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Abandoned? Lonely? Depressed? Forsaken?

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JACKSONIAN COTTON BARONICH

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otton” Baronich helps women with their chairs. He adds “dahlin’” to just about every sentence when he speaks with them. That’s the kind of old-school southern gentleman he is—his daddy raised him up right. He clearly loves women, and he loves music. “There was a lady the other day, and I says to her: ‘Precious lady. You make me feel brand new,’” he says, ending in song. Baronich, 84, has lived in Jackson since he moved here from Biloxi, his birthplace, in 1970. Long-time Jacksonians likely know him for mixing their perfect cocktail at the Sun & Sand (back in the days when state lawmakers made the hotel their home during the annual legislative session), George Street Grocery, Hal & Mal’s or the Edison Walthall Hotel. The bartender may not have remembered your name, but he knew how many olives you liked in your martini. The second time you patronized his bar, he probably arrived with your drink before you ordered it. This year, the impeccably turned-out Baronich—who’s made being nice to everyone his mantra—is the grand marshal of the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade, which takes on the theme “Drink Local, Think Global” this year. He’s humble about the honor. “I’ve been around a long time,” Baronich says. He knew the Malcolm and

CONTENTS

Hal White’s father before he knew them. The Mississippi Gulf Coast has a thriving Slavic community, he says, especially among those whose ancestors made their livings by fishing. Baronich’s parents immigrated to the United States from Croatia’s Adriatic coast, and Rudolf (Baronich’s given name) was the fifth of the couple’s eight sons. “I’m first generation in this country,” he says, proudly. He got his nickname, “Cotton,” from his blonde “cotton top”—back before his hair turned silvery white. It was in Jackson that Baronich met and married the love of his life, Jean Shamberger, a ballerina who taught some 300 young dancers in her studio. Before Jean’s death six years ago, the couple reveled in taking their turn on the dance floor. Their jitterbug brought applause. “She made me look good,” he says. “Skin like silk, dahlin’—moisturizer and lipstick only,” Baronich says as he shows Jean’s photo. “I still miss her, every single day.” His granddaughter, Britney, who lives in Texas, calls Baronich daily. Like every good bartender, Baronich doesn’t repeat secrets divulged with alcoholloosened tongues. But the twinkle in his eyes say that he’s seen his share of improprieties, even from the most respectable of southern gents and ladies. —Ronni Mott

Cover photo of Hal White courtesy Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau

10 In Pursuit

The Mississippi Bureau of Investigations is taking a closer look at high-speed chases after the Madison Police Department engaged in a high-speed pursuit last month that injured a bystander.

28 If You Build It

“Unpretentious is an understatement: even for the relatively no-nonsense city builder genre, ‘Banished’ is spartan. The challenge, then, is not making your city sprawling and profitable, as ‘SimCity’ would have it; or luxurious and mighty, as the fantastic Caesar series instructs, but merely to survive.” —Nick Judin, “Home on the Range: A Review of ‘Banished’”

38 Piano and Paddy

Davina and the Vagabonds bring its eclectic sound, with influences ranging from New Orleans jazz to past generations’ rock, to headline the Iron Horse Grill’s St. Paddy’s weekend.

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4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ................................................ YOU 8 ............................................ TALKS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ............................ COVER STORY 27 ......................................... FOOD 28 .......................................... GEEK 30 .............................. DIVERSIONS 33 .......................................... ARTS 34 .......................................... FILM 35 ....................................... 8 DAYS 36 ............................... JFP EVENTS 38 ....................................... MUSIC 39 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 40 ..................................... SPORTS 43 .................................... PUZZLES 45 ....................................... ASTRO 46 ............................................ GIG

CHRISTIE WILLIAMS; COURTESY SHINING ROCK SOFTWARE; KENYA HUDSON

MARCH 12 - 18, 2014 | VOL. 12 NO. 27

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EDITOR’S note

by Kathleen M. Mitchell Features Editor

Irish Wisdom, Irish Pride

W

hile I studied abroad in Ireland, I loved coming across little bits of old-fashioned wisdom—phrases such as, “For an Irishman, talking is a dance,” or “It’s no use carrying an umbrella if your shoes are leaking.” But what I learned in Ireland went much deeper than these idioms. In my case, I learned about the Dublin bus system and how to make cabbage actually edible. I learned the rules of rugby and a handful of Gaelic words that I’ve mostly forgotten since. I met my extended family—people with my mother’s maiden name who didn’t look like me and didn’t talk like me, and were so distantly related from me that the paper family tree we brought was worn and wrinkled from being pulled out and pored over and refolded so many times. But despite being my second cousin thrice removed or whatnot, these people were family from the moment we met. They took me in, fed me meals and took me to the most fabulous Irish wedding. They taught me that family bonds stretch a lot further than you might ever know. But mostly, I learned a lot about myself while studying there. Visiting another country is nearly always an enlightening experience, but what I’ve realized is that you usually learn as much or more about yourself as you do about the new place. While living in Dublin, I felt like met myself for the first time all over again. I found a renewed sense of independence in sitting alone on a bus, watching the scenery zip by. I found new favorite dishes (read about one on page 27) and learned to appreciate real food—the kind that’s grown, raised and made simply. I learned that I love architecture. I learned what it means to love a place, to let it become part

of you and let yourself become part of it. Every year, when St. Patrick’s Day rolls around, I can’t help but think back to my time in the Isle of Eire and the lessons I learned there—especially since St. Paddy’s has come to be such a significant part of springtime in Jackson. While Ireland and Mississippi might be miles apart, geographically and cultur-

Isn’t the idea that what your locals are doing is so exciting that others just have to come along and experience it, too? ally, the two have more in common than you might believe. Mississippi is actually only about 16,000 square miles larger than Ireland, and although Dublin vastly outpopulates our city with soul, if you include Jackson’s metro area, the two are somewhat comparable. Ireland is a place with a past wrapped up in agriculture. The people there are family-oriented. Music is an integral part of the culture, and local bars and pubs

play host to local musicians night in and night out. Sound familiar? One thing I found is that the Irish have a real appreciation for their cultural identity, both in its historical sense and in its modern equivalent. I remember students on campus in an apartment near ours practicing the Irish language—a dead language, with no practical modern use—just to keep that part of the country’s history alive. I participated in pub crawls honoring Irish music and classic literature. I smile fondly looking back at my photos of hordes of Irishmen and women going into the cobblestone streets and raising a pint of Guinness at exactly 5:59 p.m. on Sept. 23, 2009, toasting “To Arthur!” and breaking out in joyous renditions of Happy Birthday to the man that created Ireland’s signature beer. I studied in Dublin in the fall, so I missed St. Patrick’s Day itself, but I heard tales of the citywide celebrations, which seem to take on a sort of funny confluence of native Irish culture and a globalized partying mindset. But Dublin isn’t the only place I’ve lived where St. Patrick’s Day and Irish culture are a big deal. After I graduated from Millsaps College, I moved to Boston, Mass., for two years. Boston is very different from Jackson, with its size, its weather, its noise and brashness. St. Paddy’s in Boston is all Southie accents, rough pride and women with big hair selling access to their bathrooms for $5 a trip. Getting on the T (Boston’s subway) the morning of the St. Patrick’s Day parade is an adventure like no other. Green-clad locals and tourists pack into train cars like sardines until it’s just an indistinguishable mass of bodies. Despite the inherent risk of being crushed by the mob, strangers become friends and

trek across the city together. Boston has lessons we could learn, too. Bostonians are fierce in their love for their city, whether its cheering on the Red Saawx, fighting those pesky Canadians at a Bruins match, claiming its seafood as best in the world or boisterously shouting from the rooftops (sometimes literally) on St. Paddy’s Day. St. Patrick’s means different things to different people and different places. How we celebrate here in Jackson is different from how they celebrate in Dublin or in Boston or in San Francisco or in Montreal. To me, the day has always been a combination of celebrating a specific culture—one that happens to be my heritage through my mother’s side—and celebrating local frivolity. It’s often a day when tourism and local celebrations merge—and isn’t that the best type of tourist attraction? Isn’t the idea that what your locals are doing is so fun and so exciting that others just have to come along and experience it, too? Certainly we’ve seen that as our own Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade has grown from a smattering of friends parading down the street to a highly anticipated weekend drawing tens of thousands to our city. So this weekend, as you revel with your friends and family, as you drink green beer and catch beads and listen to music and frolic, take time to appreciate being part of a celebration that is at once both global and utterly unique to Jackson. Besides abiding by what is probably my favorite bit of Irish wisdom (“What butter and whiskey will not cure, there is no cure for.”), I urge you to do as the Irish do, and as Bostonians do: Have pride in our city, our state and the cultural identity we are forming for ourselves, on St. Paddy’s Parade day and beyond.

March 12 - 18, 2014

CONTRIBUTORS

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Ronni Mott

R.L. Nave

Molly Lehmuller

Dustin Cardon

Julie Skipper

Genevieve Legacy

Jesse Flowers

David Rahaim

Freelance writer Ronni Mott has been a Mississippian since 1997. She’s an award-winning writer and a yoga teacher, just stumbling and fumbling toward bliss like everyone else. She wrote the Jacksonian.

R.L. Nave, native Missourian and news editor, roots for St. Louis (and the Mizzou Tigers)—and for Jackson. Send him news tips at rlnave@ jacksonfreepress.com or call him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12. He wrote the cover story.

Molly Lehmuller is a 2013 graduate of Millsaps College’s Else School of Management. She enjoys visiting her beautiful blonde mother in Belhaven. She wrote a St. Paddy’s feature.

Web Editor Dustin Cardon is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi. He enjoys reading fantasy novels and wants to write them himself one day. He wrote the business roundup.

Julie Skipper lives, works and plays downtown. Ask her about it if you want an earful. She hopes to learn to cook one day, but mostly thinks of the kitchen as additional closet space. She wrote a piece for the St. Paddy’s package.

Genevieve Legacy is an artist-writer-community development consultant. She works at Hope Enterprise Corporation and lives in Brandon with her husband and youngest son. She wrote an arts story.

Graphic Design Intern Jesse Flowers is a Delta native and graduate of Delta State University with degrees in graphic design and painting. In his free time, he paints, travels and attends music festivals. He helped design the issue.

One day sales representative David Rahaim will finish his first novel. He promises. It may just be after he finishes his second.


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[YOU & JFP] Name: Ashley Gonzalez Age: 28 Location: Fair Trade Green Occupation: Sales clerk Jackson resident: Five months From: Denver, Colorado Favorite part of JXN: Fondren Favorite quote: “Be here—meow� Secret to life: “Chocolate�

Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

YOUR TURN Remembering Mayor Lumumba on jfp.ms “Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, 66, Has Died; Tillman Acting Mayor,� by JFP Staff Richardlaswell Such high hopes for our city. I hope that we won’t throw away all that he has accomplished in his short time as mayor. tsmith Sad, sad day for the city. Mr. Lumumba, like him or not, was an intelligent man who was taking control and making positive things happen. He was a stable influence. Now I fear it will revert back to the circus it has been for years. NotLikeU From afar, it looked like Jackson had found the mayor that will get the city on the right track. I was really looking forward to how Jackson will develop under Lumumba. Strength to the Lumumba family and friends during this time.

tombarnes12 What a horrible shock for Jackson. From what I have observed, Lumumba was a thoughtful man with a plan to move the city in a positive direction. Terribly sad. Duan It’s a tough pill to swallow, because— outside of Chokwe being mayor—he was a good human being. Some tried to sell him short of being a good humanitarian! He was a voice for those who didn’t have one, and he believed wholeheartedly in that. I do believe in the ability of the citizens in Jackson to find a mayor, the same way we found Chokwe. We have to be diligent in the campaign process, and ask the tough questions, evaluate the candidates’ credentials and ask the candidates (about) their vision for Jackson. It would be a disservice to Mayor Lumumba to take a halfway approach to finding his successor. Titus 2:13 “looking for the blessed hope!�

-OST6IRAL3TORIESAND0AGES ATJFPMS

March 12 - 18, 2014

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For more on late Mayor Chokwe Lumumba’s life and legacy, explore a gallery of photos from photographer Trip Burns and others at jfp.ms/lumumbapictures.

IT’S ALMOST TIME FOR MAL’S ST. PADDY’S PARADE! THIS YEAR’S THEME IS “DRINK LOCAL, THINK GLOBAL�—WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL DRINKING SPOT?

“Chokwe Lumumba, 1947-2014,� by R.L. Nave

Jason King Under the Woodrow Wilson bridge by the train tracks.

AnnGarrison Thanks for this, including the details of the city’s response that the press from outside don’t have. I’m devastated by his death. Though he was not a federal or even state officeholder, I didn’t think there was a more important leader in the U.S. or the world today. But I’m grateful for his profound thoughts and plans, which despite their depth, were not difficult to understand. Also grateful for the love he so obviously felt for his people and for anyone trying to be a decent human being.

Stephanie Burks Wherever Jamie Moss is bartending. (The best theme ever!)

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Cody Walker Fenian’s. Summer Nation Fondren Public! Miranda Jordan Good theme! James Ridgley M Bar, Freelons, Martins Bar Tim Murphy The Bulldog, Jackson’s new Barkade. JustSay ThatThen Yes! Been going (to The Bulldog) even when it was Lager’s.


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Thursday, March 6 The Obama administration puts new visa restrictions on pro-Russian opponents of the new Ukraine government in Kiev and clears the way for financial sanctions, while the European Union also begins to impose sanctions. At the same time, lawmakers in Ukraine’s Crimea region unanimously declare their intention to split from Ukraine and join Russia instead, scheduling a referendum in 10 days for voters to decide the region’s fate. Friday, March 7 Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas says there is “no way� he will recognize Israel as a Jewish state and accept a Palestinian capital in just a portion of Israeli-annexed east Jerusalem. Saturday, March 8 A Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200 carrying 239 people goes missing over the South China Sea on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Sunday, March 9 European Union’s foreign-policy chief Catherine Ashton says that meetings with Iranian officials and world powers on ongoing negotiations over the country’s nuclear program and the civil war in Syria may not reach a final deal.

March 12 - 18, 2014

Monday, March 10 Boston public-safety officials reveal that he number of police officers patrolling this year’s Boston Marathon will be doubled to more than 3,500 in response to last year’s attack.

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Tuesday, March 11 The Senate passes legislation in support of devoting $126 million over the coming decade for additional research into pediatric cancer and other childhood disorders like autism and Down syndrome. It now goes to President Obama for his signature.

Memorial Highlights Lumumba’s Complexity by R.L. Nave

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hokwe Lumumba was a complicated man. Close observers of his four-decade-long career as an activist, attorney and politician are likely aware of this on some level, but the multifaceted nature of Lumumba’s life came into stark focus at his memorial services, which took place last weekend in Jackson. Jolivette Anderson, a poet who lived in Mississippi for a decade as artist, community organizer and activist, noted in a tribute to Lumumba that his rivals during the 2013 mayor’s election painted him as an extremist and tried to raise doubts about his Christian faith. However, Anderson said, like Jesus Christ, that Lumumba was a revolutionary, a Christian and a black man. Certainly those strains were evident among the well-wishers who attended Lumumba’s funeral, who came dressed in traditional western suits as well as dashikis and tunics common to African and the Middle East. Kangols, berets, kufis, hijab and headwraps adorned their heads. Throughout the service, speakers invoked Jesus Christ, Allah and the orishas of the west African Yoruba tribe. “All of us know God by different names, and we should recognize all those names,� said Bishop Jeffrey Stallworth, Lumumba’s pastor at Word & Worship Church. “It’s good to have a God that big.� While Lumumba’s time in public office dominated many of the tributes, other lesserknown parts of Lumumba’s biography also came to light. Acting Mayor Charles Till-

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Wednesday, March 5 Doctors at an AIDS conference in Boston reveal that a second American baby born with the AIDS virus may have had her infection put into remission and possibly cured by very early treatment four hours after birth. ‌ College Board officials update the SAT for the first since 2005 to make the exam better representative of what students study in high school and the skills they need to succeed in college and afterward.

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Chokwe Antar Lumumba eulogized his late father this weekend in Jackson.Antar’s sister, Rukia, said her father was complicated beyond comprehension.

man, U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson—who was formerly the mayor of Bolton, near where the Lumumba and the Republic of New Afrika wanted to start a new black-led state in early 1970s—and former Mississippi Gov. William Winter also spoke. Winter confessed that he had reservations about Lumumba’s election as mayor last year. “Based on the stereotypes this old white man had formed about (Lumumba), I thought that he would divide our city. I could not have been more wrong,� Winter said. Lumumba’s reputation as a divisive came in part from his ferocity in the court-

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room. Imhotep Alkebu-Ian, whom Lumumba appointed to work in the city’s legal department, talked about relocating to the capital city to work with Lumumba. “I was happy to move to Mississippi to work with Chokwe Lumumba. There was no Chokwe Lumumba in Texas,� AlkebuIan said to the crowd. Jackson State University professor C. Liegh McInnis recited an original poem he wrote titled “Free the Land Man� (see page 12), a reference to the phrase with which Lumumba often began speeches. McInnis described Lumumba as “our own AfroAmerican Robin Hood with MXG on

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his chest,â&#x20AC;? referring to the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, an organization Lumumba co-founded. Members of the New Afrikan Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Organization, which Lumumba also founded, along with the MXGM, NAACP and Nation of Islam, representing Minister Louis Farrakhan, gave remembrances as well. Dr. Safiya Omari, a former Jackson State University professor who managed Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign and worked in his administration as chief of staff, said Lumumba â&#x20AC;&#x153;not only wanted to build institutions, but to improve institutions to better serve the people.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;This man, that people thought was too

divisive, was able to bring every segment of this city together,â&#x20AC;? Omari told the crowd. Myrlie Evers, a civil-rights icon and widow of slain Mississippi civil-rights hero Medgar Evers, said she was grateful for Lumumba and challenged attendees to continue his goal of â&#x20AC;&#x153;one city, one aim, one destiny,â&#x20AC;? which has also become an unofficial motto for Jackson city government. Bill Chandler, a veteran labor organizer and immigrant-rights advocate who has known Lumumba since the 1970s, said he moved to Mississippi for many of the same reasons Lumumba moved here from his native Detroit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To change America, we have to change

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the South. And to change the South, we have to change Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? Chandler said. Lumumba was eulogized by his children, Chokwe Antar of Jackson and Rukia, who lives in New York City. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was complex. He was a man who loved deeper than we could comprehend,â&#x20AC;? Rukia said in her remarks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He knew that if he loved his people, he loved all people.â&#x20AC;? Chokwe Antar, Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youngest child, whom family members and other longtime family friends often called â&#x20AC;&#x153;little Chokweâ&#x20AC;? during the memorial, delivered an impassioned eulogy to close the service. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am Chokwe Antarâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;another Chris-

tian brother with an African name,â&#x20AC;? he said, repeating a phrase his father used often during his 2013 mayoral race when opponents attempted to cast him as a Muslim. Antar, who announced this week that he will attempt to succeed his father as mayor, also tackled the notion of that the elder Lumumba was divisive and started the process of injecting himself into his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s narrative. He said that love, not hate, spurred his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love changed Jackson, Mississippi â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and Chokwe Lumumba was love,â&#x20AC;? he said. Comment at jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Race?

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he candidates vying to replace May- no listings for Johnson or his wife, Kathy; a oper, supports Yarberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s candidacy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been or Chokwe Lumumba are wasting Hinds County landroll query yields two re- in this town a long time, over 30 years, and no time, with the first handful of sults for Johnson. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve watched mayors come and go and this candidates making their intentions Ward 6 Councilman, long believed young man has all of the talents,â&#x20AC;? Garrett known early this week. told the Jackson Free Press. The first out of the gate were a In a bit of a surprise move, Regina couple of relatively old hands in city Quinn, former general counsel for government. On Monday, March 10, Jackson State University, confirmed former Jackson Mayor Harvey Johnto reporters at the city council meetson Jr., whom finished in third place ing that she would also run. Quinn behind business Jonathan Lee and just finished in fourth place in last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shade behind Lumumba in the 2013 Democratic mayoral primary. When Democratic primary race, jumped in. the race came down to a runoff beJohnson tied his own narrative as tween then-Ward 2 Councilman Luthe cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first African American mayor mumba and businessman Jonathan to that of Smith Robertson, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lee, Quinn threw her support to first black alderman, with an anLumumba. Many of her supporters nouncement at the museum named in also got behind Lumumba; currently, Robertsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honor. several members of her campaign staff Jackson, known for being a bit hold positions in city government. of an infrastructure wonk, rattled off a That sets up an interesting race long list of road repairs completed or given that Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son, Chokwe started during his three terms as mayAntar, also plans to seek the seat and or. A reporter asked Johnson why he is expected to draw much of his late was seeking another term when voters fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s political base. rejected him in 2009, when he lost to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve worked so closely with late mayor Frank Melton, and 2013. Chokwe and, honestly when Antar â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re keeping score, they said he wanted to run, I kind of felt With a small qualifying window, candidates began said no twice, but they said yes three like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be running against my nephew. announcing their bids for Jackson mayor this week. times,â&#x20AC;? Johnson quipped. Johnson But then I really started thinking about also addressed rumors that he pulled what Jackson needs and what I could up stakes and settled in Madisonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a rumor to be positioning himself to run for mayor bring to the table to get that done,â&#x20AC;? Quinn, that surfaces every time he runs. Johnson someday, is also in the running. the only woman so far to definitively declare said he lives in Jackson on Hallmark Drive In announcing his candidacy, Yarber her candidacy, told the JFP. and owns a barn where he keeps horses in said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;My commitment from day one is to Quinn also stressed that her candidacy Hinds County north of Clinton. give you a reason to shop in Jackson, to eat does not mean she has doubts about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in a big mansion in Madi- in Jackson, to stay in Jackson, to love Jackson leadership potential of Chokwe Antar or son County. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even live in a big man- and if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve moved away, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to give anyone else who has declared intentions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I sion in Jackson,â&#x20AC;? said Johnson. A search of you a reason to move back.â&#x20AC;? donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have doubts about anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leadership land records in Madison County turns up Socrates Garrett, a Jackson-based devel- abilities, but what I have confidence in is

what I bring to the table,â&#x20AC;? she said. Chokwe Antar Lumumba and Ward 2 Councilman Melvin Priester Jr. also made announcements on Tuesday, after the Jackson Free Press had gone to press. Supporters of Mayor Lumumba had been pushing for Chokwe Antar as the most logical person to succeed his father and continue the policies and programs of his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s administration. Chokwe Antar seemed to start that ball rolling when he eulogized his father on Saturday, calling himself an extension of his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision for Jackson and reminding attendees of Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career in human-rights activism. Priester, who succeeded Lumumba as Ward 2 Councilman and ascended to city council president after the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death, is also seeking the seat. He announced at his law office. In a press release, he enumerated his bona fides for the job, which include â&#x20AC;&#x153;deep ties to the communityâ&#x20AC;? and working to improve relationship between the Jackson Police Department and neighborhood groups. He will also transform the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budgeting process and promptly address constituent concerns about potholes, drainage, and blighted properties, he pledged. Jonathan Lee, who finished in first place during the primary last year but lost to Lumumba in the primary, declined to run, ending wide speculation whether he would attempt again to capture the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chair. Also, Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon said she was weighing a bid, but would finalize her plans at the end of the week. Watch jfp.ms/politicsblog for breaking updates. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@ jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

by R.L. Nave

9


TALK | city

‘Hot’ Madison Police Pursuit Under Investigation by Haley Ferretti

T

KENYA HUDSON

he Mississippi Bureau of Investiga- are willing to shoot one person they may be A Safety Question tions is reviewing policies of the willing to shoot somebody else. So again, the Vance said that the issue goes beyond Madison Police Department the jurisdictional question; the main after its officers engaged in issue is one of public safety. He said a high-speed pursuit through the JPD limits its pursuits to violent streets of Jackson on Sunday, Feb. crimes. Several police pursuits in 23. The chase of auto-burglary Mississippi over the last few years suspects, which began at the Jackfor suspects in non-violent crimes son Target store at approximately resulted in individuals being injured 2 p.m., caused two auto accidents, or killed. left a bystander in critical condition On the morning of Feb. 5, 2012, and caused $30,000 in damages to a a 38-year-old mother, Milinda Jackson building. Clark, died when a car, containing The Jackson Police Departtwo individuals suspected of stealing ment asked MBI investigate what it about $500 worth of groceries from calls a “hot pursuit chase.” a Ridgeland Kroger, slammed into “Madison police officers enthe woman’s driver’s side door at JPD Assistant Chief Lee Vance says that a recent gaged in a high-chase pursuit withthe intersection of Grants Ferry and car chase the Madison Police Department initiated out the authority or assistance of Highway 25 during the Ridgeland endangered public safety in Jackson. the Jackson Police Department. police’s pursuit of the suspects into The Madison officers had no arrest Rankin County. Both the suspects powers for an alleged crime that ocand the police were driving close to curred in the city of Jackson. There was no public would be in greater danger if someone 100 miles per hour on the busy streets. request for assistance to investigate a crime in was running loose who had just shot someOn Oct. 26, 2013, a teenage girl died Jackson,” JPD said in a statement. body as opposed to if they had broken into in a crash during a police pursuit that ensued JPD Assistant Chief Lee Vance told the somebody’s car.” when a car fled from police at a checkpoint Jackson Free Press that the pursuit proceeded Madison police told the JFP that the in Kosciusko. Just last month, a two-car coldown Interstate 55 onto High Street where suspects involved in the chase were already lision resulted after police chased two teenagthe first accident occurred. The pursuit con- under investigation for a string of auto bur- ers through Starkville for fleeing from police tinued, ending close to South Gallatin Street glaries that took place the Saturday before in on Feb. 19, 2014—then charging them with where the pursuit caused a second accident Madison. The suspects allegedly stole credit felony fleeing from police officers. in which a truck slammed into a building. A cards and used them at a Target store in Advocacy groups such as Chico, Calif.bystander was injured as well. north Jackson that same day. based Voices Insisting on PursuitSAFETY Vance told the Jackson Free Press that That Sunday, Madison police received estimate about one person dies each day in the Madison police pursuit of auto-burglary a call from the Target store’s loss-prevention the U.S. due to police pursuits. suspects was too dangerous for the pursuit of team notifying them that the suspects had These often occur because policies are suspects in a non-violent crime. returned. Upon seeing the Madison police, insufficient and between jurisdictions, and “If there is somebody that we are look- the suspects fled, and the chase ensued. because the public and police officers spend ing for that we end up having to chase beMadison police identified the three too little time considering the consequences cause we know they have just shot somebody, auto-burglary suspects as Lemoyne Rakes and high costs in lives of such pursuits. we are far more prone to chase them than May, 33; James “Joshua” Johnson, 27; and we would somebody that broke into a car,” Yvette Blanchard, 46. Investigators with the Madison Justified? Vance said. “Both are felonies, but the differ- Madison police are currently working to link While the Madison Police Department ence is that the person that shot somebody, the suspects with auto burglaries from their continues its investigation of the auto burcommon sense will basically dictate: If they corresponding jurisdictions. glaries, the Mississippi Bureau of Investiga-

tions is pursuing an independent investigation into the Madison Police Department, as JPD requested. “The Jackson Police Department policy regarding high-chase pursuits takes into consideration the inherent dangers of highspeed chases on the public thoroughfares. The facts that have been presented to date did not show that a criminal act occurred that would justify a high speed chase,” JPD said when announcing the MBI investigation of Madison police. Madison Assistant Chief Robbie Sanders addressed the “justified” question in an interview with the Jackson Free Press. Sanders said that upon Madison officers’ arrival at the Target store, a Jackson police car was already parked in the parking lot. This led Madison police officers to believe that Jackson police were already aware of the situation. Madison dispatch had contacted the Jackson police prior to Madison police’s arrival, Sanders said. However, Jackson police say that Madison made no request for assistance to investigate a crime in Jackson and that JPD officers were only contacted after Madison police were already on the scene at the Target store and initiating a high-speed chase. “What it really comes down to is the safety of the public,” Vance said. “That’s our number-one concern.” Vance said that although he cannot speculate on how Madison police made their decisions that day, he believes police officers must abide by safe pursuit policies. “This reminds me again of why most police departments have strict policies in relation to these things and strict guidelines that must be followed so that the public is not put in any unnecessary danger,” Vance said. “That’s the basis of most policies relating to these types of pursuits. Is what you’re chasing this person for worth putting the public in some type of risk?”

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LEGISLATURE: Week 9

La Familia by R.L. Nave

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the legislation unnecessary. “I’ve been a union person all my life. … I’ve even picketed. As of today, most pickets are peaceful.” The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which represents many of the nation’s largest companies, is pushing for the legislation. Robert Shaffer, president of the Mississippi AFL-CIO union federation, told the Associated Press: “They’re over there passing laws to keep people beat down when they make a pitiful wage.”

A Flood of Uncertainty Officials with the RankinHinds Pearl River Flood and Drainage Control District (levee board) are concerned about a bill the Mississippi House is considering. The legislation would lump levee districts in with counties and municipalities and place them under the direction of the Mississippi Emergency Bill Chandler calls anti-union legislation passed Management Agency in times by the Mississippi Senate and House is an affront of emergencies. to activists who fought to equal treatment during Keith Turner, leveeFreedom Summer of 1964. board attorney, said the bill is vague. Turner said the levee Representatives advanced several bills that board works with the U.S. Army Corps would restrict labor unionizing and picket- of Engineers during flood events, and it’s ing activities, which Chandler called an “at- unclear how the proposal would affect tack on the democracy.” that relationship. Those measures include Senate Bill “Are we for it or against it?” asked Flo2473, the “Prohibition Against Employer wood Mayor Gary Rhoads, who also preIntimidation Act,” which would make it ille- sides over the levee board. gal during a unionizing campaign to coerce “It’s unclear, so I’d suggest we’d be a business into signing a neutrality or card against it,” Turner told the board. check agreement (as opposed to holding secret ballot votes). Expanding Health Care, SB 2653 restricts mass picketing of Just not Medicaid a residence or place of business and clears The Legislature continued throwing some legal roadblocks to obtaining a court money at health-care centers, apparently to injunction against such demonstrations. Fi- give the appearance that they’re taking care nally, the House version of SB 2797 requires of citizens’ health-care needs while continuthe Legislature to approve certain agreements ing to resist Medicaid expansion. between businesses and labor unions. The House passed its version of SB “It’s an insult to the work that people 2117, which creates the Mississippi Qualified did 50 years ago,” Chandler told the Jackson Health Center Incubator Grant Program. Free Press. The program sets aside $3.2 million per year Robert Moses talked about those goals to increase “access to care to uninsured or of Freedom Summer in a speech at Stanford medically indigent patients in Mississippi.” University in 1964. “If we gain the right to Some Democrats lawmakers have picket in integrated picket lines, then labor groaned that the amount is too small to have unions will gain the right to picket in inte- a widespread impact, but the bill passed grated picket lines in Mississippi,” said Mo- 112-0 anyway. ses, then the field secretary for the Student The House also passed SB 2829, which Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. “And, permits 15 regional community mental possibly, the trade unions and UAW (United health centers in Mississippi to offer primary Auto Workers) and the Teamsters and the care services to patients, but the bill does not labor unions will move into Mississippi and appropriate any money for what could be a begin to organize working people.” massive medical-services expansion. During debate on the House floor, Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Rep. Oscar Denton, D-Vicksburg, called Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

58;< <DB82 jacksonfreepress.com

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ill Chandler, a veteran labor organizer, says it’s ironic that during this 50th-year commemoration of Freedom Summer, when activists descended on Mississippi to demand fairness and equal rights for black citizens, which included the right to organize labor unions— that Mississippi legislators are trying to turn back the clock on those gains for workers. Last week, the Mississippi House of

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Free-the-Land Man (For Chokwe Lumumba) by C. Liegh McInnis Just like a river that knows where it’s going, your feet have kept you like the Wise Men headed for the North star. There was no fat cat with pockets full enough. There was no pothole deep enough. There was no curve, bend, or speed bump in the road to keep you from arriving at your destination. You are a steamroller grinding angry asphalt into smooth street, making rough roads ready for revolution to ride to town. You are the cement foundation upon which we build our freedom house. You are the forest of fruit from which we may find nourishment from the fangs of poverty. You are the fortified fortress that protects us from the vandals of industry. You are the ocean of hope in which we swim to safety. A Detroit demolition man destroying the dragons of self-hate so that self-determination can fertilize the community into a bouquet of spring flowers.

March 12 - 18, 2014

Better than Superman, you be Free-the-Land Man. Able to leap skyscrapers of injustice in a single bound and slam dunk the lies about us through the hoop of truth. Able to slay slimy Judges with a lightning rod of litigation Faster than a speeding bullet, you erased the “t” from can’t, making us a city of can. And stronger than a locomotive, you broke through the barriers that have kept us herded like cattle, unshackling our dreams from the dungeon of Dixiecrats A liberation lawyer willing to lumberjack the liars who attempt to lay waste to the lives of rainbow children. More than a mouthpiece for a moment, You welded words into stainless steel to slash the noose of oppression from the wretched of the earth. Even when bad times became storm clouds blocking the sun, you were a lighthouse leading people to the land of liberty. Whether it’s planting proper seeds into your sons so that they can sprout into life-giving trees, or being an architect for your daughter giving her the blueprint of properly engineered manhood, you are a brick wall that protects all families from the wolves, thieves, and pimps that lurk like fungus in the pit of the night.

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One of the Chief Captains of the Justice League of Super Negroes— more amazing than Spiderman, you be Anansi the word weaver spinning webs to stop the wicked from stampeding our sanity, more fantastic than the four, our shining Dark Knight of Democracy freeing the land from monstrous mercantile Magnetos. When my mild mannered mayor removed his suit there was MXG on his chest and instead of a Batsignal when we needed him we simply shined NAPO in the sky but the feet-washer that he was kept him Assembled among the People our own Afro-American Robin Hood who was more Daring than those Mississippi Devils Now that your spirit finally became too big for your body, you are a pulsar that will forever illuminate our path to justice. Poet and fiction writer C. Liegh McInnis, the editor of Black Magnolias, read this poem at Mayor Lumumba’s Celebration of Life on March 8.

Stop Endangering Lives with ‘Hot’ Police Pursuits

I

n 2012, young mother Milinda Clark was hit by a car going 100 miles per hour in a Flowood intersection and killed. Why? Police from Madison County were chasing people they suspected of stealing groceries from the Ridgeland Kroger through crowded suburban streets in broad daylight. Two weeks ago, Madison police got a call from the Jackson Target about auto-burglary suspects who might be using stolen credit cards there. The officers showed up and began chasing the suspects deep into Jackson in what the Jackson Police Department called “hot” pursuit, causing two accidents, injuring an innocent bystander and causing $30,000 worth of damage to a local building. Those two instances had two major things in common besides the fact that they seemed at the behest of a big-box stores: First, none of the suspects was suspected of actually hurting a person, which might justify such a TV-drama police chase. Second, they both caused much more damage than the people were actually accused of inflicting. Oh, and a third one: The police response was dumb, overblown and very dangerous to public safety. Here in Jackson, the police department has caught up with modern criminal-justice best practices based on the reality that high-speed police pursuits must be limited to situations where the risk of not pursuing is higher than the risk

of a pursuit. As you can read in Haley Ferretti’s report on page 10, JPD has paid attention to the dangers of pursuits and the research showing how often high-speed pursuits kill people (averaging one life a day nationally). Meantime, suburban law-enforcement agencies continue to conduct themselves in a wildwild-west fashion, seeming to think that any crime merits the police barreling through streets chasing down the suspect like Keystone cops—except that these chases aren’t funny. Ask the family of Milinda Clark and others right here in the metro who have lost loved ones to such chases. Adding insult to injury, suburban cops seem to think they have the right to leave their jurisdiction and endanger lives in nearby towns and communities as well. This cannot continue. JPD rightly asked the Mississippi Bureau of Investigations to look into this clearly unnecessary police pursuit—based on the facts the Madison police themselves provided. In addition, members of the public must become educated about the risks of high-speed pursuits—before losing an innocent loved one—and demand loudly that these suburban agencies move into the 21st century. They must adopt smart police-pursuit policies with teeth, and then reveal them to the public on demand. They work for us, and they are supposed to protect our safety, not endanger it.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to 125 South Congress Street, Suite 1324, Jackson, Mississippi 39201. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn” and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


Business to Business Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer EDITORIAL News Editor R.L. Nave Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Nicole Wyatt Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Ronni Mott, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Editorial Interns Brittany Sanford, Demetrice Sherman Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Zilpha Young Graphic Design Intern Jesse Flowers Staff Photographer/VideographerTrip Burns Photographer Tate K. Nations ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Assistant to the Publisher Leslie La Cour Operations Assistant Caroline Lacy Crawford Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper, Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press 125 South Congress Street, Suite 1324 Jackson, Mississippi 39201 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com

The Jackson Free Press is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2014 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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I

walked the entire Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade route last year. Literallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the entire lay of the land. That was my goal. But first, I had to park. As I zoomed past the High Street and Pearl Street exits, I saw cars lined up to enter the parade. Not for me. I knew I could not go wrong by taking the back way under the Stack. Trying to fool the 60,000-plus cars trying to park, I got off at the State Street exit on Interstate 20 West. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so smart. Not. A train was barreling down the track, blocking my destination. Looking at cars turning around, I had to think fast. I advanced toward Gallatin Street, and then I saw my first passageway. The graffiti-splattered steel bridge under the tracks was my first window toward downtown. I looked down South Street and spotted a rustier bridge. Under the tracks I went. I was now just blocks away from downtown. OK. I had found the golden entrance. But as I passed, I saw parked cars everywhere. I was so late. If I got one more text from my friends asking where I was â&#x20AC;Ś I saw a man letting people park for $10. I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t falling for this. Everyone else found a free spot, so I passed him up, sure I could find a free parking space. But then, I saw in front of me, about a half block down South Street on the left, a lanky man holding up his hand. Curious, I drove closer. Shoving my left hand out my window, I spread my fingers as wide as they could go, and we connected. I felt like I was in New York. He looked at me, eye to eye, without any hesitation to direct me to a parking space. I pulled in. The spring-clover-covered parking lot was actually a rundown field and the back yard of an abandoned building. The land had limited space, yet this man was making it happen. As I entered, I suddenly felt wrangled and trapped as I drove my Ford Expedition far back into the lot. I thought I would never get out. As I passed him, halfway hanging out my window, I stopped and asked him, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sir, can I get out of here when I am ready to leave?â&#x20AC;? He said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sure, but you need to back up in this space. It would help.â&#x20AC;? Two more cars pulled into the lot, wanting to know where to park. I felt

even more trappedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;more cars in this money-making pit. It was a very sardinelike moment. I sat in my car, still wanting the assurance of an exit. Then, the man and his counterparts placed orange cones at the front entrance. I was not sure if he knew the car count, but he had made an executive decision. After the last two cars behind me entered, he shut down the space. He knew his lot was full. No more revenue. This man was a true entrepreneur. He knew his limits. As I got out of my car, I walked toward him. With a very calming look on his face, he assured me that I could exit at any time. He was customer-focused. I handed him $5 for the fee, then I rushed to the parade. In my hurried state to get to the event, I forgot my cell phone. I realized it after walking several blocks already. I had to go back. I was not happy, and I was still late. Mad at myself, I walked back to my car, passing all kinds of parade-goers that were happily prancing towards the parade,. As I grudgingly walked back to the lot, the man asked me if I needed help getting out of my space. He thought I was leaving, but I told him I had left my phone. I did not need his help; yet, he was so nice and accommodating. What a great entrepreneur, I thought. He set me up for exit success and asked if I needed help as I passed him up to retrieve my phone, so I stopped to show him I appreciated his genuine concern. I extended my hand in gratitude, his very long fingers wrapped around my whole hand. We shook. We did the businessman eye-to-eye look â&#x20AC;Ś entrepreneur to entrepreneur. He knew kindness and respected his clients. He was there for me when I was in doubt of his product. Finding customer service in the deep bowels of our beloved Jackson was peaceful. Jackson is a melting pot of diversity. We are a â&#x20AC;&#x153;familyâ&#x20AC;? in this great city. We celebrate one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most populous and widespread parades and understand we are all the same. Oh, the parade was fantastic, but if I get one more text asking where I am â&#x20AC;Ś David Joseph is the operations manager of the Jackson Free Press.

Jackson is a melting pot of diversity. We are a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in this great city.

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The JFP Interview with

Malcolm White

Directorof

I

Optimism

March 12 - 18, 2014

t took Malcolm White a few years to find the right place to anchor his St. Patrick’s Day parade. The first year, 1983, White and his friends started at CS’s and paraded to George Street. The second year, CS’s dropped out, and White and his fellow revelers started and ended at George Street. At one point, they set up shop at the state fairgrounds. “We stayed down there for a number of years, but it never felt right. It didn’t have an ambiance to it. It was cold and institutional,” White said. But when White and his brother, Hal, got the lease to the old railroad depot building on Commerce Street and turned it into Hal & Mal’s, White moved parade operations to the restaurant. “We headquartered it here just because it made perfect sense for everything that we were doing to have a physical place … so it would have an address, so that we could have offices and phone lines and bathrooms and infrastructure,” White said. Over the years, Mal’s parade has grown into the third largest St. Patrick’s Day parade in the nation and the single largest annual event in the Jackson metropolitan area. Its success, combined with White’s experience planning other major events, led him to join the Mississippi Arts Commission as in 2005, after Hurricane Katrina wrecked the Coast and, along with it, the region’s arts economy (and his second home there). In 2013, Gov. Phil Bryant appointed White to heard the tourism division within the Mississippi Development Authority. Recently, White talked with the JFP at Hal & Mal’s, the restaurant he started with his brother, who passed away in 2013, about tourism, the future of the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade and how each is vital to telling the whole Mississippi story.

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The parade started with you and your friends and has grown into this huge organism with lots of moving parts. How has the parade changed in terms of the planning that goes into it?

When I created it, I was in the business of creating events. It performed precisely as envisioned. As the years went on, I never envisioned that I would

by R.L. Nave

leave the private sector and go into the public sector. I never thought about running the (Mississippi) arts commission or being the state tourism director. That was never even a remote thought. So that evolution has changed a lot about the way I think about it. I have a full-time job. My brother has passed, and we’re into the next generation now of family that runs this place, and I’m frankly looking eagerly to the day when the parade is in the second generation. I have worked for years with the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau, Downtown Jackson Partners and honestly anybody who would talk to me about forming some sort of next generation for the parade. But the bottom line is that nobody wants to work that hard. No one wants to take the responsibility, and it falls on me every year. If I didn’t do it, nobody would do it. I have a team of a lot of people. I do big ideas, and they do all the small details. We have multiple partners. Ardenland is a partner in the concert. Charley Abraham is one of the managing partners in the parade. Blair Batson Hospital for Children is a partner in the run, the fundraising, the registration of the floats. The city’s a partner in inspecting the floats. The fire department is involved in the inspection. The county’s involved in the cleanup. I bring a guy to run the children’s festival. There’s a staff of probably 20 key people that do key things that keep me from having to do it all. The restaurant does a lot in terms of the street after-party and Arden (Barnett) puts on the music. These are volunteers?

Oh, yes. There’s no full-time person responsible. It’s not a full-time job. When I started it, I had a company called Malcolm White Productions. This is one of the many things I did. I did Jubilee! JAM, I did Zoo Blues, I did Wellsfest. I had a portfolio (of events) … all over the state and down into Florida, and what I did was produce events, do fundraisers, book banks. My brother and I did this. But a decade ago, I got into public service and started to phase myself out of all of this stuff.

What was the thinking behind that? I can’t imagine public service was more lucrative.

No, I took a huge pay cut. I went into state service because of Hurricane Katrina. My vision was that if the lower six counties of Mississippi were going to recover and re-envision themselves, then the art story piece had to be a huge part of that. And that was the reason I wanted to work at the Arts Commission. I planned on doing three years; I stayed seven. Then I was offered this opportunity to lead the tourism office, and I thought it was a logical next step for me, so I’m still going. In that role, Mississippi?

what’s

your

sales

pitch

for

Our sales pitch is that Mississippi is an authentic, real place. The experiences that you can have here are unique and unparalleled—whether it’s music, literature, architecture or food. Civil War. Civil Rights. The arts, sacred spaces, film … it’s a unique and curious place. It has abundant natural resources. It has an embarrassment of riches of a cultural story to tell. It’s unparalleled in the number of musicians we produce, the number of writers we produce, sports figures we produce. It’s a fascinating, powerful place. As James Meredith said, Mississippi is the most powerful word in the English language. No one says “Mississippi,” and there’s no reaction. So my job is to encourage people to visit Mississippi. And, I think, to get them here, they have to rethink it. My job is about rethinking Mississippi. The way we intend to do that is by telling the whole truth, nothing but the truth and being honest about all of it. We’re just as interested in civil rights tours as we are in golf tours. Our hardest job is to get people to come here the first time. But (once) we get people here the first time, we usually can get them back. My job is to get more people to come here and get them to stay longer. So we’ve got to promote our natural resources, we’ve got to promote our great culture. We’ve got to be open-minded about our past and include that as part of the story. We can’t just leave out the 20th century. It’s a difficult but fascinating opportunity. If it were easy, I wouldn’t have been interested. It’s hard, and we have a lot of competition. Missis-


The children of brothers Malcolm and Hal White took over running Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s after Halâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death in 2013. Now, Malcolm (pictured) is also looking for a new generation to take on his popular Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade.

What kind of number are we talking about?

Three million dollars. The next closest is about $8 million, $8.5 million. Part of the challenge is trying to tell the story and not really having any resources to tell it with. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine. I accepted the job knowing this. So what I look at is social media, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s affordable, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s real time. (I look at) promoting what we have and starting to recognize who our new visitors are. The current visitor to Mississippi is 52 years old ,and they stay 2.5 days. I want them to stay longer and start coming earlier. I think international (tourism) is a great opportunity for us. Interestingly, when you say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? people in Iowa will have an opinion. If you say it in Germany, not so much. Germany has a past that ours pales compared to, in terms of struggle. They understand struggle; they understand civil war. They know oppression. They know evolution. But internally, in the United States, Mississippi can be a tough sell. Externally, not so much. You mention Mississippi in Asia or Europe, they know about the river, they know about the blues, and they know a little bit about the civil-rights stuff. But theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re intrigued and curious as opposed to turned off and appalled. We have to focus on regional promotion. We want people from Texas and Tennessee and Florida and Arkansas to come. And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to get some people from New York and some people from California and from the Great Lakes. But I am more focused on Canada and Europe for new growth. Canadians can drive here, and their golf courses are frozen, and their food is rather bland, and they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the blues. But they want the blues. Europeans, Canadians, Asians know more about American music than the average Mississippians, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the birthplace of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the Blues Trail has been so successful, the country music trail and the freedom trail and some of those projects. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the B.B. King Museum is so important, the Grammy Museum is so important.

Mississippi is building the only other Grammy Museum outside of Los Angeles, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because we have more Grammy winners. We spend a lot of time allowing other people to tell our story and getting it wrong the whole time and poor-mouthing ourselves and selling ourselves short. I think we have a very powerful and compelling story to tell, and I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time we got busy telling it. Once we agreeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if we can agree collectivelyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;what that story is, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of power in that.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re inviting people to paddle and to camp, bird watch and get outside. Our barrier islands are an amazing resource, the Mississippi River is an amazing resource. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re finally getting outfitters set up so they can have a Mississippi River experience. The Natchez Trace is covered in bicyclists. People come from all over the world to ride the Natchez Trace. These are gigantic assets that we have. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never done a good job of promoting them.

So developing international tourist interest is your main focus?

A lot of people might be surprised, that as a Mississippi state official, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re willing to talk about the uglier parts of our history along with the positives.

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an initiative for Europe, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an initiative for Canada, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an initiative for Asia. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all culturally different. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big, and it all requires resources and manpower, which weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re short on. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really focused on 2014 as the year of the creative economy in Mississippi. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re launching this Mississippi homecoming campaign, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about how we tell our story and celebrating the things that are uniquely Mississippi. And inviting people to come and visit. We target successful creative Mississippians like Morgan Freeman and ask them to help bring people here. We target musicians and celebrity chefs and invite them home and celebrate creativity. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a state-supported initiative, from the governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office down to the local CVBs (convention and visitors bureaus). And then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all building toward 2017, when the state celebrates its bicentennial, 200 years of statehood. This summer, we celebrate Freedom Summer. We commemorated the Evers assassination, Freedom Riders. We treat all of that as part and parcel of our story. Mississippi has the last free-flowing, unimpeded river system in the United States. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called the Pascagoula River system and, for the outdoor enthusiastic, this a crown jewel.

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the director of optimism. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe you can tell part of a story and expect people to trust you. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got tell it all. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to tell the Emmett Till story as well as the John Grisham story. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a huge story to tell. Oprah Winfrey is a story of success; Medgar Evers is a story of disgrace, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re both stories we have to tell. The Jimmy Buffet story a lot of people think is really interesting. There are so many things that people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even realize. The way Americans eat, and this whole phenomenon of the celebrity chef (that the Food Network has furthered) was created by three people: Julia Child, James Beard and a guy named Craig Claiborne. And Craig Claiborne is from the Mississippi Delta. One of the three people who have changed the way that Americans think about food was from Mississippi. He was the first food editor and food critic for The New York Times, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big deal. PRUH0$/&2/0VHHSDJH

jacksonfreepress.com

sippi has the smallest advertising and promotion budget than any other state in the union by a long shot. We are tiny; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s miniscule.

15


0$/&2/0 IURPSDJH

America gets credit for creating three art forms: modern dance, movie making, and jazz or American music. One out of the three came out of Mississippi. What kinds of supports are there for someone who, say, has an idea for the next Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade or similar arts events?

March 12 - 18, 2014

We don’t take just anybody off the street who has a big idea. If someone comes to us with a fully fleshed-out business plan (for) a tourism-related project that looks like it can employ a significant number of people, that can create change, then sure. But government’s role is not to be in the big-idea business. Government’s role is to support people who have big ideas. And sometimes support doesn’t mean a grant. Sometimes support means infrastructure, connecting dots and honoring—the year of the creative economy is about honoring creatives. (Like) Jim Henson, who is from Leland, Miss., who created the Muppets and Sesame Street and single-handedly taught more people to read and write than all institutions of education collectively, in my opinion, through his puppets and through his television presence. He didn’t come to the MDA and say, “I’ve got this idea about the Muppets,” but he was encouraged through teachers and his family to be imaginative. Then you go back and celebrate his accomplishments and to encourage other people to dream up big ideas. The MDA is a large government agency that is not as flexible and nimble as, say, Hal & Mal’s. But by the same token, its role is to grow the economy and create jobs and create opportunities, whether its in film or its in creative economy, manufacturing, the health-care industry. So we are a place where ideas become realities and industries are launched— sometimes organically, and sometimes with us as their partner. My job in tourism is about promoting tourism-based businesses and encouraging people to come. Anybody brings me a big idea about a tourism event, I’m very interested.

16

program where we fund all sorts of festivals and events around the state, from literary to music to civil war and civil rights stuff, arts festivals. There’s a group that wants to start a book festival, and we’re very supportive. We helped them get started, given them some seed funding, sit on their committees ... some day we hope to have a book

I don’t believe you can tell part of a story and expect people to trust you. You’ve got tell it all.

festival in Mississippi, and we can say we’ve done our part to support it.

Is the climate today better than when you started?

You mentioned the next generation, in terms of the parade. Do you have plans for that?

Yeah. When I started the St. Paddy’s Parade, my contact was not the state tourism office. My contact was the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau. When I first started, the CVB helped me. They don’t anymore, and they shouldn’t. I’m a fully mature event: 32 years, 75,000 people. They need to be seed-funding somebody else. The state is there and available to help people with idea. We have a grant

If I knew the answer to that, I would have already put it in place. As I’ve mentioned, I’ve approached the (Convention and Visitors Bureau), Downtown Jackson Partners, and any other group I thought might have the bandwidth, range, capacity and ability to take it on. The city’s not the right entity. It’s probably going to have to be a group of family, some of these people who help manage


TRIP BURNS

Do you think you’ll stick it out in public service for a while?

Yeah. I don’t have a plan for how long I want to be there. Like I said, I went in with a plan of staying three years, and I just entered my eighth. I’ll stay as long as I think I can make a difference. Is that why you’ve stayed so long— because you feel like you’re making a difference? Malcolm White, I feel like progress is being made. Take Mississippi’s tourism the notion of the creative economy as an exdirector and Mal’s St. ample. We did a study in 2011 when I was at Paddy’s Parade creator, believes both the bitter the Arts Commission to look at creative class and sweet parts of and creative enterprises in Mississippi. From the state’s history are that, I’m now in a position to work with the potential selling points. governor and have him declare the year of the creative economy and Mississippi homecoming. That is a progression of success. The Blues Trail is probably the most successful initiative that the state of Mississippi has achieved, culturally, in my lifetime. The creation of win-win-win. We’re going to build a civil-rights museum this trail, leading people to museums, leading people to and a new history museum. We’ll be the only state in communities—the telling of the story of the birthplace of the union that has a state-supported civil-rights museum. America’s music. The B.B. King museum, the Grammy We’ve invested in interpretive centers for the Emmett Till museum, the Elvis Presley birthplace. This is a gigantic murder up in the Delta. We’ve invested in commemoratglobal story that we have finally figured out how to tell. ing the life of Medgar Evers, and working to make his This trail leads people all over the state to share the good home a visitor’s center. We are so on the right track here news, and it builds civic pride. It is a win-win-win-win- for telling the whole story and getting it right. The Unit-

ed States Poet Laureate is from Gulfport. That is a big damn deal—that Natasha Trethewey grew up and became the poet laureate of the United States of America. Gigantic. We need to be celebrating that. That’s a big story. We spend more time talking about what we don’t have than talking about what we do have. My vision has always been to take this success we’ve had in the creative sector and use it to reinvent ourselves, to tell ourselves, to re-educate our children. I always say that Mississippi is first on every list we want to be last on and last on every list we want to be first on. And we need to change that. That is about teacher pay raises, but it’s also about acknowledging Freedom Summer. It is about jobs, but it’s also about AIDS. And as the tourism director, I get to take it all on and talk about all of it, and have some influence and some impact. The way I do that is through the storytelling. Mississippi is 2.9 million storytellers—we’re all good storytellers. We need to use that ability that we have to encourage people to come visit us, to teach, to love each other, to care about each other. I just think that if we’re celebrating St. Paddy’s Day or the ribbon cutting on a civilrights museum, this is all really rich soil that we have an opportunity to plow together. Man, if we ever get right, we’re going to be hell on wheels. Medgar Evers used to say, Mississippi is going to be a great place when ... when people are treated fairly, when we are able to heal the past. That was 50 years ago, and it’s still true. I was talking to Myrlie Evers (Medgar’s widow) yesterday, and she said, “I came home to be a part of the new Mississippi. I came home so we could get it right.” I’m just on a big team of people who are trying to get it right and trying to put a positive spin on in, but no smoke and mirrors. No sweeping. Just telling it the way it is. That’s why I’m still here. (For) optimists like me, it doesn’t take a lot of success to keep us motivated. Comment at jfp.ms.

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it. The truth is, I don’t know. I’ve been trying to figure that out. Now that the next generation is here, it would be logical for them to take it over—my daughter, my brother’s son, his daughter and her husband. That’s who’s running this place and I would assume they would eventually take a leadership role in the parade. Like I said, we’ve got these other partners—Arden Barnett, Charley Abraham, Bob McFarland. The hospital itself—they do a lot. They organize the run, they organize the registration of the floats. And the city does a lot. It’s just having somebody to manage all that, and I think we’re getting closer to (figuring out) who that’s going to be.

17


The Southern Survivalist’s Guide to St. Paddy’s (Or, ‘Let’s Go Drinking, Mississippi’) by Molly Lehmuller

H

ow would you prepare for a zombie apocalypse? The essentials, right? A backpack, filled with water and nutritious non-perishables. An emergency communication device. A map. Weaponry. A pair of sturdy shoes. For walking the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade—a Mardi Gras-style festival held in downtown Jackson each March for more than three decades—and the subsequent afternoon and evening revelries, I advise you to strap up much the same as you would to fight the zombies. Now, I’m not telling you to bone up on “Survivor Man” episodes, but I’ve been burned at one too many outdoor celebrations by heat, low blood sugar, dehydration and the subsequent shenanigans that result from treating your body a little too rough. I’ve been getting to the parade under my own steam (well, generally—thanks for pushing me up State in the shopping cart, Wade!) for the past four

LINE UP

KENNY BROWN

you are walking downtown on your own, the location of your allies (or friends-offriends-of-friends) is valuable intel if you’re suddenly overcome by crowds or you run out of Lucky Town. Make sure you know of at least one tailgate, tent, port-o-potty, or street corner controlled by friends, family or an employer.

Rendezvous: My old home in Belhaven,

Outfitting: Do your damndest to blend

across from Baptist Hospital, was the perfect rendezvous, organization and replenishment point for friends from all over the metro area. I advise you make friends NOW with someone who lives within one or two miles of the parade route—a place to park your car, leave unwanted beads, refrigerate leftovers and adult beverages, etc.

in. The individuals who now populate the downtown of our capital city are coated in fabrics, paint, imitation hair and plastic objects in every lurid shade of green. Don’t be afraid to go to extreme measures to match their newfound devotion, as the more outlandish the outerwear, the greater likelihood you’ll seamlessly integrate your-

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March 12 - 18, 2014

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18

Allies: Do not go to this parade alone. If

years. I highly recommend walking or biking to downtown from a nearby neighborhood, if the option’s available to you (kids, crutches and puppies might need closer dropoff points). It’s often faster than finding a parking place if you’re coming from the ’burbs, and if it’s warm and sunny, you can think of it as your most enjoyable workout of the year. Here is my survivalist’s checklist to having the best time at Jackson’s biggest party (RIP Jubilee! JAM).


Of great import is your ruck. I advise procuring one of those free drawstring backpacks (the kind given away by sports-drink companies or at college fairs) or other inexpensive backpack to carry keys, consumables, a small wallet and any other desired provisions. The rucksack can be deposited in a friend’s home or vehicle if you grow weary of it, and the small wallet maintained about one’s person. Comm devices: Even

though the parade doesn’t attract crowds at New Orleans Mardi Gras levels, anyone who’s been to an Ole Miss-LSU game or similar crowded, compact venue can attest to their cell phone losing service due to a high volume of users, or else draining its battery searching for signal in its owner’s pockets. Write down the phone number of at least one responsible ally, or that of the administrator of your recon point (above), so that you’ll be able to communicate from a public phone if yours dies unexpectedly. Sustenance: Hydration is

key. If you don’t partake in alcohol, skip down to “personal defense.” If you do, here are my top sources of liquid sustenance along the main route to the parade: backpack beer, tailgate beer and bars-along-the-roadway beer. According to my extensive research, green beer—available only during mid-March, due to the annual algal growth in underground beer caverns from whence most major breweries harvest their product—is the most nutritious. However, man cannot live by ale alone, so tote a bottle of water or two in your ruck, and drink from it at least every half-hour to prevent possible evening coma-naps. Avoiding the catatonia and eventual deep nappage that occurs around 5:30 p.m. on parade day, accompany water with a nutritious mini-meal. In past years, my go-tos were peanut butter and sliced apple sandwiches (which never seem to go bad despite

heat and weight displacement) and balance bars. They’re good to share, especially when you see a fellow survivalist worn down with sun- and Special K breakfast-fatigue around 2:45 p.m. Street vendors, bars and restaurants on the parade route and your walking itinerary will offer superior food, but I find I forget to eat at St. Paddy’s unless my snack is immediately at hand. Restoration and reinforcement: It’s been a

long, hot day, and once the parade is over, you might, depending on your location when the parade ends, make your way to the nearest eatery or home kitchen for a fortifying “linner” meal, accompanied by more water. Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification St.), Jaco’s Tacos (318 S. State St.), and Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St.) are all great nearby choices. For dessert, split a small can of Red Bull or a Diet Coke to stay awake on a full belly. If you return to your home or rendezvous point afterward, wash up and choose a new nighttime outfit that isn’t soaked in sweat and acrylic paint. Charge your phone and contact friends and family to create a tentative schedule for the night, which may include another meal, a get-together at one’s house or bar-hopping. Or all three. If you need a little time to be a rugged individualist after suffering a mob of strangers to touch your bare arms, the end of the night is drawing near, and you find yourself unable to extricate yourself from a social situation, order the smelliest thing on the menu to passively but effectively rid yourself of hangers-on. For me, it’s the Scotch egg at Fenian’s—I almost lost some dear friends with the initial order. Personal safety: As I’ve

emphasized the convenience and pleasantness of walking to and fro the parade site, it must be said that, as with any large, public celebration, be on your guard. At night, if you choose to walk more than a few blocks, stay in well-lit areas and on busy streets, and try to travel with other like-minded individuals. Sometimes large crowds attract unsavory characters, so be aware of yourself and your surroundings. Having a destination and someone expecting you there can make all the difference between a fun night and toned legs, and getting lost and spending the night huddled under the lights of the drivethrough at the State Street McDonald’s.

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self into the parade experience. You’ll get sweaty very quickly if the sun’s out, so factor that into whatever plush chicken suit you’re considering renting. Since you’ll be walking, comfortable and sturdy boots or tennis shoes are essential … wearing your foam pool flipflops on hot concrete in a crowd brings a new scope to the phrase “there will be blood.”

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PRESENTS:

St. Paddy’s Day d ow n t ow n t h r ow d ow n & dance party

March 12 - 18, 2014

SM

20


Girl About Town’s

1.

Kick things off (but not too hard).Friday night is

the Marching MALfunctions Second Line Stomp. For this event, the marching krewes invite anyone who wants to participate to gather at the King Edward Hotel at 5 p.m. and march to Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.) for a party. It’s a festive way to start the weekend, but Saturday is the main event. I generally march in the stomp, but I head home by 8 p.m. so I don’t wear myself out.

2.

Ready supplies and start hydrating. Friday

night, I purchase adult beverages and mixers, bottled water, snacks, ice, sunscreen—all the parade necessities I don’t want to purchase in the morning when I’m dressed up like a crazy person. Also, on Friday night I assemble my traditional food contribution to the morning’s pre-parade gathering.

anything with a stiletto, giant wedge, ankle strap that will cut into you, or flip-flops (all those people who wear them regardless of the drink spillage everywhere, gross). Converse Chuck Taylors are an excellent option, providing comfort, coverage and a hipster style element.

5. A seasoned veteran of the Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade day, Girl About Town Julie Skipper shares her tips for making the most of it.

3.

It’s the big day! I wake up way before my alarm

like a kid on Christmas morning, and the hardest part is to wait until a decent hour to head outside. Luckily, if you’re an early riser, you can participate in or watch the 5K (though I definitely don’t run on parade day).

4.

by Julie Skipper

Get dressed. On this one day of the year (and

only this one day), I strongly advocate putting comfort before fashion when it comes to footwear. Standing—or marching—for a long time, with a lot of people, requires practicality. Don’t wear stupid shoes unless you want to be utterly miserable. I consider “stupid” parade shoes

Drink water. My parade-day rule is to refrain

from any adult beverage before 10 a.m. The goal is to not peak too early and miss out on the street party. Generally, a group of downtowners and their friends enjoys a pre-parade gathering on the balcony of the Electric Building (308 E. Pearl St.), so I go to that for some green eggs and ham, green cookies, green, well, everything. Last year, I was invited to join the marching krewe the Nugget League of Mayhem, so now parade morning includes going to Hal & Mal’s to meet the girls to dress, mingle with the other marching krewes and line up for the parade.

6. 7.

Parade time! Have fun, catch beads, kiss an

O’Tuxer and dance. Practice patience when trying to get into the street party afterwards. The line is long

but worth it. Know that the staff at Hal & Mal’s prepares for this day like it’s their Olympics. It’s crazy, it’s crowded, but they will get you what you need.

jacksonfreepress.com

al’s St. Paddy’s Parade day is one of my favorite days in Jackson. To some, it’s just an excuse to day drink, and that’s fine (as long as you imbibe responsibly and don’t drive home). But what makes it special to me is that it’s all about celebrating our city in an irreverent, fun spirit and in an environment where everyone is welcome. That being said, the day is a marathon, not a sprint, so it’s important to have a plan. Herewith is my approach, honed over years of trial and error.

TRIP BURNS

M

St. Paddy’s Plan

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WHAT’S

When

E Capito

& Where

Governo r’s Mansion

l St

E Amite

S State

E Pearl St

Friday, March 14, 2014 r St

10 a.m. - Pet Parade on S. Lamar

Street in front of the Mississippi Museum of Art.

E South

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16 WAPT & BankPlus Children’s Parade & Festival

Buckethead Judges Stand

5K Run/Walk Start & End

ue to the construction on E. Capitol Street underway to make the street two-way, the St. Paddy’s Parade route is changing this year. The parade will start at the corner of State and Court streets as usual. As floats and marchers make their way up State Street, they will hook a left on Pearl Street rather than continuing to Capitol.

mar Street in front of the Mississippi Museum of Art. 1 p.m. - Parade begins. After Parade - Street Dance (no

coolers or pets) at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). Gates open at 4 p.m. Ages 18 and up, please.

on St

Parade Route

D

11 a.m. - Children’s Parade on S. La-

St

S Jeffers

9 a.m. - 16 WAPT & Bank Plus

ce St

(5K run/walk, 1 mile fun run) at the Jackson Convention Complex.

S Commer

S West St

8 a.m. - Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade Race

Tombigb ee

St

7 a.m. - Float lineup begins.

MS Museu m of Art

S State

Cou rt S t

S Congre

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Children’s Festival on S. Lamar Street in front of the Mississippi Museum of Art.

ula St

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Thalia Mara Hall

ent St

Planetarium

S Presid

S Lam a

S Farish St

Convention Center

E Pearl St

Hal & Mal’s Restaurant

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Commerce St

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This means, among other things, the popular watch locations in front of the Governor’s Mansion and along that street will be off route this year. In addition, the Buckethead Judges will be stationed in front of the Jackson Convention Complex rather than in front of the Capitol. Construction is scheduled to finish this year, so the route will likely be back to business as usual next year.

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GEEK p 28

The Ultimate Comfort Food by Kathleen M. Mitchell

FLICKR/DASPUNKT

O

Beef and Guinness Stew Ingredients:

3 tablespoons olive oil 2 pounds boneless chuck roast, cut into 1-inch cubes 1/4 cup flour 2 cups onion, coarsely chopped 2 cups carrots, coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, minced

2 11.5-ounce Guinness Stout beers 3-4 sprigs fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons tomato paste 3 cups beef stock Salt and pepper to taste

Directions: Toss the meat in olive oil until it is lightly covered on all sides (you don’t want it dripping). Brown the cubes in a large pot. Be sure there is only one layer of meat in the pot at once—brown in multiple batches if need be, then set aside for the moment. Add the onions and carrot to the pot, cooking until just beginning to soften. Add the garlic and cook another minute. Put the beef back into the pot and add the rest of the ingredients. Adjust the heat so the stew is just barely boiling, cover and let cook for 2-4 hours. Check every hour or so and add more liquid if too much has boiled off (either beef stock or Guinness, depending on your preference). The stew is done when the beef is very tender, and you can easily pull it apart with a fork. Serve over mashed potatoes with a side of bread (and a pint of Guinness, of course). Feeds 4-6.

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n Ireland’s rocky west coast, a little hamlet of a town lies in County Clare somewhat south of Galway. The town is called Doolin. Tiny quaint houses are clustered between largely unbroken expanses of green, dotted only by sheep. In Doolin, a cluster of buildings slightly larger than normal marks it as the tiny town’s cultural center. A B&B offers room and respite to a handful of travelers, and down the way a little is Gus O’Connor’s pub. Thanks to its close proximity to the Cliffs of Moher, a tourist favorite, the pub has developed a reputation that far outreaches its population. Established in 1832, Gus O’Connor’s is well known for two things: the local music that fills its walls nearly every night and the food. I remember distinctly what it felt like to walk into Gus O’Connor’s on a chilly, sharp autumn day. Escaping the seaside wind, the pub was a warm haven, with a fire lit in a deep hearth and two musicians Beef and Guinness stew is the perfect Irish playing leisurely in a corner. Extricating dish, in this author’s ourselves from layers of coats, scarves and humble opinion. gloves, my companion and I sat down for lunch. Only one meal is worth ordering at O’Connor’s—not because it’s the only good thing on the menu, which I’m sure it isn’t, but because it is so delicious and so suited to its location that to order anything else would be a crime. It’s a softly steaming bowl of beef and Guinness stew, with a side of brown bread and butter, and a pint o’ black beauty to wash it down. The warm, thick stew immediately banishes any lingering chill from outside, and the comforting, familiar flavors make your fellow tourists feel like family. I’ll never forget that bowl of stew. One of my goals this year was to learn to make beef and Guinness stew. Although I can’t recreate Doolin or Gus O’Connor’s, this meal is perfect for any day where you want to escape the cold, feel comforted and loved, or both. You can make this stew a million different ways—on the stove, in the oven, in a slow cooker—and with lots of slight differences in the ingredients. This recipe is the result of combining a few versions I’ve found, and tinkering with what I like best. The key is to not rush. This is a meal that will take you several hours to make (for me, it’s about four), and there’s no point in trying to finish it in less time by kicking up the heat (I’ve tried, and the charred beef you’ll get isn’t the flavor you’re looking for, trust me).

27


JFPmenus.com Paid advertising section. Call 601-362-6121 x11 to list your restaurant

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution for breakfast, blue-plates, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys & wraps. Famous bakery! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180)Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch & more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900)Hot breakfast, coffee drinks, fresh breads & pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches.

PIZZA 904 Basil’s (904 E. Fortification, 601-352-2002)Creative pizzas, Italian food, burgers & much more. Casual dining in the heart of Belhaven. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919)Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant Parmesan, fried ravioli & ice cream for the kids! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

LIFE&STYLE | geek

Home on the Range:

A Review of ‘Banished’ by Nick Judin

ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298)Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Huntington Grille (1001 East County Line Road, Jackson Hilton, 601-957-2800) Mississippi fine dining features seafood, crayfish, steaks, fried green tomatoes, shrimp & grits, pizzas and more. The Islander Seafood and Oyster House (1220 E Northside Drive, Suite 100, 601-366-5441) Oyster bar, seafood, gumbo, po’boys, crawfish and plenty of Gulf Coast delights in a laid-back Buffet-style atmosphere. Que Sera Sera (2801 N State Street 601-981-2520) Authentic cajun cuisine, excellent seafood and award winning gumbo; come enjoy it all this summer on the patio. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222)Fine dining at its best. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. Sal and Phil’s Seafood (6600 Old Canton Rd, Ridgeland (601) 957-1188) Great Seafood, Poboys, Lunch Specials, Boiled Seafood, Full Bar, Happy Hour Specials Shea’s on Lake Harbour (810 Lake Harbour Drive, Ridgeland, MS 39157 (601) 427-5837) Seafood, Steaks and Southern Cuisine! Great Brunch, Full Bar Outdoor and Seating

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma. Vasilios Greek Cusine (828 Hwy 51, Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic greek cuisine since 1994, specializing in gyros, greek salads, baklava cheesecake & fresh daily seafood.

BARBEQUE

COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038)Best Burger of 2013, plus live music and entertainment! Capitol Grill (5050 I-55 North, Deville Plaza 601-899-8845) Best happy hour & sports bar, kitchen open late, pub food with soul and live entertainment. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. City Grille( 1029 Hwy 51, Madison (601) 607-7885)Southern with Blue Plate Specials; Seafood and Steaks, Happy Hour, Kid Friendly Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. Don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055)Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches & Irish beers on tap. Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Mc B’s (815 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland (601) 956-8362) Blue plates, amazing burgers, live music, cold beer, reservoir area Mississippi Legends (5352 Lakeland Dr. Flowood (601) 919-1165) American, Burgers, Pub Food, Happy Hour, Kid Friendly, Late Night, Sports Bar, Outdoor Dining Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot.

March 12 - 18, 2014

ASIAN AND INDIAN

28

Crazy Ninja (2560 Lakeland Dr., Flowood 601-420-4058) Rock-n-roll sushi and cook-in-front-of-you hibachi. Lunch specials, bento boxes, fabulous cocktails. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, an extensive menu features everything from curries to fresh sushi Nagoya Japanese Sushi Bar & Hibachi Grill (6351 I-55 North, Ste. 131, Jackson 601-977-8881) Fresh sushi, delicious noodles, sizzling hibach & refreshing cocktails from one of jackson’s most well-known japanese restaurants. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more.

VEGETARIAN High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513)Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

Platforms: PC

T

few years—clothes to keep them warm outside, herbs and doctors to keep them healthy, and wine and religion to keep them happy. And critically important to “Banished” is the concept of scarcity. Clear-cut the forests and they will die, and likely your village with them. Strip-mine the mountains, and stone and iron will need to come from somewhere else. There’s no easy answer for a paucity of resources in “Banished.” So the cycle goes. Your foresters keep the woodlands healthy, your gatherers and farmers keep the people fed. Each home produces offspring, who in time demand their own homes in which to begin families. These new families require more resources: more farms, more carefully preened forests, more fuel to keep them warm in the winter. Expand too quickly, and the storehouses will run empty. Famine culls your workers, which only causes

he challenge of a good city builder is all in the planning. Never is the player expected to react on the fly—that’s the domain of real-time strategy. No, what tests us is our ability to see a plan come together, to make a budget that funds an empire or to craft a distribution system that feeds a city. Complexity is the bread and butter of these titles, and recent years have seen no shortage of that, whether in the ecological factions of the futuristic Anno 2070 or the endless charts and services to be managed in the modern iterations of “SimCity.” “Banished” takes a different tack: remarkable simplicity. A one-man project under the banner of Shining Rock Games, there’s nothing particularly revolutionary about the design or implementation of the technology. Banished is a small-scale city builder. Your village will begin with a few families and will top out at a few hundred, and you’re just as likely to watch your first settlement wither and die before you The simplicity of world-building in the spartan “Banished” puts ever see so much as the focus on survival. a town hall. The theme of “Banished” is survival: As the title sug- more famine. Expand too slowly, and gests, your people have been exiled from your population will age childless in their their ancestral home and must find a place parents’ homes, leading to an elder boom in the wild to found a new village. There that will similarly cripple your economy is no campaign, no plot, no contact with as one by one they die. the outside world save for the occasional This cycle defines “Banished” as a appearance of river traders. game that quickly reveals itself, beneath Unpretentious is an understatement: its quaint exterior, to be a brutal, unforeven for the relatively no-nonsense city giving picture of frontier life, a tenuous builder genre, “Banished” is spartan. The balancing act between growth and death. challenge, then, is not making your city This game will frustrate and infuriate you, sprawling and profitable, as “SimCity” leaving you with anxious unease in its would have it; or luxurious and mighty, summers and outright despair in its winas the fantastic Caesar series instructs, but ters. Your reward will be subtle—nothing merely to survive. triumphant and marbled, or colossal and There’s a simple cycle to “Banished.” sprawling, merely a quiet, strikingly orThe villagers need food—foraged, grown ganic village in the wilderness, a church or or traded—homes to protect them from a market the smallest signs of prosperity. the elements, and firewood in the winter There’s something beautiful about for heat. They need tools to remain effi- that, and it makes “Banished” an expericient—iron or steel, to be replaced every ence to be savored.

SHINING ROCK SOFTWARE

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Banished


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ARTS p 33 | FILM p 34 | 8 DAYS p 35 | MUSIC p 38 | SPORTS p 40

MATT HERRON

“Selma to Montgomery,” Matt Herron, 1965.The work of Herron and other activist photographers during the Civil Rights Movement will be showcased at “This Light of Ours,” showing at the Mississippi Museum of Art through August 17.

The Light of Activists

March 12 - 18, 2014

I

30

n the summer of 1964, several hundred college students came to Mississippi to work with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and its campaign to increase black voter registration. The campaign, marked by the murder of three organization volunteers in Neshoba County, succeeded in focusing national attention on Mississippi and its mandated oppression of African Americans and their right to vote. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer. In celebration of the gains the SNCC made and in recognition of those who lost their lives, the Mississippi Museum of Art is hosting a number of exhibits, centered on “This Light of Ours: Activist Photographers of the Civil Rights Movement.” Organized by the Center for Documentary Expression and Art in Salt Lake City, Utah, the traveling exhibit consists of 157 black-and-white images. Because the everyday activists, rather than photojournalists covering breaking news, took the photos, they offer an insider’s perspective. “The exhibit makes sense for the museum,” Julian Rankin, the MMA’s director of new media, says. “Over the past few years, we’ve started a tradition of holding exhibits that connect historically with the anniversaries of the Civil Rights Movement.” Matt Herron, one of nine photographers represented

in the show, is the curator for “This Light of Ours.” Along with Heron, the exhibit includes images by Bob Adelman, George Ballis, Bob Fitch, Bob Fletcher, David Prince, Herbert Randall, Maria Varela and Tamio Wakayama. All of the photographers in the exhibit lived and worked in the south between 1963 and 1967, primarily as members of SNCC. The images, which Heron grouped by theme, represent SNCC’s strategy as an organization. Those themes include resolve in the face of violence, impact on the nation’s policies and influence on the nation’s consciousness. Audio guides—personal accounts recorded by the individual activist-photographers that accompany the images—give the viewer a deeper understanding of the moment the photographers chose to document and its impact. “Activist photography is an interesting dynamic because the people taking the photographs are able to get up close and personal at the events,” Rankin says. “Though some were artists, they weren’t necessarily at the event to create art—they were there to document the story as it was happening.” During the exhibit, the community will be invited to contribute to a memory wall titled “A Wall To Tell Our Stories.” People are encouraged to bring photographs and family mementos from the time period. “We’ll make digital copies of people’s documentation from that time period, as an interactive way to connect personal history

by Genevieve Legacy

with social and cultural history,” Rankin says. Submission guidelines for the memory wall will be available after the exhibit opens March 7. Digital images can be sent by email to Carol Peaster cpeaster@msmuseumart.org Several corresponding exhibits will be on display during the five-month duration of “This Light of Ours,” which ends Aug. 15, including “The Slave Series: Quilts by Gwendolyn A. Magee” March 7-May 18. Using applique, embroidery and layered fabrics and embellishment, Magee creates pictoral quilts based on historical accounts of the treatment of slaves. Another event is “Norman Rockwell’s Murder in Mississippi” June 14Aug. 31. LOOK Magazine commissioned the piece in 1964, several months after the murder of three volunteers in Neshoba County, Rockwell created an iconic illustration for the cover of the magazine. Rockwell did extensive research about the circumstances of the crime and produced a number of preliminary drawings and sketches before completing the finished oil painting. “This Light of Ours” will be in the Donna and Jim Barksdale Galleries for Changing Exhibitions at the Mississippi Museum of Art until August 17. Admission is $10 for regular admission, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for children ages 5 and under and museum members. Visit msmuseumart.org for more information or to purchase exhibition tickets.


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2/26/14 12:39 PM


Is there a deadline to enroll in the Health Insurance Marketplace under the Affordable Care Act? YES! The AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, also called OBAMACARE, is a law requiring U.S. citizens and lawfully present immigrants to have health insurance. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deadline to enroll is MARCH 31, 2014. ENROLL AND PAY BY COVERAGE BEGINS March 15 ............................................... April 1 March 16-31 ............................................. May 1

Open enrollment wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t begin again until Nov. 15, 2014 unless you qualify for a special enrollment period.

You can enroll on your own by going to www.healthcare.gov or enroll over the phone by calling 1-800-318-2596.

March 12 - 18, 2014

You can also talk to a UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER NAVIGATOR who can answer your questions and help you enroll.

32

UMMC NAVIGATORS are located at the JACKSON MEDICAL MALL and are available to meet in person by appointment.

THE UMMC NAVIGATOR PHONE NUMBER IS

1-866-545-6842

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THE RICKYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SMILEY SHOWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GARY WIT DA TEA AND JUICY TAMBRA CHERIE AN VICK ALLEN

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DIVERSIONS | arts/culture

Steve Hendrix: Lost in the Art by Ronni Mott

S

T O L L A B P U POP

TRIP BURNS

teve Hendrixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long, slender hands highly graphic portraits based on phomight indicate that he has psychic tographs of iconic African Americans he abilities, if you believe in that sort admires, rendered in acrylic paint. His of thing. At the very least, palm portrayal of Malcolm X in black, white readers would say theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a sign of an active and shades of gray has a brooding quality. mind in search of knowledge. His hands are Black, cool blue and purple are the only colone of the first things youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice about ors in his painting of Tupac Shakur, orange Hendrixâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that is, if his shoulder-length is the color of choice for his image of Ray dreadlocks donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t regCharles, the warm ister as unusual. color accentuating Hendrix, 26, Charlesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; open, wela tattoo and visual coming smile. Miartist, says his paschael Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s image sions center on his 7floats on an approyear-old son, Dante. priately frenetic field Hendrix is a single of yellows. father, and several Comics also of Danteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Avengfeature in Hendrixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ers action figures artâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and on his skin. (along with Token He sports several tats Black from â&#x20AC;&#x153;South of the Joker from Parkâ&#x20AC;?) occupy a shelf Batman comics. His in his workspace at first tat was SuperHardroc Tattoo in manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sâ&#x20AC;? shield, Brandonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;where and Spideyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web children arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alcovers the back of lowed. His latest tat, his left hand. Henon his left inner arm, drix inked several of is Spiderman. his own tattoos as In creating his paintings of African â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of his training. American icons, Steve Hendrix uses favorite,â&#x20AC;? Hendrix His momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, photos to â&#x20AC;&#x153;mapâ&#x20AC;? the images onto the says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He jumped for Sherell, is on canvas, looking for high-contrast areas. joy for that.â&#x20AC;? the inside of his Hendrix, whose right wrist, a sign real last name is Smith, has worked as a of his admiration for her strength and professional tattoo artist for about a year constant inspiration. since completing an apprenticeship, but his â&#x20AC;&#x153;She helps me a lot with life,â&#x20AC;? Hendrix interest in art goes back to his days at Can- says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can go to her with anything.â&#x20AC;? ton High School. He was always sketching College hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been in the cards for back then, he says, and later tried his hand Hendrix, who was born in Peoria, Ill., but at graphic design. heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big believer in gaining knowledge for â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hated painting when I was personal growth. Hendrix hopes to take his younger,â&#x20AC;? Hendrix says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just never art overseas, eventually, but for now heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a understood it.â&#x20AC;? voracious reader whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constantly seeking He kept at it, though, and now con- to better himself. Right now, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reading siders painting his therapy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get lost in it,â&#x20AC;? the classic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Think and Grow Richâ&#x20AC;? by Nahe says. poleon Hill, first published in 1937. Dante frequently watches his daddy â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to learn,â&#x20AC;? Hendrix says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Ś work, and Hendrix was thrilled when his You can find everything in a book.â&#x20AC;? son told him he wants to be an artist â&#x20AC;&#x153;just Hendrix sums up his lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s philosophy like you,â&#x20AC;? when he grows up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let this way: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let your failures define anyone tell you (that) you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it,â&#x20AC;? Hen- you. You have to let them teach you. â&#x20AC;Ś drix told him. Take that negative energy, that anger, and Hendrix began painting in earnest (transform it with) your art.â&#x20AC;? when he saw the work of Atlanta-based See Steve Hendrixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work at Soul Wired Miya Bailey several years ago. Bailey is also CafĂŠ (111 Millsaps Ave., 601-863-6378) a tattoo and visual artist, and his life shows during a one-man show on March 15 from Hendrix that he can make it, too, doing 7 p.m. until 11 p.m. or midnight. Drinks and what he loves. food will be available. The event is free and â&#x20AC;&#x153;His work is amazing,â&#x20AC;? Hendrix says open to the public. Visit instagram.com/stevieof Bailey. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(And) heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real down-to-earth, hendrix87 to see photos, or contact Hardroc humble guy.â&#x20AC;? Tattoos (1149 Old Fannin Road, Brandon, Most of Hendrixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s canvasses are stark, 769-251-5363) to schedule your own ink.

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DIVERSIONS | film

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

Calling Jackson Filmmakers

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. 3/14 – Thur. 3/20

Tyler Perry’s Single Moms Club PG13 3-D Need For Speed PG13 Need For Speed (non 3-D) PG13 3-D 300: Rise of an Empire R 300: Rise of an Empire (non 3-D) R 3-D Mr. Peabody and Sherman PG

Non-Stop

PG13

by Jordan Sudduth

Son of God PG13 Repentance

R

3 Days To Kill PG13 About Last Night R The Monuments Men PG13 The Lego Movie (non 3-D) PG

$5 Martini Monday 2 for Tuesday 2 for 1 Well Drinks

Wine Down Wednesday

2 for 1 House Wines

Frozen (non 3-D) PG

Thirsty Thursday

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

$2 Domestic Longnecks and 16oz Drafts

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

We’ve Got Crawfish!

Movieline: 355-9311

E H T G

O RO M

R EE N

This Week’s Line Up Thurs. 3/13

DOUG FRANK

- Pool Is Cool-

Best!of!Jackson! Winner

Best Place to Play Pool Industry Happy Hour Daily 11pm!-2am

Daily Beer Specials 12pm!-!7pm

Enjoy Spring with the Best Patio Seating in Town!

March 12 - 18, 2014

Pool!League

34

Mon - Fri Night Drink Specials Burgers-Wings-Full Bar Gated Parking Big Screen TV’s League and Team Play Beginners to Advanced Instructors Available

444!Bounds!St.!Jackson!MS 601-718-7665

810 Lake Harbour Drive, Ridgeland Across from McB’s

601-427-5853 Like Us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter

COURTESY ALEC MARTIN

Ride Along PG13

Mr. Peabody and Sherman (non 3-D) PG

T

he 48 Hour Film Project, formed in lowed by a celebratory closing-night recep2001 and based out of Washington, tion at ROUX Public House. The honor of D.C., is an international competi- Best Film went to “Geen Klote!” by Amstertion in which teams of amateur and dam team De Filmband. To watch the winprofessional filmmakers make short films ning film and see the list of categorical winover the duration of a selected weekend. ners, visit 48hourfilm.com/en/filmapalooza. To ensure fairness, each team is assigned a Our city of Jackson last hosted a lospecific character, prop, line of dialogue and cal 48 Hour Film Project competition in genre, which they must include in the film, 2012 (read more about it and opportunities at precisely 7 p.m. on Friday. At that point, for young filmmakers in Jackson at jfp.ms/ teams have exactly 48 hours to write, cast, shoot, edit and musically score their films. They must hand-deliver a hard copy, which can be a data or playable DVD, or a USB flash drive, to the local organizer (producer) by 7:30 p.m. Sunday. With every year comes increased participation. Now, approximately 120 cities host local 48 Hour Film Project competitions. The winning film of each After an inactive year, the 48 Hour Film Festival returns city then competes at Filto Jackson in 2014, giving opportunities to budding and mapalooza—which took professional filmmakers alike. place this past weekend in New Orleans. The Crescent City, which has solidified itself as a premier film raisingfilmmakers). With nearly 20 teams production city, was a great destination in competition, the weekend was a success; choice for Filmapalooza. Hundreds of par- however, due to production missteps, the ticipating filmmakers descended upon the competition didn’t come together in 2013. city to take part in the four-day festival, and Luckily, the 48 Hour Film Project is hundreds of locals attended daily. returning to Jackson this year. I have taken Teams screened their films at the newly on the organizing position, charged with renovated Joy Theater on Canal Street. The reigniting the competition in our artistically atmosphere was not short on networking and culturally rich state. I am in the process or socializing, either. Filmmakers, indus- of selecting a competition date. Trying to try folk, and festival patrons mingled at maximize participation, the 48 Hour Film scheduled parties each night. Buzz about Project and I are aiming for a late-May or the recent Oscars was everywhere. The mix early-August weekend that doesn’t conflict between southerners and people from other with surrounding competitions in New Orparts of the country and the world was neat leans, Memphis, Little Rock and Nashville. and refreshing to observe. Despite cultural I truly believe the 48 Hour Film Project and geographical divides, a love of movies and its local competitions give both estaband filmmaking unified everyone . lished filmmakers and newcomers an excitBesides the screenings and parties, the ing platform to make creative cinematic art. 48 Hour Film Project organized various It is a great vehicle to increase awareness of film-related panel discussions and offered and promote our Mississippi creative econtours of the filming locations of recent no- omy. Whether high school or college stutable productions, including “Dallas Buy- dents, amateur or professional filmmakers or ers Club” and “12 Years a Slave”—both of simply curious newcomers, the competition which were filmed in and around Nola. and its process is extremely rewarding. Although Filmapalooza overlapped the For more information about the 48 opening weekend of the famed South by Hour Film Project and the Jackson competiSouthwest (SXSW) Festival in Austin, Tex- tion, please email jordan.w.sudduth@gmail. as, cinemaphiles weren’t deterred. With high com or like the Facebook page, facebook. attendance and excitement, by all accounts, com/Jackson48HFP. the festival was successful. A packed crowd Thank you for your future interest and watched winners get crowned Sunday, fol- support. That’s a wrap!


WEDNESDAY 3/12

MONDAY 3/17

WEDNESDAY 3/19

Poker Run is at Fleet Feet Sports with an after-party at Cazadores.

OFNA Happy Hour is at Sneaky Beans in Fondren.

Shellie Rushing Tomlinson signs copies of “Heart Wide Open” at Lorelei Books.

BEST BETS MARCH 12 - 19, 2014

RICK OLIVIER

WEDNESDAY 3/12

Poker Run is at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports (500 Highway 51 N., Suite Z, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com. … Tickle Me Wednesdays Comedy Show is at 9 p.m. at The Penguin (1100 John R. Lynch St.). $10 in advance, $15 at the door; thepenguinms.com.

Better Than Ezra headlines Mal’s St. Paddy’s Official After-party March 15 at Hal & Mal’s.

RICK A. PREBEG/WORLD CLASS IMAGES

Jackson 2000 Millennial Meetup is at 5:30 p.m. at Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St.). Free; jackson2000.org. … High Note Jam: Hip Hop Night is at 6 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) in the Art Garden. Rashad Street, DJ Young Venom, Cody Cox, 5th Child and DJ Brik-a-Brak perform. Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. … An Evening with Jungle Jack Hanna is at 6:15 p.m. at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). $100; call 601-352-2500; jacksonzoo.org. … The Blast Downtown is at 9 p.m. at Martin’s (214 S. State St.). DJ Scrap Dirty, The Nasty Sho, Sketch the DJ and DJ Spirituals perform. $5; theblastdowntown.com.

at 8 p.m. at Beau Rivage Resort and Casino (875 Beach Blvd., Biloxi). The wildlife expert shares the stage with animal friends. $10-$20; call 888-566-7469 or 800-745-3000.

SATURDAY 3/15

Mal’s St. Paddy’s Parade is at 1 p.m. in downtown Jackson. It begins at the corner of State and Court streets. Free; malsstpaddysparade.com. … Mal’s St. Paddy’s Official After-party is at 3:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). Performers at the street party include Better Than Ezra, The Weeks, The Revivalists and Rooster Blues. For ages 18 BY BRIANA ROBINSON and up. $15; call 601-292-7999; ardenland.net. … The Hendrix Experience Art Show is from 7JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM 11 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe (111 FAX: 601-510-9019 Millsaps Ave.). Enjoy artwork, a DAILY UPDATES AT cash bar and music from DJ CanJFPEVENTS.COM non. Free; call 601-863-6378. … Cindy Scott performs at 9 p.m. at Yellow Scarf (741 Harris St., Suite E). $15 in advance, $20 at the door, $5 students; call 866-590-4647; yellowscarf.ojahmediagroup.com.

EVENTS@

Jack Hanna brings his wildlife expertise to the Jackson Convention Complex March 13 for a Jackson Zoo fundraiser and to Beau Rivage Resort and Casino March 14-15 for “Into the Wild Live.”

FRIDAY 3/14

“Musical of Musicals” opens tonight at 7:30 p.m. at Warehouse Theatre (1000 Monroe St.). The musical about musicals is a comedic satire of musical theater. For mature audiences. $10; call 601-948-3533, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com. … Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild Live is

SUNDAY 3/16

Made for a Runway II Fashion Weekend: Model Casting is from noon-6 p.m. at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). Males and female models ages 16 and up may audition. Free; call 982-8467; thekmarshiionline.com. … GMO Grand Challenge is at 6:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Participants take a multiple-choice test for a chance to win prizes, including cash. Free; call 601-937-7224; email lukelundemo@gmail.com.

MONDAY 3/17

OFNA Happy Hour is from 6-7:30 p.m. at Sneaky Beans (2914 N. State St.). Free; email byronknight1@ gmail.com; facebook.com/OurFondren. … “Immigrant and LGBTQ Rights in America” is at 7 p.m. at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.) in the Academic Complex, Room 215. Civil rights activist Filipe Matos speaks. Free; millsaps.edu.

TUESDAY 3/18

Chef’s Table is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Fairview Inn (734 Fairview St.). $65; call 228-493-6555; eatyall.com. … “Elton John: The Million Dollar Piano” is at 7 p.m. at Malco Grandview Cinema (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). $15; call 601-898-7819; malco.com. … Wanton Bishops performs at 8 p.m. at Crossroads Bar and Lounge (3040 Livingston Road). The garage rock and blues band from Beirut, Lebanon performs. Free; wantonbishops.com.

WEDNESDAY 3/19

Shellie Rushing Tomlinson signs copies of “Heart Wide Open” from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at Lorelei Books (1103 Washington St., Vicksburg). $14.99 book; call 601-6348624; loreleibooks.com. … All 4 Children Consignment Spring/Summer Pre-Sale is from 5-8 p.m. at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Purchase or sell gently used children’s clothing and accessories through March 22. Free, $10 pre-sale; call 601-566-7046; email cbpampa@yahoo.com; all4childrenconsignment.com. … The Fleshtones perform at 8 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Used Goods also performs. $10 in advance, $12 day of show; call 601-292-7999; email arden@ardenland.net; ardenland.net.

jacksonfreepress.com

THURSDAY 3/13

35


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*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jackson 2000 Millennial Meetup March 13, 5:30-7:30 p.m., at Sal & Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New York Pizza and Ice Cream Joint (565 Taylor St.). The purpose of the event is to create a network for young, forward-thinking Jacksonians. Free; jackson2000.org. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Musical of Musicalsâ&#x20AC;? March 14-15, 7:30 p.m., and March 16, 2 p.m., at Warehouse Theatre (1000 Monroe St.). The musical about musicals is a comedic satire of musical theater. The performance is part of New Stage Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Unframed Series. For mature audiences. $10 (cash or check); call 601-948-3533, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com.

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Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parade March 15, 1 p.m., in downtown Jackson. The Mardi Gras-style parade begins on the corner of State and Court streets. Enjoy the Trustmark Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Festival and the Pet Parade before the main event. Visit website for schedule. Free; malsstpaddysparade.com. Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Official After-party March 15, 3:30 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.). Performers include Better Than Ezra, The Weeks, The Revivalists and Rooster Blues. Gates open at 2:30 p.m. For ages 18 and up. No coolers. $15; call 601-292-7999; ardenland.net.

601.664.7588

1002 Treetop Blvd â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood Behind the Applebeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

Best Fried Chicken in Town & Best Fried Chicken in the Country

#/--5.)49 History is Lunch: Commemorating 175 Years of the Old Capitol, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Sessions are at noon. Free; call 601-5766998; mdah.state.ms.us. â&#x20AC;˘ March 12, MDAH historians Mike Stoll and Clay Williams examine the Old Capitolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. â&#x20AC;˘ March 19, Millsaps College history professor Stephanie Rolph talks about civil and voting rights during Old Capitolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. Precinct 2 COPS Meeting March 13, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 2 (711 W. Capitol Street). The forum is designed resolve community problems. Free; call 601-960-0002.

-Best of Jackson 2003-2013-

Jackson Garden and Patio Show March 14-15, 9 a.m.; March 16, 11 a.m., at Mississippi Trade Mart (1200 Mississippi St.). Enjoy shopping, gardening seminars, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities and door prizes. Special guests include gardening experts Nellie Neal and Dr. Gary Bachman. $6, children 12 and under free; call 601-919-8111; msnla.org.

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 11am - 3pm

Roll-Off Dumpster Day March 15, 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m., at Lee Elementary School (330 Judy St.). Jackson residents can bring tree limbs, other yard debris, household furniture, small appliances and

-Food & Wine Magazine-

Bat Education Program March 15, 2 p.m., at North Mississippi Fish Hatchery and Visitor Education Center (457 CR 36, Enid). The program focuses on Mississippi bat species, diets, habitats and more. Call 662-563-8068; mdwfp.com. Information Technology for Nonprofits March 18, 9 a.m.-noon, at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St., Suite 700). The

T

he Japan-America Society of Mississippi is partnering with the Crossroads Film Festival to bring a little bit of Japanese culture to the metro area, by showing three Japanese films at Madison Malco Grandview theater starting March 13. The film series is an outreach program by the Consulate General of Japan in Nashville, and Nissan Neighbors sponsors the series. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be neat for Jackson metro to show up and really learn a little bit about the culture of a country whose company has employed more than 8,000 people here in Mississippi,â&#x20AC;? says John Henry Jackson, vice president of the Japan-America Society of Mississippi. The first film is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Always: Sunset on Third Street,â&#x20AC;? directed by Takashi Yamazaki and adapted from RyĂśhei Saganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manga â&#x20AC;&#x153;SanchĂśme no YĂźhi,â&#x20AC;? which means â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunset on Third Street.â&#x20AC;? The film, set in post-war Tokyo, follows the lives of a few residents in a single year as the Tokyo Tower is being built. The film shows at Malco at 7 p.m. March 13. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brave Story,â&#x20AC;? directed by KĂ´ichi Chigira, is the second film. Based on Miyuki Miyabeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fantasy novel of the same name, the movie centers on a boy named Wataru who tries to change his fate by

March 12 - 18, 2014

Large Orders WELCOME!

36

And eat with us after the parade! 6600 Old Canton Rd, Ridgeland 601-957-1188

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Always: Sunset on Third Streetâ&#x20AC;? by Takashi Yamazaki airs March 13 as part of a Japanese film series.

entering a world full of magic and monsters, where he must summon his courage and go on a journey to find the Goddess of Destiny. The movie will air March 20 at 7 p.m. The third film is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Robo-G,â&#x20AC;? directed by Shinobu Yaguchi. The plot follows three employees of the Kimura Electrical Company who plan to present a new robot at an exhibition but, after an accident destroys the robot, they hire an actor to get inside the remains. It shows at Malco March 27 at 7 p.m. The Japanese film series begins at Malco Grandview Theater (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison) on March 13 and ends March 27. All films will be shown with English subtitles. Seating will be on a first-come first-served basis. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit jasmis-us.com. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Amber Helsel

Call Us For All Of Your Catering Needs!

Come get some

for your St. Paddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s party!

Coffee & Cars Third Saturdays, 7-10 a.m. through Sept. 20, at Primos CafĂŠ and Bake Shop (2323 Lakeland Drive, Flowood). Car enthusiasts are welcome to view or display cars of all makes and models. Free; call 601-936-3398; email mike_ marsh@bellsouth.net.

Japan Comes to Jackson

SEAFOOD RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

Live & Boiled Crawfish

workshop includes topics such as server and Internet security, protecting and backing up data, and new hardware and software products. Registration required. $109, $69 members; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits.org.

COURTESY DENTSU MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT

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accessories. Tires, chemicals and gas tanks are not accepted. Proof of residency may be required. Free; call 601-960-0000; jacksonms.gov.

Pick Up a Whole Dessert Today! -Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 â&#x20AC;˘ 2006 2008 â&#x20AC;˘ 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson â&#x20AC;˘ 601.956.7079


Soul Session: Our Health March 15, 2-5 p.m., at Open Arms Healthcare Clinic (500 E. Woodrow Wilson Ave., Suite M). The LGBT health care initiative includes health information, a Q&A session and medical tests. Registration required; space limited. Free; call 601-899-2843; bit.ly/P1ezT6. GMO Grand Challenge March 16, 6:30 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The purpose is to raise awareness about the health and environmental risks of consuming genetically modified foods (GMOs). Participants take a multiplechoice test for a chance to win prizes, including cash. Test preparation CD available. Free; call 601-937-7224; email lukelundemo@gmail.com. Baptist GYN and Breast Cancer Support Groups Joint Meeting March 18, 5 p.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.). In the Baptist for Women Conference Room. The meeting includes remarks from cancer survivor Cynthia “Mammy Gram” Stuart and refreshments. Registration required. Free; call 601-948-6262; mbhs.org.

Sturgill Simpson March 13, 7:30 p.m., at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.). The Nashville native sings alternative country music with soul and roots influences. Doors open at 7 p.m. $8 in advance, $10 at the door, additional $3 surcharge for patrons under 21; call 601-292-7999; email jane@ halandmals.com; ardenland.net. Mississippi Academy of Ancient Music’s Early Music Concert Series March 13, 7:30 p.m., at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church (5400 Old Canton Road). The British group Stile Antico presents 17th- and 18th-century sacred choral music. $30, $5 students, $125 season tickets; call 601-594-5584; email info@ancientmusic.org; ancientmusic.org. Faculty Piano Recital March 18, 7:30 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive). In the concert hall. Dr. Stephen Sachs performs works such as Franz Liszt’s “The Sonata in B Minor” and selected movements of Olivier Messiaen’s “Vingt Regards sur l’enfant Jesus.” Doors open at 7 p.m. Free; call 601-974-6494; belhaven.edu.

NAMI Basics Class beginning March 18, at Holmes Community College, Ridgeland (412 West Ridgeland Ave., Ridgeland). The six-week course is for parents and other caregivers of children and adolescents living with mental illnesses. Pre-registration required. Space limited. Free; call 601-8999058 or 800-357-0388.

Wanton Bishops March 18, 8 p.m., at Crossroads Bar and Lounge (3040 Livingston Road). The garage rock and blues band from Beirut, Lebanon performs. Also enjoy a performance from Vasti Jackson. Free; call 984-3755; wantonbishops.com.

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Donald Link Guest Dinner March 12, at City Grocery (152 Courthouse Square, Oxford). Enjoy a four-course meal from Chef Donald Link, author of the cookbook “Down South: Bourbon, Pork, Gulf Shrimp and Second Helpings of Everything.” Reservations encouraged. Signed books for sale after the dinner at Square Books ($35 book). $70 with pairings, $60 without pairings; call 662232-8080; citygroceryonline.com.

Bottleneck Blues Bar Comedy Tour, at Ameristar Bottleneck Blues Bar (4116 S. Washington St., Vicksburg). Nardo is the emcee, and shows are from 7-9 p.m. No cover; call 601-638-1000; ameristar.com. • March 12, performers include Antoine Blackmon, Mark Brooks and Reggie Walker. • March 19, performers include A.G. White and Ice Dawg. Events at Tinseltown (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl). Call 601-936-5856; cinemark.com. • “Werther” March 15, 11:55 a.m. The Metropolitan Opera presents Massenet’s opera. Encore show March 19 at 6:30 p.m. March 15: $22, $20 seniors, $15 children; March 19: $20, $18 seniors, $14 children. • “Elton John: The Million Dollar Piano” March 18 and March 26, 7 p.m. See the simulcast of the pop star’s concert The Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. $14, $13 seniors and students, $12 children. “The Cherokee Word for Water” Film Screening March 18, 7 p.m., at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). The film is based on a true story about a rural Cherokee community’s efforts to bring running water to their families. Free; call 601-326-3001; cw4w.com.

-53)# Dialogue March 13, 7:30 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The eight-piece horn band plays songs from the group Chicago. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. All-ages show; adults must accompany children. $12 in advance, $15 at the door, additional $3 surcharge for patrons under 21; call 601-292-7999; email arden@ardenland.net; ardenland.net. High Note Jam: Hip Hop Night March 13, 6-7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) in the Art Garden. Rashad Street, DJ Young Venom, Cody Cox, 5th Child and DJ Brik-a-Brak perform. Cash bar included. Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org.

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Rising Readers Storytime (Ages 3-5) March 19, 9:30-10 a.m. and 10:15-10:45 a.m., at Canton Public Library (102 Priestley St., Canton). Includes stories, music, movement, crafts and more. Free; call 601-859-3202. “Heart Wide Open” March 19, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at Lorelei Books (1103 Washington St., Vicksburg). Shellie Rushing Tomlinson signs books. $14.99 book; call 601-634-8624; email loreleibooks@ wave2lan.com; loreleibooks.com. Purple Word Book Club Third Sundays, 1-4 p.m. through May 18, at Purple Word Center for Book and Paper Arts (140 Wesley Ave.). The monthly book discussion is for ages 18 and up. $5 annual fee, free for members; purpleword.org.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Spring Break Art Break March 12-14, 10 a.m.noon, at Lauren Rogers Museum of Art (565 N. Fifth Ave., Laurel), in the annex. Children in grades K5-6 create a variety of media including sculpture, paint and collage. Reservations required. $50, $40 members; call 601-649-6374; lrma.org. Visiting Artist: Rick Anderson March 16, 1-4 p.m., at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). The Mississippi artist gives workshops on creating spring paintings with acrylic paint. $8, children under 12 months and museum members free; call 601981-5469; mschildrensmuseum.com. Discover Class Series March 18, 6-8:30 p.m., at Mississippi Craft Center (950 Rice Road, Ridgeland). Options include mixed media with Larry Strayer or felting with Jane Mullins. Registration required. $35 per person; call 601-8567546; email education@mscrafts.org; mscrafts.org.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). Call 601-979-2040; jsums.edu. • Student Juried Art Show through April 4. See works from JSU students in the Liberal Arts Gallery. • The ArkLaMiss Photography Show through May 2. See the exhibit of photographs in Johnson Hall Gallery. Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. • This Light of Ours: Activist Photographers of the Civil Rights Movement through Aug. 15, in the Barksdale Galleries. See the Civil Rights Movement through the work and voices of nine activist photographers. Includes admission to the Slave Series exhibit. $10, $8 seniors, $5 students, free for members and children ages 5 and under. • The Slave Series: Quilts by Gwendolyn A. Magee through May 18, in the Barksdale Galleries. See the late artist’s quilts that tell the story of slavery in America. Includes admission to the This Light of Ours exhibit. $10, $8 seniors, $5 students, free for members and children ages 5 and under. • C3 (Conversation. Creativity. Community.) Participatory Art Project Thursdays and Saturdays through March 19 Significant Developments is the facilitator. Participants record their own symbols of identity onto clay bells that will be part of an art installation in the Art Garden. Public ceremony March 20 at 6 p.m. Email daniel@significantdevelopments.us. The Hendrix Experience Art Show March 15, 7-11 p.m., at Soul Wired Cafe (111 Millsaps Ave.). Enjoy artwork, free wine, a cash bar and music from DJ Cannon. For ages 18 and up. Free; call 601-863-6378. March Art Exhibit through March 31, at Fischer Galleries (Dickies Building, 736 S. President St., fourth floor). See works from Ellen Langford. Free; call 601-291-9115; fischergalleries.com. Lagniappe: A Little Something Extra through April 30, at Mississippi Library Commission (Education and Research Center, 3881 Eastwood Drive). See Susan Wellington’s oil and watercolor paintings, and fine jewelry from Jackie Messer, Martha Scarborough and Laura Tarbutton of The Beach House Studio. Opening reception March 20 from 5-7 p.m. Free; call 601-432-4111; email gloriajw@mlc.lib.ms.us.

"%4(%#(!.'% Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance Advocacy Meeting March 12, 6 p.m., at Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance (612 N. State St., Suite B). MIRA discusses current issues and upcoming campaigns at the meeting held on second Mondays. Open to the public. Light dinner included. Free; call 601-968-5182; yourmira.org. Breaking Bread March 15, 1 p.m.-5 p.m., at Poindexter Park (200 Poindexter St.). The purpose of MS Move’s community event is to fellowship with the homeless. Includes healthy food from Nuttin’ But Smoke Catering and music from DJ Sean Mac. Vendors welcome Free; call 601-918-4350 or 601-201-5658; email mac@msmove.org or seanmac6@gmail. com; msmove.org. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings, or to add your own events online. You can also email event details to events@jacksonfreepress.com to be added to the calendar. The deadline is noon the Wednesday prior to the week of publication.

Wednesday, March 12th

SWING DE PARIS 6:30, No Cover

Thursday, March 13th

JODI JAMES 7, No Cover

Friday, March 14th

DOUG FRANK TRIPLE THREAT 9, $10 Cover

Saturday, March 15th

OPENING

10:30AM

DRINKS AND FOOD IN PEARL ST. LOT

MUSIC AFTER THE PARADE JAREKUS SINGLETON FOLLOWED BY TIME TO MOVE BAND Monday, March 17th

BLUES UNDERGROUND

FILMING

SOUTHERN KOMFORT AND CHRIS GILL 6:30, No Cover Tuesday, March 18th

BLUES UNDERGROUND

FILMING

LISA MILLS 6:30, No Cover

Happy Hour!

2-for-1 EVERYTHING* Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-6:00 (*excludes food and specialty drinks)

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

7%,,.%33

37


DIVERSIONS | music

A Distinctive Mix by L. Kent Wolgamott

D

CHRISTIE WILLIAMS

avina Sowers started playing the piano when she on her Edison record player. In her small Pennsylvania town, states—from the Northwest to the Southeast and back was a little girl. Unlike most, she kept going after Sowers’ mother’s records were her best exposure to music. through the middle of the U.S.—in three months. That’s the lessons ended. Like even fewer, she now makes “I grew up in a really depressed coal-mining, railroad business as usual for the Vagabonds. Sowers, however, someher living pounding the keys. town (with) this park where they’d bring in washed-up bands, times yearns for more time in her Minneapolis home. “I wasn’t throwing down Fats Domino or anything like like The Guess Who with one original member,” she said. “I’m a homebody, and I’m a woman, so I may want that, but I started taking piano at 6 and have just nesting to a certain extent,” she said. never quit,” Sowers said in a February phone inter“But I’m a business owner—the band is my view. “I’ve pretty much been playing my whole life. business—and I’m passionate about my music, so I And now it is pretty much my whole life.” need to share that with people outside of my comSowers is the Davina of Davina and the munity. Sometimes, do I just want to eat nachos and Vagabonds, the Minneapolis-based combo she has watch really bad TV for a week? Sure. Sometimes fronted since 2005. A rare guitar-free ensemble, you need that. I get just enough that I can get back Davina and the Vagabonds is often tagged as a on my horse and get back on the highway.” blues band. But the music isn’t blues in the conThis year, Davina and the Vagabonds will release temporary sense. Nor is it jazz, even though it has its fifth album, a follow-up to 2011’s “Black Cloud,” horns, piano and drums. which brought the band to ’70s rootsy pop territory. “I think unique is a good word,” Sowers said, Sowers, who writes all the band’s songs, says the trying to define her band. new record, called “Sunshine,” is again made up en“I think eclectic has been overused, but it fits tirely of originals. And again, it’s impossible to classify for me, too. It’s hard for me … to come up with one beyond being Davina and The Vagabonds music. word for what we do. There’s New Orleans jazz in “There’s some pre-war, some New Orleans muDavina and the Vagabonds, led by Davina Sowers, headlines The Iron it, blues, pop, old school rock ‘n’ roll. … We make it sic,” she said. “It sounds like us. I didn’t start doing Horse Grill’s St. Paddy’s Block Party. our own, so it has a specific sound to it.” country or rap or rock ‘n’ roll. Well, there’s some early On stage, Sowers— frequently compared to Janis Joplin rock ‘n’ roll in there. It’s just us, once again.” The pre-war sound, evocative of the 1920s through early 1940s, comes from Sowers’ childhood. Her folk-singer and Adele—is nothing if not enjoyable as she sings and plays Davina and the Vagabonds headlines the St. Paddy’s mother remarried when Sowers was young. Her adoptive fa- in her boisterous, engaging style. She performs her distinctive Block Party, starting at 3 p.m. March 15 at The Iron Horse ther, far older than her mother, was born in 1902. As a child, mix of music with trumpeter and vocalist Daniel Eikmeier; Grill (320 W. Pearl St., 601-398-0151). Otis Lotus, The she listened to artists such as Judy Collins, Simon and Gar- trombonist Ben Link; drummer Connor McRae; and bassist Bailey Brothers, and Chris Gill and the Soul Shakers also funkel, and Crosby, Stills and Nash. She recalls listening to and sousaphonist Andrew Burns perform. Admission is $5. Visit theironhorsegrill.com and her mother’s records of The Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin Davina and the Vagabonds’ current tour crosses 13 davinaandthevagabonds.com.

in the mix

by Tommy Burton

The Art of Tribute

38

things came together, we made an unspoken decision: We would not play cover songs. I don’t have a problem with cover songs or with the musicians who choose to play them. I usually play a good number of other people’s songs during my own solo sets. The two of us just figured that if we were going to COURTESY UNIVERSAL

March 12 - 18, 2014

I

f the Neilsen ratings are to be believed, 13.95 million people watched “The Night That Changed America: A Grammy Salute To The Beatles.” For those that didn’t see it, it was two-plus hours of various artists performing The Beatles songs to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the band performing on “The Ed Sullivan Show” for the first time. The performers ranged from Stevie Wonder to Ed Sheeran. Overall, the concert was pretty decent and featured some fine renditions of classic music. The show ended with a living Beatles “reunion” between Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. McCartney remarked at some point that he wasn’t sure about doing the show at first, as it seemed silly to pay tribute to himself. It got me thinking about tributes and the art of performing other folks’ work. I started playing rock music in earnest when I was in college at Delta State with Danny McGreger. Danny played guitar and I started playing bass as we formed Lately David. The “band” (hardly deserving of that moniker, as it was just me and Danny) served as an outlet for our burgeoning songwriting careers. Somewhere in the ether of how

The best musicians find a way to make a cover song their own, like Johnny Cash did in his “American IV” album.

mess up someone’s music, it might as well be our own. That decision has probably cost us

countless paying gigs, but we have lived with it, and are still happy to write and record as Lately David. Playing cover tunes takes a certain art. One method is to recreate the song as it was recorded. Jacksonians are probably familiar with Sid Thompson and his band DoubleShotz. Thompson told me how he takes pride in is his ability to recreate the guitar solos in the songs the band covers. Todd Rundgren released an album in 1976 entitled “Faithful.” The first side of the record is a collection of classic songs that Rundgren re-recorded. He recreated Jimi Hendrix and The Beach Boys tunes that sound identical to the original versions. I can only guess that his motivation was just to prove that he could. I recently took my daughter to see American Pink Floyd, a band that presents a note-perfect concert of Pink Floyd music. In a case such as this, my young daughter will never experience seeing the real thing live, so these tribute bands will have to suffice. Needless to say, they’d better be good at what they do in order to sustain livelihoods as touring bands.

There is something to be said of musicians that can play cover music well. Audiences enjoy hearing music they know and love; plus, it requires a strict discipline and special skill to execute flawless covers. The other method to cover material is for musicians to put their own spin on the material—to make a song their own. A great example of this is Johnny Cash’s later recording with producer Rick Rubin, “American IV: The Man Comes Around.” Cash was singing songs that the likes of Danzig or Nine Inch Nails wrote, but the songs were unmistakably Johnny Cash. Plus, it just made the aging artist seem all the more cool to younger audiences. The greatest tribute might perhaps be to cross genres. To take a pop melody and have it performed by a classical orchestra might be the ultimate compliment to a songwriter. I own several jazz CDs that are tributes to rock artists I admire. This gives a song a more broad appeal, as some listeners simply do not like certain genres of music. Of all the tributes and cover songs, I usually find that very few examples that top the original.


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SATURDAY, MARCH 15

MARTINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ST. PADDYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PARTY!

WEDNESDAY

3/12

LADIES NIGHT LADIES 1/2 OFF 5-CLOSE

THURSDAY

3/13

THE BLAST DOWNTOWN Following the Parade 10 P.M.

NMS HILLCOUNTRY PICNIC PREVIEW

KENNY BROWN (RL BURRNSIDE)

Featuring Bubba & Terrance of River City Tanlines

GEORGE MCCONNELL & THE NONCHALANTS (Beanland, WSP, Kudzu Kings)

ALVIN YOUNGBLOOD HART

CAREY HUDSON BAND (Blue Mountain) LEE BAINS III & THE GLORY FIRES (Sub Pop Records)

CEDRIC BURNSIDE PROJECT

DJ YOUNG VENOM

KENNY BROWN BAND

5 -9PM

2 FOR 1 DRAFT FRIDAY

3/14

SOUTHERN K OMFORT BRASS BAND 10 P.M.

SATURDAY

3/15

MARTINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ST. PADDYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PARTY MONDAY

3/17

OPEN MIC/

TALENT SEARCH NIGHT Local bands tryout for gigs On stage w/ pro sound & lights Both bars open

1.50 Pick & Grab Beers & 2 for 1 draft

TUESDAY

3/18

SHRIMP BOIL 5 - 10 PM

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S KARAOKE

10 - close $1 PBR & Highlife $2 Margaritas 10pm - 12am

UPCOMING SHOWS 3/19: JCBCB (Jerry Garcia Band Cover Band) featuring members of Dubconsious and others 3/21: Dead Gaze w/ Young Buffalo 3/22: The Last Waltz Ensemble Featuring Members Of Dirty Dozen Brass Band 3/28: Benjamin Booker 3/29: Bella Machine with Hartle Road 4/10: Zoogma SEE OUR NEW MENU â&#x20AC;¢ W W W . M A R T I N S L O U N G E . N E T

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

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MUSIC | live

39


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports the best in sports over the next seven days Serving the area for over 30 yrs.

Come!Check!Out!Our Daily!Lunch!Specials!&! Extensive!Beer!Selections! Revisit!An!Old!Favorite! WED 3/12

Aaron Coker (8!-!12)

Ladies Drink Free THURS 3/13

Karaoke Night FRI!3/14

Chad Perry (5!-!8)

Kenny Davis & Brandon Latham (8!-!12) SAT 3/15

Happy Hour! 9PM!TO!CLOSE! SUN 3/16

2 for 1 Bloody Mary’s MON! 3/17

Service Industry Night: 2!for!1!Domestic!Beer! $3!Fireball!Shots! $2!Miller!High!Life TUES 3/18

Karaoke Night

Only one team is left undefeated in the nation in men’s college basketball: The Wichita State Shockers have a perfect 34-0 record.

THURSDAY, MARCH 13 College basketball (8-10 p.m., ESPN U): Two teams battle it out in a conference tournament as Memphis and Connecticut collide. SATURDAY, MARCH 15 College basketball (8-11 p.m., CBS): Get up early if Southern Miss reaches the C-USA Men’s Basketball Tournament final—the Golden Eagles will be playing while you eat breakfast. SUNDAY, MARCH 16 College basketball (5-6 p.m., CBS): Find out where all 68 teams will be heading, and get tips for filling out your bracket on the Division I Men’s Basketball Selection Show. MONDAY, MARCH 17 NHL (6:30-9 p.m., NBCSN): Get your hockey fix in early before the madness starts as the Boston Bruins host the Minnesota Wild. TUESDAY, MARCH 18 College basketball (6-11 p.m., Tru TV): The First Four kicks off the 2014 NCAA Tournament with a double header, where only two teams will make the final field of 64 teams. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19 College basketball (6-11 p.m., Tru TV): The final two games of the First Four will see the last two spots in the field of 64 teams claimed, so the Big Dance can begin. Wichita State will be the obvious choice for Cinderella, but others include Harvard, St. Louis, Mercer and Eastern Kentucky.

bryan’s rant

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his offseason has seen the New tect, run inside or outside. He was a great Orleans Saints make cuts left and receiver in the passing game and a dangerright, some of which were obvi- ous return man in the kicking game. ous—but last week, the team A healthy Sproles allowed the Saints made cuts that were a bit of a shock. to put pressure on defenses with his verThe first round of cuts saw the de- satility. In fact, losing Sproles might have fense take a big hit with cornerback Jabari the biggest effect on the Saints offense if Greer, safety Roman Harper and line- the team can’t sign a replacement. backer/defensive end Will Smith getting New Orleans tight end Jimmy Grathe boot. The Saints also informed line- ham tweeted he was “shocked and disapbacker Jonathan Vilma that they won’t try pointed” by the Saints cutting Sproles. to re-sign him. Graham’s tweet was kind of funny since Vilma wasn’t a he is one of the reashock after he spent sons New Orleans had last season injured and to cut Sproles and the unable to play a down. other players. Smith was a high-priced Graham wants a aging veteran, and so huge salary, to be paid was Harper. Both Vilma as the top tight end in and Harper have seen the league or paid like their play drop off since a wide receiver. That helping the team win means someone has to the Super Bowl. go to free up money for In a surprising move, the New Greer and Smith Orleans Saints cut running the tight end. tore ACLs last season. back Darren Sproles last week. Graham wants Smith has been in the to get paid like Saints league for eight seasons, quarterback Brees, who so it makes sense the Saints would cut got his money lined up a couple of seasons him after an injury. Greer’s cut was more ago. I understand the short window for complicated (injury protection benefits), playing in the NFL, and I don’t begrudge so it was, at the time, the biggest surprise. either player for wanting to make as much Then, last week New Orleans an- money as possible. But Graham shouldn’t nounced it was cutting wide receiver be shocked—he should know he played a Lance Moore and running back Darren part in these cuts. The salary cap in the NFL makes Sproles, which might be the biggest cuts it one of the most exciting sports in the the Saints have made this offseason. Moore was a dependable receiver world. It levels the playing field and is who always seemed to make a big catch part of the reason that, at the start of each when New Orleans needed one. He was season, fans for every team feel they could Saints quarterback Drew Brees’ safety net win the Super Bowl (well, except perhaps when the quarterback needed to settle fans of the Cleveland Browns). But what happened last week in down or get a big first down. Sproles was a running back who New Orleans shows the ugly side of the could do everything. He could pass pro- salary cap. WIKICOMMONS/DENVER JEFFERY

LADIES!NIGHT!

SLATE

by Bryan Flynn

Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

WED!3/19

Shaun Patterson & Jonathan Alexander

Rich Aronovitch

(8!-!12)

LADIES!NIGHT! March 12 - 18, 2014

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Wild Wrangler by Justin Hosemann

As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? This is going to be a little odd, but I always wanted to go into the funeral business because I knew it was a business that â&#x20AC;&#x153;never dies,â&#x20AC;? so to speak. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been fascinated with science, so I wanted to be an embalmer.

Describe your work day in three words. Exciting. Hectic. Rewarding.

What tools could you not live or work without? Probably animal knowledge. I also could definitely not live or work without a computer to keep up with animal records. Our supportive staff is also an important tool here.

What steps brought you now to this position? NAME: WILLIE BENNETT AGE: 58 JOB: ANIMAL CARE SUPERVISOR AT THE JACKSON ZOO

When I was in school, I was interested in animals. I started taking zoology courses at Hinds Community College and got into a program that placed high school kids in part-time positions. Too make a long story short, I saw the zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer program here 30 years ago and have been here ever since.

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the strangest aspect of your job? No matter how long youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in this business, you never get used to death. These animals here are just like the animals we might have at home, our personal pets. Once you get attached to a specific animal, and that animal gets sick or passes away, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard sometimes.

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best thing about your job? Working around animals and working with people. Lately, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten the chance to explain to visiting children how we do our jobs. ... Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot different than what they usually see on TV.

What advice do you have for others who would like to become a zookeeper? This profession is rewarding. Depending on how you go in the ranks, you can make a decent salary. If you are an animal lover, you can definitely help the animal species. We deal a lot with animals that are threatened in the population. We help replenish the numbers of these animals by breeding them in captivity and releasing them back into the wild. ... Paperwork may be the same every day, but out there on the grounds, something new is always happening. It keeps you on your toes and keeps you thinking.



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v12n27 - Malcom White on the parade, tourism and the Mississippi story.  

Mayor's Race: Who's in? p 9 Art Through Activists' Eyes p 30