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October 9 - 15, 2013


COURTESY CHRIS CAJOLEAS

JACKSONIAN CHRIS CAJOLEAS

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hris Cajoleas woke up north of Tampa, Fla., early one morning several weeks ago, and his day didn’t end until late in Doulgassville, Ga., at the 7 Venue. Early the next morning, he headed to the Drunk Horse Pub in Fayetteville, N.C. The following day, he was in Richmond, Va., at Kingdom. The travel is all part of his job: Cajoleas, worked 16 shows in 18 days managing a tour featuring hip-hop artist Pell and DJ Staccato. As a kid, Cajoleas wasn’t really interested in music. Before transferring to Madison Central High School, he attended Jackson Academy, and his passion was sports—basketball, track and football. Cajoleas dreamed of touring the southeast, but as a college football running back or strong safety—not as a musical-event promoter and artist manager. “I didn’t really make the connection with bands when I was really young,” he says. “I just wanted to play college football.” Cajoleas’ brother, Jimmy, who is seven years older, did have the music bug; he toured for eight years with Colour Revolt. Cajoleas naturally wanted to hang with his big brother and his friends in the music industry, and over time, he developed similar passions. “As I became more involved with music, I found my niche,” Cajoleas says. “By the time I left for Mississippi State in 2009, I knew I was interested in the marketing side of music.” While at MSU, he majored in marketing and booked opening talent for events. Cajoleas

CONTENTS

graduated from Mississippi State this past spring and now manages Pell, aka Jared Pellerin, among others. Pell’s first performance under Cajoleas’ management was at Hal and Mal’s in October 2012. They just wrapped up their “Fresh Produce Tour.” “I refer to it as the Fresh Produce Tour because Pell is perceived as a fresh and unique artist and brand in the music industry,” Cajoleas says. “He is not just a rapper. He is also a singer, which is not typical in the hip-hop, urban world.” Cajoleas, 22, is excited about starting his marketing career as an entrepreneur in the music world. “Music changes every day,” he says. “I have fresh ideas every day, and with technology, it is possible to instantly reach millions. It’s not the same music world anymore.” Lost Legend Entertainment, his company, takes its name from a story about a homeless man who worked outside the University Pub, once across from the King Edward Hotel downtown. The man called himself “The Lost Legend of Mississippi Music.” Ultimately, Cajoleas plans to handle artists in multiple musical genres, taking the artists’ visions, and strategizing and growing their brands. For now, though, Cajoleas loves life on the road, waking up every day in a new place, meeting new people and relating to college students and 20-somethings. —Marilyn Trainor Storey

Cover photograph of Jason Daniels by Packer McBride

10 H2O FAQ

Dive into the real numbers surrounding the increase in water and sewer rates in Mayor Lumumba’s budget.

25 Farm Fresh

Take advantage of the waning weeks of fresh bounty from farmers markets across the city with these recipes.

33 Among the Stars

“This is an experiential film. Cuarón creates a unique movie experience through long takes and the absence of sound. Through custom-made machinery, cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki captures the grace, beauty and weightlessness of space. Bullock’s character, appropriately named Stone, provides the gravitas.” —Anita Modak-Truran, “‘Gravity’: Space Without Noise”

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4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ............................................ TALKS 11 .................................. BUSINESS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ........ BEST OF JACKSON RECAP 16 ............................ COVER STORY 23 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 25 ......................................... FOOD 31 .............................. DIVERSIONS 33 .......................................... FILM 34 ....................................... 8 DAYS 35 ............................... JFP EVENTS 38 ..................................... SPORTS 39 .................................... PUZZLES 41 ....................................... ASTRO 42 ............................................ DIY

COURTESY WARNER BROS; FILE PHOTO; TIRP BURNS

OCTOBER 9 - 15, 2013 | VOL. 12 NO. 5

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EDITOR’S note

by Briana Robinson Music Editor

Making it Happen

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pen-mic nights seem to be the place to be on weekdays—maybe even on weekends, too— in Jackson. This summer, I frequented them at Fenian’s Pub and Martin’s Lounge. One of my musician friends tried his best to perform at those bars each week. One Monday night at Martin’s (my first time going to Martin’s on a Monday), I joined him for openmic night. I didn’t know what to expect. Chris Rybolt, Martin’s bartender, manager and music booker, had set up a microphone and some sound equipment toward the back of the primary bar. When I walked in, my friend was already setting up to play, his maroon hollow-body Gretsch hanging from a guitar strap around his body and a cold Blue Moon—one of our favorite beers—in hand. I sat at a table with several of our friends; we made up about half the attendees at the bar. I expected that open mic would be something like karaoke, where you got to play one song at a time, but my friend, who was playing first that night, performed at least four or five. He had a whole set list planned. This was also my first time seeing him perform live for an audience that wasn’t a few friends in a room or Millsaps College students sitting outside on campus. I recognized all of the songs he played; they were originals, but he had played them for me on different occasions. Every time I’ve seen him play at open-mic nights since then, people have come up to him after to let him know that he did a great job or to ask if he had any CDs available. He would just direct them to his SoundCloud account. Although he is only 22, he believes he is starting his musical career late. While

other people his age and younger were doing the open-mic scene already and even getting bands together and recording EPs and LPs, he was busy studying for music theory and other Millsaps classes. What he should realize, however, is that it is almost never too late to pursue a passion and that he should not be comparing himself to others anyway.

No matter how you want to be involved in the Jackson music scene and its various subscenes, a place for you exists. That’s a sure way to feel like a failure. Chicago-based blues and rock player Voo Davis—who plays at Underground 119 Oct. 26—says he didn’t even start playing the guitar until he was about 19. Now, at 40 years old, Davis has two full-length records, the latter of which came out in September. The first album, “A Place for Secrets,” spent seven months on the American Music Awards

and Roots Music Report charts. I’m sure that at some points in his life, he also felt as if he should have been making music instead of doing something else. For this year’s music issue, I interviewed Jackson-based Adam Collier, aka AJC, of AJC and the Envelope Pushers. He’s 28 years old and is working to release his first LP in April. He is relying on community support to make it happen and is hopeful about the coming months. AJC has big plans and knows that Jackson will help him out. The Jackson music scene, as Lydia Bain of Wink & the Signal described it to the JFP (page 16), is full of different age groups and skill levels working together to help each other succeed. The community aspect of the scene is strong, and to some it might be daunting. Someone on Twitter recently asked the Jackson Free Press what the best ways are to get involved with the Jackson music scene. Some might think that a silly question because Jackson seems to be flourishing with music, but I would say that many of those artists have long been part of the scene in one way or another. From the outside, it might be easy to wonder how to get in. Everyone seems to know each other already, as last year’s “Jackson’s Musical Family Affair” illustrated. Artists in and around the city have come together, regardless of genre, age or gender, to create great music. No matter how you want to be involved in the Jackson music scene and its various sub-scenes, a place for you exists. Shows need volunteers, promoters need street teams and bands need members. The easiest and quickest way, however, to get involved with music in Jackson is show your face at music events around town. Working in an office with

Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton has shown me just how much music is happening in Jackson. Each week, the music listings email (music@jacksonfreepress. com) gets dozens of messages detailing upcoming events, all of which go up at jfp.ms/musiclistings. Some names come up each week, often with more than one performance per week. Venues such as Duling Hall, Martin’s Lounge, Ole Tavern on George Street, Freelon’s Bar and Groove, and Hal & Mal’s have live music each week. Open-mic nights are also an important part of Jackson nightlife. While some may think open mic is just stomping ground for amateur artists, it has actually proven to be the opposite for me. I wouldn’t call a single thing about the performances I saw this summer “amateur.” Each artist was professional and seemed seasoned in his or her approach to performing, regardless of age or genre. Some of the people performing at Martin’s or Fenian’s were there almost every week just like my friend. Open mic was the only time that some of them ever get the opportunity to perform for an audience. Others were accustomed to playing around town either solo or with full bands and did open mic for fun, more exposure, or a change of scenery. The longer I stay in Jackson, the more I discover about its rich musical history and present. This year’s artists to watch show just how diverse Jackson’s music scene is right now. If anyone is wondering how to get involved or get started, they should just take some advice from the folks featured in this issue. They’re making it happen, and so can everyone else.

October 9 - 15, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Marilyn Trainor Storey

Mo Wilson

Justin Hosemann

Amber Helsel

Darnell Jackson

De’Arbreya Lee

R.L. Nave

Tommy Burton

Marilyn Trainor Storey, a Delta native, is a Jackson-based interior designer. She writes the blog MS Design Maven, combining Mississippi stories and with her work. She wrote the Jacksonian.

Editorial Intern Mo Wilson is a Millsaps College student. He enjoys pizza, the Internet, dancing alone in his bedroom, social justice, politics and giggling. He contributed to the cover package.

Editorial Intern Justin Hosemann is a native of Vicksburg. He recently graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi. He contributed to the cover package.

Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel graduated from Ole Miss with a journalism degree. She is short, hungry and always thinking. She contributed to the cover package.

Darnell “Chris” Jackson is a writer, photographer, graphic designer and entrepreneur. He is a Jackson State University graduate and owns J.Carter Studios. He contributed to the cover package.

Editorial Intern De’Arbreya Lee is a recent Jackson State University graduate and a Pittsburg, Calif., native. She loves art, family, fighting for the people and quoting lines from the film “Love Jones.” She contributed to the cover package.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Call him at 601-3626121 ext. 12. He wrote for the talk section.

Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton plays bass with Lately David, collects records, sees movies and travels a lot with his wife, Michelle. He contributed to the cover package.


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jacksonfreepress.com


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Wednesday, Oct. 2 International inspectors start destroying Syria’s chemical arsenal in the midst of a civil war. ‌ Head Start providers that serve 3,200 low-income children in four states close due to the federal government shutdown.

Friday, Oct. 4 President Barack Obama conducts an interview with the Associated Press on a wide range of topics such as the government shutdown, the debt ceiling, health care, foreign affairs and Washington’s football team. ‌ A man sets himself on fire in the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Saturday, Oct. 5 The Republican-run House passes a bill to ensure furloughed workers get paid for days they could not work due to the shutdown. ‌ U.S. Special Forces capture an al-Qaida leader linked to the 1998 American Embassy bombings in East Africa. Sunday, Oct. 6 After days of slowly moving toward the Gulf Coast, the storm system Karen dissipates.

October 9 - 15, 2013

Monday, Oct. 7 The torch relay for the Sochi Winter Games begins in Moscow. ‌ Authorities investigating the stabbing death of a Seattle-based soldier announce that they have arrested three other soldiers who serve at the same military installation.

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Tuesday, Oct. 8 Global test results show that American adults score below the international average in math, reading and problemsolving using technology. ‌ President Barack Obama once again tells Speaker John Boehner that he won’t negotiate on the basis of delaying the Affordable Care Act over reopening the government or debt-ceiling legislation. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com

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Will Ratepayers Get Hosed? by Tyler Cleveland

T

he city of Jackson’s water and sewer rate increases included in the city’s 2014 budget will go into effect in 30 days, and the first bill to reflect those rate increases will go out in December. Right now, it’s unclear if the promised relief for residents on fixed incomes will be available at the same time—or how it can legally be done. The program includes at least $175,000 for low-income people who can prove they cannot afford the extra expense for the increased rates. The task of setting up the program, which city leadership hopes to have in place before bills reach customer mailboxes this month, is left to Michael Raff, director of Jackson’s Health and Human Services Department. Raff said he’s “hopeful� that the program will be in place, but indicated that the program has to clear legal hurdles, and that the city attorney’s office is still looking at the proposal. Details are not available, but former City Attorney Pieter Teeuwissen, who officially left his post Sept. 30 to take a similar job as an attorney for the Hinds County Board of Supervisors, explained that the city can’t simply give money to its citizens. “The program was proposed last year,� Teeuwissen said. “At that time, our legal department opined that it would be considered a gratuity if the city came up with the system and distributed the funds, and you just can’t do that; however, non-profits are allowed by statute. We give money to Stewpot, Habitat for Humanity, and the Boys and Girls Club, so this system would have to be set up similar to those programs. They’ll have to develop their own rules and

procedures, but it should work well.� The Hinds County Human Resource Agency, a non-profit entity, has offered to distribute the funds at no cost to the city.

Jackson, by comparison, has some of the lowest rates in the southeast. City statistics state that the average monthly sewer bill in Jackson is $15.66. With the increase, TRIP BURNS

Thursday, Oct. 3 A woman with a young child in her car tries to ram a White House barricade, then leads police on a chase ending with her death outside the U.S. Capitol. ‌ A federal official reveals that U.S. attorneys are shelving most civil prosecutions, and immigration courts are closed except for the most pressing cases because of the government shutdown.

¹4HEYTHINKTHECRIMEISGOING TODECREASENOW)JUSTSEE MOREDEATHOCCURRINGINTHE FUTURE²

Complaints over increased water and sewer rates have continued, even after the Jackson City Council passed the 2013-2014 fiscal-year budget.

The organization already distributes funds through 10 separate income-based programs, including one that helps low-income Hinds County residents pay their energy bills. Mayor Chokwe Lumumba raised water and sewer rates as part of his first budget, which a majority of the Jackson City Council approved Sept. 12. The increases are necessary in light of the city’s crumbling infrastructure and a $380 million consent decree from the Environmental Protection Agency to fix the wastewater management system.

that number doubles to $31.33, which is still lower than Atlanta; Birmingham or Huntsville, Ala.; Charleston, S.C.; Little Rock, Ark.; Louisville, Ky.; New Orleans and St. Louis, Mo. (See sidebar). If you combine water and sewer payments, the total increase is 40 percent. For the average Jackson homeowner, the bill increases from $52.76 a month to $73.92. Even with the extra $21.17, Jackson’s rates PRUH+26('VHHSDJH

FALL FOR MUSIC A

t long last, it’s starting to feel like autumn in Mississippi. Before the freezing rain sets in and winter takes over (or, before temperatures shoot back into the 90s again for summer’s last stand), grab a cozy sweater and a cup of cider and turn on some of these autumn tunes. After all, you only have a short window before the onslaught of Christmas music. Van Morrison, “Autumn Song� Eric Clapton, “Autumn Leaves� Simon & Garfunkel, “Leaves That Are Green� The Vines, “Autumn Shade II� The Cure, “Last Days of Summer� Neil Young, “Harvest Moon� Yo La Tengo, “Autumn Sweater� Eva Cassidy, “Autumn Leaves� John Coltrane, “Autumn Serenade�

Green Day, “Wake Me Up When September Ends� Manic Street Preachers, “Autumnsong� Fleet Foxes, “Sun It Rises� U2, “Autumn� Sparks The Rescue, “Autumn� Moody Blues, “Forever Autumn� Broken Bells, “October� Don Henley, “The Boys of Summer� The Small Faces, “The Autumn Stone�

Donna Summer, “Autumn Changes� Ed Sheeran, “Autumn Leaves� The White Stripes, “Dead Leaves and The Dirty Ground� The Kinks, “Autumn Almanac� Jake Bugg, “Country Song� The Crocketts, “Autumn Afternoon� Sea Wolf, “Leaves in the River� SOURCE: SOME SONG SUGGESTIONS FROM NME.COM


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TALK | city

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are still well below those other city’s rates. After the increase, the average annual water and sewer bill is roughly $887. What the city has done is not unusual. Faced with a similar situation, Baltimore increased its rates 42 percent on water and sewer last year. Birmingham raised its water rate 4.9 percent this year, and the leadership of Shreveport, La., voted to raise its water and sewer rates by 13 and 55 percent, respectively. But the reality is that many Jackson budgets don’t have a lot of leeway. U.S. Census data reveal that the city’s per capita income in 2011 was $19,301, and the median household income was $34,567. Nearly 28 percent of Jacksonians live below the poverty level. The rates in other cities don’t mean much to Jackson resident Joe Harvey. The Jackson retiree, who lives at 4031 California Ave. in the heart of Jackson, was one of the concerned citizens who attended the mayor’s town hall meeting at Progressive Missionary Baptist Church Sept. 11. “Those numbers they are putting out aren’t worth the paper (they’re) printed on,� Harvey said. “Atlanta is a big city. There’s a lot of industry and a lot of jobs. That’s why they pay more. Right now, we have people coming into Jackson, earning income, and taking their money to McComb, Vicksburg, Meridian, Rankin County and Madison. I say we find a way to get them to help. They run on the roads, use the water, and go back and spend their income and pay their taxes somewhere else.� Harvey had heart surgery in 1995 and

has been living on disability and Social Security ever since. He lost one of his kidneys, and is required to drink a lot of water every day. The water at his house, he says, is undrinkable, so he buys $40 worth of bottled water every week at Sam’s. “We have Medicaid and Medicare, but I have had bypass heart surgery, a kidney stone, and now I have an aneurysm, and they say I have to go back,� he said. “My wife gets $500 a month, and our total income is $1,600 a month. I am paid up now on my medical bills, but we are already scraping by, so my expense on water is really affecting us.� Harvey said his average water bill is around $100. While he is looking into getting his household on the city’s payment assistance program, he said he has been denied in the past because he was told his household income is too high. The city bills water customers every two months, and Jacksonians will see the first bills with the new rate for October. September’s portion of the bill will be at the old rate. Ratepayers will see the full increase in November/December bills. For folks like Harvey, details of the city’s plan an assistance program cannot come fast enough. At this point, it’s unclear whether he would even qualify for the program, much less how to access the benefits. “I’m not the only one that this will hurt,� Harvey said. “I talk to people in my neighborhood all the time that have it tough. If all the people that got their rates increased would get up off their behind and show up, there could have been standing room only (in the town hall). I’m not the only one sitting on fixed income. People needed to let them know how they felt.� Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

‘I say we find a way to get them to help.’

How Jackson’s Rates Stack Up

October 9 - 15, 2013

                           

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City Atlanta, Ga. Louisville, Ky. Little Rock, Ark. Birmingham, Ala. Huntsville, Ala. Baltimore, Md. St. Louis, Mo. Jackson, MS* New Orleans, La. Charleston, S.C.

Avg. Bill $50.06 $42.10 $40.09 $38.00 $34.48 $33.19 $32.95 $31.33 $29.80 $27.50

Avg. Income $43,903 $33,175 $40,976 $28,646 $45,018 $38,721 $32,570 $19,301 $35,041 $49,284

*This is a monthly breakdown of average water bills. Jackson sends out bills every two months, so the average bill in Jackson is $62.66 for two months of service.


TALK | justice

Crossfire by R.L. Nave

TRIP BURNS

Vigil Gives Mom Peace, Not Justice wants justice for her son. Reports from local TV news stations that covered the July 12 shooting suggest that sometime before dawn, a homeowner in the Lakeover subdivision of northwest Jackson crept out onto his front porch and fired several shots at an individual he said he believed was trying to steal his SUV. Jackson police officials declined to charge the homeowner with a crime, citing Mississippi’s Castle Doctrine, which outlines circumstances under which individuals may be justified in using deadly force to protect their home, automobile or body. After questions arose about the doctrine’s applicability to Thomas’ shooting in Lakeover, in which the vehicle was unoccupied, police said the homeowner feared Thomas was making a move for a gun of his own. Thomas’ family is dubious about the details of the reports. Media reports initially stated that Thomas was shot five times, but a report emergency physicians at University of Mississippi Medical Center completed ob-

by R.L. Nave R.L. NAVE

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lmost three months have passed since Quardious Thomas was shot and killed in northwest Jackson’s Lakeover subdivision for allegedly trying to steal a car. “It feels like yesterday,” said his mother, Tonya Greenwood. At a vigil held Oct. 4, friends and family members shared remembrances of the young man they refer to as “Q.” Family friend Nancy Gaynor described Thomas as both brilliant and stubborn. Once arrested for house burglary in 2012, Thomas seemed to have straightened up enough to complete his high-school equivalency and he planned to start taking classes at Hinds Community College in the fall. “Q was a unique person; there was nobody like Q,” Gaynor said of 20-year-old Thomas, whom she knew for a decade. Greenwood called the vigil a muchneeded outlet for her grief as well as that of her family, but she stopped short of saying the vigil represents closure—she still

an arrest because witnesses said Brown initiated a gun battle. “He shot at the other guy first. Apparently he missed, then the other guy returned fire striking him about 12 times. It’s not for me to judge the amount of rounds that were fired. I don’t know if the amount of times he fired his weapon is of any circumstance at this point,” Vance told WLBT-TV’s Cheryl Lasseter. Matt Steffey, a professor of constitutional law at the Mississippi College School of Law in Jackson, explained that although police and district attorneys have a lot of discretion in terms of whether to arrest or charge people with crimes, in all deliberate shootings a prima facie case for assault exists or, if the victim dies, for homicide. “(If) I pick up a gun and shoot you, even in self defense, I have met the elements of intentional homicide,” Steffey said. DeUndra Brown describes her husband as a fun guy who loved being a father to his 16-month-old daughter and 11-year-old son and mentoring neighborhood kids on how to break into the music industry. She believes that if a witness to her husband’s shooting contacts JPD and tells police what they say, it might move the investigation along and help bring the shooter to justice. “It hurts me that nobody in that neighborhood will speak up. He would have done anything for them,” she said. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

Friends and relatives of Quardious Thomas, a 20-year-old man killed this summer in Jackson, released sky lanterns in his memory.

served six gunshot wounds. Family members who observed Thomas’ body after the shooting, however, report seeing numbers written next to bullet holes; the numbers went up to eight, family members told the Jackson Free Press.

Jackson police say the Hinds County District Attorney’s office has the case. Hinds County District Attorney Robert Shuler Smith did not respond to phone calls and emails. Matt Steffey, a professor of constitutional law at Mississippi College School of Law, says the state’s Castle Doctrine legislation did not have the intended effect of clarifying when deadly force is justified. “I think the main thing the Castle Doctrine accomplished is (it) made more citizens confused about what their rights were. I’m not sure that it really expanded anybody’s self-defense rights, but it sure made the issue more complicated,” Steffey said. Tonya Greenwood is hopeful that law-enforcement will provide more answers about how her son died. “I miss him. I love him and all that, but that won’t bring him back,” Greenwood said. She described the pain of losing Quardious: “It’s like a hole that I can’t fill with nothing.” Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

jacksonfreepress.com

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fter quarrelling with a man the DeUndra Brown, who returned from death occurring in the future.” night of Sept. 20, William Brown military training three weeks before her husWilliam Brown’s death appears to give was convinced that the man and band’s death and was not aware of the HB2’s credence to fears that local law-enforcement his brothers would try to officials expressed when they filed a kill him. Brown, who went by the lawsuit to prevent the controversial law, nickname “Nod,” even told his wife HB 2, from going into effect. that he thought the brother’s family “It’s difficult to determine who was gunning for him. is a threat, and (who) isn’t a threat,” A day later, just after 5 p.m., Hinds County District Attorney RobBrown proved fatally prophetic ert Shuler Smith said just before the when, near the intersection of Doclaw’s planned effective date of July 1. tor Moton Street and Smith RobCalls to Smith and JPD’s Deputy inson Road in the Virden Addition Chief Deric Hearn, with whom neighborhood, the brother of the Brown has been in communication man Brown beefed with the night about her husband’s death investigabefore shot him 12 times. tion, were not returned for this story. Police took the shooter, who Smith, along with JPD and the did not flee the scene, into custody Hinds County Sheriff’s office, joined and after questioning him, let him in a lawsuit that met brief success go in time to attend a concert at when Hinds County Circuit Court a local nightclub, Brown’s family Judge Winston Kidd enjoined the members said. gun law that state Attorney General “I’m at a loss for words because Jim Hood admitted would “be pretty the guy who shot my husband gets tricky for cops on the street” to ento go free. He shot my husband 12 force. The state Supreme Court overtimes. I don’t see that as self-defense,” turned Kidd’s decision, allowing the Nod’s wife, DeUndra Brown, told law’s implementation to go forward. William Brown’s wife, DeUndra, believes her husband was victimized twice—once at the hands of his killer and again the Jackson Free Press last week. DeUndra Brown suspects the by a state law that allows people to carry guns openly. Almost as unsettling is her belaw may also have the effect of givlief that one reason police declined ing police an excuse to not investigate to charge the shooter was because both passage until her husband’s death, believes the crimes that are more complicated to untanmen were allowed to have guns, according law is making it easier for people to kill each gle. JPD has said William Brown’s death reto an open-carry law the Legislature passed other instead of serving as a deterrent to crime. mains under investigation, but at the time of this year. After a brief court battle, the law “They think the crime is going to de- the shooting, JPD Assistant Chief Lee Vance took effect in August. crease now?” she asked. “I just see more told a TV reporter that police did not make

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TALK | business

JRA Moving on Farish, Slowly by Tyler Cleveland

T

he sewer and water pipes that run underneath Farish Street are ready to support businesses. The bricked street and landscaping along the sidewalks are ready, too. Some storefronts look revamped and new, and the wiring inside the buildings is damn-near state of the

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and a dentist’s office. Later, in the 1950s and 1960s, civil-rights leaders held meetings in the area’s churches, restaurants and homes. Icons of the movement, including Stokely Carmichael and Medgar Evers, made the push for equality out of an NAACP office

of Farish and Griffith streets, and a small handful of legacy businesses hanging on, but none of that was Watkins’ doing. The Farish Street Group’s plans included 13 venues on the stretch of storefronts from Amite Street to Griffith Street, but TRIP BURNS

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art. It ought to be—the mixture of private and public investment for the historic district since renovation began now totals more $20 million. So why isn’t Farish Street thriving? That’s a question Jackson Redevelopment Authority officials are apparently tired of asking, leading them to cancel the contract with developer Farish Street Group LLC at the Sept. 25 JRA meeting. The group, and its lead investor and developer David Watkins, had held the development lease for Farish Street since 2008. Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba said during his mayoral campaign earlier this year that it was time for JRA to go in a new direction. In late September, Lumumba called the board’s decision to cut ties to the former contractor “long overdue.� “Unfortunately, it just didn’t work out, and it was time for a change,� Lumumba said. “Hopefully, some of the people who were involved with the previous group will be able to remain involved, but I just don’t think they will be able to do what was originally planned. Either way, it didn’t make sense for the city to be held hostage by one long-term contract.� Lumumba has called for Watkins’ group to be kicked to the curb since December 2012 when he served on the Jackson City Council. The history of Farish Street’s renovation efforts, which Jackson architect Steven Horn first proposed in 1983, is as shameful as the area is illustrious. Once a bustling downtown strip that served as a business and social hub for Jackson’s African American community, much of Farish Street sat abandoned for years, contributing to making the area increasingly prone to crime. At its peak from 1900 to World War II, the strip housed African American attorneys, doctor’s offices, a bank, two hospitals

The structures along Farish Street, like this building across the street from Frank Jones Corner at the corner of Griffith and Farish Streets, appear to be ready for businesses to move in, but still have structural problems on the interior.

located at 507 N. Farish St. The area suffered a rough economic downturn following school integration and was almost completely vacant from 1975 to 1983, when plans to revitalize the area surfaced. In the three decades since, planning, renovations and new construction have been ongoing, but little has come to fruition. The Farish Street Group was the latest, but certainly not the first development group—or the last, hopefully—to get involved. It generated renewed hope, however, because of Watkins. He was known for his prominent role in renovating the historic King Edward Hotel and Standard Life buildings, both of which are now fully operational and breathing life into downtown Jackson. That momentum didn’t carry over to nearby Farish Street. It does have one nightclub, Frank Jones Corner, open at the corner

the future of those buildings is once again unclear. Watkins had hoped to have a B.B. King’s Blues Club open on the street by the end of 2012, but after architects finalized designs for the club, engineers discovered that the structure was not capable of supporting the capacity load. In fact, the building didn’t even have a foundation. Watkins did not return phone calls for comment. All of that leaves the JRA board with the decision on what to do with the property next. When the Jackson Free Press asked for a comment concerning Farish Street, JRA board member Beneta Burt deferred to board President Ronnie Crudup. Crudup, the bishop at New Horizon Church, has not returned numerous calls for comment. Comment at jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.



 

      

 

October 9 - 15, 2013

 

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jacksonfreepress.com


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Pimp Slapped and Car Jacked

M

iss Doodle Mae: “Jojo is a savvy boss who always keeps the Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store staff involved and aware regarding what’s happening in the world and in the discount dollar-store business. On the eve of the government shutdown, he called for an emergency staff meeting. For a moment, the staff and I thought we were about to be furloughed. Instead, Jojo wanted to have a heart-to-heart chat with his long-term employees. Whew!� Jojo: “The bad news is that some mean and callus politicians in Washington, D.C., will continue to pimp slap, car jack, hijack, beat down and humiliate the American people by shutting down the government. The government of the people, by the people, and for the people seems to be gradually perishing from this bitter earth. And the real people suffer the consequences. Furloughed federal-government employees will not get paid. Government services for the people will be delayed. “The good news is that Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store staff will be unaffected by the government shutdown. During this unfortunate crisis, Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store will become an oasis of hope and understanding for people affected by the shutdown. “Starting today, I will stock Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store with necessary items at half price for furloughed workers, WIC Program recipients, and disabled and senior citizens. “Now that you have the good and bad news, it’s time to open the doors of Jojo’s Discount Dollar Store and help those folk who have been shut out.�

‘cooperation’ Âł7KH'HPRFUDWVZKRFRQWUROWKH6HQDWHVKRXOGFRPHWRWKHWDEOHDQGZRUN ZLWKXVLQDVSLULWRIFRRSHUDWLRQWRNHHSWKHJRYHUQPHQWRSHQDQGWUHDWDOO $PHULFDQVIDLUO\´

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Why it stinks: As Nunnelee’s fellow Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives have demonstrated over the past week, “cooperation� isn’t the goal. Their actions, refusing to keep the federal government funded and running, amount to extortion. The following day, Nunnelee said this to a reporter: “(Senate Majority Leader) Harry Reid’s refusal to negotiate is an arrogance that I haven’t seen in this town.� Right. The height of arrogance is to repeatedly try and fail to repeal a law that Congress passed three years ago and the conservative U.S. Supreme Court largely upheld—a law that the American people voted for when they re-elected President Barack Obama. Now, they’re holding the American people—and, some say, democracy itself—hostage to get their way. Some GOPers are more truthful about what’s going on. Rep. Marlin Stutzman, R-Ind., and Rep. Dennis Ross, R-Fla., said the arrogance is piling up on the conservative side of the equation. “We’re not going to be disrespected,� Stutzman told reporters. “ ... We have to get something out of this. And I don’t know what that even is.� Ross said this to The New York Times: “Republicans have to realize how many significant gains we’ve made over the last three years, and we have, not only in cutting spending but in really turning the tide on other things. We can’t lose all that when there’s no connection now between the shutdown and the funding of Obamacare. I think now it’s a lot about pride.�

Shutdown: All Part of the Plan

T

he Republican members of the U.S. Congress, including the Mississippi coalition, are trying to blame the government shutdown on anyone but themselves. The talking points have become as annoying as Mississippi mosquitoes: “Obamacare is train wreck!� “Democrats refuse to negotiate!� Malarkey. Let’s put aside that funding for Affordable Care Act is part of the mandatory portion of the budget. The part Congress is fighting about now is the discretionary portion, thus the “partial� shutdown. Let’s not consider that the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the overwhelming majority of the act—everything except the part mandating states expand their Medicaid programs. We don’t have to talk about how the ACA is derived from a conservative Heritage Foundation plan or that it’s essentially what then-Gov. Mitt Romney enacted in Massachusetts. And the American people—the ones who re-elected Barack Obama by an overwhelming majority less than a year ago? The same American people priced out of adequate health care? The 800,000 sitting idle, the toddlers with no day care? We don’t have to bring them into the picture, either. No, we don’t need to talk about that. But here’s what we should talk about: The Republican Party has been planning this tactic—holding the budget and, possibly, the debt ceiling, hostage—for months. At least, the far-right-wing purists of the party—and their big buckets of money—have

done so, and The New York Times broke that story in its Sunday edition: “To many Americans, the shutdown came out of nowhere. But interviews with a wide array of conservatives show that the confrontation that precipitated the crisis was the outgrowth of a longrunning effort to undo the law, the Affordable Care Act, since its passage in 2010—waged by a galaxy of conservative groups with more money, organized tactics and interconnections than is commonly known.� Two examples: Freedom Works, a conservative advocacy group published a memo in February that outlines its “Blueprint for Defunding Obamacare.� The Tea Party Patriots published its “Defunding Obamacare Toolkit� in September, complete with talking points just in case they get the blame. For Tea Party-backed Republican hardliners, no tactic is too harsh. They will sacrifice the health and treasure of the American people, and the economic stability of the nation. Moderate estimates of the shutdown’s cost are $300 million a day; one week costs the nation $2.1 billion. This isn’t about what’s good for the American people. It never was. This is about ideological purity, and it has to stop. Call your Republican congressman and tell him. Sen. Thad Cochran: 202-224-5054; 601965-4459. Sen. Roger Wicker: 202-224-6253; 601-965-4644. Rep. Alan Nunnelee: 202225-4306; 662-841-8845. Rep. Steven Palazzo: 202-225-5772; 228-864-7670. Rep. Gregg Harper: 202-225-5031; 601- 823-3400.

Email letters and opinion to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Justin Hosemann, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Intern Lindsay Fox Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

HOME FOR SALE

A Musical Elephant

Located at Jackson, 2758 Emerald Dr

I

t’s a scene any Mississippi resident would recognize. People were bustling about, eating fried catfish and pulled-pork sandwiches, or they were sipping lemonade and sweet tea while sitting on folding chairs and blankets. All of them were listening to a rotating cast of locals performing the blues and gospel music. It was almost identical to any other late-summer festival happening in rural towns across the state. This one just happened to be where my family stopped for lunch during the seven-hour drive from Atlanta to Millsaps College after the summer break. My mom looked around, marveling at the scene. “I can’t believe you’ve spent four years in Jackson, and you still don’t like the blues music,” she remarked. Whoa! Hold on. Let’s back up here. Blues is a great genre of music. It’s earthy, powerful and sometimes humorous: a perfect soundtrack to a day eating barbecue. But I would never rip it away from its roots and cram it into the small confines of my dorm room. This music belongs outside in the summer heat and is best enjoyed from a blanket—or in a dark, smoky bar. It would be out of place on my iPod as I walk around Belhaven. It’s not a good fit for the loudspeakers of clubs like the Mosquito or in stores like Swell-o-Phonic. Blues is a great rural Mississippi tradition, but my experience in Jackson and Oxford is that it’s not the only genre we have to offer. Music-heads love talking about Mississippi’s rich musical tradition. Most cite Elvis as a typical example, alongside Muddy Waters and B.B. King. While the blues are great in context— and we certainly have a wealth of talent in that genre—our continuing to trot out these old tropes to define the “Mississippi music” sound is limiting the music scene’s potential for growth here, as well as the state’s musical reputation across the nation. Jackson and the surrounding towns have more to offer the music scene of America. After all, this is the post-Internet age: We don’t have to limit inspiration to local barbecues anymore. Just a few examples: Spacewolf has been churning out grimy rock songs that reference ’90s grunge acts such as Nirva-

na as well as modern acts like Yuck. Bass Drum of Death is part of a nationwide movement of indie-rock musicians playing lo-fi gravelly bursts of noise. That Scoundrel makes garage rock that draws from jazz and blues as well as punk and psychedelic music. And the baroque pop of The Da Vincis falls in line with the pristine pop of Vampire Weekend. The Internet has also made it possible for these bands to gain exposure in scenes outside the state. Bass Drum of Death’s sophomore EP got reviewed in magazines in the United Kingdom and on revered hipster music blogs such as Pitchfork. Paste Magazine did a profile on Mississippi music artists, which listed gospel and blues acts as well as rockscene stalwarts such as The Weeks. Even more exciting are projects that seem to spring up out of nowhere. When I first heard JTRAN, the little-known electronic freak-out project of producer Tre Pepper and artist Josh Hailey, I was floored. It sounded like nothing I’ve heard in Jackson before or since, with electronic squelches and hiccupping drum lines. (My roommates complained at times that my computer was broken, but later, I caught them dancing to JTRAN in the bathroom.) Hip-hop producer Got Koke!? (aka Matthew Furdge) has received two Grammy nominations for his work on albums by 2 Chainz and Rick Ross, proving that Jackson, too, produces southern hip-hop. Artists like these, who might not sound to others as if they hail from Jackson, are the key to breaking Mississippi music’s single narrative of the Delta blues musician. At the Sept. 28 premier of the documentary “subSIPPI” at the Mississippi Museum of Art, one quote stood out for me. The narrator told the anecdote of the baby elephant: If you repeatedly chain a baby elephant, when it grows up, it will still act as if it’s tethered, even though it now has more than enough strength to break free. Mississippi’s music scene is an unchained elephant. We’re more than capable of breaking out and exploring new terrain when defining our music. Editorial Intern Mo Wilson is a Millsaps College senior. He enjoys pizza, the Internet, dancing alone in his bedroom, social justice, politics and giggling. Follow him on Twitter @p_nkrocky.

We don’t have to limit inspiration to local barbecues anymore.

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starting at •

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Thomas Jackson (Restaurant) BikeWalk MS Fundraiser (Patio)

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FRIDAY 10/11:

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LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache • Ladies Drink Free October 11

The Passing Parade w/ European Theater

Paperclip Scientists (Restaurant) 4th Annual Libra Celebration: SATURDAY 10/12:

Deeb’s Blues (Restaurant) SUNDAY 10/13:

Duff Dorrough Benefit (Big Room)

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Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday TUESDAY 10/15:

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant)

England in 1819 w/ Spirituals

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Saturday October 12

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ach year for more than a decade now, the Jackson Free Press has let readers vote for their favorite local businesses, organizations and people. It’s time to gear up to campaign for the 2014 Best of Jackson awards. To kick off the 2014 campaign season, the Jackson Free Press is listing the Best of Jackson 2013 winners each week until we release the ballot on Nov. 6. Think you have what it takes to join the ranks of the Best of Jackson champions? Well, here are the ones to beat! Let the campaigning begin!

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with DJ STACHE

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Fenian’s Pub has won dozens of Best of Jackson awards.


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15


Lydia Bain How would you describe the Jackson music scene?

search on what made American music. Not only emulating the music through listening and copying, but they also did their research. And Coldplay because it’s just beauty rap, and they make the world a better place sonically, in my opinion.

It’s great. There’s so much talent and all types of people and styles of music. I get to play a lot of different things. I get a chance to explore all of the musical genres I like.

How would you describe the Jackson music scene?

Growing and inspiring. There are a lot of great musicians here who are up-andcoming and also who have been here for awhile. ... I think that it’s a mixture of young and old coming together, and that’s a great thing to see. There’s a mentorship mentality.

What has been the hardest part of being a musician in Jackson?

NAME: Barry Leach AGE: 53 OCCUPATION: Guitar teacher BAND NAMES: The Barry Leach Band, The Vamps, solo work POSITION IN BANDS: Guitarist GENRE: Jazz, rock, blues Who are your top three musical influences and why?

I would have to start with The Beatles, then probably Led Zeppelin and Pat Metheny. The Beatles have so many great songs. Jimmy Page’s guitar playing really set his and Led Zeppelin’s music apart for me. Metheny, obviously, is a jazz guitarist, and that was a new style I was getting into (at) that time. John McLaughlin is another guitarist who has probably been even more influential to me than Metheny because he blended rock and jazz into a fusion. … I was coming from the rock scene when I was a teenager, so McLaughlin and guys like Al Di Meola really caught my atten-

I’ve always been able to meet and play with different kinds of people here. I really enjoy working around Jackson, so I don’t know if I’d say anything has been hard so far. Where do you see yourself in three years in terms of your musical career?

I want to put out a new studio project that I’m trying to get off the ground, and I hope to continue teaching. I’ve been teaching now for about 17 years, and I’ve had several students who have gone on to receive music scholarships. I hope to get this project out which will be a little more mainstream. It’s got some of my own songs as well as some classic rock covers, so I hope that might catch on. Maybe in three years I could be touring locally or regionally. What are your favorite pastimes when you’re not practicing or performing?

I’m a big football fan, and I love the Saints. A lot of things really revolve around music for me. I love listening to music and finding new and old artists alike. YouTube is great for musicians, and you can just about find anything on it to listen to. —Justin Hosemann

NAME: Lydia Bain AGE: 26 OCCUPATION: Music teacher at Mississippi Talent Education BAND NAME: Wink & the Signal POSITION IN BAND: Vocalist and violinist GENRE: Afro-country Who are your top three musical influences and why?

I would say Fiona Apple, Coldplay, Al Green and The Rolling Stones. I know that’s not three. Fiona Apple because of her lyrical content and just her voice. She doesn’t sound like anyone else. She continued the femaleartist torch; a lot of people are influenced by her. Al Green because he’s Al Green. The Rolling Stones because Mick Jagger is one of the greatest frontmen of rock ‘n’ roll. They were really influenced by the great blues musicians and did a lot of anthropological re-

October 9 - 15, 2013

Drew McKercher

16

Who are your top three musical influences and why?

What has been the hardest part of being a musician in Jackson?

Tough question. Specifically for this band, when we got together the biggest influence that we kind of drew on was Queens of the Stone Age, definitely—Josh Homme’s guitar tones and his songwriting. Also Dinosaur Jr., and … I have to say Nirvana.

To get more recognition, you have to go outside Jackson, whereas if you lived in New York City or Austin or Portland, you wouldn’t have to travel as much to get national attention.

How would you describe the Jackson music scene?

I think the Jackson music scene has really grown a lot in the past six years. There’s a good hip-hop scene. There’s a good rock scene. There’s a good metal scene. I think we have a varied, high-quality music scene.

Where do you see yourself in three years in terms of your musical career?

Over the past couple years I’ve been focusing more on recording and producing other artists My main goal is to develop that and develop the record label (Business People Music) that me and Justin Shultz have. For a couple of years it’s really been dormant,

so building up the record label and also still writing and recording. What are your favorite pastimes when you’re not practicing or performing?

What has been the hardest part of being a musician in Jackson?

We do mostly original music, and a lot of the Jackson music scene works by cover songs. So we’re gradually incorporating a few choice cover songs. Where do you see yourself in three years in terms of your musical career?

Definitely on some large stages, American Music Awards, and we’ll be playing a lot of charity events for causes that we feel are important. My bandmate and I are also music teachers, so we want to incorporate the touring with master classes and educational programs across the country. What are your favorite pastimes when you’re not practicing or performing?

Coincidentally, my bandmate and I have the same extra-curricular; we love to ice skate (and) try new restaurants when we have the resources. —Briana Robinson

DANE CARNEY/STEAL THESE PHOTOS

tion when they bridged the gap between rock and jazz.

COURTESY LYDIA BAIN

R. RAULSTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Barry Leach

I have two kids, so hanging out with my kids. I also own a record store. —Mo Wilson NAME: Drew McKercher AGE: 32 OCCUPATION: Owner of Morningbell Records & Studios BAND NAME: Spacewolf, Ice for Eagles POSITION IN BAND: Vocalist and guitarist GENRE: Post-grunge


How would you describe the Jackson music scene?

NAME: Jason Daniels AGE: 44 OCCUPATION: Full-time Musician BAND NAME: Jason Daniels Band POSITION IN BAND: Guitarist GENRE: Americana

It’s vibrant. I love it because what I’m seeing now is a lot of different folks working together. Some of the coolest guys and girls I know are in the music scene.

there’s a ton of uber-educated people and technically proficient players. (But) there’s a depth to playing with people here that you don’t get in Nashville.

What has been the hardest part of being a musician in Jackson?

Who are your top three musical influences and why?

Gil Scott Heron is my biggest influence because I think the way he encompassed all that is what I call “black music.” He pieced together blues, hip-hop, jazz, soul and R&B. Joe Henderson is my favorite saxophonist of all-time. ... He’d go from hard bop to more fusion jazz to all different styles. He could play them all well, which is what I try to do

COURTESY CALEB ROWE

Caleb Rowe

Where do you see yourself in three years in terms of your musical career?

I’m trying to get into deejaying. ... I feel like that is the basis for all hip-hop. ... I’d like to start doing some tribute pieces—maybe take something like Curtis Mayfield samples and making a whole project out of just that. What are your favorite pastimes when you’re not practicing or performing?

I like working out, but I like to explore new things and expose myself to different things. —Tommy Burton

How would you describe the Jackson music scene?

I’d say that we’re reevaluating our ethics as far as what we believe should happen or not happen. So we’re just trying to piece that together and make it as communal as possible and not really worry about the stereotypes or anything like that.

What has been the hardest part of being a musician in Jackson?

Who are your top three musical influences and why?

J.J. Cale, because of his down-home groove. Keith Richards, because ... of his awesomeness at playing rock ‘n’ roll. Taj Mahal, because I just love the way he plays the blues with a little Caribbean flavor.

Who are your top three musical influences and why?

Basement, a band from the U.K., is probably my favorite because they have a great sound and they’re not afraid to express how they feel. Dads is a smaller twopiece band. They’re very DIY and vegan, so probably a lot of our music is influenced by them. Another band, The World is a Beautiful Place & I Am No Longer Afraid to Die, musically is just mellow and reminds me that everything is OK in the world.

Getting people to believe in the things that you believe in with the same amount of passion that you have. Getting people excited about the cool things that are going on; not just that, but getting people to come out to shows or getting people to help out. Where do you see yourself in three years in terms of your musical career?

Maybe doing media for bands, like shooting videos or helping set up tours. What are your favorite pastimes when you’re not practicing or performing?

Just listening to music, looking up videos of other bands and seeing how things are being done. I sit on Tumblr a lot. ... I like DIY spaces and general knowledgeful things and funny things. —Briana Robinson

Where do you see yourself in three years in terms of your musical career?

Hopefully, playing frequently and being respected in the Jackson area. Doing some regional touring and maybe some national touring. And (still) making records. What are your favorite pastimes when you’re not practicing or performing?

It’s kind of interesting coming from Nashville where the scene is so thick and

I cook. I spend a lot of time in the kitchen. —Tommy Burton

Maya Kyles How would you describe the Jackson music scene?

People are still trying to categorize us in that whole—I don’t even know what to call it—like that old backwoodcountry blues kind of stuff, but there’s so much versatility. What has been the hardest part of being a musician in Jackson?

What has been the hardest part of being a musician in Jackson? NAME: Caleb Rowe AGE: 22 OCCUPATION: Server/bartender at Sombra Mexican Kitchen BAND NAME: Sucio POSITION IN BAND: Vocalist GENRE: Screamo

The big struggle was really just getting band together—finding people that had similar interests, a super amount of time and similar aspirations. ... I’ve gotten really lucky with the guys I’m playing with.

How would you describe the Jackson music scene?

COURTESY MAYA KYLES

NAME: Herbert Brown AGE: 33 OCCUPATION: Financial aid counselor STAGE NAME: James Crow GENRE: Rap

For me, it has been doing shows. I know my sound, and I know what I bring to the hip-hop scene. I want to entertain, but I want people to be left with something more than just a feeling, so it’s been hard to play some of the traditional hip-hop venues.

NAME: Maya Kyles AGE: 20 OCCUPATION: Student at Jackson State University studying social work BAND NAME: The Amazin’ Lazy Boi Band POSITION IN BAND: Drummer GENRE: Blues, R&B, soul, neo-soul, gospel Who are your top three musical influences and why?

Number one would be Anita Baker, because she’s so sultry. ... Number two would have to be Prince. I’ve always liked him, but he just has that great versatility (and) awesome music. Number three (is) Chrisette Michelle. She has that urban flair, but she still (makes) good music.

I play at F. Jones Corner every Thursday night from 12 a.m. to 4 a.m., and I have to get up for class that morning. ... You can’t compare yourself to other musicians. ... (It’s) finding your own sound, and just being creative in your own sense. Where do you see yourself in three years in terms of your musical career?

Hopefully, I’ll still be kicking it with The Amazin’ Lazy Boi Band. I see myself as being a well-rounded, seasoned musician, and one that can hopefully pass on wisdom and a little talent to the next generation. What are your favorite pastimes when you’re not practicing or performing?

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COURTESY JAMES CROW

with my music; I want to do it all well. ... Curtis Mayfield because of his poetry and the way he was able to narrate urban life.

PACKER MCBRIDE

Jason Daniels

Herbert Brown

I kind of enjoy in a weird way being a student. I’m a student at Jackson State University. ... I think I just like hanging out with my friends, and I love to watch “The Golden Girls.” —Amber Helsel 17


Artists to Watch

the music issue

Introducing the JFP’s 2013 Artists to Watch. To read about last year’s Artists to Watch, visit jfp.ms/a2w_2012.

The StoneCoats by Justin Hosemann

T

CHRISTY BELL

by Seth Hall

H

onesty, exuberance and joy come through in the work of The Weekend Kids, a Flowood-based collective of five high-school friends. Drummer Cody Bass, 20, bassist and background vocalist Salar Almakky, 20, guitarist Travis Bass, 22, lead singer and guitarist Hayden Boyd, 21, and guitarist Micah Boyd, 22, have been playing together since April 2012, shortly after the youngest members, Bass and Almakky, graduated from high school. While everyone is spread across the state for college—Almakky and Travis Bass are in Starkville, and Cody Bass is in Hattiesburg—the Boyd brothers are the only members living full-time in the Jackson area. “Since we all pretty much live in separate places, we write music separately, but we all put our own different musical tastes and influences into songs,” Hayden Boyd says. The band typically produces material through the Boyd brothers’ simple recording software, with members emailing parts of songs to each other. The Weekend Kids’ remote collaboration and freedom to record what they want to hear provides license to craft a sound based on the separate members’ influences, including early rock ‘n’ roll melodies, punk rhythms and post-rock guitars. In October 2012, the band wrote and recorded its debut album, “Animals,” a work with rolling drums and guitar melodies rooted in classic rock ‘n’ roll from 1960s California. In addition to surf rock, punk also drives songs such as “Fish Tacos,” and modern-rock reverb floats through “Focus.” The result is a sound similar to Wavves in its edgy reference to ’60s surf culture, but with a brighter and more approachable sound featuring clear, multivocal harmonies. In September, The Weekend Kids re-released its three-song EP, “Sick Youth”— which first came out in May on CD and digitally—on 7-inch vinyl. “Sick Youth” marks the continued development of the band through three-part vocals and a larger sound for the band’s three guitars. “We wanted to keep the ’60s California-rock influence but be more than just surf rock,” Boyd says. The punk and progressive elements in “Sick Youth” indicate an intelligent and hard-working ethos at the core of the band. Boyd says the next few months for The Weekend Kids include local shows around Jackson and continued work on the band’s next full album, due for a spring 2014 release. The Weekend Kids perform Nov. 9 at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St., 601-9480888) during the Elegant Trainwreck/Homework Town One-Year Anniversary. Listen to The Weekend Kids at theweekendkidsms.bandcamp.com, and find the band on Facebook.

COURTESY THE WEEKEND KIDS

he StoneCoats, a Brandon-based indie-rock band, spends hours every week pushing its practice space, a barn outside of Brandon, to its sonic (and electrical) limits. The band formed more than two years ago, and many of its original songs are products of its rustic soundstage. “We only got the sheriff called on us once,” lead guitarist Carson Bristow, 17, says about the latenight jam sessions in the barn. He and his brother, drummer and bassist Leighton Bristow, 19, teamed up with their best friend, lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist Sam Reed, 20, two years ago to form The StoneCoats. They’ve seen shifts in the lineup this year due to members going to college, but this trio makes up the core of the band. While the members of the band aren’t old enough to legally drink or gamble, their sound is mature beyond their years, emanating rawness and cohesive unity. “It really just comes down to jamming,” Reed says. “When you’re relaxed, you get into a creative zone. That’s really how we write our songs.” Getting into that “creative zone” doesn’t happen overnight. They practice up to 60 hours per week when they can—20 to 30 hours per week during the school year. All three musicians merge their efforts when writing songs, a collective experience that takes time and patience. All of it is paying off. The band recorded its EP, “Change,” at Morningbell Records & Studios this summer under the tutelage of local musician and Morningbell owner Drew McKercher, showcasing The StoneCoats’ musical range and songwriting proficiency. Tracks such as “Remember When” and “Leave Me Be” combine a soulful, neo-blues sound that resembles Alabama Shakes and The Black Keys. Songs such as “Fool for You” and “Great Communicator” give off a more low-key indie vibe. The band is looking forward to a release party for “Change” Oct. 25 at Brandon High School (3090 Highway 18, Brandon, 601-825-2261) during the pre-game activities of the football game against Oak Grove High School. The guys also hope to plan a statewide tour for the near future. “Our goal is for a steady following,” Leighton says, “so that we can perform our own songs. We want to be as original as possible.” Listen to The StoneCoats’ EP, “Change,” on ReverbNation. Visit thestonecoats.com, and find the band on Facebook and Twitter.

The Weekend Kids

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Artists to Watch

the music issue

Noelle “Gahdis� Gee

by Micah Smith

by Mo Wilson

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Rozay Mo by Darnell Jackson

F

rom hours of studio sessions to opening for countless hip-hop superstars, raper Rozay Mo is definitely chasing his dreams of stardom in the music industry. “A basketball player gets to the NBA by going to the gym (and) shooting jumpers every day,� Mo says. “He’s shooting 1,000 jumpers, 1,000 free throws, working out, doing everything. I know that my odds of making it are lower than going to the NBA, so I’m working every day.� Born Montrell Williams, the 25-year-old is the younger brother of NBA point guard Mo Williams. He is a 2006 Callaway High School graduate, and he got his entrepreneurship degree in 2011 from Jackson State University. “I (have) like over 500 songs recorded,� Mo says. He has recorded at 16 Bars Recording Studio twice a week from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. for the past two years. “I record six songs a session, so that’s 12 songs a week, and that’s almost 50 songs a month.� Mo recorded his first three songs in 2007. “That was the first time I ever recorded. I didn’t really give any serious thought to it; it was just rapping.� he says. “I really didn’t envision this out of those three songs.� Mo has worked with a variety of Jackson artists who are also on the rise and has opened for rappers such as Big K.R.I.T., Bun B, Webbie and, most recently, for Rocko at Freelon’s Bar and Groove. In April, Mo released the full-length album, “Don’t Judge Me.� It features local talent including Hollywood Luck, Stax aka Da Kid, Slim Picket and Vegas.

CHUCK WAY/FULLOFLAVA

Weekly Open-mic Nights

J

ackson-based singer and rapper Noelle “Gahdis� Gee, 22, stays current with her sound while addressing social issues in her music. “Mi Girlz,� for example, is a shout-out to all women—from CEOs to stay-at-home moms. When she’s not repping females, Gee is looking out for No. 1 with boasts like “go against the goddess, make you an example,� and “flow coleslaw and my swagga BBQ, I’m getting that bread so they want the beef stew.� Gee remembers the group Destiny’s Child stirring her passion for music. “(I was in) sixth grade (when) Destiny’s Child came out,� she says. “Me and my cousin recorded their video and performed it at family events.� Gee also credits TLC and Aaliyah for inspiring her to sing, although at first it was just in youth-choir programs. She began writing poetry in third grade and eventually started rapping her poems to get exposure. Her

SYMONE KIMBLE/ONE OVER IMAGES

COURTESY AARON COKER

F

rom country to folk, it is easy to find a guy with a guitar in Jackson, singing his heart out, most nights of the week. For singer-songwriter and Pearl native Aaron Coker, 33, standing out in that crowded field took dedication and good old-fashioned showmanship. “I always put on a show, more than just play music,â€? Coker says. “You have to engage the audience, whether that’s with the lights or just an ability to read the crowd.â€? Part of engaging the listener for Coker means that his set lists act as guidelines rather than rules. “When there are different styles of audience members, I’m able to jump in and see that and relate to them,â€? he says. Coker says his personal style ranges from country to classic rock to rhythm and blues, but no matter the style, he writes with a stage mindset. “Everything I write has a full band in mind— a full sound and whole package,â€? Coker says. “Usually, I write on an acoustic (guitar), but ‌ I’m hearing drums and lead parts and bass lines.â€? Though Coker approaches creating music as a band experience, he says the city responds better to acoustic players. “Around the Jackson area, it’s been easier to do acoustic solo shows because of the venues,â€? Coker says. “A lot of them are restaurant-style, family-friendly and subtle. At those, people don’t like eating to a full band.â€? Acoustic also means a more intimate environment. “The goal in songwriting is to touch someone’s life, to write in a way that tells them other people are feeling the same way,â€? Coker says. “It either helps them to remain happy or comforts them in a bad situation. Acoustic is raw, touching and emotional music. It gets people’s attention on a different level than a band.â€? Overall, Jackson audiences have been accommodating in Coker’s musical pursuit over the years. “People have always come out to the shows and stayed for a long time (and) bought my live recordings. It’s a very supportive, very friendly place,â€? he says. Coker has big plans for his future. “The all-time goal is to get a platinum record, to perform in front of sold-out arenas,â€? he says. “I always dream big, and I don’t think I’ll stop until I hit that mark. Even if I did hit it, I know I won’t stop.â€? Aaron Coker’s single, “I’ll Ride,â€? is available on iTunes, Amazon and ReverbNation. He performs Oct. 17 and Nov. 7 at Pop’s Saloon (2636 S. Gallatin St., 601-961-4747). Find Aaron Coker Music on Facebook.

singing heroes such as Lauren Hill also became her rapping idols, and Hill’s I’ll-rap-like-the-boys-rap attitude is audible in Gee’s music. Gee’s flow also contains echoes of the hard-edged delivery heard now in Three 6 Mafia’s Gangsta Boo. B. Juize, Jackson-based beat-maker and one of Gee’s long-time collaborators, helps her with production. While Gee’s music finds its foothold firmly in southern rap, the beats eschew the minimal snap style for a busier side of the dirty south. B. Juize keeps her R&B and rap tracks sounding sonically unified by adding these re-occurring elements. They have been working together on Gee’s debut EP, “Head Above the Clouds,â€? which is set for release this winter. “We got pop ‌ that street anthem ‌ something for the girls ‌ (and) motivational music on there,â€? Gee says about the upcoming release. She also says that Mr. Franklin, aka Kamikaze, will make an appearance on the album. Download Noelle Gee’s songs, “Mi Girlz,â€? “Salute Meâ€? and “Hurt Me,â€? at audiomack.com/artist/gahdis-noelle. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter @GahdisNoelle.

He is currently working on a collaboration between rap duo SmokinAces—which is Rozay Mo and C-Lew—and R&B group Calico Panache, called “The Cali-Smoke-Pan-Aces.â€? “It should be some really good afro-centric groovy sounds,â€? Mo says. The city has immerse talent, Mo says, but the exposure isn’t what it could be. “I feel like we (have) a lot of talent in Jackson, and we have a lot of talented DJs. I just feel like it’s not put in the light like it should be. ‌ We cater to more outside music than we do to the music from the city. The talent is here, but we just need the outlets to let the world know.â€? Rozay Mo’s next album, “Kush Kingdom,â€? is set for release on his birthday, Oct. 24. Hear and download his music at rozaymo.bandcamp.com, and follow him on Twitter @RozayMo.

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Aaron Coker

More ARTISTS TO WATCH, see pg 20

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October Album Releases

Derrick says. That video is now featured on CMT.com. “Hick-hop” is a hybrid of southern rock and rap. “Mud on the Map” is a mixture of rock guitars and tight harmonies with distinct southern vocals. Trademark is definitely not afraid to let you know what part of the country it is from.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE JACKSON MUSIC EXPERIENCES. Tyler Edward Ricketts: That one time Headcase played, and there were confetti bombs everywhere. It was unreal. Argus Zachariah Burton: Headcase underneath Electric Daggers’ old spot. Best show of the year. Latasha McGill: Wink and The Signal

The band hopes to have its first fulllength album out by the end of the year. “I don’t want to give too much away, but the album should be 10 or 11 songs and really defines where we are musically,” Derrick says. Trademark performs at 8 p.m. Oct. 18 and Oct. 19 at Beechwood Restaurant & Lounge (4451 E. Clay St., Vicksburg, 601-636-3761), and at 8 p.m. Oct. 25 and Oct. 26 at Pop’s Saloon (2636 S. Gallatin

Oct. 14 Beats Antique – “A Thousand Faces – Act 1” Cults – “Static” Fall Out Boy – “Pax Am Days EP” Pearl Jam – “Lightning Bolt”

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

St., 601-961-4747). Trademark’s single, “Mud on the Maps,” is available on iTunes and other online music retailers. Visit trademarkhome.com, and find the band on Facebook.

COURTESY TRADEMARK

A

lthough Carthage-based, countryrock band Trademark formed in 2005, the band decided in 2011 to either get serious about its music or hang it up. Singer Charles Derrick and bassist Griffin Hardy put an ad on Craigslist, and guitarist Lukas Elijah and drummer Chas Henry answered. Soon after, the band locked itself away in the woods of Pine Valley, Miss., and practiced. Those who saw Trademark perform four years ago might be shocked at the band’s transformation. “We used to be really focused on the lights and the way we dressed more than the music itself. It wasn’t until this current line-up got together that we became more musical,” Derrick says. “The group has re-identified itself. … Once Chas and Elijah came on board, we moved into a serious direction and arrived at country-rock.” Trademark still prides itself on its presentation, though. The band’s performances are comparable to a large-arena concerts because of the professional level of staging with lighting and sound engineering. Early this past summer, the band submitted the music video for its first single, “Say It Ain’t So,” to CMT, but the station rejected it. “I think that may have something to do with the ‘hick-hop’ sound of that song. The next single, ‘Mud on the Map,’ is more definitive of what we do,”

Tim Murphy: Black Francis at Martin’s earlier this year. Jackson Browne at Thalia Mara Hall might be the best concert I’ve ever seen in Jackson. That or Wilco at Thalia Mara.

Oct. 15 Jason Daniels – “Dashboard Visions and Rearview Reflections”

Brett Dennen – “Smoke and Mirrors” Katy Perry – “Prism”

Oct. 21 Active Child – “Rapor EP” Best Coast – “Fade Away” Dead Gaze – “Brain Holiday”

Oct. 28 Arcade Fire – “Reflektor” Bad Religion – “Christmas Songs” Son Volt – “Lanterns”

Annual Fall Harvest Festival at Garden Works

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Artists to Watch

the music issue

childhood, although Keith’s first performance was with Pilcher. After singing at her baptism when she was 8, Pilcher began performing with her grandmother, Peggy, a gospel singer, in Alabama. “I loved the way she touched people,” Pilcher says. “I wanted to be a part of it.” The duo hopes to find time to work on an album between performing and caring for their 7-month-old daughter, Finley. Tightrope Escapade performs at 8 p.m. Oct. 11 at Bonny Blair’s Irish Pub (1149 Old Fannin Road, Brandon, 769-251-0692); 9 a.m. Oct. 12 at Clinton’s Olde Towne Market; and at 6 p.m. Nov. 23 at Pelican Cove Grill (3999A Harborwalk Drive, Ridgeland, 601-605-1865). Visit tightropeescapade.tumblr.com, and find the band on Facebook..

by De’Arbreya Lee

I

ndie-rock band Wolf Cove recorded its first EP in one member’s basement. The aptly titled “Ben’s Basement” came out in April. Jackson native Clayton Waller, 21, on drums; Grenada native John William White, 22, on guitar; and Birmingham native Ben Watson, 21 on lead vocals and bass make up Wolf Cove. The three study at Mississippi State University in Starkville, but officially met two summers ago while working at Alpine Camp for Boys, where they decided to form a band. Wanting to name themselves after the place that united them, the group adopted Wolf Cove after Waller’s cabin. The band really came together during its second time playing together. It was in the hot, thick atmosphere of a house party—no practice, pure performance. “We literally played three hours’ worth of material, just random stuff from Kanye West to Katy Perry,” Waller says.

Watson believes the group really clicked that night. “It was kind of cool to see the chemistry happen,” he says. The group describes its sound as a mash-up of heavy, soul-rock music— which actually isn’t the original sound the guys expected. “That’s kind of how it happens. Once you start writing music, the music kind of steers its own way,” Waller says. “There’s definitely a southern twang there.” The band recently released a music video for “After the Comma,” from the EP. Wolf Cove performs Oct. 15 at Proud Larry’s, Oct. 31 at Rick’s Cafe with Pell, and Nov. 16 at The Lyric opening for The Dirty Guv’nahs. Download “Ben’s Basement” on iTunes and other online music retailers. Visit wolfcove.bandcamp.com, and find the band on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

jacksonfreepress.com

A

fter answering the same Craigslist post seeking musicians to play with in December 2011, Jacquelynn Pilcher and Clay Keith started dating and made their own band, Tightrope Escapade, by January. “You rarely hear of any type of Craigslist story that ends well,” she says, laughing. Tightrope Escapade doesn’t consider itself as a typical cover band. “What we do differently from a lot of the local bands that we’ve heard is that we actually write our own original songs,” Pilcher says. “When we do cover music, we add our own style to it, and people don’t even realize it’s a cover song.” Tightrope Escapade’s sound is sultry indie-folk with influence from Bon Iver, Dave Matthews, Fleetwood Mac and Red Hot Chili Peppers. Life adventures also influence the duo’s music—as well as its name. “Imagine you’re walking through life on a tightrope, trying to balance and keep yourself on a straight path,” Pilcher says. “Life then becomes your escapade.” Lead singer Pilcher, 24, and guitarist Keith, 28, have been involved with music since

Wolf Cove

JACKSON DONALD

by Jessica Simien

COURTESY TIGHTROPE ESCAPADE

Tightrope Escapade

More ARTISTS TO WATCH, see pg 22

21


Artists to Watch

the music issue

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by Micah Smith

M

ost cities have their fair share of cover bands, treading familiar ground for the sake of fun and fanfare, and Jackson is no different. For local band Filter the Noise, covers are a way to set itself apart—making the format work for it and not against it. “We play covers, but they’re more like the B-sides, not necessarily the songs everyone else might think to play,� vocalist and lead guitarist Chris Harben, 35, says. Filter the Noise’s set includes a range of ’90s and ’00s rock songs, but the band tries not to limit itself to that genre. “We know what other people usually play, and we feed off of that. We want to be a little different and to play songs that we really like playing. We also want to play things you would know—the ‘Oh yeah, I remember that’ songs—instead of the ones you could hear at another venue down the street.� While cover songs have been the primary focus in recent months, Filter the Noise didn’t set out to be a cover band. “Chris and I do this full time,� vocalist and rhythm guitarist Nicole Alexander, 33, says. “I quit my job in May to pursue mu-

sic as a career. So yes, we sort of had to put a halt on writing music, but if I didn’t have the money we make from gigging, then I wouldn’t get to play music all day.� Filter the Noise plays regularly around Jackson and around the state, and in Sep-

COURTESY FILTER THE NOISE

BR^aT1XV 4eTah3Ph

Filter the Noise

tember, the band helped organize the Coosa Family Farm Festival in Carthage, Miss. In the midst of this schedule, Filter the Noise completed new acoustic demos—with just Alexander and Harben—and full-band demos including bassist Russell Hawkins, 37, and drummer Justin Thompson, 24. The recordings are available at their con-

certs and online, and they include both original work and cover songs. Despite the fact that cover songs have opened doors in Jackson for Filter the Noise, the ultimate goal is to shift toward original music. “Any band is going to want to tour and that kind of thing, so that’s definitely on our minds—to get out and tour and get a record deal,� Harben says. “The original songs are going to be the things that take us to that point. But in this town, you have to play covers. If we can be a band that does both and does both well, that’s just one more thing that sets us apart.� Filter the Noise performs at 7 p.m. each Sunday at Hazel Coffee (2601 N. State St., 601-362-5223); 7 p.m. Oct. 22, and every other Tuesday, at Sal & Mookie’s New York Pizza & Ice Cream Joint (565 Taylor St., 601-368-1919); 10 p.m. Nov. 8 with The Breton Sound at Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St., 601960-2700). The band will also be at Woofstock Music Festival Oct. 12 in Madison and BlocktoberFeast Oct. 19 in Jackson’s Broadmeadow Neighborhood. Find Filter the Noise on Facebook and ReverbNation.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE JACKSON-AREA MUSIC VENUES AND WHY? Jacob Lewandowski: Martin’s Bar and Duling Hall are the two best. Hands down. Eric Corbello: Martin’s Bar ‌ Hands down. Chuck Chiles: Duling Hall.

Erica Morgan Brooks: Hal & Mal’s, because they have good music (like Coheed & Cambria on Nov. 6!) and awesome food. Also Underground 119 for the same reasons, except different vibe and music. I like both, but it just depends on my mood. Vance Green: Got to be the Palm Beach Club, or was that the ’90s?

Ayana Smothers-Cole: Hal & Mal’s, especially the bluegrass. Bob Soukup: 119 Underground. Diversity of music and great food in an adult-friendly atmosphere.

October 9 - 15, 2013

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A

COURTESY ADAM COLLIER

dam Jerrell Collier, 28, aka AJC, is fully aware of Mississippi’s reputation, good and bad. He loves living in Jackson, but at one point in his life he was embarrassed to admit that his home state is Mississippi to others. “I feel like American music kind of started here, and it’s the perfect place,� he says. “It’s funny that people look down on Mississippi. People would look at you crazy, or they form this opinion in their mind about your music before you tell them.� Now that he is older and has molded his musical career in Jackson, Collier

doesn’t want to be anywhere else. “I think this the best place for me as far as music and everything,â€? he says. “I don’t think I’d be doing music the way I do it if I wasn’t in Jackson.â€? As a multi-genre musical artist, Collier recognizes that the state is the birthplace of American music. “Anybody who has done anything great in music ‌ they’re all from here,â€? he says. Many of these greats are unknown, such as Benjamin Wright of Greenville who played horns and strings on both of Justin Timberlake’s 20/20 Experience albums. Collier, a Brandon native, studied accounting at Jackson State University, but he started singing at age 5 and rapping at age 13. He grew up listening to oldies such as Luther Vandross and Barry White with his dad. His taste went from Nas and JayZ as he was entering college to Maroon 5 and Erykah Badu as he matured. Now, Collier says, it is becoming easier to channel the music his father had him listening to when he creates original material. Collier has trouble defining his music and calls himself a genre jumper. His upcoming album, “Fallen Star,â€? will feature reggae, rock, hip-hop, and Latin-styled music with splashes of classical, gospel, and acoustic. While he hates the term fusion, Collier admits that it accurately describes what he is doing. The closest description Collier can gibe for the music he currently makes is “poetry meets jazz pop.â€?

“I like to fuse genres and break them apart at the same time. When we break down into a jazz piece on the album, you know it’s jazz,â€? he says. “Then we go back to a regular hip-hop type of thing.â€? AJC and the Envelope Pushers, Collier’s band, is working on its debut album, “Fallen Star,â€? to come out in the spring. Along with Collier as the vocalist, the band includes hand percussionist Wilton Knott, lead keyboardist Terrence Evans, drummer Frank White and keyboardist Chris Johnson. The group plans to have three songs for “Fallen Starâ€? recorded by the end of this month and the rest of the 14 tracks before January 2014. In September, Collier set up a Kickstarter campaign to fund the project with a goal of raising $2,000 by Oct. 22. Within the week, the project raised $900. After he receives the money from Kickstarter, Collier plans to pull several all-night sessions to crank out material. Collier anticipates releasing the “Fallen Starâ€? in April. The album will combine serious and positive messages with dance-worthy music influenced heavily by reggae. “I had to find something that would make people move, but it couldn’t be booty-shaking music,â€? Collier says about reggae’s appeal. “I’m a lyricist, so I wanted to find a tone that could make people want to dance, and they could still get the message.â€? While people aren’t usually inclined to dance when listening to music with serious messages, Collier thinks dancing can be important. “The body is made to move, so why not make it move?â€? he asked. “And the brain and the cognitive senses are made to process different things and think. ‌ Why not enjoy the fact that this is a really good message—whether it’s about depression, AIDS, sex, religion or somebody who’s going through a hard time—and dance to it. I think when you have fun with anything, (even when) it’s something very sincere, it kind of gets in your spirit a little bit easier.â€? AJC and the Envelope Pushers perform at 9 p.m. Oct. 19 and 8 p.m. Nov. 7 at Underground 119 (119 S. President St., 601-352-2322). Visit tinyurl.com/ajcbelief by Oct. 22 to contribute to the “Fallen Starâ€? Kickstarter campaign. Listen to AJC’s single, “Special Passenger,â€? on YouTube.

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jacksonfreepress.com

AJC and the Envelope Pushers

MUSIC | live

COURTESY RALSTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Artists to Watch

the music issue

23


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October 9 - 15, 2013

        

24

     







   



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FLICKR/JEFFREYW

Bow-tie Bounty by Lynette Hanson

W

hat does it take to make you smile on a late summer day? For me, it’s not always air conditioning or ice-cold watermelon. Sometimes it’s a bowl filled with pasta, chicken stock and fresh vegetables, accompanied by a chunk of cheese, a stack of crackers and a glass of tea. First, let’s go shopping. Grab your favorite wicker basket, backpack, reusable shopping bag, or maybe a little red wagon with the wooden slatted sides. What you use depends on where you shop for vegetables and how much you want to take home. Then set out for the nearest farmers’ market or purveyor of fresh, locally grown produce, be it an open-air, metal-roofed building with plenty of parking or a handbuilt wooden vegetable stand alongside the road. Speaking of farmers, some of you just might be growing your own in your garden. I say, “Yea for y’all!” After cooking this meal, I carried my bowl to the table and set beside it an already-opened sleeve of crackers. Last but not least, I Fresh poured my glass of sweet iced tea and took it to the table. Smilveggies from ing, I savored the textures, flavors and seasonings. From the the farmers market pair first bite I knew the leftovers would be good. Now, you know perfectly with how I make myself smile on a late summer day. Join me? bow-tie pasta.

Ingredients (feeds 4 to 6): Olive/canola oil mixture (Fill a plastic squeeze bottle with half olive oil, half canola oil) Salt Around 30 ounces of chicken broth 1 bunch of young carrots 2 small yellow zucchini 3 small green zucchini Around 14 fresh okra pods

10 small vine-ripened tomatoes 5 spring onions Bow-tie pasta Cheese of your choice (Mine is Pecorino Sole di Sardegna, a semisoft pure sheep’s milk cheese from Italy.) Saltines

Wash vegetables thoroughly and drain dry. Slice the vegetables into the shapes and sizes you want, such as thin and circular slices of onion, chunks of dense carrots, zucchini cut into yellow- or green-edged coins, and okra and tomatoes minus stem caps and left whole. Turn the stove burner to medium-high heat. Put a large pot on the burner and squirt in your mixture of olive and canola oil, just enough to cover the bottom.

To check the heat of the oil, toss a slice of onion into the pot. When it sizzles, throw in the rest of the onion slices and stir with a large spoon, thoroughly coating them with the oil mixture and breaking them apart into a jumble of sautéing circles. Stir. Monitor your onions as they change from opaque to translucent. This takes only a few minutes. When the onions are translucent, pour in the chicken stock. Add the zucchini, okra and carrots. Sprinkle two small pinches of salt into the pot. Stir. Cook for five minutes.Turn down the heat to simmer, toss in the tomatoes and put on the lid. Stir the vegetables every 10 minutes. Check for doneness by pushing a fork into the carrots. After 30 minutes of cooking the vegetables, cook the pasta in another pot. While it boils, slice the cheese. Strain the pasta when done. To serve, toss a handful of pasta into a bowl, then ladle in vegetables and chicken stock until the look of the combo suits you. You can also freeze half of the Bow-tie Bounty to enjoy in a few weeks. Feeds 4-6, depending on the size of your bowls.

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FILE PHOTO

Bow-Tie Pasta

25


Stop By Either Location to Let Us Know For a Chance to

Win Free Lunch for Two!

What is Steve’s to You?

2 Locations

JFPmenus.com Paid advertising section. Call 601-362-6121 x11 to list your restaurant

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution for breakfast, blue-plates, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys & wraps. Famous bakery! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches.

125 S. Congress St. 601-969-1119 200 S. Lamar Ave. 601-714-5683

PIZZA 904 Basil’s (904 E. Fortification, 601-352-2002) Creative pizzas, italian food, burgers and much more in a casual-dining atmosphere in the heart of Belhaven. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

ITALIAN

VASILIOS

AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING

Authentic Greek is the Best

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Vote for Vasilios in Best of Jackson

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Huntington Grille (1001 East County Line Road, Jackson Hilton, 601-957-2800) Mississippi fine dining features seafood, crayfish, steaks, fried green tomatoes, shrimp & grits, pizzas and more. Que Sera Sera (2801 N State Street 601-981-2520) Authentic cajun cuisine, excellent seafood and award winning gumbo; come enjoy it all this summer on the patio. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK

MON-FRI 11A-2P,5-10P SAT 5-10P

828 HWY 51, MADISON • 601.853.0028

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma. Vasilios Greek Cusine (828 Hwy 51, Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic greek cuisine since 1994, specializing in gyros, greek salads, baklava cheesecake & fresh daily seafood.

BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads.

COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Hazel Coffee Shop (2601 N. State St. Fondren Across from UMC) Fresh locally roasted coffee and specialty drinks to perk up your day!

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

October 9 - 15, 2013

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2013, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Capitol Grill (5050 I-55 North, Deville Plaza 601-899-8845) Best happy hour & sports bar, kitchen open late, pub food with soul and live entertainment. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Musician’s Emporium (642 Tombigbee St., 601-973-3400) Delicious appetizers, burgers, sandwiches, and more. Great food goes with great music! Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot.

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ASIAN AND INDIAN Crazy Ninja (2560 Lakeland Dr., Flowood 601-420-4058) Rock-n-roll sushi and cook-in-front-of-you hibachi. Lunch specials, bento boxes, fabulous cocktails. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, an extensive menu features everything from curries to fresh sushi


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Do your depressive symptoms continue, despite ongoing antidepressant treatment? We are seeking volunteers for the ARTDeCo Study. We hope to learn more about the effects and safety of a study drug in people with depression when it is taken with an ongoing antidepressant medication. We will also study how much drug is in your body and how long the body takes to get rid of it.

You may be eligible to participate if you: ■ Are between the ages of 18-65 years ■ Have a diagnosis of depression ■ Are having an inadequate response to your current antidepressant treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI)

Please call today to learn more about the ARTDeCo Study! For More information, call:

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October 9 - 15, 2013

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WELCOME TO JACKTOWN. JACKTOWN is the JFP’s new iPhone and Android focusing on and entertainment in the Jackson Metro Area. ! “Best Bets” recommended listings in a variety of categories ! Bookmarks to remember events you want to attend ! Invite Your Friends via the app or SMS text ! Group chat about upcoming events with invited friends ! Venue maps, ticket links, Facebook connection ! Access to full music, events and headlines of Jackson Free Press ! Sponsored Listings and Venue Channels

TO DOWNLOAD JACKTOWN TEXT ‘JACKSON’ TO 77948 AND FOLLOW THE LINKS FOR iPHONE OR ANDROID!

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JFP’s Arts and Entertainment App - iPhone and Android!

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October 9 - 15, 2013


FILM p 33 | 8 DAYS p 34 | SPORTS p 38

Yarn, Hooks, Coffee and Tradition E by Genevieve Legacy

Judy Thompson and her handiwork.

jacksonfreepress.com

FLICKR/CURT

The Thread, Yarn, Crochet and Coffee group welcomes anyone at their meetings.

COURTESY LYNDA ASSINK

stitch. She put her new skill to work to create her own leaf-and-vine patterned afghan. “I liked the way her afghan turned out, so I decided to try it myself,” Thompson explains. “She taught me the stitch that creates a square pattern and allows you to cross stitch.” Thompson has donated the lined afghan for a fundraising raffle that will support the senior exercise program at Ridgeland Rec Center. (Tickets are $5 a pop and the raffle will run through Nov. 14, the group’s annual Thanksgiving luncheon). Thompson says six or seven women attend the group on a regular basis. Most of the members do crochet, and a few knit or do embroidery. They celebrate birthdays together, bringing in baked goods to go with their coffee. “You become friends, you sit and talk.” Thompson says. “You get ideas from other people—it’s a good social activity.” Anyone who would like to learn how to crochet can attend the meetings. As recently as this past summer, the group welcomed a mother and her two daughters. “The group meets in the afternoon, so it’s geared toward people who are at home,” Assink says. “Every once in a while, we’ll have a young mama come in (who) wants to learn.” As for the lack of men in the group, Assink laughs. Men are scarce but welcome. “Just women so far, but everyone is welcomed to come and enjoy—We’d love to have them.“ The Thread, Yarn, Crochet and Coffee Group meets on the second and fourth Monday of every month, from 1:30-3 p.m. at the Ridgeland Recreation Center (137 Old Trace Park, Ridgeland) For more information, call 601-856-6876

COURTESY LYNDA ASSINK

very second and fourth Monday of the month, long enough after lunch to be ready for a nice cup of afternoon coffee, a group of crafty women meet in Old Trace Park. Armed with sewing boxes and lumpy bags of yarn, they converge on the Ridgeland Recreation Center for an hour and a half of crochet, coffee, conversation and lots of laughter. The Thread, Yarn, Crochet and Coffee Group started about eight years ago to give people an opportunity to spend time together and learn how to crochet. “People would come and try to learn. Some got frustrated and didn’t come back,” Senior Adult Programs Coordinator Lynda Assink says. “Eventually, the group decided just to do their own crochet and needlepoint projects. “ The members of the group, primarily women of a certain age, make good use of their time together. They exchange ideas and share their finished projects. Sometimes, they work on projects together, donating their handiwork when the opportunity arises, such as giving crocheted scarves to the winners at the Special Olympics. Judy Thompson, a bright-eyed, nimblefingered 69-year-old, has been a member of this lively group since 2010. She learned to crochet as a child. “I’ve been crocheting, off and on, for most of my life,” Thompson says. “My mother and grandmother used to do it, my grandmother especially—I learned from her.” Like many yarn and needlecrafts, learning from a friend or family member is tradition. Inspired by the blanket a friend made, Thompson recently learned how to do the afghan

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7KDL)RRG $W,WV%HVW

October 18th Jamie Johnson

PGG"OZPSEFS 'PSB-JNJUFE5JNF0OMZ

Tickets Available Night of Event at Door and at www.ticketmaster.com Door Opens at 8:30

824 S. State St. Jackson

www.clubmagoos.com

601.664.7588

October 9 - 15, 2013

1002 Treetop Blvd • Flowood Behind the Applebee’s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

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601.487.8710


COURTESY WARNER BROS

DIVERSIONS | film

‘Gravity’:

SPACE WITHOUT NOISE by Anita Modak-Truran his jet pack. Beneath them, the home planet looms in hues of blue, green and brown. “Houston, I have a bad feeling about this mission,” Kowalski says, jokingly, to Mission Control back on Earth. Mission control (voiced by Ed Harris in a nod to “Apollo 13”) copies that, and they reminisce on stories told so often that they are part of a bond between the experienced Kowalski and the Earth-based team. Stone, though, is new and doesn’t know the drill, yet. She listens in through her headset. Another astronaut (Phaldut Sharma) does a no-gravity version of the Macarena. The playful mood shifts when Mission Control announces that dangerous debris from a Russian satellite is quickly heading their way. The debris pelts the ship, causing irreparable damage. Stone spins off the ship into space. She gasps for breath. We gasp with her. It’s a spellbinding, hair-raising sequence, but this is only the beginning of a long series of bad things to come. “Gravity” accelerates and intensifies until it becomes a

Sandra Bullock and George Clooney shine in the outer-space thrill ride “Gravity.”

rare mingling of lyric poetry and macabre farce. You must suspend your disbelief. The rules of quantum physics do not apply. The movie would not work without Bullock and Clooney. They bring with them their effervescent personalities and buoyant charm. Clooney provides a necessary calm before the storm. Bullock is the film’s heart. It is essential that we identify with Bullock’s character and connect with her emotional roller coaster as she finds herself adrift in outer space. Life and death hang in the balance. This is a journey that audiences should experience for themselves. To describe what happens may diminish the experience.

This is an experiential film. Cuarón creates a unique movie experience through long takes and the absence of sound. Through custom-made machinery, cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki captures the grace, beauty and weightlessness of space. Bullock’s character, appropriately named Stone, provides the gravitas. The greatest achievement is that you’ll come out of the theater not dull and depressed the way you feel after movies that insult your intelligence, but restored and thankful to be back on Earth. I don’t think I could sit through this film again. It was too thrilling.

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“G

ravity” reaches into the void of eternal space and sucks you into a black hole of anxiety. I was absolutely terrified. The fascinating thing about this film is that it succeeds magnificently on a cosmic scale and on a human level. It’s a think piece, a science-fiction thriller and a showcase of technology. It reminds us of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” in its audacity but stands on its own as an original work. Director Alfonso Cuarón, who co-wrote the script with his son Jonás, constructs for the screen space without noise and a universe without limits. It seems so real that it is hard to imagine the technological hurdles Cuarón and his team faced to achieve this cinematic recreation. I look forward to a documentary on the process. In “Gravity,” Dr. Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock), a medical engineer, tinkers with the Hubble telescope, while Commander Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) zips around in

Movieline: 355-9311 33


THURSDAY 10/10

SATURDAY 10/12

SUNDAY 10/13

Andrew Burkitt’s Gallery Talk is at Millsaps College in room AC 215.

See “Beyond the Myth” at Woofstock Family Music Festival at Malco Theatre.

The Mississippi State Fair ends today at the fairgrounds..

BEST BETS OCT. 9 - 16, 2013

Healthcare Information Forum is from 5:30 p.m.6:30 p.m. at Bethel AME Church (805 Monroe St., Vicksburg). Free; call 601-636-5777; motherbethelofms.org. … fun. performs at 8 p.m. at Mississippi State University (Highway 12, Starkville) in Humphrey Coliseum. $30-$35; call 662-325-2930; msuconcerts.com.

The bi-annual Canton Flea Market Arts & Crafts Show is from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 10 at Canton Square.

COURTESY CANTON FLEA MARKET

WEDNESDAY 10/9

THURSDAY 10/10

Canton Flea Market Arts & Crafts Show is from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at Historic Canton Square (Courthouse Square, Canton). Free admission; call 601-859-1307; cantonmsfleamarket.com. … Andrew Burkitt’s Gallery Talk is from 6-7 p.m. at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.) in room 215. Free; call 601-974-1294; andrewburkitt.com millsaps.edu.

FRIDAY 10/11

Thief at the Crossroads: The Blues as Black Technology Blues Reception is from 6-8 p.m. at Gallery1 (1100 John

door. Call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net. … I Love R&B Night is at 9 p.m. at Mediterranean Fish and Grill (6550 Old Canton Road). For ages 21 and up. $10; call 956-0082.

lette” Film Screening is at 6:30 p.m. at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road). Free; call 601-366-1602; email co-opgm@rainbowcoop.org.

SATURDAY 10/12

MONDAY 10/14

COURTESY CARA

Jackson Restaurant Week 2013 ends today. Food prices vary; jacksonrestaurantweek.com. … Tumbling with the Stars is from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at YMCA Flowood (690 LibBY BRIANA ROBINSON erty Road, Flowood). $10, $7 ages 4-7, ages 3 and under free; call 601-454-6966; email JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM mskimsgym1@gmail.com; FAX: 601-510-9019 misskimsgym.com. … Woofstock Family Music Festival is DAILY UPDATES AT at 10 a.m. at Grandview BouJFPEVENTS.COM levard (Grandview Boulevard, Madison). Free, dog food donations welcome; email information.icare_rk@bellsouth.net. … Bree’s Bark Park Grand Opening is from 10 a.m.-1 p.m., at Community Animal Rescue and Adoption (960 N. Flag Chapel Road). Free, dog food donations welcome; call 601842-4404; email cara@carams.org; carams.org/dog_park.

October 9 - 15, 2013

EVENTS@

34

The Grand Opening of Bree’s Bark Park, Jackson’s first off-leash dog park, is at 10 a.m. Oct. 12 at C.A.R.A.

R. Lynch St., Suite 4). Free; call 601-960-9250; jsums.edu/ gallery1. … Street Corner Symphony performs at 9 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $10 in advance, $15 at the

SUNDAY 10/13

Mississippi State Fair ends today at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). $5, children under 6 free; call 601-961-4000; msfair.net. … The First Baptist Jackson Sanctuary Choir and Orchestra perform at 6 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Jackson (431 N. State St.). Free; call 601-949-1900; firstbaptistjackson.org. … “Genetic Rou-

Mississippi Conference of Fundraising is from 8 a.m.5 p.m. at BancorpSouth Conference Center (386 E. Main St., Tupelo). $59; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits. org. … Microphone Mondays is at 9:30 p.m. at Jackson State University, Walter Payton Recreation and Wellness Center (32 Walter Payton Drive) in Studio A. $5; call 601-979-1646 or 601-979-1647.

TUESDAY 10/15

All 4 Children Consignment Fall/Winter Sale is from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. at Plantation Commons (105 Plantation Cove, Gluckstadt). Free; call 601-713-4040; all4childrenconsignment.com. … Matthew Cody signs copies of “Will in Scarlet” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). $16.99 book; call 601-366-7619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com.

WEDNESDAY 10/16

Live at Lunch is from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. … U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks at South Forward Town Hall Meeting at 5:30 p.m. at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.) in the Community Meeting Room. RSVP. Free; southforward.nationbuilder.com.




Jackson 2000 October Luncheon Oct. 9, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Jackson City Council members Deâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keither Stamps and Melvin Priester Jr. are the speakers. RSVP. Attire is casual or business casual. $12, $10 members; call 960-1500; email bevelyn_branch@att.net; jackson2000.org. Thief at the Crossroads: The Blues as Black Technology through Jan. 4, at Gallery1 (1100 John R. Lynch St., Suite 4). See John Jenningsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comic art showcasing African American expressions. Blues reception from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 11. Free; call 601-960-9250; jsums.edu/gallery1. Jackson Restaurant Week 2013 through Oct. 12. Dine at participating restaurants, and vote at the end of the meal for a charity to receive $10,000. Food prices vary; jacksonrestaurantweek.com.

#/--5.)49 Events at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Mississippi Minority Business Alliance Awards Gala Oct. 11, 6 p.m. The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paving the Way Towards Minority Business Success.â&#x20AC;? The reception is at 6 p.m., and the gala with food, entertainment and awards is at 7 p.m. The speaker is Darrell S. Freeman Sr., executive chairman of Zycron. $125; call 601965-0366; email info@mmba.us; mmba.us. â&#x20AC;˘ ACLU of Mississippi Annual Membership Meeting Oct. 12, 4:30-10 p.m. Includes an art auction, a cash bar, dinner and dancing. Free for members (memberships: $35, $5 student and low-income memberships); call 601-354-3408; email office@aclu-ms.org; aclu-ms.org. Events at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St., Suite 700). Registration required. $99, $59 members; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Creating a Marketing Toolkit for Your Nonprofit Oct. 11, 9 a.m.-noon Learn how to utilize marketing strategies to tell your story and increase your impact in your community. â&#x20AC;˘ Managing Your Faith-based Nonprofit Oct. 16, 9 a.m.-noon Make your faith-based organization become more efficient with its planning and program delivery. Events at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). Free; call 601576-6998. â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch Oct. 9, noon As part of Archaeology Month, archaeologist Sam Brookes will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aspects of Mississippi Delta Prehistory.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch: Tuesday Special Session Oct. 15, noon Author Charles Bolton discusses and signs his new book â&#x20AC;&#x153;William F. Winter and the New Mississippi: A Biography.â&#x20AC;? $35 book. â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch Oct. 16, noon MDAH archivist Chloe Edwards discusses the Gates v. Collier decision and Parchman Penitentiary. Lauren Lachance Trunk Show and Cocktail Reception Oct. 10, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., at SummerHouse (1109 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite D, Ridgeland). Pressed botanical artist Lauren Lachance displays and sells her work. Cocktails and hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres included. Free; call 601853-4445; email laurel@summerhousestyle.com. First-year Anniversary of Duvalier Malone Enterprises Oct. 10, 7-9 p.m., at Hearts of Madison (123 Jones St., Madison). Come early to have professional photographers take your photo, and mingle with local community leaders and celebrities. Free; call 601-862-1763; email info@ heartsofmadison.com; duvaliermalone.com.

Meet the Quakers: A Spiritual Path for Our Time Oct. 12, 11 a.m., at High Noon Cafe (2807 Old Canton Road). Quaker author, photographer and retreat leader Brent Bill is the speaker. Light refreshments served. Free; call 3661513; email info@jacksonquakers.com. All 4 Children Consignment Fall/Winter Sale Oct. 14 pre-sale, 5-8 p.m., Oct. 15, 10 a.m.7 p.m., Oct. 16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and 6-8 p.m., and Oct. 17, 8 a.m.-noon, at Plantation Commons (105 Plantation Cove, Gluckstadt). The general sale is Oct. 15-17 with discounts of up to 50 percent off Oct. 17. $10 pre-sale, free admission to general sale; call 601-713-4040; all4childrenconsignment.com.

7%,,.%33 National Depression Screening Day Oct. 10, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., at Hinds Behavioral Health Services (3450 Highway 80 W.). Adults ages 18 and up receive free screenings at the annual event. Free; call 601-321-2400. Prescription Review Program Oct. 15, 11 a.m.1 p.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.) in the main lobby. Bring your medications for a pharmacist to review and explain possible interactions and side effects. Includes blood pressure screenings. Free; call 601-974-6274.

&!2-%23-!2+%43 Olde Towne Fall Market Oct. 12, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at Jefferson Street. In front of City Hall. Shop at the open-air market in Olde Towne Clinton. The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fall for Clinton.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601924-5472; email mainstreet@clintonms.org; clintonms.org. Jump Start Jackson Farmers Market Call for Farmers. Farmers and gardeners who participate receive incentives such as a cash stipend up to $200-300 and free vendor space. The market operates Saturdays from 8 a.m.-noon at Lake Hico Park (4801 Watkins Drive) through Nov. 2. Free; call 601-898-0000, ext. 118; email jcollins@ mbk-inc.org. Mississippi Farmers Market Saturdays, 8 a.m.2 p.m. through Dec. 21, at Mississippi Farmers Market (929 High St.). Free; call 601-354-6573; mdac.state.ms.us.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856; cinemark.com. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eugene Oneginâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 9, 6:30 p.m. The encore of the Metropolitan Operaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance includes performers such as Anna Netrebko and Piotr Beczala. $20, $18 seniors, $14 children. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermeer and Music: The Art of Love and Leisureâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m. The film is about the National Galley in Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibition of Johannes Vermeerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artwork and its relation to music. $11.50, $10.50 seniors and students, $9.50 children. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SURGEâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 9 and Oct. 16, 7 p.m., at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). The high-energy, interactive movie theater event fuses Christian rock music, comedy and inspirational messages for teens. $12.50; call 601898-7819; surgeexperience.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death by Insanityâ&#x20AC;? Dinner Theater Oct. 15, 6-9 p.m., at Rossini Cucina Italiana (207 W. Jackson St., Suite A, Ridgeland). Includes cocktails before the show and a three-course dinner. RSVP. $58; call 601-668-2214; brownpapertickets.com.

â&#x20AC;˘ Laptop & iPads screen replacement â&#x20AC;˘ Data backup,DC Jack repair â&#x20AC;˘ Small business service calls â&#x20AC;˘ Same day service â&#x20AC;˘ We sell and buy used computers Reviews & photos at www.kismar.com â&#x20AC;&#x153;Work was completed as promised and price was lower than other stores. This is the second time I have used them and am very satisfiedâ&#x20AC;? Ernest V.

6712 Old Canton Rd Suite 10, Ridgeland M - F 9 am - 7 pm Sat. 9 am - 5 pm

601-977-1008

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4654 McWillie Dr. Jackson, MS Monday - Thursday: 10AM - 9PM Friday & Saturday: 10AM - 10PM Sunday: CLOSED

Voted One of The Best Places For Lunch Bes t o f

2013

Cool Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

CoolAlsJxn

601.713.3020

025((9(1766((3$*(

Voted One of The Best Places

www.coolals.com

jacksonfreepress.com

*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43

35


)5203$*(

-53)#

2-for-1 EVERYTHING*

Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-7:00 (*excludes food and specialty drinks)

Wednesday, October 9th

CROOKED CREEK

(Americana) 6:30, No Cover

Thursday, October 10th

LUCKY HAND BLUES BAND & JASON DANIELS (Blues) 8:00, No Cover

Friday, October 11th

BIRTHDAY EXTRAVAGANZA 9:00, $10 Cover

Saturday, October 12th

DAVIS COHEN

(R&B) 9:00, $10 Cover

Tuesday, October 15th

ADIB SABIR

Casey Donahew Band Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Doors open at 7:30 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

Schnitzel and Beer Steins

J

DFNWREHUIHVWEULQJVEHHUEUDWZXUVWDQGEDQGVWR WKH-DFNVRQDUHD  ³,WZDVDOPRVWDGDUHEHWZHHQDJURXSRI IULHQGVWKDWVHUYHGRQWKHDUWVDQGPXVLFERDUG\HDUV DJR WKDW ZH QHHG DQ 2NWREHUIHVW LQ -DFNVRQ´ VD\V 6WHSKHQ%DUQHWWHZKRFRIRXQGHGWKH¿UVWIHVWLYDOLQ ³,WZDVUHDOO\DERXWGRLQJDIUHHVWUHHWPXVLF IHVWLYDOLQWKHWUDGLWLRQRI2NWREHUIHVWDQG SXWWLQJ D -DFNVRQWDNHRQLW´  %U\DQ DQG $QQLH .HOOHU 3- /HH DQG WKH 5DLVH <RXU3LQW FUHZ DUH WKH RWKHU IRXQGHUV -DFNWREHUIHVW ROY ADKINS

End Of Summer Happy Hour!

Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Live at Lunch Oct. 9, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Enjoy live music in the Art Garden. Bring lunch or buy food from the Palette Cafe by Viking. â&#x20AC;˘ Unburied Treasures: Cover to Cover Oct. 16, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Dr. Yumi Park talks about pre-Columbian ceramics, and David Moore performs using culturally-related instruments he created.

Synergy Night Oct. 12, 9 p.m., at Mediterranean Fish & Grill (6550 Old Canton Road). Tiger Rogers and the League of Jassmen perform during the open-mic and jazz event. 99.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Maranda J. hosts. $10, $5 if participating in open mic; call 601-383-6094.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; email info@ lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;William F. Winter and the New Mississippi: A Biographyâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 9, 5 p.m. Charles C. Bolton signs. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $35 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fear and What Follows: The Violent Education of a Christian Racist, a Memoirâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 11, 5 p.m. Tim Parrish signs. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $28 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Jumperâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 11, 5 p.m. Tim Parrish signs. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $26.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grimm Conclusionâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 14, 5 p.m. Adam Gitwitz signs books. $16.99 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Restrikeâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 15, 5 p.m. Reba White Williams signs. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $12 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Local Soulsâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 16, 5 p.m. Allan Gurganus signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.95 book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Talk About It: Muslim Journeysâ&#x20AC;? Discussion Series Oct. 10, 6-7:30 p.m., at Jackson State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Margaret Walker Center (Ayer Hall, 1400 John R. Lynch St.). Dr. Loye Ashton leads the discussion on Eboo Patelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Acts of Faith.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-979-2055 or 601-432-6752; jsums.edu/margaretwalkercenter.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Lewis Art Gallery (Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex, 1701 N. State St.).

Jacktoberfest has seen huge growth as the beer culture in Jackson has gotten more sophisticated the past few years.

Free; call 601-497-7454; email om_peace2you@ hotmail.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Andrew Burkitt Art Exhibition through Oct. 30. The artist exhibits several etchings, drawings on paper and small sculptures assembled from etchings. Email aab_cobra@yahoo. com; andrewburkitt.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Danielle Peters and Andrew Burkitt Sitespecific Installation through Oct. 30, in the Emerging Space. The artists spend three days gathering debris and assemble their findings with cut paper to form an installation.

"%4(%#(!.'% Therapeutic Foster Care Informational Oct. 10, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Services (1900 N. West St., Suite C). Learn about becoming a therapeutic foster-care parent. Free; call 601352-7784. Bike Walk Mississippi Fundraiser Oct. 10, 6:30-9 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). Proceeds benefit Bike Walk Mississippi. $5 cover; call 948-0888; email bikewalk@

(R&B) 6:30, No Cover

October 9 - 15, 2013

coming soon

36

Pam Confer Friday, October 18th Jazz, 9pm, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

VKRZFDVHVDQDUUD\RI2NWREHUIHVWLQVSLUHGHYHQWVOLNH WKH FUDIWEHHU FRPSHWLWLRQ OLYH PXVLF DQG SOHQW\ RI IRRG²EHHUFXOWXUHDQGJRRGIRRGLQGRZQWRZQ-DFN VRQ´%DUQHWWVD\V7KHFUDIWEHHUFRPSHWLWLRQLVRQH RIWKHKLJKOLJKWVRIWKHHYHQW,WJLYHVORFDOEUHZHULHV DFKDQFHIRUORFDOEUHZHUVWRFRPSHWHIRUWKHWLWOHRI ¶VEHVWFUDIWEHHU&KHFNMDFNWREHUIHVWFRPIRUD GHWDLOHGWDSOLQHXSWKHZHHNRIWKHIHVWLYDO  7KLV \HDU¶V IHVWLYDO LQFOXGHV PXVLF IURP 6XSHU EDQG:DVWHEDQGWKH'LPH%URVDQG7%LUGDQGWKH %UHDNV3-/HHRI+DO 0DO¶VDQG5\DQ%HOORI6RSKLD¶V 5HVWDXUDQWFUHDWHGDSRSXSHDWHU\  ³7KH FUHDWRUV RI WKH HYHQW ZDQWHG WR DGG DQ RWKHU HOHPHQWDQGNLFNXSWKHIRRGDELW:HWKRXJKW µ:K\QRWGRDSRSXSUHVWDXUDQWVHUYLQJ*HUPDQW\SH VWUHHW IRRG"¶´ /HH VD\V7KH DXWKHQWLF*HUPDQ IRRG ZLOOKDYHDVRXWKHUQWZLVW  7KHFUDIWEHHUJDUGHQZLOOJLYHSHRSOHDFKDQFH IURPSPWRSPWRVDPSOHDQGYRWHRQWKHLUIDYRU LWHEUHZWRZLQWKH-DFNWREHUIHVW3HRSOH¶V&KRLFH %HHU$ZDUG7KHHYHQWLVERWKIDPLO\DQGSHWIULHQGO\ DQG DGPLVVLRQ LV IUHH7KH FUDIWEHHU JDUGHQ LV  KRZHYHU7KHHYHQWVWDUWVDWDP2FWRQ1&RQ JUHVV6WUHHWEHWZHHQ($PLWHDQG(&DSLWROVWUHHWVLQ GRZQWRZQ-DFNVRQDQGUXQVWRSPVRSODQRQD ZKROHGD\RIHDWVDQGGULQNV  )RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQYLVLWMDFNWREHUIHVWFRP ²$OH[LV0RRG\

bikewalkmississippi.org; bikewalkmississippi.org. Know Your Rights: School Discipline Oct. 12, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at COFO Civil Rights Education Complex (1013 John R. Lynch St.). The Southern Poverty Law Center is the host. Learn what parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights are if a child is suspended or expelled from school. Free; call 334-322-8218; email jed. oppenheim@splcenter.org. A Voice of Hope Gala Oct. 12, 6 p.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The event includes a seated dinner, a themed-package auction and music. The keynote speaker is actress Candace Cameron Bure (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Full Houseâ&#x20AC;?). Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Chapter of the American Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Disease Association. $75, $100 premium seating; call 601-914-9213 or 601-566-1938; email mindiphillips@rocketmail.com; msapda.org. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

Call Us For All Of Your Catering Needs! BBQ Party Pack Serves 10 - $44.95 (2 lbs pork/beef or 2 whole chickens; 2 pints beans, 2 pints slaw, 6 slices Texas toast/10 buns)

Rib Party Pack Serves 4 - $52.15 (2 whole ribs, 1 pint of baked beans, 1 pint of slaw, 1 pint of potato salad, 4 slices of Texas toast)

Where Raul Knows Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name -Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 â&#x20AC;˘ 2006 2008 â&#x20AC;˘ 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ 601.956.7079

Best Fried Chicken in Town & Best Fried Chicken in the Country -Best of Jackson 2003-2013-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 11am - 3pm


)5203$*(

-53)#

2-for-1 EVERYTHING*

Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-7:00 (*excludes food and specialty drinks)

Wednesday, October 9th

CROOKED CREEK

(Americana) 6:30, No Cover

Thursday, October 10th

LUCKY HAND BLUES BAND & JASON DANIELS (Blues) 8:00, No Cover

Friday, October 11th

BIRTHDAY EXTRAVAGANZA 9:00, $10 Cover

Saturday, October 12th

DAVIS COHEN

(R&B) 9:00, $10 Cover

Tuesday, October 15th

ADIB SABIR

Casey Donahew Band Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Doors open at 7:30 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

Schnitzel and Beer Steins

J

DFNWREHUIHVWEULQJVEHHUEUDWZXUVWDQGEDQGVWR WKH-DFNVRQDUHD  ³,WZDVDOPRVWDGDUHEHWZHHQDJURXSRI IULHQGVWKDWVHUYHGRQWKHDUWVDQGPXVLFERDUG\HDUV DJR WKDW ZH QHHG DQ 2NWREHUIHVW LQ -DFNVRQ´ VD\V 6WHSKHQ%DUQHWWHZKRFRIRXQGHGWKH¿UVWIHVWLYDOLQ ³,WZDVUHDOO\DERXWGRLQJDIUHHVWUHHWPXVLF IHVWLYDOLQWKHWUDGLWLRQRI2NWREHUIHVWDQG SXWWLQJ D -DFNVRQWDNHRQLW´  %U\DQ DQG $QQLH .HOOHU 3- /HH DQG WKH 5DLVH <RXU3LQW FUHZ DUH WKH RWKHU IRXQGHUV -DFNWREHUIHVW ROY ADKINS

End Of Summer Happy Hour!

Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Live at Lunch Oct. 9, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Enjoy live music in the Art Garden. Bring lunch or buy food from the Palette Cafe by Viking. â&#x20AC;˘ Unburied Treasures: Cover to Cover Oct. 16, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Dr. Yumi Park talks about pre-Columbian ceramics, and David Moore performs using culturally-related instruments he created.

Synergy Night Oct. 12, 9 p.m., at Mediterranean Fish & Grill (6550 Old Canton Road). Tiger Rogers and the League of Jassmen perform during the open-mic and jazz event. 99.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Maranda J. hosts. $10, $5 if participating in open mic; call 601-383-6094.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; email info@ lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;William F. Winter and the New Mississippi: A Biographyâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 9, 5 p.m. Charles C. Bolton signs. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $35 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fear and What Follows: The Violent Education of a Christian Racist, a Memoirâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 11, 5 p.m. Tim Parrish signs. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $28 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Jumperâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 11, 5 p.m. Tim Parrish signs. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $26.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grimm Conclusionâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 14, 5 p.m. Adam Gitwitz signs books. $16.99 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Restrikeâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 15, 5 p.m. Reba White Williams signs. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $12 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Local Soulsâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 16, 5 p.m. Allan Gurganus signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.95 book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Talk About It: Muslim Journeysâ&#x20AC;? Discussion Series Oct. 10, 6-7:30 p.m., at Jackson State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Margaret Walker Center (Ayer Hall, 1400 John R. Lynch St.). Dr. Loye Ashton leads the discussion on Eboo Patelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Acts of Faith.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-979-2055 or 601-432-6752; jsums.edu/margaretwalkercenter.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Lewis Art Gallery (Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex, 1701 N. State St.).

Jacktoberfest has seen huge growth as the beer culture in Jackson has gotten more sophisticated the past few years.

Free; call 601-497-7454; email om_peace2you@ hotmail.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Andrew Burkitt Art Exhibition through Oct. 30. The artist exhibits several etchings, drawings on paper and small sculptures assembled from etchings. Email aab_cobra@yahoo. com; andrewburkitt.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Danielle Peters and Andrew Burkitt Sitespecific Installation through Oct. 30, in the Emerging Space. The artists spend three days gathering debris and assemble their findings with cut paper to form an installation.

"%4(%#(!.'% Therapeutic Foster Care Informational Oct. 10, 5:30 p.m., at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Services (1900 N. West St., Suite C). Learn about becoming a therapeutic foster-care parent. Free; call 601352-7784. Bike Walk Mississippi Fundraiser Oct. 10, 6:30-9 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). Proceeds benefit Bike Walk Mississippi. $5 cover; call 948-0888; email bikewalk@

(R&B) 6:30, No Cover

October 9 - 15, 2013

coming soon

36

Pam Confer Friday, October 18th Jazz, 9pm, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

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bikewalkmississippi.org; bikewalkmississippi.org. Know Your Rights: School Discipline Oct. 12, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at COFO Civil Rights Education Complex (1013 John R. Lynch St.). The Southern Poverty Law Center is the host. Learn what parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights are if a child is suspended or expelled from school. Free; call 334-322-8218; email jed. oppenheim@splcenter.org. A Voice of Hope Gala Oct. 12, 6 p.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The event includes a seated dinner, a themed-package auction and music. The keynote speaker is actress Candace Cameron Bure (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Full Houseâ&#x20AC;?). Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Chapter of the American Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Disease Association. $75, $100 premium seating; call 601-914-9213 or 601-566-1938; email mindiphillips@rocketmail.com; msapda.org. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

Call Us For All Of Your Catering Needs! BBQ Party Pack Serves 10 - $44.95 (2 lbs pork/beef or 2 whole chickens; 2 pints beans, 2 pints slaw, 6 slices Texas toast/10 buns)

Rib Party Pack Serves 4 - $52.15 (2 whole ribs, 1 pint of baked beans, 1 pint of slaw, 1 pint of potato salad, 4 slices of Texas toast)

Where Raul Knows Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name -Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 â&#x20AC;˘ 2006 2008 â&#x20AC;˘ 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ 601.956.7079

Best Fried Chicken in Town & Best Fried Chicken in the Country -Best of Jackson 2003-2013-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 11am - 3pm


Ricky Skaggs and Bruce Hornsby with Kentucky Thunder Sunday, October 6, 2013, 6 p.m. Imagine most bluegrass instrumental lineups, and a piano is usually not among them. But the pairing of mandolin-picking icon Ricky Skaggs with legendary pianist and songwriter Bruce Hornsby, who burst onto the music scene in 1986 with “The Way It Is,” results in masterful music. With dozens of awards and millions of albums !"#$%&'()''*%(+',-%./011!%0*$%2"3*!&4%53!(%6"##0&"30('$%"*%(+'73% 2007 album, “Ricky Skaggs & Bruce Hornsby.” The combined magic of high, lonesome harmonies, full-throttle bluegrass picking, and improvisational piano continues with this current tour. For Fans of: Steve Winwood, Del McCoury, Tony Rice

Stuart Little

Family Show

Friday, October 11, 2013, 7 p.m. Aside from the pet cat, Snowbell, it seems that the rest of the Little family sees nothing strange about the youngest son, Stuart. But having a polite, well-dressed mouse as part of an ordinary human family in New York City proves only that small creatures are often quite big when it comes to friendship and bravery. Based on “Stuart Little,” the beloved book by E. B. White, this play by Dallas Children’s 8+'0('3%7!%,"!(%099'0#7*1%("%/7*$'3103('*'3!%(+3":1+%5;(+<130$'3!= For Fans of: Children’s books written by E. B. White, including Stuart Little and Charlotte’s Web.

Michael McDonald After decades as a singer and pianist, producing hits with the likes of Steely Dan and The Doobie Brothers, Michael McDonald hasn’t taken +7!%;""(%";;%(+'%9'$0#%";%+7!%!"#"%603''3=%27!%#0('!(%>?-%@A*5*7!+'$% Business,” was released this year and is a collaboration with guitarist Robben Ford. Its style is a bit of a departure from McDonald’s recent penchant for Motown covers and holiday classics, but many of its tracks are sure to please those clamoring for more from this rock legend with the snow-white hair and smooth baritone. For Fans of: Kenny Loggins, Boz Scaggs, The Doobie Brothers

2200 5th Street • Meridian, Mississippi 601-696-2200 • www.msurileycenter.com

jacksonfreepress.com

Tuesday, October 15, 2013, 7:30 p.m. | Pre-Show 6 p.m.

37


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SLATE

bryan’s rant

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by Bryan Flynn

The New Orleans Saints are 5-0 for the third time in franchise history, which brings up some good and some bad memories associated with other two times the Saints started undefeated five weeks into a season. THURSDAY, OCT. 10 NFL (7:30-11 p.m., NFL Network): The New York Giants need a win on the road against the Chicago Bears to avoid going 0-6 this season. FRIDAY, OCT. 11 MLB (Time TBA, TBS): One team will earn the right to represent the National League in the World Series, starting with game one of the National League Championship Series. SATURDAY, OCT. 12 College Football (7:30-11 p.m., ESPN): The Ole Miss Rebels will have to be on their A game to stop a two-game losing streak against Johnny Manziel and the Texas A&M Aggies. SUNDAY, OCT. 13 NFL (3-6 p.m., Fox): Drew Brees and the New Orleans Saints look to go 6-0 at home against Tom Brady and the New England Patriots. MONDAY, OCT. 14 NFL (7:30-11 p.m. ESPN): Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts hope to continue their winning ways against Phillip Rivers and the San Diego Chargers. TUESDAY, OCT. 15 Documentary (7-8:30 p.m., ESPN): ESPN’s 30 for 30 film “No Mas” features the two boxing matches between Sugar Ray Leonard and Roberto Duran. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16 WNBA (7-9:30 p.m. ESPN): Game five (if necessary) will be the deciding game between the Minnesota Lynx and the Atlanta Dream for the 2013 WNBA Championship. In 1993, New Orleans started 5-0 and went on to lose eight of their final 11 games to finish 8-8. In 2009, the Saints finished the season as world champions. How will 2013 end? Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.


All are welcome! We look forward to meeting you. Sundayâ&#x20AC;©Services 10:30â&#x20AC;©amâ&#x20AC;©&â&#x20AC;©6:00pm 650â&#x20AC;©E.Southâ&#x20AC;©Streetâ&#x20AC;©â&#x20AC;¢â&#x20AC;©Jacksonâ&#x20AC;©â&#x20AC;¢â&#x20AC;©601.944.0415 Sundayâ&#x20AC;©Services:â&#x20AC;©10:30amâ&#x20AC;©&â&#x20AC;©6:00pm

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41


Go Big (When You) Go Home

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

W

KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL

hen it comes to décor, sometimes you need a big piece to make a room look balanced, fill a large empty wall or make a bold statement. (Unless, of course, you’re me, and think every wall looks good as a gallery wall packed with little tidbits of happiness. But then your husband will tell you that, really, one or two gallery walls is plenty, and you begrudgingly admit he might be right, and then you are back to square one, needing a few big pieces of art.) The problem? Big art is expensive. Even framing big cheap art nicely is expensive. And if you don’t have the art chops to create statement pieces for yourself, it can be frustrating. But you really don’t have to be an artist to make your house a home. The secret is finding or creating things that are meaningful to your life. Here are three ways I’ve made a big impact in my own home:

1

Indulge your inner photographer. I took these photos at a Chihuly exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Although I could have purchased large prints of the artist’s work that would perhaps be sharper or lit better, I liked that my own photos reminded me of my experiences wandering through the museum. Instead of trying to print one picture really big, I chose three and printed them at 16 inches by 20 inches. The frames are cheap poster frames, and the end result is a triptych that looks much classier than the less-than-$40 it took to create.

2

Write a love letter. You don’t have to be an artist to create something big. All you need is a large canvas— whatever size fits your space (and your wallet)—and paint. My canvas is nearly three feet tall. Choose text that is meaningful for you— song lyrics, a favorite book passage, monologue or even a section of a government bill that means something to you. Then just paint it on the canvas. I chose a passage from one of my favorite books, which a good friend also read at our wedding. Because of the subject matter, it ended up as a sort of large-scale love letter for our home.

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART

An Italian Palate: paintings by

Wyatt Waters

October 12, 2013 – January 12, 2014 Wyatt Waters (born 1955), Above and Beyond, 2011. watercolor on paper, copyright © the artist.

F eatures more than 60 breathtaking

watercolors of Italy from the travels

of Wyatt Waters and Robert St. John. Coinciding with the release of the duo’s collaborative cookbook,

42

Mississippi Museum of Art  380 South Lamar Street  Jackson, MS 39201 W W W. M S M U S E U M A R T. O R G



6 0 1 . 9 6 0 . 1 5 1 5 o r 1 . 8 6 6 . V I E WA R T

64.

October 9 - 15, 2013

An Italian Palate.

Tip: Trying to make the letters look perfect on your first go will usually make your handwriting look unnatural. Try to write the whole thing out quickly and then go back through slowly to fill out the lettering. Also, don’t be afraid to let it be a little messy—its better to have something that reflects your true handwriting.

3

Think outside the rectangle. I have an ampersand obsession and they are slowly showing up all over my house to prove it. When I found out about this giant ampersand, which was marked down at a huge sale, I jumped at it. (“Watch for a good sale” is a tip that could really apply to any of these ideas, from printing your own images to purchasing canvases). Even deeply discounted, it is still the most expensive item on this list, but the piece is seriously huge—more three feet tall, more than two feet wide and three inches deep. It’s a big statement piece for our dining room and doesn’t require much more to make the space feel full. And here’s another tip: Don’t be afraid to repurpose something to fit your taste. Although I like the aged map look this piece came with, I plan to eventually paint it to best complement our tastes. Gold foil may be involved.


WE’RE HAVING A LITTLE WORK DONE. Mississippi's only full service Hilton Hotel has kicked off a major renovation project. The renovation plan calls for updates in the hotel lobby, restaurants, 276 guest rooms, and a few more exciting enhancements. Entire project is scheduled to wrap up by the end of the year. We are excited about our renovation and look forward to providing you with an even better hotel! For room reservations please visit hilton.com or call 601-957-2800 STAY HILTON. GO EVERYWHERE.

1001 East County Line Road | Jackson | MS 39211 | USA ©2013 Hilton Worldwide

2013-06-27 15:51:19 +0100

When Marcus received custody of his two children, he had no job, no high school diploma, and no idea how he would take care of them. Marcus turned to one of United Way’s partners for help. Six months later he had his GED, a new job, and is currently working on his associate’s degree at a local community college.

Your United Way’s initiatives are changing lives, right here, right now. Each of us can be the one who helps turn a life into a success story. Together, person by person, we can make lasting change.

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YOUR UNITED WAY SUPPORT HELPED ME PROVIDE A STABLE HOME FOR MY KIDS

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v12n05 - The Music and Nightlife Issue  

Artists to Watch • Musiicians Open Up • Your Favorite Nightlife Spots • Five Years of Farish.