Issuu on Google+

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TEDx Comes to Town, p 30 // Nick’s Farm to Tom’s Table, pp 60 - 61 April Fitzpatrick’s Art Therapy, p 72 // The FAIRest of Them All, p 76

FREE // Vol. 7, No. 2 July - August 2014

The Wellness Issue

A Healthy New Outlook for Jackson pp 36-37

2014

Young

Inſluentials

Forging New Paths pp 62-69

Local Menu Guide,

starts p 43


          

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Left to right: Alon Bee, City President of Regions Bank Metro Jackson; Dr. LouAnn Woodward, Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs; Dr. James E. Keeton, Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs; and Dr. Ian Paul, School of Medicine Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

Expect more admiration. Congratulations to Dr. Ian Paul, School of Medicine Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC), for being awarded the Regions Bank TEACH Prize. This award recognizes a faculty member who best exemplifies the values of student engagement, intellectual challenge and dedication to the craft of education that drive UMMC’s educational mission. As a proud corporate citizen, Regions is always excited to support those in our community who work so tirelessly to make a difference in the lives of others. To Dr. Paul and everyone striving to improve our communities, we offer our thanks, our assistance and our commitment to making life better.

Š 2014 Regions Bank.

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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1L=HAFLG.AD9L=K41LM<AG and let us help you to enhance your core strength, and become more toned, flexible, balanced and healthy, at any age!

1867 Crane Ridge Dr. Suite 124 A, Jackson 39216 • pilatesVworks@gmail.com • pilatesVstudioworks.com • 601.665.4530 Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

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      Offbeat is the brainchild of Phillip Rollins, known professionally as DJ Young  Venom. Envisioned as equal parts art gallery and retail establishment, Offbeat provides a platform for local artists to showcase their talents from artwork to  furniture, while also stocking an eclectic selection of graphic novels, limited edition  designer toys, new and used records, and much more. Located at 151 Wesley Ave,  Offbeat looks to serve as a catalyst to upcoming and established artists from all  parts of Mississippi to exhibit their work and reach a broader audience.

Midtown Partners

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Business Association  of Midtown

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   Thanks to our sponsors who work in partnership to promote and foster the growth of Midtown Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creative economy.

July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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“I’ve been fortunate for all the support I’ve gotten from the city of Jackson.” —John “Stax” Tierre, page 32.

62

72

11 JXN Born Free We pay tribute to the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer.

38 Well at Work Learn how one office is helping its employees get healthy.

13 The Equality Trail Learn about a trail of civil rights in Jackson.

39 Learning to Run Whether a marathon or a life, this couple can.

14 Secret JXN An ancient giant slumbers under the metro area.

40 Choose Your Gain Hot or not? Yoga can go either way.

16 A New Leader Get the inside scoop on Mayor Tony Yarber. 17 What’s In a Name? Robert E. Lee, meet Robert G. Clark. 18 Progress Jackson gets a stateof-the-art mixed-use building and other city developments. 20 EX PAT Mad Kit This actor may be on “Mad Men” now, but he loves his hometown.

82 30

21 EXPLORE DOWNTOWN JACKSON Sponsored section. 30 BIZ Technology, Entertainment, Design TEDx is coming. 32 So. JXN Ambition John “Stax” Tierre runs this. 34 Sweating It Out Pilates isn’t what you think. Ask Angelia Brown. 36 WELLNESS Healthy City Jackson workplaces are changing, and it’s good business.

60 62 Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

36 The City’s Best Read about Best of Jackson’s health-care mini ballot winners.

43 MENU GUIDE Paid Advertising 59 BITES Holy Food, Batman! Some say eating at 303 Jefferson is akin to a religious experience. 60 RESIDENT TOURIST Fresh Produce Nick Wallace delivers fresh perspective to Tom Ramsey. 62 Young Influentials A new generation is changing the face of Jackson. 70 Schlep This Cool new bags— whether for the office or the classroom. 71 DO GOODER Protecting Families The JFP Chick Ball celebrates its 10th anniversary of fighting domestic abuse. 72 ARTS Healing Through Art Learn about April Fitzpatrick’s journey into the world of art. 76 COOL TOO The Best of Times Philadelphia and Choctaw are two towns worth checking out. 78 EVENTS Not sure what to do this summer? Check out these events 82 Local List Terry Sullivan, Jackson’s best runner, tells us his favorite places to go in Jackson.

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boomjackson.com

editor’s note

The Courage to Change // by Donna Ladd

Art Director Kristin Brenemen Managing Editor Amber Helsel Assistant Editor Briana Robinson Assistant to the Editor Micah Smith Editorial Writers Trip Burns // Tommy Burton Dustin Cardon // Carmen Cristo // Haley Ferretti Turry Flucker // ShaWanda Jacome Kathleen Morrison Mitchell // LaTonya Miller Ronni Mott // R.L. Nave // Julian Rankin Brittany Sanford // Julie Skipper // Nick Wallace Listings Editor // Latasha Willis Stylist // Nicole Wyatt Interns Jared Boyd // Deja Harris // Savannah Hunter Mary Kate McGowan // Emma McNeel // Maya Miller Achaia Moore // Bria Paige // Adria Walker Photography Staff Photographer // Trip Burns Photographer // Tate K. Nations Ad Design Zilpha Young Business and Sales Advertising Director // Kimberly Griffin Account Executives // Gina Haug // David Rahaim Executive Assistant // Leslie La Cour Distribution Manager // Richard Laswell Bookkeeper // Melanie Collins Operations Consultant // David Joseph President and Publisher Todd Stauffer CONTACT US Story ideas and pitches // editor@boomjackson.com Ad Sales // ads@boomjackson.com BOOM Jackson P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296 p 601.362.6121 f 601.510.9019 Would you like copies of BOOM Jackson for recruiting, welcome packets or other corporate, institutional or educational uses? Call 601.362.6121 x16 or email davidjoseph@jacksonfreepress.com. BOOM Jackson is a publication of Jackson Free Press Inc. BOOM Jackson, which publishes every other month, focuses on the urban experience in Jackson, Miss., emphasizing entrepreneurship, economic growth, culture, style and city life. © 2014 Jackson Free Press Inc.

Cover photo of Catherine Lee by Tate K. Nations Fashion info is on pages 62-69 8

I

brought my yoga mat to work today. I’ve Commitment Engine: Making Work Worth It” finally decided to use that big spot of carby John Jantsch (both recommended to us by pet in my Capital Towers office to bring a John Evans at Lemuria Books who knows his spot of calm and wellness into my hectic Zen business books well, I’ve learned). Both, essentially, are about building workdays. I even brought a blanket to roll up for a quiet restorative pose. strong, committed office cultures. But the first You wouldn’t always takeaway is one that I’m know it, but I’ve come a also learning as a threelong way from my sevenyear W.K. Kellogg Founday-a-week workaholism. dation fellow: Self-care No doubt, I still work too must come first before much, in no small part you can help others. because I love what I do At a recent Michigan and the people I work meeting, the foundation alongside, not to mention hosted meditation, yoga the constant drumbeat and Zumba classes early of readers telling me to mornings to encourage “keep doin’ what you’re us Type AAA personalidoin’, girlfriend.” ties to slow down and be When you are present for ourselves. Summer at BOOM Jackson means I’ve learned this passionate about your lots of interns. Their training program work—as we all should now includes self-care. Pictured, from as CEO of this publishleft: Jared Boyd, Donna Ladd, Emma be, whether or not the ing company for the last McNeel and Mary Kate McGowan. job or the passion came 12 years. If I’m sick or first, because the alternacranky, I don’t manage tive sucks—it is easy to work too much, forget well. If I’m stressed, my staff will be, too. If I’m to leave at a decent hour and eat lunch at your out because of a bad fall because I wasn’t being desk (which I’m really guilty of doing). I used mindful, then systems might go awry back in to be impressed by staffers who always worked the office. Then negativity and lethargy set in. Here at BOOM Jackson, we’re all learning long days after others have left. I’m not any longer. Of course, I get that we these lessons together. We have an amazing all must work extra during big deadlines (like team right now—we’re introducing new Manthis issue of BOOM Jackson), but it shouldn’t aging Editor Amber Helsel this issue—and be the norm. And when it is someone’s reguwe’re clicking like clockwork these days, in no lar habit, it usually means they are not working small part because we’re encouraging our staff smart and are likely pushing deadlines too late and interns to focus on self-care first. We all by not starting soon enough. Sometimes, it make our choices and create our own realities: means they (or we—I’ve done it, too) are wastWe need to choose a healthy one. Tomorrow morning, we’re hosting our ing time on social media or such and then trying to make up for it at night. first in-house yoga class. We offer free gym and Sadly, and almost inevitably, those are yoga memberships to our staffers, and we’re the folks who end up burned out. I like to tell encouraging smoking-cessation efforts both staffers to go home because I don’t want them for the health of staffers and the business (see to end up in my office crying one day because page 39 to read more about why). We urge you and your company to join us they’re tired of working all the time. As entrepreneurs and managers, my parton the inspiring road to wellness. Namaste. ner Todd Stauffer and I are constantly self-educating on the world of smart business, reading inspiring books to each other on road trips, and listening to TED Talks and podcasts—and using the advice to improve on our own mistakes. Two books that are motivating us of late are “Conscious Business: How to Build Value Through Values” by Fred Kofman and “The

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

JARED BOYD

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd

boomjackson.com


contributors

“Where office flexibility meets functionality” We specialize in office solutions that are designed to meet your individual business needs…

1. Amber Helsel Managing Editor Amber Helsel is an Ole Miss graduate with a degree in journalism. Amber is a foodie, music lover, potential novelist and short person. Her favorite activity is telling dumb jokes. She managed this issue.

Professional Office Solutions fully furnished professional offices Virtual Business Solutions professional appearance for virtual offices Meeting Solutions convenient, cost effective, full service meeting space CALL TRIAD BUSINESS CENTERS TODAY!

www.triadbusinesscenters.com info@triadbusinesscenters.com (601)-709-4610 460 Briarwood Drive | Suite 400

2. Turry M. Flucker

Bringing The Community Together:

Turry M. Flucker, an independent curator and a cultural historian, has organized many contemporary art and African American history exhibits. He maintains an active schedule as a museum consultant. He wrote a Young Influential and a civil-rights piece.

Promoting Racial Harmony and Facilitating Understanding

3. LaTonya Miller LaTonya Miller is a freelance writer who is passionate about music, photography and all things positive. You can visit her any time at her second home, online at etudelife.com. She wrote a biz story.

4. Mary Kate McGowan Mary Kate McGowan, a senior communication and English major at Mississippi State University, is a Starkville Free Press contributor and a Jackson Free Press intern this summer. She wrote the Cool, Too story.

••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2014 Friendship Golf Outing September 23, 2014 This yearʼs Friendship Golf Outing will be held at Lake Caroline Golf Club in Gluckstadt on Tuesday morning, September 23. The four-man, 18-hole scramble format starts at 9 a.m. and lunch follows in the clubhouse. Teams, individuals and sponsors all welcome!

••••••••••••••••••••••••• Monthly Discussion Luncheons Second Wednesday, 11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Jackson 2000 invites you to join us to “lunch and learn” with provocative speakers and discussions held at the Mississippi Arts Center in downtown Jackson.

••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2014 Dialogue Circles Ongoing for adults and youth - see website Jackson 2000 presents dialogue circles, a series of facilitated, curriculum-based discussion sessions that can open minds, change hearts and build lasting friendships.

More information: www.jackson2000.org

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

9


PAID ADVERTISING

    

                   



n a world where everything people want is quite literally at their fingertips, business owners must embrace new technologies or run the risk of not meeting increasing customer expectations. After nearly a decade serving businesses all over the South, Jackson-based Broadband Voice credits its location in Mississippi for helping keep customer service one of its core proficiencies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If anyone understands how important relationships are, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mississippians,â&#x20AC;? said Gary Watts, CEO of Broadband Voice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In business, you can have a great product and save people money, but when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all said and done, caring for the customer is what really matters,â&#x20AC;? he adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our mission and passion is the customer. Plain and simple.â&#x20AC;? Building its business by providing the best customer service at all costs, Broadband Voice stands as the leading provider of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone systems in the state. Finding its niche serving small to mid-sized companies, Watts believes the key to Broadband Voiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success is rooted in what Mississippians hold in highest regardâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;its people. With large, well-known organizations competing in this space, Watts quickly realized it was going to take a lot more than high-tech products and services to keep a competitive advantage in this market. By taking its biggest strengthâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;taking care of customersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Broadband Voice made personal relationships its highest priority, and the people responded.



Any company can claim top-notch customer service, but Broadband Voice makes it a reality by physically going into businesses and evaluating existing telephone bills. Seeing an overwhelming trend of multi-site customers paying thousands extra each year in hidden fees, maintenance and equipment updates, Broadband Voice found its sweet spot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reviewing existing phone bills showed us that businesses are getting hit hard without even realizing it,â&#x20AC;? Watts said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen that customers really do respond by knowing theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re taken care ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even if it means telling them not to buy from us if we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t save them money.â&#x20AC;? After several years of assessing telecom bills for potential customers, Broadband Voice found that 80% of businesses were being severely overcharged, and 70% of the bills they reviewed contained errors. The company learned that mass-market bundling schemes include a lot of fine print. If not caught upfront, these fees leave the customer victimized if they are not looking for increases on the bill each month. Also, the bill evaluation method found that most of these businesses were agreeing to pay fees for things that that Broadband considers standard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not in the business of adding fees, and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell our customers anything other than what they need,â&#x20AC;? Watts emphasized. 10

July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

â&#x20AC;&#x153;While honesty in business relationships should be expected, unfortunately itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not these days,â&#x20AC;? he adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve built a successful business by something as simple as being transparent, and our customers really appreciate that.â&#x20AC;?

 

After learning what advanced technologiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as VoIPâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;can do for them, business owners are starting to see the impact upgrading can have on their bottom line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be like using a pay phone on the street to make a local call while everyone else is passing you by closing business deals using apps on their iPhones,â&#x20AC;? said Watts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;VoIP technology is creating opportunities for our customers today that they would have never otherwise known.â&#x20AC;? Broadband Voice offers advanced features like built-in disaster recovery to ensure a multiple-campus environment keeps a system up and running 24/7 despite weather conditions. Also, Broadband Voice gives their customers enhanced web-based visibility to who within the office is on the phone to help bring cost savings (think one receptionist for multiple campuses). The beauty of VoIP technology is also evident when businesses think about the future. With a platform built on IP technology, Broadband Voice customers can have access to the latest and greatest telephone features as they are being added without having to add a new costly gadget. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the new wave of business, and people are catching on and saving big.



With Broadband Voiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales force on the ground each day using the bill evaluation method to save business owners money, this company is making Mississippi proud doing what the state is best known for â&#x20AC;&#x201C; helping people. And, as always, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to know that a homegrown company in downtown Jackson is making major strides in B2B technology, joining other local success stories who are glad to call Mississippi their home. Broadband Voice is located at 736 S. President Street in the old Dickies Buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;now a beautiful downtown office and loft complex. Call 601-926-6000 today for a complimentary phone bill assessment.

 (,+$)#*%"#'++ !&*('      boomjackson.com


Civil Rights Trail p 13 // Slumbering Giant p 14 // Meet the Mayor p 16 // A Tale of Two Names p 17 // Progress pp 18-19 //

TAMIO WAKAYAMA, COURTESY MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART

The A Fiery Cross // by Trip Burns

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

s Mississippi celebrates the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, we also remember the great costs of the people involved, and the bravery and dignity that they possessed to keep moving forward. The year 1964 may be decades in the past, but it’s still alive for those who lived it. Freedom Summer’s major purpose was to register and educate as many black Mississippians as possible so they would have a voice and be recognized as registered voters. This was an official way of saying that African Americans are people, not “colored” or other offensive labels. Education was equally important. The Council of Federated Organizations, or COFO, created freedom schools to offer an alternative to under-funded and segregated schools. There, students learned about the U.S. Constitution and black history—subjects not easily accessed in public schools for people of color. The freedom schools were also places in the community where African Americans could safely gather. The Mississippi of June 1964 was not a hospitable place for such new enterprises. People in power resisted almost from the get-go, and law enforcement, unfortunately, was not to be trusted. These people were on their own. The goal of mass voter registra-

11


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A Klan mob, which included law enforcement, abducted and murdered James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner in Neshoba County. A week later, their car was found burned out 13 miles outside Philadelphia. tion would require organization, communication and leadership. One such leader was Bob Moses, a field secretary of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and a primary organizer of the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964. But the movement would need other hands to help, and a variety of multiracial groups and volunteers, many 21 and younger, came together to register black voters in our state.

There were hardships, though. Pictured on page 11 is a Mississippi Delta â&#x20AC;&#x153;freedom houseâ&#x20AC;? in Indianola. The Ku Klux Klan, a group of organized white male Christians, burned a cross on the front side of the house. The KKK used violence and intimidation to keep blacks segregated from whites, and burning a cross was the most infamous way of intimidating people who supported desegregation and equal rights.

Other tactics included murder, kidnapping and lynching â&#x20AC;&#x153;in the name of the Lord.â&#x20AC;? The KKKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terror was designed to preserve a way of life that kept African Americans inferior to whites and to preserve whatever social standing was passed down from generation to generation. The burning of Christianityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most famous symbol wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t blasphemy to the KKK. Ignition of a fiery cross was a warning and an announcement: We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like you or your kind. Rather than take the cross down, a freedom worker painted â&#x20AC;&#x153;FREEDOMâ&#x20AC;? on the charred pieces of wood. On this burnt piece of hate and confusion, a new object of hope aroseâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;literally from the ashes. It could be a symbol of the great state of Mississippi in the 21st century.

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July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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CHANGING THE CITY:

The Civil Rights Movement in Jackson

Jasmin Searcy

Peekaboo TRIP BURNS

GEORGE BALLIS, MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM OF ART

JXN // legacy

// by Turry Flucker

T

he black-freedom events that happened during the 1950s and 1960s in Jackson, like many other cities in the Deep South, sent shock waves throughout the country. Mississippi was a microcosm of the Civil Rights Movement, but in every African American community, education and civil rights coexisted. Since slavery, African Americans fought second-class citizen status in America. Here are some places in Jackson that the Civil Rights Movement touched. 4OUGALOO#OLLEGE7#OUN TY,INE2OAD  7KH FROOHJH ZDV D PDMRU FHQWHU RI DFWLYLW\ GXULQJ &LYLO 5LJKWV PRYHPHQW 7KH 7RXJD ORR &ROOHJH %RDUG RI 7UXVWHHV DSSURYHGWKH7RXJDORR$UW&RO OHFWLRQRQ0DUFK1RZ RQH RI WKH ODUJHVW FRQWHPSR UDU\DUWFROOHFWLRQVLQWKH86 LWZDVDQH[WHQVLRQ RIWKHZRUNDUWDF WLYLVWV ZHUH GRLQJ LQ1HZ<RUNZKLFK ZDVUDLVLQJPRQH\ IRU WKH &RQJUHVV IRU 5DFLDO (TXDOLW\ &25(  DQG WKH 6WXGHQW 1RQYLROHQW &RRU GLQDWLQJ &RPPLWWHH 61&&  0DQ\VWDWHDQGQDWLRQDOOHDGHUV VSRNHDW7RXJDORR¶V:RRGZRUWK &KDSHO

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The COFO Center was at the heart of the voting and education drives during the Civil Rights Movement.

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MS DEPT. OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

JXN // secret city

Igneous Intrusion // by Amber Helsel

M

odern-day Jackson is a beautiful place to work, live and play. The historical architecture, food and museums are astounding. Turn the clock back a few million years. Take out people, buildings, streetsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or really any form of civilizationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and turn the city into an island. Add in a shallow sea, scary-looking sea creatures and dinosaurs, then put a tall volcano smack dab in the middle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how accurate it is, but I like to visualize a Caribbean volcanic island, lush with vegetation. Except that the creatures flying overhead may have been pterosaursâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;flying reptilesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the animals

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July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

FASHION

FABULOUS

F U N K Y

COURTESY MS DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

swimming in the sea may have included some very ferocious marine-going reptiles,â&#x20AC;? Michael Bograd, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state geologist, says. At the peak of its life cycle in the Cretaceous period, about 75 million years ago, the volcano, which geologists call the Jackson Dome, stretched across the entire metro area. The Mississippi Office of Geologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1997 circular, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Windows Into Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Geologic Past,â&#x20AC;? says that the volcano stood at its tallest 79 million years ago, stretching from Clinton to Brandon to Ridgeland to Richland. Late in the Cretaceous period, the volcano went dormant. As the land began to sink and the sea levels rose, the volcano eroded away until it was no longer above sea level, and then a reef of algae formed over it. The dome is now buried so deeply that a surface impression isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t visible. Eugene Hilgard, the state geologist from 1858 to 1873, discovered the volcano around 1860 while creating a map of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s geography. He noticed that the land hit a slight incline, indiSince Eugene Hilgardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s discovery of the extinct Jackson cating that something was volcano, geologists have created a map showing the volcanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s buried beneath the surface. cross sections.

An illustration, published in Denbury Resourcesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; annual report, depicts what the Jackson Dome may have looked like.

-DFNVRQ VLWV DERXW  PLOHV DZD\ IURPWKH1HZ0DGULG)DXOWOLQHZKLFK H[WHQGV IURP $UNDQVDV WR 0LVVRXUL WRWKHQRUWKHUQPRVWSDUWVRI0LVVLV VLSSL,QDVHULHVRIHDUWK TXDNHVDORQJWKHIDXOWOLQHFDXVHGWKH 0LVVLVVLSSL5LYHUWRĂ&#x20AC;RZEDFNZDUG In the centuries since, geologists have created a map showing cross sections of the volcano. Its sections mark different layers of rock, from the reef that sits on top to where its flanks are. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until the 1930s that people first began drilling into the reef, called the Jackson Gas Rock because of its natural gas deposits. In Bill Pittsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; article on The New Southern View website, geologist David Dockery says that the rock houses about one-fourth of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s naturalgas deposits. The natural reaction is to imagine the volcano erupting one day, but Bograd says that while geologists never rule anything out, he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect an eruption any time soon. But that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t appreciate the idea of Jackson being the only capital city in the world that sits on top of a volcano.

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JXN // leader

About Tony Yarber // by R.L. Nave

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master’s degree in education administration and supervision from Jackson State University and is a former middle-school principal. Emphasis on “administration.” Yarber is moving many administrative functions off the plates of department heads and consolidating them in his office so they can focus on the meat-and-potatoes issues. “I don’t want my police chief involved in grant writing. I don’t want my police chief involved in anything but crime fighting,” Yarber told an audience in May. Yarber grew up in Jackson’s Sub 2 neighborhood, near Wiggins Road and Highway 80, and graduated from Forest Hill High School in 1996. He enrolled in the University of Southern Mississippi, with an education scholarship named for former Mississippi Gov. William Winter. He originally majored in biology and wanted to become a physician, but at the insistence of a relative, he met with a college adviser and changed his major to elementary education, in part because there are so few black men teaching in elementary schools. Yarber completed his master’s degree in 2004. A 2005 Ward 6 debate piqued his interest in public service. When 2009 rolled around and Ward 6 Councilman Marshand Crisler got in the Jackson mayor’s race, Yarber ran for the council seat and won. Yarber, whom many people believed would seek the mayor’s seat eventually, decided to run for re-election to the city council in 2013. After the death of Mayor Chokwe Lumumba in February and a week of prayer—during which Yarber says he lost 10 pounds as he weighed the decision—Yarber tossed his hat in the mayoral ring earlier this year, winning the election by eight percentage points over Chokwe Antar Lumumba, the late mayor’s son. Now, Yarber appears to be trying to carve out a niche as the education mayor. The engine of Yarber’s economic and policy agenda is Alignment Jackson, an effort in which private businesses, nonprofits and government agencies support Jackson Public Schools. In other words, Alignment Jackson’s community partners can step in to provide things that JPS needs, but either can’t afford or would need to jump through too many bureaucratic hurdles to get. By design, it brings people together who have not always gotten along, such as JPS and the City of Jackson, which until this year were locked in a legal dispute over funding. “Now, everybody is talking out loud about the work that they do, and everybody’s having these a-ha moments,” Yarber says. He stresses that Alignment Jackson is not a program. Those end, he says. Instead, Yarber emphasizes structure, processes and technology. “We don’t do stuff,” he says of the initiative. “We get stuff done.” One of Mayor Tony Yarber’s goals is to improve education in Jackson schools.

TRIP BURNS

n the evening of his election as mayor of Jackson, Tony Yarber led supporters in prayer and delivered a brief victory speech. When finished, he looked around for a campaign staffer, unsure of what to do next. One supporter, standing in the back of the room, had an idea: “Turn up!” he called out. While Election Night was about revelry for Yarber’s election as the youngest person in recent history to lead Mississippi’s capital city, it didn’t take long for him to get to the serious work of running the city. Following a low-key swearing in at City Hall, Yarber immediately shook up the mayor’s office, making key appointments to city departments. At the core of his administration is what Yarber calls the “continuum of success,” which involves goal-setting, processes and accountability for each city department. If that sounds like it came out of a meeting of education administrators, that’s because Yarber has a

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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JXN // contrast Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in a Name?

Lee vs. Clark // by Amber Helsel

TRIP BURNS

Robert E. Lee Building

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Jackson: Good for Business

In recent years, Jackson has continued to pile on the superlatives, as the larger world figures out what we already know. WalletHub.com recently released its â&#x20AC;&#x153;2014 Best Cities to Start a Businessâ&#x20AC;? listing, ranking Jackson No. 4 on the list, ahead of Memphis, Tenn. (No. 5), and Atlanta, Ga. (No. 40). Metrics included 5-year business survival rate, the affordability of office space and the educational background of the local labor force. Read more at WalletHub.com.

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Maywood Mart Shopping Center â&#x20AC;˘ 1220 E. Northside Dr. 601-366-5676 â&#x20AC;˘ Mon. - Sat., 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

17


JXN // progress

Renewing the City // by Haley Ferretti

S

everal new development projects in Jackson are charging ahead, while others are being revitalized and even re-launched.

ONE EASTOVER CENTER

high-end mixed use development that will afford our employees access to restaurants, retail, banking and other amenities in a walkable environment,â&#x20AC;? Painter said.â&#x20AC;?

METROCENTER MALL

sibilities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are some very strong potential leads. Some do require some funds to redevelop and change the property,â&#x20AC;? he said. The company is looking for strategies that will bring in revenue to the city and county, while also bringing foot traffic back to Metrocenter. This will open the door for the possibility of government, health-care or educational offices. Some of the rumored leads include a junior college, a state university, Jackson Public Schools or even a hospital.

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TRIP BURNS

The District Land Development Company The Overby Company is to revitalizing announced in May that the Jackson office of Metrocenter Mall, starting with the old Dillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz will be the lead tenant for a new mixed-use office building called One Eastover Center. Baker Donelson will occupy the top DATA CENTER AND three stories of the fiveTECHNOLOGY PARK story 120,000-square-foot Venyu Solutions, building. Nelson Partners based in Baton Rouge, is is the property designer, beginning development and Holder Properties is on a data storage and the developer. cloud-based data center Breck Hines of The and technology park on District Land Developthe 100,000-square-foot ment Company said that property that formerly the development will inbelonged to McRaeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in clude â&#x20AC;&#x153;a variety of retail north Fondren. The $35 tenants, first-rate dining million project is expected When completed, One Eastover Center will include a variety of retail tenants such options, one- and two -bedto 30 to 40 jobs in 2015. as restaurants andâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wait for itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a movie theater. (We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have one now.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking forroom loft living spaces, a Residence Inn by Marriot ward to becoming active hotel and an unmatched, and participating local elegant movie theater experience.â&#x20AC;? building. WAPT News reported that due to zoncitizens of the city,â&#x20AC;? said Tommy Curb, Venyuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s William Painter, managing shareholder of ing changes to the Highway 80 corridor, several executive vice president. Curb said the new development would Baker Donelsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jackson office, said that he businesses are not viable for the space, including expects the office will give employees new op- a movie theater, a skating rink and bowling alleys. have plenty to offer local businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hospitals portunities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are excited about the prospect However, Scott Overby, mall property manager, and health-care providers, accounting firms, law of locating to a new state-of-the-art building in a said that the company is delving into other posfirms, financial planners, and brokerage houses

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July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


TRIP BURNS

Venyu Solutions, a company based out of Baton Rouge, will soon begin development on a data center and a technology park, set to be built on the property of the old McRae’s building.

all deal in valuable data and look to us so that they can focus on their core competencies,” Curb said. “We don’t typically offer ‘off-the-shelf’ services. We custom tailor a solution for each customer.”

MERIDIAN AT FONDREN On May 21, the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning approved a property lease the Meridian at Fondren at a meeting. The University of Mississippi Medical Center partnered with SKD Development LLC to develop the mixed-use project, located on Lakeland Drive, near the UMMC campus. SKD includes an affiliate of StateStreet Group and Kassinger Development Group. The project, estimated at $30 and $32 million, will consist of 200 apartment homes, office and retail space. Stewart Speed, a partner with SKD, said site preparation will begin this summer. He noted that the quality of the development’s amenities

would take the Jackson metro market to new heights. “We anticipate that the Meridian will attract not only UMMC personnel and others from the larger medical community, but anyone and everyone who appreciates the walkable, vibrant environment of Fondren,” Speed said.

PHOENIX INITIATIVE As part of the Fondren Renaissance Foundation’s Phoenix Initiative, Fondren residents are getting renovations to their homes. With the help of churches and St. Dominic Health Services, Fondren Renaissance has been making repairs that families may not be able to afford. More than 50 homes have been renovated since the project began in 2006. The initiative was recently renewed with $96,000 from St. Dominic’s, which asked Fondren churches to provide a dollar-for-dollar match. St. Dominic Executive Vice President and CFO Deidra Bell said previously that the effort

helps build the initiative’s support system. “It’s wonderful what has happened here over the years through this program. You now see pride of ownership in what was once a dilapidated area,” she said. Fondren residents can apply for help from the Phoenix Initiative, which will send a contractor, at no cost, and evaluate any repairs needed. Phoenix will pay for paying the contractor up to $7,500 per home to make the repairs. Homeowners must match 20 percent of the total project cost to move forward. At press time, Bill Scruggs, a project coordinator for St. Dominic’s and a Fondren Renaissance board member, said at least four homes are either being worked on or evaluated.

JSU’S GREEN CORRIDOR Jackson State University will create a “Green Corridor” in the area surrounding the School of Engineering, which was the state’s first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-certified project. Plans include a rain garden and convertible parking lots, as well as an outdoor classroom. Rainwater will be used for irrigation. “JSU is positioned to be at the forefront of innovation for creative and environmentally sound solutions to the problems,” said Mukesh Kumar, interim director of the school’s Urban and Regional Planning Programs. “It is our desire to expand upon the current green technologies in the School of Engineering building and create an educational venue that significantly enhances the surroundings.” Subscribe free to jfpdaily.com for regular business and development news.

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19


EXPAT // mad man

Kit Williamson: An Oddball in L.A. // by Zack Orsborn

K

COURTESY KIT WILLIAMSON

it Williamson wakes up for a photo playwriting. For his thesis project, he wrote a Compared to Ed, who lives in a state of constant shoot where he shows off his bar- play about a girl who escapes Texas and finds fear while keeping his head low, Williamson is tending skills before walking around herself at a motel and diner called Desert Refloud and outspoken. As Ed’s story progresses, viewers see Ed’s his neighborhood in Silver Lake, uge owned by a Navajo emo teenager. Since then, Williamson created and wrote sense of humor about his workplace. Calif., to shoot in his favorite hangouts where “(He has) a confidence in his position, he gets all his writing done. After an interview the critically acclaimed web series, “EastSiders,” with BOOM Jackson, he plans to email every- which was recently picked up by Viacom/Logo. which is fun to explore different sides to this one he knows about his Kickstarter campaign “EastSiders” explores the human relationships guy. He’s also really quirky, and I think that to raise funds for season two of his web series, of LGBT people. he’s an oddball,” he says. “I wanted to create a show with gay char“I’ve certainly been accused of being an “EastSiders.” Later, Williamson plans to book another interview with Comic Book Queers to acters I could relate to. I wanted to play a gay oddball from people in my life.” Working on the “Mad Men” set has been discuss the “EastSiders” graphic novel. character because, in my career, I was never It’s just another day for this actor, writer and given the opportunity to play anything other an actor’s paradise for Williamson. Along with director from Jackson, Miss. than a straight, counterculture kid,” Williamcarefully crafted scripts and sets, the cast often Williamson attended St. Andrew’s Epis- son says with a laugh. plays games such as “Catch Phrase,” “HangWilliamson also portrays Ed Gifford, a man” and the classic “Heads Up, Seven Up.” copal School in Ridgeland, where he was nicknamed “Gay Kid.” He was out to his friends, but copywriter, on the 1960s-era drama “Mad Men.” But the strangest game he’s played is “Giant he didn’t feel safe letting everyJenga” while wearing 1960sone at school know. period costumes. “It’s such a cliché, ‘kids can The inevitable and be cruel,’ but they really can. I trademark smoking on set think that when you live in an makes Williamson nostalgic, atmosphere that fosters disreminding him of the time in crimination, it’s going to result college as an emo kid smokin bullying,” he says. ing Djarum Black cigarettes Williamson is excited while writing angsty poetry. Despite moving away about Mississippians banding together against efforts to codifrom Jackson, he still holds on fy discrimination into state law, to his southern values—holdknown as SB 2681 that became ing the door for everyone and effective July 1. He says he saying “yes, ma’am” and “no, wasn’t brave enough to share ma’am.” He hasn’t entirely his story when he was growing abandoned his home, as he up in the city. visits his family as much as He spent most of his time possible. Jackson has flourthen sitting at Cups, reading ished, particularly Fondren and transcribing quotes from where he interned for the his favorite books into a jourJackson Free Press, BOOM nal. This led him to pursue his Jackson’s sister publication. “I’m so grateful, deown writing at the prestigious Interlochen Arts Academy in spite the challenges, to have Michigan. Honing his craft, grown up there because it Williamson attended Fordham has really shaped who I am University, balancing essays profoundly,” he says. “I think and his role in Broadway’s rewe all need to celebrate and vival of “Talk Radio.” Between support the progress that undergraduate studies, acting is happening in Mississippi in off-Broadway shows and and refuse the perception writing, he attended UCLA that equal rights in MissisJackson native Kit Williamson plays Ed Gifford in AMC’s “Mad Men.” for graduate school to study sippi are a lost cause.” 20

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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D O W N T O W N J A C K S O N PA R T N E R S

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Your next address can be in one of these high profile Downtown buildings.

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4 EXPLORE DOWNTOWN

CHURCHES 22 8 9 16 15 55 36

Cathedral of St. Peter the Apostle..................123 N. West St. (601) 969-3125 Central United Methodist Church...................500 N. Farish St. (601) 355-7854 Farish St. Baptist Church ................................619 N. Farish St. (601) 355-0636 First Baptist Church .......................................... 431 N. State St. (601) 949-1900 Galloway UMC............................................ 305 N. Congress St. (601) 353-9691 St. Alexis Episcopal Church..............................650 E. South St. (601) 944-0415 St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral.................305 E. Capitol St. (601) 354-1535

CULTURE & PERFORMING ARTS 12 51 51 17 11

Alamo Theater..................................................333 N. Farish St. (601) 352-3365 Arts Center of Mississippi .......................201 E. Pascagoula St. (601) 960-1537 Ballet Mississippi.................. 201 E. Pascagoula Street, Ste. 106 (601) 960-1560 Eudora Welty Library ....................................... 300 N. State St. (601) 968-5811 Farish St. Park .....................................................402 Farish St. (601) 960-0716 Governor’s Mansion .......................................300 E. Capitol St. (601) 359-6421

51 51 55 6 53 51 51 19 50 7 52 51 51

Greater Jackson Arts Council ...201 E. Pascagoula St., Ste. 103 (601) 960-1557 Int’l Museum of Muslim Cultures ...........201 E. Pascagoula St. (601) 960-0440 Light and Glass Studio ................................. 523 Commerce St. (601) 942-7285 Mississippi Arts Commission...........501 N. West St., Ste. 701B (601) 359-6030 Mississippi Museum of Art.............................380 S. Lamar St. (601) 960-1515 Mississippi Opera ......................201 E. Pascagoula St., Ste. 105 (601) 960-2300 Mississippi State Capitol ......................................400 High St. (601) 359-3114 Mississippi Symphony Orchestra............201 E. Pascagoula St. (601) 960-1565 MS Department of Archives & History............. 200 North St. (601) 576-6876 Old Capitol Museum ..........................................100 S. State St. (601) 576-6920 Russell C. Davis Planetarium ..................201 E. Pascagoula St. (601) 960-1552 Smith Park .........................................................302 E. Amite St. (601) 960-0716 Smith Robertson Museum.................................. 528 Bloom St. (601) 960-1457 Thalia Mara Hall .......................................255 E. Pascagoula St. (601) 960-1537 USA Int’l Ballet Competition ...................201 E. Pascagoula St. (601) 355-9853 VSA Arts of Mississippi ...........................201 E. Pascagoula St. (601) 965-4866


EXPLORE DOWNTOWN

HOTELS & CONVENTIONS 27 23 18 49

Jackson Convention Complex.................105 E. Pascagoula St. King Edward Hotel........................................ 235 W. Capitol St. Marriott Downtown........................................200 E. Amite St. Old Capitol Inn ................................................. 226 N. State St. Sleep Inn ........................................................209 S. Gallatin St.

(601) 969-0114 (601) 353-5464 (601) 969-5100 (601) 359-9000 (601) 896-0390

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 39 24 41 30 30 30 24 43 24 55 34 24 24 23 46 35 33 56 54 45 25 29

Bancorp South .................................................525 E. Capitol St. (601) 354-4500 Capitol Copy & Imaging ................210 E. Capitol St., Ste. M195 (601) 969-6500 Choice Copy Service.....................125 S. Congress St., Ste. L150 (601) 355-5555 Courthouse Racquet & Fitness ......................100 E. Capitol St. (601) 948-8688 Kirkland Hair Studio .......................................100 E. Capitol St. (601) 354-3482 Kolb’s Grand Cleaners....................................100 E. Capitol St. (601) 354-3041 Massage Revolution.......................................210 E. Capitol St. (601) 918-1853 Micro Printing & Blueprint............................... 225 E. Pearl St. (601) 355-9543 Nails Envy Spa ...............................210 E. Capitol St., Ste. M114 (601) 398-7186 NunoErin......................................................... 533 Commerce St. (601) 944-0023 OmniBank.........................................................236 E. Capitol St. (601) 355-1000 Regions Bank...................................................210 E. Capitol St. (601) 987-1919 Sam’s Shoe Shine.................................................................210 E. Capitol Street Shoe Shine Doctor & Co........................................................200 E. Amite Street State Bank & Trust Company ..........................140 W. Pearl St. (601) 355-1568 Trustmark Bank...............................................248 E. Capitol St. (601) 208-5801 Trustmark Bank...............................................190 E. Capitol St. (601) 208-3800 Trustmark Bank..................................................504 S. State St. (601) 354-5055 U.S. Post Office ................................................401 E. South St. (601) 359-7096 Uncle Charles Barber Shop..............................211 S. Lamar St. (601) 831-1303 Wells Fargo......................................................188 E. Capitol St. (601) 503-1020 William’s Shoe Repair............................. 113 1/2 W. Capitol St. (601) 969-2996

RETAIL 47 2 30 43 24 1 30 24 38 38

A Balloon Basket...............................................206 W. Pearl St. (601) 969-6482 Carter Jewelers......................................................711 High St. (601) 354-3549 Chuck Campbell’s Jewelers............................100 E. Capitol St. (601) 355-1032 Downrange Sporting Goods ............................ 227 E. Pearl St. (769) 233-8807 Green Floral, Inc..............................................210 E. Capitol St. (601) 969-4050 Mississippi Farmers Market.................................929 High St. (601) 354-6573 Office Environments .......................................100 E. Capitol St. (601) 355-0313 Riverboat Shop ...............................................210 E. Capitol St. (601) 948-6706 Thimblepress...................................................... 113 N. State St. (769) 218-8639 Tulip .................................................................... 115 N. State St. (601) 572-1777

13 1 59 48 57 20 27 20 45 21 58 28 23 41 31 18 5 57 53 29 27 3 30 41 44 24 42 14 37 4 40 26 30

F. Jones Corner ............................................303 N. Farish St. (601) 983-1148 Farmer’s Table $....................................................929 High St. (601) 944-0024 Hal & Mal’s $$ ......................................200 S. Commerce St. (601) 948-0888 Iron Horse Grill $$ .......................................320 W. Pearl St. (601) 398-0151 Jaco’s Tacos $$ .................................................318 S. State St. (757) 879-2799 Keifer’s Restaurant $ ................................ 120 N. Congress St. (601) 353-4976 King Edward Bar & Grill $$$ ..................... 235 W. Capitol St. (601) 353-5464 La Finestra $$$..........................................125 S. Congress St. (601) 345-8735 Lamar Restaurant $........................................209 S. Lamar St. (601) 354-9300 LurnyD’s Grille $ ...................................Corner of Amite & West (601) 906-9480 Martin’s Restaurant & Bar $ .......................214 S. State St. (601) 354-9712 Mayflower Café $$$................................... 123 W. Capitol St. (601) 355-4122 McAlister’s Select $ .........................................220 E. Amite St. (601) 985-9108 Monroe’s Donut & Bakery $......................125 S. Congress St. (601) 981-3208 My Cup Runneth Over $ ................... 111 E Capitol St, Ste 125 (601) 360-2419 Old Capitol Inn Restaurant $$....................... 226 N. State St. (601) 359-9000 Ole Tavern on George Street $$ ................. 416 George St. (601) 960-2700 One Block East $ .......................................642 Tombigbee St. (601) 944-0203 Palette Café by Viking $................................380 S. Lamar St. (601) 960-1515 Parlor Market $$$ ...................................... 115 W. Capitol St. (601) 360-0090 Seattle’s Best Coffee $ ................................ 235 W. Capitol St. (601) 969-8535 Sillers Café $..........................................................550 High St. (601) 359-5513 Smoothie King $ .............................................100 E. Capitol St. (769) 257-7483 Steve’s Downtown Deli $..........................125 S. Congress St. (601) 969-1119 Steve’s Uptown Café $ ..................................200 S. Lamar St. (601) 714-5683 Subway $ ........................................................210 E. Capitol St. (601) 352-5989 Subway $ .......................................................... 308 E. Pearl St. (601) 360-2831 Sugar’s Place $.............................................. 168 E. Griffith St. (601) 352-2364 Taste of the Island $......................................436 E. Capitol St. (601) 360-5900 Two Sisters $$........................................... 707 N. Congress St. (601) 353-1180 Underground 119 $$ ............................. 119 S. President St. (601) 352-2322 Union Station Restaurant $......................... 300 W. Capitol St. (601) 355-5443 Wasabi Sushi & Bar $$.................... 100 E Capitol St., Ste 105 (601) 948-8808

GET IN TOUCH WIT H U S DOWNTOWN JACKSON PARTNERS 308 E. Pearl Street, Suite 101 Jackson, Mississippi 39201 P : 601.353.9800

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RESTAURANTS & NIGHTLIFE 47 20 10 23 25 41 24 42 24 32

Adobo $ ............................................................ 127 S. Roach St. (601) 944-9501 Basil’s $....................................................... 120 N. Congress St. (601) 944-9888 Big Apple Inn $................................................509 N. Farish St. (601) 354-4549 Bistro Restaurant $ .........................................200 E. Amite St. (601) 503-2045 Bonnie’s $........................................................188 E. Capitol St. (601) 353-5836 Capital Club ................................ 125 S. Congress St., Ste. 1900 (601) 969-7101 Chick-Fil-A $ ...................................................210 E. Capitol St. (601) 594-7003 Coffee Roastery $............................................ 308 E. Pearl St. (601) 949-6994 Cups on Capitol $ ...........................................210 E. Capitol St. (601) 352-0514 Elite Restaurant $$ .......................................141 E. Capitol St. (601) 352-5606

5

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6 EXPLORE DOWNTOWN LIVING DOWNTOWN ])*0%-()'&*8$'%$1(7'$%"8)/'5%./"*%./7)'5.F2'%2*+"$%"*%&.$"*).7%-*)25N 72($$%&*"'2$%0(5'%./"*%&.1%7."6%(1()"0'/"$A%B*-/"*-/%L(7M$*/%&($% F'7*0'%&*0'%+*)%&8/5)'5$%*+%+822N".0'%)'$.5'/"$3 G&'"&')%."#$%-("7&./,%(%a)*(5-(6%$&*-A%2.$"'/./,%"*%"&'%$601&*/6A% D.'-./,%-*)25N72($$%()"A%*)%5././,%("%*/'%*+%"&'%QJ%)'$"(8)(/"$%(/5%F()$% ./%"&'%()'(A%-&'/%6*8%2.D'%B*-/"*-/%6*8%7(/%&(D'%."%(22%E8$"%$"'1$%+)*0% 6*8)%5**)3 % % B*-/"*-/%.$%&*0'%"*%+*8)%08$'80$%$87&%($%<0."&%`*F')"$*/ % C8$'80%(/5%;82"8)(2%;'/"')A%"&'%C.$$.$$.11.%C8$'80%*+%4)"A%"&'%@25% % ;(1."*2%C8$'80%(/5%"&'%!/"')/(".*/(2%C8$'80%*+%C8$2.0%;82"8)'$3 % % :&'%4)"%b()5'/%("%"&'%C.$$.$$.11.%C8$'80%*+%4)"%(/5%<0."&%c()M % *++')%)'2(W./,%,)''/$%$1(7'%+*)%)'$.5'/"$A%B*-/"*-/%-*)M')$% % (/5%D.$."*)$3 % % T(7&%6'()%B*-/"*-/%L(7M$*/%&*$"%/80')*8$%'D'/"$A%+'$".D(2$A%+)*0 % "&'%'1.7%+8/%*+%"&'%C(2#$%<"3%c(556#$%c()(5'%"*%"&'%C.$$.$$.11.% % a28'$%C()("&*/3 % % B*-/"*-/%.$%+822%*+%&.$"*).7%$."'$%(/5%F'(8".+82%$7'/')6%+)*0%"&' % b*D')/*)#$%C(/$.*/%"*%C.$$.$$.11.%<"("'%;(1."*23

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Explore Downtown Jackson is a paid supplement in BOOM Jackson magazine. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

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COURTESY DAVID PHARR; TRIP BURNS

BIZ

// storytelling

// by Dustin Cardon

Meets Jack

Attorney David Pharr will bring TEDx to Jackson Nov. 6.

A

ttorney David Pharr pours a great deal of time and energy into the community. Besides aiding the city with issues such as planning, development and economy, Pharr supports public schools as co-chairman of Alignment Jackson, pushed Farish Street development and is creating an â&#x20AC;&#x153;ecosystemâ&#x20AC;? for innovation-based companies in Jackson. One of Pharrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest and most exciting projects is organizing and hosting TEDx Jackson, the first TED conference in Mississippi. TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) conferences address a wide range of topics concerning the research and practice of science and culture, often through storytelling. Anyone who obtains a free TEDx license and agrees to follow certain principles can host independent TED events. In March, Pharr attended the main TED conference in Vancouver, Canada, a requirement for TEDx organizers. He found a number of attendees excited about the prospect of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first TED event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I met a former executive of EDF, a tech company in Dallas, who is originally from Mississippi and has been attending TED events for years,â&#x20AC;? Pharr says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He told me how happy he was to hear about the undertaking of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first TEDx. ... It happens all over the world in hundreds of countries. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re bringing it to the only state that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had one.â&#x20AC;? 30

Pharr and other organizers for the event, including Maris, West & Baker; C Spire Wireless; Innovate Mississippi; Mississippi Development Authority and the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning, have timed it to coincide with Mississippi Innovation Month and the Year of the Creative Economy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The idea of TEDx is to build local communities around innovation,â&#x20AC;? Pharr says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The theme we selected for our event is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fertile Ground,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; which is both a nod to the agricultural origins of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy, as well as a reference to all the opportunities in Mississippi. â&#x20AC;Ś Our focus is going to be on education, health care and the creative economy.â&#x20AC;? Pharr got his start in law working as a paralegal for what is today known as the Maxey Wann law firm. Later, he attended the University of Mississippi School of Law, graduating in 1997. Pharr, 44, spent 15 years working for a number of large

firms in the Jackson area before he started David Pharr Law in November 2012. The firm mostly represents small- to medium-sized businesses. He offers commercial litigation and business counseling throughout Jackson. TEDx Jackson is 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 6 at the Capri Theatre (3023 N. State St.). Speeches will be recorded and available on YouTube. Tickets will cost no more than $100, and seating will be limited. For more information, follow @TEDxJackson on Twitter, find TEDxJackson on Facebook, call David Pharr Law at 601.208.0922, or visit tedxjackson.com.

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July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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31


BIZ // ownership

The Ultimate Science Project // by Dustin Cardon

I

brand of T-shirts, which he dubbed Official Block Wear. “T-shirts seemed like a great product to produce,” Tierre says. “People love T-shirts. They’re timeless, and they don’t go out of style, depending on what you put on them. It’s all about the design.” Tierre designed his Official Block Wear shirts himself and had them produced by topnotch Houston manufacturers. He brought

MELANIE BOYD

n a plaza on Ellis Avenue, you’ll find a clothing store called Stax Hip Hop and Urban Fashion, the Red Room Hair Studio, a barbershop named Kut Factory and, the most recent addition, a restaurant called Norma Ruth’s. These shops all have one thing in common: They belong to Jackson entrepreneur John “Stax” Tierre. From as early as he can remember, Tierre immersed himself in the world of self-owned

After establishing himself as a formidable businessman, John “Stax” Tierre is expanding to the food world with his new restaurant, Norma Ruth’s, in south Jackson.

business thanks to his grandfather, John Goodwin. Goodwin owned a string of small businesses in Omaha, Neb., that included a club, a taxi service, a bar and numerous other commercial properties. Tierre moved to Jackson from his native Houston in 1996 and headed to Jackson State University on a tennis scholarship, where the three-time SWAC tennis champion majored in business administration. After graduating, Tierre decided to make Jackson the place where he would grow a business of his own. Due to his interest in art and fashion, Tierre started his business by selling his own 32

them to Jackson and began searching for a place to build a market. Starting out, all Tierre had was a trunk full of T-shirts and confidence in his product. A friend, Mead Fino, owner of Signature Clothing in Metrocenter Mall, helped Tierre by stocking Official Block Wear in his store while Tierre was searching for a location of his own. Driving around Jackson, Tierre found the plaza on Ellis Avenue. Centrally located in Jackson in an area with high population, he decided the location was perfect for his future business and acquired an empty building to set up shop. Tierre got his first opportunity to expand

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

his business after a lease dispute at the nearby Be Unique barbershop. Tierre says he “just decided to go with it” and started leasing the space. With new branding and uniforms, the barbershop reopened as Kut Factory in 2011. Two years later, increasingly heavy foot traffic created a large market of women in search of hair-care services, and Tierre decided to create Red Room Hair Studio just for them, situated on the other side of the plaza from the barbershop. Norma Ruth’s restaurant is named for and inspired by Tierre’s great grandmother, who was born in Omaha, Neb., in 1891. Tierre learned to cook by watching and working with his grandmother, just as he learned business with his grandfather. Tierre says that he was one of the few children he knew who actually took a liking to the kitchen, helping his grandmother make the cakes, pies and other dishes that people would come even from other states to taste. He also took classes, watched videos, practiced at home and, after arriving in Jackson, started visiting successful restaurants like Char and Collins Dream Kitchen to learn about the local fare. He hired Chef Brian Myrick, who has also worked for Jackson’s Char and Ridgeland’s Anjou restaurants, to run the kitchen. Myrick and Tierre collaborate on the restaurant’s menu, which includes rib-eye steaks, wings, burgers, seafood such as shrimp and crab claws, and more. Tierre plans to open a new location in north Jackson in the future, as well as start up Norma Ruth’s Kitchen on Robinson Road, which will offer a completely different menu that will cater to the lunch and brunch crowd in a similar manner to Two Sisters Kitchen. “This has all been like the ultimate science project,” Tierre says. “Building from the ground up, learning day-to-day operations, building a customer base. People supported the clothing store, then they supported the barbershop and the beauty salon, and now they’re loving Norma Ruth’s. I’ve been fortunate for all the support I’ve gotten from the city of Jackson.” Tierre’s businesses are located at 10151023 Ellis Ave. Call Tierre at 601-594-9390 or find him on Twitter. boomjackson.com


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33


BIZ // work it

FLICKR/US ARMY AFRICA

// by Deirdre Danahar

Certain character traits define your ability to be an effective leader.

C

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34

Love at First Burn // by LaTonya Miller and Mary Kate McGowan

A

ngelia Brown (pronounced AN-jeh-luh) knows a thing or two about being a busy mom. The mother of threeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Ashton, 16, Tyler, 12, and Alexia, 9â&#x20AC;&#x201D;says the birth of her third child led her to find her Pilates passion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always loved fitness, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always exercised,â&#x20AC;? Brown says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But after the third

Working individuals can pop in for a quick workout during their lunch break and go back to work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Typically, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sweat,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a shower right after Pilates even though it is a real workout.â&#x20AC;? The fitness studio, which includes a private lesson room and an infrared sauna for a holistic detoxifying ex-

as a mind, spiritual and body connection. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a core exercise, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s similar to anything you do at the gym versus cardiovascular. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a whole body workout from head to toe,â&#x20AC;? she says. But a physical workout is not the only challenge Brown has faced since opening her studio. She says one of the biggest business lessons she has

LATONYA MILLER

A Leaderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Essentials

Pilates of Jackson owner Angelia Brown demonstrates Reformer exercises. baby, no matter how much I worked out or how much cardio I did, I just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get my body to change.â&#x20AC;? Then, someone introduced her to Pilates, and it was love at first burn. Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newfound motivation to help others through Pilates inspired her to open Pilates of Jackson (1491 Canton Mart Road, 601.991.3201) in 2007. Her studio, which is not a franchise, is a short distance from three schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lower School, St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catholic School and Jackson Academy. The location appeals to moms who stop by for a workout after dropping their children off at school. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just for moms, though. Brown says anyone can benefit from Pilates.

July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

perience, offers two types of classesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Reformer Pilates and Power Pilates. Reformer Pilates, which is named for the machine used, allows you to fully engage targeted muscles whether standing up, lying down or sitting. It is especially effective for those who cannot do floor work. Both routines focus on core stomach and back muscles but are full body workouts designed to strengthen and lengthen the body, stabilize balance and build lean muscle, which burns fat. The difference is that Power Pilates has an added element that will get your heart rate up. No matter which class you choose at Pilates of Jackson, a full-body work out is guaranteed. Brown describes Pilates

learned is that the customer is always right. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always at all times try to make sure that I listen to the good and the bad, and make the changes that my clients give me,â&#x20AC;? Brown says. Brown shares success stories of clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;professional athletes and senior citizens among themâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;who have come back from injuries and some who remain injury-free thanks to the conditioning of Pilates. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of anything that Pilates cannot fix,â&#x20AC;? Brown says. For class schedule and rates visit pilatesofjackson.net or call 601.991.3201. Ask about group rates. Walk-ins are welcome. For more information, find Pilates of Jackson on Facebook.

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Barefield Workplace Solutions specializes in hospital and doctor’s office furniture from Steelcase.

Call (601) 354-4960 or stop by our full showroom for a visit.

601.354.4960 • 251 West South Street • Jackson, MS 39205 • barefieldandcompany.com


A Healthy Angle for Jackson // by Mary Kate McGowan

T

COURTESY KYM WILLIAMS

hrough new programs and initiatives, medical and health centers around the capital area are taking strides to help Mississippians with everything from diet plans to skin care. Some have partnered, while some have trail-blazed alone, but the end result are new and improved health options for the state’s residents.

UMMC Dermatology Program Because Mississippi’s climate is harsh on skin, Robert Brodell, professor and chairman of the Department of Dermatology at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, said that early detection and treatment of skin cancer by dermatologists can help save some Mississippians’ lives. Luckily, the first two dermatology residents at the Department of Dermatology have completed their first year at UMMC—the state’s only dermatology training program. Brodell said that he aims for the program to double the number of dermatologists in the state in the next 20 years. “There’s a huge need for dermatologists in Mississippi. Just call and try to make an appointment,” he said. He hopes that this program will help eliminate the waiting period for people who need appointments.

Best Dentist: Paula Stewart // by Tommy Burton

D

r. Paula Stewart, 54, has many things to be proud of these days. In addition to being voted Best Dentist in this year’s Best of Jackson, the Mississippi Dental Association recently elected her as its president. “It’s a well-respected group,” Stewart says. “I just got back from

36

A Sense of Security The American Red Cross does more than just respond to local emergencies with manpower and supplies. It is a multi-faceted organization that also serves the community through giving certifications for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and first aid, among other options. Laurie Noble, the service delivery administrator for Red Cross’ Mississippi and

Washington where we’re among the top four ... lobby groups for dentistry in Mississippi.” Her path to dentistry wasn’t typical. The Raymond native attended dental school at University of Mississippi Medical Center as a mother of three children. “I was in sole survival mode,” she says. “I look back on that time now with a bit of nervous reflection.” She still managed to graduate at the top of her class in 1995. Stewart opened her first practice in Clinton 19 years ago before moving to her current location in Highland Village. Her practice is now a family affair as her oldest

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Louisiana regions, said that these classes are offered throughout the state and can be tailored to a student’s needs based on job requirements and interests. Classes are available in classroom and online settings. She believes that the classes grant people peace of mind about emergencies, which may help lower stress and, in turn, could increase a person’s well-being.

COURTESY PAULA STEWART

2014

David Elkin, executive director of the Children’s Collaborative, addresses a crowd during an announcement of the partnership between University of Mississippi Medical Center and Mississippi Children’s Home Services.

Local dentist Dr. Paula Stewart recently became president of the Mississippi Dental Association. son, Dr. Stewart Strange, practices alongside her. “We have a great team, and it’s a lot of fun,” she says.

She is excited to be involved with dentistry. “It’s an amazing field to be a part of,” Stewart says. “It’s one part of health care that is not affected by recent health-care changes, as well as being one of the top professions for hard-working young people to be in. I love it.” Dr. Paula Stewart, D.M.D. and Associates is located in Highland Village at 4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 235. For more information, call 601-987-8722 or visit paulastewartdmd.com. Second Place: Jim Ed Watson / Third Place: Kalil Abide / Finalist: Rusty Riley

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The Children’s Collaborative The University of Mississippi Medical Center and Mississippi Children’s Home Services have partnered up to help improve mental- and behavioral-health services and care for children. The goal is also to reduce costs. Kym Williams, the director of public relations of MCHS, said they plan to spread out from the Jackson area eventually. She hopes this will help families find treatment for behavioral and mental health-care services more easily. Each patient who comes into the collaborative will have a care coordinator. David Elkin, executive director of the Children’s Collaborative, said care coordinators are vital to the process and will help ease patients and families into the medical system because the current process can be patronizing and difficult. He wants patients to get doctor appointments quickly. “I really want there to be no wrong doors into this mental-health system,” Elkin said. “We want there to be no barriers or restrictions for anybody regardless of how much money they make, the color of their skin, or anything. Our responsibility is to the kids of the state of Mississippi—all of them.”

The Biggest Loser, Choctaw Edition The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians is doing more than just sweating this summer. The tribe, along with the Pearl River Resort, is competing in the Biggest Loser 2 Challenge, which entails eating healthy, exercising, and weekly weigh-ins, from May 23 to Aug. 22, Pearl River Resort employees are already 5,136 pounds lighter after about 700 workers finished an initial phase of the health contest, which involved getting a new insurance plan with more comprehensive benefits and healthy food options. The challenge will lower tribal members’ health risks and issues. Native Americans are the most affected ethnic group when it comes to diabetes, which is often caused by obesity. Native American adults are twice as likely to develop the disease than Caucasian adults and are 60 percent more likely to be obese. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

Holly Gagnon, the Pearl River Resort president and CEO, said in a statement that she is confident the MBCI and Pearl River Resort will exceed their goal of losing 5 tons, collectively, by the end of August.

2014

Best Nurse Practitioner: Geraldine Young // by Micah Smith

Healthy Weight with St. Dominic’s As Mississippi leads the nation with a 35.4 percent obesity rate, St. Dominic’s Hospital wants to help curb some of that statistic. The organization’s Healthy Weight Advantage Weight Loss Program is designed to help people lose anywhere from 10 to more than 200 pounds through meal replacement. This summer, Healthy Weight Advantage is focusing on its healthy shake program. Jennifer Hebert, operations manager of the Healthy Weight Loss Advantage Weight Loss program, said that the healthy shake program is the best summer diet because it is flexible and quick for people who do not have a lot of time. The program includes shakes, fruits, vegetables and a meal of the person’s choice. Healthy Weight Advantages, which focuses on developing a healthy lifestyle, offers different options for weight-loss success through varying low and moderate calorie diets, home weight-loss kits and varying degrees of medical supervision. Hebert said the program’s six- to 12-month maintenance phase, which teaches people how to live healthy off the diet, distinguishes the program from other weightloss programs.

Healthy Life Screenings Baptist Health Systems has offered lowcost health-risk screenings for the past 15 years, but the company spruced up the program this year regarding cardiovascular, lung and cancer screenings. This past year, Baptist put a focus on its Healthy Life Screen Team, which offers lowcost lung screenings, prostate cancer screenings, colonoscopies, skin screenings and lowcost mammograms. Baptist has also been concentrating on spreading the importance of getting annual mammograms. Robby Channell, the media manager for Baptist Health Systems, said that the Center for Breast Health at Baptist offers programs that help patients find physicians and give low-cost mammograms at a flat rate of $180—payable by cash only—to women who meet their criteria. Mandy Williams, the employee health and wellness coordinator at Baptist, said health screenings are valuable and important, and Baptist offers them at little or no cost.

H

COURTESY GERALDINE YOUNG

“(The classes) definitely spread awareness of different things like cardiac emergencies (and) sudden illnesses if you’re taking first aid—especially (heat-related) emergencies in the summer time, or even during the winter when it’s deer season,” Noble said. “It definitely provides that sense of security and understanding that if an emergency would ever happen to someone you know, you could provide care in emergency situations.”

ealth was something of a family business for nurse practitioner Geraldine Young. “I was encouraged by my mother to become a nurse,” she says. “She was a respiratory therapist, and I was always in hospitals and around nurses growing up.” Since she began her dream job, Young has been faced with a foe that seems to grow stronger every year—diabetes. She’s treated countless cases, whether serving Local Nurse as a nurse practiPractioner tioner for pediaGeraldine Young trician Dr. Louisa works to fight diabetes in Lawson or as an Mississippi. assistant professor at Alcorn State University. The sheer number of patients suffering from this life-draining disease prompted Young to act. When a grant came through from Central Mississippi Health Services, Young decided to become a certified diabetes educator. Soon after, she assisted in creating the first American Association of Diabetes-accredited program in the state of Mississippi. Young warns her patients of signs associated with diabetes, including constant thirst and urination, increased appetite, weight loss, sores that don’t heal or constant sickness. The Best of Jackson winner seeks ways to stem the diabetes epidemic, from simple changes like implementing a better electronic medical filing system to perhaps the hardest change of all—daily life. “Looking at your daily diet and exercising are both essential. Just watch it,” Young says. “If you can manage to have one serving of meat in a meal and keep everything else fruits and vegetables, that alone would help.” Second Place: Louis Greg Ross / Third Place: Kenyatta Moore 37


Well at Waggoner // by Julie Skipper

I

38

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

ployee who wants to participate is left out. The company hopes to see improvement in the areas in which the assessment shows them lacking within 12 months; each year, a new assessment will track how the company wellness as a whole has improved. “We hope that besides the analytics, we can track in terms of corporate risk assessment, insurance, sick days, etc., which (Blue Cross & Blue Shield) will give us. The success is what we never actually see—like a reduction in heart attacks and other things that not living a healthy lifestyle causes,” Boteler says. While the committee recognizes resistance to change is a challenge in implementing any new program, it hopes staff will get excited. It hopes that as they start to participate and see positive changes in their own lives, they will then tell coworkers, and people will grow more comfortable with it. Milton adds that, in addition to the new aspects of the wellness program, there’s also an aspect of making employees aware of things that are already available to them, such as smoking-cessation assistance. “It’s about bringing awareness to resources so employees can make use of them,” Milton says. With incentives to participate, such as entries in drawings for a prize upon completion of the wellness assessment, and gift cards or time off for doing the insurers’ Healthy You program, Waggoner seeks to support its employees in adopting a more healthy lifestyle. Pleased with the ease of implementing the program thus far, the company hopes to serve as an example for other offices. KAY MORTIMER

t’s no secret that Mississippi represents we need,” Milton says, including templates a ground zero of sorts for widespread for employee communications, forms and health-related issues such as obesity, dia- programming. The wellness program’s first betes and heart disease. Armed with that year is about benchmarking and identifying knowledge, some employers are taking steps significant company-wide wellness goals to to address workplace wellness with a com- be met year-to-year. prehensive approach. Jackson’s Waggoner Engineering, a company of about 100 employees, Tracey Milton, Bill McDonald, recently formed a comChris Flowers and Justin Kay spearheaded Waggoner mittee to look into the isEngineering’s new wellness sue of workplace wellness initiative for its employees. and health. The company decided that it would implement a wellness initiative, and then a committee of three—Tracey Milton, Margie Bean and Justin Kay—entered a dialogue with their humanresources department to identify ways to implement a wellness program and to get people interested and participating in the effort. Kirby Boteler, Waggoner’s director of information technology, has This means that, initially, Waggoner will been with the company for 13 years. “Waggoner is a very employee-focused firm and like a fam- conduct an online assessment for each emily,” she says. ployee. After that, it will host a health fair with That close-knit environment resulted in representatives who will come in and collect a recognition that the company truly cares health statistics such as BMI (body mass inabout the people who work there and wants dex), blood pressure, lipid and cholesterol them to participate in a healthier lifestyle. readings. Then, Blue Cross & Blue Shield “We have some employees who are very ac- will put together an overall recommendation tive in participating in walks and runs around the based on the company’s collective needs. To area, and we also knew we have people who want start addressing those needs and reaching to eat healthier,” says Milton, who serves on the their goals, employees will have opportunicompany’s Workplace Wellness Initiative cam- ties to work with dieticians, personal trainers paign. “We wanted to create a way for people to and other health professionals. While they hope everyone eventually come together as a company to do those things.” The committee discovered that its in- participates in the wellness program, Milton surer, Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Missis- notes that participation is not required, and sippi, has a program in place that helps com- adds that the company will pay for non-BCBS panies do just that. “They have everything plan participants’ program costs so no em-

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TOMMY BURTON

INDEX

Smoking at Work: The U.S. Numbers, on Average

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SOURCES: OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTH DAKOTA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL, AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY, FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF ATLANTA, JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE.

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Making Every Mile Count // by Tommy Burton

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 6:30 a.m. on a cool Saturday morning in Ridgeland. The sun hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even been out for a full hour, but cars begin filing into Old Trace Park. At 6:45 a.m., everyone is stretching, and by 7 a.m., everyone is running. Every week, more miles are added to the Saturday morning run so that by the end of the year, the runners will do 26.2 milesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the distance that makes up a full marathon. Mark and Robin Simpson started Marathon Makeover 11 years ago. In more than a decade, the couple trained more than 4,000 Mississippians to run full marathons and half marathons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really started with a dare and challenge,â&#x20AC;? Mark, 48, says. Chuck Engle, who was a big marathon runner, complained that no one in Mississippi wanted to run marathons. Mark reasoned that it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a matter of not wanting to, but simply not knowing how to. The friend told Mark that he would train him for a marathon if Mark could find five others to do it. The first person he asked was his wife, Robin, now 47.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a mother of three,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had no interest in doing this.â&#x20AC;? They had a friend that was very out of shape who told him that she would do it if Robin did. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought that if thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what it took, then I have to do it,â&#x20AC;? Robin says. Mark and Robin managed to gather about 20 people in that first group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had this vision at 18 (years old) of where I wanted to be in 20 years,â&#x20AC;? Mark says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was approaching 38, and I had everything except health.â&#x20AC;? By the time he reached his 38th birthday, Mark ran in the Chicago Marathon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It had such an impact in peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives that more and more wanted to do it,â&#x20AC;? he says. The couple returned and began doing research on how to train beginning runners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can imagine experienced runners keeping a crazy training schedule,â&#x20AC;? Mark says. We did our research and adjusted that for sane peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the couch potatoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and we started this program, and it has just grown from there.â&#x20AC;?

Through Marathon Makeover, Mark and Robin Simpson train locals to run in marathons.

After graduating from Mississippi College, the Memphis native married Robin in 1987. The couple have three childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Caroline, and Anna and Kate, who are twins. Mark enjoys Marathon Makeoverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sense of community and fellowship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we take the negative peer pressure of our culture that is so set in being unhealthy, and shift that into a healing pressure of community that encourages and uplifts, you become unstoppable,â&#x20AC;? he says. So how does one get into the mindset of running 26.2 miles? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The biggest obstacle is between the ears and not under the feet,â&#x20AC;? Mark says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have these self-limiting beliefs that we buy into. We settle. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a saying: When the why is strong, the how becomes easy. When the why is strong, you make it happen. If people have enough support, they can do amazing things.â&#x20AC;? Marathon Makeover has training sessions throughout the year. For more information, visit marathonmakeover.com. 39


Our Wellness Manifesto

Hot or Not?

// by Amber Helsel

// by Ronni Mott

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ith the deep freeze of 2014 over, thoughts turn to facing the public in skimpy, revealing clothing or (gasp!) a bathing suit. Pole dancing and old-fashioned calisthenics can get the fitness job done, but letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not forget about yoga. Bending and stretching is a good start if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve spent the winter on the couch sipping tea in wooly socks, and for my money, nothing compares with yoga to increase flexibility. But what style? Should you try hot yoga, trademarked Bikram? Now, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need 105 degrees to sweatâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the average temperature in a Bikram studio. Skinny friends are astounded that 80 degrees isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t within my ever-shrinking comfort zone.

July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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I can lose a few pounds of water weight just standing outdoors in a Mississippi summer. Yoga poses take strength, too, so I â&#x20AC;&#x153;glowâ&#x20AC;? effusively in a 70-degree yoga class. But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s move beyond that annoying detail. Is hot yoga for you? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re into group exercise in a virtual saunaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;absolutely. But sweating more wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t detox your liver faster (as Bikram claims), and water weight comes back the minute you rehydrate. Yoga has hundreds, perhaps thousands of asanas (thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sanskrit for â&#x20AC;&#x153;posesâ&#x20AC;?). Bikram does 26, and every class does the same 26 in the same order. Maybe uniformity is your thing. To me, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like having a smorgasbord loaded with hundreds of yummy dishes boomjackson.com


// by Micah Smith

D

r. Timothy Quinn has championed better living by personal choice through his time at Belhaven University, his medical education at Meharry Medical College in Nashville and his residency at King Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles. The emphasis on making smart decisions in daily life has only strengthened since he began practicing family medicine in Jackson in 2003.

How did you first get interested in the medical field?

When did you first become focused on personal fitness as a form of health care? I’d always had a big interest in weight loss and fitness, which is why I went to Los Angeles. Soon after, I was made aware that there was a need for my type of

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

Best Orthodontist: Priscilla Jolly

Jolly Orthodontics (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 7201, Ridgeland, 601-879-4746) jollyortho.com Second Place: Karl Bierdman / Third Place (tie): Eugene Brown; Ken Walley

medicine in our state, a need to be more aware about making choices on what we eat and on exercise that would very strongly impact our health. COURTESY TIMOTHY QUINN

Best Doctor; Best General Practitioner: Timothy Quinn

Second Place: Greg Fiser

COURTESY PRISCILLA JOLLY

2014

I was born in Chicago, and I moved to McComb at an early age, about 6 or 7. I finished high school there, and after that I joined the National Guard, where I was assigned a job as a field medic. I was deployed in Operation Desert Storm, but I only served stateside. After that, I attended (Jackson State University) and worked at Baptist Hospital as a nurse’s aid. During my first year of college, I received an academic scholarship to Belhaven and transferred. About that time, people started encouraging me to pursue being a physician, and eventually I did my residency in family medicine.

Martin Surgical Associates (971 Lakeland Drive, Suite 211, 601200-4350)

COURTESY OZIOMA NEWS

and choosing only fried chicken and green beans for every meal, every day. After a week, I’d be an expert on crispy skin, but I’d also be bored. Bring me variety! Bikram aficionados say a hot room allows you to deepen stretches faster. That’s true. But is it a good thing? You already have an internal heat-generating machine. To safely stretch, warm is good. Hot may be dangerously easy. Ligaments and tendons don’t stretch much, and once stretched, they don’t snap back. Think of it like a hot rubber band. Like that band, if you over stretch muscles, or more importantly, tendons or ligaments (which keep your joints in place), you might tear something or rip a tendon away from your bones. That’s not good. In an overheated room, you might not notice in time to stop. My advice for beginners? Find a knowledgeable teacher who focuses on alignment and who looks for potential problems. If you’re in decent shape, join the legions of hot and happy Bikram yogis. If you’re OK with letting Mississippi take care of the heat thing, or if you’re a couch potato, on the northern end of the age spectrum or have issues like high blood pressure, be careful. Yoga has numerous benefits, but heat stroke is not a path to Nirvana. Ronni Mott is a certified yoga instructor at Butterfly Yoga.

Best Surgeon: Reginald Martin

Dr. Timothy Quinn puts a focus on fitness at Quinn Healthcare.

How have you put this focus into your practice? We Mississippians are not as healthy as far as our lifestyles. And I say “we” because it has affected me. Even in my family, I’ve

had an uncle, an aunt, and a cousin die untimely of a stroke, a heart attack and another stroke before the age of 60. I’m always working with patients to make them understand that if they work hard, exercise and make a conscious effort, it will make situations a lot better. Genetics are a big part of it, but lifestyle is just as powerful. It may not completely protect from things like high blood pressure or diabetes, but it will definitely make them better. Exercising and eating healthy can, in some cases, be the difference between life and death. If you change your lifestyle, you can change your destiny. Best Doctor Second Place: Justin Turner / Third Place: Scott Kelly / Finalist: Alan Rathburn Best General Practitioner Second Place: Scott Kelly / Third Place: Justin Turner

41


D

COURTESY JIM ED WATSON

he moved to Jackson in 2001, he brought his dental expertise to the Jackson Center for 2014 Smiles to provide aesthetic dental services to patients. The Jackson Center for Smiles offers serBest Cosmetic Dentist: vices such as teeth whitening, braces, aligner Dr. Jim Ed Watson // by Emma McNeel therapy, veneers, and dental bonding. He provides smile makeovers by altering teeth gaps, r. Jim Ed Watson defines cosmetic restoring chipped or missing teeth, replacing dentistry as a “disciworn or aged dental work, pline that has evolved dental implants or clear sixin recent years … because of month braces. Other proceadvancements in materials, dures include fillings, dental demand in patients, and (edubridges and crowns, and cation) in dentistry.” laser periodontal therapy. Watson, a general denWatson also uses the Zoom tist who focuses on cosmetic system to provide teeth dentistry, works at Jackson whitening, which is his most Center for Smiles, which he popular cosmetic procedure. Watson believes that opened Sept. 8, 2001. The Yazoo City native got a doccosmetic dentistry protorate in dental surgery from vides “healthy, functional Dr. Jim Ed Watson the University of Tennessee. and beautiful smiles.” He At the Pacific Aesthetic Consays it is “driven by necestinuum (PAC-live), Watson sity, but it is fulfilled … with trained with Dr. Bill Dorfman cosmetic, appealing materiof ABC’s “Extreme Makeover” and studied als. To me, a cosmetic procedure is a patient smile design and dental procedures. When desired procedure.”

Best Runner: Terry Sullivan liverightnowonline.com Second: Jeremy Jungling Third: John Browser

Best Race: Mississippi Blues Marathon

January, msbluesmarathon.com Second: Run Up for Downs (runnningforlily. com) / Third (tie): 12Ks for the Holidays (christmas12k.com); Fondren Urban Ultra (ultrasignup.com)

Best Local Sports Apparel Shop: StinkyFeet Athletics

153 Ridgeway, Suite C, Flowood, 601992-1439; 122 E. Main St., Starkville, 662-268-8042 stinkyfeetathletics.com Second: Fleet Feet (500 Highway 51, Ridgeland, 601-899-9696) / Third: The Bike Rack (2282 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-936-2100)

You deserve some

Me time.

Mississippi’s First Blow Dry Bar 5352 Lakeland Drive Suite 600, Flowood | 601.992.4911 Tues: 9-7 • Wed: 10-5 • Thu: 9-7 • Fri: 9-6 • Sat: 9-3 42

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com


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Our Kitchen is Open Unil 1AM

CAPITOL GRILL Jackson, Ms

Appetizers Quesadilla $8 Add Certified Angus Beef ® Steak $5 Add Chicken $3

Gator Bites $9 Breaded Button Mushrooms $6 Onion Rings $6 Cheese Fritters $9 Fried Green Tomatoes $8 Chips & Queso $8 Chips & Salsa $6 Nachos $8 Stadium Fries $9

Salads

Served with your choice of dressings (Add chicken $2, Add shrimp $3) House Salad $7 Cobb Salad $9 Summer Crisp Salad $ Wedge Salad $6 Seafood Salad $9

Sides $3.00 each Steak Fries • Onion Rings Sweet Potato Fries • Side House/Caesar Sautéed Vegetables • Fried Mushrooms Fried Green Tomatoes • Mac & Cheese Coleslaw • Potato Salad • Baked Potato

Visit our website for our entire menu & daily express lunch specials. www.capitolgrillofjackson.

The Gamecocks

Burgers

All of our eight-ounce Certified Angus Wings Beef ® burgers are served on our house (3) $6 / (6) $11 / (12) $15 / (24) $26 or wheat bun with lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle, and your choice of side. Choice of sauce: Sweet BBQ, Hot, Sweet Mac & Cheese Burger $13 Chili, Spicy Garlic, Caribbean Jerk. Capitol Cheddar $10 Served with celery sticks and ranch. Black & Bleu Cajun $13 Tenders Screaming Jalapeño $12 Mushroom-Onion-Swiss $13 (3) $6 / (6) $10 / (12) $15 / (24) $25 Capitol Chili $14 Grilled or fried with choice of wing sauce The Aggie $12 if you would like.

Capitol Flatbreads Shrimp & Basil Pesto Flatbread $9.50 Buffalo Chicken Flatbread $9.50 Veggie Flatbread $9.50

Plates & Platters Rebel Red Beans $9 Pulled Pork $10 Grilled Chicken $9 Redfish $16 Shrimp $13 Fried Oyster $16 Fried Shrimp $14

Steaks

Abundantly flavorful. Incredibly tender. Naturally juicy. The Certified Angus Beef ® brand is Angus beef at its best®. Filet $23 Ribeye $25 Bone In Pork Chop $16 Tiger Bites $15

Sandwiches

All sandwiches served with your choice of our house, wheat bun or sliced sourdough with your choice of side. Redfish $13 Chicken $9 Club $12 Razorback $10 War Eagle $10

Po’ Boys

All po’ boys are served with lettuce, tomato, onion and mayo with your choice of side. Redfish $15 Oyster $15 Shrimp $13 Crawfish $12 Turkey Club $11 Philly Steak $11 B.L.T. $10 The Mayor’s Special $12

Extras

Add to any item $.50 Extras • Onions & Peppers Caramelized Onions • Fresh Jalapeños Pico de Gallo • Mushrooms Fried Green Tomatoes $1.00 Extras Chili Bacon • Queso • Bleu Cheese Shredded Cheese • Sliced Swiss

Happy Hour Every Day 3-7 PM 5050 I-55 North, Suite F • Jackson • 601.899.8845 M44

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


LUNCH MENU

APPETIZERS

$10 ENTRÉE SPECIALS

Stuffed Mushrooms..........................................$6.95

All specials come with salad wagon Gluten Free Pasta available for $1.50 extra

New Orleans BBQ Shrimp...............................$6.95

The Italian Melt

Large mushrooms filled with our roasted red pepper cream cheese stuffing. Topped with melted mozzarella and a honey butter white wine cream sauce. Tail-on jumbo shrimp sautéed in a Worcestershire roux. Served with garlic bread.

Fried Mozzarella Cheese Sticks.......................$4.95 Italian battered mozzarella cheese fried to perfection. Served with our homemade marinara. Customer favorite!

Fried Ravioli ....................................................$4.95 Cheese ravioli fried golden brown. Served with our homemade marinara.

Meatballs................................................. $1.50 each If you haven’t tried our big meatballs, you should. Get one, two, or a whole plate!! Nana’s ground beef meatballs hand-rolled with love. Served in our marinara & topped with mozzarella.

SOUPS & SALAD Soup of the day Cup .......... .....................$4.95

Bowl .......... $6.95

Cerami’s Salad Wagon .....................................$6.95 All you can eat. Fresh romaine, olive salad, gorgonzola cheese, marinated onions. Choice of Italian vinaigrette or creamy Italian.

Help yourself! Add grilled chicken..........................................$2.95 Add 5 grilled shrimp ........................................$4.95 Soup & Salad ...................................................$9.95 Cup of soup & salad wagon

DESSERTS Tiramisu Classic OR Toasted Almond.............$4.95 Cheesecake NY style OR Crème Brulee..........$4.95 Chocolate Eruption cake ..................................$5.95 Italian Cream Cake ..........................................$5.95 Italian Cannoli .................................................$4.95

Thick slices of tender roast beef piled high on Gambino’s French bread. Topped with mozzarella and broiled to warm it all up. Served with side of au jus.

Meatball Sub Our homemade beef meatballs on Gambino’s French bread, smothered in our marinara and topped with mozzarella cheese. 9” of Italian Bliss!

AJ’s Linguini & Meatballs A classic Italian favorite & customer favorite!! Served with 2 Meatballs.

Baked Lasagna Heavenly layers of Italian. Filled with cheeses, herbs, ground beef & marinara.

Chicken Alfredo Grilled chicken on linguini pasta covered in our “oh so good, I can drink it” parmesan Alfredo sauce.

Pasta Primavera Delicious handpicked vegetable medley sautéed in garlic herbed butter over linguini pasta.

Add Chicken ......... $2.95 Add Shrimp .......... $4.95

Red Beans & Rice Absolutely nothing Italian about this dish but the chef’s favorite recipe. Red beans, sausage, and white rice served with toast.

5417 Lakeland Dr. Flowood MS 39232 • 601-919-2829 Delivery available for orders over $100 • Gratuity added to all to-go orders Jackson Menu Guide

M45


1220 E. Northside Dr Ste 100 Jackson, MS 39211 601-366-5441 — STARTERS — ISLANDER SEAFOOD & ANDOUILLE GUMBO $3.95/ $6.95 SOUP OF THE DAY Market Price

ISLANDER CRAB CAKES

— TACOS & POBOYS —

— ENTREES —

Blackened Mahi-Mahi Sandwhich

Server Will Offer A Description. $Market Price

Served with Fresh Cut Kennebec Fries or Choose Sweet Potato Fries, Soup, Salad or Gumbo for $1.50 Blackened Mahi-Mahi, Remoulade, Zesty Lime Pico de Gallo, Jalapeno Cole Slaw, Onion Roll $13.95

REDFISH TACOS

Tropical chutney & Remoulade $11.95

Flour Tortillas, Bronzed Redfish, Zesty Lime Pico de Gallo, Jalapeno Cole Slaw $14.95

CRAWFISH ROLLS

FAJITA SHRIMP TACOS

Cream Cheese, Crawfish, Roasted Red Bell Peppers, Pico de Gallo $9.95

TUNA TARTAR Ponzu, Pineapple Salsa, Jalapeno Cole Slaw, Gambino Bread$11.95

BACON WRAPPED SCALLOPS Mixed Greens, Islander Salsa, Sweet Chili Sauce $14.95

SHRIMP & GUACAMOLE! Boiled Shrimp, Guacamole, Lime Pico de Gallo, Shaved Coconut, Tortilla Chips $9.95

— SALADS — HOUSE Mixed Greens, Tomato, Red Onions, Cheddar, Homemade Croutons, Comeback Dressing $3.95

MARGARITA SALAD Gulf Shrimp, Scallops, Mixed Greens, Iceberg, Candied Pecans, Tomatoes, Avocado, Orange Wedg-

Flour Tortillas, Grilled Shrimp, Guacamole, Cheddar Cheese, Sauteed Peppers & Onions, Iceberg, Zesty Lime Pico de Gallo $13.95

CUBAN TACOS Flour Tortillas, Black Cherry Smoked Pork, Grilled Ham, Mustard, Pickle, Jalapeno Cole Slaw, Fried Onions $9.95

POBOYS Oyster, Shrimp, or Catfish, Caramelized Onions, Tomato, Iceberg, Remoulade $12.95

PARADISE CHEESEBURGER Half Pound Beef Patty, Cheddar, Bacon, Red Onion, Lettuce,Tomato, Comeback Dressing, Onion Roll $9.95

— OYSTERS — MARKET PRICE

SEAFOOD PASTA Crawfish, Shrimp, Scallops, Crab, Linguine Pasta, Roasted Tomato Basil Alfredo Sauce $19.95

ISLANDER PLATTERS CHOOSE: Gulf Shrimp, Oysters, Catfish, or Chicken Fresh Cut Fries, Jalapeno Cole Slaw

$14.95

SHRIMP & GRITS Smoked Gouda “Grit Girl -Oxford, MS” Grits, Gulf Shrimp, Green Onions, Bacon, Creole Gravy

$18.95

BOILED GULF SHRIMP By the pound or Half Pound with Corn, “Country Pleasin” Sausage, Red Potatoes $25.95/

$14.95

RED BEANS & WILD RICE

RAW

Jalapenos $9.95

SEAFOOD BUCKET

CHARGRILLED

Gulf shrimp, Snow Crab Clusters, Corn, “Country Pleasin” Sausage, Red Potatoes

ISLANDER OYSTERS

Herbed Grilled Chicken, Grilled Pineapple, Baby Arugula, Feta, Pomegranate Vinaigrette, Herb & Oil Infused Croutons $11.95

CAIN’S OYSTERS

Shrimp, Mozzarella Cheese, Applewood Smoked Bacon

Cheddar, Cream Cheese, Pepperoncini Jalapeno Pepper, Relish, Bacon

ROCKEFELLER

$32.95 ($62.95 for two)

Visit Our Website IslanderOysterHouse.com for lunch and brunch menus!

Spinach, Sambuca, Parmesan Cheese

CRAB STUFFED

Lump Crabmeat, Roasted Red Bell Peppers, Parmesan Cheese

SCAMPI

Iceberg Lettuce, Cheddar Cheese, Pico de Gallo, Guacamole, Sautéed Onions & Bell Peppers, Fresh Fried Tortilla Wedges.Topped Bronzed Redfish Filet

Garlic Butter, Sauvignon Blanc, Parmesan Cheese, Shrimp

$13.95

PINEAPPLE SALSA

CHIPOTLE GARLIC Chipotle Chilies, Fresh Garlic, Butter Pineapple, Bell Peppers, Jalapenos, Onions

M46

$19.95

Served chilled on the half shell Cocktail & Horseradish

PANZANELLA CHICKEN SALAD

REDFISH FAJITA SALAD

BEER BUTTER SHRIMP Gulf Shrimp, Andouille Sausage, Potatoes, Corn, Carrots, Beer Butter Emulsion, Fresh Herbs, Bread

Red beans, “Country Pleasin” Andouille Sausage, Cheese, Tomatoes, Red Onions, Scallions, Fried

Garlic Butter, Parmesan Cheese

ISLANDER CRAB SALAD

N’AWLINS STYLE

All Oysters are served by the Dozen or Half Dozen. Combo any Dozen with two Varieties

es, Red Onions, Margarita Vinaigrette $16.95

Mixed Greens, Toasted Coconut, Lump Crabmeat, Kiwi, Orange Sections, Grilled Pineapple, Candied Pecans, Citrus Vinaigrette $15.95

FRESH FISH OF THE DAY

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

18% gratuity included for parties of 6 or more. $2 charge for split plates. Warning: Consumption of undercooked meat, poultry, eggs, or seafood may increase the risk of food borne illness

Owner: Chris Jacobs Executive Chef: Jessica Furches Manager: Kathleen Harr jxnmenus.com


Jackson Menu Guide

M47


TRIP ADVISOR’S #1 RESTAURANT IN JACKSON

SELECTED ENTREES Monday - Saturday, 5:30pm - Until

WOOD-GRILLED WAGYU HANGER STEAK ROASTED FINGERLING POTATO, ARUGULA, PICKLED ONIONS, CRISPY ONIONS, RED WINE SAuCE 16 oz DUROC PORKCHOP SWEET POTATO MASH, THIN BEANS, PEACH CHUTNEY, MADEIRA WINE SAUCE PAN-ROASTED GULF GROUPER SHRIMP-FETA RISOTTO, CARMELIZED FENNEL, CUCUMBER & TOMATO SALAD, PARMESAN BROTH EVERYTHING CRUSTED #1 TUNA SPICY CHEESE GRITS, CHIPOTLE GLAZE, TOMATO RELISH

Artist Series: Jacqueline Ellens southern breeze gallery

PAN-SEARED JUMBO “DRY-PACKED” SEA SCALLOPS ARUGULA-PESTO RISOTTO, GRILLED CORN & SWEET ONION SALAD, CHARRED TOMATO LEMON BUTTER WOOD-GRILLED GULF SHRIMP CHIPOTLE GLAZED, FORBIDDEN BLACK RICE, DAIKON, CUCUMBER & CARROT SLAW, COCONUT-CURRY BROTH CRISPY POULET ROUGE RED CHICKEN-SEMI BONELESS, WILD MUSHROOM BREAD PUDDING, BRUSSELS SPROUT-CELERY ROOT SALAD, SPICY THYME JUS REDFISH ANNA WITH LUMP CRAB MEAT GARLIC MASH, THIN BEANS, CHARRED TOMATO LEMON BUTTER

DRIVE-INARTS DISTRICT 3016 NORTH STATE STREET - FONDREN 601.982.2633 - WALKERSDRIVEIN.COM

Dinner Reservations Welcome. Private Dining & Catering Services Available. Walkers Also Serves Lunch Monday Through Friday.

TRIP ADVISOR’S #1 RESTAURANT IN MADISON

Selected Entrees

Redfish 463 with sauteed crabmeat, garlic mash, thin beans and a charred tomato-lemon butter Crispy Jumbo Shrimp with pink slaw, french fries, cilantro and corn fritter and a chipotle tartar sauce Apricot-Teriyaki Glazed Grilled Salmon on sesame spinach, with shiitake mushrooms and soy lemon butter Pan Seared Jumbo Sea Scallops on roasted poblano, green tomato, and feta risotto with crawfish and corn salsa and a charred tomato lemon butter The “Original” Honey-Rosemary Fried Chicken all natural chicken breast in a Mississippi honey-rosemary with garlic mash and thin beans

Lunch

MONDAY - SATURDAY, 11:00 - 2:00 PM

Dinner

MONDAY - SATURDAY, 5:30PM - UNTIL

121A COLONY CROSSING - MADISON, MS 601.707.7684 - LOCAL463.COM

Prime Flank Steak spice crusted and sliced with toasted garlic, spinach, Manchego shoestring fries and a chimichurri sauce 8 oz. Filet wood-grilled Hereford beef filet with baconcheddar mash, fresh asparagus and crispy onions

Southern-style plate lunch on weekdays reservations welcome bar open all day

Walker’s Drive-In and Local 463 are owned and operated by Derek & Jennifer Emerson. M48

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


OVR :HDHU FDW

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

Soup & Salad 5HG/HQWLO6RXS 

2.95

Sandwiches

*UHHN6DODG  *UHHQ6DODG  )DWRXFKH  7DERXOL   7]HNL6DODG $UDELF6DODG  6KDZDUPD6DODG *ULOOHG&KLFNHQ6DODG 6KULPS6DODG 

5.49 3.75 4.49 4.49 4.49 4.49 7.59 7.59 8.59

)DODIHO   *\URV   /XOD.DEDEchicken or lamb 6KLVK.DEDEbeef or lamb &KLFNHQ.DEDE  &KLFNHQ6KDZDUPD %HHI6KDZDUPD  +DPEXUJHU  &KHHVHEXUJHU  3KLOO\6WHDN 

Add meat on your salad for 3.00 Add feta on your salad for 1.00

Appetizers $ODGGLQ·V6SHFLDO14.69 +XPPXV'LS  3.95 %DED*DQXM'LS  4.50 0XVDEDKD  4.50 )RXO   4.50 4XGVLD (mixed hummus & foul) 4.50 /HEQD   4.50 )ULHG.LEE\  4.50 0HDWRU9HJJLH'ROPDV 4.50 3LFNOHVDQG2OLYHV 2.50 )HWD&KHHVHDQG2OLYHV 3.50 6SLQDFK3LH    4.00 )ULHG&KHHVH  5.95 )DODIHO    3.50 %DVPDWL5LFHZ6DIIURQ 2.50 )UHQFK)ULHV  2.50

3.99 4.99 5.49 5.49 5.49 5.99 5.99 4.79 4.99 5.49

Desserts )UHVK%DNODYD %XUPD  %DNODYD)LQJHUV %LUG1HVW 7LUDPLVX

    

Phone 601-948-0055 Fax 601-948-1195 KITCHEN HOURS Mon-Thur 11am-11pm Fri 11am-Midnight Saturday 4pm-Midnight

Appetizers

Burgers

Scotch Egg A traditional Celtic

Pub Burger $8

staple. (Allow 15 min.) $5

Irish Nachos $8 Chicken & Chips $6 Fish & Chips $7 Fried Cheese Balls $6 Bacon Wrapped Stuffed Jalapenos $6

1.95 1.95 1.95 1.65 3.69

Slider Basket $7

Chicken & Cheese $8 Buffalo Chicken $8 Hawaiian Chicken $8

House Salad $5 large $8

Blackened Tilapia Sandwich $9

Add a grilled chicken breast $3

Entrees Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pie $10

Bookmaker $9 Reuben $9 Portabella Sandwich $10

Desserts Irish Bread Pudding $5 Dirty Ice Cream Sandwich $6

Corned Beef & Cabbage $10 Grilled Tilapia Plate $9 Grilled Chicken Plate $9

Irish Boxties Reuben Boxty $10 Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pie Boxty $10 Veggie Boxty $9

$INEINOR4AKE/UT7EALSO$ELIVER 6XQ7KXUVDPSP)ULDQG6DWDPSP DODGGLQLQMDFNVRQFRP

Jackson Menu Guide

Sandwiches Pub Club $8

Chef Salad $9

7HO)D[

Scotch Egg Burger $9

Salads Add a grilled chicken breast $3

,AKELAND$R &ONDREN

Western Burger $9

Reuben Burger $10

Basket Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Chips $3

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Fried Egg Burger $9

Grilled Sausage & Cheese Platter $9

Caesar Salad $5 large $7

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Bleu Cheese & Bacon Burger $9

Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pie Burger $10

Basket Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Okra $3

served with salad, hummus, rice and white or whole wheat pita bread

Chilli Cheese Burger $9

Fried Dill Slices $4

Corned Beef Slider Basket $7

Entrees

Mushroom Swiss Burger $9

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Grilled Tilapia Plate $9

HEARTY FOOD. STOUT LIBATIONS . A HUNDRED THOUSAND SALUTATIONS . M49


Jackson’s Best BBQ JFP’s Best of Jackson

2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012

Sandwiches

Extra Fixin’s

BBQ Chicken (chopped w/ slaw relish) Garlic Bread ............................. .95 ..................................................... 6.35 Brunswick Stew w/ homemade BBQ Pork (chopped w/ slaw relish) cornbread: 1/2 pint - 5.45, pint - 9.10, ..................................................... 5.45 1/2 gallon - 29.05, gallon - 54.45 BBQ Beef (chopped w/ slaw relish) .................................................... 5.80

Assorted Potato Chips .......... 1.10

Po-Boys your choice of Pork, Chicken, Beef, Ham or Turkey (lettuce, tomato, mayo & Ruffles) .......................... 10.45 with cheese ............................... 11.99

Tater Salad, Cole Slaw, Baked Beans, BBQ Sauce: single - 2.45, 1/2 pint - 3.25, pint - 5.45, 1/2 gallon - 18.50, gallon - 32.95

Grilled Cheese ........................ 4.15 extra cheese ................................ 1.25

Homemade Pies

Onion Rings ........................... 3.90 Smoked Ham (lettuce, tomato & mayo) Fries (fresh cut taters) ................. 3.60 ..................................................... 6.35 Regular or Sweet Potato with cheese ................................ 6.95 Small Garden Salad .............. 4.70 Smoked Turkey (lettuce, tomato & mayo) (Come Back, Ranch, or Raspberry ..................................................... 6.35 Vinaigrette) with cheese ................................ 6.95 Chef Salad ............................. 12.55 Hamburger ............................. 4.75 (topped with cheddar and swiss (lettuce, tomato, mayo, mustard, cheese, boiled egg, smoked chicken or pickles & onion) with cheese ....... 5.99 smoked ham & turkey, with a choice Double Hamburger ............... 5.99 of Come Back, Ranch or Raspberry with cheese ................................. 7.99 Vinaigrette)

M50

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Special Sandwich Platter ...... 9.45 (BBQ Chicken, Pork, Beef, Ham, Hamburger, or Turkey Sandwiches. Choice of two fixins: garden salad, slaw, tater salad, home fries, sweet potato fries, onion rings or baked beans)

Lemon or Pecan ..................... 4.80

BBQ Plates

Party Packs

Choice of 2 of our delicious fixins: garden salad, slaw, tater salad, home fries or baked beans and Texas toast! BBQ Pork (chopped) ............. 12.95 BBQ Beef (chopped) .............. 13.50 Pork Ribs (wet or dry) 1/2 slab ..................................... 16.45 whole slab ................................ 28.55 BBQ Chicken (1/2 cluck) .......... 13.15 Combination (1/2 cluck, 1/2 slab) .................................................. 24.95 BBQ Nachos ........................... 8.99

Serves 10 Adults .................. 49.85 (2lb. pork or beef or 2 whole chickens; 2 pints beans, 2 pints slaw & 6 slices of Texas toast or 10 buns)

Hershey Bar ............................ 5.45 Carrot Cake ............................. 5.45 Coconut Cake .......................... 5.45

We also sell Whole Pies!

1/2 Party Pack ....................... 26.15 Rib Party Pack (serves 4) ....... 57.35 (2 slabs ribs, 1 pint beans, 1 pint slaw, 1 pint potato salad, 4 slices of Texas toast) We sell BBQ Pork, Beef, Ribs, Chicken, Ham & Turkey by the pound.

Ask About Our Catering!

jxnmenus.com


Where do you use the APP? No matter where you are 3 of your favorite restaurants are at your fingertips!

Full menus, daily specials, special event news, discount offers, & more!

Download your FREE Mangia Bene App today!

ANDROID

IPHONE

BravoBuzz.com Jackson Menu Guide

SalAndMookies.com BroadStBakery.com M51


M52

July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


National Register of Historic Places This historic 1910 building located in downtown Jackson, was once a neighborhood grocery called George Street Grocery. The famous Pulitzer Prize winning author, Eudora Welty, lived just around the corner until she was age 16. She frequented the store often and wrote a short story about it. The store was converted into a restaurant/bar in 1973. In 2008, under new ownership with some renovations, it was renamed “Ole Tavern On George Street”. We have captured the essence of the South’s unique culinary flair and good ole fashioned home cooking inspired by the local fares of Jackson and New Orleans. Cuisine ranges from Fried Green Tomatoes and Pimento Cheese Fritters to Seared Tuna Sandwich, Portabella Burger, and King George Burger to Gumbo, Red Beans & Rice, Fried Catfish and Country Fried Steak.

Our night life includes: Mon. Pub Quiz, Tues.-Open Mic, Wed.-Karaoke, Thurs.-Ladies Night with D.J., Fri./Sat.- a variety of live music from national and local bands and DJs. 416 George Street Jackson | 601.960.2700

www.oletavern.com

(Call 601-960-2705 for Catering and Private Parties) Restaurant: Mon.-Fri., 11a.m.-10p.m. | Sat., 4p.m.-10p.m. Bar Hours : Mon.-Fri., 11a.m.-2a.m. | Sat.,-4p.m.-2a.m. Happy Hours: Mon.-Sat., 4p.m.-7p.m.

Jackson Menu Guide

M53


Patio Brunch

“1st Place Best Wings 2009-2014” Best of Jackson Awards (Saturday & Sunday 11am-4pm)

Prime Rib Herb Crusted And Slow Roasted Petite 8oz $16 • Shea’s Cut 12oz $24 • Chef’s Cut 16oz $32 With 2 Eggs, Home Fried Potatoes, Fresh Fruit And A Muffin Shea’s Loaded Delta Omelet $12 Ham, Bacon, Sausage, Onions, Bell Peppers, Tomato, Cheese Fried Green Benedict $18 2 Fried Green Tomatoes, Topped With Our Crab Cakes, Poached Eggs And Remoulade

On The Start

Oysters… On The Half Shell 1/2 Dozen $7 Or Full Dozen $13 Charbroiled 1/2 Dozen $10 Or Full Dozen $16 Spicy Deep Fried $12

Traditional Eggs Benedict | $14 2 Poached Eggs Over Grilled Ham On English Muffins With Hollandaise Sauce Steak & Eggs $18 8 Ounce Ribeye, Grilled Or Blackened With 2 Eggs Any Way Shea’s Fried Chicken & Waffles $16 A Thick Belgium Topped With A Pecan Crusted Chicken Breast And Maple Syrup. Served With Fresh Fruit And A Blueberry Muffin

Fried Green Tomatoes $7 Jalapeno Mac & Cheese Bites $7 Crab Fritters $10 Mozzarella Caprese $9

Huge Salads & Homemade Soups File Gumbo Cup $4 • Bowl $8 Mt. Olympus $14

Shea’s Chopped Olive Salad $8 Strawberry Walnut $12

Sandwiches

Fried Green Tomato Blt $8 The Ultimate Veggie Burger $9

Mahi Tacos $12 BBQ Chicken Sliders $10

The Blue Plates $10 Served daily until 2pm Every Day Special Soup & Salad Combo (Does Not Include Sides) • Choice Of Side Garden, Side Caesar, Or Side Olive Salad And A Bowl Of File Gumbo Or Chef’s Soup Of The Day. Monday Country Fried Pork Chop – With Gravy Red Beans And Rice - With Grilled Green Onion Smoked Sausage Tuesday Pot Roast • Pecan Crusted Chicken Wednesday Meatloaf • Catfish Reuben - Blackened

Entrees

Catfish, Sauerkraut, Swiss Cheese, And Remoulade On A Marble Rye Bread Thursday French Onion Salisbury Steak - Garlic Cheese Toast With French • Onion Gravy • Chicken Spaghetti - With Fresh Angel Hair Pasta, Loaded With Chicken Friday Seafood Platter - Fried Catfish And Fried Shrimp • Mahi Tacos - Blackened Mahi, Shredded Cabbage, Mango Salsa Drizzled With A Pineapple Mango Bbq Sauce On Flour Tortillas

served with choice of garden or chopped olive, or ceasar salad

Shea’s Ribeye Filet 16 Ounces $36 10 Ounces $39 Pork Ribeye $18 Crab Cakes $20 Top With Crawfish Cream Sauce $5

New Orleans Style Bbq Shrimp $19 Jambalaya $18 Seafood Risotto $22

Order online - www.wingstop.com CLINTON RIDGELAND JACKSON JACKSON (601) 969-6400 (601) 605-0504 (601) 969-0606 (601) 924-2423 952 N. State St. 398 Hwy 51 N 1430 Ellis Ave. 1001 Hamptead Blvd.

WING FLAVORS

ATOMIC, CAJUN, ORIGINAL HOT, MILD, TERIYAKI, HICKORY SMOKED BBQ, LEMON PEPER, GARLIC PARMESAN, HAWAIIAN

Sauced and Tossed in your favorite flavor!

COMBO MEALS

FAMILY PACKS

MIX AND MATCH REGULAR AND BONELESS WINGS

REGULAR/ BONELESS WINGS

Wing Combo Meals are sauced and tossed and served up with Specialty Dip, Fries, and Beverage.

6pc (1 flavor, 1 dip) .........7.99 8pc (2 flavors, 1 dip) ...... 8.99 10pc (2 flavors, 1 dip) .... 9.79 15pc (2 flavors, 2 dips, 2 drinks) ...................................... 16.99

BONELESS STRIP COMBOS

3pc (1 flavor, 1 dip) .........7.99 5pc (1 flavor, 1 dip) ........ 8.99 10pc (2 flavors, 2 dips, 2 drinks) ...................................... 17.99 Add 5 wings to any order ....................................... 3.79

GLIDERS

2 Gliders...............................$4.99 4 Gliders...............................$9.89 6 Gliders.............................$13.99 Glider Combo......................$6.99 Add a Glider to any order 2.59

REGULAR/ BONELESS WINGS

10pc (2 flavors) .............7.29 20pc (2 flavors) .......... 14.19 35pc (3 flavors) ......... 24.29 50pc (4 flavors) ......... 33.49 75pc (4 flavors) ..........47.99 100pc (4 flavors) ........ 60.99

BONELESS STRIPS

4pc (1 flavor) ................ 5.99 7pc (2 flavors) ............. 8.99 16pc (3 flavors)............ 17.99 24pc (4 flavors) ......... 24.99 32pc (4 flavors) .......... 33.99

Complete meals for large orders. Packs the perfect size to feed family, small gatherings and large parties.

30pc (3 flavors, 3 dips, large fries, veggies) .............. 25.99 40pc (4 flavors, 4 dips, large fries, veggies) .............. 33.99 50pc (4 flavors, 4 dips, large fries, large side, veggies) ...................................... 41.99

SPECIALTY DIPS

Creamy Ranch, Chunky Bleu Cheese or Honey Mustard. Great for wings (fries too). Single Serving......................$0.59 Large........................................$3.29

HOMEMADE SIDES

FRESH CUT SEASONED FRIES Regular.....................................$1.99 Large.......................................$3.19 CREAMY COLE SLAW Regular.....................................$1.99 Large........................................$3.19 FRESH POTATO SALAD Regular.....................................$1.99 Large........................................$3.19 BOURBON BAKED BEANS Regular.....................................$1.99 Large........................................$3.19 HOT AGED CHEDDAR CHEESE SAUCE Regular....................................$0.99 Medium....................................$1.75 Large........................................$3.49 CRISP VEGGIE STICKS Regular....................................$0.99 FRESH BAKED YEAST ROLLS Each.........................................$0.59 Half Dozen.............................$2.99 Dozen.......................................$5.79

BEVERAGES

ICED TEA/SODA 20 oz. $1.99 32 oz. $2.49 BEER Domestic $3 Specialty $4

810 Lake Harbour Dr., Ridgeland 601-427-5853 Like Us on Follow us on M54

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

jxnmenus.com


We would print our menu here, but it changes weekly.

Fresh pasta, wines by the carafe and Sinatra on the stereo...what more could you ask for?

120 N. Congress St. Jackson, MS 39201 601-345-8735

eatlafinestra.com Jackson Menu Guide

M55


JAPA N E SE SU SH I BAR & HIBACH I GR ILL

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VOTED BEST SUSHI AND JAPANESE 2009-2014

APPETIZERS

DINNER SPECIAL

* indicates raw material

Edamame 4.95 Gyoza 5.95 Soft Shell Crab 8.95 Oyster Tempura 8.95 Chicken Tempura 5.95 Shrimp Tempura 5.95 Vegetable Tempura 4.95 *beef Tataki 7.95 *tuna Tataki 7.95 BbQ Squid 7.95 Yellow Tail Neck 6.95 Shrimp And Avocado 4.95 Baked Salmon & Scallop 7.95 Japanese Egg Roll 4.95 Cheese Wonton 4.95 Sashimi (8pcs.) 11.95 LUNCH SPECIAL * indicates raw material

L1. Chicken Teriyaki 8.95 L2. Beef Teriyaki 9.50 L3.*sushi Lunch Special 9.95 L4. *chirashi Lunch Special 10.95 L5. Tempura 8.95 L6. Chicken Tempura 8.95 CREATE YOUR OWN COMBO LUNCH (any two items) 11.95 Shrimp/Chicken Tempura Chicken/Beef Teriyaki * Sushi HIBACHI LUNCH Served with soup, fried rice and veg. Vegetable 6.95 Chicken 7.95 Steak 9.95 Shrimp 9.95 Salmon 9.95 Scallop 10.95 Combination (Choose two) 12.95

Chicken, Steak, Shrimp, Scallop, Salmon

Nagoya Lunch

(Chicken, shrimp and steak)

Share Plate NOODLES Yakisoba Yakiudon Udon Tempura Udon FRIED RICE Plain Fried Rice Chicken Fried Rice Steak Fried Rice Shrimp Fried Rice Combo Fried Rice SIDE ORDERS Scallops Shrimp Filet Mignon Steak Chicken Lobster Vegetables Fried Rice KID’S MENU

14.95 5.95

8.95 8.95 10.95 10.95 2.95 7.95 8.95 8.95 10.95 7.95 7.95 9.95 6.95 6.95 13.95 3.95 2.95

(For Dine in Only)

Fried Chicken Strip 4.50 French Fries 3.50 KID’S HIBACHI (Dine in Only, for 10 years old and under)

Chicken Shrimp Steak

5.95 5.95 5.95

(All dinner served with miso soup and house salad) * indicates raw material

Chicken Teriyaki 14.95 Beef Teriyaki 15.95 Grill Salmon 15.95 Shrimp Tempura 15.95 Chicken Tempura 14.95 Seafood Tempura 16.95 Unagi Donburi 13.95 *tekka Donburi 14.95 *sushi Combination 18.95 *sushi & Sashimi 18.95 *sashimi Dinner 22.95 *chirashi 19.95 CREATE YOUR COMBO DINNER (any two items) 18.95 *Sushi, *Sashimi Shrimp/Chicken Tempura Chicken/Beef Teriyaki HIBACHI DINNER Served with soup, salad, fried rice, and vegetable

Vegetable 9.95 Chicken 13.95 Steak 17.95 Shrimp 17.95 Salmon 16.95 Scallop 19.95 Filet Mignon 19.95 Lobster 27.95 Filet and Lobster 29.95 Seafood lover 28.95 Nagoya for Two 39.95 Combination (Choose two) 20.95

Chicken, Steak, Shrimp, Scallop, Salmon

Sub Filet 6.95 Sub Lobster 6.95 Share Plate 6.95 SUSHI NIGIRI OR SASHIMI(2 PCS.) Tuna 3.75 Fresh Yellow Tail 3.75 White Fish 3.50 Fresh Salmon 3.50 Sweet Shrimp (Raw) 6.50 Octopus 3.95 White Tuna 3.50 Smelt Roe 3.75 Salmon Roe 3.75 Smoked Salmon 3.75 Shrimp 2.95 Crabstick 2.95 Eel (Unagi) 3.50 Squid 3.95 Egg Omelet 2.95 ROLLS California Roll 3.95 Special Eel Roll 4.95 Alaska Roll 4.95 Miami Roll 4.95 Tuna Roll 4.95 Spicy Tuna Roll 4.95 Fresh Yellow Tail Roll 4.95 Fresh Salmon Roll 4.95 Spicy Salmon Roll 4.95 Sashimi Roll 6.95 Rock & Roll 8.95 Soft Shell Crab Roll 8.95 Jackson Roll 10.95 Rainbow Roll 10.95 Ultimate Roll 12.95 Oyster Tempura Roll 10.95

Note: Consuming raw animal products such as egg, beef, or fish can be hazardous to your health. *A gratuity may be added to the bill for a group with six or more. You are free to remove any item from any order. But any substitution may cost you extra money. And for some specific items, no special request is available.

LIVE MUSIC • BAD ASS BURGERS

M E N U BLOCK BURGER $7

American Cheese, Mayo, Lettuce, Pickles & Red Onion

BIG BLOCK BURGER $10 Block Burger with double the meat and cheese

BBQ BACON $9 Block Burger with Sweet Baby Ray’s and Bacon KAMIKAZE $9 Jalapenos topped in Cream Cheese and slapped on a Block Burger BLUE PIG $9 Bacon and Bleu Cheese melted on a Block Burger MOZZARELLA STICKS $6 Served with Marinara

SOUTHWEST EGGROLLS $8 Eggrolls with a Twist

CHICKEN TENDER BASKET $7 Regular, Buffalo or Sweet Baby Ray’s BBQ

SEASONED FRIES $2.25 SWEET POTATO FRIES $3.25 OVER 30 DRAFT, BOTTLE AND CAN BEERS TO CHOOSE FROM! HAPPY HOUR 3-7 M-F

*3003;97328;-88)6

0-/)9732*%')&33/

6351 I-55 North, Ste. 131 (next to Target) in Jackson 601•977•8881 M56

642 Tombigbee Street | (601) 944-0203 Facebook.com/oneblockeast

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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jxnmenus.com


SMALL PLATES

Sausage & Cheese Plate…8.99 Pimento Cheese…5.99 Boudin Links…5.99 Pork Belly Corn Dogs…7.99 BBQ Nachos…8.99 (Choice of Pulled Pork or Smoked Chicken) Brisket BBQ Nachos…9.99

SALADS

BLT Salad…8.99 The P&P Caesar Salad…7.99 (Add Smoked Chicken…1.99)

SANDWICHES

Choice of 1 side: Collard Greens / Fries / Smoked Tomato Cole Slaw Potato Salad / Pasta Salad / Smokehouse Beans Boudin Burger…10.99 Fried Green Tomato BLT…8.99 (Add Pulled Pork or Smoked Chicken…1.99 Add Brisket…2.99) Smoked Chicken Salad Sandwich…8.99 Bacon Melt…10.99 BBQ Sandwich…8.99 (Choice of Pulled Pork or Smoked Chicken) Brisket BBQ Sandwich….9.99

TACOS

Pulled Pork BBQ Tacos…6.99 Smoked Chicken BBQ Tacos…6.99 Brisket BBQ Tacos…7.99 BBQ Taco Sampler…9.99 (One Pork / One Chicken / One Brisket)

‘QUE PLATES

Choice of 2 sides: Collard Greens / Fries / Smoked Tomato Cole Slaw Potato Salad / Pasta Salad / Smokehouse Beans Herford Brisket Plate…14.99 Smoked Chicken Plate…11.99 Pulled Pork Plate…11.99 Baby Back Ribs Full Slab…24.99 Half-Slab…14.99 ‘Que Sampler Platter…16.99 Pulled Pork / Hereford Brisket / Pulled Chicken

DESSERTS “Parker House” White Chocolate & Cranberry Bread Pudding…3.99 Bananas Foster Pudding…3.99

3139 N STATE ST, JACKSON WWW.PIGANDPINT.COM

Jackson Menu Guide

U.S. Farm Raised Catfish•All Shrimp North American Gulf Shrimp•WE ALSO SELL FRESH GAMBINOS BREAD FROM NEW ORLEANS APPETIZERS LUNCH SPECIALS Tuesday through Friday Only Crabmeat Stuffed 11:00 am - 2:00 pm Jalapeños (5) 5.50 Served with salad bar add 1.00 Fried Crabclaws 9.95 Fish Plate (french fries & Fried Crawfish Tails 8.95 hushpuppies) 7.99 Crabcakes (2 large) 7.95 Pork Chop Plate (rice Oysters on Half Shell w/gravy & squash) 7.99 1/2 doz. 6.95 doz. 10.95 Red Beans & Rice (sauFried Pickles 3.75 sage & bread) 7.99 Onion Rings 4.49 Chicken Fried Steak 7.99 SOUPS & SALADS Grilled Red Snapper (new All salads served on a bed of potatoes & squash) 7.99 lettuce with cherry tomatoes Boiled Popcorn Shrimp 8.75 Stuffed Flounder (new Fried Popcorn Shrimp 8.75 potatoes & squash) 7.99 Fried Crawfish Tails 9.50 6 Fried Jumbo Shrimp Crabmeat (Lump) 10.95 (new potatoes & squash) 7.99 Fried Chicken Salad 7.95 Oyster Salad 10.95 PLATES All FRIED and served with Seafood Gumbo french fries and salad Cup 3.95 Bowl 6.25 bar. Baked potato served after 5:00 pm. French bread Crawfish Ettoufee Cup 3.95 Bowl 6.25 served on request. Trio (8 shrimp, 4 oysters, 3 Red Beans & Rice 14.50 Cup 3.95 Bowl 6.25 catfish) Combo PO-BOYS (10 shrimp, 3 catfish) 12.95 Served on Gambinos New Orleans french bread Combo Add .50 for swiss, american, (8 oysters, 3 catfish) 14.95 or provolone cheese Shrimp (10) & Oysters (6) Sal’s Supreme (roast beef, ham & cheese) 9.50 Stuffed Shrimp (5) 13.95 11.95 Roast Beef 8.50 (15) 12.95 Veal Cutlet 7.25 Shrimp (12) 14.95 Hamburger 6.25 Oysters (6) 12.95 Ham 6.25 Catfish Crab (2) 11.95 Ham & Cheese 7.25 Stuffed Shell Crab Chicken Strip 6.75 Soft 12.95 Smoked Sausage 6.75 (1 - in season) Tails 11.95 Oyster 10.95 Crawfish Popcorn Shrimp Shrimp 9.50 Chicken Strips (4) 11.95 7.50 Catfish 9.25 Seafood Platter 15.95 Crawfish Tails 9.25 (3 catfish filets, 8 shrimp, 4 Soft Shell Crab (in season) oysters, and 2 stuffed shrimp) 10.95 BEVERAGES Crab Cake 8.75 Soft Drinks, Tea, Fried Grouper or Lemonade 1.75 Red Fish 9.50 & Domestic Beer 3.00 Muffuletta 4.00 Half 7.45 Whole 12.95 Import Beer EXTRAS BOILED SHRIMP 10 Large 5.99 French Fries 1.75 18 Large 9.25 Baked Potato 1.75 30 Large (with salad bar) 1.50 13.50 Hushpuppies DESSERTS Chips 0.95 Cobbler (with vanilla ice (only after 5) 2.95 cream add 0.50) 2.25 Pasta Fried/Grilled Squash 2.49 Homemade Bread 2.95 Pudding 3.50 Salad Bar

Now you can access local restaurants’ menus any time, day or night, on your computer, tablet or smartphone!

Plus, get maps, phone numbers, social media feeds and much more!

BOILED AND LIVE CRAWFISH 6600 Old Canton Road • 601-957-1188 Tues - Thurs 11am - 9pm • Fri - Sat 11am - 10pm Sun 11am - 8pm • CLOSED MONDAYS TAKEOUT: Call ( 601) 957-1188 OR Fax: (601) 957-2939 M57


the wing station

YOU WORK HARD.

    

A 5-Star Twist on Takeout!

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T WORK HARDER FOR LUNCH. STEVEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BOX LUNCHES

Made from the freshest ingredients and include a sandwich or wrap of your choice, side item, and one of our famous fresh-baked cookies.

Side Item Choices

Miss Vickieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chips, Baked Layâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chips, Pretzels, Sugar-Free Fruit Cup, Lemon Dijon Pasta Salad, or Cole Slaw.

Metro Deli Box | $8 per person

LUNCH & DINNER

SPECIALS L U N C H 11AM - 3PM

$ 7 10PC WINGS

PL US TA X

Oven-roasted turkey breast, smoked ham, or chicken salad sandwich on house-baked focaccia, croissant or wheat bread.

601-594-9390

  

Club Box | $9.75 per person

Oven-roasted turkey breast, smoked ham, bacon & provolone on house-baked focaccia, croissant or wheat bread.

Wrap Box | $9.75 per person

Chicken Club Wrap, Smoked Brisket, Sausalito Wrap, Area 51, or Mediterranean Wrap on wheat or sun-dried tomato tortilla

W / FR IE S A N D D R IN K

D I N N E R 5PM - UNT

$6

PL US TA X

IL

6 P C W I N GRSINK

DD W / FR IE S A N

QUICHE BOX LUNCHES

&OOD Nachos, Burgers, Salads, Hot Wings, Pasta and much more

3PECIALS Happy Hour

4-7 everyday Half off bottle beer 2-for-1 all liquor drinks

Late Night Happy Hour

Thinking outside the box? Looking for a sandwich alternative? How about a slice of our hand-made quiche with a salad or a cup of one of our famous soups. Vegetarian options always available.

Quiche & Greens Box | $10.75 per person One slice of quiche; field greens salad with dressing; and a fresh-baked cookie.

Quiche & Soup Box | $10.75 per person One slice of quiche; 8 oz. cup of soup; and a fresh-baked cookie.

SANDWICH TRAYS Small Sandwich Tray | $50

Eight cut deli sandwiches (turkey breast, ham, chicken salad). Feeds 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12

Large Sandwich Tray | $73

Twelve cut deli sandwiches, Feeds 12-18

Custom Catering | Starts at $12 per person Hot lunches served buffet style with tea and desert.

Sun - Thur 10pm-midnight

2-for-1 everything except pitchers and bottles of wine

6270 Old Canton Rd, Jackson

601-978-1839

w w w.t i m e o u tc a f e . c o m M58

125 S. Congress St. | Capital Towers T:601-969-1119 F: 601-969-7058 200 S. Lamar St. | City Centre North T: 601-714-5683 F: 601-714-6989 www.StevesDowntown.com Steve@StevesDowntown.com Catering@StevesDowntown.com

July - August 2014 // The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

888-769-WING (9464) EXT 1

THEWINGSTATION.NET jxnmenus.com


BITES // fusion TRIP BURNS

Jesus & a Hot Lunch // by Zack Orsborn

A

couple months after the grand opening of 303 Jefferson in Clinton, a man broke in. God told him that Jesus was inside, and he needed someone to pour Jesus a beer. After knocking over some chairs and a rack of silverware, he poured two glasses of Devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Harvest, a Southern Prohibition ale from Hattiesburg. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drink either of them, so I guess Jesus had a buddy with him and needed two beers,â&#x20AC;? Raymond Jackson, co-owner and head chef of 303 Jefferson, says, laughing. Dining at the southern fusion restaurant does tend to be close to a religious experience. An average of 150 people walk through the reclaimed wooden doors during lunch ready for a hot plate: three sides and a main dish, which ranges from fried chicken or catfish to chicken Hours: /XQFK 7XHVGD\6DWXUGD\ DPÂąSPÂ&#x2021;'LQQHU7KXUV GD\6DWXUGD\ÂąSPÂąSP Lunch Specials: +RW3ODWH/XQFKHV VHUYHGZLWKFRUQEUHDGRU\HDVW UROO  7XHVGD\ FRXQWU\ IULHG VWHDN SRW URDVW RU FKLFNHQ  VDXVDJH MDPEDOD\D

spaghetti. On the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest day, 257 hungry diners showed up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a plate coming out of the kitchen every 45 seconds,â&#x20AC;? says Jackson, who prides himself and his staff for quick and accurate food orders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hectic and nonstop. â&#x20AC;Ś By two oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; clock, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ready to stop talking and have a glass of tea.â&#x20AC;? At age 14, Jackson lied to a manager of Pizza Hut, telling him he was about to be 16. The manager let him cook pizzas. Thirty-two years later, Jackson and business partner, Tim Parkman, remodeled Lot 15, an old stable. The two outfitted the restaurant with tables made from fallen red cedar trees. Under a wooden sign that says â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome Friendsâ&#x20AC;? is a door repurposed from the elephant house and bird sanctuary at the Jackson Zoo.

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Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

The tin ceiling is from barns in Carroll and Grenada counties. The cooking is Southern with a unique flair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to take southern food and the creole flavors that are traditional to the area and just expand outward from that,â&#x20AC;? Jackson says. Jackson crafts dishes like sweet-andsour duck with Cantonese-grilled pineapple (a special dish), a ribeye steak sandwich and a pimento cheese BLT. On the sweeter side, he offers blueberry and white chocolate cheesecake and a deepdish pecan pie flavored with molasses and Makerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mark bourbon. A Grenada native, Jackson hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strayed from his deep-fried ways, though. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I grew up eating, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the South,â&#x20AC;? he says.

Menu: MHIIHUVRQFRPPHQX

At 303 Jefferson, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find classic southern dishes with a twist..

59


BITES

// farm to table

Windows to the Homegrown by Nick Wallace with

C

hef Tom Ramsey’s staff gathered around the service window watching him craft a dish. The ingredients came from my family’s farms in Edwards. From my post as executive chef at the Mississippi Museum of Art, I had brought candy-striped beets, cucumbers and black garlic in a bag to Ramsey’s La Finestra kitchen in downtown Jackson. He riffed off the local fare, while the others looked on. For a chef, ingredients like this—straight from the surrounding soil— are indeed like treats in a candy shop. When we get hold of fresh items, we tackle them with a child-like imagination. Ramsey called the vegetables gorgeous, and they were. Before they were washed, dust

Julian Rankin

and dirt from Edwards still clung to the roots. I had harvested the black garlic from my uncle Donald’s roadside garden. The cucumbers came from my grandmother’s homemade hydroponic system inside a shed adjacent to her chicken coop. The beets, immaculate and striped as if they came from a “Where’s Waldo?” storyboard, I found on the fringe of grandma’s garden beds and snatched them up. My grandmother often says that she doesn’t have recipes to pass down because she doesn’t cook by the book. She makes food by memory and by feel. That same improvisation was on display when Ramsey brought out his finished dish with house-made mozzarella, onion blossom petals, a little tomato salad with JULIAN RANKIN

Tom Ramsey collaborated with Nick Wallace to bring the farm to the table when he created a dish with ingredients from Wallace’s family farms.

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

garlic parmesan aioli, all inside a roll of mandolined cucumber. Sherry vinegar, olive oil, and of course, the beets, and slivers of black garlic topped the dish. Eating like this is what my philosophy of farm-to-table is all about. I’ve heard regional chefs talk about sourcing their prestigious ingredients from farms as far away as northern Virginia. “You’re not pushing for local?” I’ll ask. “I’m pushing for quality,” they’ll say. But, you know, quality is all around us. You’re sitting in quality right now. It’s in your own backyard. And it’s good business, too. It not only helps distribution and the bottom line, but it helps the community. That’s the biggest thing: It empowers farmers and chefs alike when the menu is tied to the restaurant’s locality. You can take the contents of a humble brown paper bag and harvest vegetables that would make any cook envious. Instead of importing your beef or your lamb from afar, you can source it from places like Terry. Pickett Farms, whose quality and processes I can vouch for. Every time a chef comes to my kitchen, I give gifts of food. It’s what my grandmother always did. And when I visit my other colleagues in the kitchen world, I do the same. They see me coming, and they can know, Nick’s bringing me some goodies. “This is from my garden to your kitchen,” I’ll say. “Make something from this. Sit down and have lunch with me so we can create this bond over food.” Having access to these food items is one component of being a locally minded chef, but sharing them is the true goal. I have a deep appreciation for Tom Ramsey and for all the other chefs that I consider friends and family. After I finished the salad, an amalgam of Edwards, Miss., veggies and Italian-inspired accoutrements, I stuck around and ordered some chicken parmesan. A healthy culinary community is made up of folks who support each other. Chefs supporting chefs. Chefs supporting farmers. And kitchen staff who are passionate about putting out dishes with that same passion. “What makes it fun to cook for other chefs?” someone asked Ramsey as he prepared the dish. “You know you’re getting judged,” he said, laughing. “So it keeps you on your toes.” It might be true that there’s an added bit of pressure when cooking for a fellow chef’s finetuned palate. But the reality, especially here in boomjackson.com


JULIAN RANKIN

Tom Ramsey (left) and Nick Wallace are two downtown Jackson chefs who love gorgeous, fresh, local vegetables.

Rustic Roasted Beet Salad E\1LFN:DOODFH

Roasted Beets

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Jackson, is that there is no cutthroat competition. There is no judgment. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the meal; the sharing of our diverse ideas about food with ingredients that bring our dishes to life with authenticity. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got more brown bags and more harvests ahead of me. Maybe next time, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be showing up at your kitchen to share the proteins and produce of my Mississippi home. You can know one thing: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be hungry. Note: Julian Rankin is the director of media and public relations at the Mississippi Museum of Art. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

61


WC wc mcclendon, networker // by Greg Pigott

W

Photos by: Tate K. Nations Styled by: Nicole Wyatt Coordination: Kathleen Mitchell Hair & Makeup: Kate McNeely, Trim Salon Style Assistant: Carmen Cristo Locations: In and Around The Hatch in Midtown Jackson

WC is wearing a plaid shirt ($40) and slacks ($64.99) from Capital Menswear, and his own shoes.

62

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

C McClendon has recently been charged with the monumental task of training every court in the state of Mississippi on the new electronic filing system that will go into effect later this year. For the 27-year-old Jackson native, this fulfills a dream that he didn’t realize he even had until recently. “This system will make attorneys’ and judges’ case files, as well as public records, easier to access and will cut down a lot of time that is done filing these important documents,” he says. “It will make the court systems of Mississippi much more efficient and will close any holes in the justice system.” After graduating from Terry High School and getting an international business degree from Mississippi State University, McClendon admits that he came back to Jackson “kicking and screaming,” taking an IT and marketing job with Sta-Home Health. “After a while, the events and culture of the city made me fall in love with it all over again,” he says. “I really wanted to be someone that helps the city and local businesses, schools and government officials alike.” McClendon credits his recommitment to Jackson to his recent completion of the Leadership Greater Jackson program. “It really opened my eyes,” McClendon added. “There is a lot to be done right here in the capital city, and I’m glad to be a part of it.” As a business analyst for the Mississippi Supreme Court, McClendon’s job is important, but not what makes him influential. “Networking is the key,” he says. “Really just having people use their talents in general makes Jackson a better place to be.” McClendon is an accomplished saxophonist who plays in the Mississippi Symphonic Winds, the Mississippi Community Orchestra and the First Baptist Church of Jackson Sanctuary Orchestra. He is active on the National Board of the Mississippi State University alumni association as well as the alumni association of Leadership Jackson, serving as its director of communications. boomjackson.com


Brian brian drennan, brewmaster // by Kathleen Mitchell

I

f you love beer, Brian Drennan is one of your favorite Jacksonians—you just may not know him by name. Drennan’s family started Capital City Beverages, which now brings many of the city’s favorite craft beers to Jackson, along with brands such as Miller, Coors and Heineken. Drennan, 39, grew up around the beer business. His great-grandfather and uncle started a beer distributorship on the coast in 1934—they held one of the first beer licenses in the state—before moving up to Jackson and starting Capital City in 1941. Drennan went to Ole Miss for his undergraduate and law degrees, and worked as a lawyer for seven years before joining Cap City. Indirectly, Drennan also works as sort of a Jackson ambassador. “I love when national or large regional breweries come to Mississippi to ex-

Brian is wearing a plaid button-down ($89.95), white pants ($165) and navy belt ($80) from Kinkade’s, and his own shoes.

Catherine catherine lee, organizer

// by Briana Robinson

W

hile growing up, Catherine Lee and her family would help out at homeless shelters and participate in political advocacy for housing issues. Now 31, she uses the principles of helping others that were instilled in her then as Midtown Partners’ director of housing and community development. Her path to that position, however, was not a clear one. The Jackson-raised Birmingham native attended the University of Tampa and pursued a communications degree. When graduation came in 2004, Lee took a job at Habitat for Humanity. After spending two years in Colorado, Lee returned to Mississippi in 2009 and decided to attend Jackson State University, graduating in 2011 with a master’s degree in urban and regional planning. After serving as a special projects officer for former Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr.,

Lee applied for a job with Midtown Partners, where she has since seen progress on a variety of projects. She has helped with the West Millsaps Development, a low-income housing tax-credit project that will include 31 housing units, a public skate park, and Midtown House Blend, an effort that pairs local artists with volunteer organizations to beautify vacant houses in the area. Lee’s job includes helping midtown residents with any housing needs, concerns or questions each day. She strives to be as available as possible to those who seek her help, and it’s those seemingly smaller interactions that may be most important to Lee. “All those different movements in midtown are really exciting to be a part of,” she says. “Knowing that those things are going on with us and how engaged our residents are is why I think midtown is so special.”

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

pand here. They’re usually surprised at the restaurants and the food culture here,” he says. “We have suppliers who love to come back to Jackson because the people are so hospitable.” Drennan has been married to his wife, Natalie, for 16 years, and the couple has three kids, so he stays plenty busy, but he still makes time to make Jackson stronger. He is on the board of the Jackson Zoo and finds ways to give back through Cap City. “One thing I enjoy a lot is that, in our business and most businesses in this area, when there is a need, everybody steps up and nobody says no,” he says. “Just recently, several local restaurants and Cathead decided to put together a benefit for tornado relief. I think they got it together in about two days, and 20 to 25 businesses supported it. And you see that every day throughout the year.”

Catherine is wearing a mesh overlay dress ($400), black gladiator sandals ($158) and a blush lace halter bra ($38) with bangles ($28), a leather medallion bracelet ($28), all from Free People.

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YOUNG INFLUENTIALS 2014, FROM PAGE 63

Jake is wearing a collared shirt ($44.95) and linen pants ($175) from Kinkade’s, a light blue belt ($85) from The Rogue, and his own shoes.

Jake jake mcgraw, thinker

// by Haley Ferretti

W

hile Jake McGraw was studying for his master’s degree in economics and social history at the University of Oxford in England last year, he found that he was having trouble staying connected and engaged with the major political issues being addressed back in Mississippi, his home state. McGraw, 26, took it upon himself to answer that problem by creating Rethink Mississippi, an online forum in which anyone may submit their insight, analysis or debate of the state’s most critical issues, including education, health, economic advancement and social justice. “I had noticed this disconnect in the state amongst our political leaders and the issues they discussed … and how the folks that I knew from school and many other bright, passionate young Mississippians thought about the key issues in the state,” he says. “I thought that the state needed some sort of outlet for the ideas and the thoughts of that young generation.” McGraw left Oxford in February 2013 to come back to Mississippi and team up with Susan Glisson, the executive director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation, based at Ole Miss, who wanted to expand the institute’s political role. 64

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

With Glisson’s help, McGraw launched the site in August. The website currently is a platform for young Mississippians to engage in critical and substantive conversation about the state. McGraw hopes the website will also become a catalyst for political engagement among the rising generation. He would also like to expand Rethink Mississippi’s partnerships, content and data capabilities. McGraw says that Rethink will keep combatting the state’s blindeye mentality by engaging in honest and intelligent conversation, which is at the forefront of Rethink’s major aim. He wants Rethink to continue tackling hard-hitting issues, such as LGBT discrimination, education reform, gender inequality and how racial disparity continues to color daily life in Mississippi. “I just think that (with) anything that we find personally embarrassing about the state, … our reaction has been that we just try to change the subject and don’t talk about those things in the old polite southern fashion. …That mentality still pervades,” McGraw says. “You can admit Mississippi’s faults while still loving the state. In fact, the greatest display of love for the state is to try to confront our deepest challenges.” boomjackson.com


Jamie is wearing a dress ($176) and black heels ($135) with a Lo Lady Fashion necklace ($52), a Spell ring ($155), Verameat cuff bracelets ($156-$178), Verameat claw ring ($100) and Sunahara midi rings ($18-$25), all from Mulberry Dreams.

Jamie jamie ainsworth, model

// by Kathleen Mitchell

I

t’s hard to imagine that Jamie Ainsworth used to be shy. The tall, impossibly willowy brunette walks runways with a rare intensity and can turn on the magic the instant a camera turns to her. But the 27-year-old model and businesswoman says she was very shy growing up. But modeling, which she started doing at age 13, helped her gain self-confidence. “Once I started going through modeling, I was doing all this myself,” Ainsworth says. “My mom was there a lot, but as far as going into castings, you’ve got to do all that yourself. Pushing myself to go in there and actually speak to someone or shake someone’s hand—it all eventually built my confidence until I could talk to anyone.” Ainsworth, a Magee native, has traveled all over the U.S. and walked in innumerable fashion shows, but says she’s not interested in making a home anywhere besides Mississippi—so she’s bringing the worlds of high fashion and modeling to Jackson. In February 2013, Ainsworth founded JEA Model Management in

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

Jackson. Then, in November, she opened Mulberry Dreams, a retail store in Fondren, where she is the buyer and stylist. Through JEA, Ainsworth has helped models get spreads and even covers of local magazines (including BOOM Jackson) and walk in Memphis and New Orleans Fashion Weeks. Last fall, she took a couple of girls to New York City, where one of her models walked in Nolcha Fashion Week. “I remember sitting there watching my girl walk, and I looked across and there was Christy Turlington!” Ainsworth says. “Just being able to jump into that world with us being based in Mississippi … that’s huge.” Working with her models, most of whom are teens, gives Ainsworth a chance to give others the confidence that made such a difference in her life. “To me, the biggest reward with working with my models, the guys and girls, is just seeing them be happy and build their confidence,” Ainsworth says. “I have one that is just like me in that she is real shy, and I’m trying to break her down and break her out of it. Because, besides the shyness, she is not like me—she has complete potential to go to New York. If I sent her right now, they would want her. But she’s not ready. So I’m working with her to break down that kind of thing to get her ready, and it’s kind of beautiful.”

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YOUNG INFLUENTIALS 2014, FROM PAGE 65

Nic nic lott, politico // by R.L. Nave

O

ne night, while working as a congressional staffer, Nic Lott stopped for dinner at a popular restaurant for power players on Capitol Hill, where a memorably raucous crowd was seated toward the rear. That noisy gathering, Lott discovered later, was the regular dinner meeting of women serving in the U.S. Senate, which at the time included Kay Bailey Hutchinson, a Texas Republican, and Hillary Clinton, a Democrat from New York. “You can disagree with people and still be friends,” says Lott, a Republican. On Twitter, Lott, 35, weighs in on everything from the 2013 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya, to Jackson city politics, which sometimes leads to passionate debates with ideological opponents. “You have to have thick skin if you’re going to be a black Republican,” he says. Offline, however, Lott is affable and, often, apolitical. Lott, who grew up in Taylorsville, said his grandmother raised him to respect everyone’s opinions. Inspired by Bill Cosby’s Cliff Huxtable, Lott wanted to be a pediatrician but, after winning a high-school essay contest and trip to Washington, D.C., Lott turned to public service. Lott credits endorsements from a broad coalition including progressive-leaning student organizations with helping him become the first black president of the Ole Miss Associated Student Body, the university’s student government organization, in 2000. After working for former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott—no relation, Nic stresses frequently—and U.S. Rep. J.C. Watts of Oklahoma, Lott returned to Mississippi in 2003 to serve as the youthoutreach director for Haley Barbour’s first gubernatorial campaign. After Barbour won the election, Lott became a spokesman for the Mississippi Department of Corrections and, later, worked for the Department of Public Safety. Currently, Lott works for the Mississippi Development Authority as a labor, housing and disability compliance officer for federal disaster programs. A Belhaven resident and father of a 6-year-old, Nicholas, Lott attends Anderson United Methodist Church and is active in Leadership Jackson and other local organizations. 66

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

Nic is wearing a paisley button-down ($89.95) and slacks ($175) from Kinkade’s, and his own shoes.

boomjackson.com


Kelli is wearing Element shorts ($39), a Vans button-down ($44) and Nike tennis shoes ($80) with a Taki watch ($89), all from Swell-O-Phonic.

Kelli kelli nichols, mentor

// by Kathleen Mitchell

K

elli Nichols didn’t expect to work in education. “I never saw myself being a teacher,” she says. “I ran from it, actually.” But when Nichols’ husband died when their daughter Karley was young, Nichols found herself working long hours in sales and looked to teaching and coaching to give her a better schedule. So she decided to go back to college, at Belhaven University. “I was thinking, ‘You know, I really enjoy sports and love coaching her. So I think I’ll try this teacher thing,’” she says. “I did and, ironically, have fallen in love with actual instruction. I still love being a coach but have really enjoyed the classroom environment and developing a relationship with my students, mentoring them.” Clearly, the love is mutual—Nichols received one of the 2013 Metro Teacher of the Year awards for her work at Forest Hill High School. And her teaching goes beyond the classroom and the field. Nichols is also a leader in her role as first lieutenant in the Mississippi Army National Guard. She decided to join the military after a student deployed to Iraq called her on Christmas Eve. “Any time you get a call from Afghanistan or Iraq, you answer it,” Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

she says. “So I answered it, and we had a conversation. “He was really miffed about the lack of leadership he felt existed in his unit, and made a statement that I would be a good officer, that they needed more people who understood younger soldiers’ needs. I took him at his word and joined and enlisted and then received my commission a couple years ago.” As a lesbian, Nichols knows she’s in a position to open others’ minds through her example. She says she’s very aware of what it’s like for her daughter to have a lesbian mother, but is lucky to be surrounded by acceptance. From her late husband’s family to her JPS students and coworkers, her daughter’s Brandon High School softball team and National Guard families, Nichols is “fortunate to be surrounded by outstanding people,” she says. In her spare time, Nichols is passionate about the music scene in Jackson and enjoys working on cars. But Karley, who plays fast-pitch softball, is always her priority. “It’s mostly helping my athletes become better athletes and watching my kid play ball,” Nichols says. 67


YOUNG INFLUENTIALS 2014, FROM PAGE 67

Nina is wearing a blush crop top ($18), white maxi skirt ($131), sequin bra ($80) and paisley scarf ($53) and platform wedges ($75), all from Shoe Bar at Pieces.

Nina nina washington, healer

// by Carmen Cristo

WHERE2SHOP:

4450 (4450 Interstate 55 N., 601.366.3687)

Arco Avenue (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, 601.790.9662) Capital Menswear (3040 U.S. Highway 80, 601.932.2323) Free People (1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 5018, Ridgeland, 601.605.0406)

Kinkade’s Fine Clothing

(120 W. Jackson St., Suite 2B, Ridgeland, 601.898.0513) Mulberry Dreams (3026 N, State St., 601.559.7074) The Rogue (4450 Interstate 55 Frontage Road, 601.362.6383) Shoe Bar at Pieces (135 Market Street, Flowood, 601.992.9057) Swell-O-Phonic (2906 N. State St., 601.981.3547)

A special BOOM Jackson thanks to Midtown Partners and JEA Model Management.

xx

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

D

r. Nina Washington, pediatric rheumatologist at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, had once planned to be a lawyer like Claire Huxtable. But, “medicine happened to me,” she says. After attending a health sciences camp at Mississippi State University in high school, she was hooked. Washington studied at Xavier University in New Orleans and returned to her native Jackson for medical school, where both her and her mother’s experiences with lupus led her to rheumatology. She chose to work with children because of their resilience and her own diagnosis as a 10-year-old. “I thought it was something I could make a difference in, because I understood what they were going through,” Washington said. She now treats children in the same hospital where she was treated. After two years at UMMC, Washington spent a year at Johns Hopkins University getting her master’s in public health. She returned to UMMC and completed her medical training before moving to Chicago for her residency. Washington had to decided to study at UMMC due to a Barksdale scholarship. She says it is what keeps her coming back to Jackson even now, after completing her medical training and living in large cities across the country. “I’m back now because, 10 years ago, when I was in medical school, they saw something in me,” Washington says. “They planted a seed, and everything I learned, I brought home.” She brought back a passion for culinary arts and a thriving social scene. She was pleasantly surprised when she returned to Jackson to find many new restaurants and places to meet people, but she wants more. A medical professional by day and social butterfly by night, Washington singlehandedly created the Metro Jackson Happy Hour and Dinner Club, which has had as many as 43 participants in one night. She wanted to give foodies like herself an outlet to slow down, unplug and have genuine conversation over delicious plates of food. Washington specifically wants to connect single professionals, who can often feel like “outsiders” in southern culture. “There are things to do, but you have to get out and do them,” she says. “I’m willing to make that effort.” boomjackson.com


Somair somair riaz, innovator

// by Carmen Cristo

J

ust 20 yards from the glass case that holds the world’s first electric wheelchair is Somair Riaz’s lab office at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Riaz, 29, is a medical doctor, neuroscience PhD candidate, SPINES fellow and DIY biotechnologist with a master’s degree in biomedical sciences. Riaz is part of the Maker Movement, creating pop-up shops for innovation all over the world, and is working to bring the next one to Jackson. Makerspaces are communal co-ops, providing tools and resources that are too expensive for one person to buy. Riaz wants to see Jackson become the Palo Alto of neurotechnology, and he is invested in seeing the ideas of Mississippians come to life. He has seen positive changes in Mississippi since his arrival

from Pakistan in 2009. “Jackson has a lot of potential in terms of manpower, but what it lacks is guidance,” Riaz says. “Mississippi has a chance to take a leap.” He says he benefits from an outsider’s perspective, allowing him to see progress natives may not. He likes that UMMC nurtures a pro-diversity academic society. “Contrary to what one might think, the older generation is trying to make changes,” he says. Riaz calls Mississippi “fertile,” a place that has produced technology NASA still uses. He has participated with Scientific Reseach (SR1), a nonprofit that uses science and technology to improve quality of life. Resilience, he adds, is a product of diversity. “And that’s why Mississippi will always produce the brightest stars,” he says.

Somair is wearing a light gray suit ($395), a white button-down ($135), yellow tie ($95) and light blue belt ($85), all from The Rogue.

Crystal crystal welch, advocate

// by Turry Flucker

A

ttorney Cystal Welch has advocated for social justice from Boston, Mass., to Guatemala City, not to mention right here in her hometown of Jackson. Welch is a Jim Hill High School graduate of the International Baccalaureate Program, and she attended Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, on a full academic scholarship as a Chamberlain Leadership Scholar. After Bowdoin, Welch moved to Guatemala to work in a Zone 3 garbage-dump community where the stench is unbearable. Fluent in Spanish, Welch worked with Guatemalan families scavenging the tons of trash for food, clothing and scrap metal they can sell to make a living. Due to the fact that these children cannot attend school because the families need them to work during the day, Welch implemented a reading pro-

gram and managed the local library. In addition, she taught math, reading and reggaeton dance classes. Welch said this experience changed her life, so she decided to return to United States to attend Mississippi College School of Law where she works as adjunct professor of law, and she is an attorney for the school’s Adoption Legal Clinic. She says her work is inspired by Proverbs 31:8-9: “Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute. Speak up and judge fairly; defend the rights of the poor and needy.” Welch always knew that she wanted to teach and inspire the next generation to become politically active and socially aware. “I did not know that I would be teaching law students, but it panned out that way,” she says. “Now I get to teach and practice; it is the best of both worlds for me.”

Crystal is wearing a mint top ($250), gray shorts ($225), white blazer ($320) and quartz necklace ($105) from 4450; and white wedges ($118) from Arco Avenue.


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I

t might still be summer, but it’s never too late to begin thinking about going back to school. Many freshly graduated students will be off to college soon. Kids and teenagers will head back to the classroom soon. Even if you’re not going to school, chances are, you might have a job that requires having some form of a bag to keep your laptop, notebooks, or whatever in. Whatever your reason for a new way to carry your things, here are a few bags or backpacks that could be good for school or work.

Nolita briefcase $12, Orange Peel (422 E. Mitchell Ave., 601-364-9977)

Poler Outdoor Stuff backpack $80, Swell-O-Phonic/Soma Wilai (2906 N. State St., 601-981-3547)

Chooze reversible backpack $41.95, Ulmer’s Stride Rite (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 153, 601981-4276)

Parson gray messenger bag $90, Bridgette’s Monograms and Gifts (2725 N. State St., 601-362-9947) Hadaki Paisley Backpack $60, Bridgette’s Monograms and Gifts (2725 N. State St., 601-362-9947)

Handmade tote $35, Fair Trade Green (2807 Old Canton Road, 601-366-1602) Vera Wang tote $15, Orange Peel (422 E. Mitchell Ave., 601-364-9977)

Herschel Supply Co. backpack $89, Swell-O-Phonic/Soma Wilai (2906 N. State St., 601-981-3547)

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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Do-Gooders Ten Years Standing Against Violence

// by Ronni Mott

T

RACHEL BUSH

en years ago, Donna Ladd, editor-in- vention program. In 2012, the dollars helped set protect victims and add teeth to abuse laws. “We’re creating a culture of deterrence chief of the Jackson Free Press and up a rape crisis unit. In 2013, it raised money to BOOM Jackson magazine, decided fight sex trafficking. This year marks the event’s when it comes to these crimes,” she says. “We’ve to do something about the scourge of 10th year, and the money will support every probeen able to form these great partnerships with domestic violence. Her solution was to invite the gram the center offers. law enforcement and the courts. We’re really Domestic abuse and human trafficking providing a coordinated community response to community to a fun evening of music, food and art to raise awareness, and give funds raised to a cross all social, economic, racial and cultural these crimes of interpersonal violence, and that local women’s shelter. boundaries, but Middleton encounters people encourages victims to come forward. With a telephone book as her resource, who don’t believe it affects their community. “When they feel like they can trust the Ladd chose the system, that’s when Center for Violence they’ll come forward. Prevention in Pearl … It’s encouraging to as the beneficiary of me that we’re having the event. She hosted more victims to rethe first JFP Chick port because, for the Ball in July 2004. By first time in a long the next year, the time, they feel like center’s executive disomebody cares, and rector, Sandy Middlethat they’re going to ton, started working get a fair shake.” The annual JFP directly with Ladd to host the event, which Chick issue also feahas now become a tures area women signature event for who make life better the center. for Mississippians. In addition to “Chicks We Love” raising awareness come from all walks Sandy Middleton, executive director of the Center for Violence Prevention, has and cash, the event of life. They include embraced the JFP Chick Ball, an annual fundraising event for the center. allows artists to dislegislators and lobplay their talents and byists, media figures, for women musicians leaders of non-profit to raise their voices. Local restaurants and busiand for-profit organizations, social workers, law“If anything, we’re seeing more cases renesses donate food and merchandise. ported, but that’s a good thing,” Middleton says. yers and teachers. This year, for its 10th anniverThe first year, the event raised $5,000. As “If the national average is true here—and you sary, the Chick Ball is bringing back many forcommunity response increased, so has the tally. have to assume that it would be—a large nummer “Chicks We Love” to help celebrate, as well The last several years, Chick Ball raised more ber of our population is suffering from domestic as honor artists who have donated multiple years than $15,000 annually, and every penny beyond violence, sexual assault and human trafficking, and present the Angel Award to people who help minimal expenses goes directly to the CVP. which we now call interpersonal violence.” prevent domestic abuse, protect families and em“It’s given us such a wonderful vehicle to Nationally, an estimated one in four Ameripower victims to build stronger lives. The 10th Annual Chick Ball, “Prevent, Proraise awareness in the community,” Middleton can women experience domestic violence dursays. “It’s helped to not only educate the com- ing their lifetimes. Fewer than 25 percent of tect, Empower,” is July 19 from 6 to 11 p.m. at the munity; (it assists) us in passing good legislation. the victims ever report the crime to police. The Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). We’ve talked about so many issues.” CVP (which serves Claiborne, Copiah, Hinds, For details about the JFP Chick Ball, including how In 2008, the funds went toward buying a Issaquena, Madison, Rankin, Sharkey, Simpson, to donate or provide items for the silent auction, vis“freedom van” to provide transportation for do- Warren and Yazoo counties) works with police it jfpchickball.com or facebook.com/JFPChickBall. For information on the Center for Violence Prevenmestic-violence victims, for example. In 2009, the and courts to provide training, and with the atmoney seeded the state’s first Batterers’ Inter- torney general’s office to help craft legislation to tion, visit mscvp.org. Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

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ARTS // therapy TRIP BURNS

S

omething triggered in April Fitzpatrick’s heart after seeing the devastation Hurricane Katrina left on the Gulf Coast when it ripped through in 2005. She saw the aftermath on her TV screen, which contrasted with the carefree environment at Jim Hill High School. “The hurricane victims didn’t have as much support from the government as they needed. There

“If you don’t have people’s attention, no one wants to hear what you’re saying. I feel that’s why people gravitated to me. They saw something different. They said the pieces reminded them of things. That was my goal.” Fitzpatrick, now 24, wants to bring art therapy into Jackson Public Schools. Art gives children a way to cope with life, find their identity, restore their pride and gain knowl-

Art in Hard Places // by Brittany Sanford

The devastation in New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina gave April Fitzpatrick a new purpose in life—to use art to express the challenges African American communities face.

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

wasn’t any push for these poor people to have housing and there were many discrepancies. They fixed the historical sites before they aided some of the low-income neighborhoods. This reminded me of slavery all over again and black people trying to fend for what they have,” Fitzpatrick says. This unnerving reality gave Fitzpatrick, then a sophomore, a new spark, and she created a model levee as a project in Jim Hill’s International Baccalaureate program. It was the beginning of her experimentation with art to express concerns in the African American community. In 2012, when she was 22, she ventured to Memphis to pursue her art. Without a gallery, a stand or even an easel, Fitzpatrick sold her first painting for $60. When she came back to Jackson, she auctioned off more paintings at Metrocenter Mall during a sickle-cell charity fundraiser. Fitzpatrick says she was around professional painters and felt intimidated, but she sold the most paintings that night. “I truly feel God implants certain talents … just to attract people so you can tell your story,” she says.

edge about their heritage. Fitzpatrick says African American children aren’t as aware of their culture and don’t have the pride and confidence that others embrace. “Many people in other races can date back to their origin. A lot of African Americans can’t date anything back because we don’t know anything,” she says. “You hold the key to your own prison. You can unlock your knowledge.” She also wants to raise self-esteem in the African American community and foster a sense of pride. “When you step into a room, and you know who you are, people can sense that, and you get immediate respect,” she says. “It’s just something about knowing who you are.” Fitzpatrick is creating an arttherapy curriculum. Through it, she plans to show that art plays a role in each subject, such as the shapes used in math, the science of how trees change colors and the flow of poetry in language arts. “Those are tools that pull out what God placed in you. Life is art,” Fitzpatrick says. To see more of Fitzpatrick’s work, find her on Instagram at @hopefulkreations.

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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MELODIES // tradition worldwide

From Gospel to The Blues

play, she had me down at the church playing that guitar.” Two years ago, Coleman wanted a change

COURTESY MR. SIPP

C

astro Coleman, 37, takes his role in the Mississippi blues scene seriously. After years of playing guitar in churches, he rechristened himself as Mr. Sipp, “The Mississippi Blues Child,” and began his journey in the blues. This year, he received the ultimate affirmation of his musical career choice when he took first place at the International Blues Challenge. While it makes perfect sense for a blues musician from Mississippi to win these events, Coleman’s musical pedigree wasn’t exactly steeped in the tradition of the fertile Delta, where so many blues giants hail from. Coleman was born in McComb, closer to New Orleans and jazz, and his upbringing was in gospel music instead of juke joints. “I knew I wanted to play guitar,” he says. “When I was 6, I begged for a guitar because I just knew I could play it. My parents got me a (guitar). I was little, and that was a big guitar, but I worked at it. When my mom figured out I could

// by Tommy Burton

Castro Coleman, also known as Mr. Sipp, placed first in the International Blues Challenge this past January.

of scenery and chose to pursue a career in blues music. “I’d always loved blues music,” he says. “Of course, growing up in Mississippi, you can’t get away from its influence. Even while playing gospel music, my playing had a bluesy feel.” Coleman stepped out of the church’s shadow and started singing the blues. His first release, 2013’s “It’s My Guitar,” garnered favorable reviews. “Sooner or later, you blues fans are going to be hearing about Mr. Sipp,” blues critic Peter Lauro wrote. Coleman is hard at work on his follow-up. He realizes the importance of the blues to Mississippi as well as his part in carrying on the music’s tradition. “There are so many greats that have come before me,” Coleman says. “I just want to do my part in bringing this music to as many people as I can and making audiences happy wherever I play.” For more information about Mr. Sipp aka The Mississippi Blues Child and to hear his music, visit mrsippthemississippiblueschild.com.

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COOL TOO // fair cities KAYE ROWELL

Tale of Two Fairs // by Mary Kate McGowan

A family makes its way down Sunset Strip during the Neshoba County Fair last year.

F

rom the thunderous clumping of the horses’ hooves during the Neshoba County Fair races to the victorious thud of a towa ball falling into the leather thong of a handcrafted kabocca stick at a Choctaw Indian Fair stickball game, tradition and excitement blossom in the Mississippi towns of Philadelphia and Choctaw in July. Celebrating its 65th year, the Choctaw Indian Fair displays the traditions of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians in Choctaw, west of Philadelphia. This year’s festival is July 9-12. The fair features world-series stickball— called the “granddaddy of all sports”—Choctaw social dancing, the 60th Choctaw Princess Pageant, and tribal artisan work including beadwork and basketry. Chris Young, David Crowder and the Eli Young Band will take the stage, and Jimmy Riffle from Animal Planet’s show “Gator Boys” will perform his “Scales, Tails & Teeth” alligator show. The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, comprised of descendants of the Choctaws who refused to move to Oklahoma in the 1800s during the tribe’s forced removal along the “Trail of Tears,” owns the Pearl River Resort (13541 Mississippi 16, 601.663.0656), which offers fine dining and Vegas-style gaming, as well as the Dancing Rabbit Golf Course with two par-72 courses. Visitors can learn more about the tribe at the Chahta Immi Cultural Center (101-A Choctaw Town Center) and the Choctaw Museum (101 Industrial Road, 601.650.1685). Five miles separates Choctaw from Philadelphia’s other well-known fair. The Neshoba 76

An Ishtaboli Primer Americans have their baseball and softball. The English have their cricket matches. Hogwarts students have their quidditch. The Choctaws? They have ishtaboli, or “stickball.” During the Choctaw Indian Fair, the championship game is played at the Choctaw Central High School football stadium.

Terminology

Kabocca: the handcrafted stick used to get the ball down the field Towa: woven leather ball

How it works • •

The game is played in four 15-minute quarters Players score points by hitting the ball against the opposing team’s goalpost, often placed in the middle of the football goalpost. Players must advance the towa using only the kabocca.

County Fair, known as “Mississippi’s Giant House Party,” will liven up the area from July 25 to Aug. 1 for its 125th anniversary. The site has some 600 colorful cabins and 575 RV parking spots with quirky names such as Happy Hollow, Founder’s Square and Bourbon Street.

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

The 100-year-old dirt track hosts the harness races, similar to chariot races, and quarter horse races. Musical acts such as Parmalee, Brett Elderege, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Easton Corbin will play throughout the week. Outside the temporary city limits of the Neshoba County Fair, Philadelphia mixes the past and present. Williams Brothers Inc. (10360 County Round 375, 601.656.2651) sells feed, seed, trendy clothing lines including Ralph Lauren and TOMS shoes, and around 1,000 pounds of sliced slab-bacon a day. Jerome Tank Season 2 Season (1115 E. Main St., 601.656.7104) is an old-timey variety store that specializes in arts and crafts supplies. The Neshoba County Historical Museum (303 Water Ave., 601.656.1685) displays the city’s industrial history and that of the Neshoba County Fair. Visitors can learn about the county’s difficult civil-rights history on the Neshoba County African-American Heritage driving tour (601.656.1000). The Neshoba County Jail, former radio jock Charles Evers and the three civil-rights workers who were murdered during “Freedom Summer” in the county are highlighted on the tour. Peggy’s (512 Bay St. E., 601.656.3478) is another link to the past. More than 60 years ago, Ms. Peggy began to welcome visitors into her home where she served home-style buffet lunches. Her recipes live on, and customers still pay on the honor system. Ye Old Drug Store Deli & Restaurant (509 W. Main St., 601.656.7719)offers drugstore favorites including milkshakes. For more information about the fairs, visit choctawindianfair.com and neshobacountyfair.org. boomjackson.com


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Events // gallivant

Farm to Fork Project 4-6 p.m., at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Purchase produce from the Alcorn State University Extension Program’s Demonstration Farm of Mound Bayou. $5 per bag; call 601-718-6578.

Ice Cream Safari 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Sample more than a dozen ice-cream flavors scooped by local television, radio and print media celebrities (including Team JFP!), and vote for your favorite flavor as well as favorite celebrity scooper. $12.25, $9.25 ages 2-12, $3 members; call 601-352-2580; jacksonzoo.org. An Evening with the Gaither Vocal Band 6 p.m., at First Baptist Church of Jackson (431 N. State St.). Bill Gaither, Wes Hampton, David Phelps, Adam Crabb and Todd Suttles make up the southern gospel group. $35, $30 seniors, children ages 2-12; call 855-484-1991; premierproductions.com.

Independence Day Celebration 7 p.m., at Trustmark Park (1 Braves Way, Pearl). The celebration and fireworks show takes place after the Mississippi Braves game against the Mobile Bay Bears. $8-$15; call 601-932-8788 or 800-745-3000; milb.com.

Tougaloo Art Colony 4 p.m., at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road). The theme is “Broken But Mended: The Healing Powers of Art.” The art retreat for adults includes workshops and forums. Runs through July 19. Registration required. Details pending. Call 601-977-7743 or 601-977-7839; tougaloo.edu.

Lil’ Boosie 8 p.m., at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). The rapper from Baton Rouge, La., performs on his TD2CH Tour. $26-$56; call 800-745-3000. History Is Lunch noon, at Wiliam F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Historian Dennis Mitchell discusses and signs copies of his new book, “A New History of Mississippi.” Free; mdah.state.ms.us.

A Night of One Acts by Local Playwrights July 17-19 at 7:30 p.m. and July 20 at 2 p.m., at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). Plays include “Spin Cycle” by Marianne House, “Her, Him” by Kris Vick, “The Party” by Keni Bounds and Eric Riggs, and “Banjo’s Dream,” which is based on Marshall Ramsey’s book. $15, $10 students, military and seniors; call 601-825-1293; email brtc12@gmail.com; blackrosetheatre.org.

19th — 10th Annual JFP Chick Ball 8 p.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Includes food, door prizes, a silent auction, the Diva of Bling outfit contest, poetry and live music. Benefits the Center for Violence Prevention. For ages 18 and up. Seeking sponsors, auction donations and volunteers now. $5 cover; call 601-3626121, ext. 23; jfpchickball.com.

Fitness Fest 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Children’s Healthcare of Mississippi is the host. Includes games, dancing, a bounce house, play zones, healthy cooking demonstrations, gifts and more. $2 ($10 maximum per family); call 354-7051; parents-kids.com.

Freedom in Mississippi Series Lecture 6-7 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). In Trustmark Grand Hall. Turry M. Flucker of the Mississippi Arts Commission speaks on Tougaloo College’s involvement during the Civil Rights Movement and its impact on art. Cash bar at 5:30 p.m. Free; call 601960-1515; msmuseumart. org.

Jackson Music Awards 6 p.m. at Jackson Marriott (200 E. Amite St.). Recipients receive awards in 25 categories. Performers TBA. $20, $30 reserved; call 601-981-4035; jmaainc.com. JACKSON AREA EVENTS UPDATED DAILY AT JFPEVENTS.COM.

POST YOUR OWN EVENTS OR SEND INFO TO EVENTS@BOOMJACKSON.COM

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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FILE PHOTO; JAKE CUNLIFFE/FLICKR; COURTESY UNIVERSITY PRESS OF MISSISSIPPI; FILE PHOTO; COURTESY DANNY JONES; FILE PHOTO

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AUGUST Whistle Stop Cabaret: 2014 Summer Showcase 6 p.m.-9 p.m., at Union Station (300 W. Capitol St.). The Mississippi Chorus’ annual fundraiser includes a tablescape contest, music, dinner and a cash bar. Attire is casual chic. Valet parking available at the King Edward Hotel. $75, $125 table for two, $425 table for six, $550 table for eight; call 601-278-3351; email mschorus@gmail.com; mschorus.org.

Magnolia Roller Vixens Roller Derby 7 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). The team takes on the Cajun Rollergirls. Doors open at 6 p.m. $12 in advance, $15 at the door, $5 children; magnoliarollervixens.com. Take It to the Streets 9 a.m., at North Ridge Church (3232 N. State St.) and St. Joseph Catholic High School. Participants serve the community through activities such as feeding the homeless and repairing homes for the disabled. Free; call 769-218-5140; northridgejackson.com.

Jackson Audubon Society First Saturday Bird Walk 8 a.m.-noon, at LeFleur’s Bluff State Park (2140 Riverside Drive). An expert birder leads the walk. Bring binoculars, water, insect repellent and a snack. Call ahead if you would like to borrow a pair of binoculars. Adults must accompany children under 15. Free, $3 car entrance fee; call 601-832-6788.

“Voices of Freedom” Aug. 14-17 at 7:30 p.m., and Aug. 16-17 at 2 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Fish Tale Group Theatre presents the drama in conjunction with the exhibit “This Light of Ours: Activist Photographers of the Civil Rights Movement.” $15 in advance, $18 at the door; msmuseumart.org.

Jackson Rhythm and Blues Festival Aug. 15 at 5 p.m., and Aug. 16 at 3 p.m. at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). Ziggy Marley headlines the festival. A portion of the proceeds benefits the Mississippi Blues Commission’s Blues Musicians Benevolent Fund. $50 two-day pass; jacksonrhythmandbluesfestival. com; call 800-745-3000. Maxwell 8 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The R&B singer performs on his Summer Solstice Tour. $39-$69; call 800-745-3000. “Les Misérables” Aug. 8-9 and Aug. 15-16 at 7:30 p.m., and Aug. 10 and Aug. 17 at 2 p.m., at Vicksburg Theatre Guild/Parkside Playhouse (101 Iowa Blvd., Vicksburg). The musical is based on Victor Hugo’s historical novel about a French peasant’s search for redemption. $12, $10 seniors, $7 students, $5 ages 12 and under; call 601-636-0471; vicksburgtheatreguild.com.

Bright Lights, Belhaven Nights 5:30 p.m.9:30 p.m., at Carlisle Street and Kenwood Place, behind McDade’s. The annual street festival includes art and food for sale, live music, children’s activities and a silent auction. The Weeks headlines the event. $5; email bsmithson@greaterbelhaven. com; greaterbelhaven.com.

Unburied Treasures: Cover to Cover 6 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Art educator Jerry Jenkins talks about the artwork of Romare Bearden and the influence of West Africa on American culture. Other presenters include writers C. Liegh McInnis and Charlie Braxton. Cash bar at 5:30 p.m. Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. Mississippi Craft Show Aug. 23 from 9 a.m.-6 p.m., and Aug. 24 from 11 a.m.4 p.m. at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Shop for handmade crafts from Mississippi artisans. A portion of the proceeds benefits organizations such as Shaw Pit Bull Rescue, Cedarhill Animal Sanctuary and TEAAM. Pet adoption drive Aug. 23. $6 in advance, $7 at the door, children under 12 free; mscraftshow.com.

W.C. Gorden Classic 6 p.m., at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). The Jackson State University Tigers take on the Florida A&M Rattlers. $25-$50; call 601979-2420; jsutigers.com. JACKSON AREA EVENTS UPDATED DAILY AT JFPEVENTS.COM.

POST YOUR OWN EVENTS OR SEND INFO TO EVENTS@BOOMJACKSON.COM

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July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

boomjackson.com

COURTESY MARY STRIPLING JACKSON AUDUBON SOCIETY; ERIC JOHNSON; RHETT AMICKL; COURTESY WME ENTERTAINMENT; FILE PHOTO

Events // wander


Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

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MY LOCAL LIST

10

faves for the fittest

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1. Rainbow Co-op and High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road, 601.366.1602). Rainbow is my favorite place to shop for healthy foods and supplements, and High Noon is a great lunch spot. Rainbow is a staple in Fondren and is the real deal. 2. Duling Green (corner of Duling Avenue and Old Canton Road). This beautiful space in the heart of Fondren is a good spot to hold outdoor exercise classes or to take kids to fly a kite. 3. BRAVO! Italian Restaurant and Bar (4500 Interstate 55 N. Suite 244, 601.982.8111). This is my favorite Jackson restaurant, due to its consistency of service and food. 82

Vegetarian or vegan customers can get dishes adjusted for them. 4. Fondren Hill (Old Canton Road). The hill on Old Canton from Avondale Street to Duling Avenue is where we have held our Fondren Hill Runs for almost three years now. It’s a challenging hill to run, and now drivers know to respect the running lanes. 5. Cups (multiple locations, cupsespressocafe.com); Sneaky Beans (2914 N. State St., 601.487.6349). It may be weird to name two competing coffee shops together, but I love and support them both. Great coffee and awesome employees—what’s not to like?

July - August 2014 // The City’s Business and Lifestyle Magazine

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6. Fortification Levee (Fortification Street). Another great spot to get outside and enjoy our great weather. You can run and get in exactly 2.2 miles if you run out and back, or just go and let your dog run around in some of the open fields around the levee. 7. Butterfly Yoga (3025 N. State St., 601.594.2313). We have several good yoga studios in the Jackson area, but Butterfly is my favorite and where I also hold a couple of non-yoga classes. If you have never tried yoga, I highly suggest giving it a shot, and Butterfly is a great place to start. :DQWWRWUDLQZLWK7HUU\6XOOLYDQ" 9LVLWOLYHULJKWQRZRQOLQHFRP

8. Keifer’s (710 Poplar Blvd., 601.355.6825; 120 N. Congress St., 601.353.4976). I mean, who doesn’t like Keifer’s? 9. Midtown. I need to spend more time in midtown, but I really enjoy it when we go visit the art studios and shops there. I can’t wait to see what the future holds for midtown Jackson. 10.Studio Chane (2906 N. State St., Suite 103, 601.362.3547). As you can tell, I am a big fan of Fondren. Studio Chane is where we print all of our T-shirts, and they have always done us right. A good screenprinter is hard to find, and the crew at Studio Chane has been fabulous over the years. boomjackson.com

PHOTO OF TERRY SULLIVAN AND BUTTERFLY YOGA BY TATE K. NATIONS. CUPS PHOTO BY LYNETTE HANSON. ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY TRIP BURNS

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CLUB HOURS Monday–Thursday 5:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. Friday 5:30 a.m. – 8 p.m. Saturday 7 a.m. – 5 pm and Sunday 1 – 5 p.m.

Nutritional Counseling Gift Certificates available Discount for St. Dominic’s employees 3 Months for $100 for full-time students (12 hours)


BOOM Jackson v7n2 - 2014 Young Influentials and Wellness Issue