students; call 601.948.3533, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com.

2

“The Glass Menagerie” March 2, 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m., at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). At McCoy Auditorium. The Tennessee Williams play is about a man’s struggle to support his family after his father abandons them, and his disabled sister’s preoccupation with glass animal figurines. $10, $5 students with ID; call 979.2121; maddrama.com.

21



Sister Act: Margaret Walker and Eudora Welty March 5, 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m., at Eudora Welty Education and Visitors Center (1109 Pinehurst Place). In honor of Margaret Walker’s centennial, author Carolyn Brown discusses the personal and literary relationships between Margaret Walker and Eudora Welty. Free; call 601.353.7762.

6

Patti LaBelle March 6, 8 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The legendary R&B singer is known for songs such as “Lady Marmalade,” “On My Own” and “If Only You Knew.” Doors open at 7 p.m. Xperience Jxn Entertainment is the host. $49.5-$77.5; call 800.745.3000 (tickets) or 678.322.8098 (information).

4

History Is Lunch March 4, noon1 p.m., at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Ulysses S. Grant Association presents “The Civil War Ends and Reconstruction Begins in Mississippi.” Free; call 601.576.6998; mdah.state.ms.us.

26

Margaret Walker Centennial Lecture March 26, 4 p.m., at Medgar Evers Library (4215 Medgar Evers Blvd.). Poet C. Liegh McInnis of Jackson State University presents “For My People: What the Internationally Famous Poem Has to Say to Young People Today.” Free; call 601.982.2867.

27



Barks, BBQ and Blues March 3, 6 p.m.-9 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Includes all-you-can-eat barbecue, a cash bar, a silent auction and music from The Envelope Pushers. Proceeds benefit Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (CARA). $45 in advance, $55 day of event, $350 table of eight; call 601.209.0667 or 601.826.4968; email arden@ardenland.net; carams.org.

Mal’s St Paddy’s Street Festival March 21, 3:30 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.). Performers include Trombone Shorty, Dumpstaphunk, Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath and Roxy Roca. Gates open at 2:30 p.m. No coolers or pets. $20 in advance, $25 day of show; call 948.0888; email jane@halandmals.com; malsstpaddysparade.com.

9

Spring Break Camp March 9, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). The camp for ages 6-12 includes lessons and activities related to animals and nature. Held daily through March 13. Registration required. $185 or $44 per day, members: $170 or $40 per day; call 601.352.2500; jacksonzoo.org.

19

Museum After Hours Pop-Up Exhibition March 19, 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Includes works from the artists at Mid City Prints and the release of singersongwriter Cody Cox’s new album. Free with cash bar; call 601.960.1515; msmuseumart.org.

ElectroDash 5K March 27, 7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). The nighttime 5K race and dance party is illuminated with lights, lasers and projections. A portion of proceeds benefits Friends of Children’s Hospital and is part of Zippity Doo Dah Weekend. Registration required. $50 on site, discounts for early registration; call 354.6021; electrodash5k. com/race/jackson (use promotional code FONDREN).



Taste of Mississippi March 30, 7 p.m.-10 p.m., at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). Sample cuisine from more than 40 local restaurants. Includes a silent auction, live music and more. Proceeds benefit Stewpot Community Services. For ages 21 and up. $65 in advance, $80 at door; call 982.5861; tasteofms.org.

JACKSON AREA EVENTS UPDATED DAILY AT JFPEVENTS.COM.

POST YOUR OWN EVENTS OR SEND INFO TO EVENTS@BOOMJACKSON.COM

62

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com

COURTESY WIKICOMMONS/PUBLIC DOMAIN; COURTESY WIKICOMMONS/PUBLIC DOMAIN/NYWTS; COURTESY AJC AND THE ENVELOPE PUSHERS; COURTESY WIKICOMMONS/MATHEW BRADY/PUBLIC DOMAIN; COURTESY JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY; NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY; COURTESY WIKICOMMONS/PUBLIC DOMAIN; TRIP BURNS; COURTESY MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART; TRIP BURNS; TRIP BURNS; FLICKR/ GOOD EYE MIGHT; TRIP BURNS

-!2#(


Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Table Cooking School Kids and Teen Camp

2 0 1 5 The Best Summer Yet! June 8th - June 12th June 15th - June 19th Kids Camp 9:00AM - 12:00PM Teen Camp 1:00PM - 4:00PM

What I Did Last Summer July 13th - July 17th July 20th - July 24th Kids Camp 9:00AM - 12:00PM Teen Camp 1:00PM - 4:00PM

Daily Outings Include: Monday- Meet the Chickens Tuesday- Go To the Garden Wednesday- Meet the Butcher Thursday- Tour the Candy Stores Friday- Go Fishing

Kids Camp 5 - 10 Teen Camp 11 - 15 1030 Market Street, Flora, MS 39071       

601.506.6821       Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

]GG%220WZRWKLUG 6XQGD\)HEUXDU\30

63


Events // forward

2

Fondren’s First Thursday April 2, noon, in Fondren. This revamped monthly event is a showcase of the local shops, galleries and restaurants of the Fondren neighborhood. Includes live music, food and vendors. Free; call 601.720.2426; email newfondrenafter5@ gmail.com (artists, crafters and musicians); fondrenafter5.com.

10-12

Crossroads Film Festival April 10-12, at Malco Grandview Cinema (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). Enjoy dozens of independent films, workshops and parties during at the three-day event. Discounts for members, students and seniors. Admission TBA; call 601345.5674; email info@ crossroadsfilmfestival. com; crossroads filmfestival.com.



3

Zoo Brew April 3, 5 p.m.-9 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Enjoy an evening of more than 50 craft beer samples, a wing-eating contest and music. VIP tickets include early admission at 4 p.m., animal encounters and a firkin tapping at 4:30 p.m. For ages 21 and up. $30, $15 designated driver, $60 VIP (includes a keepsake, T-shirt and poster); call 601.352.2580; jacksonzoo.org.



7

Bunny Brunch April 4, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Enjoy a hot breakfast and a picture with the Easter Bunny. $20, $15 members; call 601.981.5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com.

The Rebirth of Dope April 7, 8 p.m., April 14, 8 p.m., April 21, 8 p.m., April 28, 8 p.m., at Soul Wired Cafe (111 Millsaps Ave.). Enjoy soul-infused poetry featuring Mahogany Blue. $5; call 601.863.6378; email teamsoulwiredcafe@gmail. com; soulwiredcafe.com.

NatureFEST! April 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). Includes reptile encounters, watching divers feed the fish in the giant aquarium, guided tours, a dinosaur bone display and more. Included with admission ($4-6); call 601.576.6000; msnaturalscience. org.

14

Fused Glass with Jennifer Thomas April 14, 6 p.m.-8:30 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Learn to make a trivet or a set of coasters. Registration required. $35; call 601.856.7546; email education@mscrafts.org; craftsmensguildofms.org.

15

Mississippi Jubilee April 15, 6 p.m.-8 p.m.April 16, 6 p.m.-8 p.m.April 17, in downtown Jackson. African American music focus opens with a reception at Smith Robertson Museum April 15 from 6-8 p.m., a freedom celebration at the Mississippi Museum of Art April 16 from 6-8 p.m., presentations from renowned historians and more. Free; call 601.576.6800.

18

Sante South Wine Festival April 18, 6:30 p.m., at Renaissance at Colony Park (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). The annual event includes more than 120 wines and food samples from 20 Mississippi restaurants. The VIP tasting is at 6:30 p.m., and the grand tasting is at 7:30 p.m. The festival is a fundraiser for the Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi. $80$250; call 601.987.0200; santesouth.com.

22

JJ Grey & Mofro April 22, 8 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.). The band from Jacksonville, Florida plays several genres of music such as southern rock and R&B. Cocktails at 7 p.m. $22 in advance, $25 at the door, $3 surcharge for patrons under 21; call 601.292.7999; email jane@halandmals.com; ardenland.net.

23

Ultimate Fashion Show and Champagne Brunch April 23, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). Includes refreshments, a fashion show and a car giveaway from Patty Peck Honda. Proceeds benefit Camp Kandu, the Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi’s biannual camp for children with diabetes and their families. $70; call 601.957.7878; msdiabetes.org.



“Just for the Fun of It” April 26, 3 p.m.-4 p.m., at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol St.). The Metropolitan Chamber Orchestra’s concert includes music from artisan Jason Smith on his handmade banjo, audience participation with kazoos and songs such as Haydn’s “Farewell Symphony.” A reception and silent auction follows in the parish hall. Free; call 354.1535; freewebs.com/ metropolitanchamberorchestra.

JACKSON AREA EVENTS UPDATED DAILY AT JFPEVENTS.COM.

POST YOUR OWN EVENTS OR SEND INFO TO EVENTS@BOOMJACKSON.COM

64

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Now enrolling for Summer Camps! Ballet •Tap •Jazz •Competition Dance Teams 4149 South Siwell Road, Jackson, MS 39212 Lcdanceco@yahoo.com (601) 260-7470 •www.lcdanceco.com

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MY LOCAL LIST

10

Serving the City

3 2 4

4

1

5

10 7

6

9

8

1). Orange Peel (422 Mitchell Ave., 601.364.9977) I love the vintage feel and unique style of this local thrift store. They have a great selection of trendy and vintage clothes, shoes, accessories and even a furniture barn out back. 2). La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road, Ridgeland, 601.899.8821) This is my favorite local Mexican restaurant. It is family owned with authentic Mexican food that is affordably priced. I love going here for lunch. 3). La Finestra (120 N. Congress St., 601.345.8735, eatlafinestra.com) It has the best Italian food in Jackson. La Finestra offers house-made pasta and a farmto-table concept with an innovative menu that changes weekly based on what is seasonally available. 4). Saltine Oyster Bar (622 Duling Ave., Suite 201, 601.982.2899, saltinerestaurant.com) The laid-back, yet sophisticated atmosphere makes Saltine a great place to grab a drink in 66

the Fondren area, and I really enjoy the fresh oysters and the kale salad. 5). Saigon Vietnamese Restaurant (2640 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601.420.4848) Saigon is a local hole-in-the-wall Vietnamese restaurant located in a former fast-food spot, but don’t let this fool you. Saigon offers sit-down service with the best, most flavorful Vietnamese food including vegetarian options. 6). Sneaky Beans (2914 N. State St., 601.487.6349, sneakybeans.com) I was recently introduced to this coffee shop, and it has become my favorite. This coffee shop has an eclectic ambience with a down-home feel. It has several rooms with unique, mismatched furniture so there is plenty of room to hang out or catch up on reading. 7). Whole Foods Market (4500 Interstate 55 N., 601.608.0405, wholefoodsmarket.com) I am so glad Whole Foods came to Jackson. My girlfriend and I like to go here for pizza dates; it has a nice selection including vegetar-

March - April 2015 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

ian and vegan options. We love the coffee and tea bar, and the organic wine selection in its Merchant of Vino Wine & Spirits store. 8). Parham Bridges Park (corner of Ridgewood Road and Old Canton Road) I like to come here on my break between working doubles. I usually make a few loops on the one-mile track or meet up with a friend to play a game of tennis. 9). LeFleur’s Bluff State Park (2140 Riverside Drive, 601.987.3923) LeFleur’s Bluff has plenty of fun things to do. I like to use the hiking trail and play disc golf. I also bring my niece to the playground, which is a kid’s dream. The museums and gardens are also a fun way to spend the day. 10). Fair Trade Green (2807 Old Canton Road, 601.987.0002) This is a cool spot to check out if you are into supporting your local community. They have healing crystals, handmade crafts by Mississippians and a library of donated books you can borrow for free. boomjackson.com

SALTINE PHOTO COURTESY SALTINE; ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY TRIP BURNS

You may know Amado Felipe as one of the servers at La Finestra restaurant. Along with his busy job, he is a certified cosmetologist, author and tri-athlete. Recently, Felipe gave us his top 10 favorite places in Jackson.


Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

67


Honda

SALES EVENT Happening Now!

M i s s i s s i p p i â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s # 1 Vo l u m e H o n d a D e a l e r s h i p

555 Sunnybrook Road Ridgeland, MS 39157 (601) 957-3400 www.pattypeckhonda.com


BOOM Jackson v7n6 - Neat Spaces: The City's Coolest Offices