Issuu on Google+


2

October 30 - November 5, 2013


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN TOY GATHINGS

T

oy Gathings, 23, was apprehensive about taking the job as Habitat for Humanity Mississippi Capital Area’s volunteer development coordinator. The Jackson native graduated from Jackson Preparatory School in 2007 and went to Mississippi State University, where she received a bachelor’s degree in apparel textiles and merchandising with a minor in business and marketing, so she was new to this type of job. After graduation and an internship in Dallas, she moved back to Jackson and started at Fondren’s Interiors Market as a sales associate. Gathings felt, however, that she was not fulfilling her passion. “I knew I always wanted to help people, but I wanted to do something more fulfilling,” Gathings says. When she saw the position available at Habitat for Humanity, she went for it. After she started the position last January, the organization quickly welcomed Gathings’ warm spirit. Seeing the group’s work change lives fuels her passion for bettering the Jackson community. “It is incredible to see an area of nothing—not even a slab—be turned into a house for a family in need,” she says. Habitat for Humanity Mississippi Capital Area has, to date, built more than 560 homes in 27 years. Gathings’ passion to help people has built her strong relationships with diverse groups of people. “I have been able to see parts of Jackson that I have not even seen, and I have lived here my entire life,” she says.

CONTENTS

Nationwide, Habitat’s goal is to work with homeowners to create affordable housing. Locally, as volunteer development coordinator, Gathings connects organizations and volunteers to the Jackson metro area to help build homes for those in need. She also assists in building a stronger community. Those who receive housing must log 250 hours of “sweat equity” to their house or a neighbor’s house. This creates stronger connections between people and their homes and community. Gathings’ hobbies are also communitycentered, including meeting new people, spending time with friends and family, tennis and playing kickball on a local team. Another outlet for Gathings is Habitat Young Professionals. This group for 21- 40year-old professionals provides networking opportunities for future leaders around Habitat’s mission of building affordable housing in partnership with low-income families. “We are motivated to make a positive impact in the Jackson area and have fun doing it. We are love in action; a hand up, not a hand out,” Gathings says. Gathings looks forward to her future work with Habitat for Humanity. “Having the opportunity to be a part of something bigger than myself has changed my life,” she says. Read more about Habitat’s young professional group in the Nov.-Dec. issue of BOOM Jackson magazine, out this week. —Christina Spann

Cover photo of President Obama by flickr/Daniel Borman/borman818

10 JRA v. Watkins

The battle over Farish Street continues, with a lawsuit complicating the fray further.

23 Bread and Butter

Gil Turchin left investment banking to follow his dream of opening a bakery, where he makes breads from scratch each day.

29 On ‘Alluvium’

“I was about 57, and I was here in Memphis, and I said, ‘Look, Pritchard, you always thought you were going to write a big, beautiful book about the Delta.’ I thought I was going to be like William Alexander Percy or William Faulkner, who knows. I had a manuscript at the time I was working on, but I realized it just wasn’t working. I said, ‘Maybe you shouldn’t write a big, beautiful book. Maybe start with a small and not-so-beautiful book.’ Well, as it turned out, the book was small, but it was quite beautiful, even though it was very profane.” —John Pritchard, “A Delta Romp

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ............................................ TALKS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ............................ COVER STORY 18 ........ BEST OF JACKSON RECAP 23 ......................................... FOOD 27 ................................... WELLNESS 29 ....................................... BOOKS 30 .......................................... FILM 31 ....................................... 8 DAYS 32 ............................... JFP EVENTS 34 .......................................... ARTS 35 ....................................... MUSIC 36 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 37 ..................................... SPORTS 39 .................................... PUZZLES 41 ....................................... ASTRO

COURTESY NEW SOUTH BOOKS;; TRIP BURNS; TRIP BURNS

OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 5, 2013 | VOL. 12 NO. 8

3


EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Mississippi’s Flag: A Blow at Civilization

A

h, the flag. The Mississippi State flag is like that obnoxious relative at a family gathering. He’s offensive, disrespectful and not representative of your family’s values at all—one hopes—but he’s not going anywhere anytime soon. So you put up with him. Last week, JFP photographer Trip Burns drew national attention when he shared a brilliant piece of photojournalism with the world. When Tyler Cleveland’s story about the ground-breaking of Mississippi’s new museums, including a civil rights museum, went up at jfp.ms/museums, so did Trip’s photo showing the jarring symbol of the Confederacy flying in the foreground with Gov. Phil Bryant at the mic and Myrlie Evers-Williams, former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Reuben Anderson and state Sen. John Horhn sitting behind the flag. The latter three are, of course, African American, and Evers-Williams saw her husband Medgar gunned down five miles northwest of the new museums in 1963. The Confederate battle emblem that still appears in our state flag was the hateful symbol preferred by the man who executed Medgar as well as that of his buddies in the Citizens Council and the Ku Klux Klan. It was, and still is, a symbol of resistance against integration and equality for blacks in our state and nation. No, wait! … some will yell. It’s a symbol of heritage, and of respect for southerners who died in a war fought not over slavery, but for economics and state’s rights. Right. This state’s and other Confederate states’ right to own and use human beings in order to increase their wealth—the economics of slavery was exactly what the Civil War was about. It’s remarkable to me how many people have been told something different—and choose to believe it. But I’ll be honest: Even though I never had any doubt about what

the Civil War was fought over—at least as an adult—it wasn’t until a decade ago that I first read the evidence no one can deny. After some or another debate on the JFP website with a slavery apologist, my nephew-in-law emailed and asked me if I had read Mississippi’s Declaration of Secession. I hadn’t. And I sure as hell hadn’t studied it back in history

The state flag tells the world that Mississippi hasn’t changed. class at Neshoba Central where I should have learned it, just as every student in the state (or nation) should before getting a diploma. Mississippi’s Declaration of Secession pulls no punches: “Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery—the greatest material interest of the world. Its labor supplies the product, which constitutes by far the largest and most important portions of commerce of the earth. These products are peculiar to the climate verging on the tropical regions, and by an imperious law of nature, none but the black race can bear exposure to the tropical sun. “These products have become necessities of the world, and a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization. That blow has been long aimed at the institution, and was at the point of reaching its consummation. There was no choice left us but submission to the mandates of abolition, or a dissolution of the Union, whose principles had been subverted to work out our ruin.” And Texas’ secession explanation is

even more blatant, along with all the others of Confederate states. If you want to see a slavery apologist go radio silent on Facebook, just drop the link and the opening section into a comment. The silence is deafening. What some folks also don’t seem to realize is that the Confederate cross, enshrined in our taxpayer-funded state flag, was the symbol of defiance for those who believed that “a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization.” First, in the war and then afterward, whether waved by the first round of the Ku Klux Klan, created to scare blacks out of claiming their new rights, and then for decades by whites trying to intimidate blacks out of voting, integrating schools and daring to walk proudly through the front door. Put another way, today’s taxpayers pay to embed that heinous symbol in a state flag that flies outside office buildings, museum ground-breakings and public schools that, too often, have almost totally re-segregated. What’s interesting is to watch reactions among many white people when you try to discuss why the flag needs to be inside the museum, not waving outside on behalf of us all. “It’s just a piece of cloth.” Right, so why do we all have to pay for it? And is the American flag “just a piece of cloth”? Of course not. Flags matter. We all know that. “It’s tradition.” Yes, the worst kind, and it hurts us all, some much more than others. “I don’t mind it.” Well, go ask yourself why you don’t mind it. And don’t you care about how black people feel in the state with the highest proportion of African Americans. They don’t get a voice? “Voters overwhelmingly voted to keep it there.” So? Rights have always been about that of the individual, not the majority, by necessity. And what might have happened if more people were educated about the flag’s true origins, not to mention what the dang secession declaration proves about slavery? What if we challenged the revisionism

in an honest, deliberate, direct fashion? Here’s the rub for me personally, not to mention for many others of all ethnicities. I’m not black, and I’m still offended to the core by that flag every time I see it. It’s used by politicians to play coded race politics (textbook “southern strategy”) to get racist votes (ironically for policies that don’t benefit many of the presumed racists). It’s despicable to watch politicians—including Haley Barbour and Phil Bryant, who spoke at the ground-breaking—try to appeal to people they assume are racist. Why not help lead them another direction? Perhaps by leading on changing the flag? Still worse, this state flag tells the world (and each other) that white Mississippians have not changed. We can protest all we want about what others think about our state—but we all bear the burden of those assumptions of the worst about us. And why wouldn’t they believe it when so many of us brag that we “overwhelmingly” kept that flag in place to represent us? Is this age-old game of defiance really worth painting ourselves as unchanged racists more than a century after we lost the war to keep slavery? Just who is living in the past here? Ten years ago, I went to the old Capitol and listened as Evers-Williams gave her husband’s papers to the state of Mississippi. I was inspired by her belief that Mississippi can and will change and leave the old ways behind us (or in a museum). I wrote then that Mississippians had to get on with fighting the “worthy scrap” of change until “that ugly symbol rots off the flagpole out of sheer irrelevance.” (See jfp.ms/scrap) I have seen that fight unfold, and it feels good. Our past is not past, yet, though, and it won’t be as along as we as a state allow that flag to continue tainting and obscuring our progress. It is high time to take action and prove to the world, and ourselves, that Mississippi is a more civilized place these days.

October 30 - November 5, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

4

Christina Spann

R.L. Nave

Brinda Willis

Richard Coupe

Kathleen Mitchell

Mo Wilson

ShaWanda Jacome

Kimberly Griffin

Ridgeland native Christina Spann is working on her master’s degrees in public policy and administration. She enjoys making people laugh and has a passion to change the face of public-school education. She wrote the Jacksonian.

R.L. Nave, native Missourian and news editor, roots for St. Louis—and for Jackson. Send him news tips at rlnave@ jacksonfreepress.com or call him at 601-362-6121 ext 12.

Brinda Fuller Willis often plays tricks on people with her identical twin. She’ll go anywhere to hear the blues, and she is a real farmer’s daughter. She wrote the food story.

Richard Coupe, avid fan of the beautiful game, husband, brother and father of four, is still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He wrote a wellness story.

Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell is a DIY-er, cat lady and founding member of the girl group CMO. She likes to make brunch for her friends. She wrote the books feature.

Editorial Intern Mo Wilson is a Millsaps College student. He enjoys pizza, the Internet, dancing alone in his bedroom, social justice, politics and giggling. He wrote an arts story.

ShaWanda Jacome is an elementary librarian in JPS. She lives in Ridgeland with her husband, Mike, and son, Mateo. One of her favorite scriptures is Psalm 34:4. She wrote the event blurb.

Kimberly Griffin is a fitness buff and foodie who loves chocolate and her mama. She’s also Michelle Obama’s super secret BFF, which explains the Secret Service detail.


WELCOME TO ALL NEW LUNCH & DINNER MENU PLATTERS STARTING AT $10 THURSDAY

10/31

Halloween Blowout with Passing Parade

Download the app and enjoy these special offers during our LAUNCH WEEK, November 4 - 10!

Costume Contest & Other Events!

$4 APPETIZERS • 5 -9PM 2 FOR 1 DRAFT

FRIDAY

11/1

STEEPWATER BAND

(Best Rock Album of the year.-Jambase)

SATURDAY

Nov. 4 $5 Admittance THE BRIGHT LIGHT SOCIAL HOUR

Free Cookie With $5 Purchase

2-for-1 Damned Straight Shots

Text ‘Jackson’ to 77948 to get download links

11/2

THE SO SO GLOWS (Recently on David Letterman, Rolling Stone Magazine Band To Watch....)

MONDAY

11/4

OPEN MIC/ TALENT

$1.75 Domestic Long Necks

Free Small Fry

w/purchase of Drink & Burger (Limit 2 per order. Must mention if calling in.)

2 for 1 Well Drinks & 15% Off Of Menu Item

(Only one menu item discount per ticket.)

SEARCH NIGHT Local bands tryout for gigs On stage w/ pro sound & lights Both bars open

1.50 Pick & Grab Beers & 2 for 1 draft TUESDAY

$10 Off Check $40 Or More (One per ticket)

$2 Well Drinks Or $1 Domestics Free Scoop of Ice Cream (One per customer per visit.)

With Purchase

11/5

SHRIMP BOIL 5 - 10 PM

MATT’S KARAOKE 5 - 9 & 10 - close

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

SAL & PHIL’S

WEDNESDAY

LLadies ADIES NIGHT Drink Free 9-close

RESTAURANT

2 for 1 Any Beer Bottle or Draft

25% Off An Appetizer (Limit One Per Ticket)

Come party with

DJ Young Venom

UPCOMING SHOWS

Download The App For A Chance To Win… Two Tickets To Georgia Satellites on December 6, VIP Meet and Greet, Overnight Stay and $250 In Gambling Credits.

11.8 Unknown Hinson 11.15 Archnemesis 11.23 Zoogma SEE OUR NEW MENU

W W W. M A R T I N S L O U N G E . N E T

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

jacksonfreepress.com

15% Off Sandwiches or Appetizers (One offer per customer.)

11/6

5


¹7EAREMOTIVATEDTOMAKEA POSITIVEIMPACTINTHE*ACKSON AREAANDHAVEFUNDOINGIT² ²7R\*DWKLQJVYROXQWHHU GHYHORSPHQWFRRUGLQDWRU IRU+DELWDWIRU+XPDQLW\ 0LVVLVVLSSL&DSLWDO$UHDRQ +DELWDWœVPLVVLRQ

¹4HECURRENTPARTIESARESO ANGRYATEACHOTHERTHATTHEY CAN´TSEEBEYONDPLAYINGAGAME OF³GOTCHA ´ANDYETTHEPROJECTIS GOINGWANTINGALLTHISWHILE² ²-RKQ+RUKQFKDLUPDQRIWKH 6HQDWH(FRQRPLF'HYHORSPHQW &RPPLWWHHRQWKHUHQRYDWLRQ RI)DULVK6WUHHW

'DYLG:DWNLQV ÂżQGVKLPVHOI LQWKHOHJDO FURVVKDLUVRI WKH-DFNVRQ 5HGHYHORSPHQW $XWKRULW\S

COURTESY TONY GREER, TRIP BURNS; MELANIE BOYD, TRIP BURNS

Wednesday, Oct. 23 Hundreds of students and others gather at a candlelight vigil outside the Sparks, Nev. middle school where a 12year-old killed a teacher and himself. ‌ At 14 years old, Philip Chism is arrested and charged with the murder of Colleen Ritzer, a math teacher from Chism’s school.

Friday, Oct. 25 Amid incidents of pets dying from dog treats, the Food and Drug Administration announces rules for safer pet food and animal feed. ‌ A grand jury indictment issued in 1999 in the JonBenÊt Ramsey investigation is released to the public. Saturday, Oct. 26 A wave of anti-American banners crop up in Iran’s capital city, protesting President Hassan Rouhani’s pursuit of better ties with America ‌ A rare obstruction call ends Game 3 of the World Series in favor of St. Louis, sparking intense debate throughout the sports world.

October 30 - November 5, 2013

Sunday, Oct. 27 The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons announces that Syria has filed details of its poison gas and nerve agent program and an initial plan to destroy it. ‌ R&B singer Chris Brown is charged with felony assault for attacking a man near in Washington, D.C.

6

Monday, Oct. 28 District Judge Lee Yeakel rules that regulations in Texas requiring abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital are unconstitutional. ‌ The Mississippi Department of Public Safety drops the $6 photo fee it tacked onto the charge for a concealed-carry gun permit starting July 1. Tuesday, Oct. 29 The House Ways and Means Committee questions Medicare Chief Marilyn Tavenner on what went wrong with HealthCare.gov. ‌ A senior administration official says that the White House is considering ending eavesdropping on friendly foreign leaders.

Two of these men (from left:Tony Greer, Darrel McQuirter, Alphonso Hunter and James “Lap� Baker) will join the Hinds County Board of Supervisors, possibly shifting the balance of power on the five-member board.

Analysis: Power Up for Grabs in Hinds Election by R.L. Nave

W

hen Hinds County voters go to the polls Tuesday, Nov. 5, they will not simply select some guys to fill a pair of empty seats on the board of supervisors— they will chart the county’s course for at least the next two years. Of course, political campaigns are often peppered with the rhetoric of destiny, but in this case, it’s actually true. Here’s why: Right now, on the Hinds County Board of Supervisors, board President Robert Graham and Vice President Kenneth Stokes run the show. Along with interim District 2 Supervisor Alphonso Hunter, the three men have the votes to do whatever they want on spending as well as on hiring and firing of employees. All that could change in November, when the District 2 seat is up for grabs. That race pits Hunter against longtime public servant Darrel McQuirter. The board selected Hunter as a temporary replacement for the late Doug Anderson on the condition that he would not seek to hold the seat perma-

nently, but he later reneged on that promise. McQuirter, who is on a leave of absence from overseeing the county’s planning and zoning division and has served as the city of Clinton’s fire chief, won a grueling Democratic primary. McQuirter, came out on top of a field of nine Democratic opponents to make it to a runoff in which the powerful U.S. Congressman Bennie Thompson and Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba endorsed his opponent. He said during the primary that, at least, he knew who his foes were. Hunter’s candidacy, however, consists of several unknowns. “You’ve already flipped the table on me once,� McQuirter said of Hunter, who professes to be a Democrat but is running as an independent in the District 2 race. When asked whether Hunter’s party flip-flop is reason to distrust him, McQuirter offered: “I don’t trust him. That’s up to the people (whether to trust Hunter).� Hunter has the support of Stokes, who, along with his wife, Jackson Councilwoman

LaRita Cooper-Stokes, have created an effective turnout machine in Ward 3, part of which lies in Hinds Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s District 2. Hunter did not respond to messages the Jackson Free Press left at his county office. District 2 represents a crucial swing vote on the county, in which Stokes and Graham are often allied and the District 4 supervisor allies with Peggy Hobson Calhoun of District 3. Interim District 4 Supervisor Robert Walker, the former Vicksburg mayor and a current Byram resident, also vowed not to seek the position permanently and is sticking by his pledge. The district, which encompasses parts of northwest and southwest Hinds County, is considered the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only Republican stronghold. Phil Fisher, who took over as mayor of Clinton in July, previously held the seat. The lone Republican is unlikely to push through big-ticket legislation on the board. But Fisherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach helped bring transparency to the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial dealings, and PRUH$1$/<6,6VHHSDJH

R.I.P. Lou Reed: The Godfather of Punk FLICKR/MAN ALIVE!

Thursday, Oct. 24 A congressional hearing focuses on the contractors who built the faulty federal health insurance website. â&#x20AC;Ś Myrlie Ever-Williams and various state leaders break ground on the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson.

/RX5HHGÂśVOHJDF\ZDVQHYHUDERXW UHFRUGVDOHVEXWUDWKHUWKHLPSDFWKH KDGRQDOWHUQDWLYHPXVLF+HUHÂśV DKLJKOLJKWUHHO

1.

(IS½RSTMARKONTHESCENE 7KH9HOYHW8QGHUJURXQG¶V GHEXWDOEXP³7KH9HOYHW 8QGHUJURXQGDQG1LFR´LVRQHRIURFN µQ¶UROO¶VJUHDWHVW5RFNOHJHQGVD\VWKDW HYHU\RQHZKRERXJKWWKH¿UVW FRSLHVZHQWRIIWRIRUPEDQGVRIWKHLU RZQ7KHVRQJVZKLFKWDFNOHGVH[XDO GHYLDQF\ ³9HQXVLQ)XUV´ DQGGUXJ XVH ³:DLWLQJIRU0\0DQ´³+HURLQ´  IHDWXUHG5HHG¶VDQJXODUJXLWDUZRUNDQG

KLVVLJQDWXUHVLQJWDONFDGHQFHERWKRI ZKLFKEHFDPHKLVWUDGHPDUNV (ISBIGGESTMOMENT5HHG¶V ELJJHVWKLWFDPHGXULQJKLVVROR FDUHHULQWKH¶V³:DONRQ WKH:LOG6LGH´KDGDQLQIHFWLRXVEDFN LQJFKRUXVDQGDOD]\EDVHOLQH/DWHU KLSKRSSLRQHHUV$7ULEH&DOOHG4XHVW VDPSOHGWKHWUDFN (ISSEXUALITY6HQWWRHOHFWUR VKRFNWKHUDS\DVDWHHQWRFXUH KLVELVH[XDOLW\5HHGFRQWLQXHG WR¿QGORYHRXWVLGHRI³QRUPDO´KHW HURVH[XDOVWDQGDUGVHYHQXVLQJKLV ORQJWLPHWUDQVYHVWLWHJLUOIULHQG5DFKHO DVLQVSLUDWLRQIRUKLVDOEXP³&RQH\ ,VODQG%DE\´

2. 3.

4. 5. 6.

(ISDRUGUSE*LYLQJDKXJH PLGGOHÂżQJHUWRWKH&OXE 5HHGOLYHGWRWKHULSHROGDJH RIGHVSLWHSHQQLQJQXPHURXVVRQJV DERXWKHURLQDQGVFRULQJ (ISIDEASABOUTMUSIC7KH JRGIDWKHURISXQNKDGWKLVWR VD\DERXWJXLWDUZRUNÂł2QH FKRUGLVÂżQH7ZRFKRUGVDUHSXVKLQJLW 7KUHHFKRUGVDQG\RXÂśUHLQWRMD]]´ (ISLEGACY:LWKRXW5HHGÂśV ZRUNERWKLQ7KH9HOYHW8QGHU JURXQGDQGDVDVRORDUWLVWLWÂśV KDUGWRLPDJLQHWKHZRUNRI85(0 0RUULVH\DQG7KH6PLWKV6RQLF<RXWK 7KH6H[3LVWROV%HFNDQG7KH&XUHZKR DOOFLWHKLPDVDQLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFH


New Stage Theatre presents

FREES! K O O B

Based on the novel by

JOHN STEINBECK Adapted by

FRANK GALATI Directed by

Francine Thomas Reynolds

October 22 thru November 3, 2013 For tickets: 601‐948‐3531 or

newstagetheatre.com Sponsored by

THE GRAPES OF WRATH is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

Children enrolled in United Way’s Imagination Library program receive a free book each month, delivered directly to your home. Go to ImaginationLibrary.com to enroll your child or dial 2-1-1 to reach a call specialist. Children 0-5 years old who reside in Hinds, Madison, or Rankin County are eligible for this program. Made possible in part with funding from Nissan.

YP Y LP YOUNG LEADERS IN

PHILANTHROPY

UNITED WAY OF THE CAPITAL AREA

Barbour. Lumumba. Tonkel. And you. The conversations we’re having among our like-minded friends and families aren’t enough. Join us for a frank, open talk about solutions for our metro area led by former Governor Haley Barbour, Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, and long-time central Jackson pastor Rev. Keith Tonkel.

Thursday, Nov. 14th 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Jackson Convention Complex Tickets $50 | operationshoestring.org

jacksonfreepress.com

A Conversation About Community

7


TALK | supes

$1$/<6,6 IURPSDJH

Tony Greer: Shining a Light on Spending by R.L. Nave

October 30 - November 5, 2013

8

A

quick scan of Tony Greer’s cam- as important as good fiscal management, paign Facebook page gives a and good fiscal management takes place strong sense of where he’s com- in both parties. ing from, ideologically speakI think Democrats and Republicans ing. Greer, a Clinton and Realtor seeking want the same thing. We’re not talking the Hinds County District 4 seat, has photos of himself posing with fellow Republicans Gov. Phil Bryant, Speaker and fellow Clintonian Philip Gunn, and Rep. Andy Gipson of Braxton. Greer, 52, also uses the page to criticize decisions of the board’s current leadership and their spending decisions, such as in this post from early October: “Today the county wasted $60,000 of your hard earned tax dollars on feel good projects that have little or nothing to do with addressing their court ordered priorities ... Meanwhile, the Raymond Detention Center is falling apart. We are hemorTony Greer, the Republican candidate for Hinds rhaging $$$$$.” County’s District 4 supervisor seat, plans to make The candidate is up against transparency a hallmark of his tenure on the board. former Hinds County publicworks manager James “Lap” Baker, the Democratic nominee in the about immigration reform here. We’re race. The Jackson Free Press recently talking about managing the people’s caught up to Greer for a telephone inter- money and prioritizing projects. view about his candidacy and thoughts For instance, last week, the county on serving as the sole Republican on the squandered $650,000—they bought five-member board. $8,000 worth of basketball goals and spent $100,000 to give to Jackson for Are you emphasizing transparency a walking trail for Battlefield Park. You because, as the lone Republican on know, there may be some importance to the board, it’s unlikely you would some of those things, but (the county be able to push through many big- is) also under a court order to make ticket items? improvements and renovations at the Here’s what I tell people about that: (Raymond) Detention Center. If you I am the lone Republican running; I fully were practicing good management of expect to win the office. I think, at the resources, you would have addressed the supervisor level on down to the munici- priority because it was set by the court pal level, that party politics is not nearly and then, later, way down the line, COURTESY TONY GREER

he took stands against what he characterized as unnecessary spending. Tony Greer, a Clinton alderman, also considers himself a fiscal conservative, but dismisses the role party affiliation plays in running the day-to-day operations of the county. “We’re not talking about immigration reform here. We’re talking about managing the people’s money,” Greer told the Jackson Free Press. “You’ll see a lot of fiscal conservative ideas coming from me. I suspect that if I need to forge some relationship, there are some opportunities in this race, particularly in District 2.” Greer is referring to fellow Clintonian McQuirter, who drew criticism during the Democratic primary for being cozy with Republicans, particularly Fisher and former Clinton Mayor Rosemary Aultman—McQuirter’s former bosses when he was a city employee. McQuirter calls that effort a misinformation campaign, but admits that it probably helped his opponent, Willie Earl Robinson, with voters who did know much about McQuirter. It remains to be seen whether those charges matter in his bid against Hunter. Another wild card going into the November election is the recently retired public-works manager and Democratic nominee in District 4, James “Lap” Baker. Baker, who also resides in Clinton, delivered a series of powerful performances during the primary, but could meet a brick wall in District 4 against Greer, who touts support from a list of heavy hitters in the Mississippi GOP, including Speaker Philip Gunn. See the Jackson Free Press’ coverage of the Hinds County supervisor’s race at jfp.ms/2013supervisorcandidates. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com

looked at recreation opportunities. From what I have seen, the recommendations coming out of the sheriff’s office to the board of supervisors are not being heeded. They’re not being listened to. There are ways to save money to get these repairs done and there are also opportunities to get some of these done. You take the sale of the Mississippi Valley Title Building, for instance. Well, there’ll be $2.4 million that comes from the sale of that property that could be used in whole or part to address some of the concerns in the detention center in the other (jail housing) pods. So, how do you see your role on the board?

I think what you’ll see from me is someone who’ll be able to work with the other supervisors to get things done. I’m very much a conservative. I’ll be looking for ways to shine a light on any kind of frivolous spending, and there has been an abundance of that. A lot of wasted money has gone through there, and I’ll be trying to ferret that out. I’ll be looking for opportunities to save money in the county, and I think there are plenty of opportunities there. I’ll be interested in the service contracts that we have and who’s making money off the county, that those are actual arms length transactions as opposed to favoritism of any sort. I think what the people are looking for is transparency and a change in the perception of how Hinds County is being managed. So I think that I’ll be able to work very closely with the other supervisors but at the same time, if I need to, I can bow up and get things done by playing hardball. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.


Do your depressive symptoms continue, despite ongoing antidepressant treatment? We are seeking volunteers for the ARTDeCo Study. We hope to learn more about the effects and safety of a study drug in people with depression when it is taken with an ongoing antidepressant medication. We will also study how much drug is in your body and how long the body takes to get rid of it. You may be eligible to participate if you: ■ Are between the ages of 18-65 years ■ Have a diagnosis of depression ■ Are having an inadequate response to your current antidepressant treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) For More information, call:

Scan this QR Code with your smartphone to access the pre-screener, or visit the website at: www.artdecostudy.com Download the QR Code Reader App “i-nigma” or a QR Code Reader of your choice.

jacksonfreepress.com

Ad_V2.0_July12_English

3531 Lakeland Drive Brentwood Plaza – Suite 1060 Flowood, MS 39232 (601) 420-5810

9


TALK | city

JRA Sues Watkins, Jackson Leaders Fed Up by Tyler Cleveland

A

October 30 - November 5, 2013

TRIP BURNS

nother week in Jackson, another even if it has the same â&#x20AC;&#x153;managerâ&#x20AC;? as ture of Farish Street, said he is more conround of Farish Street in-fighting. the Farish Street Group. cerned about seeing some progress on the Hope for a compromise Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba, beleaguered project rather than listening between the Jackson Redevel- who criticized the Farish Street Group pub- to the bickering. opment Authority and the latest Farish licly during his campaign for mayor earlier â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very frustrating that after 14 years, Street developer took a we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen the area dehit last week, when JRA veloped,â&#x20AC;? Horhn said Monfiled a lawsuit against the day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that if cooler Farish Street Group and heads will prevail, and JRA Watkins Development, and Mr. Watkins sit down LLC., seeking to expunge and try to work their way its name from liens and through this process, we can recoup nearly $5 million get some develop on Farish in penalties for breach Street, and very soon. of contract. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are other fiJRA filed the lawnancial contributors and suit Wednesday, the same developers interested, but day Watkins was named the current parties are so chairman of Downtown angry at each other that Jackson Partners, the orthey canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see beyond playganization that manages ing a game of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gotcha,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and the downtown business yet the project is going improvement district. wanting all this while.â&#x20AC;? A copy of the lawsuit, Stevens said Watkins provided to the Jackson After the Jackson Redevelopment Authority fired him, developer David Developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lien was filed Watkins hopes to recoup the $4.7 million heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s invested in the Farish Free Press by Watkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at- Street project over the past six years. on the advice of one of the torney Lance Stevens, says most prestigious business liens filed by Ellis Custom lawyers in the state at one Construction LLC. and Dale Partners Ar- this year, said the legal issues need to be re- of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most prestigious firms, but did chitects, P.A. are Watkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, and by exten- solved so the project can move forward. not name that lawyer or firm. sion, the Farish Street Groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s problem, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Watkins has said that he has JRA says in the lawsuit that it never and that a third lien Watkins himself filed been injured by termination of the lease had any contract or agreement with Watagainst JRA is unlawful. and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s due some money, and we need to kins Development, and is not indebted to Watkins filed that lien on behalf of determine whether that is true,â&#x20AC;? Lumum- that company â&#x20AC;&#x153;for any sums whatsoever.â&#x20AC;? his company Watkins Development on ba said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it is true, we need to sit the Further, it alleges that Watkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lien, Oct. 7, 2013, and claims it â&#x20AC;&#x153;supplied parties down and negotiate a settlement. filed through his company Watkins Deequipment, labor, materials, and develop- Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested in getting through it. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m velopment, was â&#x20AC;&#x153;done with gross negliment services, and otherwise performed not interested in waiting on anybody for gence or malice, with the intent to coerce work on the project.â&#x20AC;? four more years.â&#x20AC;? the JRA to reverse its termination of (The Under the lease agreement, the Mississippi Sen. John Horhn, D- Farish Street Group)â&#x20AC;? and, therefore, is Farish Street Group agreed to waive its Jackson, is also growing weary of the cause for Watkins to forfeit the money rights to place liens on any of the Far- back-and-forth between the JRA and listed in the lien. In this case, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ish Street property, but it does not pre- Watkins. Horhn, who sponsored the $6 roughly $4.76 million Watkins says he vent a third party from filing liens. In million, low-interest loan program that had invested in Farish Street. this case, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Watkins Development, paid Watkins to develop the infrastrucBecause the property in question is

10

publicly owned, JRA says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unlawful for Watkins to file a lien. Under a provision in state law pertaining to debtor-creditor relationships, â&#x20AC;&#x153;any person who shall falsely and knowingly file the notice... without just cause shall forfeit to every party injured thereby the full amount for which such claim was filed.â&#x20AC;? Despite the acrimony, Stevens, speaking on behalf of Watkins, said there is still ample room for discussion between the parties to resolve the issue and get the project completed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have offered that olive branch,â&#x20AC;? he said. Horhn said he can foresee an agreement where Watkins is involved but without serving in a leadership position. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think what needs to be developed is an exit strategy for Mr. Watkins from the Farish Street development, but one that compensates him fairly for the work that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at a point where a new developer can come in with a fresh equity to get the thing done. â&#x20AC;Ś I think David knows at this point he canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be the face of Farish Street.â&#x20AC;? While JRA tries to fight Watkins in the legal arena, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not exactly getting a vote of confidence from the city. A motion to â&#x20AC;&#x153;unauthorizeâ&#x20AC;? the board is making itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way through the economic-development committee of the city council, and the council went into executive session Monday afternoon to discuss its the ongoing legal problems. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think (naming new board members) will fix a lot of the problem,â&#x20AC;? Lumumba said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The engine is stalled, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be stalled any time you have people missing from the board. We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been intentionally slow on that. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to fill those seats soon.â&#x20AC;? Email City Reporter Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com. PDFs of court documents are linked to this story at jfp.ms.

  



        

    

CUPSESPRESSOCAFE.COM


TALK | CITY

Sales Tax Goes to Voters in January by Tyler Cleveland

one amendment from Ward 4 Councilman De’Keither Stamps, which was designed to TRIP BURNS

Chokwe Lumumba opposed the 1percent sales-tax proposal during the campaign, but said he now realizes how much money the city needs to fix its infrastructure problems.

give contracting preferences to Jackson businesses for infrastructure work. “This is imperative that we push forward supporting this referendum for the reputation of the city of Jackson to the Legislature,” Ward 1 Councilman Quentin Whit-

well said. “We should operate in good faith for what (the state Legislature has) done for us and what they’ve allowed for us to do.” Whitwell, a Republican, brushed off the notion that the commission is a slap in the face to Jackson, saying that ultimate power over additional revenue will remain, like all other revenue, with the city council. “I have assurances from business leaders in my ward that they would not only not have a problem with my support for this, but that they would also support it going forward,” Whitwell said. Other members were more conflicted. Ward 2 Councilman Melvin Priester Jr. said he had “struggled mightily with this particular ordinance,” because Jackson has a low average income and a sales tax is unprogressive in nature, but said he would defer to the mayor’s mantra: “The people must decide.” “That is something that we can’t get around,” Priester said. “The people should be allowed to decide on this matter, and I’m looking forward to the process over the next few months.” Ward 3 Councilwoman LaRita Cooper-Stokes cast the lone “no” vote. She said

her vote was cast after listening to the concerns of her constituents. Duane O’Neill, president/CEO of the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership and the man who will present eight nominations to Lumumba for appointment to the commission, came to the council meeting to assure members that his choices would be up to their standards. “We’ve come to a good accord in our discussions,” O’Neill said. “We should have no problems coming to a consensus (on the nominees).” Lumumba previously said he had reached a deal with GJCP leaders, under which he would have the opportunity to choose the organization’s nominees. Lumumba backtracked on that story when O’Neill said they still intend to nominate their own choices as state law requires. Under the law, 67 percent of the $15 million would go to street repair, including reconstruction and resurfacing projects. Thirty percent would go to enhanced fire and police protection and emergency street repairs, and the State Tax Commission would collect the other three percent.

October 31-November 2

November 3

November 6-9

November 15

NASCAR in Mississippi— Fueling Your Dreams Tour Union Street

Stars of American Ballet Thalia Mara Hall

Mistletoe Marketplace Mississippi Trademart

Rickey Smiley Jackson Convention Complex

November 22

November 24

Katt Williams Mississippi Coliseum

Willie Nelson Thalia Mara Hall

Photo: Mistletoe Marketplace JCV8123 Events Ad November JFPress 9.25x5.875.indd 1

10/29/13 9:15 AM

jacksonfreepress.com

T

he Hinds County Board of Supervisors’ election is Nov. 5, but Jacksonians shouldn’t be ready to put away their votin’ shoes just yet. The Jackson City Council decided last week to authorize a city-wide referendum vote on the question of a 1-percent sales-tax increase for Jacksonians. It’s a regressive tax, and a commission with members who may not live in Jackson serving on it. The people will decide if it’s in their best interests on Jan. 14, 2014. This is not a tax Mayor Chokwe Lumumba said he wanted to pass before he got into office, and certainly not with the commission, which he saw as disrespectful to Jackson’s leadership. State law gives appointments to the governor, lieutenant governor and the speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives for the 10-member committee that will oversee disbursement of the roughly $15 million in expected revenue. Some council members praised Lumumba for his decision to give the people a choice, despite the publicly unresolved commission question. The council approved the measure with

11


:DQWWRVXEPLWHGLWRULDOFDUWRRQVWRWKH-)3"(PDLOHGLWRU#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP

Milking Our Emotions

W

ith all that is going on with the government lately, people on all sides of the political spectrum seem to be on edge. Nothing will make people emotional faster than cuts and government actions they can feel immediately. The 24-hour news media are doing an exceptional job of milking our emotions for every ounce of fear, empathy, sadness and rage they can find. When they sensationalize the news, we will keep watching and reading their websites. But often, we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even getting real news many of us need. A great example is the recent computer glitch that caused EBT service to go down in 17 states for almost a day. In a different time, this wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have been such a big issue, but we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in normal times. We are in the middle of an economic downturn complicated by a government shutdown. Poor and working-class people had been hearing for weeks of very real reports of services like WIC and Head Start being cut off or that cuts to them were pending. Rumors of SNAP being cut off any day had been going around my neighborhood for weeks. So naturally the moment that hundreds of thousands of people couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use their benefits and feed their families, they knew it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just at their store due to social media. Panic started breaking out. Where was the 24-hour media then? I guess news involving 17 states and affecting the lives and ability of children to eat wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough to report on, even though it may be a bigger story about routine glitches with Xerox systems. Had they and local networks taken a bit of time and care to get the message out that, yes, this was a big thing, then perhaps people would not have panicked the way some did. Store owners, especially mom-and-pops, could have looked online and seen what was going on and then spread the word. Instead, information was hard to find. Make no mistake: I am not excusing the bad behavior of people who chose to steal from stores rather than wait to see if the systems came back online. I do, however, understand that you may think that is a legitimate choice when you have children to feed and you think that you are facing a lose/lose situation. Those who call themselves journalists have a duty to inform the public for the sake of the public goodâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just for the sake of what drives ratings and page views. Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s telling people whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really in the ACA, covering local politics in-depth instead of reporting on accidents five states over, or informing people in 17 states who receive SNAP that they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t access their funds, it is all news worthy of being told.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bureaucratic cash grabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; October 30 - November 5, 2013

³0\¿UVWWKRXJKWZKHQ,OHDUQHGRIWKLVEXUHDXFUDWLFFDVKJUDEZDVWKDWWKH 2EDPDDGPLQLVWUDWLRQPLQGVHWKDGWDNHQRYHUWKH'HSDUWPHQWRI3XEOLF 6DIHW\OHDGHUVKLS´

12

°-ISSISSIPPI,T'OV4ATE2EEVESCRITICIZING$03#OMMISSIONER!LBERT3ANTA#RUZ FORIMPOSINGADMINISTRATIVEPHOTOFEEFORCONCEALED CARRYGUNPERMITS

Why it stinks: One of the objections civil-rights leaders often raise about voter ID is the it is tantamount to an unconstitutional tax. Even if the state-issued IDs are free, the argument goes, voters have to expend time and money taking the extra step of going to a circuit clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office, which might require taking a little bit of time off of work. Of all the statewide officials, Reeves hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been the most rabid voter ID supporter. On the other hand, he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exactly stand in its way, as he has done in other instances when he saw fit. But how Reeves can justify getting testy about a $6 fee trampling on 2nd Amendment gun rights while remaining silent about voter IDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suppression of constitutional voting rights is anybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guess.

Vote Nov. 5 for McQuirter, Baker

I

n the contest for Hinds County District 2 supervisor, the Jackson Free Press endorses Darrel McQuirterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and for all the reasons we gave him our endorsement in the Democratic primary. Mr. McQuirter is a longtime public servant, having served as fire chief in the city of Clinton before joining Hinds County, where he is now the planning and zoning director. Mr. McQuirter entered the supervisorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race at great personal risk, taking a leave of absence from his paid job that he could lose if the Tuesday, Nov. 5 election does not go his way. At every step in this electionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which started out with a crowded field of hopefuls that eventually was narrowed down to Mr. McQuirter and a dark horse with big support named Willie Earl Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;he has remained positive and professional. This, frankly, stands in stark contrast to Mr. McQuirterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opponent, interim District 2 Supervisor Alphonso Hunter. In his brief time on the board, Mr. Hunter has approached the position with the dedication of a thoughtful, earnest representative of the people. Our objection to Mr. Hunter, who is running as an independent, is not even because Mr. Hunter went back on his pledge to not seek the seat when he began serving out the rest of late Supervisor Doug Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s term. It is the fact that as far as we can tell, he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bothered to explain why heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breaking that promise. Politicians change their minds

all the time, but when they do, they should explain their rationale to constituents, answer our questions and seek our understanding. Mr. Hunter has not done this, and we cannot support his bid for the District 2 position. The choice in District 4 is less clear-cut. Tony Greer, a Republican alderman in the city of Clinton, is matched up against Democrat James â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lapâ&#x20AC;? Baker. Both men reside in Clinton and know the ins and outs of local government well. Philosophically, Mr. Greer likely aligns with the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conservative-minded residents more than Mr. Baker. We are also confident that Mr. Greer, just as previous Supervisor Phil Fisher did, would be unapologetic in, as he told the JFP this week, â&#x20AC;&#x153;shining a lightâ&#x20AC;? on the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business dealingsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whatever his motives. With little appetite or need to funnel county funds to his district for special projects and programs, Greer would likely devote himself to calling out the questionable moves of his Democratic counterparts. What gives us the most pause about Mr. Greer is the support he has proudly received from state leaders, including Gov. Phil Bryant, Speaker Philip Gunn and state Rep. Andy Gipson, whose policies we do not believe have been helpful for Mississippi. If Mr. Greer is in favor of blocking Medicaid expansion, opposing full funding for public K-12 education, promoting racist immigration-reform measures while widening access to guns, we cannot give him our endorsement. We endorse Mr. Baker in the race.

Email letters and opinion to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity, as well as factchecked.


Southern Tradition and Hypocrisy Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer EDITORIAL News Editor R.L. Nave Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell City Reporter Tyler Cleveland Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Nicole Wyatt Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Justin Hosemann, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

O

XFORD—Way back in 1988, I sat across from Strom Thurmond in his Capitol Hill office in Washington, D.C., and listened as he explained his opposition to federal antilynching laws and any other encroachment on states’ rights during his long career. “I felt it was dangerous to shift it all to Washington,” the then-85-year-old U.S. senator and former Dixiecrat presidential candidate from South Carolina told me. “Lynching was nothing but murder. All states had laws against murder. … I’ve never had any feelings against minorities.” Never mind that Thurmond, who died at 101 in 2003, led the Dixiecrat revolt out of the Democratic Party in 1948 and into the Republican Party in the 1960s largely as a reaction against civil rights legislation. Never mind that he was a segregationist superstar during much of the Civil Rights Movement. Thurmond’s disdain for the federal government that provided him a paycheck through much of his life was in classic southern tradition. As far back as the 1830s, another South Carolinian, John C. Calhoun, led the so-called “nullification” effort to allow states to “nullify” federal laws on tariffs and other issues. It took a fellow southerner, President Andrew Jackson, to put the lid on that campaign after sending troops down to Charleston. The tradition is going strong today. Southern conservatives in Congress deserve much of the blame for the recent federal government shutdown that cost the economy $24 billion. In the U.S. House vote to re-open government, 73 southern Republicans voted “No,” and only 18 voted “Yes,” according to Zack Beauchamp in ThinkProgress. The much-talked-about Tea Party leading the charge against government speaks with a decidedly southern accent. Yet who have these southern leaders represented through the years? Calhoun and his fellow nullifiers risked civil war in large part to defend planters worried that higher tariffs would cost them British customers. Three decades later, hundreds of thousands of southern farm boys went to war to defend the right of the same planters to own slaves. When Thurmond and his vicepresidential candidate, Fielding Wright of Mississippi, led the Dixiecrat ticket in 1948, a major plank in their platform was opposition to organized labor. Like their predecessors, their hot-button issue may have been race, but they were also determined to protect the interests of the

southern business and political elite. Today, the Tea Party rank and file rants against the federal government, but just try to take their Social Security and Medicare away from them. Thanks to the demonization of not only Uncle Sam but also labor unions by Fox News and its counterparts in Mississippi and elsewhere, the progeny of those same southern farm boys who fought for slavery think they now have to fight for the rights of business owners and corporate CEOs to enrich themselves at the expense of a docile and voiceless workforce. A South African delegation led by Cedric Gina, president of the National Union of Metal Workers of South Africa, visited the Jackson area earlier this month and was shocked at the uphill fight Nissan workers in Canton have to wage just to exercise their legal right to a union election. “We think this is not supposed to be happening in a so-called First World country, a so-called bastion of democracy,” Gina told me in a telephone interview. “To be so fearful, the workers, with no intervention. This is not supposed to be happening.” Workers at the Nissan plant in Canton say they’ve been subjected to repeated meetings with managers who threaten a plant closure and lost jobs if they opt to join the United Auto Workers. Although well paid by Mississippi’s low standards, most of them have gone years without a pay raise and are subjected to arbitrary decisions by management on health and pension benefit changes, work hours and working conditions. Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant has gone on record saying he supports outside groups that help keep unions out of his state. He’s probably happy now that the Virginia-based National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation has issued a special notice to Nissan workers in Canton warning them of the horrors of joining together and speaking with a united voice. After a majority of workers at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., indicated their support for a company-andunion-backed, German-style works council at the plant, the same foundation filed charges with the National Labor Relations Board alleging UAW coercion. The UAW says the claims are ridiculous. A thread that runs through southern history even stronger than race is class. The ruling class in the South doesn’t tolerate challenges to its rule well—whether that challenge comes from united black people or from united working people.

The ruling class in the South doesn’t tolerate challenges to its rule well.

Aleena Gabriel Adams Case No. 2013-AD-47

NOTICE OF HEARING

The State of Kansas to Marcus Diamond, biological father of Aleena Gabriel Adams, minor child born October 4, 2013, at Wesley Medical Center, Wichita, Kansas, to Mackeltra Adams, and to all other persons who are concerned. You are hereby notified that a petition for adoption has been filed in the Probate Department of the District Court, Butler County, Kansas, by petitioners seeking to adopt the said child, and you are hereby required to plead to said petition on or before December 6, 2013, at 11 o’clock a.m. in said court at El Dorado, Kansas. Should you fail therein, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon said petition.

Roofing General Laborers in Jackson, MS

• Must have a minimum of 6 months construction experience. • Must not be afraid of heights. • Driver’s License required For an application call

1-866-665-2422

jacksonfreepress.com

JOE ATKINS

13


FLICKR/EXPERTINFANTRY

by Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez

A National Guardsman looks out over the U.S.-Mexico border, where reports indicate that people arrested by border-patrol agents are subjected to cruel treatment.

October 30 - November 5, 2013

T

14

his year’s annual Project Censored list of the most under-reported news stories includes the widening wealth gap, the trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning, and President Obama’s war on whistleblowers—all stories that actually received considerable news coverage. Project Censored isn’t only about stories that were deliberately buried or ignored. It’s about stories the media have covered poorly through a sort of false objectivity that skews the truth. Journalists do cry out against injustice, on occasion, but they don’t always do it well. Academics and students from 18 universities and community colleges across the country pore through hundreds of submissions of overlooked and underreported stories annually to pick the top 25 stories and curates them into themed clusters. This year’s book, “Censored 2014: Fearless Speech in Fearful Times,” just hit bookstores. Brooke Gladstone, host of the radio program “On the Media” and writer of the graphic novel cum news media critique, “The Influencing Machine,” said the story of Manning (who now goes by the first name Chelsea) was the perfect example of the media trying to cover a story right, but getting it mostly wrong. Manning’s career was sacrificed for sending 700,000 classified documents about the Iraq war to

WikiLeaks. But the media focused largely on Manning’s trial and subsequent change in gender identity. The media mangling of Manning is No. 1 on the Project Censored list, but its shallow coverage is not unique. The news mainstream media are in a crisis, particularly in the U.S., and it’s getting worse. WATCHING THE WATCHDOGS The Project for Excellence in Journalism, which conducts an annual analysis of trends in news, found that newsrooms have shed 30 percent of their staff in the last decade. In 2012, the number of reporters in the U.S. dipped to its lowest level since 1978, with fewer than 40,000 reporters nationally. This creates a sense of desperation in the newsroom, and in the end, it’s the public that loses. “What won out is something much more palpable to the advertisers,” says Robert McChesney, an author, longtime media-reform advocate, professor at University of Illinois and host of Media Matters from 2000 to 2012. Blandness beat out fearless truth-telling. Even worse than kowtowing to advertisers is the false objectivity the media try to achieve, McChesney said, neutering news to stay “neutral” on a topic. This handcuffs journalists into not drawing conclusions, even when those conclusions

are well-supported by the facts. To report a story, they rely on words of others to make claims, limiting what they report. “You allow people in power to set the range of legitimate debate, and you report on it,” McChesney said. For example, reporting on the increasing gulf between the rich and the poor is easy, but talking about why the rich are getting richer is where journalists worry about objectivity, Gladstone said. “I think that there is a desire to stay away from stories that will inspire rhetoric of class warfare,” she said. Unable to tell the story of a trend and unable to talk about rising inequality for fear of appearing partisan, reporters often fail to connect the dots for their readers. The story, “Bank Interests Inflate Global Prices by 35 to 40 Percent,” is a good example of the need for a media watchdog. Researchers point to interest payments as the primary way wealth is transferred from Main Street to Wall Street. It’s how the banks are picking the pockets of the 99 percent. But if no politician calls out banks on this practice, if no advocacy group gains enough traction, shouldn’t it be the media’s role to protect the public and sound the battle cry? “So much of media criticism is really political commentary squeezed through a media squeezer,” Gladstone said.

For American journalism to revive itself, it has to move beyond its corporate ties. It has to become a truly free press. It’s time to end the myth that corporate journalism is the only way for media to be objective, monolithic, and correct. The failures of that prescription are clear in Project Censored’s top 10 underreported stories of the year:

1.

Manning and the Failure of Corporate Media

Untold stories of Iraqi civilian deaths by American soldiers, U.S. diplomats pushing aircraft sales on foreign royalty, uninvestigated abuse by Iraqi allies, the perils of the rise in private war contractors—this is what Manning exposed. They challenged the U.S. political elite, and they were enabled by a sacrifice. Manning got a 35-year prison sentence for the revelation of state secrets to WikiLeaks, a story told countless times in corporate media. Though The New York Times partnered with WikiLeaks to release stories based on the documents, many published 2010 through 2011, news from the leaks have since slowed to a trickle—a waste of more than 700,000 pieces of classified intelligence giving unparalleled views of America’s costly wars.


Richest Global 1 Percent Hide Billions in Tax Havens

Global corporate fat cats hold $21 trillion to $32 trillion in offshore havens, money hidden from government taxation that would benefit people around the world, according James S. Henry, the former chief economist of the global management firm McKinsey & Company. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists obtained a leak in April 2013, revealing how widespread the buy-in was to these tax havens. The findings were damning: government officials in Canada, Russia, and other countries have embraced offshore accounts, the world’s top banks (including Deutsche Bank) have worked to maintain them, and the tax havens are used in Ponzi schemes. Moving money offshore has implications that ripped through the world economy. Part of Greece’s economic collapse was due to these tax havens, ICIJ reporter Gerard Ryle told Gladstone. “It’s because people don’t want to pay taxes,” he said. “You avoid taxes by going offshore and playing by different rules.” U.S. Sen. Carl Levin, D-Michigan, introduced legislation to combat the practice, SB1533, The Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act, but so far the bill has had little play in the media. Researcher James Henry said the hidden wealth was a “huge black hole” in the world economy that has never been measured, which could generate income tax revenues between $190 billion to $280 billion a year.

3.

Trans-Pacific Partnership

Take 600 corporate advisers, mix in officials from 11 international governments, let it bake for about two years, and out pops international partnerships that threaten to cripple progressive movements worldwide. The Trans-Pacific Partnership is a trade agreement, but leaked texts show it may allow foreign investors to use “investor-state” tribunals to extract extravagant extra damages for “expected future profits,” according to the Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. The trade watch group investigated the TPP and is the main advocate in opposition

ery letter of the law in the bill he had just signed. “Certain provisions in the Act threaten to interfere with my constitutional duty to supervise the executive branch,” Obama said. “As my administration previously informed the Congress, I will interpret those sections consistent with my authority.”

5.

Antigovernment and Hate Groups on Rise across U.S.

Hate groups in the U.S. are on the rise, according to a report by the Southern Poverty Law Center. There are 1,007 known hate groups operating across the country, it wrote, including neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan, WIKICOMMONS/BRADLEY MANNING SUPPORT NETWORK

2.

of its policies. The AFL-CIO, Sierra Club and other organizations have also had growing concerns about the level of access granted to corporations in these agreements. With extra powers granted to foreign firms, the possibility that companies would continue moving offshore could grow. But even with the risks of outsized corporate influence, the U.S. has a strong interest in the TPP in order to maintain trade agreements with Asia. The balancing act between corporate and public interests is at stake, but until the U.S. releases more documents from negotiations, Americans will remain in the dark.

At a December 2011 rally in San Francisco, members of the group Anonymous pledged support of Pfc. Bradley Manning, who was convicted in July 2013 for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to Wikileaks.

4.

President Obama’s War on Whistleblowers

President Obama has invoked the Espionage Act of 1917 more than every other president combined. Seven times, Obama has pursued leakers with the act, against Thomas Drake, Shamai Leibowitz, Bradley Manning, Stephen Kim, Jeffrey Sterling, John Kiriakou and most recently, Edward Snowden. All had ties to the State Department, FBI, CIA or NSA, and all of them leaked to journalists. “Neither party is raising hell over this. This is the sort of story that sort of slips through the cracks,” McChesney said. Pro Publica covered the issue, constructing timelines and mapping out the various arrests and indictments. But where Project Censored points out the lack of coverage is in Obama’s hypocrisy—only a year before, he signed The Whistleblower Protection Act. Later on, he said he wouldn’t follow ev-

white nationalists, neo-Confederates, racist skinheads, black separatists, border vigilantes, and others. Since 2000, those groups have grown by over half, and there was a “powerful resurgence” of Patriot groups, such as those involved in the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995. Worst of all, the huge growth in armed militias seems to have conspicuous timing with Obama’s election. “The number of Patriot groups, including armed militias, has grown 813 percent since Obama was elected — from 149 in 2008 to 1,360 in 2012,” the SPLC reported.

6.

Billionaires’ Rising Wealth Intensifies Poverty and Inequality

The world’s billionaires added $241 billion to their collective net worth in 2012.

That’s an economic recovery, right? That gain, coupled with the world’s richest peoples’ new total worth of $1.9 trillion (more than the GDP of Canada), wasn’t reported by some kooky socialist group, but by Bloomberg News. But few journalists are asking the important question: Why? Project Censored points to journalist George Monbiot, who highlights a reduction of taxes and tax enforcement, the privatization of public assets, and the weakening of labor unions. His conclusions are backed up by the United Nations’ Trade and Development Report from 2012, which noted how the trend hurts everyone: “Recent empirical and analytical work reviewed here mostly shows a negative correlation between inequality and growth.”

7.

Merchant of Death and Nuclear Weapons

The report highlighted by Project Censored on the threat of nuclear war is an example not of censorship, strictly, but a desire for media reform. A study from the The Physicians for Social Responsibility said 1 billion people could starve in the decade after a nuclear detonation. Corn production in the U.S. would decline by an average of 10 percent for an entire decade and food prices would make food inaccessible to hundreds of millions of the world’s poorest. This is not journalism in the classic sense, Gladstone said. In traditional journalism, as it’s played out since the early 20th century, news requires an element of something new in order to garner reporting — not a looming threat or danger. So in this case, what the project identified was the need for a new kind of reporting it called “solutions journalism.” “Solutions journalism,” Sarah van Gelder wrote in the foreword to Censored 2014, “must investigate not only the individual innovations, but also the larger pattern of change — the emerging ethics, institutions, and ways of life that are coming into existence.”

8.

Bank Interests Inflate Global Prices by 35 to 40 Percent

Does 35 percent of everything bought in the United States go to interest? Professor Margrit Kennedy of the University of Hanover thinks so, and she says it’s a major funnel of money from the 99 percent to the rich. In her 2012 book, “Occupy Money,” Kennedy wrote that tradespeople, suppliers, wholesalers, and retailers along the chain of production rely on credit. Her figures were initially drawn from the German economy,

more UNDER-REPORTED see

jacksonfreepress.com

The media took a scathing indictment of U.S. military policy and spun it into a story about Manning’s politics and patriotism. As Rolling Stone pointed out (“Did the Media Fail Bradley Manning?”), Manning initially took the trove of leaks to The Washington Post and The New York Times, only to be turned away. Alexa O’Brien, a former Occupy activist, scooped most of the media by actually attending Manning’s trial. She produced tens of thousands of words in transcriptions of the court hearings, one of the only reporters on the beat.

15


Intern at the JFP

Design Your Life

Hone your skills, gain valuable experience and college credit* by interning with the Jackson Free Press. You set your hours, and attend free training workshops. We currently have openings in the following areas: • Editorial/News • Photography • Cultural/Music Writing • Fashion/Style

• Arts Writing/Editing • Internet • Graphic Design • Communications: Marketing/Events/PR

Interested? E-mail interns@jacksonfreepress.com, telling us why you want to intern with us and what makes you the ideal candidate. *College credit available to currently enrolled college students in select disciplines.

Butler’s

SOUTHLAND AUTO SERVICE Is Your Car Winter Ready

?

Complete Cold Weather Diagnostics & Maintenance

Phase 1: Master the Basics Phase 2: A Hands On Approach Phase 3: Advance Your Skills Phase 4: Prepare and Work

Call Now for November 17th Enrollment Ask About Our Flex Schedule Options and Schedule Your New Life

1-800-New Look

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, gainful employment statistics and other important information, please visit our website at, www. magnoliacollegeofcosmetology.com Photo Courtesy of Pivot Point International Inc.

Domestic, Foreign, European 5448 North State St., Jackson

601-362-2253

October 30 - November 5, 2013

Mon-Fri 7:30 - 5:30 • Sat 7:30-12

16

4725 I-55 N • Jackson, MS • 601.362.6940 www.magnoliacollegeofcosmetology.com


UNDER-REPORTED

9.

Icelanders Vote to Include Commons in Their Constitution

Project Censored wrote, “when Iceland’s unregulated banks borrowed more than the country’s gross domestic product from international wholesale money markets.”

In 2012, Icelandic citizens voted in referendum to change the country’s 1944 constitution. When asked, “In the new constitution, do you want natural resources that are not privately owned to be declared national property?” its citizens voted 81 percent in favor. Project Censored says this is important for us to know, but in the end, U.S. journalism is notably Americancentric. Even the Nieman Watchdog, a foundation for journalism at Harvard University, issued a report in Do you know that Physicians for Social 2011 citing the lack of reporting on a Responsibility estimate that 1 billion people could starve in the 10 years following a nuclearwar the U.S. funneled over $4 trillion weapons detonation? Probably not. into over the past decade, not to mention the cost in human lives. If we don’t pay attention to our A “Culture of Cruelty” own wars, why exactly does Project Censored along Mexico–U.S. think we’d pay attention to Iceland? Border “The constitutional reforms are a direct response to the nation’s 2008 financial crash,” The plight of Mexican border crossings

FLICKR/FUTUREATLAS.COM

but Ellen Brown of the Web of Debt and Global Research said she found similar patterns in the U.S. This “hidden interest” has sapped the growth of other industries, she said, lining the pockets of the financial sector. So if interest is stagnating so many industries, why would journalists avoid the topic? Few economists have echoed her views, and few experts emerged to back up her assertions. Notably, she’s a professor in an architectural school, with no formal credentials in economics. From her own website, she said she became an “expert” in economics “through her continuous research and scrutiny.” Without people in power pushing the topic, McChesney said that a mainstream journalist would be seen as going out on a limb. “The reporters raise an issue the elites are not raising themselves, then you’re ideological, have an axe to grind, sort of a hack,” he said. “It makes journalism worthless on pretty important issues.”

from page 15

10.

usually involves three types of stories in U.S. press: deaths in the stretch of desert beyond the border, the horrors of drug cartels and heroic journeys of border crossings by sympathetic workers. But a report released a year ago by the organization. “No More Death’s snags the 10th spot for overlooked stories. The report asserts that people arrested by Border Patrol while crossing were denied water and told to let their sick die. “No More Deaths” conducted more than 12,000 interviews to form the basis of its study in three Mexican cities: Nacos, Nogales and Agua Prieta. The report cites grossly ineffective oversight from the Department of Homeland Security. This has received some coverage, from Salon showcasing video of Border Patrol agents destroying jugs of water meant for crossers to a recent New York Times piece citing a lack of oversight for Border Patrol’s excessive force. The ACLU lobbied the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to call international attention to the plight of these border crossers at the hands of U.S. law enforcement. If ever an issue flew under the radar, this is it.

The Most Under-reported Stories in Jackson Jackson’s Falling Crime Rate Everybody loves to talk about how crime is out of control in the capital city, but aside from ignoring the systemic causes of crime, it’s just flat-out wrong to say that crime is on the rise. The most recent information from the Jackson Police Department show that total major crimes are down more than 10 percent from last year, dropping from 8,472 at this time last year to 7,585 this year. And despite occasional spikes in various crimes, the crime rate has fallen steadily and dramatically in Jackson since the 1990s.

nered national and international attention as the state’s last abortion provider, but JWHO is not the final frontier of reproductive rights in Mississippi. Starting July 1, a new state law requires health-care professionals to collect and test DNA from the umbilical cord of mothers under age 16. Supporters of the measure, which included Gov. Phil Bryant, believe it will help curb Mississippi’s high teen birth rate. Reproductive-rights advocates call the cord-blood law an invasion of privacy.

Juvenile Justice Makes Strides FLICKR/KDCSTM

Mississippi has a very troubled history with respect to youth corrections at Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility, Oakley TrainThe Beer Renaissance ing School (now called the Oakley Soon, Lucky Town Brewing Youth Development Center) and Co. will become the first microbrewHinds County’s Henley-Young Juery operating in the capital city in venile Justice Center, just to name a recent memory. Meanwhile, Kiln’s few. However, there is positive news Lazy Magnolia is earning a national Crime is down in Jackson. Surprised? about the way Mississippi treats kids reputation for the quality of its suds, in its juvenile-justice systems. and Jackson now has a store dediAn August 2013 report from cated to the legal-at-last hobby of home brewing called Bre- the Pew Charitable Trusts shows that Mississippi is one of whaha. Those stories are widely reported. The story that has three states where the number of children sent to youth been under-reported is what a healthy craft-brewing culture correctional facilities fell by more than 75 percent between means for social and economic progress in Mississippi. Mi- 1997 and 2011. The overall national rate fell as well, by 48 crobreweries are a respectable portion of the U.S. beverage percent in that time period. market, with about $10.2 billion in annual sale. Also, more than 2,300 craft breweries—which include brewpubs, re- State Democrats Surge gional craft breweries and microbreweries—operated durThe state Democratic Party may have overplayed its ing 2012 and 409 new breweries opened in 2012. hand a bit by chest-beating about the party’s successes in several major cities during this year’s mayor’s races in JackContinued Assault on Reproductive Rights son, Vicksburg, Ocean Springs, Hattiesburg and Starkville. The Jackson Women’s Health Organization has gar- The Dems’ victories with Jason Shelton in Tupelo and Percy

Bland, the first black mayor elected in Meridian, are notable accomplishments, but that’s not really where the story is. Rather, it’s the quiet success of the party’s 1876 Plan, which involved ensuring that each of Mississippi’s 1876 voting precincts has Democratic presence. In some of the state’s conservative areas, having even one brave soul stepping up to carry the mantle of the party of Obama seems worthy of more coverage than it has received. And it’s newsworthy in its own right that the state’s Democrats are increasingly running as progressives, rather than trying to out-conservative Republicans.

Gun Laws Confusing Law Enforcement Are liberal gun laws having a chilling effect on the investigation of violent crime? As predicted, a new state law designed to clarify the definition of open-carry of firearms appears to have created confusion among law-enforcement officials. Several people whose loved ones were killed by handguns have told the Jackson Free Press that police officials used the new opencarry law and the state’s Castle Doctrine as an excuse to wash their hands of a prolonged investigation into the facts. Over the summer, 20-year-old Quardious Thomas became the victim of a homeowner who claims Thomas was breaking into his automobile. In that case, Jackson detectives declined to pursue charges against the homeowner, citing homeowners’ right under the Castle Doctrine to protect their home and vehicles. This, despite the fact that legal experts have pointed out that the Castle Doctrine requires that vehicles be occupied to justify deadly force. In a separate case, William Brown was shot and killed as the result of an apparent feud. His family question whether police declined to press charges against his assailant because people have the right to self-defense and, under the new state law, they also have the right openly carry firearms.

jacksonfreepress.com

W

ith few exceptions, slow news days are rare in the capital city.

17


Voting Starts Nov. 1

Stop In & Try Our

Plate Lunch Specials

http://jfp.ms/ballot

Only $10, 1 meat, 3 vegetables, bread & a drink. 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

-&Mon - Thur 3:00 - 6:00 p.m. Sat 11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

1/2 off Martinis & House Wines 2 for 1 Draft & Wells

1029 HWY 51 N. SUITE A | MADISON | 601.607.7885 WWW.THECITYGRILLE.COM | FIND US ON FACEBOOK

E

ach year for more than a decade now, the Jackson Free Press has let readers vote for their favorite local businesses, organizations and people. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now time to gear up to campaign for the 2014 Best of Jackson awards. To kick off the 2014 campaign season, the Jackson Free Press has listed the Best of Jackson 2013 winners each week until the ballotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s release online Nov. 1 (and in the Nov. 6 print edition.) Think you have what it takes to join the ranks of the Best of Jackson champions? Well, here are the ones to beat! Let the campaigning begin! :LQQHUVIURP%HVWRI-DFNVRQ

Call Us For All Of Your Catering Needs! BBQ Party Pack

"EST"REAKFAST"EST0LACEFOR$ESSERT"EST0LATE ,UNCH0RIMOS#AFm /DNHODQG'ULYH)ORZRRG/DNH +DUERU'ULYH5LGJHODQGSULPRVFDIHFRP

Serves 10 - $44.95

"EST0LACEFOR$ESSERT  6HFRQG!MERIGO)TALIAN2ESTAURANT 2OG &DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG 7KLUG3AL -OOKIE´S.EW9ORK0IZZAAND)CE#REAM*OINT  7D\ORU6W *RRG6KRZLQJ"OP´S&ROZEN #USTARD 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVERSVIUR]HQFXVWDUGFRP  "ROAD3TREET"AKING#OMPANY ,QWHUVWDWH1 6XLWH #HAR2ESTAURANT  ,QWHUVWDWH6XLWH

(2 lbs pork/beef or 2 whole chickens; 2 pints beans, 2 pints slaw, 6 slices Texas toast/10 buns)

Rib Party Pack Serves 4 - $52.15 (2 whole ribs, 1 pint of baked beans, 1 pint of slaw, 1 pint of potato salad, 4 slices of Texas toast)

Where Raul Knows Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name -Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 â&#x20AC;¢ 2006 2008 â&#x20AC;¢ 2009 â&#x20AC;¢ 2010 â&#x20AC;¢ 2011 â&#x20AC;¢ 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. â&#x20AC;¢ Jackson â&#x20AC;¢ 601.956.7079

"EST"REAKFAST  6HFRQG!NOTHER"ROKEN%GG +LJKODQG &RORQ\3DUNZD\6XLWH5LGJHODQG  7KLUG"ROAD3TREET"AKING#OMPANY ,QWHUVWDWH 16XLWH *RRG6KRZLQJ"EAGLE "AGEL#AFm 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVWKHEHDJOHEDJHOFDIHQHW  "RENT´S$RUGS 'XOLQJ$YH #ORNER "AKERY 0DUNHW6W)ORZRRG *UDQGYLHZ%OYG0DGLVRQ  "EST0LATE,UNCH  6HFRQG-C$ADE´S-ARKET 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV PFGDGHVPDUNHWVFRP 7KLUG4RACE'RILL +LJKZD\ 16XLWH)5LGJHODQG *RRG6KRZLQJ &HEROKEE)NN 2OG6TXDUH5RDG  #OSMOPOLITAN#AFm 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG  'EORGIA"LUE &RORQ\&URVVLQJ:D\0DGLVRQ 

"EST"AKERY "EST0LACETO"UY#AKES #AMPBELL´S"AKERY 16WDWH6WFDPSEHOOVEDNHU\PV

October 30 - November 5, 2013

"EST"AKERY  6HFRQG"ROAD3TREET"AKING#OMPANY  ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH 7KLUG 0RIMOS#AFm /DNHODQG'ULYH)ORZRRG /DNH+DUERU'ULYH5LGJHODQG  *RRG6KRZLQJ"EAGLE"AGEL#AFm 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV WKHEHDJOHEDJHOFDIHQHW #ORNER"AKERY 0DUNHW 6W)ORZRRG*UDQGYLHZ%OYG 0DGLVRQ 'REAT(ARVEST"READ#OMPANY 3DUNZD\'ULYH+LJKZD\ 5LGJHODQG

18

"EST0LACETO"UY#AKES  6HFRQG0RIMOS#AFm /DNHODQG'ULYH)OR ZRRG/DNH+DUERU'ULYH5LGJHODQG  7KLUG4HAT3PECIAL4OUCH 2OG %UDQGRQ5RDG3HDUO *RRG6KRZLQJ #RAZY#AT"AKERS ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  $REAM#AKES 7RS6W6XLWH' )ORZRRG &AT#AKE'UY /DNHODQG 'ULYH6XLWH)ORZRRG

"EST"URGER"EST&RENCH&RIES"URGERS"LUES (&RXQW\/LQH5RDG6XLWH5LGJHODQG EXUJHUVEOXHVFRP "EST"URGER  6HFRQG-UGSHOTS'RILL"AR /DNHODQG 'ULYH)ORZRRG 7KLUG3TAMPS 3UPERBURGER 'DOWRQ6W *RRG

6KRZLQJ#OOL!L´S 0F:LOOLH'ULYH  &IVE'UYS"URGERSAND&RIES 0DUNHW6W)ORZRRG +LJKODQG&RORQ\3DUNZD\6XLWH 5LGJHODQG -AJESTIC"URGER  +LJKODQG&RORQ\3DUNZD\5LGJHODQG

"EST&RENCH&RIES  6HFRQG#OOL!L´S 0F:LOOLH'ULYH  7KLUG-UGSHOTS /DNHODQG'ULYH  *RRG6KRZLQJ&IVE'UYS"URGERSAND&RIES 0DUNHW6W)ORZRRG+LJKODQG &RORQ\3DUNZD\6XLWH5LGJHODQG  2OOSTER´S 16WDWH6W 3TAMPS 3UPERBURGER 'DOWRQ6W

COURTESY PRIMOS

Enjoy Happy Hour in our Bar

Primos Cafe won Best Breakfast, Best Place for Dessert and Best Plate Lunch in 2013. "EST"ARBECUE"EST0LACEFOR2IBS%,"ARBECUE %DLOH\$YH "EST"ARBECUE  6HFRQG(ICKORY0IT &DQWRQ0DUW5RDG  7KLUG3ONNY´S2EAL0IT"AR " 1  +LJKZD\::*RYHUQPHQW6W %UDQGRQ *RRG6KRZLQJ#HIMNEYVILLE 3MOKEHOUSE +LJK6W (AUTE0IG 0DLQ6W0DGLVRQ 3TATE3TREET "ARBEQUE 16WDWH6W

"EST0LACEFOR2IBS  6HFRQG3ONNY´S2EAL0IT"AR " 1 +LJKZD\ ::*RYHUQPHQW6W%UDQGRQ  7KLUG(ICKORY0IT &DQWRQ0DUW 5RDG *RRG6KRZLQJ#HIMNEYVILLE 3MOKEHOUSE +LJK6W (AUTE0IG 0DLQ6W0DGLVRQ 3TATE3TREET "ARBEQUE 16WDWH6W

"EST%THNIC2ESTAURANT"EST-EDITERRANEAN-IDDLE %ASTERN!LADDIN-EDITERRANEAN'RILL /DNHODQG'ULYHDODGGLQLQMDFNVRQFRP "EST%THNIC2ESTAURANT  6HFRQG3PICE!VENUE ,QWHUVWDWH1  7KLUG!BEBA%THIOPIAN2ESTAURANT ,QWHUVWDWH1 *RRG6KRZLQJ "ABALU4ACOSAND4APAS 'XOLQJ$YH6XLWH  3AIGON /DNHODQG'ULYH)ORZRRG


"EST0LACEFOR(EALTHY&OOD  6HFRQG"RUNO´S!DOBO 65RDFK6W6XLWH  7KLUG2AINBOW.ATURAL'ROCERY #OOPERATIVE 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG  *RRG6KRZLQJ!LADDIN-EDITERRANEAN'RILL  /DNHODQG'ULYH *ASON´S$ELI ( &RXQW\/LQH5RDG .EWK´S%XPRESS#AFm 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVQHZNVFRP

"EST6EGETARIAN/PTIONS  6HFRQG!LADDIN-EDITERRANEAN'RILL /DNH ODQG'ULYH 7KLUG"RUNO´S!DOBO 6 5RDFK6W6XLWH *RRG6KRZLQJ "2!6/)TALIAN2ESTAURANTAND"AR ,QWHUVWDWH 16XLWH 2AINBOW.ATURAL'ROCERY #OOPERATIVE 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG  3PICE!VENUE ,QWHUVWDWH1  4ABLE 5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG

"EST+IDS-ENU"EST0LACEFOR)CE#REAM3AL -OOKIE´S.EW9ORK0IZZAAND)CE#REAM*OINT 7D\ORU6WVDODQGPRRNLHVFRP  "EST+IDS-ENU  6HFRQG-C!LISTER´S$ELI 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV PFDOLVWHUVGHOLFRP 7KLUG WLH .EWK´S%XPRESS#AFm 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVQHZNVFRP 0RIMOS#AFm  /DNHODQG'ULYH/DNH+DUERU'ULYH 5LGJHODQG *RRG6KRZLQJ"ROAD3TREET "AKING#OMPANY ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  "URGERS"LUES (&RXQW\/LQH5RDG 6XLWH5LGJHODQG

"EST0LACEFOR)CE#REAM  6HFRQG"OP´S&ROZEN#USTARD 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV ERSVIUR]HQFXVWDUGFRP 7KLUG#OLD3TONE#REAMERY 0DLQ6W6XLWH%0DGLVRQ *RRG 6KRZLQJ"ERRY"ERRY'OOD9OGURT 3DUNZD\ )ORZRRG&RORQ\&URVVLQJ6XLWH 0DGLVRQ+LJKZD\6XLWH$ 0DGLVRQ "RENT´S$RUGS 'XOLQJ $YH 3WEET4REE9OGURT /DNH +DUERXU'ULYH6XLWH5LGJHODQG

"EST,UNCH"UFFET"EST3OUL&OOD -AMA(AMIL´S3OUTHERN#OOKIN´ 0DJQROLD6W0DGLVRQKDPLOVFRP  "EST,UNCH"UFFET  6HFRQG4WO3ISTERS+ITCHEN 1&RQJUHVV6W  7KLUG)CHIBAN 5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG  *RRG6KRZLQJ#OUNTRY&ISHERMAN +LJKZD\ 3PICE!VENUE  ,QWHUVWDWH1 4HAI(OUSE 2OG 6TXDUH5RDG

"EST3OUL&OOD  6HFRQG4WO3ISTERS+ITCHEN 1&RQJUHVV6W  7KLUG0EACHES 1)DULVK6W  *RRG6KRZLQJ"ULLY´S2ESTAURANT  /LYLQJVWRQ5RDG #OLLINS$REAM+ITCHEN 7HUU\5RDG 'LORIA´S+ITCHEN  %DLOH\$YH6XLWH$

"EST-EAL5NDER"EST3ANDWICH0LACE .EWK´S%XPRESS#AFm 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVQHZNVFRP "EST-EALUNDER  6HFRQG"ASIL´S ()RUWL¿FDWLRQ6W6XLWH %16WDWH6W  7KLUG"RENT´S$RUGS 'XOLQJ$YH  *RRG6KRZLQJ#HEROKEE)NN 2OG6TXDUH5RDG  +EIFER´S 3RSODU%OYG 1&RQJUHVV6W 0RIMOS#AFm  /DNHODQG'ULYH)ORZRRG/DNH+DUERU 'ULYH5LGJHODQG

"EST#HINESE2ESTAURANT 0U&KHQ¶V$XWKHQWLF&KLQHVH&RRNLQJ ,QWHUVWDWH1  6HFRQG)CHIBAN3USHIAND#HINESE"UFFET  5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG 7KLUG+ING"UFFET 5LGJHZRRG&RXUW'ULYH6XLWH,  *RRG6KRZLQJ"EST7OK#HINESE2ESTAURANT  0HDGRZEURRN5RDG #HINA"ELLE 

Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative placed in three categories /DNHODQG'ULYH6XLWH( $ING(OW !SIAN"ISTRO 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG  &IVE(APPINESS#HINESE2ESTAURANT  0F'RZHOO5RDG([WHQVLRQ

"EST!SIAN0AN !SIA +DUERU3RLQWH&URVVLQJ5LGJHODQG SDQDVLDFRP  6HFRQG WLH 4HAI(OUSE 2OG6TXDUH5RDG  -R#HEN´S!UTHENTIC#HINESE#OOKING ,QWHUVWDWH1 7KLUG)CHIBAN 5LGJHZD\)ORZRRG *RRG6KRZLQJ "ONSAI*APANESE3TEAK(OUSE /DNHODQG'ULYH  .AGOYA*APANESE2ESTAURANT  ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH&RORQ\ &URVVLQJ6XLWH0DGLVRQ 3AKURA "ANA ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH

"EST"RUNCH*ULEP2ESTAURANTAND"AR ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWHMXOHSUHV WDXUDQWFRP  6HFRQG.ICK´S2ESTAURANT 2OG&DQWRQ 5RDG 7KLUG!NOTHER"ROKEN%GG +LJKODQG&RORQ\3DUNZD\6XLWH5LGJHODQG  *RRG6KRZLQJ#HAR2ESTAURANT  ,QWHUVWDWH6XLWH 1UE3ERf3ERf 16WDWH6W 4ABLE 5LGJH :D\)ORZRRG

"EST$OUGHNUTS3CURLOCK´S$ONUT3HOPAND%ATERY 6&RQJUHVV6W6XLWH VFXUORFNGRQXWVFRP  6HFRQG$ONUT0ALACE 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV  7KLUG3HIPLEY´S$O .UTS +LJKZD\ (&OLQWRQ *RRG6KRZLQJ-ONROE´S 0HGJDU(YHUV%OYG 0ILLOW$ONUTS 2OG)DQQLQ5RDG6XLWH')ORZRRG %HDX3UH'ULYH5LGJHODQG 3WEET 3ENSATIONS 3DUNZD\'ULYH

"EST%THNICOR3PECIALTY'ROCER2AINBOW.ATURAL 'ROCERY#OOPERATIVE 2OG&DQWRQ5RDGUDLQERZFRRSRUJ  6HFRQG-R#HEN´S/RIENTAL3UPERMARKET  ,QWHUVWDWH1 7KLUG!LADDIN'ROCERY /DNHODQG'ULYH *RRG6KRZLQJ

"EST&RIED#HICKEN4WO3ISTERS+ITCHEN 1&RQJUHVV6W  6HFRQG*ULEP2ESTAURANTAND"AR ,QWHUVWDWH 16XLWH 7KLUG-AMA(AMIL´S 3OUTHERN#OOKIN´ 0DJQROLD6W0DGLVRQ  *RRG6KRZLQJ&ANNIN-ART +LJKZD\ )ORZRRG 0RIMOS#AFm /DNHODQG 'ULYH/DNH+DUERU'ULYH5LGJHODQG  4ABLE 5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG 

"EST'REEK2ESTAURANT+EIFER´S 3RSODU%OYGNHLIHUVQHW1 &RQJUHVV6WNHLIHUVGRZQWRZQFRP  6HFRQG+RISTOS 0DGLVRQ$YH0DGLVRQ  7KLUG7RAPS (1RUWKVLGH'ULYH6XLWH  *RRG6KRZLQJ"ILL´S'REEK4AVERN 0F:LOOLH'ULYH +RILAKIS¯#ASUAL 'REEK$INING :-DFNVRQ6W5LGJHODQG  6ASILIOS'REEK#UISINE +LJKZD\0DGL VRQ

"EST'UMBO1UE3ERf3ERf 16WDWH6WTXHVHUDPVFRP  6HFRQG(AL-AL´S 6&RPPHUFH6W  7KLUG#HAR2ESTAURANT ,QWHUVWDWH 16XLWH *RRG6KRZLQJ"ROAD 3TREET"AKING#OMPANY ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  &AT4UESDAY´S 2OG&DQWRQ 5RDG5LGJHODQG 3AL0HIL´S 2OG &DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG

"EST(ANGOVER&OOD#HEROKEE)NN 2OG6TXDUH5RDG  6HFRQG+EIFER´S 3RSODU%OYG 1&RQJUHVV6W 7KLUG"URGERS "LUES (&RXQW\/LQH5RDG6XLWH5LGJHODQG  *RRG6KRZLQJ1UE3ERf3ERf  16WDWH6W &IVE'UYS"URGERS&RIES 0DUNHW6W)ORZRRG+LJKODQG &RORQ\3DUNZD\6XLWH5LGJHODQG  0IZZA3HACK ()RUWL¿FDWLRQ6W 3DUNZD\'ULYH

-OST)NNOVATIVE-ENU0ARLOR-ARKET :&DSLWRO6WSDUORUPDUNHWFRP  6HFRQG"ABALU4ACOSAND4APAS 'XOLQJ$YH 6XLWH 7KLUG4ABLE 5LGJH :D\)ORZRRG *RRG6KRZLQJ"RUNO´S !DOBO 65RDFK6W6XLWH  *ULEP2ESTAURANTAND"AR ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  7ALKER´S$RIVE )N 16WDWH6W 

"EST)TALIAN!MERIGO)TALIAN2ESTAURANT 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG DPHULJRQHW  6HFRQG"2!6/)TALIAN2ESTAURANT"AR  ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH 7KLUG #ERAMI´S)TALIAN2ESTAURANT /DNHODQG'ULYH  *RRG6KRZLQJ"IAGGI´S2ISTORANTE)TALIANO +LJKODQG&RORQ\3DUNZD\5LGJHODQG  &RATESI´S)TALIAN&OODS /DNH+DUERXU'ULYH 5LGJHODQG 2OSSINI#UCINA)TALIANA  :-DFNVRQ6W6XLWH$5LGJHODQG

"EST*APANESE3USHI.AGOYA*APANESE2ESTAURANT ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH &RORQ\&URVVLQJ6XLWH0DGLVRQ QDJR\DPVFRP  6HFRQG3AKURA"ANA ,QWHUVWDWH1  7KLUG,ITTLE4OKYO $YHU\%OYG 5LGJHODQG *RRG6KRZLQJ"ONSAI *APANESE3TEAK(OUSE /DNHODQG'ULYH  )CHIBAN 5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG  7ASABI3USHIAND"AR (&DSLWRO6W6XLWH 

"EST-EXICAN,ATIN,A#AZUELA-EXICAN'RILL ()RUWL¿FDWLRQ6W JDUFLDUHVWDXUDQWVQHWFD]XHODKWP  6HFRQG%L0OTRILLO-EXICAN2ESTAURANT  *UDQG9LHZ%OYG6XLWH+0DGLVRQ /DXUHO3DUN'ULYH)ORZRRG :*RYHUQPHQW6W6XLWH'%UDQGRQ  7KLUG0APITOS-EXICAN'RILL &RORQ\&URVVLQJ6XLWH 0DGLVRQ 

4654 McWillie Dr. Jackson, MS Monday - Thursday: 10AM - 9PM Friday & Saturday: 10AM - 10PM Sunday: CLOSED

Follow Us

We Have New Desserts! Cookies & Fresh Baked Brownies

Cool Al’s

CoolAlsJxn

601.713.3020 www.coolals.com

Best Fried Chicken in Town & Best Fried Chicken in the Country -Best of Jackson 2003-2013-

-Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music oct 30 - nov 4

wed | oct 30 | 5:30 - 9:30

Jesse “Guitar��� Smith thur | oct 31 | 5:30 - 9:30

Brian Jones fri | nov 1 | 12:00 - 3:00

Acoustic Crossroads fri | nov 1 | 6:00 - 10:00

Shaun & Richard sat | nov 2 | 6:00 - 10:00

Brad Biard & Eric Neely sun | nov 3 | 4:00 - 8:00

MayDay mon | nov 4 | 6:00 - 9:00

Karaoke 1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038

jacksonfreepress.com

"EST0LACEFOR(EALTHY&OOD"EST6EGETARIAN/PTIONS (IGH.OON#AFm 2OG&DQWRQ5RDGH[W

"EST"EER3ELECTION4HE"ULLDOG 5LGJHZRRG5RDGEXOOGRJMDFNVRQ GUDIWIUHDNFRP  6HFRQG-C$ADE´S-ARKET 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV PFGDGHVPDUNHWVFRP 7KLUG-ARTIN´S,OUNGE 6 6WDWH6W *RRGVKRZLQJ"UFFALO7ILD 7INGS /DNH+DUERXU'ULYH5LGJHODQG  (AL-AL´S 6&RPPHUFH6W  3AL-OOKIE´S.EW9ORK0IZZAAND)CE#REAM *OINT 7D\ORU6W

(IGH.OON#AFm 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG H[W &RESH-ARKET +LJKODQG&RORQ\3DUNZD\ 5LGJHODQG 0ATEL"ROTHERS +LJK ZD\6XLWH

Happy Birthday Kimberly!

"EST-EDITERRANEAN-IDDLE%ASTERN  6HFRQG-EDITERRANEAN&ISHAND'RILL 2OG &DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG 7KLUG0ETRA #AFm 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG *RRG 6KRZLQJ!BEBA%THIOPIAN2ESTAURANT ,QWHUVWDWH 1 .EIFER´S 3RSODU%OYG  -EZZA 0DLQ6W0DGLVRQ 3PICE!VENUE ,QWHUVWDWH1

"EST3ANDWICH0LACE  6HFRQG"ROAD3TREET"AKING#OMPANY  ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH 7KLUG"ASIL´S ()RUWL¿FDWLRQ6W6XLWH%1 6WDWH6W *RRG6KRZLQJ"EAGLE"AGEL #AFm 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVWKHEHDJOHEDJHOFDIHQHW  *ASON´S$ELI (&RXQW\/LQH5RDG  -C!LISTER´S$ELI 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVPFDOLVWHUVGHOLFRP

TRIP BURNS

 4HAI(OUSE 2OG6TXDUH5RDG 

19


:LQQHUVIURP%HVWRI-DFNVRQ

"EST.EW2ESTAURANT"RUNO´S!DOBO 65RDFK6W6XLWH  6HFRQG!NJOU2ESTAURANT 7RZQVKLS$YH 5LGJHODQG 7KLUG4HE)SLANDER  (1RUWKVLGH'ULYH6XLWH *RRG 6KRZLQJ*ACO´S4ACOS 66WDWH6W  3IGNA´S'RILLE +LJKZD\16XLWH(5LGJHODQG  3OMBRA-EXICAN+ITCHEN 7RZQVKLS $YH6XLWH5LGJHODQG

"EST/UTDOOR$INING"ABALU4ACOSAND4APAS 'XOLQJ$YH6XLWHEDEDOXPVFRP  6HFRQG1UE3ERf3ERf 16WDWH6W  7KLUG+EIFER´S 3RSODU%OYG 1&RQJUHVV6W *RRG6KRZLQJ "URGERS"LUES (&RXQW\/LQH5RDG6XLWH 5LGJHODQG +RISTOS¯#ASUAL'REEK$INING 0DGLVRQ $YH0DGLVRQ 7ALKER´S$RIVE )N  16WDWH6W

"EST0IZZA0IZZA3HACK ()RUWL¿FDWLRQ3DUNZD\'ULYH WKHSL]]DVKDFNMDFNVRQFRP  6HFRQG3AL-OOKIE´S.EW9ORK0IZZAAND )CE#REAM*OINT 7D\ORU6W 7KLUG 3OULSHINE0IZZA&ACTORY +LJKZD\6XLWH )ORZRRG+LJKODQG&RORQ\3DUNZD\ 6XLWH,5LGJHODQG *RRG6KRZLQJ(UN GRY(OWIE´S0IZZA 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG 6SLOOZD\&LUFOH%UDQGRQ  -AZZIO´S)TALIAN%ATERY 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV PD]]LRVFRP -ELLOW-USHROOM 'RJZRRG%OYG )ORZRRG

"EST0LACETO%AT7HEN3OMEONE%LSE0AYS 7ALKER´S$RIVE )N 16WDWH6WZDONHUVGULYHLQFRP  6HFRQG#HAR2ESTAURANT ,QWHUVWDWH1 6XLWH 7KLUG0ARLOR-ARKET  :&DSLWRO6W *RRG6KRZLQJ.ICK´S 2ESTAURANT 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG6XLWH  3HAPLEY´S2ESTAURANT &HQWUH6W5LGJHODQG  4ABLE 5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG 

October 30 - November 5, 2013

"EST0LACETO'ET#OFFEE#UPS!N%SPRESSO#AFm 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVFXSVHVSUHVVRFDIHFRP  6HFRQG3NEAKY"EANS 16WDWH6W  7KLUG3EATTLE$RIP 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV VHDWWOHGULSFRP *RRG6KRZLQJ"EAGLE"AGEL#AFm ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  0DQQVGDOH3DUN'ULYH6XLWH,,0DGLVRQ $YHU\%OYG5LGJHODQG "ROAD3TREET "AKING#OMPANY ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  +OINONIA#OFFEE(OUSE 6$GDPV6W 

20

Grilled or fried Mississippi catfish with cabbage slaw, pico de gallo and served with homemade tortilla chips.

"EST2ESTAURANT4ABLE 5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG WDEOHRQHKXQGUHGFRP  6HFRQG7ALKER´S$RIVE )N 16WDWH6W  7KLUG"2!6/)TALIAN2ESTAURANTAND"AR ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH *RRG 6KRZLQJ"ABALU4ACOSAND4APAS 'XOLQJ$YH 6XLWH *ULEP2ESTAURANTAND"AR ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH 0ARLOR -ARKET :&DSLWRO6W

"EST3EAFOOD3AL0HIL´S 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG  6HFRQG4HE-AY¾OWER :&DSLWRO6W  7KLUG!*´S3EAFOOD'RILLE 5LGJH :D\)ORZRRG *RRG6KRZLQJ"ONE½SH 'RILL &RORQ\:D\0DGLVRQ #RAB´S 3EAFOOD3HACK 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG  7ALKER´S$RIVE )N 16WDWH6W 

PRIMOSCAFE.COM

"EST3TEAK3HAPLEY´S2ESTAURANT &HQWUH6W5LGJHODQG VKDSOH\VUHVWDXUDQWFRP  6HFRQG4ICO´S3TEAKHOUSE (&RXQW\/LQH 5RDG5LGJHODQG 7KLUG#HAR2ESTAU RANT ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  *RRG6KRZLQJ%LY´S2ESTAURANT"AR :-DFNVRQ 6W5LGJHODQG +ATHRYN´S3TEAKHOUSE 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG6XLWH5LGJHODQG  2UTH´S#HRIS3TEAKHOUSE +LJKODQG&RORQ\ 3DUNZD\6XLWH5LGJHODQG 4ABLE  5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG

"EST4AKE /UT/%#*APANESE%XPRESS 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVRHFÃ&#x20AC;RZRRGFRP  6HFRQG.EWK´S%XPRESS#AFm 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQV QHZNVFRP 6HFRQG"2!6/)TALIAN2ESTAURANTAND "AR ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  *RRG6KRZLQJ"EST7OK#HINESE2ESTAURANT  0HDGRZEURRN5RDG -R#HEN´S!UTHEN TIC#HINESE#OOKING ,QWHUVWDWH1  4OKYO%XPRESS (&RXQW\/LQH5RDG6XLWH $5LGJHODQG,QWHUVWDWH1 6XLWH'

TATE K NATIONS

*RRG6KRZLQJ"ABALU4ACOSAND4APAS 'XOLQJ $YH6XLWH -ARGARITAS-EXICAN 2ESTAURANT (&RXQW\/LQH5RDG &OLQWRQ3DUNZD\ 3OMBRA-EXICAN +ITCHEN 7RZQVKLS$YH6XLWH5LGJHODQG 

Cups: an Espresso Cafe won Best Place to Get Coffee in 2013. "EST4AQUERIA4AQUERIA,A'UADALUPE 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG WDJXDGDOXSHFRP  6HFRQG"ABALU4ACOSAND4APAS 'XOLQJ $YH6XLWH 7KLUG*ACO´S4ACOS 66WDWH6W *RRG6KRZLQJ #ARNICERIA6ALDEZ 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG5LGJHODQG  ,A#AZUELA ()RUWL¿FDWLRQ6W  ,A-ORENA 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG 5LGJHODQG

"EST6EGGIE"URGER#OOL!L´S 0F:LOOLH'ULYHFRRODOVQHW  6HFRQG(IGH.OON#AFm 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG  7KLUG-AJESTIC"URGER 2OG&DQWRQ 5RDG+LJKODQG&RORQ\3DUNZD\ 6XLWH%5LGJHODQG *RRG6KRZLQJ "RUNO´S!DOBO 5RDFK6W6XLWH  "URGERS"LUES (&RXQW\/LQH5RDG6XLWH 5LGJHODQG 3TAMPS3UPERBURGER 'DOWRQ6W

"EST7INE,IST3ELECTION"2!6/)TALIAN2ESTAURANT AND"AR ,QWHUVWDWH6XLWH EUDYREX]]FRP  6HFRQG4ABLE 5LGJH:D\)ORZRRG  7KLUG+ATS7INEAND3PIRITS ( )RUWL¿FDWLRQ6W *RRG6KRZLQJ#HAR 2ESTAURANT ,QWHUVWDWH16XLWH  0ARLOR-ARKET :&DSLWRO6W  3HAPLEY´S2ESTAURANT &HQWUH6W5LGJHODQG 

"EST7INGS7INGSTOP 0XOWLSOH/RFDWLRQVZLQJVWRSFRP  6HFRQG"UFFALO7ILD7INGS /DNH+DUERXU 'ULYH5LGJHODQG 7KLUG7ING3TATION 3DUNZD\'ULYH *RRG6KRZLQJ !MERICAN$ELI +LJKZD\:  0IZZA3HACK ()RUWL¿FDWLRQ6W 3DUNZD\'ULYH 3AL-OOKIE´S.EW9ORK 0IZZAAND)CE#REAM*OINT 7D\ORU6W


Now Featuring

Blue Plate Lunch Starting at $10

Monday-Friday • 10am - 4pm

5 Course Cocktail Dinner at Sal & Mookie’s featuring 5 of Jackson’s best bartenders

Featuring Special Guest Bartenders Robert Arender, Alex Engle, John Ingram, John Swanson & Jonathan Webb

Monday, Nov.18 | 6 PM | $60 per person Includes beverages & 5 course meal Seating is limited. Email MaggieB@SalandMookies.com Or call 601.368.1919 to RSVP!

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY 730 Lakeland Dr. • Jackson, MS Tel: 601-366-3613 or 601-366-6033 Fax: 601-366-7122 DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT! Sun-Thurs: 11am - 10pm Fri-Sat: 11am - 11pm VISIT OUR OTHER LOCATION 163 Ridge Way - Ste. E • Flowood, MS Tel: 601-922-7338 • Fax: 601-992-7339 WE DELIVER! Fondren / Belhaven / UMC area WE ALSO CATER! VISIT OUR GROCERY STORE NEXT DOOR.

NEW! Mahi Mahi Special served w/ rice, salad, hummus & sauté veggies $15.99

361 Township Avenue • Ridgeland, MS 601.707.0587 • www.anjourestaurant.net

voted the

Best Place For Luanckcshon

In WesJatckJson 2013 Best of

136 S. Adams Street Jackson (Located on Metro Parkway) 601.960.3008 koinoniacoffee.net

&

2906 N. State St. Suite 104

601-982-2001

One of Mississippi’s Three Must-Try Burgers Across the Country for 2014 It’s Up to You to Name it

Jackson’s Best Burger Vote Best of Jackson 2014

jacksonfreepress.com

Named

21


     Downtown Diners

October 30 - November 5, 2013

Come try some of your old favorites along with some of your soon to be new favorites!

22

  Served with regular or Mexican cornbread or yeast roll!

  



  



For our entire live music calendar visit WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON


WELLNESS p 27

Gil’s Bread for Life by Brinda Fuller Willis

S

Gil’s Bakery starts churning out fresh baked bread before the sun rises each weekday.

jacksonfreepress.com

TRIP BURNS

ince August, Ridgeland residents have reaped business needs. His day winds down with the store closing at says. “I use tried-and-true bread formulas.” For him, this the benefits of a frustrated investment banker’s “ 5:30 p.m. “My wife is wrapping things up at the old house in includes measuring ingredients in grams, not pounds, cups new passion. Texas,” Turchin says. “All I have to focus on until she arrives or spoons. Gil’s serves Mississippi Mud Coffee with sweet After a long day’s work morning breads, which contain rolled in the fast-paced world of finance, Gil oats, raisins, cinnamon and chocolate. Turchin sought solace by baking bread. Turchin bakes all of the bread in steamHe baked as a hobby for about 10 injected deck ovens, which ensures that years. “The bread I made wasn’t always the breads come out moist. fit to eat, but the process of making Gil’s serves New York rye bread, (it) bread was my way out,” Turchin French country and rustic Italian loaves, says. “Bread-making took me out of baguettes, brioche, scones, and Missismy skin and gave me a creation that I sippi sourdough bread, among others. could put my hands on. As a birthday Home bakers can buy Gil’s sourdough present in 1996, my wife, Sally, sent starter, a mixture of yeast and water that me to the French Culinary Institute sets overnight unrefrigerated and acts as for two weeks in New York for a blue a base for homemade sourdough bread, collar hands-on cooking school to deone of the most difficult kinds of bread termine if I was serious about making to bake at home. They also sell the bread bread. At course end, I was hooked. wholesale with 24 hours’ notice. I knew making bread was the work I Turchin wants to introduce Miswanted to do for the rest of my life.” sissippians to a variety of breads from He satiated himself in the trade around the world. To keep the artisan with a 12-year stint at a bakery in Fort tradition alive, he teaches old-world Worth, Texas, learning how to bake techniques and methods via hands-on the artisan bread he now shares with classes twice a month. locals. Turchin, who is originally from Students make at least three kinds Europe but lived in the United States of bread during the five-hour work sesA former investment banker, Gil Turchin now spends his days baking bread in his shop. most of his life, visited Jackson with his sions. Participants get to take home all wife while vacationing in and around of the breads that are made in the class, Memphis. When he was ready to make the leap to opening is my dog and making the best bread I can for some of the along with an apron and a bench knife, also known as a his own bakery, the couple chose Jackson. nicest people in the world.” dough scraper. The 66-year-old’s day starts at 3:30 a.m. Gil bakes a vaHe prides himself on his baking process. At Gil’s, all of Gil’s Bread (655 Lake Harbour Drive, Ridgeland, 601riety of staple breads in the morning. After the lunch crowd the bread is made from scratch, with no added chemicals or 856-0885) holds its workshops on the first and third Sundiminishes, he experiments with formulas that he wants to preservatives. Turchin never uses a dough proofer. He says the day afternoon of each month from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. through perfect using indigenous ingredients that are prevalent and bread is done when it’s done and uses King Arthur Flour, the Dec. 15. A $125 class fee includes all ingredients and perseasonal in central Mississippi. Otherwise, his day is occupied “Sir Galahad” type. sonal instruction. with receiving new equipment, planning ahead and other “None of my bread is made from a recipe,” Turchin Visit gilsbread.com for more information.

23


BR^aT1XV 4eTah3Ph CWXb5^^cQP[[BTPb^]

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lunch Through November 30th

Specials 50¢ Boneless Wings Monday & Tuesday Only

Domestic Beer Specials $8 Pitchers â&#x20AC;˘ $2.50 Pints

Crazy Craft Beer Specials

$12 Pitchers â&#x20AC;˘ $3.50 Pints

0[[H^d2P] 4Pc3aX]Z

$20 per person â&#x20AC;˘ Dine In Only Every Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 6 - 11pm State Street Location Only

Rock-N-Roll Hibachi & Sushi

Best of Jackson is Around the Corner Best Sushi? Best Asian? Best Happy Hour?

Use the ew handy n TM HOPE A bow! at Rai n

You Decide!



925 N State St, Jackson

601-969-6400

1430 Ellis Ave, Jackson

601-969-0606

398 Hwy 51 N, Ridgeland

601-605-0504

1001 Hampstead Blvd, Clinton

601-924-2423

2560 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood 601.420.4058 â&#x20AC;˘ like us on

GET A Free

Hope Credit Union Membership

GET 1/2 off Rainbow Co-op Membership

   Community matters at Rainbow Co-op and HOPE Credit Union.

October 30 - November 5, 2013

HOPE is building better financial futures for local families, and we are excited to join together to offer all our members exclusive benefits.

24

Stop by and sign up today!


A MISSISSIPPI FARMERS MARKET THANKSGIVING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 8 am - 2pm Not only will our vendors be packed full of your favorite fall fruits and vegetables, but we’ll also have a number of other exciting activities including… Holiday cooking demonstrations featuring seasonal produce by the chefs from Bravo! at 10:00 a.m., Table 100 at 11:00 a.m., and Sophia’s at the Fairview Inn at 12:00 p.m. Live entertainment from Ralph Miller & Kim Middleton Kids activities including crafts and complementary fall photographs, as well as a showing of Charlie Brown’s Great Pumpkin Adventure A chance to give back during the holiday season by bringing non-perishable food items benefitting Stewpot

MISSISSIPPI FARMERS MARKET 929 High Street Adjacent to the Fairgrounds www.msfarmersmarket.com 601.354.6573 Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce Cindy Hyde-Smith, Commissioner

OCTOBER 31 AT MMA IT’S HALLOWEEN!!! Spooky Cocktail Hour

Cash Bar 5PM Galleries open until 7PM

Screen on the Green feature movie: Night of the Living Dead Blankets, chairs and costumes welcome Free Admission Cash Bar & Concessions Movie at 7PM Festival seating on the BankPlus Green in The Art Garden

Gift Cards Available They Make The Best Stocking Stuffers 901 Lakeland Place, Suite #10 Flowood, MS (in front of Walmart) flowood@anytimefitness.com

601.992.3488 2155 Highway 18, Suite E

Brandon, MS (across from Home Depot) brandon@anytimefitness.com

...and “camp” out!

601-706-4605 4924 I-55 North, Suite #107 Jackson, MS (in front of Kroger) jacksonms@anytimefitness.com

Screen on the Green is sponsored by in conjunction with

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART

601.960.1515 380 SOUTH LAMAR STREET JACKSON, MS 39201 MSMUSEUMART.ORG

601-321-9465 www.anytimefitness.com Voted One of the Best Places to Work Out Best of Jackson 2010-2012

jacksonfreepress.com

AFTER HOURS Dig in...

25


Coming January 2014

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Wedding Announcements and Resource Guide

Deadline: November 27, 2013 For more information call

601-362-6121 x11 or write

October 30 - November 5, 2013

hitched@boomjackson.com

26

Xfflmz!Tdifevmf Npoebz

Uivstebz

12 noon: Yoga Glo

12 noon: Level 1

5:30 pm: Level 2

6 pm: Mixed Level Vinyasa

Uvftebz

Gsjebz

noon: Level 1

12 noon: Tabatas

5:15 pm: Tabatas 6 pm: Level 1

Tbuvsebz

Xfeoftebz

10:30 am: Yoga Over 50

12 noon: Restorative Yoga 6 pm: Yoga from the Core

9 am: Level 1

Tvoebz 5:30 pm: Bellydancing

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424


LIFE&STYLE | wellness

Football Brain by R.H. Coupe

P

FLICKR/JDANVERS

racticing at the linebacker position, Wesley Ward hit the a coma and still has not completely recovered. fullback hard, but he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize how hard. After a few â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi is the only state without a youth sports conmore minutes into the cussion law,â&#x20AC;? says Lee Jenkins, expractice at Central Hinds ecutive director of the Mississippi Academy, his vision blurred and his Brain Injury Association. Mishead started to throb. The impact sissippi Sen. Michael Watson, a to his head had caused a subdural Republican from Pascagoula, prehematomaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a blood clotâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on the sented a sports concussion bill in right side of his brain. Prompt and 2012 that passed unanimously in skilled medical attention saved his the Senate but died in the Public life. He has fully recovered, but he Health Committee. Watson tried canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember five months of his again in 2013 but failed. life. It was 2008, and Ward was 16. The bill, based on the ZackBrain injuries are serious and ery Lystedt law enacted in many can have lifelong consequences. Reother states, has three parts aimed cently, many people have become at organized youth sports in Mismore aware of just how serious, sissippi. The first requires that evbetween former National Football eryone involved with youth sports League players suing over how their in Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;parents, coaches, concussions were handled and the athletes, and officialsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;receive edunumber of Iraq and Afghanistan cation on concussions. The second veterans returning with traumatic part requires any athlete showing brain injury due to explosions. symptoms of a concussion to imFootball isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only orgamediately come out of the game or nized sport that causes head injusports activity and not participate 2EADMORE PVELDRUJ ries, but it is the most frequent. The for the rest of the day. The last part MISPV:$FRQFXVVLRQODZ website for the American Associaof the bill requires anyone who has tion of Neurological Surgeons lists been diagnosed with a concussion football as causing nearly 47,000 Kids playing in Pee Wee, middle school and high school to get a release from a qualified emergency-room visits for head football are at an increased risk for head injury. medical professional before he or injuries, followed by baseball and she participates again. Watson, Jensoftball with 38,000, basketball kins and a host of other agencies with 35,000 and then soccer with 24,000. and organizations are going to try again in 2014 to pass the bill. â&#x20AC;?Never cut corners on a brain concussion, especially in youth Sen. Watson is committed to the cause. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After visiting with players, as the brain is in a fragile and developing state,â&#x20AC;? Ward says. a local doctor in our district and Much of the current attention around brain concussions learning more about concussions, occurring during youth sports be- I felt compelled to do something &ORMORE INFORMATION gan with Zackery Lystedt in Oc- to help protect our children &ROM4HINK&IRST REACHOUTTO tober 2006. At the time, he was a from the dangers of concussions /HH-HQNLQV /RGANIZATION 13-year-old middle-school football and their long term effects,â&#x20AC;? ([HFXWLYH'LUHFWRU MISPV7)FRQFXVVLRQV player in Washington state. He col- he says. %UDLQ,QMXU\$VVRFLDWLRQRI 0LVVLVVLSSL lapsed from a brain injury when he â&#x20AC;&#x153;This legislation is mainly 2OG&DQWRQ5RDG was allowed back into a game just about educating coaches, parents 6XLWH &ROMTHE#$# 15 minutes after suffering a con- and young athletes and establish MISPV&'&FRQFXVVLRQV OMHQNLQV#PVELDRUJ cussion. He spent nine months in ing a return-to-play protocol.â&#x20AC;?

(EAD)NJURIESBY3PORT 7KHIROORZLQJVSRUWVDQGUHFUHDWLRQDO DFWLYLWLHVUHSUHVHQWWKHFDWHJRULHVFRQWULEXW LQJWRWKHKLJKHVWQXPEHURIHVWLPDWHGKHDG LQMXULHVWUHDWHGLQ86KRVSLWDOHPHUJHQF\ URRPVLQ

#YCLING &OOTBALL "ASEBALLAND3OFTBALL "ASKETBALL 7ATER3PORTS 'LYLQJ6FXED'LYLQJ6XU¿QJ 6ZLPPLQJ:DWHU3ROR:DWHU6NLLQJ:DWHU 7XELQJ  0OWERED2ECREATIONAL6EHICLES $79V'XQH %XJJLHV*R&DUWV0LQLELNHV2IIURDG   3OCCER 3KATEBOARDS3COOTERS &ITNESS%XERCISE(EALTH#LUB 7INTER3PORTS 6NLLQJ6OHGGLQJ6QRZERDUG LQJ6QRZPRELOLQJ  (ORSEBACK2IDING 'YMNASTICS$ANCE#HEERLEADING 'OLF (OCKEY /THER"ALL3PORTSAND"ALLS 5NSPECI½ED  4RAMPOLINES 2UGBY,ACROSSE 2OLLERAND)NLINE3KATING )CE3KATING

)NJURIESIN9OUTH

7KHWRSVSRUWVUHODWHGKHDGLQMXU\FDWHJR ULHVDPRQJFKLOGUHQDJHVDQG\RXQJHU #YCLING &OOTBALL "ASEBALLAND3OFTBALL "ASKETBALL 3KATEBOARDS3COOTERS 7ATER3PORTS 3OCCER 0OWERED2ECREATIONAL6EHICLES 7INTER3PORTS 4RAMPOLINES

SOURCE:AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES

50% OFF Travis Sledge

Jo Guillot

LMT 1876

LMT 437

Upledger CranioSacral Therapist Synergetic Myofascial Therapy Deep Tissue Alignment Taoist QiGong Acupressure

Swedish Massage Therapist Synergetic Myofascial Therapy Deep Tissue Bodywork Intuitive Reflexology

All Pumpkins

FALL!

Dale Lomax Medical QiGong Practitioner Energy Projection Therapy

601.842.8221 | 3670 Lakeland Lane Suite #23 JacksonPostureCenter@gmail.com | www.JacksonPostureCenter.com By Appointment Only

650 Hwy 51 | Ridgeland    Interiors Market | Fondren

 www.martinsonsms.com  601.856.3078

jacksonfreepress.com

Acupressure ~ Massage ~ Alignment

27


28

October 30 - November 5, 2013


FILM p 30 | 8 DAYS p 31 | ARTS p 34 | MUSIC p 35

A Delta Romp T by Kathleen M. Mitchell

How did you get into writing growing up?

Was a novel your ultimate goal?

I really have wanted to have a book of my own published by somebody great from the time I was about 17. That finally happened when I was in my mid 60s. But I had been writing all those years one way or another. I lived in New York a couple times, and I used to keep manuscripts in my refrigerator. That was one of the most convenient places since I didn’t have any food in it. And I was a copy boy for The New York Times, and then I was a news clerk for the Times. Back then the editors did everything with paste pots and scissors. But, in any case, I really wanted to be a writer. I didn’t want to be an author; I’m not really fond of the word “author.” Now, since the (personal computer) is out there, everyone can be an author. I sometimes say, heavens, there’s just too many authors. I like to make the distinction between writer and author, and I like to make the same sort of distinction between teacher and educator. This book is third in a series, right? Tell me about writing the first one.

Yes, it has now become a series. I was about 57, and I was here in Memphis, and I said, “Look, Pritchard, you always thought you were going to write a big, beautiful book

so, Tennessee Williams and Faulkner and William Alexander Percy and Flannery O’Connor. But the truth is, some of my strongest influences were Al Capp and his L’il Abner and Chester Gould and his Dick Tracy. Do you consider yourself a writer tied to the Delta?

Not tied to the Delta. I lived out in the world a lot. It’s not that one is tied to the Delta, but I think a lot of writers write about what made them, one way or another. If I had grown up in the streets of Chicago, it would be that. There is a sort of driving force that makes me do what I do, which is probably true of all artists and even businessmen. … This character wakes me up at night saying things, and I have to get up out of bed and write them down or I’ll forget them. COURTESY NEW SOUTH BOOKS

Well, I just wrote things, even just on the backs of envelopes and whatnot. When I was about 20, I tried to write a novella. … Then, later in life, I made my living writing as a copywriter, that is to say an advertising writer and a PR writer for about 10 years in my 40s and early 50s. And I was a songwriter in Nashville in the 1970s for about 10 years. I was sort of successful as a lyricist. … We had a Captain and Tennille single that got up to No. 13 on the Hot 100 list.

about the Delta.” I thought I was going to be like William Alexander Percy or William Faulkner, who knows. I had a manuscript at the time I was working on, but I realized it just wasn’t working. I said, “Maybe you shouldn’t write a big, beautiful book. Maybe start with a small and not-so-beautiful book.” Well, as it turned out, the book was small, but it was quite beautiful, even though it was very profane. Junior Ray was a character in this larger work about the

What do you expect readers to like about this book?

My copies came, and it really is the most beautiful thing you’ve ever seen in your life. And, really, readers get two books for one, because they get (Leland’s psychosis as well as) Junior Ray and Voyd being “diktectives”—and Junior Ray and Voyd Mudd listening underneath Miss Attica’s house with stethoscopes (laughs heartily), and while they are under there, they find MeriJohn Pritchard will sign his latest book at Lemuria Nov. 7. gold Potts hiding. There’s just a ton of stuff. I’m just really proud of the book. My books are very profane, but in the hundred or so pages of Leland Shaw’s writDelta, and I took him out and let him tell the story rather ing in this, there’s no profanity at all. It’s absolutely sublime. than me as narrator. In the end, Leland Shaw says, talking about mad That book was called “Junior Ray,” and it came out in women, “And yet I have noticed, the truly sane never seem 2005. Publishers Weekly in New York called it “hilariously to take the obvious route, and like Columbus, they always tasteless.” The Mobile Press Register said it might be the most think they are in India. They do not trust implicity, I’ve obprofane book in recent history. It made quite a splash, and I served this. Perhaps it is for one thing, they do not hear the loved every minute of it. Barnes & Noble called the book one voice of God giving them directions, as do mad women and of the top 10 debut novels of 2005. men who think they are Napoleon. … My sadness is massive, This book is a continuation of that. and my regret, my regret is without measure. In the end, the only thing I can think to say for myself is that I have always How would you describe “Sailing to Alluvium”? wanted to be better.” I would describe it as a massively defining work by me. It brings full circle things that were in the first book and in the Read a longer version of this story at jfp.ms/JohnPritchard. second book. John Pritchard will read from and sign “Sailing to AlluPeople sometimes ask me (about) my influences. And vium” at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202) 29 perhaps they would expect me to say, and somewhat rightly Thursday, Nov. 7, beginning at 5 p.m. Books are $27.95. jacksonfreepress.com

alking with John Pritchard is kind of like getting on a verbal roller coaster, as he bounces from one topic to another, excitement evident underneath the smooth southern cadence of his voice. Pritchard’s excitement is due to the release, “Sailing to Alluvium,” the third novel in a series set in the Mississippi Delta. Pritchard talked to the JFP by phone about his writing journey and his new book.


COURTESY SCOTT FREE PRODUCTIONS

DIVERSIONS | film

Cocktail of Debauchery by Anita Modak-Truran

“T

he Counselor” unites the visually opulent director Ridley Scott with Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Cormac McCarthy. The movie skims the surface of sex, greed and avarice before plummeting into an abyss of nonsense. It’s a bewildering story, bloodsoaked, piled high with miscreants, cluttered with vacuous symbols such as diamonds and cheetahs, and enveloped in a mist of popculture babble. The movie opens with curtains fluttering in the breeze and two bodies moving under pristine white sheets. Scott tries to suggest purity, but it’s nothing more than a smutty jolt of whispery pillow talk and suggestive foreplay. The Counselor (Michael Fassbender), who is never addressed as anything but his profession, teases his soulmate Laura (Penelope Cruz) about her erotic zone. The Counselor loves this woman so much that he will do anything to keep her satisfied and happy. As proof of his love, the Counselor stoops to crime to pay for a perfect diamond ring for his beloved Laura. The jeweler (Bruno Ganz) pontificates on cautionary diamonds and their relationship with

the nobility of the fragility of life. The Counselor doesn’t understand—nor do we, as the dialogue is riddled with religious and philosophical tautologies of McCarthy vintage. In “No Country for Old Men,” which was based on McCarthy’s book of the same name, the dialogue was fresh and cunning. Here, it comes off pretentious and silly. Purchasing the diamond initiates the Counselor’s downfall—he knows bad folks who will help him raise money. He rationalizes to his best client, Reiner (Javier Bardem), that just this once he will cross the legal line. Reiner eyes him up and down and smiles. Reiner’s a messy sort of convivial crook. He loves women, but doesn’t understand them. It scares him that his current girlfriend Malkina (Cameron Diaz) has made love to his car. “So she goes around and climbs up on the hood of the Ferrari and pulls her dress up around her waist and spreads herself across the windshield in front of me with no panties on,” he says. “You see a thing like that, it changes you.” It changes us too, and not in a good way. The Counselor partners with Reiner on a rather vague drug deal. Westray (Brad Pitt) brokers the deal for them with the faceless

Brad Pitt and Michael Fassbender are among the beautiful faces in the disappointing “The Counselor.”

cartel. Things fall apart when Ruth (Rosie Perez), a convicted criminal in the federal penitentiary, convinces the Counselor to pay the speeding ticket for her son (Richard Cabral). The son loses his head. Twenty million dollars worth of drugs disappear. And everyone blames the Counselor. The Counselor experiences great anguish in this film. I felt his pain. In fact, I lived it. This movie is repellent with a misanthropic integrity. Each of the chiselers— including the Counselor, who was never a good guy to begin with—has his or her agenda. Except for perhaps Laura, all of the characters are hard-boiled and pitiless. Unlike “No Country for Old Men,” the criminal subculture in this film doesn’t

come equipped with law enforcement as a moral explorer. The actors look stunning, the locations are enticing and the film is glossy and glamorous. But even with Javier Bardem in orange blossom-tinted glasses and spiked hair, this film fails miserably because the one thing left out of its suffocating cocktail of debauchery, promiscuity and immorality is hope. Without hope, there’s no reason to care if the slick criminal entrepreneurs and the sleazy lawyer who represents them win. They all need to be flushed into the sewer. Eventually they are, in a metaphorical sense, but you don’t leave overjoyed, only empty. Perhaps that is the point: Greed leaves you empty of feeling, principles, ethics and humanity.

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. 11/1 – Thur. 11/7

Ender’s Game PG13

Captain Phillips PG13

Last Vegas PG13

Enough Said PG13

3-D Free Birds PG Free Birds (non 3-D)

PG

Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa R The Counselor R Carrie

R

Escape Plan

R

3-D Gravity

PG13

Gravity (non 3-D) PG13

Nov 2nd • Spank The Monkey

$2000 in CASH! $1500 for Best Costume $250 for Sexiest Female & Sexiest Male

Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2 (non 3-D) PG Baggage Claim PG13

October 30 - November 5, 2013

I’m In Love With A Church Girl PG

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

e n i l n Votestaorting ! 1 r e b m e v o N

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

30 Movieline: 355-9311

824 S. State St. Jackson www.clubmagoos.com

601.487.8710

HTTP://JFP.MS/BALLOT/


WEDNESDAY 10/30

SATURDAY 11/2

MONDAY 11/4

The Congress performs at 8 p.m. at Duling Hall.

The Fall Native Plant Sale is at Clinton Community Nature.

Vince Vawter signs copies of “Paperboy” at Lemuria Books.

BEST BETS OCT. 30 - NOV. 6, 2013

PAUL KOLNIK

WEDNESDAY 10/30

Louis LeFleur Trading Post Christmas Kickoff is at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Free with admission; call 601-981-5469; mschildrensmuseum.com. … Todd Snider performs 8 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The Congress also performs. $25; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

THURSDAY 10/31

The Weeks stop in Jackson to perform Oct. 31 at Pink Night Out and the grand opening of The Belhaven. Back/Slash, Brave Baby and Maggie Eckford also perform. Music starts at 5:30 p.m.

“Chicago: The Musical” is at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 5 and Nov. 6 at Thalia Mara Hall.

co-opgm@rainbowcoop.org; find Jackson Bike Advocates on Facebook. … Smokin’ on the Rez BBQ and Music Festival is at Old Trace Park (Post Road, Ridgeland). Bill and Temperance, The Chill, Chris Gill and the Soul Shakers, and Vince Vance and the Valiants perform. $5 Nov. 1, $10 Nov. 2, $10 two-day pass, ages 12 and under free; call 601-853-2011; barnettreservoirfoundation.org.

$20-$60 ballet, $75 reception; call 601-960-1560 or 800745-3000; balletms.com. … Mississippi Chorus: Song Eternal I is at 4 p.m. at St. Columb’s Episcopal Church (550 Sunnybrook Road, Ridgeland). $10, $5 students with ID; call 601-278-3351; mschorus.org.

SATURDAY 11/2

Vince Vawter signs “Paperboy” at 4 p.m. at Lemuria (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). $16.99 book; call 601366-7619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks. com. … The Bright Light Social Hour, Black Taxi and Clear Plastic Masks perform at 8 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $10; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

Fall Native Plant Sale is from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at Clinton BY BRIANA ROBINSON Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton). Free; call 601-926-1104; email JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM ccnaturecenter@gmail.com. … FAX: 601-510-9019 Metro Jackson Heart Walk is at 9 a.m. at Mississippi State CapDAILY UPDATES AT itol (400 High St.). Fundraising JFPEVENTS.COM encouraged; call 601-321-1209; email gsajacksonhw@heart.org; metrojacksonheartwalk.org. … Red Beans & Rice Celebration is from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Trustmark Park (1 Braves Way, Pearl). $10-$20; call 601-949-4799, 601-896-6081, 601-208-6626 or 601-506-5375; stewpot.org.

EVENTS@

FRIDAY 11/1

Avodah: A Night of Worship Through the Creative Arts is at 6:30 p.m. at Belhaven University (1500 Peachtree St.). Free; email studentministries@belhaven.edu. … Halloween Pub Crawl is at 6 p.m. at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road). Free; call 366-1602; email

SUNDAY 11/3

Stars of American Ballet is at 4 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). Members of the New York City Ballet present four pas de deux by co-founder George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins’ “Fancy Free.” Reception follows at the Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.).

MONDAY 11/4

TUESDAY 11/5

Bow and Wreath Making Workshop is at 6 p.m. at Brighton Park (530 S. Frontage Road, Clinton). Register by Nov. 1. $40; call 601-924-6082; clintonparksandrec.com. … Jackson: Past, Present and Future is at 7 p.m. Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Businessman Leland Speed and activist Charles Evers speak. $10, $5 students; call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted.

WEDNESDAY 11/6

“Chicago: The Musical” is at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). $20-$62.50; call 601981-1847 or 800-745-3000; kesslerbroadway.com. … Mississippi Black Leadership Summit is at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-9594; uniteonevoice.org/MBLS.

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY SARAH SIGRO

Pink Night Out is at 5 p.m. at The Belhaven (1200 N. State St.). $5, ages 12 and under free; call 601292-7121; fundforthegirls.com/fund-times. … Screen on the Green is at 5:30 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) in the Art Garden. Watch “Night of the Living Dead.” Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. … Spooky, Scary Scripts & Stories: A Fondren Theater Workshop Halloween Party is from 8-10 p.m. at Warehouse Theatre (1000 Monroe St.). Suggested donation of $5 and/or pet food for ARF; call 601-213-6355.

31


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43

October 31 • $10 Cover

Jarekus Singleton Costume Contest

$150 1st place cash prize plus $100 bar tab Wednesday, October 30th

KELLY MCRAE

(Americana) 6:30, No Cover

Thursday, October 31st

JAREKUS SINGLETON (Blues) 8:00, No Cover

Friday, November 1st

SOUTHERN KOMFORT

(NewOrleansSt.Jazz)9:00,$10Cover

Saturday, November 2nd

TIME TO MOVE

(Rhythm & Blues) 9:00, $10 Cover

Tuesday, November 5th

ROBERT KING & SETH JOHNSON

October 30 - November 5, 2013

(Blues) 6:30, $10

32

Happy Hour!

2-for-1 EVERYTHING*

Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-7:00 (*excludes food and specialty drinks)

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

PAUL KOLNICK

Halloween Party

Metro Jackson Heart Walk Nov. 2, 9 a.m., at Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.). Check-in and other activities begin at 8 a.m. The 5K walk benefits the American Heart Association. Teams welcome. Walkers who raise a minimum of $100 receive a T-shirt. Fundraising encouraged; call 601-321-1209; email gsajacksonhw@heart.org; metrojacksonheartwalk.org.

(/,)$!9 Trunk or Treat! Oct. 30, 5:30-7 p.m., at Fondren Presbyterian Church (3220 Old Canton Road). Children trick-or-treat from car to car in the parking lot. Costumes welcome. Free; call 982-3232; fondrenpcusa.org. Pumpkin Run Oct. 30, 6 p.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Expect surprises along the three-mile course. Costumes welcome. Free; call 601-899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com. Halloween Costume Ball in the Mall Fundraiser Oct. 31, 7:30-11:30 p.m., at Metrocenter Mall (1395 Metrocenter Drive). Award given for best costume. A portion of the proceeds from the event benefits Mississippi in Action, an organization that assists Mississippians with HIV and AIDS. For ages 21 and up. $15 in advance, $20 at the door; call 601-506-7545 or 404-915-8626. LEGO Jackson Halloween through Oct. 31, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). See Dr. Scott Crawford’s LEGO sculptures of a haunted house, Dracula’s castle and more through Oct. 31. Free; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. heARTalot Halloween HoeDown Oct. 31, 7-11 p.m., at Photamerica Popup Studio (3009 N. State St.). Includes a photo booth, music, body painting, laser lights and drinks. $10 cover; heartalot.com; find heARTalot Halloween HoeDown on Facebook. Halloween Party Oct. 31, 8 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.). Includes a costume contest and music from Jarekus Singleton. $10 cover; call 601-352-2322; underground119.com.

#/--5.)49 Hobnob Mississippi Oct. 31, 8:30 a.m., at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). The Mississippi Economic Council hosts the annual political conference that takes a comical look at politics. Several state leaders speak, including Gov. Phil Bryant, and the Capitol Steps perform. $90, $60 members; call 601-969-0022 or 800-748-7626; msmec.com.

Lipschitz!

P

op. Six. Squish. Uh uh. Cicero. Lipschitz! If you recognize these as more than just a random group of words, you’ll be excited to know that “Chicago the Musical” is coming to Jackson. This show is truly electrifying— all the glitter, razzle and dazzle. “We select shows we think the people of this city will enjoy,” says local promoter Averyell Kessler of W. Kessler LTD. “‘Chicago’ is a theater classic. It was here eight or 10 years ago, and people have been asking for it to come back.” The show tells the story of two women—Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly—on trial. Roxie is on trial for the murder of her lover, and Velma for her husband. They get mixed up with a slimy, showboating lawyer named Billy Flynn who turns it all into a three-ringed celebrity circus. As for the end—well, you’ve got to see the show to find that out. Touring nationally, Carol Woods will

The Huge Multi-family Yard Sale Nov. 2, 6 a.m., at Cobblestone Subdivision off Highway 51 in Madison. The sale is a fundraiser for the Lady Sox, a youth fast-pitch softball team. Free. Children’s Harvest Carnival Nov. 2, 10 a.m.2 p.m., at Parham Bridges Park (5055 Old Canton Road). Enjoy refreshments, carnival games and prizes, an obstacle course and a space jump.

Now Leasing

1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.

Call Today 601-373-4455

Stratford Terrace Aptartments 150 Woody Drive Jackson, MS

“Chicago the Musical” comes to Jackson Nov. 5 and 6.

Your

Neighborhood Fun Spot 601.978.1839

take on the role of Matron “Mama” Morton. Woods is a Broadway veteran who appeared in the film “Across the Universe,” where she performed a gospel rendition of The Beatles’ “Let It Be.” She later sang the same song at the 2008 Grammy Awards. Terra MacLeod, a mezzo soprano, will play the role of Velma Kelly. MacLeod has also been in productions of “Kiss of the Spider,” “Guys and Dolls,” “West Side Story,” “Damn Yankees” and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Winner of six Tony Awards, two Olivier Awards and a Grammy, “Chicago” will be at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E Pascagoula St., 601-960-1537) Nov. 5 and 6, with the show starting at 7:30 p.m. Due to the scantily clad ladies, sexy dance numbers, murder and betrayal, children younger than 4 will not be admitted. Purchase tickets ranging from $25 to $62.50 at ticketmaster.com. —ShaWanda Jacome

Volunteers welcome. Free; mscac.org. Women for Progress’ Networking After 5 Nov. 5, 5:30-8:30 p.m., at Capital Club (125 S. Congress St., Suite 19). Speakers include WJSU-TV director Melissa Faith Payne, celebrity fashion stylist J. Bolin and leadership coach Sherri David Garner. Pam Confer performs. $20, free for members; womenforprogress.net.

Halloween Blow Out November 1 7pm - Until live music by

“Wink and the Signal” starts at 9pm

Food Specials

6270 Old Canton Rd.

& $1.50 Draft

Jackson, MS

Try Our “Wink Punch”

www.timeoutcafe.com


Senior Health and Wellness Fair Oct. 30, 9 a.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Includes free flu and pneumonia shots, health screenings for vision, blood pressure and cholesterol, and resources on health. For ages 55 and up. Free; call 601-960-0335. Health Help Mississippi Educational Presentation Oct. 31, 1 p.m., at Willie Morris Library (4912 Old Canton Road). Learn more about health benefits under the Affordable Care Act. Free; call 877-314-3843. American Heart Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fit-Friendly Worksites Program Call for Applications through Nov. 1. The program recognizes employers who support the health of their employees with options to encourage physical activity and good nutrition such as on-site walking routes, healthy food options, health risk assessments and online tracking tools. Free; call 601-321-1200; ffc.heart.org.

performance features music from Gluckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Orfeo, Respighiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ancient Airs and Dances, Pucciniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crisantimi for Strings and a concerto from Mississippi Institute of Arts & Letters composition winner Shandy Phillips. $16; call 601-960-1565; msorchestra.com.

jewelry. Registration required. $125 per session; call 601-863-6935; email gil@gilsbread.com; gilsbread.com.

Orchestras, Strings and Choir Concert Nov. 5, 7:30 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive), in the concert hall. The Belhaven Orchestra with senior pianist Megan van der Bijl, the Belhaven Choirs and the String Chamber Orchestra perform. Doors open at 7 p.m. Free; call 601-974-6494; belhaven.edu.

Museum After Hours Oct. 31, 5 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Enjoy a cash bar at 5 p.m. and exhibition tours at 6 p.m. or 6:30 p.m. Admission varies per exhibit; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org.

Coheed and Cambria Nov. 6, 7 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.). The rock band from Nyack, N.Y. is known for the song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dark Side of Me.â&#x20AC;? Balance and Composure, and I the Mighty also perform. Doors open at 6 p.m. $25 in advance, $30 at the door; call 601-292-7121; email jane@halandmals.com; ardenland.net.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3

The Mummy Returns through Oct. 31, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). The famous â&#x20AC;&#x153;mummyâ&#x20AC;? returns again to greet her adoring fans during the month of October. Free; call 601576-6920; email info@oldcapitolmuseum.com; oldcapitolmuseum.com. Autumn Art Show through Nov. 2, at Wolfe Studio (4308 Old Canton Road). See the latest creations from the studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artists including Bebe Wolfe. Free; call 601-366-1844; wolfebirds.com.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grapes of Wrathâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 30-Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m., and Nov. 3, 2 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). The play based on Frank Galatiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adaptation of John Steinbeckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel is about a poor familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s move to California in hopes of a better life. $28, $22 seniors and students; call 601-948-3533, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Johanne dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Arcâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 30-Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m., and Nov. 2, 2 p.m., at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive), in Blackbox Theatre. $10, $5 seniors and students, free for Belhaven students and employees; call 601-965-7026; belhaven.edu. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forbidden Fruitâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 2, 7 p.m., and Nov. 3, 3 p.m. and 7 p.m., at Alamo Theater (333 N. Farish St.). J. Lee Productionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; play is about a married coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s struggle with avoiding infidelity. For mature audiences. Kerry Thomas also performs. $15; call 601-208-0965 or 800-745-3000; email jimmie.lee@jleeplays.com; jleeplays.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Old Maid and the Thiefâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 5 and Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The Mississippi Opera presents Gian Carlo Menottiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comic one-act opera in a radio-broadcast style. $30; call 601-960-2300; msopera.org.

-53)# â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chamber II: The Music of Gluck, Haydn, Puccini and Respighiâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m., at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). The Mississippi Symphony Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Death of Santini: The Story of a Father and His Sonâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 2, 3:30 p.m. Pat Conroy signs books. Reading at 5 p.m. $28.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ Lemuria Story Time Saturdays, 11 a.m. Children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free. Poetry Out Loud National Recitation Contest. High school students at participating schools may compete, and regional finalists compete is the spring of 2014. The winner advances to the national contest in Washington, D.C. Schools must register by Nov. 1. Free; call 601-3271294; email poetryoutloud@arts.state.ms.us; arts.state.ms.us.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Cooking Class Nov. 2, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., at Raindrop Turkish House (900 E. County Line Road, Suite 201A, Ridgeland). Learn to make Turkish appetizers, entrees and desserts. Registration required. $15 per session; call 769251-0074; email jacksonrwa@turkishhouse.org; raindropturkishhouse.org. Bread Baking Class Nov. 3, 1 p.m.-6 p.m., at Gilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bread (655 Lake Harbour Drive, Suite 500, Ridgeland). Students receive a bench knife and apron, and get to take home the bread they bake. Limit of 10 students. Dress comfortably and wear closed-toe shoes with non-slip soles - no loose

IT PAYS TO BE BILINGUAL! On average bilingual employees make 5%-20% more. Learn Spanish or English Private Tutoring or Group Classes Native and Fun Instructors Spanish for Medical, Financial and Customer Service Fields Registration for classes start in January. NEW LOCATION! 6712 OLD CANTON RD SUITE 10 RIDGELAND | 601.500.7700 | LINGOFEST.COM

"%4(%#(!.'% Relay for Life Cookout Oct. 31, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Sta-Home Health and Hospice (406 Briarwood Drive). Sta-Home Health and Hospice hosts the fundraiser. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Relay for Life. Pre-ordering recommended/ $10 steak plates, $7 chicken or sausage plates, $8 combo plate (chicken and sausage); call 601-906-6510; email diajones@sta-home.com.

Interested in interviewing musicians, reviewing albums and networking within Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music community? The Jackson Free Press is looking for freelance writers interested in covering the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music scene. Please e-mail inquiries to

briana@jacksonfreepress.com

Pink-a-licious Breast Cancer Fundraiser through Oct. 31, at Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bakery (3013 N. State St.). Purchase a pink ribbon cookie, and a portion of the proceeds go to Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. Free; call 601-321-5512; email tracie.wade@cancer.org. Expressions Through the Arts Nov. 1, 7 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Catholic Charitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Legal Assistance Clinic hosts the fundraiser to help domestic violence survivors with filing fees. Includes refreshments, a silent auction and a performance from MADDRAMA. Sponsorships available. $30 admission, $140 filing fee donation (average cost for a contested divorce); call 601326-3759; catholiccharitiesjackson.org.

'RPHVWLF%HHU %X\2QH*HW2QH

)5(( $OO'D\$Q\'D\

Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

/XQFK6SHFLDO

MS State Dept of Health

570 E. Woodrow Wilson, Jackson, MS seeks an Epidemiologist I â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Asthma Program to develop, implement and use asthma tracking & surveillance systems; apply principles of public health, epidemiology & biostatistics accurately and thoroughly for chronic asthma studies; and analyze & disseminate data from asthma data sources. Requires Masters Degree in Epidemiology, Public Health, Biostatistics, Health Planning or Health Care Admin; and 2+ yrs. of directly related exp. Must have knowledge of statistical software, including SPSS, SAS/ SUDAN and ArcGIS.

EOE

34!'%!.$3#2%%.

Music Writing

Send Resume to HR Director, P. O. Box 1700, Jackson, MS, 39215-1700.

+LEDFKL&KLFNHQ



601.664.7588

1002 Treetop Blvd â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood Behind the Applebeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

jacksonfreepress.com

7%,,.%33

33


DIVERSIONS | stage

Bite Into the Forbidden Fruit by Mo Wilson COURTESY J.LEE PRODUCTIONS

ko,

F

orbidden Fruit. The title alone conjures up red apples and serpents and all manner of biblical things, not to mention the worst of our state’s race history. But Jimmy Lee, of J.Lee productions, is thinking of something more down-to-earth in his new play of the same name. The play, which marks J.Lee’s 10th production and fifth stage show, serves as both a milestone and the turning of a new leaf. “I just wanted to change up everything … to show growth,” J.Lee said. The product of that growth is a play J.Lee promises will be “tastefully subversive.” Like his previous play, “Everybody Plays a Fool,” his new production presents couples dealing with infidelity and temptations. While that play focused on the comedy of people acting foolish, this one shows the steamier side of giving into temptation. J.Lee promises his play will not feel like another played-out episode of “Cheaters.” “It’s a little deeper than that. I don’t want to give away too much, but everything is done differently. It’s not what you would expect,” J.Lee said. The play features six intertwining storylines that mix together two mar-

ried couples desperate to get the spark back in their marriages-—a woman debating getting into a relationship with a friend’s ex, a bachelor whose serial dating is starting to catch up to him and a woman who always falls for men she can never have. J.Lee’s ability to weave all these narratives together serves as a testament to his increased writing ability. “I definitely think I have a little bit better knowledge of what an audience will relate to, and what they will react to, what will grab their attention,” he said. That seems to include eye candy as well as narrative nuggets. The ensemble cast has been toning up more than their dialogue since they started rehearsals in August. “My cast has been working out, and everyone has been to the gym,” J.Lee said. This kind of preparation was a wise choice, seeing as how the actors are planning on bearing more than their souls on stage. “Skin will be shown,” promised J.Lee, who also kept affirming throughout the interview that his show was “tasteful” and “done with class.” While he chortled at my attempts to get him to put a MPAA rating on the show, he did say, “We’re definitely seeking a mature audience.”

“Forbidden Fruit” is J.Lee’s first stage play at the Alamo theater.

It Takes a Thief

by Justin Hosemann

October 30 - November 5, 2013

t’s been about seven decades since home audiences gathered around their wood-grained Zenith radios, tuning their dials past the static to find the weekend radio plays. Before television, radio dominated home entertainment, and genres were as diverse as American tastes. “Little Orphan Annie,” “Dick Tracy,” Shakespeare, live recordings of Count Basie’s Orchestra, and Orson Welles’ dramas dominated radio during its golden age. Even opera slipped into the airwaves, as composers attempted to bring the “high arts” into living rooms nationwide. Jacksonians will have a chance to experience this era Nov. 5 and 7 at Duling Hall, when the Mississippi Opera puts on a radio opera called “The Old Maid and the Thief” in front of a live audience. Gian Carlo Menotti—an ItalianAmerican librettist and composer who was instrumental in bridging the gap between the “high art” of opera and the popular entertainment of the day—composed the opera. “It originally premiered in 1939,” says Edward Dacus, the artistic director for Mississippi Opera. “But I think it stands the test of time. The characters are very recognizable.” Dacus says that, because the one-act radio opera is composed in English and examines the comical side to small-town gossip, it should be accessible to a 21st-century audience. The basic storyline follows a righteous “old maid,” Miss Todd, and her housemaid, Laetitia, as they receive an unexpected guest named Bob. He’s the wanderer who wins over Laetitia’s affections while taking temporary residence in Miss

TRIP BURNS

I

34

Don’t feel shy, though. J.Lee fully expects to see all his own family at the show. “Of course, they better be there to support (me),” he exclaimed. “Don’t go left field and think we’re putting on a porno!” Porno or not, the Alamo Theatre promises an intimate affair, something J.Lee thought of when selecting the venue. “You can really feel what the cast is going through and get a feeling up close and personal with what is happening on stage,” he said. This will be J.Lee’s first stage show at the Alamo. The Farish Street theater was the site of two film screenings by J.Lee productions, including the short film “The Murder,” which J.Lee said significantly broadened his audience. “It just opened a lot of eyes to J.Lee production like, “Oh, maybe they do know what they are doing,” J.Lee said. The quality of his productions is something that some may not expect from a Jackson-based studio. “Everyone was pleasantly shocked that it was definitely something that could rival any movie that’s in a theatre right now,” he added. Movie-goers and stage enthusiasts alike can catch “Forbidden Fruit” at the Alamo Theatre (333 N. Farish St.) on Nov. 2 at 7 p.m., and Nov. 3 at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $15.

Rebecca Geihsler-Chittom, James Turcotte and Viola Dacus (from left) bring the golden age of radio to Duling Hall Nov. 5 and 7 with “The Old Maid and the Thief.”

Todd’s home. Miss Pinkerton, a neighbor of Miss Todd’s and a catalyst for local gossip, throws her own rumors into the mix when she hears of an escaped convict who has recently been in the area, causing Miss Todd to believe that she is harboring a thief. Of course, Laetitia vehemently opposes to Bob being forced out of the home, and a series of comically energized scenes take place as the women try to keep their guest content and out of the public eye-—especially to protect Miss Todd’s reputation in the community.

“The trend is to do this work as it was originally intended,” Dacus says. Although this won’t be broadcast on radio, audiences will be able to see how such plays were put together and how they challenged performers to solely use their voice to bring the story to life. Dacus will use two “old-fashioned” microphones on a fairly minimal set, with a small orchestra composed of members of Mississippi Symphony Orchestra nearby. A radio announcer will deliver expository notes between scenes as well as sound effects when needed. “Typical operatic singing, or singing without the aid of amplification, can be expected, but it’s also in English,” Dacus says. “It’s really very humorous, and Menotti is one of the few operatic composers of the 20th century whose works are still performed regularly.” Cast members for “The Old Maid and the Thief” include Viola Dacus (Professor Dacus’ wife) as “Miss Todd,” James Turcotte as “Wanderer” or “Bob,” Rebecca Geishlee-Chittom as “Laetitia” and Kim Griffing Porter as “Miss Pinkerton.” “These are all seasoned singers and actors who should be able to really make their characters come alive to the audience,” Dacus says. “The Old Maid and the Thief” plays Nov. 5 and 7 at 7:30 p.m. in Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Tickets are $30. To purchase, call Mississippi Opera at 601-960-2300 or visit msopera.org.


DIVERSIONS | music LINDSEY BYRNES

The Sci-Fi Career of Coheed and Cambria by Micah Smith

prequel novel, “Year of the Black Rainbow,” which coincided with the release of the band’s fifth studio album of the same name. In February 2013, shortly after the release of the second half of the band’s “The AfterEven after more than a decade of epic science-fiction stories, creating interesting original music comes first for Coheed and Cambria, which performs in Jackson Nov. 6. man” double album, Coheed and Cambria announced that producers Mark Wahlberg and Stephen Levinson were eyeing “The oheed and Cambria is a band that defies classifica- Amory Wars” as a potential live-action film. tion. Elements of metal, punk, post-hardcore and But even with these momentous movements in the pop are interwoven so thoroughly that critics and band’s narrative, music has and always will exceed story for fans raise the proverbial white flag and call it “pro- Coheed and Cambria’s lead guitarist Travis Stever, 34. The gressive rock.” The New York quartet’s noncompliance runs same goes for the other band members: drummer Josh deeper than jumping from genre to genre, though; it can’t Eppard and bassist Zach Cooper. even stay in one art medium. “We’re always most concerned with doing what’s best Coheed and Cambria has made the leap from audio to for a song,” Stever says. “The story has a life of its own, and visual with its career-spanning concept “The Amory Wars,” though they work together, the music has to come first. Of an underlying science-fiction tale that singer and guitarist course, there is emphasis within everything—things that we Claudio Sanchez crafted. Sanchez teamed up with artists do because the story needs it, but the music stands on its own.” such as Gus Vazquez (“Sunfire & Big Hero 6”) and ChristoStever, a founding member of the band, is no stranger to pher Shy (“Pathfinder”) for a number of graphic novels and writing songs that sync with Sanchez’s vision. an ongoing series from Sanchez’s Evil Ink Comics. “Claudio has definitely shifted lyrically and grown over Author Peter David followed the series with his 2010 the years,” he says. “That’s just the way it is with music. You

C

move on as a band, and you try things and ecperiment with different sounds and styles.” Stever says this natural stylistic shifting has been both a blessing and a curse for Coheed and Cambria, but one that he’s thankful to have. “I see us as a band that’s lucky. We’ve never been confined,” Stever says. “I know it gets hard to be placed as a band on tours because it’s hard to put us into one category. But I feel fortunate for us to be that kind of band, one that isn’t easy to categorize.” After a series of summer festivals, Coheed and Cambria is back on the road and will play in Jackson Nov. 6. Also performing are experimental post-hardcore band Balance and Composure and I The Mighty, an up-and-coming progressive-rock group from San Francisco. “This tour is going to be really cool for us because we just finished doing those festivals, and there are time constraints and things you have to do,” Stever says. “With this tour, we get to do our own show and play a bunch of different tunes from the whole catalogue. People will really get a full dose of what we do.” Coheed and Cambria, Balance and Composure, and I The Mighty perform at 7 p.m. Nov. 6 at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St., 601-948-0888). Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. You must be 18 or older to attend. Visit coheedandcambria.com and ardenland.net.

music in theory

by Micah Smith

Beyond that, the music industry must look to almighty social media to judge COURTESY FACEBOOK

T

he term “fan” is actually a bit more dramatic than its three letters let on. To say, “I’m a fan of foreign films,” sounds less insane than, “I’m a fanatic for foreign films.” While the root remains the same, we’ve lessened the intensity, and that’s probably a good thing. It’s easier than labeling fans as “a bunch of people that like our music.” However, even “fan” has had some of the wind removed from its sails in recent years. I’m probably not sharing any new information when I say this whole Internet thing isn’t going away. Once, the amount of time a band spent hitting the road in a beat-up van while fighting sleepless nights and gas-station food malnutrition built or broke fan bases. Now, online presence is everything. While live performances are still important—bands build credibility through which major acts they’ve played with and where—they can start to feel more like resume-building material for record-label executives: “I see here you’ve opened for Tokyo Police Club. Are you familiar with spreadsheets?”

In the midst of social-media madness, real fans get lost in the shuffle.

whether an artist’s fan base is advanced enough to risk the label’s ever-important attention. Now, if you ask around, you’ll hear “magic numbers” all over the place. “You need 1,000 ‘likes’ on Facebook or 2,000 followers on Twitter or 500 people reading your blog.” But it’s not that simple. Labels don’t just look at how many social-media fans you have. They estimate how many you could have.

With all that, you can see why bands find it so important to consistently post tour photos, upload on-the-road videos and update you on the minutiae of life as “Band A.” So why do so many bands still fail? In some cases, it might be an inability to perform the daily duties of maintaining an online presence. However, other bands excel at media upkeep, yet see their popularity still dwindle. Sadly, that’s because the same system that boosts some musicians to stardom can sink others into black-hole obscurity, and it all circles back to the crucial misrepresentation of what a fan really is. Put simply, one “like” does not equal one fan. If you need proof, look back to the dawn of time, when MySpace ruled the Web. It had charts, festivals and even a record label to make use of the soaring number of online inhabitants. But when MySpace died, people moved on to Facebook and Twitter, both of which will no doubt see a similar fate one day. The problem for some “successful” musicians was that their multitude of MySpace fans didn’t cross the Great Website Divide with them.

As with TV ratings and box-office figures, numbers rarely tell the whole story. In a thousand “likes,” there could potentially be only a few hundred true fans—people that will buy every album without fail and proudly sport band merch like a bronze star. So, if that’s true, then why does the music industry have such an obsession with online presence? You’ve probably heard the adage, “They can’t see the forest for the trees.” Well, for those in music, that idiom plays out in reverse. We look at these immense numbers and say, “Wow, Vampire Weekend has 226,621 fans,” but seldom do we grasp that each tally is a functioning person with a different level of relationship with the artist. The crazy misconception is that fans just want videos or newsletters or to know what the lead singer had for dinner, but we’re not as needy as all that. In truth, we want connection. It’s why we’ll stand in line for an hour for an autograph without batting an eye. There is something so gratifying about forming a bond with the songwriters that captivate us. And ultimately, it’s that bond that separates the followers from the fans. 35

jacksonfreepress.com

The Basis of Fan Bases


MUSIC | live

0XVLFOLVWLQJVDUHGXHQRRQ0RQGD\WREHLQFOXGHGLQSULQW DQGRQOLQHOLVWLQJVPXVLF#MDFNVRQIUHHSUHVVFRP

/#4 7%$.%3$!9

WEDNESDAY 10/30:

Brian Jones (Restaurant) THURSDAY 10/31:

Barry Leach Trio (Restaurant) Los Buddies (Patio) FRIDAY 11/1:

Restaurant closes at 9pm for UMC Private Event SATURDAY 11/2:

Impression (Restaurant) MONDAY 11/4:

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday (Restaurant)

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2 for 1 house wine

starting at â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

pm

Thursday October 31

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache â&#x20AC;¢ Ladies Drink Free

Friday November 1

DJ Young Venom

TUESDAY 11/5:

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant)

BUY GROWLERS O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

$19

Saturday November 2

Napoleon Avenue

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

/#4 4(523$!9 7KH$QWLTXH0DUNHW+HDUWDORW +DOORZHHQ+RHGRZQSP 7KH%HOKDYHQ3LQN1LJKW2XWIHDW 7KH :HHNV 0DJJLH (FNIRUG HWF  SP  DUGHQODQGQHW %XUJHUV %OXHV%ULDQ-RQHV SP &HUDPL¶V5RQ6HQQHWWSPIUHH &KHURNHH,QQ'·OR7ULR )-RQHV&RUQHU$PD]LQ·/D]\%RL %DQGPLGQLJKW )HQLDQ¶V)DPLO\)ULHQGO\+DOORZ HHQZ)HQYHUDV:UHQ *HRUJLD%OXH)ORZRRG)LOWHU 7KH1RLVH *HRUJLD%OXH0DGLVRQ'DQ&RQIDLW +DO 0DO¶V%DUU\/HHFK7ULR UHVW -RKQ:HVOH\&ROHPDQ /RV%XGGLHV SDWLR

+XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR SP ,6+/LYH-D]]SPDIWHUSP .DWKU\Q¶V7KH6RID.LQJVSP 0%DU6LSSLQ 7ULSSLQ&RPHG\ 6KRZZ'-6KDQRPDNSPIUHH 0DUWLQ¶V+DOORZHHQ%ORZRXW IHDW3DVVLQJ3DUDGHSP 2OJD¶V5LFN 5REHUWR0RUHLUD Z&KXFKR*RQ]DOH]SP 6KXFNHU¶V5HIOHFWLRQVSPIUHH 8QGHUJURXQG+DOORZHHQ%DVK IHDW-DUHNXV6LQJOHWRQSP

./6 &2)$!9

Tuesday November 5 2 for 1 Highlife & PBR

Open Mic

with Wesley Edwards October 30 - November 5, 2013

Wednesday November 6

36

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE FREE WiFi

Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

$PHULVWDU%RWWOHQHFN%OXHV%DU 9LFNVEXUJ9DVWL-DFNVRQ SPIUHH %RWWRPV8S'-'DQFLQJZ6SH FLDO(YHQWVSPFRYHU %XUJHUV %OXHV$FRXVWLF&URVV URDGVQRRQ6HDQ 5LFKDUG SP )-RQHV&RUQHU.LQJ(GZDUG PLGQLJKW )HQLDQ¶V-RH&DUUROO &RRSHU 0LOHVSP *HRUJLD%OXH)ORZRRG+XQWHU *LEVRQ *HRUJLD%OXH0DGLVRQ/DUU\ %UHZHU +XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR SP

COURTESY SOFA KINGS

THIS WEEK

,6+$NDPL*UDKDP 7KH.H\RI *Z'-)UHH]HSP %XUJHUV %OXHV-HVVH´*XLWDUµ 0%DU)OLUW)ULGD\VZ'-IUHH 6PLWKSP 0DUWLQ¶V7KH6WHHSZDWHU%DQG 'XOLQJ+DOO7RGG6QLGHUZ7KH 0F%¶V:LOO3OHDVDQWV )ULHQGV &RQJUHVVSPDGYDQFH SP GRRUDUGHQODQGQHW 2OH7DYHUQ'-<RXQJ9HQRP +DO 0DO¶V%ULDQ-RQHV UHVW

2OJD¶V6LG7KRPSVRQ 'RXEOH +XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR 6KRW]SP SP 5HHG3LHUFH¶V%\UDP7KH61$== .DWKU\Q¶V+XQWHU*LEVRQZ/DUU\ %DQGSPIUHH %UHZHUSP 6DP¶V/RXQJH/RRNLQJ)RU 0%DU&HQW:HGQHVGD\VZ $VWURQDXWV '-'XUG\&RVWHOORSPIUHH 6KXFNHU¶V0HPSKLV<DKRRVSP 0F%¶V/DGLHV·1LJKWZ5RQ 'RV/RFRV GHFN SPIUHH (WKHULGJHSP 7ZR5LYHUV&DQWRQ)LOWHU7KH 2OJD¶V7KH6RID.LQJVSP 1RLVHSP 7LPH 2XW  %OXHV :HGQHVGD\ Z 8QGHUJURXQG6RXWKHUQ.RP .HUQ3UDWW 7KH$FFXVHGSP IRUW%UDVV%DQGSP 8QGHUJURXQG-HVVH5RELQVRQ SP

The Sofa Kings

./6 3!452$!9 $PHULVWDU%RWWOHQHFN%OXHV%DU 9LFNVEXUJ9DVWL-DFNVRQ SPIUHH %RWWRPV8S±'-'DQFLQJ 6KRZ SPFRYHU %XUJHUV %OXHV%UDG%DLUG  (ULF1HHOH\SP &HUDPL¶V5RQ6HQQHWWSPIUHH &OXE0DJRR¶V6SDQN7KH0RQNH\ )-RQHV&RUQHU7KH/HJHQGDU\ +RXVH5RFNHUVPLGQLJKW )DLUYLHZ,QQ)LOWHU7KH1RLVHSP )HQLDQ¶V7KH6RID.LQJVSP )RUG$FDGHPLF&RPSOH[0LOOVDSV &ROOHJH&KDPEHU,,0XVLF RI*OXFN+D\GQ3XFFLQL  5HVSLJKLSP *HRUJLD%OXH)ORZRRG:D\QH $PPRQV *HRUJLD%OXH0DGLVRQ-RVHSK /D6DOOH +DO 0DO¶VVW,PSUHVVLRQ UHVW  SP +D]HO&RIIHH7LJKWURSH(VFDSDGH SP -XOHS/DUU\%UHZHUSP 0%DU6DWXUGD\1LJKW/LYHZ'- 6KDQRPDNIUHH 0DUWLQ¶V7KH6R6R*ORV 2OH7DYHUQ1DSROHRQ$YHQXH 2OJD¶V-DFNLH3HDUVRQ%ODQNVWRQ SP 5HHG3LHUFH¶V%\UDP6RXWKRI SPIUHH 6KXFNHU¶V'HHE·V%OXHV GHFN  SPIUHH0HPSKLV<DKRRV SP7ULSOH7KUHDW GHFN  SPIUHH 8QGHUJURXQG7LPH7R0RYH SP

./6 35.$!9 %XUJHUV %OXHV0D\'D\SP &KDU%LJ(DV\7KUHHDP )LW]JHUDOG¶V$QG\+DUGZLFNDP +D]HO&RIIHH)LOWHU7KH1RLVHSP +RW6KRWV%\UDP0LNHDQG 0DUW\·V-DP6HVVLRQ 6KXFNHU¶V)XOO0HDVXUH SPIUHH 6RPEUD0H[LFDQ.LWFKHQ-RKQ 0RUDDP 6RSKLD¶V)DLUYLHZ,QQ.QLJKW %UXFHDP 6RXO:LUHG&DIH6XJDU:DWHU3XU SOH6XQGD\3RHWU\1LJKWSP 7DEOH5DSKDHO6HPPHV DP

./6 -/.$!9 'XOLQJ+DOO7KH%ULJKW/LJKW 6RFLDO+RXUIHDW%ODFN7D[L  &OHDU3ODVWLF0DVNVSP DUGHQODQGQHW +DODQG0DO¶V&HQWUDO06%OXHV 6RFLHW\ UHVW SP .HPLVWU\6DOVD0RQGD\VSP /DVW&DOO6SRUWV*ULOO,/RYH 0RQGD\VZ'-6SRRQDIWHU SP 0DUWLQ¶V2SHQ0LF)UHH-DP

./6 45%3$!9 %XUJHUV %OXHV-HVVH´*XLWDUµ 6PLWKSP )HQLDQ¶V2SHQ0LF 0DUJDULWD¶V-RKQ0RUDSP 2OH7DYHUQ2SHQ0LF 6KXFNHU¶V'HHE·V%OXHVSP 7LPH2XW2SHQ0LF1LJKW 8QGHUJURXQG5REHUW.LQJ  6HWK-RUGDQ :DVDEL6XVKL %DU)LOWHU7KH 1RLVHQRRQ

./6 7%$.%3$!9 %XUJHUV %OXHV-HVVH´*XLWDUµ 6PLWKSP 'XOLQJ+DOO[[\\[[Z6KORKPR SP +DO 0DO¶V&RKHHG &DPELD Z%DODQFH &RPSRVXUH,7KH 0LJKW\SPDGYDQFH GRRUDUGHQODQGQHW +XQWLQJWRQ¶V-RKQQ\%DUUDQFR SP .DWKU\Q¶V+XQWHU*LEVRQZ/DUU\ %UHZHUSP 0%DU&HQW:HGQHVGD\VZ '-'XUG\&RVWHOORSPIUHH 0DLQ(YHQW6SRUWV%DU *ULOO 2SHQ%OXHV-DPE\/LQWEHOO\ SPIUHH 0F%¶V/DGLHV·1LJKWZ5RQ (WKHULGJHSP 2OJD¶V7KH6RID.LQJVSP 7LPH 2XW  %OXHV :HGQHVGD\ Z .HUQ3UDWW 7KH$FFXVHGSP 8QGHUJURXQG=DFK/RYHWWSP

&RQWDFWLQIRDWMISPV PXVLFYHQXHV

7IDESPREAD0ANIC /DNHIURQW$UHQD1HZ2UOHDQV -ICHAEL.ESMITH:RUN3OD\6RXQGVWDJH%LUPLQJKDP 6OODOO%XPERIENCEFEAT0EARL*AM -ACKLEMORE ETC&LW\3DUN1HZ2UOHDQV !LICE#OOPER%HDX5LYDJH%LOR[L


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, OCT. 31 MLB (7-11 p.m., Fox) The final and deciding game (if necessary) of the 2013 World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals is at Fenway Park. FRIDAY, NOV. 1 College football (8-11 p.m., ESPN 2): Pac-12 football on Friday night sees the USC Trojans heading to Corvallis to take on the Oregon State Beavers. SATURDAY, NOV. 2 College football (11 a.m.-3 p.m., CBS): Mississippi State needs to pull off a huge upset against South Carolina on the road to help its bowl hopes … College football (11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., CBS Sports Network): Southern Miss hopes to break the nation’s longest losing streak on the road against Marshall.

This has been one of the craziest World Series in a long time. One game ended with an obstruction call, and another ended with a pickoff play. Will it get any wilder? SUNDAY, NOV. 3 NFL (12-3 p.m., Fox): The New Orleans Saints face their third straight AFC East opponent this week on the road against the New York Jets. MONDAY, NOV. 4 NFL (7:30-11 p.m., ESPN): One of the oldest rivalries in the NFL takes center stage as the Green Bay Packers and the Chicago Bears clash in primetime. TUESDAY, NOV. 5 NHL (6:30-10 p.m., NBC Sports Network): Get your hockey fix with the Philadelphia Flyers heading south to take on the Carolina Hurricanes.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6 NBA (6-11 p.m., ESPN): With the NBA season in full swing, we’ll see a great double header featuring Chicago at Indiana and Dallas at Oklahoma City. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

Thanksgiving by Steve’s

Making Last Year’s Turkey Jealous Choice of: All-Natural Oven Roasted Turkey Breast Applewood-Smoked Ham Garlic Herb & Olive Oil Roasted Chicken Breast Seitan Turkey with Focaccia & Cornbread Dressing with Gravy Pan Roasted Brussels Sprouts Yeast Rolls $18 per/person Bread Pudding with Praline Bourbon Sauce for 18 - $30 Pecan Pie Tart for 8 - $25 Sweet Potato Pecan Cookies Double Chocolate Espresso Cookies $12 per dozen

Bes t o f

2013

Best of Jackson 2007 - 2013 Visit www.ceramis.net for specials & hours.

601.919.2829

5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

Helping Jacksonians blow their diets since 1946

Thanksgiving order deadline: Friday November 22

2 Locations 125 S. Congress St. 601.969.1119 200 S. Lamar Ave. 601.714.5683

bryan’s rant

Voted one of the best

ITALIAN RESTAURANTS

Tasty Food • Cold Beer 1410 Old Square Road • Jackson cherokeedrivein.com • 601.362.6388

I

t has been nearly six years since Southern Miss replaced Jeff Bower as head coach for its football team. Bower had led the Golden Eagles for 17 seasons, but the fan base was ready for a change. Bower never won more than nine games, and lost four or more games 12 times. He hadn’t finished in the top 25 poll since the 1999 season, and USM let him go after the 2007 season. Southern Miss finished with a 7-5 or 6-5 record eight times under Bower. Even though Bower finished 9-5 the year before his final season, the program had grown stagnate. Still, knowing what to expect can be a great thing. You could always write USM down for six to seven wins and a bowl game under Bower, but the program never took the next step. USM supporters thought the program should do better when they brought in Larry Fedora. In his first three seasons in Hattiesburg, Fedora won seven, seven and eight games. The next year, he took a senior-laden team to a 12-2 record—the best record in Southern Miss history. Fedora parlayed that season into a higherpaying job at North Carolina. Here is where USM went off the

rails: Southern Miss made an uninspired hire in Ellis Johnson, and it led to an uninspired season at 0-12. Johnson is a great defensive coordinator and, by all accounts, a good guy, but he is not head coaching material. The terrible season led to a talent flight from Hattiesburg and cost Johnson his job. Southern Miss hired Todd Monken in an attempt to right the ship. It is too early to tell if Monken is the guy or not, especially because he doesn’t have a lot to work with right now. It’s strange to see people post on social media that this is what USM gets for firing Bower. Time makes us remember the past fondly—the same fans who probably wanted Bower fired now remember winning games and going to a bowl. Southern Miss had high hopes to become the Boise State of the south, if they could only find their Chris Petersen. Maybe Monken is that guy. Either way, Bower is not coming back. Southern Miss fans need to stop worrying about the past and focus on the future. I agreed with letting Bower go. It was time to move on. Now it is time for USM fans to move on as well.

See this week’s College Football Top 25 poll at jfp.ms/2013pollweek9 and look for it to return to the paper in next week’s issue.

jacksonfreepress.com

USM Must Move On

37


W /

Pub Quiz with Andrew

T /

Family Friendly Halloween with music by

Fenveras Wren F /

Video Game Character Halloween Party with music by

Joe Carroll & Cooper Miles S /

Sofa Kings M /

Karaoke w/ Matt T /

Open Mic

with Joe Carroll

7EDDING October 30 - November 5, 2013

Feature Writer Wanted

38

Do you Tivo “My Fair Wedding”? Or do words like three-tiered cake or tulle and lace make you smile from earto-ear? If so, have we got an assignment for you. The JFP is currently seeking writers to seek out and write about unique couples in the Jackson metro area for our Hitched column. Interested? Send letter of interest and writing samples to kathleen@jacksonfreepress.com.

!"#

Halloween at Fenian’s

Oct 31st

Bring the Kids for Dinner Specials & Candy

Nov 1st

Dress as your Favorite Character for the Video Game Halloween Costume Contest!

!"#


,AST7EEK´S!NSWERS

%<0$77-21(6

:RUNXQGHUFRYHU 0RGHVWVKHOWHU ³8QLTXH1HZ<RUN´DQG ³&LQQDPRQDOXPLQXPOLQROHXP´ $OEHUWRIVSRUWVFDVWV $TXDULXPEXLOGXS ([LOHIRU1DSROHRQ RIVHFKV &RZER\¶VFRQWUROV %DQQHGIUXLWVSUD\ ³+RZBBBLVWKDW"´ 'LFWHQWULHV 6RPHHPSOR\HHGDWDIRUVKRUW

3RUWODQG¶V9RRGRR'RXJKQXWV 9LJLODQWDJDLQVWDWWDFN &DWFKHVVLJKWRI :HHNO\VHSWHW %ODFNVPLWK¶VEORFN *LIWRQWKHVHYHQWKGD\RI &KULVWPDV &LWL¿HG PDUNHGWKHLUHQG +DZDLLDQURRW

&RRNLHWKDWFDQEH³'RXEOH6WXI´ ³:DLWLQJIRUWKH5REHUWBBB´ ³$WODVWWKHZHHNHQG´ $IWHUQRRQVRFLDODFWLYLWLHV WR&DHVDU Â&#x2039;-RQHVLQ¶&URVVZRUGV HGLWRU#MRQHVLQFURVVZRUGVFRP

)RUDQVZHUVWRWKLVSX]]OHFDOOFHQWVSHUPLQXWH0XVWEH 2UWRELOOWR\RXUFUHGLWFDUGFDOO5HIHUHQFHSX]]OH

$OWN

!CROSS

%D\ORU8QLYHUVLW\FLW\ )DUIURPVODFN 6XUJHRQRQGD\WLPH79 $LUOLQHWKDWÃ&#x20AC;LHVWR7HO$YLY 1LQWHQGRIUDQFKLVH $ZIXOO\EORRG\ ³%UDYH1HZ:RUOG´GUXJ 3ODFHZKHUHFXWVDUHSDUWRIWKH SUR¿W %DGVLJQPD\EH ³<RVKLPL%DWWOHVWKH3LQN5RERWV´ EDQG 5RRVWHG '\HIDPLO\

%R[FRYHU 8SOLIWLQJFRPSDQ\" %ULW¶VVXEPDFKLQHJXQ &KLGLQJVRXQG ,W¶VPDGHZLWKDORWRIIROGLQJDQG FKHZLQJ ,QGLDBBBZKRFRYHUHG³,PDJLQH´ '09LVVXDQFH )OLJKWRUJ DQDJUDPRI&,$2

,WHPIRUDQH[KDXVWLYHVHDUFKVR WRVSHDN *DYHJUXEWR :RRG\$OOHQDQLPDWHG¿OP %LJQDPHRQWK$YHQXH ³&URXFKLQJ7LJHU´GLUHFWRU/HH

%<0$77-21(6

,AST7EEK´S!NSWERS

±+AIDOKU²

(DFKRIWKHOHWWHUVRIWKHDOSKDEHWLVUHSUHVHQWHGLQWKLVJULGE\DQXPEHUEHWZHHQDQG8VLQJOHWWHU IUHTXHQF\ZRUGSDWWHUQUHFRJQLWLRQDQGWKHQXPEHUVDV\RXUJXLGHV¿OOLQWKHJULGZLWKZHOONQRZQ(QJOLVK ZRUGV +,17VLQFHD4LVDOZD\VIROORZHGE\D8WU\KXQWLQJGRZQWKH4¿UVW 2QO\ORZHUFDVHXQK\SKHQDWHG ZRUGVDUHDOORZHGLQNDLGRNXVR\RXZRQ WVHHDQ\WKLQJOLNH672&.+2/0RU/21*/267LQKHUH EXW\RX PLJKWVHH$)*+$1VLQFHLWKDVDQXQFDSLWDOL]HGPHDQLQJWRR 1RZVWRSZDVWLQJP\SUHFLRXVWLPHDQG62/9( SV\FKRVXGRNX#KRWPDLOFRP

jacksonfreepress.com

±-OUTHPIECES²²WDNHWKLVRUDOH[DP

%ULGJHSRVLWLRQV +DZDLLWKHBBB6WDWH :DVWKRXJKWRI ³/HPRQ\6QLFNHW´HYLOFRXQW ³,ORYH\RX´LQDWHOHQRYHOD ³<RX¶UHBBB1HHGWR*HW%\´ -DSDQHVHZKHDWQRRGOH .QRWW\VRUW" L3KRQHULYDO $FFHVVIRUDZKHHOFKDLU *DOHQDDQGEDX[LWHIRUWZR .LQGRI%XGGKLVP *DERUZKRVODSSHGDFRS 9LOODLQ¶VGHQ ³7KH0RG6TXDG´UROH 2KVRSUHFLRXV 2O\PSLFVVWDU0DUN 7H[DVRU*HRUJLDIROORZHU 7KH\PD\EHFUXQFK\RUVRIW ³7KH.LQJDQG,´FRXQWU\ 'UDZHUKDQGOH %LJ¿VKKRRN ³8JO\%HWW\´DFWRU0LFKDHO 3LHFHRIODQG 7KHBBBIURP)UHQFK/LFN /DUU\ %LUG

2UDQJHGULQNRQVRPHRI

39


!D#$###%

45 "46&!7%&489%

E'/F'.GG(H.%

F(H.*I*+

&123 2@%78A;456 =>;1 BC=:??

C=

!"#$###% *+ &'() %)& !"#$%&'"( ,*-.%/0, 56 %?" &1234= ;1 ;<; +,>-3/ :) 9 8 7 /012

October 30 - November 5, 2013

*+,-.

40

Maywood Mart Shopping Center (Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com Always Drink Responsibly

Take a crack at it!

A winner every 30 minutes will receive $250 Cash and choose an envelope containing a code. At 11pm, each winner will try to Crack the Code for $2,500 Cash! If no one wins the $2,500, the prize will rollover to the next drawing day until it’s won! Earn entries now. 20X Entries Sunday, Mondays & Tuesdays. 40X Entries on Fridays.

Stir-fry cash… Mmmm! One winner hourly will receive up to $1,000 in chips and is eligible for the $5,000 Cash grand prize drawing on December 13 at 12:30am!

'=?&V3..TR 1-:*&;3<<=>?@>&5@3A&B&CDEFGHI<JK&()&,L1M-& 10M**0*1N0L12N&B&<DO=<P3QFODEFGHI<JRE@/

CDGD?&SQ3T=<G&4QIH&U@<&/@<=&A=?3DQGR&(IG?&H=&21&T=3<G&@U&3J=&@<&@O=<R&(3>3J=/=>?&<=G=<O=G&3QQ&& <DJV?G&?@&3Q?=<&@<&E3>E=Q&.<@/@?D@>G&3?&3>T&?D/=&PD?V@I?&>@?DE=R&'3/HQD>J&.<@HQ=/W&43QQ&10MMM0XXX0L*L*R&& Y2-1,&5DO=<P3QF&43GD>@&B&7@?=QR&"QQ&<DJV?G&<=G=<O=AR


BULLETIN BOARD: Classifieds

3#/20)//CT .OV 

:KDWLI\RXKDGWKHSRZHUWRHQFKDQWDQGHYHQEHZLWFKSHRSOHZLWK\RXUFKDULVPD" :RXOG\RXZLHOG\RXUDOOXUHZLWKRXWPHUF\":RXOG\RXIHHOZLFNHGGHOLJKWLQWKHLU DWWUDFWLRQWR\RXHYHQLI\RXGLGQ¶WSODQWRJLYHWKHPZKDWWKH\ZDQW",VXVSHFWWKHVH TXHVWLRQVDUHQ¶WHQWLUHO\UKHWRULFDOULJKWQRZ<RXPD\KDYHPRUHPRMRDW\RXUGLVSRVDO WKDQ\RXUHDOL]H6SHDNLQJIRU\RXUFRQVFLHQFH,ZLOODVN\RXQRWWRGHVHFUDWH\RXU SULYLOHJH,I\RXPXVWPDQLSXODWHSHRSOHGRLWIRUWKHLUEHQH¿WDVZHOODV\RXUV8VH\RXU UDZPDJLFUHVSRQVLEO\+DOORZHHQFRVWXPHVXJJHVWLRQDPHVPHUL]LQJJXUXDQLUUHVLVWLEOH GLYDDVWDJHPDJLFLDQ

,KDGDGUHDPWKDW\RXZHUHLQWKH¿OP³2%URWKHU:KHUH $UW7KRX"´<RXZHUHOLNHWKHFKDUDFWHUSOD\HGE\*HRUJH &ORRQH\DIWHUKHHVFDSHGIURPDSULVRQFKDLQJDQJ&DQ \RXSLFWXUHLW"<RXZHUHZHDULQJDVWULSHGMDLOELUGVXLW DQGDEDOODQGFKDLQZHUHVWLOOFXIIHGDURXQG\RXUDQNOH %XW\RXZHUHVRUWRIIUHHWRR<RXZHUHRQWKHODPPDN LQJ\RXUZD\IURPDGYHQWXUHWRDGYHQWXUHDV\RXHOXGHG WKRVHZKRZRXOGWKURZ\RXEDFNLQWKHVODPPHU<RX ZHUHQRW\HWLQWKHFOHDUEXW\RXVHHPHGWREHHQURXWH WRWRWDOHPDQFLSDWLRQ,WKLQNWKLVGUHDPLVDQDSWPHWD SKRULFDOGHSLFWLRQRI\RXUDFWXDOOLIHULJKWQRZ&RXOG\RX VRPHKRZXVHLWLQGHVLJQLQJ\RXU+DOORZHHQFRVWXPH"

#!02)#/2.$EC *AN 

,LQYLWH\RXWRWU\WKHIROORZLQJH[HUFLVH,PDJLQHWKH PRVWSRZHUIXOUROH\RXFRXOGUHDOLVWLFDOO\DWWDLQLQ WKHIXWXUH7KLVLVDSRVLWLRQRUQLFKHRUMREWKDWZLOO DXWKRUL]H\RXWRZLHOG\RXULQÃ&#x20AC;XHQFHWRWKHPD[,WZLOO JLYH\RXWKHFORXWWRVKDSHWKHHQYLURQPHQWV\RXVKDUH ZLWKRWKHUSHRSOH,WZLOODOORZ\RXWRIUHHO\H[SUHVV\RXU LPSRUWDQWLGHDVDQGKDYHWKHPEHWUHDWHGVHULRXVO\ /HW\RXULPDJLQDWLRQUXQDOLWWOHZLOGDV\RXYLVXDOL]H WKHSRVVLELOLWLHV,QFRUSRUDWH\RXUYLVLRQVLQWR\RXU+DO ORZHHQFRVWXPH

!15!2)53*AN &EB 

,QWKHFRXUVHRIHDUQLQJDOLYLQJ,KDYHZRUNHGIRXU GLIIHUHQWMREVDVDMDQLWRUDQGVL[DVDGLVKZDVKHU2Q WKHEULJKWHUVLGH,KDYHSHUIRUPHGDVDVRQJZULWHU DQGOHDGVLQJHUIRUVL[URFNEDQGVDQGFXUUHQWO\ZULWHD V\QGLFDWHGDVWURORJ\FROXPQ$FFRUGLQJWRP\DQDO\VLV RIWKHDVWURORJLFDORPHQV\RX$TXDULDQVDUHSULPHGWR FXOWLYDWHDUHODWLRQVKLSZLWK\RXUZRUNOLIHWKDWLVPRUH OLNHP\ODWWHUFKRLFHVWKDQWKHIRUPHU7KHQH[WHLJKW PRQWKVZLOOEHDIDYRUDEOHWLPHWRHQVXUHWKDW\RX¶OO EHGRLQJ\RXURZQSHUVRQDOHTXLYDOHQWRIURFNVLQJHU RUDVWURORJ\FROXPQLVWZHOOLQWRWKHIXWXUH+DOORZHHQ FRVWXPHVXJJHVWLRQ\RXUGUHDPMRE

0)3#%3&EB -ARCH 

$XWKRU5REHUW/RXLV6WHYHQVRQORYHGWKHZRUNRISRHW :DOW:KLWPDQUHFRPPHQGLQJLWZLWKWKHVDPHHQWKXVL DVPDVKHGLG6KDNHVSHDUH¶V6WHYHQVRQDOVRUHJDUGHG :KLWPDQDVDQXQUXO\IRUFHRIQDWXUHDQGLQRQHIDPRXV SDVVDJHFDOOHGKLP³DODUJHVKDJJ\GRJMXVWXQFKDLQHG VFRXULQJWKHEHDFKHVRIWKHZRUOGDQGED\LQJDWWKH PRRQ´<RXUDVVLJQPHQWLVWRGR\RXUEHVWLPLWDWLRQRID SULPDOFUHDWXUHOLNH:KLWPDQ,QIDFWFRQVLGHUEHLQJKLP IRU+DOORZHHQ0D\EH\RXFRXOGPHPRUL]HSDVVDJHV IURP:KLWPDQ¶V³/HDYHVRI*UDVV´DQGUHFLWHWKHPDW UDQGRPPRPHQWV+HUH¶VRQH³,WRRDPQRWDELWWDPHG ,WRRDPXQWUDQVODWDEOH,VRXQGP\EDUEDULF<$:3 RYHUWKHURRIVRIWKHZRUOG´

!2)%3-ARCH !PRIL 

2QFHZKHQ,ZDVKLNLQJWKURXJK0DXL¶VUDLQIRUHVW, VSLHGDPDMHVWLFSXUSOHKRQRKRQRÃ&#x20AC;RZHUVSURXWLQJIURP DURWWLQJORJ$V,EHQWGRZQFORVH,LQKDOHGWKHPHUJHG DURPDVRIPROGHULQJZRRGDQGVZHHWÃ&#x20AC;RUDOIUDJUDQFH /HW¶VPDNHWKLVVFHQH\RXUPHWDSKRURIWKHZHHN$ULHV +HUH¶VZK\$SDUWRI\RXUOLIHWKDWLVLQWKHWKURHVRI GHFD\FDQVHUYHDVKRVWIRUDPDJQL¿FHQWEORRP:KDW KDVEHHQORVWWR\RXPD\EHFRPHWKHVRXUFHRIIHUWLOLW\ +DOORZHHQFRVWXPHVXJJHVWLRQDJDUEDJHPDQRUFOHDQ LQJPDLGZHDULQJDFURZQRIURVHV

4!5253!PRIL -AY 

:KDWGRQ¶W\RXOLNH"*HWFOHDUDERXWWKDW:KDWGRQ¶W \RXZDQWWRGR"0DNHGH¿QLWLYHGHFLVLRQV:KDWNLQG RISHUVRQGR\RXQRWZDQWWREHFRPHDQGZKDWOLIHGR \RXQHYHUZDQWWROLYH"5HVROYHWKRVHTXHVWLRQVZLWKDV PXFKFHUWDLQW\DVSRVVLEOH:ULWHLWDOOGRZQSUHIHUDEO\ LQWKHIRUPRIDFRQWUDFWZLWK\RXUVHOI6LJQWKHFRQWUDFW

7KLVGRFXPHQWZLOOEH\RXUVDFUHGSURPLVHDGHFODUD WLRQRIWKHERXQGDULHV\RXZRQ¶WFURVVDQGWKHDFWLYLWLHV \RXZRQ¶WZDVWH\RXUWLPHRQDQGWKHGHVLUHVWKDWDUHQ¶W ZRUWK\RI\RX,WZLOOIHHG\RXUIUHHGRPWRNQRZH[DFWO\ ZKDW\RXOLNHDQGZKDW\RXZDQWWRDFFRPSOLVKDQGZKR \RXZDQWWREHFRPH+DOORZHHQFRVWXPHVXJJHVWLRQ WKHRSSRVLWHRIZKR\RXUHDOO\DUH

'%-).)-AY *UNE 

$UH\RXXSIRUDQH[SHULPHQW"1RWMXVWRQ+DOORZHHQ EXWIRUDZHHNDIWHUZDUGVEHVFDULHUWKDQ\RXUIHDUV,I DQDQ[LRXVWKRXJKWSRSVLQWR\RXUPLQGEDUH\RXUWHHWK DQGJURZO³*HWRXWRIKHUHRU,ZLOOULS\RXWRVKUHGV´,I DGHPRQYLVLWV\RXLQDQLJKWO\GUHDPFKDVHDIWHULWZLWK DWRUFKDQGVZRUGVFUHDPLQJ³%HJRQHIRXOVSLULWRU, ZLOOEXUQ\RXUPDQJ\DVV´'RQ¶WWROHUDWHEXOO\LQJLQDQ\ IRUPZKHWKHULWFRPHVIURPDFULWLFDOOLWWOHYRLFHLQ\RXU KHDGRUIURPVXSSRVHGO\QLFHSHRSOHZKRDUHWU\LQJWR JXLOWWULS\RX³,DPDEUDYHFRQTXHURUZKRFDQQRWEH LQWLPLGDWHG´LVZKDW\RXFRXOGVD\RU³,DPDPRQVWHU RIORYHDQGJRRGQHVVZKRZLOOGHIHDWDOOWKUHDWVWR P\LQWHJULW\´

#!.#%2*UNE *ULY 

$UH\RXUHDG\WREHDPD]HG"1RZZRXOGEHDQH[FHOOHQW WLPHWRVKHG\RXUVRXO¶VLQIDQWLOHLOOXVLRQVWRSOD\ ZLOGO\ZLWKWKHJUHDWHVWP\VWHU\\RXNQRZWRDFFHSW JLIWVWKDWHQKDQFH\RXUIUHHGRPDQGUHIXVHJLIWVWKDW GRQ¶WWRVHHNRXWDVXSHUQDWXUDOHQFRXQWHUWKDWKHDOV \RXUFKURQLFVDGQHVVWRFRQVRUWDQGFRQYHUVHZLWK VH[\PDJLFDOVSLULWVIURPWKHIXWXUHWRPDNHORYH ZLWKWKHOLJKWVRQDQGFU\ZKHQ\RXFRPH+DOORZHHQ FRVWXPHVXJJHVWLRQWKHDUFKHW\SDO/29(5

HELP WANTED 3ELL7EB3OCIAL3ERVICES

-)3VHHNVDSUR¿WPRWLYDWHGVDOHVSHUVRQZLWKGLJLWDO VDYY\DQGVRFLDOPHGLDVNLOOV<RXtOOEHFDOOLQJRQ ORFDOEXVLQHVVHVWRKHOSWKHPZLWKWKHLUPDUNHWLQJ LQWKHQHZDJHRI02%,/((PDLOWRGG#MDFNVRQ IUHHSUHVVFRPZLWK\RXUUHVXPHDQGFRYHUOHWWHU 6HULRXVHDUQLQJSRWHQWLDO

(ELP7ANTED

PDNHH[WUDPRQH\LQRXUIUHHHYHUSRSXODU KRPHPDLOHUSURJUDPLQFOXGHVYDOXDEOHJXLGHERRN 6WDUWLPPHGLDWHO\*HQXLQHZZZ HDV\ZRUNIURPKRPHFRP $$1&$1

)NDUSTRIAL*OBS.OW

:HKDYHLPPHGLDWHRSHQLQJV0XVWEHDEOHWROLIW OEVDQGDERYH3UHKLUHGUXJVFUHHQUHT$SSO\ RQOLQHWRGD\DWZZZZRUNLQJVROXWLRQVXVDFRP

.OW(IRING

&RPSHWLWLYH3D\3DLG+HDOWK,QVXUDQFHIRU (PSOR\HHV$GYDQFHPHQW2SSRUWXQLWLHV1R([SHUL HQFH5HTXLUHG0LGZHVWHUQ6HUYLFHV,QFD+RXVWRQ 7;EDVHGFRPSDQ\LVDFFHSWLQJDSSOLFDWLRQVIRUWDQNV FOHDQHUV:LOOWUDLQ&UHZVDYHUDJHKRXUVSHU ZHHNWUDYHOUHTXLUHG7UDQVSRUWDWLRQSURYLGHGWR DQGIURPWKHMREVLWH'UXJ)UHH(2(0XVWEH DEOHWRUHDGZULWHDQGVSHDN(QJOLVK7R¿OORXWDQDS SOLFDWLRQSOHDVHJRWRZZZPLGZHVWHUQVHUYHVFRPDQG JRXQGHUHPSOR\PHQWWDEWRFRPSOHWHWKHDSSOLFDWLRQ

345$%.4!)$!33)34!.#%

&XW\RXU678'(17/2$1SD\PHQWVLQ+$/)RUPRUH (YHQLI/DWHRULQ'HIDXOW*HW5HOLHI)$670XFK /2:(5SD\PHQWV&DOO6WXGHQW+RWOLQH

RETAIL 2EBECCA2OSE&LEA-ARKET

&RPHMRLQXVLQ\RXUVHDUFKIRUKLGGHQWUHDVXUHV 2YHUVTIWRILQGRRUVKRSSLQJ2UJDQL]HG FOHDQIULHQGO\VHUYLFH&UHGLW'HELWFDUGVDFFHSWHG /LNHXVRQIDFHERRNUHEHFFDURVHÃ&#x20AC;HDPDUNHW +Z\65LFKODQG06  

$)3(462ETAILER

6WDUWLQJDWPRQWK IRUPRV  +LJK6SHHG ,QWHUQHWVWDUWLQJDWPRQWK ZKHUHDYDLODEOH  6$9($VN$ERXW6$0('$<,QVWDOODWLRQ&$//1RZ 

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

SERVICES 0ROFESSIONAL(OUSE#LEANING

)DPLO\RZQHGFRPSDQ\FKHFNRXWRXUUDWHVDWZZZ KRXVHFOHDQLQJPVFRPSULFHOLVW*HWWKHEHVWVHUYLFH LQWRZQ

Post an ad at jfpclassifieds.com, call 601-362-6121, ext. 11 or fax to 601-510-9019. Deadline: Mondays at noon.

,%/*ULY !UG 

6RPHSHRSOHLQ\RXUYLFLQLW\DUHVPROGHULQJDQGIXPLQJ 7KHDLULVKHDY\ZLWKHPRWLRQDOIHUPHQW&RQVSLUDF\ WKHRULHVDUHULSHQLQJDQGURWWLQJDWWKHVDPHWLPH+LG GHQDJHQGDVDUHVHHSLQJLQWRFRQYHUVDWLRQVDQGJRVVLS LVVZLUOLQJOLNHJKRVWO\GXVWGHYLOV<HWLQWKHPLGVWRI WKLVPD\KHPDQHHULHFDOPSRVVHVVHV\RX$VHYHU\RQH HOVHVWUXJJOHV\RX¶UHSRLVHGDQGIXOORIJUDFH7RZKDW GRZHRZHWKLVVWDELOLW\",VXVSHFWLWKDVWRGRZLWKWKH IDFWWKDWOLIHLVVKRZLQJ\RXKRZWRIHHODWKRPHLQWKH ZRUOGQRPDWWHUZKDW¶VKDSSHQLQJDURXQG\RX.HHS PDNLQJ\RXUVHOIUHFHSWLYHWRWKHVHWHDFKLQJV+DOORZHHQ FRVWXPHVXJJHVWLRQ.LQJRU4XHHQRI5HOD[DWLRQ

6)2'/!UG 3EPT 

8QL¿FDWLRQVKRXOGEHDNH\WKHPHIRU\RXLQWKHFRPLQJ ZHHNV$Q\WKLQJ\RXGRWKDWSURPRWHVVSOLFLQJDQG EOHQGLQJDQGKDUPRQL]LQJZLOOJHWH[WUDKHOSVRPHWLPHV IURPP\VWHULRXVIRUFHVZRUNLQJEHKLQGWKHVFHQHV 7KHPRUH\RXZRUNWR¿QGFRPPRQJURXQGEHWZHHQ RSSRVLQJVLGHVWKHVWURQJHU\RX¶OOIHHODQGWKHEHWWHU \RX¶OOORRN,I\RXFDQPDQDJHWRPHQGVFKLVPVDQGKHDO ZRXQGVXQH[SHFWHGOXFNZLOOÃ&#x20AC;RZLQWR\RXUOLIH7RHQ FRXUDJHWKHVHGHYHORSPHQWVFRQVLGHUWKHVH+DOORZHHQ GLVJXLVHVDUROORIWDSHDVWLFNRI.UD]\*OXHDZRXQG WKDW¶VKHDOLQJDEULGJH

,)"2!3EPT /CT 

:KDWGR\RXWKLQN\RX¶GEHOLNHLI\RXZHUHDPRQJWKH RQHSHUFHQWZHDOWKLHVWSHRSOHRQ(DUWK":RXOG\RX GHPDQGWKDW\RXUJRYHUQPHQWUDLVH\RXUWD[HVVR\RX FRXOGFRQWULEXWHPRUHWRRXUFROOHFWLYHZHOOEHLQJ" :RXOG\RXOLYHVLPSO\DQGFKHDSO\VR\RX¶GKDYHPRUH PRQH\WRGRQDWHWRFKDULWLHVDQGRWKHUZRUWK\FDXVHV" 7KLV+DOORZHHQVHDVRQ,VXJJHVW\RXSOD\DURXQGZLWK IDQWDVLHVOLNHWKDW²PD\EHHYHQPDVTXHUDGHDVDQ LQFUHGLEO\ULFKSKLODQWKURSLVWZKRGROHVRXWFDVKDQG JLIWVHYHU\ZKHUH\RXJR$WWKHYHU\OHDVWLPDJLQHZKDW LWZRXOGEHOLNHLI\RXKDGHYHU\WKLQJ\RXQHHGHGDQG IHOWVRJUDWHIXO\RXVKDUHG\RXUDEXQGDQFHIUHHO\

+RPHZRUN0HGLWDWHRQGHDWKQRWDVWKHHQGRISK\VLFDOOLIHEXWDVDPHWDSKRUIRUVKHGGLQJZKDW¶VRXWZRUQ,Q WKDWOLJKWZKDW¶VWKHEHVWGHDWK\RX¶YHH[SHULHQFHG")UHHZLOODVWURORJ\FRP

7EPIW%GGSYRX1EREKIVW

;IRIIHGPMIRXHVMZIRGERHMHEXIWVIEH]XSLMXXLIWXVIIXWXSTVSWTIGXRI[EGGSYRXWPMWXIRXS GPMIRXRIIHWERHJSPPS[YTIZIV][IIO[MXL[SVPHGPEWWGYWXSQIVWIVZMGI&VMRK]SYVPSZISJPSGEP FYWMRIWWERH]SYV[MPPMRKRIWWXS[EOIYTIZIV]QSVRMRKXSMQTVSZI]SYVGYWXSQIVW«FSXXSQPMRI 1SXMZEXIHWEPIWTISTPIGERQEOIQSSVQSVIMRXLMWGSQQMWWMSRHVMZIRTSWMXMSR [LMGLSJJIVWETEMHHE]XVEMRMRKTIVMSH

3YXWMHI(MKMXEP6ITW

-J]SYPMZIERHFVIEXLIXLIWSGMEP;IF%2(]SY«VI[MPPMRKXSKSSYXIZIV]HE]XSXEPOXSTISTPI EFSYXMX[I«ZIKSXEYRMUYITSWMXMSR;I«VIPSSOMRKJSVWSQISRIXSWIPPHMKMXEPEHZIVXMWMRKQSFMPI WSPYXMSRWWQEPPFYWMRIWWETTWERHQSVILIVIMR.EGOWSR'SRXVEGXSVMRLSYWIHITIRHMRKSR I\TIVMIRGI-J]SYPSZI]SYVWQEVXTLSRIERH]SY«VIVIEH]XSQEOIEGLERKIMR]SYVGEVIIVKIXMR XSYGLERHPIX«WXEPO

'ST])HMXSV4VSSJVIEHIV*EGXGLIGOIV

;IEVIWIIOMRKEHIXEMPSVMIRXIHERHJEGXSFWIWWIHTIVWSRXSHSGST]IHMXMRKTVSSJVIEHMRKERH JEGXGLIGOMRKJSVXLI.*4=SYQYWXPSZIXLILYRXJSVQMWXEOIWMRGST]EW[IPPEWLEZIRSJIEVSJ XLIXIPITLSRI1YWXFIEJEWXIHMXSVI\XVIQIP]VIPMEFPIERHLEZIWXIPPEVXMQIQEREKIQIRXWOMPPW 4SWMXMSR[MPPWXEVXEFSYXLSYVWE[IIO;I[MPPKMZI]SYEGST]IHMXMRKXIWXFIJSVIWGLIHYPMRKER MRXIVZMI[2STLSRIGEPPW;VMXIEQFIV$NEGOWSRJVIITVIWWGSQXSWGLIHYPIEXIWXXMQI

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

jacksonfreepress.com

3!')44!2)53.OV $EC 

As low as $20! jfpclassifieds.com

41


Your

Fashion

Inspiration Location

Welcome

Is your child aged 13-17 diagnosed with ADHD?

To The Ride of Your Life We Make It Happen!

VIP- Executive- Private

Weddings Birthday Parties Vacations www.executivelimoms.com

601.987.9426 1260 E. County Line Rd. Ridgeland platosclosetridgeland.com 601.487.8207

With The Most Reliable Luxury Transportation Service Service Excellence with Southern Hospitality

You may be eligible to participate in a research study of an investigational medication. Symptoms of ADHD include difficulty remembering information, difficulty concentrating, trouble organizing or completing tasks, and procrastination. Qualified participants may receive studyrelated psychological evaluation(s), compensation for time and travel and a three month supply of an FDA-approved medication to treat ADHD in adolescents that your physician may prescribe at no cost on completion of the study.

October 30 - November 5, 2013

For More information, call:

42

3531 Lakeland Drive Brentwood Plaza â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Suite 1060 Flowood, MS 39232 (601) 420-5810 Like Us On Facebook


VOTE TUESDAY NOVEMBER 5, 2013

Honesty and Integrity are not optional but required for leadership. @DarrelMcQuirter

Darrel McQuirter

www.ElectMcQuirter.com • P. O. Box 1077, Clinton, MS 39060 • Paid for by Friends to Elect Darrel McQuirter

MILLSAPS COLLEGE

Driving the Conversation “Across the Street and Around the Globe”

November 1-3: Millsaps Homecoming Visit millsaps.edu for full schedule of activities

November 1, 12:30 p.m.

Friday Forum: Community Voices — The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

November 2, 1 p.m.

Millsaps v. Berry (Football)

Millsaps College, Harper Davis Field Admission: $10

November 5, 7 p.m.

Arts & Lecture Series: “Jackson: Past, Present, and Future” with Leland Speed and Charles Evers, moderated by Malcolm White Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: $10

November 8, 12:30 p.m.

Friday Forum: Saffron Cross—The Unlikely Story of How a Christian Minister Married a Hindu Monk

www.millsaps.edu

jacksonfreepress.com

Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

43


MARKET PLACE Locksmith Service you can trust....

adver tise here star ting at $75 a week 601.362.6121 x11

Little Big Store

NOW HIRING!

Vinyl Records +45â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & 78â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

of Jackson

Automotive Commercial Residential For Service Call

601-355-3691

Mon, Fri & Sat: 10am - 5pm Sun: 1 - 5pm â&#x20AC;˘ CDs & Tapes â&#x20AC;˘ Posters â&#x20AC;˘ Back Issue Music Magazines & Books â&#x20AC;˘ T-Shirts & Memorabilia â&#x20AC;˘ Blu-Rays, DVDs, & VHS

For application please visit www.goodsamaritancenter.org/jobs or visit our Midtown or Fondren locations

MidTownâ&#x20AC;ŠLocation

601.857.8579

114â&#x20AC;ŠMillsapsâ&#x20AC;ŠAve.â&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;ŠJackson,â&#x20AC;ŠMSâ&#x20AC;Š39202â&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;Š(601)â&#x20AC;Š355-7458â&#x20AC;Š Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;Š-â&#x20AC;ŠFridayâ&#x20AC;Š9:30â&#x20AC;Š-â&#x20AC;Š5:30â&#x20AC;Š&â&#x20AC;ŠSaturdayâ&#x20AC;Š10:00â&#x20AC;Š-â&#x20AC;Š4:00

www.littlebigstore.com

3011â&#x20AC;ŠN.â&#x20AC;ŠStateâ&#x20AC;ŠSt.â&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;ŠJackson,â&#x20AC;ŠMSâ&#x20AC;Š39216â&#x20AC;Šâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;Š(601)â&#x20AC;Š366-9633â&#x20AC;Š Mondayâ&#x20AC;Š-â&#x20AC;ŠFridayâ&#x20AC;Š10amâ&#x20AC;Š-â&#x20AC;Š6pmâ&#x20AC;ŠSaturdayâ&#x20AC;Š10amâ&#x20AC;Š-â&#x20AC;Š5:30pm

201 E. Main Street â&#x20AC;˘ Raymond, Ms

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let Us Fight Your Battle For You!â&#x20AC;?

.543ISLOOKINGFORENERGETIC HARDWORKING CUSTOMER SERVICEORIENTEDFOLKSWITHA ÂźAIRFORTHECREATIVE

Fondrenâ&#x20AC;ŠLocation

398 Hwy. 51 â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 â&#x20AC;˘ www.villagebeads.com

Fondrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Newest Nail Salon

Specializing In Natural Nails The Law Offices of

Charlie A. Carr, PLLC Attorney & Counselor At Law Criminal Defense, Car Accidents and Divorce

601.398.8663

Shellac Healthy Nails Pedicures 2947 Old Canton Road | 601.366.6999

   

     

Danny

10% OFF

2 LOCATIONS FOR THE FOOD YOU LOVE

lunch & dinner â&#x20AC;˘ with this ad

Lunch Buffet: Mon - Fri â&#x20AC;˘ 11am - 2pm Sat & Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 11.30am - 2.30pm Dinner: Mon - Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 5 - 10pm

2481 Lakeland Drive | Flowood 601.932.4070

862 Avery Blvd â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS 601-991-3110 â&#x20AC;˘ ruchiindia.com

900 Suite E. County Line Rd. Former AJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 769.251.2657

Beesâ&#x20AC;Ś

Birds canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have all the fun. (Come get this costume for Halloween and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be busy alright!)

175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M­Th: 10­10p F­Sa 10­Mid Su: 1­10p * www.shopromanticadventures.com


v12n08 - Obama's War on Whistleblowers