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October 16 - 22, 2013


COURTESY TREVOR PICKERING

JACKSONIAN TREVOR PICKERING

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r. Trevor Pickering performs 700 joint replacements each year. “This allows my patients to be active again and not only improves their immediate quality of life, but extends the length of their life by increased blood flow and exercise,” he says. Pickering, a partner in Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopedic Center in Jackson, is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in knees and hips. This quiet and unassuming native Californian lives in Madison with his wife, Cris, and daughter, Nora. Pickering, 47, doesn’t play golf and says his hobby is his family. When it comes to vacations, he says, “I’m working on that.” His surgical days start with rounds at 5:30 a.m., and Pickering heads into surgery at 7 a.m. for around six hours of replacing hips and knees. Pickering has an undergraduate degree in comparative literature from the University of California at Berkeley and a master’s degree in French literature from Columbia University in New York. While studying comparative literature during a fellowship in Paris, Pickering realized that he wasn’t getting satisfaction from his studies. He wanted to be more a part of the community and have a tangible and positive effect on it. His desire to better others’ lives led to medical school at Duke University. The Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopedic Center brought him to the Magnolia State, and now Pickering lives, works and even-

CONTENTS

tually wants to retire in the Jackson area. “We like the people, the culture and the lifestyle, and it is just easy to live here,” Pickering explains. Pickering says that one of the biggest challenges in joint replacement today is getting a lifetime of longevity from our bones. “It used to be that the replacements would wear out. But with advanced materials, they can last a lifetime,” he says. “The replacements are so good that the bone wears out faster.” Another challenge for Pickering is working with obese patients. “The technical difficulty and risks are much greater in these patients, but if done properly, the outcome can be very good,” he says. He works with those patients by negotiating with them over their weight. “I tell them that if they can show me they can lose some weight, I can help them,” Pickering says. Mississippi Sports Medicine runs a weight-loss clinic with two nutritionists to help these patients. “We thought we’d address the issue head-on,” Pickering says. Pickering credits his wife for supporting his career path—even when it meant 10 years of training to be a surgeon. “Cris has always been terrifically supportive of my career change. She has tolerated a lot of adversity and many moves around the country. I could not have done it without her. I knew it would fulfilling in the long run, and I was right.” —Richard Coupe

Cover photograph of Dr. Hannah Gay by Trip Burns

8 Farish Fight Continues

“It’s fantastic. It’s been too damn long, and nothing has changed. … (Developers have) been down here 19 years working on two blocks. It’s a shame.” —Doctor Shumaker, about the Jackson Redevelopment Authority’s decision to terminate David Watkins’ contract, “Farish Street, Round Two (or Eight?)”

33 Capturing Music on Canvas

Canadian transplant Ken Daley brings his love of music into his art, with instruments and jazz musicians making frequent appearances.

38 ‘Southeastern’ Melody

Riding high on a successful year and the release of a new album, “Southeastern,” Jason Isbell performs at Duling Hall Oct. 21.

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4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ............................................ TALKS 11 .................................. BUSINESS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ............................ COVER STORY 18 ................................. WELLNESS 27 ......................................... FOOD 29 ...................................... HITCHED 30 ........ BEST OF JACKSON RECAP 33 .............................. DIVERSIONS 34 .......................................... FILM 35 ....................................... 8 DAYS 36 ............................... JFP EVENTS 38 ....................................... MUSIC 39 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 41 ..................................... SPORTS 43 .................................... PUZZLES 45 ....................................... ASTRO

MICHAEL WILSON ; COURTESY KEN DALEY; TRIP BURNS

OCTOBER 16 - 22, 2013 | VOL. 12 NO. 6

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EDITOR’S note

by Ronni Mott, News and Opinion Editor

My Opening Farewell

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don’t remember why my friend John asked me to edit his essay back in 2006. Perhaps I told him that I had taken on Julia Cameron’s “The Artist’s Way” as if it was a mission. I was journaling every day, taking myself out for artist’s dates to see things I hadn’t seen in the nine years since moving to Mississippi—the zoo, the natural history museum (where I watched the otherworldly gar and sturgeon in awe), a play at New Stage. I was reconnecting with old friends and taking advantage of every opportunity. I fell in love with the clarity writing brought to my monkey mind and the sense of accomplishment that came with filling pages. About halfway through John’s story, having made changes and provided direction for nearly every sentence, I thought, “I can do this.” So I did. I finished that first essay in a couple of hours. The subject was a pro-choice rally. I thought it was good, but now what? Then I remembered the Jackson Free Press. I wrote an email to Donna Ladd and attached it. But before clicking “send,” I began to doubt myself. “What am I thinking? It’s dreck. No one wants to know what I think about anything.” I made a second pot of coffee, took a shower and made breakfast. When I came back to my computer two hours later, my cursor hadn’t moved. It had no mercy. It just slowly, dispassionately blinked at the same rate as my pulse, soundlessly pointing at “send.” I held my breath and clicked the button. Instantly, my anxiety ratcheted up. “What if they print it? People will get mad. What if someone wants to hurt me?” The next 30 minutes or so are a blur of apprehension. I stared in disbelief when Donna’s reply hit my inbox.

“Can we print this?” Ego overrode uncertainty, “Absolutely!” I replied, and so began my journey with the Jackson Free Press. Seven years later, that journey, like so many in my unplanned life, is taking a new turn. What a ride it’s been.

I love Mississippi as I would love an unruly, disobedient child.

I’m blessed with some natural writing ability, and it’s connected to my love of music and art. When they flow, words create a symphony of color and kaleidoscopic impressions that can illuminate dark corners and touch the deepest part of a soul. The best work invokes movie scenes played out in the imaginations of readers. But back than, writing was still a mystery, tangled in muses and other fanciful inspirations. Only ethereal voices dictated magical words. If I learned nothing else through my tenure here, I know now that I am in charge of my words. That’s no small thing. Writing is a process. Regardless of inspiration, if you follow the A, B, Cs of the process, stories

happen. I learned the elements of a good story, one that has readers asking, “And then what happened?” in anticipation. Process won’t give you talent, but it goes a long way to break a writer’s block. Even more instructional has been the great privilege of editing others’ work. Stronger writing than mine, and weaker, clarifies where I need improvement. I came to know that if I don’t understand what a writer is trying to convey, if I don’t know the meaning of the words, no one else will, either. I’ve had great teachers here, from Donna to former managing editors Brian Johnson and Maggie Neff, to writers and editors Valerie Wells and Kathleen Mitchell. It hasn’t been easy—far from it. To borrow a phrase, they often dragged me, kicking and screaming, to paradise (and awards). The JFP has also taught me to trust my instincts and curiosity, given me a safe place to opine on the rights and wrongs of the world, to teach, to illuminate, to make a difference. And that’s really what drives me to write. I love Mississippi as I would love an unruly, disobedient child. I believe she can be better. She can pick herself off the floor with all of her horrendous scars and become a hero. All the pieces are there: people who care and those who need care; a richness of tradition; the horrors, foibles and lessons of a misspent past; and creativity as prolific as the mosquitoes buzzing in its steamy atmosphere. Heroes don’t come from easy circumstances. The greatest thing the JFP brings to its beloved home is permission to move beyond the tyranny of low expectations. Mississippi needs a lot of tough love to go forward with compassion, integrity and authenticity. Each of us has the power to participate in the journey—through votes, through activism, through the exhausting process of making

our voices heard and simply by never settling for less than excellence. Lots of JFP tough love and inspiration has come from its phalanx of engaged reporters, past and present: Adam Lynch, Ward Schaeffer, Lacey McLaughlin, Elizabeth Waibel, R.L. Nave and Tyler Cleveland, to name a few. Their various quirky personalities and ferocious intelligence have given us stories to change this city and state for the better. It’s hard work suitable for few, and I salute them. All of that good writing has to be supported, and the JFP has a small army of people committed to ensuring those words have a platform. My hat is off to all who work so hard to provide the oxygen that makes the machine go. It begins with the tenacity of publisher Todd Stauffer, the talents of ad manager Kimberly Griffin, and the numerous sales and support people they manage. And putting it all together, making it beautiful to look at and inviting to read, are the artful brilliance of creative director Kristin Brenemen, designer Andrea Thomas and photographer Trip Burns. They make magic every day. After my many years with the JFP in numerous roles, the names and faces of all the dedicated souls who passed through the doors are too many to count or name here. My grateful thanks and warm wishes go to each of you for peace, happiness and success. Be kind to each other. At this latest crossroad in my life, I will often remember and be grateful to all those who have paved and smoothed my road. I begin a new journey as an independent writer with a mixture of trepidation and ecstasy. I’m jumping off the cliff in anticipation of growing wings. I think perhaps I’ll write a book. Stay tuned, and don’t be shy. Former JFP managing editor Ronni Mott writes and edits to change the world. Reach her at ronni.mott@gmail.com.

October 16 - 22, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Richard Coupe

R.L. Nave

ShaWanda Jacome

Kathleen Mitchell

Tommy Burton

Justin Hosemann

Briana Robinson

Kimberly Griffin

Richard Coupe, avid fan of the beautiful game, husband, brother and father of four, is still wondering what he wants to be when he grows up. He wrote the Jacksonian.

Newly appointed News Editor R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Call him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12. He contributed to the talk section.

ShaWanda Jacome is an elementary librarian in JPS. She lives in Ridgeland with her husband, Mike and son, Mateo. One of her favorite scriptures is Psalm 34:4. She wrote a wellness story.

Features Editor Kathleen Mitchell loves the fall. She would wear coats and boots every day of the year if she could, and all she really wants is a crackling fireplace to drink red wine in front of. She wrote the food feature.

Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton plays bass with Lately David, collects records, sees movies and travels a lot with his wife, Michelle. He wrote a music story.

Editorial Intern Justin Hosemann is a native of Vicksburg. He recently graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi. He wrote the arts feature.

Music Editor Briana Robinson wants to become an expert on all things music. Her other passions include dance and photography. Send her the music scoop at briana@jacksonfreepress.com. She helped factcheck for the issue.

Sales Director Kimberly Griffin is a fitness buff and foodie who loves chocolate and her mama. She’s also Michelle Obama’s super secret BFF, which explains the Secret Service detail.


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jacksonfreepress.com


TRIP BURNS

[YOU & JFP] John Johnston Age: 27 How long have you lived in Jackson? A year and a half. What’s your favorite part of Jackson? Fondren. Favorite quote: “Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy,

Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

WHAT ARE YOUR HEALTHRELATED GOALS THIS FALL? Becky Hixson Tatum Run five miles. Joe Williams To walk at least two miles each day and cut down on sugar intake. Tanya Francis To continue yoga. I’ve been doing it for about a month and can really feel a difference in my stress levels. Dereck Davis (Maintain a) consistent workout schedule. Kathleen Morrison Mitchell My goals right now are to intensify my workouts, exercise more consistently each week and eat more vegetables.

DON’T FORGET! Best of Jackson 2014 is coming soon. Look for the ballot early next month!

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wealthy and wise.� —Ben Franklin Secret to life: Yoga.

Coming Soon: Hitched Magazine The January-February 2014 issue of BOOM Jackson magazine is also the first glossy Hitched! Get your wedding or engagement listed in the city’s only wedding magazine focused on living local and loving Jackson. Email hitched@ boomjackson.com for more information on prices and how to submit. We are also seeking nominations for this year’s Power Couples. We want to know about couples (married or not) who are making Jackson a better place, be they doctors, lawyers, coaches, businesspeople, artists, professors, administrators, nonprofit organizers or something else entirely. Email kathleen@jacksonfreepress.com to suggest great couples, and check out boomjackson.com to see last year’s Power Couples issue.

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October 16 - 22, 2013

 

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Wednesday, Oct. 9 Three U.S. scientists win the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing computer models for complex chemical interactions in creating new drugs. ‌ The Obama administration announces it is poised to slash hundreds of millions from military and economic aid to Egypt.

Friday, Oct. 11 The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons receives a Nobel Peace Prize for its efforts to destroy Syria’s stockpiles of poison gas weapons. ‌ New Jersey’s highest court agrees to hear a case on the legality of gay marriage. Saturday, Oct. 12 The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank meet to discuss global finances. ‌ Using their own money, some states re-open national parks closed in the government shutdown. Sunday, Oct. 13 Dozens of people stage a run to protest tickets in the closed Valley Forge National Historical Park. ‌ Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speak but fail to reach agreement on the debt ceiling or the government shutdown.

October 16 - 22, 2013

Monday, Oct. 14 Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi offers to reinstate network provider agreements with four of 10 Health Management Associates hospitals. ‌ The Washington Post reports that the National Security Agency has been sifting through millions of email contact lists and instant messaging accounts.

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Tuesday, Oct. 15 House GOP leaders unveil yet another plan to counter one from the Senate to reopen the government and forestall a debt default. ‌ Iranian negotiators in Geneva propose a “breakthroughâ€? plan to ease fears that of an atomically armed Tehran. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

Farish Street, Round Two (or Eight?) by Tyler Cleveland

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n one of the abandoned warehouse spaces at 272 Farish St., in the first block between Amite and Griffith streets, the only signs of life are a makeshift pallet where someone has been sleeping and a pile of trash where someone had Krystal burgers for supper the night before. It’s a far cry from a plate of Lumpkin’s barbecue, much less a blue plate from B.B. King’s Blues Club. Much has changed around the capital city in the last several years, but Farish Street is not one of them. Sure, some of the facades on the buildings have been cleaned up, and the bricked streets with fancy light fixtures look nice. But the buildings are empty, many of the windows are busted out, and some buildings have what looks like kudzu growing through their floors. It has been nearly six years since local developer David Watkins rode in on a white horse to save a floundering Farish Street renovation and development project, and less than three weeks since the Jackson Redevelopment Authority canceled his contract, effectively removing him from the project. The developer said in a statement his lawyer sent to the JFP that his money has paid for much work. “Some of these buildings could have been pushed to the ground with little effort, and they are now structurally sound, many with new roofs, despite the need for tenant build out,� Watkins wrote. “Watkins Development reworked the city’s water and sewage system below ground level, built additional drainage systems, repaired the brick-paved 300-yard street, repaired over 600 linear yards of brick sidewalk ranging from nine to 15 feet wide, rebuilt and repaired interior walls,

rebuilt and repaired concrete floors, reinforced support structures for upper floors, plumbed nearly every building, brought electric service to each building, purchased HVAC equipment, acquired contract rights for amazing artists like B.B. King

working on two blocks. It’s a shame.� The debate raged this week over what comes next with the troubled renovation project, originally taken on to provide Jackson with an entertainment district on the order of Memphis’ Beale Street nearly 30 years ago. TRIP BURNS

Thursday, Oct. 10 House Speaker John Boehner asks Republican lawmakers to support a six-week extension of the government’s ability to borrow money. ‌ The U.N. Security Council votes on a resolution to help end near-anarchy in the violencewracked Central African Republic.

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A building at the cornoer of Griffith and Farish streets sits abandoned, with no door or windows, rotting from the inside out.

and has advanced substantial administrative and personnel funds over the years.â€? Doctor Shumaker, who owns Dennis Brothers Shoe Shop less than a block from the abandoned properties Watkins was enlisted to renovate and manage, was in his store Thursday afternoon when this reporter wandered in to take a look around. “It’s fantastic,â€? he said about JRA’s decision to find a new developer. “It’s been too damn long, and nothing has changed. ‌ (Developers have) been down here 19 years

Ronnie Crudup, JRA board chairman, said the board stands by its decision. “We made a decision as a board with what we think is the best interests of the city. That was our determination. I’m aware of a lot of what is being said there, but it’s not productive for us to debate that in the press,� he said. The consensus seems to be that even though the project is mired in decades of setbacks and controversy, an entertainment district is essential if Jackson is going to flourish. “We’ve supported the project, and

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it’s a great project,� said John Gomez of Downtown Jackson Partners, which runs the downtown business improvement district and receives tax dollars from businesses inside the BID to pay for its services., “It’s a very reverent area of the city with a lot of history. It’s a big project for us, because one of the main things we hear from hotels in the area is that they want an area of town to which they can point their visitors. We want a place where people who are planning conventions at the convention center can go for entertainment.� Cynthia Buchanan, executive vice president of the Jackson Chamber of Commerce, pointed out that an entertainment district on Farish Street would give the city a chance to distinguish itself from other southern cities, and help keep some of our

talent from going to bigger markets. “The area needs to be exciting and engaging,â€? Buchanan said. “It needs to showcase and celebrate our local talent. ‌ What we need to do is develop a home base to give our local musicians, chefs and artists a reason to stay here to produce their craft.â€? Local business owner Jeff Good has done pro-bono work for Watkins, helping him map out the kitchen areas in the buildings that Farish Street Group planned to lease to businesses that have agreed to locate a franchise on Farish. “There’s always more than meets the eye,â€? Good said about the ongoing saga. “The surface discussions on Farish Street have been thin and veiled in nuance. The truth of the complexity of this is soon to be known by us all. It should give us the ac-

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countability we need ... After all the good that (Watkins) has done, the inaction just doesn’t jive with his track record.� Watkins’ main point of contention seems to be that if he is not allowed to continue development of the entertainment district, he will lose his personal investment of approximately $4.7 million, and the city will lose out on nearly $5 million in tax credits Watkins had secured for the project. Stevens argued that a $10 million bond that JRA promised to deliver never came about, and for the board to now cancel the contract is unfair. Stevens said the reality is that the city, through JRA, had little to no skin in the game. In a sit-down interview with the JFP Oct. 10, Stevens revealed that Watkins was in the throes of closing a deal to bring in

another investor who could have carried the Farish Street project over the finish line. “Can you imagine how (JRA’s bond promise falling through) changed the dynamic?â€? Stevens asked emphatically. “After that happens, then you have to talk to people who are hosses who can come up with $10 million for an untested project. ‌ Now, (JRA has) really poisoned David’s efforts to go to strategic partners and get the backing we need. It’s hard for him to go to the potential investors and say, ‘Hey, we’ve got the backing of the redevelopment authority,’ because they’ve made a very public statement (by canceling the contract) that will hinder him.â€? The JRA board meets again Oct. 23 at 10 a.m. in the Richard J. Porter building, across the street from City Hall.

JPS, Symphony Out of Tune? dismantle Strings in 2012, but the district kept the program in place. Sherwin Johnson, a JPS spokesman, said the district intends to have Strings this year, but is awaiting a response from MSO. Michael Beattie, the symphony’s president and executive director, did not respond to an interview request from the Jackson Free Press. “With a long-standing partnership of well over 40 years, the District wishes to MATTHEW TRUDEAU/FLICKR

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good chance exists that Omega Hart’s sons will be talented musicians merely through exposure to their musical father, who has played lead bass in Jackson bands and has toured nationally. Two years ago, Hart’s now 7-year-old son, Khai Alexander, wanted to learn the violin even though he was already learning the piano. Hart gives a lot of credit to Jackson Public Schools’ 40-year-old Strings in the Schools program for providing a structured environment where his sons’ talents can flourish. “I think the program is something that is very much needed,� Hart said. “It builds confidence, and studies show that studying music translates into better grades.� A partnership between the school district and the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, Strings in the Schools offers free music instruction for students as young as 5 at some schools all the way through high school. The MSO also performs regular concerts at JPS schools as a way to introduce children to orchestral music. But the popular program may be in peril—again. The Strings program has yet to commence this academic year, and parents of children who look forward to the classes say JPS has offered few answers. In 2009, the JPS Board of Trustees voted to slash Strings before eventually reinstating the program amid a chorus of outrage from parent groups. At issue then was the $300,000 contract between JPS and the MSO. Parents say JPS again threatened to

A popular partnership between the Mississippi Symphony and Jackson Public Schools might again be threatened.

continue the Strings in the Schools program. We hope to hear from the executive director soon so that district leadership may present the MSO’s program to the Board of Trustees for approval during its first board meeting in November,� Johnson added. Whatever issues might exist between the organizations, it is clear is that Strings is an extremely popular program among parents

and students, and its benefits surpass merely teaching tykes how to play the fiddle. JPS’ 2012 internal evaluation rated the program as exemplary, meaning it is “a commendable program model that is highly effective in meeting its program goals and learning outcomes and is recommended by the program administrator for continuance.� The evaluation shows enrollment doubling since the 2008-2009 school year, jumping to 841 students in 2011-2012 from 395 three years earlier. Fueling the expansion is elementary-school participation, which went from 300 students in 2011-2012 to 750 in 2009-2012. Middle and high-school enrollment largely remained fairly constant during that period. Still, overall participation among JPS’ 30,000 students is low; less than 3 percent of kids take advantage of the program. The JPS evaluation, which included input from the MSO, recommended expanding the number of students, teachers and public outreach about Strings, and an internship program with Jackson State University. Robert Blaine, a professor of music and special assistant to the provost at JSU, said that learning an instrument doesn’t make kids smarter per se, but he points to brain science that shows studying music helps expand neural pathways. Also, learning an instrument, fosters discipline that comes in handy later in life when kids start doing algebra and writing essays. Blaine, who oversees the JSU orchestra, said half of those students are high achieving,

and many have received academic scholarships. “It’s the level of their discipline that makes them successful in other academic studies,� Blaine said. Phyllis Lewis-Hale teaches opera at JSU, and both her children participate in Strings. Good grades aside, she believes music and playing in an orchestra helps develop social skills. Her kids hang out with kids who are also into music. “The ensemble experience is something that teaches working together, cooperation and unity,� she said. She adds that it’s unlikely that many JPS students would have exposure to the orchestra if the Strings program did not exist because their families would not be able to afford private lessons. And, for parents, Strings is convenient because everything takes place at the schools, so parents don’t have to shuttle their children to private lessons. Some parents, including Lewis-Hale and Omega Hart, would likely see their children’s music instruction continue. Dr. Blaine, who last year appealed to JPS to keep Strings in place but is not officially involved with the program, said many parents can’t afford private music lessons. “What you’re doing is setting up a divide between kids with resources from those who don’t have those resources—setting up a system of haves and have-nots,� Blaine said. “... It’s the kids who don’t have the access who need it most. The ones that have the most disadvantage might benefit the most.� Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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by R.L. Nave

9


TALK | justice

Pearl Targets Low-Income Rentals by Ronni Mott

TRIP BURNS

T

he city of Pearl is turning into a case study in ever-changing and evermore-restrictive rental ordinances, which have some folks mad as hell. Just about every city in America has rules governing rental properties. Those ordinances might cover everything from how to apply for a building permit to what defines a dwelling to outlining required safety equipment in rental units, such as smoke alarms and fire extinguishers. But Pearl has gone too far, property owners and tenant advocates say. In 2010, the Pearl Board of Aldermen passed an ordinance restricting the number of people who could occupy a rented apartment or mobile home. The ordinance requires a minimum sleeping space of 70 square feet for one person and 100 square feet for two people. The smallest unit intended for two people must be at least 220 square feet overall and have an additional 100 square feet for every additional occupant. Bill Chandler, executive director of the Mississippi Immigrants Rights Alliance, called it a “bedroom-police� ordinance, and it sets his teeth on edge. He claims that the ordinance is targeting low-income brown people—African Americans and Latinos— and is designed to keep or drive them out of Pearl. It threatens low-income people with fines and jail time should they exceed the limit without paying to apply for a residential occupancy permit—even if the additional resident is a newborn. And there’s no guarantee that the city would grant the permit. Chandler also has concerns about new ordinances, which the city’s board of alderman passed in June. One particularly troubling section allows the city to inspect properties—without notice in some cases—to ensure properties meet city codes. But Pearl’s Code Enforcement Division is part of the city’s police department, and Chandler is worried that it may expose tenants to warrantless, illegal searches of their homes. “That, like the bedroom ordinance, could be challenged in court,� Chandler said. “What we need on both of those things are plaintiffs who are willing to come forward.�

The newest version of Pearl’s rental ordinances may cost property owners millions and push out low-income tenants, minority advocates say. Apartment complexes, such as this one on Old Brandon Road, may be unable to comply without raising rents.

Pearl Mayor Brad Rogers has a somewhat more benign take on the ordinances. His city is having issues with owners who aren’t keeping their properties in good condition, he said, making them unsafe for residents. The ordinances give the city ammunition to force those owners to provide safe, livable rentals to their tenants. “What we put into place was a rental ordinance that makes sure our rental properties are, effectively, not slum properties,� Rogers said. “I don’t think you should be able to drive down the street and be able to tell ‘that’s an owned property, and that’s a rental property.’� Rogers says rental properties should provide for “the basic necessities of life,� and that when landlords fall short on that standard, the city should be able to help them. Without the new ordinances, the city has no ability to assist renters who can’t get landlords to fix or maintain their homes, he added. “Right now, I can’t do one thing about that,� Rogers said. “I cannot do one thing. I have to look at them and say: ‘I’m sorry.

October 16 - 22,2013

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There’s nothing I can do.’� Pearl has not implemented the June version of its rental ordinances, Rogers said. That version is not final, and that section is one that most likely will change, he said. Landlords say that some of the other requirements are financially burdensome and, for existing properties, could be logistically impossible to retrofit. Mandating that every rental property include a sprinkler system, an on-site siren, a phone and text warning system, and a storm shelter capable of keeping every resident safe from an F2 tornado, for example, could cost millions for a multifamily complex. “Rental properties are a business, and I believe they should be treated like a business,� Rogers said. “When you’re in business, sometimes you have to put money back into your business.� The mayor doesn’t put much stock in the owners’ financial arguments, and said the ordinances address life-safety issues. “There’s been no major loss of life, but it’s only a matter of time, I’m telling you,� he said. “And then people are going to say, ‘Why didn’t you have this code in place?’� Landlords called for this story seem convinced the city is targeting them. No such mandates apply to single-family developments with homes for sale, they said, and the ordinances will prevent the city from attracting new, low- and moderate-income rental-housing developers and their potential tenants. That may be the point, the landlords opined, though it would be ironic given the city’s push for new retail businesses, which tend to pay low wages. They’re also concerned that the city

could retaliate if they complain, and none would speak on the record. Instead, Pearl property owners brought in the big guns to do the complaining for them. Marty Milstead is the executive vice president of the Home Builders Association of Mississippi. The Mississippi Multifamily Council is one of the HBA’s divisions, and includes owners and developers of apartments and other multi-tenant properties. Milstead is negotiating with Rogers to make changes to the city’s new rental ordinances, which he called “extreme.â€? “We’ve been working with the city of Pearl because, frankly, we feel some of the ordinances would put our folks out of business—or certainly would put renters out of a place to live,â€? Milstead said. Though renters come from all walks of life and all incomes, he said, some of the changes Pearl is attempting to mandate would be “astronomical,â€? and cause rents to rise accordingly, putting Pearl out of reach for low-income people. “You just can’t incur those costs without having some implications,â€? Milstead said, adding, “As the ordinance has been adopted, it would be devastating for the owners and the tenants if changes aren’t made. ‌ We’re trying to bring some solutions to the table.â€? Milstead said the meetings have gone well and believes they’ve made some progress. “I have heard the complaints of the property owners, and we are working on that,â€? Rogers said, emphasizing that he’s not an unreasonable guy. â€œâ€Ś The only thing we’ve done over here is to make rental properties something we can all be proud of. “ Comment at www.jfp.ms.


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Save People, Not Just Boobies

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as I was making a purchase at a store the other day, the checkout process included a donation request for the Susan G. Komen Foundation. I declined. October is Breast Cancer Awareness month. The pink ribbon has become a symbol for millions of people fighting against breast cancer. But all month, I feel like a total killjoy explaining why I don’t support Komen. We should take time to reflect on how the disease has touched us—remembering the people whose lives have been forever changed, the lives lost and the loved ones who have been affected. But reflection alone won’t make an impact. Every October, almost every company in the country suddenly—and suspiciously—cares about the health of womenfolk and wants to stop breast cancer. I say “suspiciously� because many of these same companies seem to care nothing about polluting the environment with chemicals linked to cancer or putting known carcinogens in their products. Revlon and Avon, who host huge breast cancer fundraisers each year, have yet to remove known carcinogens from many of their products, according to the Environmental Working Group—but they will slap a pink ribbon on them. It’s called “pinkwashing�: putting pink ribbons on potentially harmful products and using breast-cancer awareness as a promotional tool to increase business. “Pinkwashing� is why Breast Cancer Action, a San Francisco-based advocacy group, began the “Think Before You Pink� campaign. BCA is not the only organization criticizing the “pink-ribbon culture.� Their main critique is that groups such as the Susan G. Komen Foundation seem more focused on internal fundraising and awareness campaigns than in pushing to learn the causes and developing a cure for breast cancer. Some campaigns come off as just wanting to say “boobs.� We don’t need to “Save the Ta Tas�—we need to save lives. I saw my mother’s best friend, Cathy, shortly before she died from breast cancer, leaving her two young sons without a mom. I don’t believe she was thinking about saving the “boobies.� It makes me angry to see a disease reduced to a pretty ribbon or to hear talk of saving breasts rather than people. Cancer isn’t pretty. It’s a disgusting killer. It’s a thief that scars, steals lives and robs the world of valuable people. I would never say that awareness is a bad thing. Awareness is essential. It focuses us on a target, and at their best, awareness campaigns tell us what we are fighting and how to fight it. But when it comes to winning the battle with breast cancer, we aren’t sure how to fight it, yet. We haven’t focused enough on primary research looking for a cause—and that’s where we’ll find the cure. As with any issue, awareness is not the sum total of activism.

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October 16 - 22, 2013

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Why it stinks: By the time you read this, dysfunction junction—aka the U.S. Congress—may have reopened those parts of the federal government it closed Oct. 1. It may have extended the debt ceiling that allows the feds to pay the bills it already incurred. If neither of those things happened, the U.S. has defaulted on its debt, and by all reliable accounts, sent shock waves around the globe. At this writing, 60 percent of Americans polled believe that the whole Congress should be sh*t canned. A small minority of radical right-wingers would rather devastate the world economy than give an inch, and no one has the will to stand up to them. Welcome to crazy town. Where does that leave the rest of us?

Strings in Schools is Worth Saving

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t has become an all-too familiar tune: In the midst of shrinking budgets, creative services are first on the chopping block. In business organizations, that often means scaling back marketing and advertising budgets. For school districts, it’s arts education. Jackson Public Schools again appears to be on the fence about continuing the Strings in Schools Program this year. In the past, JPS were at an impasse with the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, which dispatches its renowned musicians to Jackson schools. In 2009 and 2012, the program came close to being shelved before community and parent groups got involved to save the program. This time around, neither JPS nor MSO have indicated where the program stands, which worries many parents of the more than 800 students participating in Strings. The evidence for the positive effects of encouraging musical creativity in children is voluminous, but the research also shows that those benefits extend beyond artistic endeavors. An Oct. 12 New York Times op-ed by author Joanne Lipman points to numerous captains of industry and other leaders in their respective fields who once played instruments. Lipman lists Paul Allen, the outgoing chief executive officer and co-founder of Microsoft Corp.; Larry Page, one of the co-founders of Google; Woody Allen, a filmmaker and playwright; author Stephen King; and Alan Greenspan, the former chairman of

the Federal Reserve Bank. Paul Allen, one of the wealthiest people in the world, started learning the violin when he was 7 years old and continued playing while he was helping create software that would revolutionize the computer and software business. Music, he told Lipman, “reinforces your confidence in the ability to create.� If anyone is need of a creative confidence boost, it’s the Jackson Public Schools. The state’s largest school district serving Mississippi’s capital city, JPS is beset with poor test scores and graduation rates. Although both are climbing, they remain lower than national averages. Music could be key to JPS’ and, therefore, Jackson’s renaissance. Lipman writes: “Consider the qualities these high achievers say music has sharpened: collaboration, creativity, discipline and the capacity to reconcile conflicting ideas. All are qualities notably absent from public life. Music may not make you a genius, or rich, or even a better person. But it helps train you to think differently, to process different points of view— and most important, to take pleasure in listening.� We believe that JPS would be better with the Strings program than without it. It remains unclear what stumbling blocks exist between JPS and MSO, but the program is worth saving. We encourage the organizations to work out their differences and urge the community to offer its support to ensure the program continues.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn� and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


JED OPPENHEIM

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Prayer, Hope and Questions EDITORIAL News Editor R.L. Nave Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell City Reporter Tyler Cleveland Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Justin Hosemann, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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don’t think anyone wakes up in the morning telling themselves, “I am going to become a cause today.” We are supposed to support causes, not be causes. When I published “Everyday Struggles” in these pages, the outpouring of love and support for my fiancée, Harriett Johnson, was unbelievable. People who had never met Harriett, plus friends and loved ones in Jackson and beyond, stepped forward to offer a kidney for her. In many ways Harriett has become a “cause.” While we are grateful for everyone’s love and support, we are ready for Harriett to transform back into just “Harriett” and not “Harriett, who needs a kidney.” It looks like the wait will continue. Harriett has not received a new kidney, yet, and the waiting gets more painful the longer it lasts. Love, prayer, hopes, and wishes get tiring when they are the same for such a long period of time and for such a serious reason. Harriett and I spend many evenings poring over the latest research on kidney transplants. We watch YouTube videos of scientists proclaiming that in a couple of years they will be able to put human ingenuity-created kidneys in patients who need them. We fantasize about that being a reality today—not in 2017. Few nights pass where Harriett makes it through without deep sweats or fear that this may be her last. On many mornings, when the depression hits, and she doesn’t want to get out of bed, the only thing we can do is joke about her not being able to cry because her anti-depressants won’t let her. Mired in this day-to-day grind, we have deep hope and a commitment to see this journey through until her health improves. Harriett is able to find humor where she can and find laughter in all of God’s creations. Someone recently told me that what we are going through as a couple is “very adult.” That’s an understatement. Most young couples in love don’t imagine being caretakers at such a young age. Don’t get me wrong: Harriett is far from being incapacitated. She is still vigorous with life, love, laughter and the will to push the people around her to be better. Harriett’s struggle is by no means unique—it’s just somewhat more complicated now. As of this writing, our government is partially shut down thanks to the GOP’s commitment to ensuring

poor people stay poor and unhealthy, and rich people stay rich. Harriett is a federal government employee, and it’s been some year for her—the sequester, a late paycheck, a shutdown and a kidney that won’t work. Should she ever change jobs, Harriett stands to benefit from Obamacare because she has a pre-existing condition. But that is beyond the point. All Americans will benefit from this law—if Congress and the states ever allow its full implementation. We will all be healthier if everyone has health care. While we struggle for a kidney and for a job, our congressman, Rep. Gregg Harper, continues to vote to defund and repeal Obamacare, which is ironic given our district’s standing as one of the poorest and least healthy in the country. Also ironic is that the National Kidney Foundation puts Mississippi at the top of the list of those states hardest hit by kidney failure. Harper continues to vote against the interests of his constituents. Maybe we will do something about that in 2014. Rep. Harper is a Christian, and part of me wants to believe that he and his colleagues pray to the same God that Harriett does. That is a God who told us in Matthew 25: 34-36: “For I was hungry, and you gave me food. I was thirsty, and you gave me something to drink. I was a stranger, and you welcomed me. I was naked, and you gave me clothing. I was sick, and you took care of me. I was in prison, and you visited me.” If this is really what guides our decision-makers, then I ask: Where are you when Harriett suffers? Where are you when low-income people can’t eat or need health care? As the sun and sky continue to slip into Harriett’s brilliant space, we ask that you continue to pray, to hope and to believe that tomorrow will be better than today. We ask you to hold your leaders accountable, as we hold our loved ones accountable. We ask you to ask questions and to not submit to the lack of control we often feel. I am sick of Harriett being a cause, but I feel free to use Harriett as an example to stand up and fight for. Because, eventually, it may be all we can do. Jed Oppenheim is a citizen of Jackson. If you have type-O blood and are interested in donating a kidney to Harriett, please contact him at 310-994-1841.

‘I was sick, and you took care of me.’

SMG, manager of the Jackson Convention Complex, has issued a Request for Proposal (RFP) for Facility-wide Wi-Fi Replacement Services: For more information and instructions on how to respond, please visit http://jacksonconventioncomplex.com/ about/business/

Aleena Gabriel Adams Case No. 2013-AD-47

NOTICE OF HEARING

The State of Kansas to Marcus Diamond, biological father of Aleena Gabriel Adams, minor child born October 4, 2013, at Wesley Medical Center, Wichita, Kansas, to Mackeltra Adams, and to all other persons who are concerned. You are hereby notified that a petition for adoption has been filed in the Probate Department of the District Court, Butler County, Kansas, by petitioners seeking to adopt the said child, and you are hereby required to plead to said petition on or before December 6, 2013, at 11 o’clock a.m. in said court at El Dorado, Kansas. Should you fail therein, judgment and decree will be entered in due course upon said petition.

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Dr. Hannah Gay received international acclaim after the news of an apparent “cure” of an HIVinfected child in her care became public in March.

‘Standing Close By’ The JFP Interview with Dr. Hannah Gay by Ronni Mott

October 16 - 22, 2013

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he headlines screamed the news across the globe: “Baby Cured of AIDS!” They weren’t entirely accurate; nonetheless, the news thrust pediatrician Dr. Hannah Gay into the harsh glare of the spotlight last March. Gay’s patient, a toddler born to an HIV-infected mother in 2010, tested positive for the infection at birth and for several months while under Gay’s care. Then, she and her mother stopped showing up for treatment. When the baby returned to the University of Mississippi Medical Center about 18 months later, clinicians could not find the virus in her blood. A soft-spoken and fiercely intelligent woman, Gay insists that she didn’t cure the child. The treatment she used was within the parameters of what she would use with any patient under the same or similar circumstances. “I’m getting credit in a lot of the

press, for ‘discovering’ the cure, or ‘developing’ the cure, and I’m going, ‘Wait! I was as surprised as anybody!’” Gay said. She gives full credit for the child’s healing to God, and in retrospect, she can easily see the small miracles all along the path. “I just happened to be standing close by,” Gay said. “I obviously was not trying to cure the baby. Cure was the furthest thing from my mind.” To imply that she has a cure for HIV, human immunodeficiency virus, the therapy must be proven in more than one patient, which has yet to be done. It’s also unlikely that the specific results could be achieved in adults. None of that stopped the mainstream press, though. In April, Time magazine named Gay and two colleagues, Katherine Luzuriaga, an immunologist from the University of Massachusetts, and Deborah Persaud, a virologist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, to its 2013 list of the 100 most influential people in the world for their con-

tributions to the field of HIV research. Gay has yet to become comfortable in the role of spokeswoman for Mississippi, UMMC, and the army of doctors and researchers working in the HIV/AIDS field. Clearly, she’d rather be working with children than talking to reporters or speaking at conferences, but she gracefully and generously accepts the need to do so. In August, Gay granted the Jackson Free Press a wide-ranging interview that ran almost two hours. The edited version is below. You can read the entire interview on the JFP website. If a mother is HIV positive, at what point can the virus be transmitted to the child?

Most transmission from the mother to the child occurs during the labor and delivery process. A smaller group, a minority, probably less than 10 to 15 percent, are infected in utero, during the pregnancy. But those almost all happen

Dr. Hannah Gay Age: 59 Hometown: Jackson Works for: University of Mississippi Medical Center Field of practice: Pediatric infectious disease Education: Graduated from Wingfield High School; Medical degree from University of Mississippi Medical School Family: Married 37 years to Paul Gay; four children, all grown

near the end of the pregnancy, in the last few weeks. The reason we know that they’re not infected prior to the delivery is that those


So if the baby tests negative at birth, where do you go from there?

When the news was announced in March that this baby had been functionally cured, some people mistakenly assumed that this is the end of AIDS. What is the landscape of AIDS right now?

In the West, it is a chronic, treatable illness. In resource-poor nations, it may not be as easily treated simply because of not being able to get the treatment to the patient.

Do people believe HIV and AIDS are no longer much of a risk?

to resist whatever you’re trying to bombard it with, right?

I’m afraid that’s what’s happening. … In 1994, we had, across the nation, about 25 percent of babies born to infected moms were infected at birth. There was a large-scale study that was done that showed that if you treat the mom during pregnancy, and then we were also treating the mom with IV medicine during labor, and then treating the baby for six weeks afterwards, that you could reduce the risk of transmission down from that 25 percent average down to 8 percent average.

Exactly. And that’s why we use three and four-drug combinations in treatment, so that if you have a virus that’s resistant to drug A, you’ve still got drugs B and C trying to eliminate that virus before it takes over the whole population. Back early in the epidemic, we created a lot of the resistance due to the fact that we only had one or two drugs. The virus was becoming resistant to those one or two drugs we had. We treated patients with sequential monotherapy—as a new drug would come along, because that’s all we had. Now we wish it had been different, because we had some patients who have multi-drug resistance. Nonetheless, in the last few years, in the last five years, there have been two, actually three new classes of drugs that have been discovered. When we can talk the patient into being truly compliant—I’m not going to say that in every single case we can treat them adequately—but I haven’t run into any kids that I’ve been unable to treat. Not since we’ve had the modern drugs.

That’s huge.

Huge, yes. Really huge. So in 1994, here in Mississippi, we started a program to implement that information. When I actually started this job in 1994, a big part of my job was to implement that in MisCOURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER

The national guidelines here in America are that we test at two weeks, and then between one and two months, and then again (at) four to six months. We do a little more; our routine here at UMMC is that we test at two weeks, one month, three months and six months. Those are all by what we call virologic tests. It’s a very specific test looking for the HIV nucleic acids. For an adult, we test antibodies to see if they have the virus. But that doesn’t do us any good with babies because the baby does have the maternal antibodies, the antibodies cross the placenta. So a baby who is born to an infected mom will be antibody positive for up to 18 months. By 18 months, they have lost the maternal antibodies. Back when I first started working (in this field), we had to wait 18 months before we knew if the child was infected. The kind of test that we do now, the nucleic acid testing, we can tell much earlier. So, like I said, we test at two weeks, one month, three months and six months. If all of those tests are negative, by the nucleic acid test, that baby is not infected.

die at 5 to 8.” It was rare that we saw prenatally infected infants make it to their teenage years back when there was no therapy. Now, however, HIV is no longer a fatal illness. It’s a chronic, treatable illness. For my patients, I liken it to diabetes. It’s a bad disease. It can kill you. But if you take your medicines and do the right things to take care of yourself, you can life a long, healthy life with the disease.

In the early years of AIDS research, there was this meme that said, “If you sleep with one person, you sleep with every person that one has slept with.” In other words, there’s an incubation period for the virus to show up. How does that apply to babies?

For an average adult—and there are no average adults—(and) looking at a big group of people ... from the time they’re infected to the time they start showing symptoms, (it) may be as long as 10 years. For a baby who’s infected at birth, that period is shortened. Because an adult who gets infected starts developing antibodies to the HIV, the infected immune system actually controls the HIV for what can be a very long period of time. Babies are relatively immunosuppressed. The immune system normally develops over the first five years. So a baby doesn’t mount the immune response to the HIV virus. Before we had the anti-retroviral treatments that we have now, we used to say, “OK, an adult may start showing symptoms at eight to 10 years out, and then die, more than likely, some time after that. A baby who is infected at birth is likely to show symptoms at 1 to 3 years (of age), and

On March 19, state Sen. Will Longwitz, R-Madison, left, presented Dr. Hannah Gay with a plaque from the Mississippi Legislature for her breakthrough. Dr. James Keeton, UMMC vice chancellor for health affairs, right, accompanied Gay to the capitol.

In many parts of the West, it is no longer on the rise like it was for a long time. Who is most at risk?

In the South, most of our transmission is through heterosexual contact, and it’s much more prevalent in African Americans and Hispanics, women and men both. There are more men who are infected, but women are more likely to be infected through heterosexual contact. We do have some IV drug users who infect that way, but not nearly (as many). So it’s still on the rise in the South.

sissippi where we started treating moms. At that point, we only had one drug. There were two on the market, but only one that we could use during pregnancy. So at this point, are HIV-infected babies rare?

In the West, they’re very rare because we do an awful lot to search out, find the moms who are infected during pregnancy (and) be sure we treat the moms adequately. As a virus, HIV is constantly mutating

There’s a lot of talk lately about drug resistance.

Superbugs. Talk a little bit about that in the spectrum of infectious diseases. And also rumors—such as vaccines are responsible for autism.

Right. There have been huge studies, meta-analysis of many huge studies put together that show no basis in fact on that. I kind of go back to what my mother said when she started hearing about mothers who didn’t want to have their children get vaccines. She said, “They just don’t remember when, every summer in the hot South, when polio started going through.” And (my mother) does. Even when I was a baby, there was still polio every summer. She said, “We were all so relieved, climbing over people to get vaccine for our child.” I was still in preschool, I think, when we all had to go to elementary schools on three Sundays to get our sugar cube to get a polio vaccine. I remember that, too: lining up for that sugar cube.

I feel like that people who have this philosophy against having the children vaccinated are thinking, “OK, at least in my imagination, there’s a possibility that my child will have autism or something if they get vaccinations.” They’re not thinking about the fact that “If my child has measles, he may get encephalitis and more GAY, see page 16

jacksonfreepress.com

who are infected at labor and delivery usually have negative tests at birth. This is kind of an artificial line that’s been drawn, but we say if the baby has a positive virologic test prior to 48 hours of age, then we call that an in-utero infection.

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The JFP Interview with Dr. Hannah Gay from page 15 this was back in 2010, didn’t actually give a recommendation for what to do or what to start in babies who were at high risk. The guidelines said something to the effect

actually going on at that time, but now we have the results of the study. On the study, there were three arms (of research): One (study) arm got AZT only; one arm TRIP BURNS

die. If my child gets mumps, he may be deaf for the rest of his life. If my child gets chickenpox, he could have shingles as a result.” They don’t think of these diseases. And now, we’ve got vaccinations for hepatitis B, which kills or becomes chronic illness. We’ve got vaccinations for H flu (haemophilus influenzae, an opportunistic bacteria can cause a range of illnesses from pneumonia to meningitis to infectious arthritis). When I was a resident, even, we would have two or three cases a month with babies coming in with H flu meningitis. We never see that any more. With everything, from vaccines on, you have to do a risk-benefit analysis. I think that … people are not trained at thinking in that way. So you’re saying there’s no connection between vaccines and autism, right?

Right.

October 16 - 22, 2013

I heard you mention in a talk you gave that it wasn’t you who affected the cure for the AIDS baby. It was God, and you were there.

16

Yeah. I just happened to be standing close by. I obviously was not trying to cure the baby. Cure was the furthest thing from my mind. I was simply doing post-exposure prophylaxis. We talked about how if we treat the mom, then the baby’s at very low risk. … This mom had not been treated, and we didn’t know what her viral load was. In cases where—even if we have treated the mom, but not adequately—if she’s got a high viral load, that’s a high-risk baby. If other factors intervene, and I’ve got a high-risk baby for any reason, then my first effort is to prevent that baby from being infected by starting early post-exposure prophylaxis. We do the same thing with, for instance, needle-stick injuries. If one of my nurses is drawing blood and gets stuck with a contaminated needle, she immediately starts HIV drugs as post-exposure prophylaxis. With sexual assault cases that I see in the ER, if there’s been a significant exposure and possibly HIV involved, then I start that kid on post-exposure prophylaxis. We use three drugs. … We use the same drugs that we use on an infected patient. That post-exposure prophylaxis alone has been shown to reduce the risk of conversion, if it’s started early enough. For occupational exposure, or non-occupational exposure like rape, we start the post-exposure prophylaxis as quickly as possible and within 72 hours. After 72 hours it probably has no effect whatsoever. When this baby was born, knowing that the baby was at higher risk, I started three drugs. Our national guidelines at the time,

There’s some art to medicine, and there’s some use of basic logic. My basic logic that I was using at the time—and I didn’t have to go through all this in my mind for that particular baby because I’d already done it, and it’s what I was doing for all high-risk babies: using those three drugs. My philosophy was that if we can easily monitor for the (side effects), if those occur—and actually I’ve never seen it occur to a degree that I’ve ever had to do something about it—if they did occur … then we could stop the medicines and the counts would come right back up. So it’s totally reversible—easily monitored for and reversible. HIV, on the other hand, is not reversible. If I use only two drugs, and then that baby turns out to be an infected child who’s going to have to have therapy for the rest of their life, the risk of using only two drugs in that six weeks is that the virus would develop resistance to, particularly, one of those drugs that has a very low barrier to resistance. And then, I don’t want to have to treat the child for the rest of his childhood with him already resistant to one of my classes of drugs. My reasoning leads me to say it’s really safer to go ahead and use the three drugs. One of the things I see in many religious communities is a resistance to science. You’re a scientist, and you’re also a woman with great faith. How do you marry those two together?

In the West, “HIV is no longer a fatal illness. It’s a chronic, treatable illness,” Gay said. That doesn’t mean the risk is gone.

of, “In cases were the mom has not been treated, some experts would use more than one drug as post-exposure prophylaxis.” It recommended that you consult the pediatric-HIV expert in your area. So I looked around for one (swivels her head and laughs). And there you were!

My choice was to start three drugs, which is the same thing that I would do for a needle-stick injury or an assault. I used the three drugs that I would most commonly start in a newborn that I knew to be infected. Since 2010, our guidelines now address the issue. There was a study that was

they got two drugs; one arm they got three drugs. What it showed that (the last two) arms were superior to the AZT-only arm. These (two) were equally effective at preventing infection, but the three-drug arm carried a little bit higher risk of side effects like anemia or a lower white blood count. So, in the guidelines, they say, “(Monotherapy) doesn’t work as well to prevent infection, so we’re not going to use that. (The second and third) work equally, but the (third) causes a little more side effects, a little more risk with the therapy. So, we’re going to recommend in our guidelines that you use two drugs for post-exposure prophylaxis if the mom has not been treated.” That’s what’s in guidelines now.

I was a person of faith before I became a scientist. For me, it’s been very, very easy because as I studied science, it reinforced my faith in God. It didn’t tear it down. I remember very distinctly as a freshman in medical school, studying in embryology, and looking at all of what it takes to go from an egg and a sperm to a baby, and thinking, “Only God can do that.” It’s not something that can be programmed somewhere. To me, everything that I’ve studied in science has reinforced my faith, that God is active and in control. With this particular baby, there’s no way to—actually, without putting you through medical school—to point out all of the actual miracles that occurred to make this case come to light. One of them, a very simplistic one: This mom went into labor, went into this outside hospital, they drew (blood to test for HIV), which is standard thing. If you don’t have a negative HIV test on the chart from the first trimester and last trimester, then you do one when they come in labor. They drew the test, and … they got back, at this rural hospital, a positive screening test. That automatically kicks it over into sending it off for a confirmation test: a western blot. They sent it to a reference lab to have the western blot run.


So, it’s like she never had it at all?

Right. By all of our standard tests, she looks like a child who never had HIV. And yet we know that through the first month of life, she had it. She had five separate virologic tests.

like it normally does with treatment. We think that by treating that early, we prevented the virus from every seeding the viral reservoirs. What we know happens with adults is that when you’re first exposed, the virus gets into the blood, it starts attacking and entering the CD4 positive cells (cells that initiate the body’s response to infection), the cells that have CD4 (glycoprotein) on their surface. Most of those cells are activated T-cells. Inside those active T-cells, the virus starts replicating very rapidly. At the same time, there are some, what we call “resting” T-cells. They are also CD4positive, and they also can get infected. But inside the resting cells the virus doesn’t replicate. It can live there for as long as the cell lives, but it doesn’t replicate inside a resting cell. The resting T-cells are what we call “Tmemory” cells. If you’re 57, you probably had chickenpox as a child. When you had chicken-

But an hour, not days, not weeks.

Right. I’m convinced that it was God’s hand to have that western blot come back that early. There were a number of things like that that happened along the way. … All of these little things, these little definitions, of course didn’t become significant until a year and a half later, or nearly two years later, when we’re trying to figure out what happened. But to present this to the scientific community, you’ve got to be able to say, “I had two separate samples.” We had three other samples because, having gotten back (the first two) positive, I kept her on the medicine. We kept drawing viral loads to watch her viral loads coming down on therapy. All of that became important, not at the time, but later on when we’re trying to make the case that yes, this child was definitely infected. And now she’s definitely not. So you had steps that you can see in retrospect. Has any of that been reproducible?

We have not found another baby that we know has fit in this category. What we have known for a long time is that babies who are infected, who are treated early … at less than three months, ultimately do much better than children who are started on treatment later. … Babies who are being treated at three months or less very often don’t even make antibody to HIV because the amount of virus that they have in their blood, in their viral reservoirs, is so minute that their

Gay gives all the credit for her patient’s healing to God. “I just happened to be standing close by,” she said.

Other than, “It’s a miracle,” is there any way to explain this?

Our hypothesis is that what happened is, by starting the medicines at 30hours of age, we were starting to prevent the viral replication. The amount of virus in her blood was dropping like a rock, just

pox, you formed T-memory cells to chickenpox. When you’re exposed to chickenpox again, those T-memory cells become active. They fight off the virus before you can get chickenpox. That’s why you don’t get chickenpox twice. Those T-memory cells can be very

long-lived. They can live for many, many years. Any virus that gets into that chickenpox T-memory cell can stay there and stay alive as long as the cell lives. That’s the biggest portion of what we call viral reservoirs. It’s those long-lived Tmemory cells that got infected back at the same time as the exposure, but they’re sitting there in latency. The patient may be taking their medicine and clearing the viral replication going on in all the activated cells, but once he stops taking the medicine, there’s this reservoir waiting to receive the blood. Waiting like little time bombs.

Our advantage, with the baby—the baby doesn’t have T-memory cells. They start developing T-memory cells as they’re being presented with antigen. So somebody who’s never seen chickenpox doesn’t have any chickenpox T-memory cells. A newborn doesn’t have many T-memory cells at all. Therefore, what we think we may have done—our hypothesis in this case—is that by clearing the replicating virus out of her active cells early on, we prevented it from ever getting to those newly forming Tmemory cells—easier to do in a baby than in an adult because the adult already has Tmemory cells on the day of exposure. That’s our hypothesis. To prove the hypothesis, we’re going to have to replicate this. There’s going to be a study, hopefully starting in the fall, or the first of the year, where they’re going to take a number of high-risk babies—moms have not been treated (prenatally) so they’re at high risk— and they’re going to start the same three drugs I used as post-exposure prophylaxis in the first 48 hours of life. At age 6 weeks, they will test the baby. If the baby tests positive, that it is an infected child, they will actually add a fourth drug, keep the baby on four drugs for three years. At the end of three years, they will start testing using these ultra-sensitive tests that are only available in the research labs to look and see if they can find any replication-competent virus in the reservoirs. If they can’t, then they’ll stop the drugs to see what happens. All of that said, if that study replicates it, it’s going to kind of at least semi-prove our hypothesis. It will at least show that very early treatment works. And works definitively, correct? So the expectation is that this child is never going to show HIV virus again.

That’s our expectation. I’m still paranoid, so I see her every two or three months and draw another viral load and just check to see. We have repeated cultures in the end of May, we repeated cultures yet again, and we have still to see any replication-competent virus.

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system doesn’t even recognize it as there. … Our advantage in pediatrics, of course, is that we know the time of exposure. Most adults don’t. … My baby had the measurable virus until she was 26 days of age and the medicines controlled it. Then, when she came off of medicines, her virus didn’t come out of any reservoirs. We can’t find any virus in the reservoirs. So, it has never reappeared, even to the extent to make her make antibody. She, at this point, is negative by RNA test, which shows free virus in the blood. She’s negative by our DNA test, which shows virus in the reservoirs, in infected cells, and she’s negative by antibodies.

COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI MEDICAL CENTER

Now, I have never, here at UMMC, gotten a western blot back in less than three days. Usually, it takes us five to seven days to get the results on a western blot test. When this baby got over here, we knew that mom had a positive screening test. We were very suspicious that (the baby) was indeed infected, but we did not have confirmation that she was infected. When the baby got here, the first thing that I did was to start AZT alone. I did not want to start three drugs on a baby without knowing that he was even exposed—you get back to the risk-benefit thing. About 30 minutes after the baby got here, the outside hospital called me and said, “We just got back the western blot from the reference lab, and it’s positive.” It was less than 24-hours from the time it was drawn at the outside hospital. I didn’t believe them. I said, “You fax me a copy of that. I’ve never gotten a western blot back that fast.” They faxed it over. It showed that she was, indeed, infected. I imagined very high viral loads, and started the other two drugs. Actually, the baby got started on AZT about an hour ahead of the other two drugs.

17


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Renee and Ashton and Page’s adventures in tandem bicycling have taken the couple new places, from new neighborhoods in Jackson to foreign countries.

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or some people, exercise is a way to disconnect from the world for a period of time each day. Many enjoy going for long runs or bike rides alone as a way to get away from everyone and everything, and to clear their heads. Others enjoy being social while exercising. Some couples use exercise as a way to spend time together. One such couple is Ashton and Renee Page, both 57, who ride together on a bicycle built for two. “A tandem bicycle is famous for getting your relationship wherever it’s going real fast,� Ashton says. “If it’s going up or down, it’s going to get there real quick.� Tandem bicycles are built for two rid-

ers. The bikes have two seats, two sets of pedals and two handlebars on one extra-long frame. Standard tandems require that both riders simultaneously pedal or coast. Ashton and Renee came to the sport in different ways. Renee was a runner and took up cycling when the couple got married. Ashton started cycling as a teenager. “I (knew) some racers that lived a couple of houses down from me, yet I never was one to want to race,� he says. “But I got into cycling because of them and rode a lot of miles. Then in college, I got away from it.� He picked it up again in his 40s. “Being a little overweight at the time, a friend of mine encouraged me (to do it),� Ashton

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The Pages’ Favorite Routes: “This is the best part about living here—we can ride out of our garage and go in any direction for any distance,� Ashton says. “When we lived in New Orleans, we had to take the bike by car at least one hour out of the city to find good, safe roads to ride.� Ashton uses mapmyride.com to keep track of and share his favorite routes. See these routes and others at jfp.ms/ashtonroutes: Ross Barnett Reservoir—38 miles Bike Crossing—46 miles Brandon/Pelahatchie—57 miles Desoto National Forest/Biloxi, Miss.—33 miles Madison—62 miles

Old Trace Park—62 miles Renaissance/Lake Cavalier (Ridgeland)—20 miles Ridgeland—11 miles Tour de Bodock/Pontotoc, Miss.— 37 miles


Bicycling Magazine: bicycling. com Recumbent and Tandem Rider Magazine: rtrmag.com, Sheldon Brown (Tandem Enthusiast): sheldonbrown. com Tandem Bicycling: tandembicycling.com The Tandem Club of America: tandemclub.org Tandem Bike Experience: tandeming.co.uk The Tandem Club: tandem-club. org.uk.

says. “Someone had gotten him involved in this 150-run. He said, ‘Hey why don’t you come do this, too? It’s a lot of fun.’� The 150-run is a two-day fundraising cycling ride organized by the National MS (multiple sclerosis) Society. Ashton participated in the Louisiana MS 150, which goes from Hammond, Louis to Percy Quin State Park near McComb, Miss. Since they began riding tandem as a couple nine years ago, Ashton and Renee have traveled overseas twice for tandem bike excursions. In August they went on a bike tour from Paris to Amsterdam with 75 other tandem couples. “If you know anything about Amsterdam, it’s all bicycles there,� Renee says. “They park bicycles the way we park cars. It’s kind of cool. The trip was fun.� Ashton felt the same about it. “It was fantastic,� he says. “It was the second time we’ve gone on a two-week trip with other tandems. It’s a lot of fun because it’s like-

“Nutrition during a ride is very important, so we use gels,� Ashton says. “A fast-speed, three-hour ride can burn 1,000 calories. So we don’t want (to wait) to replace (the calories) until meal time.� Gels are easily digested, concentrated sources of complex carbohydrates with amino acids added to enhance performance and prolong energy levels during intense training and competition. They have a syruplike consistency, and can be ingested as-is or mixed with water. The Pages use Hammer nutrition gels. The flavors include apple-cinnamon, banana, chocolate, espresso, Montana huckleberry, orange, peanut butter, unflavored, raspberry, tropical fruit and vanilla. Other great snacks for tandem cyclers are: energy drink mixes fruits such as oranges, pineapples and cantaloupe

minded people vacationing together.� Riding tandem allows cyclists of differing strength and ability to ride together. The faster rider doesn’t have to slow down to wait for the slower person, and the slower rider won’t have to struggle to keep up. “Men are much more powerful ‘animals’ than most women, so for a woman to keep up with her mate or husband on a bicycle is almost impossible—they’re stronger,� Renee says. “So, (Ashton and I) could never stay together, but with the tandem, we’re always together. If he does 60 miles, I do 60 miles that day. If he does 40, I do 40. We stay together on the bike, and I’m finally able to keep up with him.� Even among top cyclists, a speed gap between men and women exists. For example, at the Race Across America marathon ride—one of the most respected and longestrunning endurance sporting events—men and women’s completion times are vastly different. During the 2013 event in the Under-50 solo category, the top female, Cassie Schumacher, completed 2,962.40 miles in 12 days, 18 hours and 57 minutes. The under-50 solo top male, Christoph Strasser, finished the same distance in seven days, 22 hours and 11 minutes. Renee says they are one of the few tandem couples in the metro area; however, tandem cycling is big in other parts of the country. The couple has been to cycling rallies where there have been hundreds of tandems. But here in Mississippi, it’s pretty rare. Ashton and Renee are also involved with the local bike club, Jackson Metro Cy-

The Pages’ Favorite Healthy Meal Mini Chicken-Salad Croissants Total Time: 25 minutes

2 cups cubed cooked chicken 12 seedless red or green grapes, halved 1 medium apple, chopped 1/2 cup mayonnaise (opt for light or fat-free to cut calories) 1/3 cup chopped walnuts, toasted 1/2 cup plain yogurt 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1/8 teaspoon salt Dash of pepper 16 miniature croissants or rolls, split 4 to 6 lettuce leaves, torn

In a small bowl, combine the first nine ingredients. Spoon about 1/4 cup onto the bottom of each croissant; top with lettuce. Replace croissant tops. Insert toothpicks into sandwiches, if desired. This recipe makes 16 mini croissants.

clists. Ashton has been on the board for three years and currently serves as the club’s president. The goal of JMS, chartered in 1995, is to increase community awareness of the enjoyment and benefits cycling provides, promote and encourage bicycle riding and safety, encourage respect for the areas where people ride, and enjoy cycling as a healthy, fun sport. “As a bike club, we do some official things and some unofficial things,� Ashton says. “We have six events a year where we set up rest stops, provide food and drink along the way for a mapped out course. We paint markers on the road, and we put someone driving the roads to see if anyone has a flat tire, which is a really great way for a beginner or someone new to cycling to extend their range. If they have been riding in a small locale, this gives them the chance to try a lon-

Tandem History  7DQGHPVELNHVZHUHÂżUVWLQWUR GXFHGWRWKHZRUOGLQWKHV 'HQPDUNQDWLYH0LNDHO3HGHUVHQ SURGXFHGWDQGHPVWULSOHWVDQG TXDGELF\FOHVLQLQ'XUVOH\ (QJODQG6RPHHDUO\WDQGHPELNHV ZHUHGHVLJQHGIRUWKHPDQWRVWHHU IURPWKHEDFNVRWKDWWKHZRPDQ ZRXOGKDYHWKHEHWWHUYLHZXSIURQW SOURCES: WWW.PEDERSENBICYCLES.COM AND WWW. BICYCLE-AND-BIKES.COM/ TANDEM-BICYCLES-TERMINOLOGY.HTML

Tandem Terminology As with other hobbies, it’s important to know the lingo. Here are a couple keys terms to know if you’re interested in joining the tandem cycling world. The Captain is the person who rides in front. He or she is responsible for navigating the tandem bicycle safely, controlling the bike’s directions and speed while warning the back seat rider of oncoming obstacles, bumps and gear shifts. Captains are often the more skilled of the two cyclists. Sometimes, they are also called the steersman or pilot. The Stoker is the rear rider. It is often thought that the person seated in the back can just relax and do nothing. That is incorrect because the rear rider acts as the “engine room� for the bike. He or she consistently pedals with the captain and provides extra power for getting up hills and slopes. The stoker can also be referred to as the tailgunner, rear admiral or R.A.

ger route with the idea that somebody will help them if they can’t make it, or they have mechanical (or) bike troubles. It gives beginners the confidence to try the longer rides.� The club, affiliated with the USA Cycling and USA Triathlon organizations, is active from March to September. It recently wrapped up its season with Trekkin’ the Trace Sept. 2. Riders cycled routes of 21, 50, 62 or 100 miles on the Natchez Trace. For the 140 in attendance, the event culminated with a catered lunch and music by Buddy and the Squids. JMS is currently holding a Share the Road campaign, where the club sponsors two local schools and provides safe-cyclingto-school workshops for them. Information about the club is available via Facebook, Twitter or its message board, where members also post their weekly and scheduled rides. “You know you can show up at the location and have other people to ride with,� Ashton says. The goal of the JMS is to grow through holding rides throughout the metro area and surrounding cities. The club currently has 200 active members. “Ashton’s all about ‘the more the merrier.’ He wants to help build it into a bigger club for everybody from beginners to intermediates,� Renee says. “He wants to see it spread all over Mississippi—people from Clinton, Pearl and Flowood. He wants to move it around and start the rides at differ19 ent places where everyone can join in.� jacksonfreepress.com

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WELLNESS

Brain Attack: Surviving the Stroke Belt by Casey Purvis

Strokes, or “brain attacks� can permanantly—and fatally—affect parts of the brain, as seen in these scans.

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What you’ve just read is a hypothetical example of stroke. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and often leads to long-term disability in adults. The National Stroke Association offers other sobering numbers. Every 40 seconds in America, someone suffers a stroke. Every four minutes, someone will die from a stroke. Although media give breast cancer much attention as a major killer of women, the National Stroke Association asserts that women are twice as likely to die from a stroke than from breast cancer. The Mississippi picture is even bleaker. Our state has the

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icture this: You and your husband are headed to your favorite restaurant for a date night. You drank a couple of glasses of good Pinot, dove into a filet topped with a bleu-cheese rub, and finished with some decadently rich concoction crowned with a scoop of ice cream. You’ve had a great time, and the night is young. As you’re walking out the door, discussing what to do next, the feeling hits. It’s a foreign sensation that’s frighteningly not right. You move your lips to tell your husband something’s wrong, and what comes out is slurred or unintelligible. Your husband, perplexed, asks, “Are you OK? What’s going on?� At that point, the right side of your body becomes numb, and your right arm seems to dangle heavily at your side. You can’t will it to move. You feel yourself lean to the right. Your husband, horrified, catches you and reaches into his pocket for his cell phone to call 911. Within minutes, the wail of sirens assaults your ears, and you’re nearly blinded by flashing red and yellow lights as an ambulance pulls up. You don’t have much time to think as you’re lowered onto a stretcher and strapped in for a ride you never planned to take.

21


WELLNESS 6752.(IURPSDJH

Limited Edition

dubious distinction of being part of the Stroke Belt, a group of southeastern states that have a higher-than-average occurrence of stroke. What is a stroke? Most of us have heard the term “heart attack” and have a general idea of what that is. A stroke is a “brain attack.” It’s a potential killer that the Centers for Disease Control says strikes more than 795,000 people a year. Stroke caused 5.5 percent of all Mississippi deaths in 2006, the CDC reports. Any time you have an interruption in the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your brain, a stroke can happen, and with it, the possibility of disability or death. Two types of strokes exist: ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke. The most common type, ischemic stroke, happens when either a blood clot or fatty buildup in the vessel walls block blood vessels. The less common but also potentially catastrophic hemorrhagic stroke occurs due to bleeding in the brain from a ruptured blood vessel. Either type of stroke is a medical emergency that requires immediate attention. This is a lot of gloom and doom to hit readers living in the Stroke Belt. Can we prevent a stroke? How do we recognize a stroke? What do we do if we recognize a stroke happening in front of us? Knowledge is the most effective weapon to help you prevent or survive a stroke. The CDC (cdc.gov/stroke/facts. htm) identifies a number of risk factors. Some of these are beyond our control. African Americans, diabetics, people over 55 years of age, and those with a family history of stroke are at higher risk of having a stroke. A history of heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels also increase your risk. We can’t reverse our age or change our family tree, but we can make lifestyle changes to reduce our stroke risk. Have your blood pressure checked. See a doctor if you have high blood pressure. Smoking is a tremendous risk factor. Alcohol is also associated with stroke, so drink in

moderation. High-fat foods can increase your cholesterol level and cause fatty deposit buildup on artery walls, creating a stroke-friendly environment. Limit high fat, fried and salty foods. Bear in mind that many fast-food offerings are loaded with fat and salt. The American Heart Association (everydaychoices.org) recommends eating five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. If you’re diabetic, medication is only one piece of the puzzle in managing your condition. Team up with your doctor to hammer out a treatment plan that incorporates lifestyle changes including proper nutrition and exercise. What if you see someone showing signs of a stroke? The National Stroke Association has a great acronym for the warning signs you need to look for and what to do. Think “F-A-S-T.” Check the Face. If you suspect someone is having a stroke, ask her to smile and check for drooping on one side. Check the Arms: ask her to raise both arms, and see if one arm is drifting back down. She may not be able to lift one arm at all. Check Speech: Listen for slurred or halting speech by asking her to repeat a simple sentence. Check the Time: Don’t hesitate. If the person is showing any of the above signs, call 911 right away. Take note of the time the person started showing signs. Treatment for ischemic stroke involves giving the clot-dissolving drug, Tissue plasminogen activator, tPA. Administration of tPA is time-dependent. Every second counts. Hemorrhagic strokes also require emergent intervention. How a stroke is treated depends on the type of stroke and any conditions that could contraindicate tPA; for example, anyone who has a hemorrhagic stroke will not be able to take tPA, due to serious bleeding risks. In the case of hemorrhagic stroke, surgery may be necessary, depending on the size of the bleed. Stroke is serious and should be taken seriously. Be the captain of your own wellness cruise. Know your risks. Know the signs of stroke. And be well.

October 16 - 22, 2012

If you think you’re having a stroke, think F-A-S-T.

22

(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com Always Drink Responsibly

Sources: American Heart Association everydaychoices.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention jfp.ms/cdcstroke jfp.ms/cdcstrokefacts National Stroke Association stroke.org


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Untitled - Page: 1

2013-06-27 15:51:19 +0100

October 16 - 22, 2013

             

          

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HITCHED p 29

Ramsey’s Food Network Debut by Kathleen M. Mitchell

T

he Food Network is premiering a new reality cooking show this weekend, and Jacksonians will recognize a familiar face on the fast-paced program. Tom Ramsey makes his network debut competing in “Guy’s Grocery Games,” hosted by Guy Fieri. Sunday, Ramsey will host a watch party at Hal & Mal’s. Ramsey, who sometmes freelances for the JFP, describes “Guy’s Grocery Games” as a combination of the old game show “Supermarket Sweep” and the Food Network’s cooking competition “Chopped.” Four chefs compete, with a contestant eliminated each round. The winner can earn up to $20,000. Ramsey met with the JFP at his new restaurant, La Finestra, opening on Congress Street downtown the first week of November, to talk about his foray into television.

This is your first Food Network appearance, but you’ve always had a sort of showmanship approach to your job, with YouTube videos and whatnot. Does that sort of thing come naturally to you?

I have a degree in theater and a degree

Did anything surprise you about the experience of filming the show?

I was really surprised at how low-key Guy Fieri is. I was expecting him to drive up with a marching band and an Ed Hardydesign Lamborghini. But he was more low key—very, very professional, and really en-

bright lights, and it’s really hectic. You’ve got to think on your feet. It was stressful, but in a fun way, and no more stressful than a Saturday night dinner rush. What do you think the rise of these food reality shows and celebrity chefs has done for the industry?

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY FOOD NETWORK

It’s elevated the job to something it never was before. It’s elevated the job of chef to a local celebrity status, or if you really do well you can be a national or international celebrity. It used to be, when I was growing up, I knew the name of maybe three chefs. Even the best chefs I knew, I had no idea what their names were. Now they are household names, they are walking red carpets and marrying stars. And part of that is, it’s so easy for people to identify with what chefs do, even celebrity chefs. … Tell me about your trans(Most people) feel they can get in a formation as a chef. kitchen and get a pot and pan and Well, I was an investment follow a recipe. People don’t think banker for 13 years. It was a good they can be Katy Perry or Mick Local chef and restaurateur Tom Ramsey (right, with host Guy Fieri) will appear on the series premiere career. I was good at it and had a lot Jagger. That’s something so far beof the Food Network show “Guy’s Grocery Games.” of fun. There was no real problem yond their comprehension. … But with the job, but I have always had being a chef, people do that every a desire to cook. I fed that passion through in film. It’s something I enjoy—I like being couraging. He was a super nice guy—self-af- night, whether it’s for themselves or their cooking for my friends and having parties in front of people. I love the instant feed- facing and funny and humble, all the charac- family or whatever. It’s something that they and doing charity events, but I just always back. I’m the neediest guy in the room—you teristics you’d like in a guy you’d want to sit can identify with the role of that person. wanted to be a professional cook. know, it’s been fun talking about me, but down and have a beer with. And if they try hard enough, they can My wife, Kitty, really pushed me into now, let’s talk about me some more. I guess I enjoyed meeting the judges. They really improve their chops. I don’t care how it. We were watching the Food Network one it’s just part of being a ham. were supportive and nice and funny. much I try, I’m never going to dance like night and she muted the TV and looked at MC Hammer. It’s never going to happen. me and said, “Just do it.” I said, “Do what?” Do you hope the spotlight continues What about the competition itself? Is But I went from home cook to a professional And she said, “Just go cook.” to be part of your path? it pretty much like what you see in the chef. And you don’t have to be good looking … So I did, and very quickly it clicked I do. I’m shooting a pilot for my own final version on TV? or have hair like Fabio. It’s like movie stars for worked really well for me. I’ve had a lot of show for a production company on the Once the competition starts, it’s fluid. common-looking people. success in a short period of time that I can west coast to pitch to a network. We’re There’s no stop-and-start (like during other The premiere episode of “Guy’s Grocery only attribute to that I’m just lucky in trying shooting that in mid-November down in parts of the filming process). If you’ve got 30 Games,” featuring Tom Ramsey, airs on the to catch up. I’ve been cooking professionally New Orleans. minutes, you’ve got 30 minutes. What they Food Network Sunday, Oct. 20, at 7 p.m for almost four years, and in that time, I’ve The show is a travelogue of me hang- do have is lots and lots of cameras. I’ve never Ramsey is hosting a viewing party at Hal & hosted a James Beard dinner with other chefs ing out with and cooking with journeymen seen this many cameras on a shoot—hand- Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St., 601-948-0888) here. I’ve hosted a dinner (with other Jack- chefs. Not the guys whose names are in bold helds and booms and static cameras. Because that night beginning at 6 p.m., where he will son chefs) at the James Beard House in New type, but the guys who work for them. John they can’t stop it. So if they miss a shot with cook food from the episode. York. Now, I’ve been on the Food Network. Besh’s name may be on the restaurant, but he one, they’ll pick it up with another. I’ve been published nationally for food ar- sure didn’t cook your rabbit tonight. Bobby Like any TV show, the conversation Read about Ramsey’s new restaurant at ticles. I’ve cooked on an international cruise. Flay’s got a hundred restaurants under his is start and stop, but the competition is jfp.ms/lafinestra. La Finestra (120 N. Congress It’s come together fast, and now I’ve got my name, but he is not making sure there are straightforward. No smoke and mirrors. St.) is scheduled to open to the public Monday, 27 own restaurant, so it’s not slowing down. perfect grill marks on your steak. The clock starts, and it’s hot, and there are Nov. 4, after soft openings starting Nov. 1.


Follow Us

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Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution for breakfast, blue-plates, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys & wraps. Famous bakery! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches.

PIZZA 904 Basil’s (904 E. Fortification, 601-352-2002) Creative pizzas, italian food, burgers and much more in a casual-dining atmosphere in the heart of Belhaven. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Huntington Grille (1001 East County Line Road, Jackson Hilton, 601-957-2800) Mississippi fine dining features seafood, crayfish, steaks, fried green tomatoes, shrimp & grits, pizzas and more. Que Sera Sera (2801 N State Street 601-981-2520) Authentic cajun cuisine, excellent seafood and award winning gumbo; come enjoy it all this summer on the patio. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma. Vasilios Greek Cusine (828 Hwy 51, Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic greek cuisine since 1994, specializing in gyros, greek salads, baklava cheesecake & fresh daily seafood.

BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads.

COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Hazel Coffee Shop (2601 N. State St. Fondren Across from UMC) Fresh locally roasted coffee and specialty drinks to perk up your day!

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

October 16 - 22, 2013

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2013, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Capitol Grill (5050 I-55 North, Deville Plaza 601-899-8845) Best happy hour & sports bar, kitchen open late, pub food with soul and live entertainment. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Musician’s Emporium (642 Tombigbee St., 601-973-3400) Delicious appetizers, burgers, sandwiches, and more. Great food goes with great music! Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot.

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ASIAN AND INDIAN Crazy Ninja (2560 Lakeland Dr., Flowood 601-420-4058) Rock-n-roll sushi and cook-in-front-of-you hibachi. Lunch specials, bento boxes, fabulous cocktails. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, an extensive menu features everything from curries to fresh sushi


LIFE&STYLE | FLICKR/M.GIFFORD

Autumnal I Do by Kathleen M. Mitchell

W

eddings are most often associated with the spring when flowers are blooming and the weather is (ideally) just starting to turn blissfully warm. Of course, with the unpredictability of Mississippi weather, even early May can see 90-degree temperatures and sweltering humidity. The fall months can often be a more temperate and pleasant alternative. Plus, the turning leaves provide a striking color scheme different from the pinks and pastels of spring. Wedding and event planner Kendall Poole shared some of her ideas for embracing autumn in your nuptials. u

u

u u u

Plan an engagement photo shoot at the state fair, where you can get lots of fun photos among the food and games as well as the ultimate romantic shot atop the ferris wheel with all of Jackson below you. Lots of people offer candy bars at the reception, with a variety of sweets to choose from. Why not try a make-your-own s’mores bar or candy apple bar instead? Give your bridesmaids colored cardigans for a sweet—and warm—photo op. For décor, stash a few glittered pumpkins among your fall florals for a bit of seasonal sparkle. Serve individual-sized boiled peanuts at the reception in little buckets.

A make-your-own candy apple bar is a decadent and fun way to bring fall flavors to your wedding reception.

u u

Instead of the wedding party changing into flat sandals to dance the night away at the reception, put on cowboy boots under your dresses. Look to the tastes of fall when planning a signature drink and incorporate fresh apple cider or Cathead pumpkin spice vodka.

u

Have a hayride at the reception to keep kids (and more than a few adults) happy and entertained.

Visit kendallpooleeventplanning.com or find Kendall Poole Event Planning on Facebook and social media to see more of Poole’s events and weddings.

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Happy Hour!

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ach year for more than a decade now, the Jackson Free Press has let readers vote for their favorite local businesses, organizations and people. It’s now time to gear up to campaign for the 2014 Best of Jackson awards. To kick off the 2014 campaign season, the Jackson Free Press is listing the Best of Jackson 2013 winners each week until we release the ballot on Nov. 6. Think you have what it takes to join the ranks of the Best of Jackson champions? Well, here are the ones to beat! Let the campaigning begin! :LQQHUVIURP%HVWRI-DFNVRQ

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TATE K NATIONS

Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-7:00

Butterfly Yoga won Best Yoga Studio. "EST-ARTIAL!RTS3TUDIO'RACIE3OUTH*IU *ITSU /DNHODQG'ULYH6XLWH)ORZRRG JUDFLHVRXWKFRP  6HFRQG!CADEMYOF+UNG&U 5LGJHZRRG 5RDG6XLWH&5LGJHODQG 7KLUG*ASON 'RIF½N´S4AE+WON$O!CADEMY &KULVWLDQ'ULYH 6XLWH'%UDQGRQ'\HVV5RDG 5LGJHODQG *RRG6KRZLQJ+NOCKOUT &ITNESSAND--! %HOOH0HDGH3RLQWH)ORZRRG  -ARTIAL!RTS!CADEMY 0DLQ6W 6XLWH)0DGLVRQ2OG)DQQLQ5RDG 6XLWH%UDQGRQ 7EST´S(APKIDO !CADEMY +LJKZD\5LGJHODQG

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Washing Away The Old To Make Room For The New! NEW

Moving Sale Markdowns Have Begun! Stop in today & see what’s happening! Prices as low as $20 (excludes new fall merchandise)

For More Specials & News Follow Us!

ShoeBarPieces Shoe Bar @ Pieces

Mon - Sat 10 am - 6pm • 425 E. Mitchell Ave. • Fondren • 601-939-5203

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MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY 730 Lakeland Dr. • Jackson, MS Tel: 601-366-3613 or 601-366-6033 Fax: 601-366-7122 DINE-IN OR TAKE-OUT! Sun-Thurs: 11am - 10pm Fri-Sat: 11am - 11pm VISIT OUR OTHER LOCATION 163 Ridge Way - Ste. E • Flowood, MS Tel: 601-922-7338 • Fax: 601-992-7339 WE DELIVER! Fondren / Belhaven / UMC area WE ALSO CATER! VISIT OUR GROCERY STORE NEXT DOOR.

NEW! Mahi Mahi Special served w/ rice, salad, hummus & sauté veggies $15.99

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jacksonfreepress.com

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31


Do your depressive symptoms continue, despite ongoing antidepressant treatment? We are seeking volunteers for the ARTDeCo Study. We hope to learn more about the effects and safety of a study drug in people with depression when it is taken with an ongoing antidepressant medication. We will also study how much drug is in your body and how long the body takes to get rid of it. You may be eligible to participate if you: ■ Are between the ages of 18-65 years ■ Have a diagnosis of depression ■ Are having an inadequate response to your current antidepressant treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) For More information, call:

October 16 - 22, 2013

Ad_V2.0_July12_English

32

3531 Lakeland Drive Brentwood Plaza – Suite 1060 Flowood, MS 39232 (601) 420-5810

Scan this QR Code with your smartphone to access the pre-screener, or visit the website at: www.artdecostudy.com Download the QR Code Reader App “i-nigma” or a QR Code Reader of your choice.


FILM p 34 | 8 DAYS p 35 | MUSIC p 38 | SPORTS p 41

Finding Rhythm on Canvas by Justin Hosemann

Daley says that the cultural mixture of that region—especially the European and African fusion—is what makes the music and art of the Caribbean idiosyncratic. In particular, you can find a West African and French Creole influence in many of his paintings, sometimes accentuated by the vibrant colors and costumes of the annual Carnival season. Daley

as adults. They are retired and currently living in Canada but make frequent trips to the island. Daley maintains a close relationship with Dominica, one that’s morphed into an artistic relationship over the years. “I’ve been going (to the island) since I was a kid. I still have a lot of family there, and there is a lot of culture there that I like to dive into,” Daley says.

spends many of his return visits to Dominica taking pictures of the island landscape and observing the Caribbean pace of life. “I like sitting there and actually watching people go on with their lives there,” Daley says. “Whether it’s a mother bringing a child to school or a woman bringing clothes to a river to wash, I like capturing that.” American genres, including jazz, soul and gospel, also inspire Daley. You can see

COURTESY KEN DALEY; TRIP BURNS

painting also contains a narrative quality, tracing the story of African-inspired music to its various roots and to the stops that it made throughout history. It’s a bittersweet memory in many ways, but Daley focuses more on the ongoing and lively influence of African music and culture in the New World. His parents were from Dominica, an island nation in the Lesser Antilles of the Caribbean, and they relocated to Canada

Music inspires Ken Daley to create his art.

ly artistic process, a way to vitalize his creative energies. “I feel like art and music share the same principles of design. There’s pattern in music, the same way that there is pattern in art,” Daley says. “For me, when I paint, I listen to music. I feel like I need to.” “The Voyage” exemplifies one of Daley’s favorite themes—capturing the rhythms of Afro-Caribbean music on canvas. But this

some of his admiration for American music legends in his portfolio, which include softblue portraits of Louis Armstrong, Nina Simone and Otis Redding. Daley often plays their music in his Fondren studio, along with other jazz greats like Miles Davis and Ella Fitzgerald, which inspire some of the variant moods and colors of his paintings. His artistic influences range from classical artists such as post-impressionists Van Gogh and Gauguin, and Austrian symbolist painter Klimt, to more modern artists such as Charly Palmer and David Kibuuka. Daley is a graduate of the Central Technical School in Toronto, Canada, where he studied visual arts. He has lived in Jackson for more than two years with his wife, Nadine, who is an assistant professor in the theater department at Belhaven. Daley hasn’t fully integrated into the Jackson art scene, yet—he’s been busy with home renovations—but he does see the potential for the metro area to grow in the arts and hopes to be involved in more art shows in the near future. During his time in Toronto, Daley saw how the community benefited from art festivals and artist co-ops, where artists could live and work. “Artist co-ops can be communities for artists to come together and brainstorm with each other. I think that would be beneficial for here,” Daley says. “Places like that would give artists and musicians more opportunity to perform and showcase their work.” Daley recognizes how insular creative professions sometimes are, but he also understands that collective communities are what makes the artistic process worthwhile and eventually, more profitable. He looks forward to future work and showings in the Jackson area. Find Ken Daley’s work on his website, kendaleyart.com. To purchase his art, email him at ken@kendaleyart.com or call him at 33 601-287-3243. jacksonfreepress.com

I

n Ken Daley’s oil painting, “The Voyage,” an antiquated ship crosses swirling blue waters, holding its head high as it approaches the maritime sun. Carved into the body of the boat are musical instruments, including piano keys, a double bass and a trumpet. Daley, a 37-year-old Canadian from Cambridge, Ontario, makes it clear that music is a large part of his dai-


COURTESY MICHAEL DE LUCA PRODUCTIONS

DIVERSIONS | film

A Visceral ‘Captain Phillips’ by Anita Modak-Truran

“E

verything is going to be OK,” the Navy doctor says to Capt. Richard Phillips (Tom Hanks). These are virtually the same words the leader of the armed and dangerous Somalian boy-pirates tells Phillips before they kidnap him from the Maersk Alabama, a cargo ship delivering food supplies and humanitarian aid to Kenya. In Paul Greengrass’ “Captain Phillips,” based on Richard Phillips’ autobiographical book, “A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy SEALS, and Dangerous Days at Sea,” if a hijacker says you’ll be OK, your life will be turned inside out. Greengrass’ signature shaky cam replicates the churning seas. It’s a visceral experience and not for those with motion sickness. The movie opens on the normality of Phillips’ life before April 8, 2009. He and his wife, Andrea (Catherine Keener), and their two kids live in Vermont. He supports his family with a high-risk job ferrying goods from the Middle East to Africa. Phillips pulls his gear together, including a family photo to sustain him for the long voyage ahead. Anticipate ominousness. The action flips from Phillip’s prepara-

7KDL)RRG $W,WV%HVW

PGG"OZPSEFS

October 16 - 22, 2013

'PSB-JNJUFE5JNF0OMZ

34

601.664.7588

1002 Treetop Blvd • Flowood Behind the Applebee’s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

tion to crowds in a Somalian village. Abduwali Abdukhadir Muse (Barkhad Abdi), aka “Skinny,” picks a crew from volunteers wanting to make millions from stealing loot from ships. These scenes resonate, in part because the actors chatter in Somali, and we read English subtitles. Poverty is palpable on each face. Muse’s skin pulls tightly over his skull, and his eyes are wild. He has something to prove. He’s smart, motivated and dangerous. And Muse is only 16 years old. As Muse and his pirate crew, armed with AK-47s, head toward the open seas, Phillips and his crew practice emergency drills on the 508-foot long ship. Somalian piracy is a known danger; however, the Maersk Alabama lacks guns. Their best defense is water hoses to drown interlopers. Phillips is tense. The pulsating blips on the radar indicate an imminent threat approaching the virtually defenseless ship. Greengrass, one of my least favorite directors because he seems unable to control the camera, shoots in spasmodic, short takes, with cuts from one anguished face to another. Is this filmmaking instinct and craft? The direction makes sense given the film’s subject matter, but Greengrass employs this style in

Jamie Johnson Rescheduled

Nov. 23

824 S. State St. Jackson www.clubmagoos.com

601.487.8710

Tom Hanks, center, stars in the new Paul Greengrass movie, “Captain Phillips,” about a vessel overtaken by Somalian pirates.

every film he’s made, including “The Bourne Supremacy” and “United 93.” We never see the big picture, because everything is shot in mini-bursts, much like the shots from an assault rifle. But, in “Captain Phillips,” Billy Ray’s script, the acting and the perfect replications of the ship and lifeboat smooth out some of Greengrass’ frantic excesses. After a false start, Muse and his thugs clamber up the side of Maersk Alabama. They scuffle with crew members, and then abandon the ship in a lifeboat with $30,000 in cash and Phillips as their hostage. Muse believes Phillips is worth millions. SEAL Team Six runs the rescue operation, and the military precision is staggering and patriotic-fervor-inducing. I felt hawkish

when SEAL Team Six demonstrated that we are better equipped and trained than any pirate on the seven seas. We will smite down enemy combatants with the mechanized destructiveness of modern warfare. Hooyah! Tom Hanks’ magnificent performance provides the film’s heart. Phillips is in a classic Victorian test of leadership. He uses logic to outsmart his captors and words to soften each blow. Phillips is a realistic hero, not perfect, but willing to place himself in danger to save his crew. He has Hemingway-esque values and courage. These elements outweigh the pulp components of the film. Contrary to what some have said, this movie does not pander to prejudices. It validates the flag on the ship.


WEDNESDAY 10/16

THURSDAY 10/17

SUNDAY 10/20

A Microsoft Certified Trainer leads the tech showcase at Systems IT.

Jesse Robinson headlines the Blues by Starlight concert at Highland Village.

Mississippi College presents “Les Misérables” at 2 p.m.

BEST BETS OCT. 16 - 23 2013

Tech Showcase is from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at Systems IT, Inc. (1855 Lakeland Drive, Suite R-101). Registration required. Free; lnkd.in/hKzUq4. … Live at Lunch is at 11:30 a.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. … South Forward Town Hall Meeting is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). RSVP. Free; southforward.nationbuilder.com.

Pianists Tiffany Delgado and Hilary Mauler, winners of two national duo piano competitions, perform Oct. 17 at Jackson State University.

COURTESY JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY

WEDNESDAY 10/16

THURSDAY 10/17

Dollye M.E. Robinson Building, room 257. Purdue University professor Dr. Nadia E. Brown speaks. Free; email byron. d.orey@jsums.edu. … Jacktoberfest is from 11 a.m.-11 p.m. on Congress Street between Amite and Capitol streets. Free; jacktoberfest.com. … Jamey Johnson performs at 10 p.m. at Club Magoo’s (824 S. State St.). $35; call 800-7453000. … The Blast (Run Midtown Edition) is at 10 p.m. at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). The house music event features DJ Spirituals, The NastySho, DJ Scrap Dirty and others. Free; theblastmidtown.com

SATURDAY 10/19

The Mississippi Mass Choir, which has been performing since 1988, will be at Thalia Mara Hall Oct. 17.

3000. … Delgado Mauler Piano Duo performs at 7:30 p.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) in the F.D. Hall Music Center Recital Hall. Free; call 601-979-2141.

FRIDAY 10/18

“It’s Not Just Hair... and Do You Care: The Politics of Appearance for Black Women State Legislators” is at 10 a.m. at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.) in the

The Pointe Works Homemade Craft Fair is from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at The Pointe Church (1120 Star Road, Brandon). Free; call 601-591-1154; email lnb6381@gmail.com or rolltidetiffany@gmail.com for booth space. … BNA BlocktoberFeast is from 3-7 p.m. on Montbrook Street. Griffin Jones, The Hefner Brothers, Filter the Noise and Pillow Fight BY BRIANA ROBINSON Club perform. Free admission; food: adults $10, children free; JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM topoffondren.com. … Plantbased Potluck is at 6:30 p.m. at FAX: 601-510-9019 High Noon Cafe (2807 Old DAILY UPDATES AT Canton Road). RSVP, and indiJFPEVENTS.COM cate what dish you are bringing. Free; call 601-366-1602; facebook.com/rainbowcoop.

EVENTS@

SUNDAY 10/20

“Les Misérables” is at 2 p.m. at Mississippi College

(200 S. Capitol St., Clinton) in the Jean Pittman Williams Recital Hall. $15, $10 students; call 601-925-3440; mc.edu. … Mostly Monthly Céilí is at 2 p.m. at Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification Street). Free; call 601-592-9914; email maggie@jacksonirishdancers.org; jacksonirishdancers.org.

MONDAY 10/21

Kickboxing Fitness Class is at 6:30 p.m. at Salsa Mississippi (605 Duling Ave.). $30 for eight weeks, $5 dropin; call 601-884-0316. … The Renaissance quartet Good Pennyworths performs during “Love Is But a Jest: Songs for Fools and Lovers” at 7:30 p.m. at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo) in Woodworth Chapel. Free; call 917-459-7561; goodpennyworths.com.

TUESDAY 10/22

Health Help Mississippi Educational Presentation is at 11 a.m. at Margaret Walker Alexander Library (2525 Robinson Road). Free; call 877-314-3843. … “The Grapes of Wrath” is at 7:30 p.m. at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). $28, $22 seniors and students; call 601-948-3533, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com.

WEDNESDAY 10/23

Jesmyn Ward signs copies of “Men We Reaped: A Memoir” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Reading at 5:30 p.m. $23 book. Call 601-3667619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. … Body Sculpting by Keshia is from 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe (111 Millsaps Ave.). $10-$20; call 863-6378.

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY MISSISSIPPI MASS CHOIR

Merle Temple signs and reads from “A Ghostly Shade of Pale” at noon at Eudora Welty Library (300 N. State St.). Free; call 601-968-5807. … Blues by Starlight is at 7 p.m. at Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N.). $100; call 601969-7088, ext. 25; email sdean@bgcm.org; bluesbystarlight. org. … Mississippi Mass Choir performs at 7 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). $10-$20. Call 800-745-

35


*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jacktoberfest Oct. 18, 11 a.m.-11 p.m., on Congress Street between Amite and Capitol streets. The annual street festival includes concerts, a craft beer competition and refreshments for sale such as bratwurst, burgers and drinks. Free admission; jacktoberfest.com.

Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music

Thief at the Crossroads: The Blues as Black Technology through Jan. 4, at Gallery1 (One University Place, 1100 John R. Lynch St., Suite 4). See John Jennings’ comic art that showcases African-American expressions. Jennings is a Mississippi native currently living and working in Buffalo, N.Y. Free; call 601-960-9250; jsums. edu/gallery1.

october 16 -21

wed | oct 16 | 5:30 - 9:30

Jesse “Guitar” Smith Guitar Charlie fri | oct 18 | 12:00 - 3:00

Acoustic Crossroads fri | oct 18 | 6:00 - 10:00

Sean, Kenny & Richard

Happy Birthday Kimberly!

thur | oct 17 | 5:30 - 9:30

sat | oct 19 | 6:00 - 10:00

Dos Locos sun | oct 20 | 4:00 - 8:00

Cassie & Stacie mon | oct 21 | 6:00 - 9:00

Karaoke 1060
E
County
Line
Rd.
in
Ridgeland Open
Sun‐Thurs
11am‐10pm Fri‐Sat
11am‐Midnight
|
601‐899‐0038

7th Annual

Halloween party Party with live music from

Dave Jordan

#/--5.)49 Events at Clinton Community Nature Center (617 Dunton Road, Clinton), in Price Hall. Call 601-926-1104; email ccnaturecenter@gmail.com; clintonnaturecenter.org. • Nature Nuts Preschool Program Oct. 16, 10-11 a.m. The nature discovery program is for children ages 2-5. Adults must accompany children. Registration required. $8, $5 members. • Nature Lecture Series Oct. 17, 7 p.m. Tom Mann of the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science presents a program on amphibians. Free. Events at Duncan M. Gray Episcopal Camp and Conference Center (1530 Way Road, Canton). Registration required. Email caelin@graycenter. org; graycenter.org. • Writing the Song Within You Oct. 18-19. Participants work on writing their own song while gaining a basic understanding of some of the fundamentals of the craft of songwriting, primarily lyric writing. $140-$155; call 601859-1556. • Fall Get-Away Oct. 18-20. Enjoy the beauty of Gray Center, wander the trails, enjoy the food and get some space from the rush of everyday life. Registration required. Meals extra. $55$200; call 601-397-4273. Events at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). • Coffee and Conversation Oct. 18, 7-8:30 a.m.. Learn about upcoming city projects. Free; call 601-576-6920. • History Is Lunch Oct. 23, noon. Enjoy a preview of the program “Past Meets Present.” Free; call 601-576-6998. Events at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo). More at tougaloo.edu. • 144th Founders’ Week Oct. 14-20, 10 a.m. Includes an art talk, a banquet and induction ceremony, a golf tournament, the Mr. and Miss

Tougaloo coronation, guest speakers and more. The keynote speaker Oct. 20 is civil rights activist Joan Trumpauer-Mulholland. Free; call 601-977-7871. • Woodworth Chapel Memorial Plaza Ceremony and Tougaloo College Civil Rights Wall of Honor Unveiliing Oct. 19, 1 p.m., at the Bennie G. Thompson Center. The events are in honor of individuals who made contributions to the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement. Free; call 601-977-7870. Jackson State University Homecoming Week through Oct. 19 at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). Events take place on campus and several Jackson locations. Oct. 19, the week culminates with the Homecoming Parade at 9 a.m. in downtown Jackson and the football game against Grambling State at Veterans Memorial Stadium (2531 N. State St.). Most events free (see website for details); Oct. 16 comedy show and Oct. 18 Greek show: $10 in advance, $15 day of show; football game tickets start at $25; sites. jsums.edu/homecoming. COMSTAT Meeting Oct. 17, 9 a.m., at Jackson Police Department Headquarters (327 E. Pascagoula St.). The JPD shares the latest Jackson crime statistics at the biweekly meeting. Free; call 601-960-1375; jacksonms.gov. Precinct 3 COPS Meeting Oct. 17, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 3 (3925 W. Northside Drive). Free; call 601-960-0003. 1-2-3 Magic Seminar Oct. 18, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at Tulane University, Madison Campus (2115 Main St., Madison). Learn parenting tips such as encouraging behavior and proper discipline methods. Registration required. $10; call 601-605-0007; email poates@tulane.edu. Better Business Bureau’s Secure Your ID Day Oct. 19, 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at BankPlus, Flowood (2351 Lakeland Drive, Flowood). Bring up to three boxes or bags of documents for shredding. Computer parts, laptops and call phones also welcome. Free; call 601-398-1700 or 800-987-8280; ms.bbb.org. Fall Fashion Mixer Oct. 19, 6-9 p.m., at Galleria Event Center (2460 Terry Road). Luxe Boutique hosts the event that includes pop-up shops from local boutiques, vendors and designers, art and music. $5; email luxeonlinebtq@yahoo.com for vendor information.

7%,,.%33 Events at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.). • Look Good Feel Better Program Oct. 21, 2-4 p.m. Cancer patients learn beauty techniques

Friday | October 25 | 9 pm | Cover $5

October 16 - 22, 2013

Open For JSU Homecoming

36

Saturday • 10.19 • JSU vs Grambling

Blues & BBQ

D’Lo Trio | Every Thursday 5-7 pm | No Cover

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson www.cherokeedrivein.com

Best Fried Chicken In Town & in the USA -Best of Jackson 2003-2013- -Food & Wine Magazine-

707 N Congress St., Jackson | 601-353-1180 Mon thru Fri: 11am-2pm • Sun: 11am - 3pm

Your

Neighborhood Fun Spot 601.978.1839 6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS

www.timeoutcafe.com

to manage the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment. Pre-registration required. Free; call 800-227-2345; lookgoodfeelbetter.org. • Breast Cancer Screenings Overview Oct. 21, 4 p.m. and 5:15 p.m., at the Baptist for Women Conference Center. Registration required. Clinical breast exam screenings available after the presentation; limited appointments available. Free; call 601-948-6262; fundforthegirls. com/fund-times. Health Help Mississippi Educational Presentation. Learn more about health benefits under the Affordable Care Act. Free; call 877-314-3843. • Oct. 17, 5:30 p.m., and Oct. 22, 11 a.m., at Margaret Walker Alexander Library (2525 Robinson Road). • Oct. 18, 10:30 a.m., at Evelyn T. Majure Library (217 W. Main St., Utica). • Oct. 21, 4 p.m., at Medgar Evers Library (4215 Medgar Evers Blvd.). • Oct. 22, 2 p.m., and Oct. 24, 6:30 p.m., at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). • Oct. 23, 11 a.m., at Fannie Lou Hamer Library (3450 Albermarle Road). • Oct. 23, 5 p.m., at Ella Bess Austin Library (420 W. Cunningham Ave., Terry). Healthiest Hometown Celebration Oct. 19, 8 a.m., at Olde Towne Ridgeland Plaza (West Jackson Street and Northeast Madison Drive, Ridgeland). Includes a 5K run/walk and a onemile fun run. The first 200 registrants receive a Tshirt. The city of Ridgeland also receives a $5,000 grant from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Mississippi. Free; call 601-853-2011; email wendy.bourdin@ ridgelandms.org. Caregivers and Survivors of Breast Cancer Sunday Brunch Oct. 20, 1-4 p.m., at Hearts of Madison (123 Jones St., Madison). $40; call 601862-1763; email info@heartsofmadison.com.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “I Didn’t See THAT Coming” Dinner Theater The Detectives Mystery Dinner Theatre presents the comedy. For ages 18 and up. RSVP. $49; call 601-937-1752; thedetectives.biz. • Oct. 20, 6-9 p.m., at Anjou Restaurant (361 Township Ave., Ridgeland). • Oct. 22, 6-9 p.m. at Char (4500 Interstate 55 N.). America’s Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway Oct. 17, 7 p.m., at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). The series includes documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions of 20th-century American popular music.


Lennon and McCartney

Light refreshments served. Free; call 601-9245684; email kcorbett@jhlibrary.com.

-53)# Unburied Treasures: Cover to Cover Oct. 16, 5:30 7:30 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Dr. Yumi Park talks about preColumbian ceramics, and David Moore performs using culturally-related instruments he created. Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. Rodney Carrington Oct. 18, 7 p.m., at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The standup comedian and country singer performs. For mature audiences. $39.75. Call 800-745-3000. Jackson State University Homecoming Concert Oct. 18, 7 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Performers include Lyfe Jennings, Terisa Griffin and Charlie Wilson. $35$50; call 800-745-3000. Jason Isbell Oct. 21, 8 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Cary Hudson also performs. Cocktails at 6:30 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $20 in advance, $25 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000; ardenland.net.

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,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; email info@lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Local Soulsâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 16, 5 p.m. Allan Gurganus signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.95 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Wuffles!â&#x20AC;? Oct. 18, 5 p.m. David Wiesner signs books. $17.99 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rules for Disappearingâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 19, 1 p.m. Ashley Elston signs books. $16.99 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Funeral Dressâ&#x20AC;? Oct. 21, 5 p.m. Susan Gregg Gilmore signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $16 book. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theodore Roosevelt and the Assassin: Madness, Vengeance, and the Campaign of 1912â&#x20AC;? Oct. 22, 5 p.m. Gerard Helferich signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $28.95 book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prayerâ&#x20AC;? Book Release Party Oct. 18, 9 2 a.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 S. Commerce St.). The author is film and video producer Curtis Nichouls. Also meet Nicole â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hoopzâ&#x20AC;? Alexander, the producers of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duck Dynasty,â&#x20AC;? Jerrica Ricard and Blake C. The Southern Komfort Brass Band performs. Free drinks with admission until 10:30 p.m.; email

Events at Easely Amused (7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland). Registration required. Call 601-707-5854; email paint@easelyamused.com; easelyamused.com. â&#x20AC;˘ SEC Tailgate Date Night Oct. 17, 7 9 p.m. Enjoy creating a painting dedicated to your favorite team with your date. Includes pizza. BYOB. $60 per couple. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Not My Nameâ&#x20AC;? Painting Class Oct. 17, 7 9:30 p.m. Paint the alphabet of your choice in an array of colors. $15. â&#x20AC;˘ Paint Your Punkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Oct. 19, 2-5 p.m. Bring a pumpkin to decorate with paint. $15. Events at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). $8, children under 12 months and members free; call 601-981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Halloween Arts and Crafts Oct. 19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Create festive and spooky Halloween art and crafts. â&#x20AC;˘ Visiting Artist: Roz Roy Oct. 19, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The local artist gives a workshop on finger painting. Photography Class Oct. 19, 8-9:30 a.m., at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Take pictures of zoo animals to learn how to improve your camera skills. For ages 16 and up. Registration required. $35, $30 members; call 601-352-2580, ext. 240; jacksonzoo.org.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.) through Oct. 31. Free; call 601960-1557, ext. 224. â&#x20AC;˘ LEGO Jackson Halloween. See Dr. Scott Crawfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s LEGO sculptures of a haunted house, Draculaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s castle and more. â&#x20AC;˘ JSU Faculty Art Exhibit. See works from Jackson State instructors in the main galleries. â&#x20AC;˘ Mississippi World Trade Center Student Art Exhibit. See works from students in the upper and lower atriums. Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Look and Learn with Hoot Oct. 18, 10:30 a.m. This educational opportunity for 4-5 year olds and their parents features a hands-on art activity and story time. Please dress for mess. Free. â&#x20AC;˘ Members Opening Reception for An Italian Palate: Paintings by Wyatt Waters Oct. 23,

6:30 p.m. Museum members are invited to an exclusive opening reception for the exhibit. Free for members; msmuseumart.org/membership. Autumn Art Show through Nov. 2, at Wolfe Studio (4308 Old Canton Road). See the latest creations from the studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artists including Bebe Wolfe. Free; call 601-366-1844; wolfebirds.com.

"%4(%#(!.'% Pink-a-licious Breast Cancer Fundraisers. A portion of the proceeds go to Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. Free; call 601-321-5512; email tracie.wade@cancer.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Purchase a slice of strawberry cheesecake Oct. 20-26 at The Penguin Restaurant & Bar (1100 John R. Lynch St.). â&#x20AC;˘ Purchase a pink ribbon cookie through Oct. 31 at Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bakery (3013 N. State St.). Purple Dress Run Oct. 17, 6 p.m., at Jacoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacos (318 S. State St.). Check-in is at 5 p.m. The annual costumed 5K run/walk benefits the Domestic Violence Services Center of Catholic Charities. Includes prizes and after-party. Registration required. Entry fee includes a T-shirt and a beverage. $35, $100 team of four; call 601-355-8634; catholiccharitiesjackson.org. Sun King 5K Oct. 19, 8 a.m., at St. James Episcopal Church (3921 Oakridge Drive). Upton Tire Pros is the host. The race includes a run/walk and one-mile fun run. Proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity Mississippi Capital Area. $25 run/walk, $20 fun run, $60 family; call 601-954-2038 or 601-260-7648; sunking5k.com. Miriam Wilson Weems Memorial 5K Oct. 19, 5 p.m., at Junior League of Jackson Headquarters (805 Riverside Drive). Registration is at 4:30 p.m. The official timed 5K is first, and the walk and fun run follows. Proceeds benefit the Animal Rescue Fund of Mississippi (ARF). Dogs on leashes welcome. Enjoy food, music and prizes after the race. Registration required. $25 in advance, $30 day of event; call 948-2357; email info@jljackson. org; find ARFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Miriam Wilson Weems Memorial 5K on Facebook. Caregivers and Survivors of Breast Cancer Sunday Brunch Oct. 20, 1 4 p.m., at Hearts of Madison (123 Jones St., Madison). $40; call 601862-1763; email info@heartsofmadison.com. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

jacksonfreepress.com

curtis.nichouls@gmail.com.

37


DIVERSIONS | music

The Hardest Working Man in Music by Tommy Burton

I

MICHAEL WILSON

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not surprising that Jason Isbell, 34, might sound a little tired when you talk to him. Just this year, Isbell married songwriter and musician Amanda Shires in February, released his latest solo effort, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Southeastern,â&#x20AC;? in June, appeared on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Late Night with Conan Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brienâ&#x20AC;? in September and has been on tour in between. Isbell got sober after his last tour and found more time to devote to writing, and he poured that effort into â&#x20AC;&#x153;Southeastern.â&#x20AC;? The album is rich with melodies and colorful characters. Most importantly, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full of excellent storiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the kind of stories that one listens to and holds their breath in anticipation of the lyrical brilliance. The Jackson Free Press spoke with Isbell by phone.

Tell me about the role melody plays in your writing.

The same melodies that work on people that are 6 or 7 years old work on people that are 50 or 60. Strong

It was honestly just a matter of working harder and spending more time on the songs. I had more time to work because my life had settled down quite a bit. I had quit drinking and going out. Because I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that nagging of feeling of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to go out and start drinking,â&#x20AC;? I could actually focus on my work a lot more. How does working with and being married to songwriter Amanda Shires work?

We help each other a whole lot. In the editing process, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll bounce songs off each other when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still very young. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make suggestions and try to be as supportive as we can. I feel like we really enjoy our time together. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to be able to play together, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also important that we are individuals.

You grew up around Muscle Shoals, Ala. How much of that part of the South informed your writing?

Muscle Shoals was a different kind of place because it has such a history of music there. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize all that had happened there until I was in my late teens. I spent a lot of time going out to restaurants and playing music with my friends, as we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any bars there. â&#x20AC;Ś It allowed me to run into a lot of those musicians who played on those old recordings. They were still out playing shows there in town. After I had gotten to know some of those people, I went back and studied the music they made and fell in love with it.

Critics have written about you getting sober, but how did get from your last album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here We Rest,â&#x20AC;? to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Southeasternâ&#x20AC;??

Muscle Shoals native Jason Isbell brings his singer/ songwriter melodies to Duling Hall Oct. 21.

Tell me about the transition from being in the DriveBy Truckers to fronting your own band.

melodies are why kids love The Beatles so much. A lot of the songs that were played on the radio back in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s when I was growing up were by people like Crowded House, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Til Tuesday, Squeeze, Prince and Cyndi Lauper. Those songs had really strong melodies. That might be something that sets my work apart from the people that fall into the Americana or roots music genre; my melodies arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just informed by old country music or punk rock.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard work. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been very fulfilling for me. I find that I work best if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the boss or Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m being told what to do. â&#x20AC;Ś Anything in between is hard. Anytime you try to share a vision with somebody else, it gets really convoluted very quickly. We had a really special thing with that band, and it worked for a while.

music in theory

by Micah Smith

Chance the Purchase

October 16 - 22, 2013

38

different tastes in music even within the same genre. I love indie rock, but I generally donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enjoy low-fi music. Now, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind a bit of dirt in the trackâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;some of my favorite albums arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t polished to perfectionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but if a new album that cost $10,000 to make sounds as if it was recorded with bargain-basement equipment thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s older than I am, then I have qualms. Blind buying has never steered me wrong. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found some gems that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have met my ears otherwise, from The Dear Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Migrantâ&#x20AC;? to Starsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Set Yourself on Fireâ&#x20AC;? to Two Gallantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-titled album. This method can actually be pretty beneficial because it removes us from the equation a bit. Sure, we have a good idea of what we like, but creating a concrete â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is good, and this is badâ&#x20AC;? stance on music is counterproductive. As antithetical as it sounds, humans are both creatures of habit and creatures of change. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to sit your musical taste in a box and blare the same CD forever. That TRIP BURNS

I

get in an odd headspace sometimes it. If the mic isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grounded, I probably wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t when I listen to music from my mea- touch it. If your pet snake is a snake â&#x20AC;Ś well, ger stack of a record collection. Most thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a no. But I make a few exceptions, of my records came from a kind of nostalgic purchase rather than the individual albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s importance in the pantheon of impeccably produced vinyl. For instance, I have â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chutes Too Narrowâ&#x20AC;? from The Shins because it represented infinite possibilities when I was a 12-year-old learning acoustic guitar amidst friends who were pounding out power chords on electrics. Of course, I own some records because I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t possibly escape buying them, such as Maritimeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blind-purchasing music can put your preconceived â&#x20AC;&#x153;Human Hearts,â&#x20AC;? an all-time favorite tastes to the test. CD that warranted tenancy on my top shelf. In fact, several of my records are repeat purchases, as if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be ineffectual as including theme park rides, strange foods a fan without a vinyl version. and buying music. Then, the wild cards. Though few and Once in a blue moon, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll simply walk far between, these records make up my prized into a music store, ask an employee what his possessions in a lot of ways. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not much of or her favorite new release is and buy that a risk taker by nature. If the tree is tall, and record. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a strange thing, I know. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m wearing sandals, I probably wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t climb a bit stupid. After all, people have vastly

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is, it would be easy if we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t regularly going about our lives. As it is, though, people changeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;change their friends, change their clothes, change their schedulesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and a music style that appealed to you when you were 17 and anti-everything doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t apply when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 30 and married with two kids. Finding an unfamiliar artist challenges your musical palate and pushes past what you have accepted as â&#x20AC;&#x153;your musicâ&#x20AC;? to a point where you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the precedence of old opinions standing in the way of your actual opinion. So is this all a big, roundabout way of saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Think outside the boxâ&#x20AC;?? Kind of, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than that. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a call to be daring in your music choices, to go beyond the bands that already play prominently in your iTunes library for the ones that you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t usually hear. If asking a recordstore clerk a few questions about the music will inspire more confidence in his or her choice, then thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s completely fine. But whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with an unknown new artist or old music that just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t click before, be willing to chance the purchase. What you find may surprise you.


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THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 10/16:

Jason Turner (Restaurant) THURSDAY 10/17:

Barry Leach (Restaurant) FRIDAY 10/18:

The Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prayer book release party by film maker Curtis Nichouls featuring Hoopz & Southern Komfort Brass Band (Red Room) SATURDAY 10/19:

Southern Grass (Restaurant) MONDAY 10/21:

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday (Restaurant)

â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

pm

Thursday October 17

LADIES NIGHT W/ DJ Stache â&#x20AC;¢ Ladies Drink Free

Friday October 18

The Bailey Brothers

TUESDAY 10/22:

BUY GROWLERS O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

$19

Saturday October 19

Liam Catchings and the Jolly Racket with Chickenpox Party

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

Tuesday October 22

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$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2 for 1 house wine

starting at

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant)

/#4 7%$.%3$!9

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9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

2 for 1 Highlife & PBR

Open Mic

with Wesley Edwards

Wednesday October 16

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

jacksonfreepress.com

/#4 7%$.%3$!9

JACK MCGEE

MUSIC | live

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

39

FREE WiFi

Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

601-960-2700


xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

WeeklySchedule Npoebz

Uivstebz

• 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo

• 12-1 pm Level 1

• 5:30 pm Level 2

• 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

Uvftebz

Gsjebz

• 12-1 pm Level 1

• 12-12:45 pm Tabatas

• 5:15 pm Tabatas

• 5:30 Level 1

(6 for $50/$10 drop in) • 6-7:15 pm Level 1

Xfeoftebz • 10-10:45 am Tabatas • 12-1 pm Restorative Yoga • 5:30 Yoga from the Core

Tbuvsebz • 9-10:15 am Level I • 10:30 Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz • 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga (see Facebook for location) • 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424

October 17-19 JSU Homecoming Pep Rally Gibbs-Green Plaza Homecoming Show: Charlie Wilson Jackson Convention Complex Annual Homecoming Parade Downtown Jackson Homecoming Football Game MS Veterans Memorial Stadium October 17 Purple Dress Run Jaco’s Tacos

October 16 - 22, 2013

October 17 Mississippi Mass Choir Live Recording Thalia Mara Hall October 19 Woodworth Chapel Memorial Plaza Ceremony & Unveiling of The Tougaloo College Civil Rights Wall of Honor Tougaloo College For a complete listing of all Jackson events, hit visitjackson.com

Jackson State University Marching Band

40 JCV7210-61 Events Ad Week of 10-14 JFPress 9.25x5.875.indd 1

10/15/13 11:19 AM


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

SLATE

by Bryan Flynn

No New Orleans Saints game this week. Now is a good time to go antiquing with the wife on Sunday afternoon.

by Bryan Flynn

A

s the football season rolls on, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting a good idea of which players will be up for regional and national awards. A Mississippi college football player will win the Conerly Trophy, but other national awards could easily go to COURTESY OLE MISS

THURSDAY, OCT. 17 College football (6:30-10 p.m., ESPN): The Miami Hurricanes look to stay undefeated on the road against former Southern Miss coach Larry Fedora and the North Carolina Tar Heels.

Keep an Eye Onâ&#x20AC;Ś

FRIDAY, OCT. 18 College football (7-10 p.m., ESPN): Central Florida hopes to pull off one of the biggest upsets of the season against its hosts, the Louisville Cardinals. SATURDAY, OCT. 19 College football (6-9 p.m., ESPN 2): Ole Miss must forget about a heartbreaking loss to Texas A&M quickly, because the LSU Tigers are coming to Oxford this weekend. SUNDAY, OCT. 20 NFL (7:30-11 p.m., NBC): Peyton Manning takes his new team, the Denver Broncos, to face his old team, the Indianapolis Colts, and the Coltsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new quarterback, Andrew Luck. MONDAY, OCT. 21 NFL (7:30-11 p.m., ESPN): This could be the worst Monday Night Football game in a long time, as the one-win Minnesota Vikings face the winless New York Giants. TUESDAY, OCT. 22 College football (7-10 p.m., ESPN): Louisiana-Lafayette faces Arkansas State with first place in the Sun Belt Conference on the line. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23 NBA (6-11 p.m., ESPN): A preseason NBA double header features the Brooklyn Nets against the Boston Celtics, followed by the Chicago Bulls at the Oklahoma City Thunder. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

W

Outland Trophy: Most Outstanding Interior Lineman (awarded since 1946) Gabe Jackson, guard, MSU Jim Thorpe Award: Best Defensive Back (awarded since 1986) Deron Wilson, safety, Southern Miss Doak Walker Award: Premier Running Back (awarded since 1990) LaDarius Perkins, running back, MSU

Bo Wallace of Ole Miss could be up for the Maxwell Award, among others.

Biletnikoff Award: Most Outstanding Receiver (awarded since 1994) Donte Moncrief, wide receiver, Ole Miss

I

understand that people want the four best teams to make the new college football playoffs system next season. Nobody wants to watch a team that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deserve a spot in the top four getting to play over a deserving team. What I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand is how people like Pat Dye and David Pollack think a woman couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pick the top four teams next year. More specifically, that Condoleezza Rice, who is helping make the selection on the new College Football Playoff Committee, couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pick the top four teams. Rice was leaked as one of the names that will be part of the new 12to 18-person committee. College football should be applauded for making such an out-of-the-box choice. My wife could be on the committee and tell you who the top four teams are in the country. Not because she wants to know, but because she lives with me. She could tell you who the four best teams are, because she sees all the top teams each week (whether she

Maxwell Award: College Football Player of the Year (awarded since 1937) Tyler Russell, quarterback, MSU LaDarius Perkins, running back, MSU Bo Wallace, quarterback, Ole Miss Bednarik Award: College Defensive Player of the Year (awarded since 1995) Benardrick McKinney, linebacker, MSU Mackey Award: Most Outstanding Collegiate Tight End (awarded since 2000) Malcolm Johnson, tight end, MSU Rimington Trophy: Most Outstanding Collegiate Center (awarded since 2000) Dillon Day, center, MSU Evan Swindall, center, Ole Miss Lombardi Award: Lineman of the Year (awarded since 1970) Denzel Nkemdiche, linebacker, Ole Miss Gabe Jackson, guard, MSU

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Davey Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Award: Best Quarterback (awarded since 1981) Tyler Russell, quarterback, MSU Bo Wallace, quarterback, Ole Miss Walter Camp Award: Most Outstanding Player (awarded since 1967) Tyler Russell, quarterback, MSU Butkus Award: Most Outstanding Linebacker (awarded since 1985) Benardrick McKinney, linebacker, MSU D.T. Shackelford, linebacker, Ole Miss Deontae Skinner, linebacker, MSU Buck Buchanan Award: Top FCS Defensive Player (awarded since 1995) Qua Cox, cornerback, Jackson State Robert Simpson, defensive tackle, Mississippi Valley State University

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant 2ICE)S!LRIGHT"Y-E

the top players in the state. Each season, the different awards put out watch lists of players to keep an eye on. Several players from college football programs in the state made these watch lists at the beginning of the season.

JFP Top 25: Week 7

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Bronko Nagurski Trophy: Most Outstanding Defensive Player (awarded since 1993) Denzel Nkemdiche, linebacker, Ole Miss Nickoe Whitley, linebacker, MSU

          

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wants to or not). She can look up at the TV and tell you who is playing just by seeing the uniforms. If my wife can learn this much while doing housework, eating, playing with the baby and more, how much can Rice learn when she puts her mind to learning about football? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty sure she will be well prepared when she steps into the room. Rice is a former secretary of state, for goodness sakes. She can handle Russia, China and the Middle East, but not Alabama, LSU, Ohio State, Oregon and Florida State? That is crazy talk. Maybe to knuckle draggers like Pollack and Dye, a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place is nowhere near football decisions, but times have changed. It might even shock either man to know that women actually play football in this day and age. I am glad college football made such a bold choice, and I hope the sport embraces that choice instead of ridiculing it.         

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jacksonfreepress.com

the best in sports over the next seven days

41


ALL NEW LUNCH & DINNER MENU PLATTERS STARTING AT $10 WEDNESDAYS

10/16

LADIES NIGHT W /

Pub Quiz

with Comic Commander

T /

Zach Lovett F /

Amazin’ Lazy Boi Band

10/17

DrFameus (Allen of Disco Biscuits)

$4 APPETIZERS • 5 -9PM 2 FOR 1 DRAFT

FRIDAY

10/18

GRAVITY A CD R S ELEASE

HOW

10/19

S /

MONDAY

10/21

M /

SEARCH NIGHT

Karaoke w/ Matt T /

Open Mic

with A Guy Named George

HAPPY HOUR MENU

Mon - Fri • 4 pm - 7 pm

• $2.25 Domestic Bottles October 16 - 22, 2013

5pm - close

THURSDAYS

SATURDAY

Lloyd Keller

42

2-for-1 Wells & Domestic

• $4 Well Drinks • $3 House Wine

THE REVIVALISTS OPEN MIC/ TALENT Local bands tryout for gigs On stage w/ pro sound & lights Both bars open

1.50 Pick & Grab Beers & 2 for 1 draft TUESDAY

10/22

SHRIMP BOIL 5 - 10 PM

Come see

Skylar Laine at the 2103

MATT’S KARAOKE

Great Delta Bear Affair

5 - 9 & 10 - close

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

UPCOMING SHOWS 10.24: Nadis Warriors 10.26: Cedric Burnside Project 11.2: So So Glows (Recently on David Letterman, Rolling Stone Magazine Band To Watch....) 11.8: Unknown Hinson 11.15: Archnemesis

Saturday, October 26 Downtown Rolling Fork, MS

Live Music All Day Arts, Crafts & Food Vendors

Kids Activities

SCAN

Trackless Train • Bungee Jump Magician • Space Jump

ME! SEE OUR NEW MENU

W W W. M A R T I N S L O U N G E . N E T

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

5K Run/Walk & Kids Fun For more information, call 662.873.6261 or visit greatdeltabearaffair.org

 Run Indian Mound Tours Chainsaw Woodcarver

FIREWORKS


METRO JACKSON OPEN HOUSES

326 LAKEWAY DR BRANDON,MS 39047

(3/3.5/$294,900) Traditional, 2 Story, Carpet, Ceramic Tile, Linoleum/Vinyl, 9+ Ceilings, All Window Treatments, Attic Floored, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Master Bath, Separate Shower, Walk-In Closet, Walk-Up Attic, 2 Car, Garage, Storage Open Date: 10/20/2013 1:00 PM-4:00 PM WEICHERT, REALTORS-MARTELLA-CLARK

1108 RIDGEWOOD BLVD JACKSON, MS 39211

(3/2/$134,900) Traditional, 1 Story, Carpet, Ceramic Tile, Laminate, All Window Treatments, Attic Floored, Fireplace, 2 Car, Garage, Parking Pad Open Date: 10/20/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

828 COLONIAL CIR JACKSON, MS 39211

(3/2/$105,700) Traditional, 1 Story, Carpet, Tile, All Window Treatments, Master Bath, Separate Shower, 2 Car, Carport Open Date: 10/20/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

5718 SEDGWICK DR JACKSON, MS 39211

(4/2/$109,500) Traditional, 1 Story, Linoleum/Vinyl, Parquet, Fireplace, 2 Car, Attached, Garage Open Date: 10/19/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM COMMUNITY FIRST REAL ESTATE, LLC

106 NOVARA CIR MADISON, MS 39110

(4/3/$398,500) French Acadian, 2 Story, Carpet, Ceramic Tile, Wood, 9+ Ceilings, Attic Floored, Beamed Ceiling, Double Vanity, Fireplace, Master Bath, Separate Shower, Split Plan, Walk-In Closet, 3+ Cars, Garage Open Date: 10/19/2013 & 10/20/2013 12:00 PM-5:00 PM RODDY RUMBLEY REAL ESTATE

819 MANGUM AVE MENDENHALL, MS 39114

(3/2/$109,900) Traditional, Ceramic Tile, Laminate, Master Bath, 2 Car, Carport Open Date: 10/20/2013 2:00 PM-4:00 PM KEYTRUST PROPERTIES PAULA RICKS

106 HARPER ST, RIDGELAND, MS 39157 (4/3.5/$499,000) Traditional, 2

Story, Ceramic Tile, 9+ Ceilings, Beamed Ceiling, Cathedral/Vaulted Ceiling, Master Bath, Separate Shower, Walk-In Closet, 3+ Car Open Date: 10/19/2013 & 10/20/2013 12:00 PM-5:00 PM RODDY RUMBLEY REAL ESTATE

Information courtesy of MLS of Jackson Miss. Inc. ,AST7EEK´S!NSWERS

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43


Millsaps College

Driving the Conversation “Across the Street and Around the Globe” October 19, 1-4 p.m.

Purple Word Center for Book & Paper Arts: Open House

140 Wesley St., Jackson, MS 39202 Admission: Free

November 1, 12:30 p.m.

Friday Forum: Community Voices — The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

October 25, 12:30 p.m.

Friday Forum: Raising Education and Awareness of the Scope and Impact of HIV/AIDS in 2013 Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

November 2, 1 p.m.

Millsaps v. Berry (Football)

Millsaps College, Harper Davis Field Admission: $10

November 1-2: Millsaps Homecoming Visit mbench.org for full schedule of activities

October 16 - 22, 2013

www.millsaps.edu

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45


M I S S I S S I PPI

14 INVITATIONAL Call for Entries

For more information visit www.msmuseumart.org email kvarnell@msmuseumart.org or call (601)960-1515.

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART 380 SOUTH LAMAR STREET n JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI

Museum of Mississippi History

Mississippi Civil Rights Museum

GROUNDBREAKING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 10AM

October 16 - 22, 2013

.VTJDt'PPEUSVDLTt$IJMESFOTBDUJWJUJFT

46

200 North Street, Jackson t'3&& .*44*44*11*%&1"35.&/50'"3$)*7&4"/%)*4503:

FREES! BOOK

Children enrolled in United Wayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Imagination Library program receive a free book each month, delivered directly to your home. Go to ImaginationLibrary.com to enroll your child or dial 2-1-1 to reach a call specialist. Children 0-5 years old who reside in Hinds, Madison, or Rankin County are eligible for this program. Made possible in part with funding from Nissan.

YP Y LP YOUNG LEADERS IN

PHILANTHROPY

UNITED WAY OF THE CAPITAL AREA


$300,000 G O HUN T OR GO HOME

GIVEAWAY Fridays in October

Take a shot at big prizes. A winner selected every hour rolls the dice on our game board for a chance to win a 4-wheeler. Earn entries now! 20X entries every Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. 40X entries on Fridays.

7pm-Midnight

$50,000

GET YOUR SLICE

GIVEAWAY Saturdays in October

Five winners every hour get $500 cash each! Earn entries now! 20X entries every Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. 40X entries on Saturdays.

8pm-Midnight

CASH & CAR CELEBRATION October 28 Noon11pm

>œœ˜Ê À>܈˜}ÃÊUÊ œœ˜‡{«“ ˆÀ̅`>ÞÊ*>ÀÌÞÊUÊ{\{x«“ >œœ˜Ê À>܈˜}ÃÊUÊÈ«“‡£ä«“

WIN A MUSTANG at 11pm!

L)+%J'KKGD !"#$%&'(()*+,*%-,'.%/%0123456(78%9:%;<!=" !>=$$>$!?><!@?%/%(1A)(B'C3A123456(7D2,E

0141+%FC'G)(4%HC65%I,(%E,()%.)+'1C4D%964+%5)%@!%G)'(4%,I%'7)%,(%,A)(D%9'*'7)E)*+%()4)(A)4%'CC% (17J+4%+,%'C+)(%,(%2'*2)C%K(,E,+1,*4%'+%'*G%+1E)%B1+J,6+%*,+12)D%L'E5C1*7%K(,5C)EM%H'CC%!>===>NNN><$<$D% O@"!;%-1A)(B'C3%H'41*,%/%P,+)CD%QCC%(17J+4%()4)(A).D

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5th BIRTHDAY

47


MARKET PLACE Sweet & Spooky

adver tise here star ting at $75 a week 601.362.6121 x11

Little Big Store

NOW HIRING!

Vinyl Records +45’s & 78’s

.543ISLOOKINGFORENERGETIC HARDWORKING CUSTOMER SERVICEORIENTEDFOLKSWITHA ¼AIRFORTHECREATIVE

Mon, Fri & Sat: 10am - 5pm Sun: 1 - 5pm • CDs & Tapes • Posters • Back Issue Music Magazines & Books • T-Shirts & Memorabilia • Blu-Rays, DVDs, & VHS

601.857.8579

201 E. Main Street • Raymond, Ms Find us on Facebook

www.littlebigstore.com

For application please visit www.goodsamaritancenter.org/jobs or visit our Midtown or Fondren locations

MidTown
Location

114
Millsaps
Ave.
•
Jackson,
MS
39202
•
(601)
355-7458
 Wednesday
-
Friday
9:30
-
5:30
&
Saturday
10:00
-
4:00

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

Fondren
Location

3011
N.
State
St.
•
Jackson,
MS
39216
•
(601)
366-9633
 Monday
-
Friday
10am
-
6pm
Saturday
10am
-
5:30pm

Try the

1220 E Northside Dr, Jackson, MS • 601-499-5277

Mention JFP2013 for

15% Off Repairs & Accessories

Go Tigers! JSU Homecoming October 19 • Blue Out Get Your Licensed BLUE Shirt 579 Hwy 51 North Ridgeland Village 601.856.8886 601.260.1904

Pilates Reformer Experience Ask about our holiday pre-sale. pilatesvworks@gmail.com pilatesvstudioworks.com

601.665.4530

IT IS NEVER TO EARLY OR TOO LATE FOR THE GIFT OF MUSIC.

601.362.0313

607 Fondren Place | Jackson www.fondrenguitars.com

Police…

No wonder they have a ball. (Come get this costume for Halloween and you won’t remain silent!)

175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M­Th: 10­10p F­Sa 10­Mid Su: 1­10p * www.shopromanticadventures.com


v12n06 - Ending AIDS, One Infant at a Time