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October 2 - 8, 2013


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN ANTHONY JONES

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uring a historic home renovation in Raymond, the owner brought Anthony Jones, the director of the project, reclaimed items including wood flooring and archways. Jones loved the opportunity to work with such unique pieces, and the owner of the home informed Jones that the items came from Old House Depot. He told Jones to head there for inspiration. After visiting the depot, Jones decided to work there on Saturdays to take a break from historic renovations. “I was originally fascinated by all of the reclaimed home pieces that are here,” Jones says. He didn’t expect that, within two months, it would become a full-time carpentry job. That was almost four years ago. Old House Depot is a warehouse with a plethora of reclaimed and recycled home décor—shutters, doors, door knobs, windows, bathtubs and even kitchen sinks—the place is packed with vintage items for sale. If customers need help bringing a project to life, that’s where Jones enters the picture. Jones’ 10 years of carpentry experience in custom cabinet making, trim work and full renovations has prepared him well to interact with the customers at Old House Depot and help bring their visions to life. “Most of the work I do is from specs from customers. It can be a simple idea that they share with me in conversation while looking at the stock in the warehouse or a picture

CONTENTS

with measurements and dimensions,” Jones says. “Old wood is a hot topic, and I use all reclaimed materials in the creations (I craft for customers) including farm tables, headboards, picture frames and entertainment centers. I love seeing a project start with raw materials and also vintage materials and ending with a vision from one of our customers.” Jones loves Jackson and the abundance of creative people who live here and support Old House Depot. While he was growing up in Richland, Jones frequently visited Jackson, especially the Fondren area, where his father lived. He still has much love and admiration for the capital city’s people. “The businesses and residents in Belhaven and Fondren have been very supportive of me and Old House Depot. Interacting with the customers and hearing their vision for a piece—and being able to build their vision—is very rewarding,” Jones says. Old House Depot is unconventional. “I never know day-to-day what will happen,” Jones says. “Being a small business, everyone pitches in. One day I could be working on a custom piece and (then) have to assist with daily sales. Sometimes I may even have to get out of here and go on a pick.” Jones, 36, lives in Florence with his wife, Shara, and sons Zachary, 2, and Amoz, 8. For more information about Old House Depot (639 Monroe St., 601-592-6200), visit oldhousedepot.com. —Langston Moore

Cover photograph of the Kemper County IGCC plant by Trip Burns

10 Huge Sale

Real estate broker The Overby Company is trying to sell the majority of Metrocenter Mall for $6.5 million.

22 Ancient Brews

Sal & Mookie’s, Lucky Town Brewery and Dr. James Bowley of Millsaps College are hosting a night of “edutainment” about the history of beer.

32 Modern Harmonica

“By and large, harmonica players are terrible musicians. Harmonica has gotten a bad name because so many people toy around and (call) themselves harmonica players without knowing what they’re doing. They’ll be in rock or blues groups, struggling to make something sound good because they won’t even know what key the band is playing in.” —Scott Albert Johnson, “A Maverick of Harmonica”

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ............................................ TALKS 11 .................................. BUSINESS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ........ BEST OF JACKSON RECAP 16 ............................ COVER STORY 21 ...................................... TRAVEL 22 ......................................... FOOD 24 ................................. WELLNESS 26 .............................. DIVERSIONS 28 ............................... JFP EVENTS 30 ....................................... 8 DAYS 31 .......................................... FILM 32 ....................................... MUSIC 33 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 34 ..................................... SPORTS 35 .................................... PUZZLES 37 ....................................... ASTRO

COURTESY SCOTT ALBERT JOHNSON; WIKICOMMONS/LOUVRE MUSEUM; WARD SCHAEFER

OCTOBER 2 - 8, 2013 | VOL. 12 NO. 4

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

From Nothing to Something

I

f you’re not one of the lucky ones to whom I’ve shown off the 6-inch scar on my right upper arm, you might not know that I’ve spent the last three months recovering from shattered bones and surgery. (Sorry: No fabulous story behind it; I tripped in my kitchen the day before we moved into a new house.) Having never broken a bone, had surgery or been under anesthesia, it was quite the adventure. I call it my achy-breaky summer. I also consider it a remarkable Zen practice, at least in its better moments. While I was out, I continued working from home—thanks to voice recognition on my iPhone and a remarkable staff—and got to think, rest, comb the cats and plan a lot. With non-essential tasks (such as driving) by the wayside, and very few outings, I was able to ponder my life, this newspaper, our business and the community as I recuperated. My accident gave me a reason to pause and reflect a lot about Jackson—where we’ve been, how far we’ve come, and the steps we need to take to help our city and state mend and grow. When I moved back to Mississippi 12 years ago, it felt as if the majority of people I met, especially younger ones, constantly had one foot out the door in one way or the other. They were helped along by terrible corporate-media outlets that pushed crime, crime, crime and allowed Jackson haters (many of whom had fled the city, causing the problems in the first place) to control the narrative. It was as if the center of gravity had literally moved from mid-city to north Jackson, with many folks trying to push it even further out into the strip malls of Flowood or the columned gas stations of Madison, leaving Jackson a shell they could disparage. This made no sense to me then or now. It also is absurd to deny the problems of the past that caused these problems, but

so many of our younger people hadn’t even been told about those dark days, at least not in a way that wasn’t somehow rationalizing them or blaming the victims for the problems that inevitably ensued. Today, this is starting to change. So many creative and determined people of all ages—but especially those young and diverse urban warriors who hold the key to the city and state—aren’t fleeing. They are digging in, renovating, creating, conspiring, networking and making cool things happen. I’ve watched some of them leave, and then

He asks about the house behind him: “How is this empty? How is this available?” come on back within a year or two. Something really wonderful is happening here if we’ll notice (and ignore local news that always leads with bleeding). This was so clear to me last Friday night sitting in the Art Garden downtown—really, my first social outing since June—watching the documentary “subSIPPI” debut on the big screen. The filmmakers, whom I met when they set up in a Metrocenter storefront during the Best of Jackson party last January, exemplify the change we’re watching unfold as well as anyone does. It was a beautiful film with what I like to call “European pacing.” That is, it wasn’t constant talk or action. They told much of the story through powerful images from

around Mississippi—from farm workers to artists on the Coast to young people playing in front of abandoned houses in Jackson. It is a hopeful story, but not a hopelessly naïve one. When they asked to interview me for it (I’m in it briefly, and not the part to see it for), I was straightforward with them as I am with all documentary makers and media these days who want to talk to me about Mississippi: We are not either/or. We have not recovered from our past, but we are not stuck there, either. We are changing. We are a work-in-progress, and we must use every tool, every history lesson to help us complete this journey. And we can’t let the fools run us off. What I liked about these young Mississippians is the fact that they knew that already. They just wanted someone to say it out loud. I watched them tear up as we all talked about what our state has been through and what is left to be done. They believe in their homeland’s potential, just as I do. And they know there is much work left to be done. My favorite part of the film spotlighted African American boys growing up on a blighted street in Jackson. One had learned to garden, and the film shows him planting in front of an abandoned house—one of so many that we cannot seem to figure out how to tear down so young people do not have to grow up amid such hopelessness. He explains how gardening helps keep him out of trouble. We later see him making art and talking about why art is meaningful to him. “We are coming from nothing to something,” one teen says to the camera. Then he asks about the house behind him: “How is this empty? How is this available?” How, indeed. Three days after watching and being inspired by the film, which leaves the viewer to

ponder solutions for herself, I read the story Tyler Cleveland wrote for this issue about the debate over the Jackson Zoo possibly moving from its location. Why does it need to move? Because many people, especially white ones if we’re honest, don’t want to go to it any longer because it’s surrounded by a “bad” neighborhood. The condition of that neighborhood is, of course, the result of all the worst parts of Jackson’s distant and recent history. When I and many of you were growing up, Jackson’s perceived (and “safe”) center of gravity had not yet moved so far north and east because whites had not yet fled much of Jackson, taking wealth and caring about the entire city with them. So white people fled. Fast forward a few decades, and now many people say the zoo is supposed to pick up and follow them. There are people who claim to care for the city who believe the zoo should be out toward the flood plains surrounding Lakeland Drive because, they tell us, people will go to the zoo there. The right people, the implication is. I dare say the new Mississippi way, the “subSIPPI” way let’s call it, is to not pick up and move the zoo (and probably leave a huge abandoned hulk in an already-challenged neighborhood). The smart and compassionate approach is to support the zoo in whatever way we can exactly where it is. I’ve been there many times and have never feared the drive to and from (sure we’re not talking about the “I see black people” problem here?). The zoo has security. And it’s beautiful and historic. Go for a romantic stroll at the zoo, take your kids, book a party there. It’s time that we become the type of city and state that does not run from our problems, but stays, digs in and works together to repair them. We can do this, Jackson. Together we heal.

October 2 - 8, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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R.L. Nave

Langston Moore

Genevieve Legacy

Alexis Moody

Tyler Cleveland

Justin Hosemann

ShaWanda Jacome

Kimberly Griffin

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Call him at 601-362-6121 ext. 12. He wrote the cover story.

Langston Moore lives in Fondren with his new bride Lisa. He enjoys flea marketing, exploring historic downtowns and photography. He works for a statewide, non-profit agency. He wrote the Jacksonian.

Genevieve Legacy is an artist-writer-community development consultant. She works at Hope Enterprise Corporation and lives in Brandon with her husband and youngest son. She wrote the arts story.

Indiana, Pa., native Alexis Moody moved to Jackson at the age of 13. She is a selfproclaimed nerd, music love, Sabre fencer, and Steam video game player. She wrote a music story.

JFP City Reporter Tyler Cleveland loves sports, good music and soul food. He can be found around Fondren when he’s running to and fro in the JFP office. He wrote talks.

Editorial Intern Justin Hosemann is a native of Vicksburg. He recently graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi. He wrote the food story.

ShaWanda Jacome is an elementary-school librarian in Jackson. She lives in Ridgeland with her husband, Mike, and son, Mateo. She wrote the events blurb.

Kimberly Griffin is a fitness buff and foodie who loves chocolate and her mama. She’s also Michelle Obama’s super secret BFF which explains the Secret Service detail. She sold ads for the issue.


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Wednesday, Sept. 25 The Obama administration tells Hispanic groups that the Spanish-language version of the healthcare.gov website will not be ready to handle online health-insurance enrollments for a few weeks. ‌ The U.S. Senate unanimously decides to advance the governmentspending bill toward a vote.

Friday, Sept. 27 The U.N. Security Council orders the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons to help Syria destroy its chemical weapons by mid-2014. ‌ A government funding measure passes the Democratic-controlled Senate 54-44, with the vote split along party lines. Saturday, Sept. 28 Iraq’s foreign minister says that the new Iranian government offers “the best chance after 34 years of animosityâ€? to improve relations with the United States. ‌ The U.S. House approves bipartisan legislation to improve the safety of drugs from compounding pharmacies that mix customized pharmaceuticals. Sunday, Sept. 29 Congressional Republicans issue a statement vowing to keep using an otherwise routine federal funding bill to attack the president’s health-care law.

October 2 - 8, 2013

Monday, Sept. 30 President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meet to discuss Palestine, Syria and Iran. ‌ The federal trial over the 2010 BP Gulf oil disaster resumes, focusing on the oil giant’s response.

6

Tuesday, Oct. 1 A federal government shutdown begins over a dispute regarding the Affordable Care Act. ‌ Federal officials experience problems handling the volume of consumers on the first day of a six-month open enrollment period for health insurance. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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Tax Commission: Who’s on First? by Tyler Cleveland

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hen Mayor Chokwe Lumumba took a stand against the composition of a commission overseeing a 1-percent sales-tax increase during his mayoral campaign last spring, he won the votes of Jacksonians tired of the state treating Jackson like a bad seed. Although he hasn’t reversed that stance, Lumumba now says he’s ready to throw his support behind putting the 1-percent sales tax to a vote, thanks to an agreement he reached with Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership regarding the chamber’s nominations for the 10-person commission. Lumumba said Monday the “deal� he had agreed to in principle with GJCP President Duane O’Neill was one that would allow him to nominate and appoint his own choices and not those of chamber. That’s where the confusion comes in. The law states that the chamber will provide the mayor with eight nominees, of which he can chose four to serve on the commission. Lumumba has three members of his own to appoint, whom the city council must approve. Gov. Phil Bryant, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves and Speaker of the House Phillip Gunn would each appoint one representative to round out the 10 members, although Gunn’s representative wouldn’t have a vote. Lumumba said again Monday that the GJCP had agreed to allow him to choose his own people to serve as the chamber representatives, but on Oct. 1, O’Neill said the agreement, as he understood it, was that the GJCP would still be submitting its list of nominees to the mayor for his approval. “That’s the way it’s written in the law,

and that’s the way we are going to do it,� O’Neill said. But the guidelines, as laid out in the law, is the same commission makeup that former TRIP BURNS

Thursday, Sept. 26 The U.N. Security Council reaches agreement on elements of a resolution to require Syria to dismantle its chemical weapons. ‌ House Speaker John Boehner announces that House Republicans will not pass a Senate spending bill shorn clean of a House plan to defund “Obamacare.â€?

¹)BELIEVEINPAY AS YOU GO) JUSTDON´TBELIEVEINPAY BEFORE YOU GO²

Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba is against a state-mandated commission to oversee disbursement of funds from the proposed 1-percent sales tax.

Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. rejected and Lumumba spoke against on the campaign trail in May and June. “The state constitution and state laws give the power to determine the budget and how the money is spent to the city council,� Lumumba told the JFP in May. “When you take that power to give it to another body, you’re depriving the people that the population elects to do their task. I don’t think that’s done in most places in the state, and it shouldn’t be done in Jackson.� Mississippi Senate Bill 2389 places re-

quirements on each of the appointees. The committee members that the governor, lieutenant governor and house speaker appoint must all be Jackson residents. The “local chamber� (in Jackson’s case, the GJCP) has the freedom, under the law, to nominate members who do not live in Jackson, but who have “business interests� in the city. O’Neill said he has met with Lumumba “several times� to talk about the issue, and that Lumumba had spoken in broad terms about what he’d like to see in GJCP’s appointees. “He talked about the whole city being represented,� O’Neill said. When pressed on whether he would accept the terms of the law and allow the GJCP to nominate its own list of possible appointees, Lumumba said he would not, adding that if that was the case, it would “change everything� for him on the issue. When told of the mayor’s Monday comments, O’Neill said he is still confident they can hash out the differences and move forward on the issue. “The mayor has been reasonable to work with,� he said. “He understands we have to move forward, and I feel like, regardless of the different interpretations of the law, we are on the same page.� That remains to be seen, however. Lumumba has publicly called for the city to take up the 1-percent tax, which could produce an estimated $15 million in additional revenue for Jackson, potentially avoiding future water-and-sewer rate increases and situating the city on more solid financial ground. After city council approval, Jackson citizens would vote on the new tax as soon as 21 days after the city publishes a notice. The tax requires 60 percent of voters to agree.

COVERAGE YOU CAN BELIEVE IN

A

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Millsaps College

Driving the Conversation “Across the Street and Around the Globe” October 4, 12:30 p.m.

Friday Forum: The Science Behind Roman Frescoes

Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

October 5, 1 p.m.

Millsaps v. Hendrix (Football)

Millsaps College, Harper Davis Field Admission: $10

October 10, 6 p.m.

Friday Forum: Gallery Talk: Artist Andrew Burkitt

Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

October 16, 11:30 a.m.

“Eatin’ with Else” – Lunch with Brent Christensen, Executive Director of the Mississippi Development Authority

Presented by Millsaps College Else School of Management Nick’s Restaurant Admission: $10 (Reserve a spot by emailing elsersvp@millsaps.edu or calling 601-974-1250).

jacksonfreepress.com

www.millsaps.edu

7


TALK | community

West Jackson Rallying Zoo Support by Tyler Cleveland

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That confidence might have been dealt a blow at Monday’s special meeting of the city council, where an emergency measure to provide the zoo funding was shot down with a 2-2 vote. The emergency item called for the

Poff said could lead to those institutions pulling their animals out of Jackson or opting to send inspectors to monitor the quality of care the Jackson Zoo provides to the animals. The bigger problem may be dwinTRIP BURNS

veryone in town seems to have an opinion on which course of action the Jackson Zoo’s leadership, faced with financial obstacles, should take to ensure the longevity of what former Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. called “one of Jackson’s jewels.� While most of the “facts� making the rounds are speculative, what’s certain is that the zoo needs to adapt to survive at its current location or move. The surrounding communities formed the Zoo Area Progressive Partnership in the mid-1990s for the purpose of getting the Jackson Zoo involved to improve the west Jackson neighborhoods around it. A representative from ZAPP joined Zoo Director Beth Poff in leading a group that met Sept. 25 at Jackson Restaurant Supply to discuss problems the zoo faces and ways the community can get involved. Jackson Zoo Director Beth Poff opened the meeting by describing the appeal process the zoo’s leadership is undergoing in order to remain Mississippi’s only accredited zoo. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums denied the zoo’s request for re-accreditation in early September, Poff says, on the grounds that the zoo was not financially stable. Since then, Jackson leadership has pledged to help fund the zoo’s budget (which was $1.4 million in 2012), with the city picking up the overwhelming bulk. Now, Poff believes the appeal process will go smoothly. “We have a nice letter from (Mayor Chokwe Lumumba) pledging his support, and I’m confident that we’ll win our appeal because the only problem they listed on our review was an uncertainty around our funding,� Poff said. “In the meantime, we remain an AZAaccredited zoo.�

Even if the Jackson Zoo retains its accreditation, questions remain about its long-term viability in its west Jackson neighborhood.

city to immediately disburse $418,472 to the zoo, as the mayor explained, so they would have cash-on-hand when it turned in it’s appeal proposal. Quentin Whitwell, Ward 1, and De’Keither Stamps, Ward 4, voted against it, even after City Council President Charles Tillman urged his council colleagues to support the measure. After speaking privately with Tillman, Stamps called for a motion to reconsider the item, but that call, which required unanimous consent, failed when Whitwell maintained his position. AZA-accredited zoos have exchange programs for animals, for breeding or health-care-related reasons, where zoos trade animals for specified periods of time. Poff said a number of the zoo’s 750-plus animals are on loan from other zoos or are “visiting� for mating purposes. If the zoo lost its accreditation, it would have to let all of its affiliated partners know, which

dling attendance numbers that do not support spending on exhibits and staff. Poff said that zoo spent millions on its exhibits in the past decade, yet it has experienced stagnant visitor numbers. Something has to give, she said, because the zoo’s attendance isn’t half of what it should be for a region the size of the greater Jackson metro area. “We’re going through a situation now where we are having to shrink the size of our staff,â€? Poff said. “We have to have a staff to match our attendance, and if our attendance is only going to be 100,000 visitors a year, we’ve got to find a way to pay (payroll and expenses). With our metro area, we should be (hosting) 230,000 visitors a year, so what’s wrong? We’ve had $12 million in new exhibits in the past 10 years, so what’s wrong? ‌ That’s what the board has to wrestle with. We have to have a hard direction—it’s either fix where

we are, get the help of (the area) around us to come up to a certain level, or maybe the zoo is in the wrong spot.� ZAPP is one organization trying to keep the zoo in west Jackson, but others are trying to help solve the zoo’s problems as well. Under the leadership of Phil Reed, the non-profit Voice of Calvary Ministries has renovated and rented dozens of houses in west and south Jackson. Reed lives within walking distance of the zoo, and has spoken to the Jackson City Council and the zoo’s leadership on behalf of the community. “I’m hopeful that the zoo is going to regain its status in terms of accreditation,� Reed said. “I understand it’s rare for (the AZA) to overturn a ruling on an appeal, but I think we’ve got a solid case, and we ought to get it.� Reed says he got involved with zoo issues when he realized the community around the zoo in west Jackson did not have sufficient representation in the conversation that seemed to be playing out in the newspapers. “All of us in the community realize that we needed to embrace the zoo and help improve the area,� Reed said. “Getting the accreditation is a first big step, and I think they will have a good case (due to) community support as well as financial support. “We may eventually get to the point where it would make sense for the zoo to move,� Reed said. “I don’t see it like that right now, but maybe it’s in the zoo’s best interest. And maybe there’s something more profitable for our community that (it) could use the land for—it is right on the medical corridor. I just think the community needs to be involved. It’s got to be an inclusive process.� Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.



     

October 2 - 8, 2013

     



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CUPSESPRESSOCAFE.COM


TALK | county

Battle of Hinds County: Round 2 by R.L. Nave

R.L. NAVE

ment. When you go to open space like that, that takes a lot of space and a lot of money. ... I support the parkway, but I’m not a stern supporter of the current alignment.” The winner of Democratic runoff in District 4 will face Republican Tony Greer in the November general election. Greer has not responded to interview requests from the JFP. After an intense nine-person race for District 2, the county’s largest geographic district, Darrel McQuirter will square off against Willie Earl Robinson in the Democratic runoff. Both men are department heads for Hinds County: McQuirter oversees planning and zoning, Robinson the county’s central repair division. McQuirter, 51, was Clinton’s fire chief from 1998 to 2005. He echoed many of his fellow candidates, citing curbing crime and growing the county’s tax rolls as keystones of a comeback strategy to make Hinds County more attractive to business investors and families. “Hinds County is unique,” McQuirter said in an interview before the primary. “It’s in the center of the state. It’s at the crossroads between New Orleans and Memphis. It’s between Dallas and Atlanta, and we’re not taking advantage of (traffic). It comes through here, but it doesn’t stop. We need to figure out a way to get things to stop here.” Robinson has not agreed to interview requests. The Hinds County Democratic Executive Committee will host a forum between the District 2 and District 4 runoff candidates Oct. 3 at 6 p.m. at Metrocenter Mall, located at 1395 Metrocenter Drive in Jackson. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

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he fields have narrowed—some- Jerry Hopkins bowed out of the District Former Vicksburg Mayor Robert what—and only a few contenders 4 race. On Sept. 24, Hopkins edged out Walker is temporarily in the District remain for two seats on the Hinds James “Lap” Baker, 353 votes to Baker’s 4 seat that Republican Phil Fisher jetCounty Board of Supervisors. 316, setting up an Oct. 8 runoff. Amos- tisoned to become mayor of Clinton. That’s assuming the courts don’t in- Norris told the Jackson Free Press that Like Fisher, Maldonado supports the tervene first. David Archie, the third-place Hopkins dropped out of the race because long-in-the-works Byram-Clinton Parkfinisher in last week’s Democratic primary “he looked at the numbers” and didn’t like way project. for Hinds County’s District 2 seat, wants a his chances. “That’s an untapped resource right new election and is suing his there. We’ve spent so much own party to get it. Archie, money on it, we can’t just 49, alleges that “tampering” leave it unfinished,” Maldoand voter confusion resulted nado said. in the district-wide apathy He added that he would that suppressed votes in the like to bolster tourism in the District 2 primary Sept. 24. county, particularly through Archie aimed his critipromoting the Jackson Zoo, cism at the voting system, which is in the middle of a which required voters to fill battle over its accreditation. in an oval next to the name “We don’t have any elof their candidate of choice. ephants at the zoo. That’s He complained that officials a big draw-in factor there,” rejected ballots marked with said Maldonado, who once an “X” or a checkmark. The worked at the zoo. ballot form indicates that Baker, who retired from only ballots with filled-in the public-works department bubbles would be counted. earlier this year, is also in fa“There’s a problem with vor of developing the ByramMichael Maldonado, a former Hinds County deputy, squeaked his way into the Democratic runoff for District 4 supervisor. He faces those outdated paper ballots Clinton Parkway but does recently retired public-works manager James “Lap” Baker Oct. 8. in 2013,” Archie said. not support new construction Jacqueline R. Amosfor it. Instead, Baker said the Norris, chairwoman of the parkway should link existing Hinds County Democratic Executive As a result, third-place finisher Mike thoroughfares. Committee, had little to say about Archie’s Maldonado, who received 160 votes, will “When we did the study for Hinds lawsuit this week. She said the party certi- face Baker in the runoff. Until January County, we looked at six corridor alignfied the results and was looking ahead to 2012, Maldonado served as a captain with ments. The No. 1 alignment came from Thursday, Oct. 3, when the party hosts a the Hinds County Sheriff’s Office and (Interstate) 55 on Siwell Road to Davis forum for the runoff candidates. counts combating crime and emergency Road, cut across Davis Road, hooked into “I have no response. David Archie operations as two of his top priorities. Mal- Springridge Road and came all the way lost. We’re moving on,” she said. donado, who now works as a homeland-se- up. This is an existing thoroughfare so A somewhat bizarre set of events in curity and training coordinator for the state, that’s less cost—and it went directly into the Democratic primary for District 4 will noted that Hinds is not only Mississippi’s Clinton,” Baker explained during a JFP pit two former Hinds County employees largest county but that the state fairgrounds interview in August. against one another. Two days after a first- serves as a staging ground for evacuees from “It could be a viable transportation place finish in the Democratic primary, the coast during hurricanes. corridor if it goes back to the original align-

9


TALK | business WARD SHAEFER

Metrocenter For Sale by Tyler Cleveland

A

fter a year of being revamped and renovated, Metrocenter mall is up for sale. Real-estate broker The Overby Company is listing the mall, excluding several attached department stores, for $6.5 million. Among the parts of the mall that are not for sale are the former Dillard’s and Belk department stores, which the city of Jackson leases from owner Retro Metro, and the Burlington Coat Factory store, which is owned by that company. The Sears department store is also for sale (the store closed in 2012), but it is owned by Sears and not included in that $6.5 million listing. Overby did not reveal its asking price. In October 2012, First Credit Bank of Los Angeles foreclosed on Jackson Metrocenter Mall LTD, a Texas-based company. First Credit Bank hired management firm Oversight LLC, to bring the mall up-to-date and get it ready for sale. “They brought us in to stabilize it,” Metrocenter Operations Manager David Sewell said. “That’s what we’ve tried to do. “ Under Oversight’s management, available space for new tenants doubled from

175,000 to 350,000 square feet. Manager Scott Overby oversaw the creation of the 60,000-square-foot La Plaza de Metrocenter, an area geared toward Latino-owned and operated stores. The food court added several new vendors, including Mac’s Pizza and Sameerah’s (a health-food store), and local chef Tina Funches has opened a soul-food joint called Southern Kitchen that serves breakfast, blue-plate lunches and supper. “The prospective buyer, whoever it is, is likely to be someone who invests in shopping malls,” Sewell said. “We’ve got a great staff. There are (employees) here who have been here 20-plus years.” Metrocenter opened in 1978 as one of the first major malls in the Jackson area, but it fell on hard times for numerous reasons. First among them was white flight, which led to competition from other, newer malls. Northpark Mall in Ridgeland opened in 1984. “Suburban lifestyle” centers opened later—including Ridgeland’s Renaissance at Colony Park, and Dogwood Festival Market and Promenade in Flowood. By fall of last year, the mall’s conditions deteriorated due to budget cuts, despite attempts to reduce operating costs by

partitioning sections of the mall. The effort backfired when many of Metrocenter’s national tenants refused to relocate without financial concessions and simply closed their stores. That left the ma- Real-estate broker The Overby Company has listed jority of the lower level Metrocenter Mall for sale for $6.5 million. of the building abandoned. Mall management suspended janitorial and maintenance Stamps said he would like to see anothservices in the area. Oversight management er piece of property developed in the vicinity. reopened the lower level; however, more than The approximately 60 acres of land along the 50 percent of the store spaces are vacant. back side of the mall, opposite the entrance Jackson’s Ward 4 Councilman that faces Highway 80, one of Jackson’s busiDe’Keither Stamps applauded the mall est thoroughfares. management team’s attempts to appeal to “(The land in the back,) it’s just a woodthe greater Jackson area’s Latino population. ed area,” Stamps said. “If we could convince In fact, he wants to see more grouping of ser- someone to open some kind of attraction vices going forward. there, it would bring the traffic from (U.S. “We don’t have centralized services for Interstate 220), Highway 80 and Highway people,” Stamps said. “It’s scattered all over 18, some of the busiest roads in Jackson, town. I think there is opportunity to work around the mall.” with some educational pieces, like a Virginia Part of the land Stamps referenced is College-type of business that will create more among the 45 acres included in the property business around it.” Overby has listed for sale.

Jackson State University & MS Film Institute PRESENTS 4th Annual MS International Film Festival

October 25­26­27 

xxx/cvuufsgmzzphb/ofu

Davis Planetarium 

WeeklySchedule

    DOWNTOWN  JXN, MS

Red Carpet Gala Friday 6pm­8pm 

Honoring 40th Anniversary  of the MS Film Commission with Special Guest:  Director Robert Schnitzer The Premonition, 1975

• 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo

• 12-1 pm Level 1

• 5:30 pm Level 2

• 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

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• 12-1 pm Level 1

• 12-12:45 pm Tabatas

• 5:15 pm Tabatas

• 5:30 Level 1

INDIE FILMS

(6 for $50/$10 drop in)

WORKSHOPS October 2 - 8, 2013

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(screening following)

Fri. 11­11 Sat. 10­11

10

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Sat. 11­until

• 6-7:15 pm Level 1

2013

Sat. noon­ late IN THE LOBBY Costumes are encouraged  during the entire film fest

f www.msfilm.org for more info msfilmfest

all events free to the public

Xfeoftebz • 10-10:45 am Tabatas • 12-1 pm Restorative Yoga • 5:30 Yoga from the Core

Tbuvsebz • 9-10:15 am Level I • 10:30 Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz • 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga (see Facebook for location) • 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

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25th Anniversary

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 A SPECIAL limited edition Commemorative Medal will be awarded to ALL race finishers.

ROUTE: The 5-mile race starts at the Old Mississippi River Bridge located at I-20 and Washington Street, crosses the Old Mississippi River Bridge, and ends back at Vicksburg.

RACE TIMES: 8:00 am for 5-Mile Run and 5-Mile Walk & 1-Mile Fun Run will follow (No headphones, rollerblades, strollers, bicycles or animals allowed on the course)! DIRECTED BY: The Mississippi Track Club, Grand Prix Event Proceeds to benefit The Southern Cultural Heritage Foundation

For more information www.southernculture.org Additional Support: Budweiser | City of Vicksburg | Coca-Cola | Coomes Produce | Gulf States Golf Cars Waste Management | Woodmen of the World

October 3 Eric Benet MS State Fair–Budweiser Pavilion October 4 Halestorm MS State Fair–Budweiser Pavilion October 5 JSU vs. Arkansas Pine Bluff Football Veterans Memorial Stadium October 5 Faith & Family Night: Casting Crowns, Britt Nicole, !"##$%&'"#(&$)* MS State Fair–MS Coliseum

jacksonfreepress.com

October 9-11 +,-./0%&1*2$%3,#$ MS Ag Museum For a complete listing of all Jackson events, hit visitjackson.com

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Help When It’s Needed

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ears ago when I was a young mother, I worked two, sometimes three, low-wage restaurant jobs. This was not easy work. It was extraordinarily taxing—not only on my body but my mind. Wait staff have a lot of tasks to complete. Plus, they have to smile and be pleasant even when customers and management serve up a big old side of mistreatment. Working those kinds of jobs always involves much more hard work than money, which is why I had two and three at a time. But even when I worked two full-time and one part-time job, I still couldn’t make ends meet. Recently, fast-food workers across the country went on strike. They asked for something fairly simple: a living wage. Make no mistake: The multinational companies that employ these workers can afford to pay better. But many from the right-wing political sphere called striking workers greedy, lazy and un-American. Fast-forward to the congressional debate over food-stamp benefits (or SNAP), which has the potential to affect many of these same workers. I keep hearing from conservatives—and even some liberals—that “those people� just need to work harder. If only “they� would do that, then the collective American “we� wouldn’t have to take care of “them.� The problem with that thinking is that many people who receive SNAP do work. Surprisingly absent from the broader discussion of responsibility has been the topic of corporate responsibility in the matter. When companies pay their employees fairly, people who work don’t need food stamps. I find this disjointed thinking odd and non-congruent. It seems as if, in the eyes of some, the working poor are wrong no matter what they do. In all my working years—on and off public assistance—I have contributed to the community. I am raising epic, awesome kids (yes, I am biased). I resent it when others imply that because people need assistance to put food on the table, they are drug addicts, lazy or worth less than other people. Every person on assistance has a story. Some may have stories you approve of, and some may not. At the end of the day, I would like to think I live in a country that believes even people we don’t like deserve to eat, one that is willing to feed people in need even when we don’t approve of every food choice. I want to have faith that I live in a country that believes providing free school lunches to hungry children is a good and moral thing to do. I hope my country shows me I’m right.

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12

Why it stinks: Palazzo is one of the Republican congressional “leaders� responsible for the government shutdown that began at 12:01 a.m. Oct. 1 because lawmakers could not agree on funding to keep the government open. The USA Today story reports that the Mississippi Gulf Coast Honor Flight escorted 91 Gulf Coast World War II veterans to the World War II Memorial; however, the shutdown mandated that the National Park Service put up barricades around National Mall memorials. The Smithsonian Institution museums—all huge tourist draws—also closed, and millions of workers were furloughed or asked to work without pay. That’s madness, all right—one of Palazzo’s own making.

The Power We Consume

P

resident Barack Obama’s administration recently set tough emission standards for electric utility companies that still rely heavily on burning carbon-heavy fossil fuels such as natural gas and coal. Generally, utilities accept that fossil-fuel power will become an increasingly smaller part of our electricity infrastructure, but many utilities still cling to the idea that coal remains the most sensible option for generating electric power in the medium term. To boot, coal and other powerful interests have seen to it that elected officials echo that coal meme. Probably not coincidentally, the biggest player on the congressional scene is Southern Co., which is building a coal plant in Kemper County under the auspices of its subsidiary, Mississippi Power Co. The plant has been mired in controversy, cost overruns and delays for close to three years. Kemper IGCC, as it’s known, is supposedly a shining example of so-called clean-coal technology. It is engineered to run on lignite coal, which is common in Mississippi but of such poor quality that a commercially untested technology had to be designed to burn the stuff. Environmentalists have criticized the power plant as costly, dirty and unnecessary. They’re probably right, but a few important ideas have been absent from the debate over Kemper IGCC and coal. To be sure, tragedies such as the Upper Big Branch mine explosion in West Virginia in 2010

and the BP Gulf oil disaster of the same year make Big Coal and Big Oil easy targets for our national disdain. It’s also easy, if not apt, to blame the government for not investing enough in renewable alternatives to dirty fuels. Case in point: Funding for the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Lab in Golden, Colo., shrunk to $352 million in fiscal year 2012 from an all-time high (but still relatively paltry) $536.5 million in 2010. But it’s also high time for us to look inward. The truth is, Americans use a lot of electricity powering our laptops, tablets, mobile phones and other toys. Specifically, the U.S. ranks second only to Canada in daily kilowatt-hours—the unit of measurement that electric utilities use to bill customers—consumed per capita. Electric power consumption in the United States (the third largest overall electricity user in the world) and emerging economies of China and India (the world’s No. 1 and No. 2 electricity users) has resulted in global climate change. Yes, the government should do more to slow climate change. Yes, we should urge our representatives to invest in renewable energy. In the meantime, we should each think about the power we individually use and overuse: electricity. We are the first line of defense, and we can’t expect power companies and politicians to change their behavior until we’re willing to change our own.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn� and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


JOE ATKINS

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Justin Hosemann, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Intern Lindsay Fox Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

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XFORD—The letters from Edwards, Miss., began arriving around 11 years ago. The penmanship was a big, wild scrawl not always easy to read. Jumping off those pages, however, was the passion of the writer. “There will be unions in the South in time because it is right,” lawyer and former journalist Sander P. “Sandy” Margolis wrote in one of them, responding to a column of mine about unions and the raw deal working-class people get. Then, in big, capital letters, he offered a quote from Eleanor Roosevelt. “YOU GAIN STRENGTH, COURAGE, AND CONFIDENCE BY EVERY EXPERIENCE IN WHICH YOU REALLY STOP TO LOOK FEAR IN THE FACE. YOU MUST DO THE THING YOU THING YOU CANNOT DO.” I miss getting those letters. Sandy Margolis, the last of the letter writers, died at age 74 two years ago this September. His had been a long illness, and the letters had stopped long before. Still, I knew that as long as Sandy Margolis was breathing, things like justice, truth and honor had a champion. A Virginia native, he came from a Jewish immigrant family with roots in Lithuania. A grandfather lived in South Africa, and an uncle once wrote for the Yiddish newspaper, the Jewish Daily Forward, in New York City. His parents struggled during the Depression. His father lacked education and lost his job, but “FDR’s New Deal gave him hope for employment and a better life,” Sandy said. They lost family members to the Holocaust. In the Margolis household, politics and social justice were part of the regular conversation. “My father … saw through Nixon’s ‘Southern Strategy’ in 1968. He remembered when LBJ said after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that ‘we’ve lost the South.’ But my father never let racism dishonor his soul,” Sandy wrote. Sandy studied at the University of Virginia and Notre Dame and got his law degree at Ole Miss. He worked as a liberal reporter and columnist in political boss Harry Byrd’s Virginia during the time of massive resistance to racial integration. He marched with Martin Luther King Jr., A. Philip Randolph, United Auto Workers leader Walter Reuther, and many thousands of others in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He wrote columns for different newspapers, worked as a lawyer and, until he became ill, fired off letters to the editor— perhaps the last place in the world where people still actually write letters. Ah, those letters! Whether to me or to a newspaper, they were full of fire. Af-

ter Republican Haley Barbour’s election as governor of Mississippi in 2003—a campaign in which Barbour brandished his state flag lapel pin with its Confederate insignia and allowed his image on the ultra-right-wing Committee of Conservative Citizens’ website—Sandy wrote this in a letter to The Clarion-Ledger: “He orchestrated a racist campaign. He knew that playing the ‘race card’ works in Mississippi. … Will Haley Barbour now seek the way of honor and apologize to African Americans for his campaign methods?” Those words produced an outcry. Another letter writer responded angrily by linking Sandy with columnist Bill Minor and yours truly as three “hysterical” liberals unable to cope with Barbour’s victory. Sandy said he was proud to be in such company. The Margolis pen was just as sharp in a column as in a personal letter. “The promotion of extreme corporate wealth and favoritism is corrupting and corroding the bedrock institutions of our republic,” he wrote in a piece for the now-defunct alternative publication Planet Weekly in 2004. “Even the press and media, the sentinels of our liberty, are being subverted by corporate ownership and used as public relations and propaganda tools.” Like the great crusading Jewish journalists Abraham Cahan, George Seldes and I.F. Stone, Sandy was an unabashed intellectual. His writings are replete with quotes—Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt, Edmund Burke, Lewis Carroll, William Faulkner. Here’s one he sent me from FDR, again in letters as big as his laugh: “THE TEST OF OUR PROGRESS IS NOT WHETHER WE ADD MORE TO THE ABUNDANCE OF THOSE WHO HAVE MUCH; IT IS WHETHER WE PROVIDE ENOUGH FOR THOSE WHO HAVE TOO LITTLE.” Although proud of his Jewish heritage, he admitted he was “not a formally religious person.” Yet, he said, “we must treat every human being as a child of God, with justice, mercy and love.” His wife, Alice and, his daughters, Kate and Amanda, keep his memory alive. And now maybe I’m helping a little, too. A postcard from Sandy and Alice hangs on the wall next to my desk, and I’ll never forget what they wrote. “We believe you have a Jewish heart because you believe in justice and truth and honor.” No letter has ever pleased me more than that card. Joe Atkins is a veteran journalist, columnist and professor of journalism at the University of Mississippi. His blog is laborsouth.blogspot.com. Email him at jbatkins@ olemiss.edu.

jacksonfreepress.com

Last of the Letter Writers

13


1060 E County Line Road Ridgeland, Ms

601.899.0038 www.burgersblues.com

LET US CATER YOUR PARTY OR EVENT

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ach year for more than a decade now, the Jackson Free Press has let readers vote for their favorite local businesses, organizations and people. Folks across the metro area get geared up to campaign for the Best of Jackson awards. To kick off the 2014 campaign season, the Jackson Free Press is listing the Best of Jackson 2013 winners each week until we release the ballot on Nov. 6. Think you have what it takes to join the ranks of the Best of Jackson champions? Well, here are the ones to beat! Let the campaigning begin!

Burger Bars • Blue Plates Pulled Pork Plates • Chick Bite Trays Wrap and Sandwich Trays

Your #1 burger place is also your #1 caterer!

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COURTESY DJ YOUNG VENOM

136 S. Adams Street Jackson (Located on Metro Parkway) 601.960.3008 koinoniacoffee.net

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15


Fighting the Power in Kemper County by R.L. Nave

photos by Trip Burns

A dragline machine will aid in mining a soft, moist form of coal called lignite, located anywhere from 8 to 150 feet beneath the surface.

October 2 - 8, 2013

B

16

arbara Correro’s house sits just off an unpaved road of sandy, bright-red clay and under a canopy of shortleaf and southern yellow pine, sweetgum, oak, flowering dogwood, elm and hickory trees. A few years ago, she built a deck on the front of her mobile home made out of wood from fallen trees in her 28-acre forest. Some years, she lacquers the porch with the spent motor oil from her car. Correro considers herself a naturalist. She keeps an organic garden and a few chickens, and cans the occasional jar of honey from her neighbor’s bees to take to friends. A retired oncology nurse, she’s vigilant about the relationship between the environment and human health. When she retired from her job at an Atlanta hospital, Correro returned to Kemper County, where her family has owned land for generations and where her son, Michael, lives. For the past two years, though, life in Kemper County’s Moscow and Damascus communities has been anything but idyllic. Correro recently started noticing an uptick in the number of animals that inhabit the forest on her land. There are more owls in the trees and, for the first

time, raccoons and opossum trying to get into her chicken feed. The chickens themselves haven’t been so lucky. In the past year, she’s lost 11 chickens, she believes, to an increased number of foxes. Some of the wildlife appears emaciated, as if they aren’t eating enough, Correro’s chickens not withstanding.

“It’s just heartbreaking to me,” she said. Correro lays blame for the nature disruption at the feet of Mississippi Power Co. and the power plant and coal mine it’s been building since late 2010. Correro and others complain that RV parks have sprung up, and residents have started renting rooms to cash in and ac-

A retired nurse, Barbara Correro hoped to enjoy the peaceful environs of Kemper County. Since Mississippi Power Co. started construction on its power plant less than three miles from her home, Correro said life has been less than idyllic.

commodate the approximately 6,000 construction workers who are feverishly trying to get the plant completed by spring 2014. In recent months, the amount of work—and, by extension, the noise, dust and number of people—has increased dramatically, Correro said. The first shift starts at 5 a.m., meaning heavy trucks start rolling down U.S. Highway 493 before sunrise. To make room, Mississippi Power has razed some 2,968 acres of forest for the power plant and the accompanying lignite coal mine that will serve as the main feedstock for the 582-megawatt generating station. Once finished, the Ratcliffe plant will start putting electricity onto the grid for 23 counties in southwest Mississippi. Hence, the migration of wildlife to Correro’s forest, she believes. The plant itself is an impressive roughly 300-foot structure that looks so modern and high-tech that the sheiks of Dubai could have imagined it. Mississippi Power has touted the Kemper County plant’s IGCC (integrated gasification combined-cycle) technology, which captures and stores carbon dioxide, as exemplary of the utility’s ability to fight the world’s climate crisis while not turning


construction or for permanent project facilities,” the report states. Information from Mississippi Power has been so closely held (the company declined to make officials available for this story as well) that word-of-mouth and the local rumor mill are the most reliable sources of news about the plant. Back at Barbara Correro’s kitchen table, the neighbors share gossip, which sometimes involves debunking some of the more popular rumors. When Michael Correro starts telling the story about a Kemper worker, who supposedly died from electrocution a few weeks ago, his mother cuts him off. “No, it was a burn, but he survived it,” Barbara informed her son. “But the interesting thing is that they took him to Tennessee,” Michael continued. “Because they’ve got an excellent burn unit,” Barbara explained. Absent any kind of reliable community-engagement apparatus, local Patrick Scott says he is one of very few local residents to have worked at the Kemper residents say they have no choice but to construction site. A retired U.S. Army veteran, Scott describes unspoken tension speculate. The utility does have a combetween workers from different contract companies whose wages can vary widely. munity-relations, Verdell Hawkins, who has an office near the construction hands—between family members a few the creek and is gobbling up more. At site, but locals are largely unaware of times and a couple times between strang- the price of $10,000 to $12,000 an Hawkins’ presence. ers. The current owner leases the prop- acre and lease rates of $300 per square “I don’t know what’s going into the erty to Mississippi Power. foot, the plant paid roughly three times groundwater, I don’t know what’s going Michael Correro is one of the few the market rate before work started on into the air,” said Barbara’s friend Jennipeople on his road who has not sold or U.S. Highway 493. Mississippi Power fer, a former federal employee who asked leased their property. Scrubby sandy lots declined to confirm these sums, citing only to be identified by her first name. once lush with pine, oak and pecan trees confidentiality agreements. Again, the environmental study prosurround his bungalow. Some clues lie within in the 2009 vides some answers to Jennifer’s questions. Near the Chickasawhay Creek, draft environmental-impact study federal Engineers designed Kemper to run which forms the western border of the regulators required of Mississippi Power on technology called TRIG, which conpower plant and mine, Michael Correro before the company could officially start verts lignite coal, which is soft but abundant in Mississippi, into gas. The plant will then burn that gas to power a turbine that will help offset increasing demand Money No Obstacle for electricity in steamy In Barbara Correro’s Mississippi. The process kitchen, cornbread and popromises to capture as tato quiche bake in the oven much as two-thirds of as she pours glasses of unthe carbon dioxide it prosweetened iced green tea for duces rather than letting visitors, which included a it escape into the atmoJackson Free Press reporter sphere like traditional coal and photographer. plants. But lignite is less Correro assembled a energy-dense than coals group of friends and neighthat come from states bors from the nearby Dalike Wyoming and West mascus and Moscow comVirginia, and it contains In early 2014, the three-member Mississippi Public Service Commission will hold what is known as a prudency munities, some of whom more pollutants including hearing that will determine how much of the projected $5 billion Mississippi Power Co. will spend on the Kemper plant can be collected from ratepayers. Pictured from left to right: Lynn Posey of the Central District, Steve have reaped benefits from the sulfur dioxide. Renfroe of the Southern District and Brandon Presley of the Northern District. Kemper County plant but TRIG is designed to generally oppose it. But all separate those harmful byare worried about the long-term effects notices a new fence. He says rust-col- work. products, and the plant could sell some of of the power plant and lignite mine. ored gates in the driveways of handsome “Mississippi Power plans to acquire the waste, including anhydrous ammonia “The traffic is a nuisance, but that ranch-style houses that are now boarded additional properties adjacent to the pro- and carbon dioxide, as commodities. is not the issue here,” said Correro’s son, up and fenced off make it easy to identify posed power-plant site for use as buffer In the mid-1990s, Southern Co., Michael, who lives about a half mile up properties the mine operators now own. areas. Approximately 1,400 acres of land started developing the TRIG technolthe road from his mother. “Money appears to be no obsta- immediately north and east of the site ogy along with one of the world’s largSituated between them is an 88- cle,” he said. have been acquired, optioned or identi- est engineering firms, KBR, which was acre tract of land that belonged to CorNeighbors wonder why the compa- fied for acquisition. None of the planned more KEMPER, see page 18 rero family members before it changed ny has bought most of the land around buffer land would be used during project

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away from a useful, plentiful natural resource: coal. Since its inception, the Kemper plant—the first of its kind to operate commercially the United States—has been steeped in controversy. Construction costs have more than doubled from the original estimated price tag of $1.8 billion; they’re now closer to $5 billion. Officially, the Mississippi Public Service Commission, which regulates utilities in the state, capped construction costs at $2.4 billion. However, Mississippi Power can ask for permission to charge its customers more during so-called prudency hearings scheduled to take place the first part of 2014. In the meantime, the company has already received the OK to raise electricity rates 15 percent this year, and it has approval to charge another 3 percent increase in 2014, even though critics believe the actual increases will be much higher. Arguably, residents next door to the plant in rural Kemper County will feel the longest-lasting effects. From up to two miles away, they can hear beeps from the massive dirt movers and other construction sounds coming from the site. At night, neighbors describe the light emanating from the plant as similar to that of an international airport. Correro and her neighbors look forward to the work being done on the plant—though many express skepticism about the stated end date—when the sounds of construction will go away, and the local highways during a shift change no longer resemble Southern California’s gridlock. The locals want to feel comfortable keeping their doors unlocked at night once more. But even then, many fear that life in rural Kemper County will never be the same.

17


Kemper

from page 17

October 2 - 8, 2013

part of Halliburton until 2006. Southern and KBR agreed that if the first facility in Mississippi proved successful, the partners could sell the technology to customers around the globe. The companies inked a deal with Denbury Resources, which buys carbon dioxide and injects it into fallow oil fields to recover oil that is too deep for the conventional oil drilling technology of the 1950s, 60s and 70s. Authors Dub Taft and Sam Heys explain the TRIG technology in Southern Co.’s corporate biography “Big Bets,” available as a free download on Southern Co.’s website. “I think those two projects are demonstrations that Southern Company is committed to leading-edge technology and finding solutions to move forward in how we make and use energy,” David Ratcliffe, Southern Co.’s former CEO and namesake of the Kemper generation facility internally called Plant Ratcliffe, told the authors of “Big Bets.” “It is truly 21st-century technology.”

18

A Heavy Load In its literature about the Kemper plant, Mississippi Power’s position is that the state is growing and needs more electricity-generating capacity. “We need a large power plant to meet future energy-load growth. The Kemper County energy facility will help us to continue to serve our customers with reliable, affordable and environmentally friendly electricity,” the company states on its website’s frequently asked questions page for the plant. The U.S. Department of Energy, which has supported the Kemper project, echoes this view. In 2009, the DOE noted in its energy profile for Mississippi that the state’s “electric power production is low given its high per-capita consumption, and as a result, the state imports electricity from neighboring states in order to satisfy consumer demand.” With the exception of one other mine in Choctaw County that supplies lignite coal to Mississippi Power’s Red Hills plant, Mississippi utilities import most of the fuel used by coal-fired generators from relatively close states such as Kentucky and Illinois. Some coal comes from as far away as Colorado. Entergy Corp., headquartered in New Orleans, runs the state’s only nuclear facility: the Grand Gulf Nuclear Generating Station near Port Gibson. The approximately 1-gigawatt reactor provides electricity to a quarter of Mississippi, including Jackson. Dr. Francis Tuluri, an associate professor of physics at Jackson State University, believes increasing the nation’s nuclear capacity is a good idea, in addition to investing heavily in renewable energy.

Michael Correro is an avowed environmentalist and lives up the road from his mother, Barbara, in Kemper County. From his front yard, he can hear the ___din of construction going on two miles away at the Kemper power plant.

Because of lack of residential spaces to house the 6,000 construction workers building the power plant, temporary RV parks have sprung up around Kemper County.

“Solar energy was considered, and a lot of research was promoted 10 to 15 years ago on photovoltaic cells and semiconductor technology, but not much impetus is there,” to promote large-scale production, he said. Tuluri draws a parallel between using coal and using oil, another energy addic-

tion that America has not shown the political will or cultural appetite to move off. “Even for the past 10 years, the United States was considering automotive reforms but did not go ahead with new regulations or reforms because the abundance of gasoline is still there—and for years to come,” Tuluri said.

Barbour’s Baby Jennifer, Barbara Correro’s friend and neighbor, said she might not be so suspicious of Mississippi Power and as vehemently opposed to the Kemper plant if the politics that birthed it were less dubious. “Coming from a federal contracts background, I was only allowed to accept a coffee cup with a contractor’s name on it, and I had to report a lunch that was over five bucks. It’s a little tricky when you start looking at how this came to be,” she said of the plant’s political origins. In June 2008, then-Gov. Haley Barbour took to the podium for the traditional gubernatorial keynote at the Neshoba County Fair. Barbour, who was in his second term, wore a red-and-blue plaid shirt and dark jeans, and made an oft-repeated gag about his spouse of 25 years, Marsha, being a trophy wife. He then talked about developing the state’s energy economy. The capstone of Barbour’s energy policy was the then-recently proposed $1.8 billion coal-gasification power plant in Kemper County. It would be the first commercial facility in the U.S. to capture and sequester carbon, and one of only a handful of new coal plants built in the U.S. in the past decade. “Our energy policy is more energy,” Barbour quipped. In the ensuing five years, Kemper has consumed a tremendous amount of energy, politically speaking. The energy is necessary partly because of activism from environmental groups like the San Francisco-based Sierra Club—which usually shows up with lawsuits—and partly because utilities themselves started seeing the writing on the wall. Old, dirty coal plants represent a huge liability for them. Louie Miller, state director of the Mississippi Sierra Club, which has somewhat slowed the plant’s progress through the courts, said the latest cost overruns have demonstrated what his organization has said in court filings and public statements. “The wheels are wobbling on this thing and, in all likelihood, (they’re) going to come off,” Miller said. Mississippi Power is doing everything it can to prevent that. Shortly after receiving regulatory approval for the plant in 2008, Mississippi Power hired a small army of a dozen lobbyists. From 2010 to 2012, the company spent $500,000 on lobbyist salaries. The lobbyists themselves doled out thousands of dollars worth of meals to state lawmakers, their staffs and spouses. Meanwhile, Southern Co. retained Barbour’s lobbying firm, the BGR Group. Since 2000, Southern Co. has paid BGR Group more than $2.6 million, according to a database run by the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit Center for Responsive Politics. During


people through a program it helped launch at East Mississippi Community College in nearby Scooba. “I know two that didn’t know how to do nothing. I mean nothing. And (Mississippi Power) hired them, and they

was part of the Keep Mississippi Beautiful campaign. The company also awards scholarships for Kemper County students to study engineering-related trades and, eventually, work at the Kemper site.

‘Super Jobs’ Kemper County consistently ranks as one of Mississippi’s poorest. As of July 2013, only six counties had higher unemployment rates than Kemper. State Sen. Sampson Jackson, a Democrat from Preston, said that when the plant is finished, some of the workers might be able to secure employment with the coal mine. He also sees opportunities for ancillary, related and research-and-development businesses to locate nearby. “They’re super jobs. Anybody who wants to work can get a job there,” Jackson said. James Hurtt is a plumbing contractor who hoped to land one of the plant’s lucrative subcontracts, but said he only received an invitation to bid on a few jobs. He was not successful in winning those bids. “A local man can’t afford to work over there,” he said in a telephone interview. “I own my own business, and they offered me $12 (per hour) to come over there and work. I haven’t worked for that since the 80s.” Residents complain that Mississippi Power hired far fewer local people than the company promised. As of July, the utility reported to the public-service commission that 1,932 Mississippians are employed as construction workers, but the company does not break the information down by county. Patrick Scott, an Army veterMississippi Power has been busy buying up land along the Chickasawhay Creek and other an who lives in the area, disagrees waterways for reasons local residents do not fully understand.The specs for the Kemper County with Jackson’s assessment of the power plant do not call for water discharge. quality of the plant’s employment offerings. Scott said a friend helped him get a truck-driving job because he heard trained them, and they’re working out,” Although some neighbors seem rethe contractor was offering $14 per hour, Jackson said. signed that they’ll just have to live with but when he accepted the position he the Kemper plant, others say that some learned that the rate was $11. Ordinary People hope rests in a case pending with the MisWages vary from job to job and beThe six people gathered around Bar- sissippi State Supreme Court and with tween contractors, but Scott believes he bara Correro’s kitchen table readily ad- the so-called prudency hearing scheduled was laid off for raising a ruckus about the mit that if a Mississippi Power executive for next spring when the utility will ask pay differences between people doing asked for suggestions on how to alleviate the Public Service Commission for final similar jobs. their concern, their response would be a approval to charge its customers for the Sen. Jackson admitted that there resounding “go away.” plant’s costs, including overruns. might be a shortage of local workers for As such, the company has no inThomas Blanton, a Mississippi Powsome of the positions requiring more centive to improve its approach to com- er customer who lives Hattiesburg, sued specialized skills (he also suggested that munity engagement, they acknowledge. the company last year, arguing that the a handful of people who did not get jobs For its part, Mississippi Power points 2008 Baseload Act, which permits the did not meet the drug- and alcohol-free to community-service initiatives it utility to charge customers for Kemper’s workplace requirements). However, Jack- launched that benefit the area, including construction costs before it is complete, is son said Mississippi Power trained many a neighborhood cleanup in DeKalb that tantamount to an unconstitutional tax.

Louie Miller of the Sierra Club argues that Mississippi Power’s ratepayers should be off the hook for every dollar over what it would have cost to build a natural-gas plant of comparable megawattage. Brandon Presley, the Democratic Northern District commissioner on the three-member Public Service Commission, has consistently opposed what he calls making guinea pigs of Mississippi citizens. Like Blanton, Presley believes the Baseload Act is unconstitutional. He declined to discuss the prudency hearing, which remains on the commission’s docket. “I believe in pay-as-you-go, I just don’t believe in pay-before-you-go. I feel like if it’s such a good deal, they could have gone to Wall Street and gotten private investment to pay for it instead of making the ratepayers shoulder the burden,” Presley said. Kemper County is not in Mississippi Power’s service area. Kemper residents get their power from a rural electric cooperative, and will not experience power-rate increases. That’s not to say they won’t feel its effects. “We’re losing our serenity we had here. It’s gone,” said Patrick Scott, who adds that local and state officials are unlikely to suffer political consequences from the unpopular decisions related to the Kemper plant. “Most people are not concerned with politics until election time comes, so there’s a good chance that nothing’s going to happen. Most people are going to go cast their votes for all the same people who allowed all this stuff to happen,” he said. “I wasn’t as outspoken as I should’ve been. Maybe we could have defeated the thing and kept it away from here.” Kenny Miles, a quiet bear of a man with a long, white beard, has profited from the plant by renting out several properties he owns to Kemper workers, despite his opposition to the plant and the lignite mine. But he disagrees with Scott that the community has not pushed back hard enough against Mississippi Power. As evidence, Miles points to the people sitting around Barbara Correro’s table, whose opposition to the plant has strengthened their bond as neighbors and friends. “Well, they come in here because it’s the poorest part of the state,” Miles said. “They thought there would be so many ignorant people that would be so greedy to get that little dab of money, but there has been a tremendous amount of smart people that has stood up to them.” Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. Comment at www.jfp.ms. 19 jacksonfreepress.com

his reign as Mississippi’s governor, Barbour said he placed his BGR assets into a blind trust; however, when his second term ended in 2012, Barbour returned to the firm, where he remains a vocal supporter of the Kemper plan.


Ricky Skaggs and Bruce Hornsby with Kentucky Thunder Sunday, October 6, 2013, 6 p.m. Imagine most bluegrass instrumental lineups, and a piano is usually not among them. But the pairing of mandolin-picking icon Ricky Skaggs with legendary pianist and songwriter Bruce Hornsby, who burst onto the music scene in 1986 with “The Way It Is,” results in masterful music. With dozens of awards and millions of albums !"#$%&'()''*%(+',-%./011!%0*$%2"3*!&4%53!(%6"##0&"30('$%"*%(+'73% 2007 album, “Ricky Skaggs & Bruce Hornsby.” The combined magic of high, lonesome harmonies, full-throttle bluegrass picking, and improvisational piano continues with this current tour. For Fans of: Steve Winwood, Del McCoury, Tony Rice

Stuart Little

Family Show

Friday, October 11, 2013, 7 p.m. Aside from the pet cat, Snowbell, it seems that the rest of the Little family sees nothing strange about the youngest son, Stuart. But having a polite, well-dressed mouse as part of an ordinary human family in New York City proves only that small creatures are often quite big when it comes to friendship and bravery. Based on “Stuart Little,” the beloved book by E. B. White, this play by Dallas Children’s 8+'0('3%7!%,"!(%099'0#7*1%("%/7*$'3103('*'3!%(+3":1+%5;(+<130$'3!= For Fans of: Children’s books written by E. B. White, including Stuart Little and Charlotte’s Web.

Michael McDonald

October 2 - 8, 2013

Tuesday, October 15, 2013, 7:30 p.m. | Pre-Show 6 p.m.

20

After decades as a singer and pianist, producing hits with the likes of Steely Dan and The Doobie Brothers, Michael McDonald hasn’t taken +7!%;""(%";;%(+'%9'$0#%";%+7!%!"#"%603''3=%27!%#0('!(%>?-%@A*5*7!+'$% Business,” was released this year and is a collaboration with guitarist Robben Ford. Its style is a bit of a departure from McDonald’s recent penchant for Motown covers and holiday classics, but many of its tracks are sure to please those clamoring for more from this rock legend with the snow-white hair and smooth baritone. For Fans of: Kenny Loggins, Boz Scaggs, The Doobie Brothers

2200 5th Street • Meridian, Mississippi 601-696-2200 • www.msurileycenter.com


FOOD p 22 WELLNESS p 24

Scandinavian Sightseeing by Richard Coupe

S

jacksonfreepress.com

RICHARD COUPE

wallowing hard, I handed the gaily colored bills, warm, ha!), Norwegians can be found sprawled out every- Gauguin and van Gogh and, like them, had a somewhat torwhich reminded me of Monopoly money, to the where, sunbathing in any green space or nearby park bench tured life. He is most famous for his painting “The Scream,” cashier. After parting with the 1,022 kroners, I did a wearing as little clothing as possible. an abstract painting of a figure with his hands to his head and quick calculation in my head and realized that I had We stayed at Marianne’s sister’s apartment a little north an agonizing expression on his face, in front of a swirling orjust spent almost $200 on lunch for five in a glorified cafete- of downtown, but conveniently located near the Metro stop ange sky. Munch actually painted four versions of the paintria. “Welcome to Norway,” I thought, “the country with the in one direction and a tram station in the other. The apart- ing. It is a very powerful piece, evoking a primal response highest standard of living in the world.” ment takes up the top two floors of a building built in the from the viewer. We’ve all been there. When I first considered goOslo has three museums on the Byging to Norway, it was really hard døy peninsula worth seeing, all within walkto think of anything that I knew ing distance of each other: The Viking Ship, about the country, other than it the Kon-Tiki and the Fram Museum. These has some weird-looking extra letmuseums celebrate that explorer spirit that ters in its alphabet. Truth be told, we associate with the Norwegians. I really couldn’t even have picked it The impressive Viking Ships on disout accurately on a map. All those play were recovered from burial mounds. Scandinavian countries sort of run I don’t know much about the Vikings and together—actually, it was fascinatsort of held that popular impression (think ing to realize that Norway, Sweden, Capital One commercials) that they were a Finland and Russia all come tobunch of brigands wearing horned helmets, gether near the Arctic. raping, burning and pillaging the world. Ashamedly, the only thing That still may be true, but they sure could I could recall about Norway was build boats. The workmanship and intricate the movie “Trollhunter” that came detail is astounding. In order to fund craftsout a few years back. What a great man to be able to do that level of work, the movie that was: Shot in the new Vikings must have had an advanced society reality-TV style, it follows three of some type. journalism students conducting The Kon-Tiki Museum makes you reinvestigative work on a mysterious alize what courage (or maybe it was stupidman who turns out to belong to a ity) these guys had in challenging the Pacific secret government agency responOcean on a balsa wood raft with little sailing sible for the country’s trolls. But I experience, all to prove a point. A trip to Norway was an eye-opener for the author, who knew little about the country. couldn’t think of any artists or auFram means “forward” in Norwegian thors or musicians that originated and is the name of a specially built boat used from Norway. for arctic exploration around the turn of the Thinking harder, I thought, wasn’t there a Thor Heyer- 1920s and stretches around the entire block with an open 20th century. The entire vessel is in an A-frame type building dahl of Kon-Tiki fame? And Amundsen, the man who beat square in the middle. The square contained clotheslines, with displays lining the walls at different levels outlining variScott to the South Pole was Norwegian. Of course, we have hordes of bicycles, a small playground, a sandy spot for 20 or ous arctic explorations. The ship itself is open for viewing. the Vikings to consider, too. 30 small barbecues and some picnic tables. A very dangerousBesides these three Viking-based museums, though, So through this curiosity, I was hooked. My daughter’s looking and fragile-feeling spiral staircase connected the two the attraction that meant the most to me was the Nobel best friend, Marianne, a Norwegian she had met while they floors of the apartment, which were sparsely decorated, with Peace Center near the main harbor. It wasn’t an especially both were exchange students in Ecuador, said she would take very white walls and ceiling. great museum, really, when considering the hefty admission a week off and show us around—a deal I couldn’t pass up. The furniture was Birch wood-blond and looked like price and my high expectations going into a Nobel Peace Oslo is a surprisingly compact city with good public it all came from IKEA—very Scandinavian. The upstairs, Prize Museum. transportation and about 1.5 million residents in the greater which mostly consisted of a living area and a bedroom, had a But just reading the list of Nobel Prize laureates and why metropolitan area. As in many places that have a severe cli- low ceiling, and much of the space was height challenged due they received the prize was bone-chillingly emotional. It gave mate, the buildings all have a very functional look without a to the slope of the roof. The best feature of the apartment was me hope to learn about people throughout the world in all lot of ornamental architecture. The city of Oslo arcs around a cozy—maybe 10-foot by 10-foot—porch, cut out of the walks of life who stood up for what was right and found a the northern end of Oslofjord and is surrounded by hills and roof, that gave a beautiful view yet retained all the elements of way forward without advocating violence. mountains with spectacular views of Oslofjord. Hundreds of privacy. We ate all our meals there. Oslo has a surprisingly large immigrant population and, islands and lakes lie within the municipality. It turns out I am familiar with Norwegian painters; I as the sun barely sets that far north, in the summer the cafes One of the first things we noticed after arriving in July just didn’t know it. The most famous and visible right now, and bars don’t ever seem to close. Norwegians are very friendwas that, as in many places where it is cold much of the because of the 150th anniversary of his birth, is Edvard ly, and (good for Americans) they all speak English. Although 21 time, whenever the weather turns warm (they call 70 degrees Munch. He was an expressionist painter—a contemporary of Norway is expensive, it was well worth the visit for me.


LIFE&STYLE | food

BR^aT1XV 4eTah3Ph CWXb5^^cQP[[BTPb^]

Ancient Ales, Local Lagers by Justin Hosemann

Through November 30th WIKICOMMONS/LOUVRE MUSEUM

50¢ Boneless Wings Monday & Tuesday Only

Domestic Beer Specials $8 Pitchers â&#x20AC;˘ $2.50 Pints

Craft Beer Specials

$12 Pitchers â&#x20AC;˘ $3.50 Pints

0[[H^d2P] 4Pc3aX]Z

$20 per person â&#x20AC;˘ Dine In Only Every Thursday â&#x20AC;˘ 6 - 11pm State Street Location Only 925 N State St, Jackson

601-969-6400

1430 Ellis Ave, Jackson

601-969-0606

398 Hwy 51 N, Ridgeland

601-605-0504

Sal and Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will explore ancient brews in its History of Beer dinner Oct. 7.

1001 Hampstead Blvd, Clinton

601-924-2423

     Downtown Diners Come try some of your old favorites along with some of your soon to be new favorites!

  October 2 - 8, 2013

Served with regular or Mexican cornbread or yeast roll!

22

  



  



For our entire live music calendar visit WWW.MARTINSLOUNGE.NET

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

I

n the Neolithic Age, about 10,200 B.C. to 2,000 B.C., mankind invented agricultural methods and began domesticating cereals for steady food supplies. Shortly after, ancient peoples of the Fertile Crescent, a region between western Asia and northeast Africa known for its moist, fertile soil, discovered that these cereal grains could undergo a process of spontaneous fermentation, producing one of civilizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest (and most beloved) beverages: beer. On Oct. 7, Sal and Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New York Pizza and Ice Cream Joint will celebrate the genesis of beer and its progression through history with a five-course meal that will take diners from ancient Mesopotamia to German beer gardens and back home to the United States. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not sure which came first: my interest in history or my interest in beer,â&#x20AC;? says professor James Bowley of Millsaps College, where he teaches religious studies. Bowley is bring his knowledge of ancient civilizations of southwestern Asia and the Middle East to the dinner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After I lived in the Middle East, I became interested in all things ancientâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; daily life sorts of things, like what these people drank and ate,â&#x20AC;? Bowley says. Bowley is teaming up with Dan Blumenthal, co-owner and executive chef of Sal and Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, and Lucas Simmons of Lucky Town Brewing Company to create a menu featuring historically accurate pairings of food and drink ancients may have eaten.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Several of the beers will be flavored in a way to try to replicate what beer in the ancient times might have tasted like,â&#x20AC;? says Jonathan Webb, bar manager at Sal and Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, and one of the organizers of the History of Beer dinner. Some of the ancient beers featured at the dinner include brew recipes that have been passed down over timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even etched on clay tablets. Bowley will lead a discussion about the five-course meal that will also make stops in beer havens Ireland and Germany before finishing in America. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the earliest patriots and founders of (America) was a brewmaster himselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Sam Adams,â&#x20AC;? Bowley says. He adds that the Americas played an important role in the modernization of beer, especially with the introduction of the lager, which has roots in yeast found in South America. Sal and Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carries the beerdrinking tradition into the 21st century, a time that has seen significant growth in the craft-beer industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always really focused on (craft) beer here,â&#x20AC;? Webb says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ever since weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve opened, the bar has had at least 15 taps.â&#x20AC;? The History of Beer dinner is Oct. 7 at Sal and Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (565 Taylor St., 601-368-1919) from 6-8 p.m. Tickets are $60. To purchase, call the restaurant or email maggieb@salandmookies.com. For more information, email Jonathan Webb at webb@salandmookies.com or go to salandmookies.com.


JFPmenus.com Paid advertising section. Call 601-362-6121 x11 to list your restaurant

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution for breakfast, blue-plates, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys & wraps. Famous bakery! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches.

PIZZA 904 Basil’s (904 E. Fortification, 601-352-2002) Creative pizzas, italian food, burgers and much more in a casual-dining atmosphere in the heart of Belhaven. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

Join Dr. James Bowley, Religious Studies professor at Millsaps College, and Lucas Simmons, Brew Master at Lucky Town Brewing Co., for this very special, one of a kind, beer event at Sal & Mookie’s!

BEER!

DO WE OWE CIVILIZATION TO BEER? What did you drink after a long day of building a pyramid? And, hey, why isn’t beer in ‘the Bible’? Come to a fascinating romp through the history of beer and learn some fun facts and drink some delicious brews, especially made for this ONCE IN A LIFETIME EVENT!

ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Huntington Grille (1001 East County Line Road, Jackson Hilton, 601-957-2800) Mississippi fine dining features seafood, crayfish, steaks, fried green tomatoes, shrimp & grits, pizzas and more. Que Sera Sera (2801 N State Street 601-981-2520) Authentic cajun cuisine, excellent seafood and award winning gumbo; come enjoy it all this summer on the patio. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma. Vasilios Greek Cusine (828 Hwy 51, Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic greek cuisine since 1994, specializing in gyros, greek salads, baklava cheesecake & fresh daily seafood.

Monday, October 7, 2013 | 6 PM | $60 per person Course 1: Ancient Beer in Mesopotamia Course 2: Beer in Egypt, of course Course 3: Those crazy Irish Beer drinkers Course 4: Germans, taking Beer and food seriously Course 5: As American as Beer and Apple Pie!

Call 601.368.1919 or MaggieB@SalandMookies.com to reserve your spot TODAY!

BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads.

COFFEE HOUSES Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Hazel Coffee Shop (2601 N. State St. Fondren Across from UMC) Fresh locally roasted coffee and specialty drinks to perk up your day!

ASIAN AND INDIAN Crazy Ninja (2560 Lakeland Dr., Flowood 601-420-4058) Rock-n-roll sushi and cook-in-front-of-you hibachi. Lunch specials, bento boxes, fabulous cocktails. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, an extensive menu features everything from curries to fresh sushi

no matter what team you’re rooting for Primos Cafe H A S Y O U R TA I L G AT E C O V E R E D Stop in and pick up our ready-to-go pasta salad, cheese straws, chicken tenders or one of our signature cakes to score big at your next tailgate. Or, call ahead to place your order!

PRIMOSCAFE.COM

jacksonfreepress.com

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2013, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Capitol Grill (5050 I-55 North, Deville Plaza 601-899-8845) Best happy hour & sports bar, kitchen open late, pub food with soul and live entertainment. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Musician’s Emporium (642 Tombigbee St., 601-973-3400) Delicious appetizers, burgers, sandwiches, and more. Great food goes with great music! Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot.

23


LIFE&STYLE | wellness This is part two in an instructional yoga series, each part focused on yoga positions for different purposes. For a yoga practice to help with sleep, it is best to have some props, such as a couple of yoga blocks and a yoga bolster; however, firm pillows and firm folded blankets will also work. When your mind is busy and preventing you from sleep, it can be good to let your awareness ride the wave of your breath or focus your mind by silently repeating a mantraâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I like the Sanskrit word for nectar, â&#x20AC;&#x153;amrita,â&#x20AC;? pronounced um-ree-TAâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or an inspiring word or phrase. As your mind wanders, gently bring your awareness back to your breath or your mantra. 0RGHO7DPDU6KDUSRZQHURIWKH )DLUYLHZ,QQDJH

Yoga for Sleep by Scotta Brady photos by Tate K. Nations

Salamba Setu Bandha in Sukhasana (Supported Bridge in Easy Pose, or crossed legs) Coming into the pose: comfortably. Place a block on the ground. '2Â&#x2021;5HOD[\RXUIDFHQHFNWKURDW DQGMDZ Place a bolster or firm pillow Â&#x2021;6XSSRUW\RXUQHFNZLWKDVPDOO parallel to the block. Sit on the UROOHGEODQNHWLIQHHGHG block in a simple cross-legged Â&#x2021;%UHDWKHVWHDGLO\DQGHDVLO\ position and gently lie down over the bolster to rest your '21¡7Â&#x2021;'RWKLVSRVHLILWKXUWV\RXU ORZHUEDFN shoulders and head on the floor. Â&#x2021;+ROG Keep your neck in a neutral po- %(1(),76 Â&#x2021;&DOPVWKHPLQG sition and turn your palms up Â&#x2021;5HOLHYHVVWUHVVDQG LQVRPQLD to help release your shoulders to Â&#x2021;%DODQFHVWKHWK\PXVDQG the floor. WK\URLGJODQGV7RQHVWKH Close your eyes and hold DEGRPLQDORUJDQVDQG three to five minutes, breathing LPSURYHVGLJHVWLRQ

Supta Baddha Konasana (Reclining Bound Angle Pose) Coming into the pose: with your palms up. Place a bolster or firm pillow Close your eyes and hold on the ground with a folded three to five minutes, breathing blanket on top. Sit on the comfortably. ground in front of the bol- '2Â&#x2021;5HOD[\RXUIDFHQHFNWKURDWDQG MDZ ster, bend both knees out to Â&#x2021;%UHDWKHVWHDGLO\DQGHDVLO\ the side and place the soles of your feet together in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;but- '21¡7Â&#x2021;'RWKLVSRVHZLWKRXWDQH[SH ULHQFHGWHDFKHULI\RXKDYHD terflyâ&#x20AC;? position. Place a block NQHHRUJURLQLQMXU\ or folded blanket under each Â&#x2021;+ROG\RXUEUHDWK knee for support and slowly lie %(1(),76Â&#x2021;([SDQGVWKHFKHVWDQG back onto the bolsterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which RSHQVWKHKLSVDQGJURLQV Â&#x2021;+HOSVUHOLHYHVWUHVVDQ[LHW\ should run the length of your DQGPLOGGHSUHVVLRQ spineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with the folded blanket Â&#x2021;&DOPVWKHPLQGVRRWKHV supporting your head. Let your WKHQHUYRXVV\VWHP Â&#x2021;6WLPXODWHVWKHDEGRPLQDO inner groins soften toward the RUJDQVDQGLPSURYHV ground. Relax your arms at a GLJHVWLRQ 45-degree angle out to the side

Viparita Karani (Inverted Action Pose or Legs Up the Wall)

October 2 - 8, 2013

Have a bolster or two or three folded blankets nearby. Lie on your right side with your butt touching the wall. Roll onto your back and shift your legs up the wall. Press your feet into the wall to lift your hips and guide the bolster under you to support your sacrumâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the flat triangular bone above your tailbone. You may have to wiggle a bit to find the sweet spot. Ideally, your sitting bones will be on the wall, but if it is uncomfortable, move further away from the wall. Close your eyes and hold five to 15 minutes, breathing comfortably.

24

'2Â&#x2021;&KHFNZLWK\RXUGRFWRULI\RXKDYHJODX FRPDXQUHJXODWHGKLJKEORRGSUHVVXUHRU DUHSUHJQDQW Â&#x2021;5HOD[\RXUIDFHQHFNWKURDWDQGMDZ Â&#x2021;6XSSRUW\RXUQHFNZLWKDVPDOOUROOHG EODQNHWLIQHHGHG Â&#x2021;%UHDWKHVWHDGLO\DQGHDVLO\ '21¡7Â&#x2021;'RWKLVSRVHZKLOHPHQVWUXDWLQJXQOHVV ZLWKDQH[SHULHQFHGWHDFKHU Â&#x2021;+ROG\RXUEUHDWK %(1(),76Â&#x2021;5HOLHYHVWLUHGOHJVDQGIHHW Â&#x2021;%RRVWVWKHLPPXQHV\VWHP Â&#x2021;5HOLHYHVORZHUEDFNDFKH Â&#x2021;*HQWO\VWUHWFKHVWKHKDPVWULQJV Â&#x2021;5HOLHYHVDQ[LHW\VWUHVVDQGLQVRPQLD

Salamba Savasana (Supported Corpse Pose or Supported Relaxation) Coming into the pose: Place a bolster (or firm pillow) to go up the length of your spine. Fold a blanket or use a small pillow to support your head. With your hips on the ground, inhale and lengthen your spine. As you exhale, slowly lie back on the bolster and adjust the support for your neck and head to a comfortable position. Release your arms to the ground at a 45-degree angle from your body and turn your palms up to help release your shoulders. Close your eyes and hold five to 15 minutes,

breathing comfortably. You may also do this pose in your bed without props and drift off to sleep. '2Â&#x2021;5HOD[\RXUKLSVOHJVDQGIHHW Â&#x2021;5HOD[\RXUVKRXOGHUVDUPVDQG KDQGV Â&#x2021;6RIWHQ\RXUDEGRPLQDOPXVFOHV Â&#x2021;5HOD[\RXUIDFHQHFNWKURDW DQGMDZ Â&#x2021;5HOD[\RXULQQHUHDUV Â&#x2021;6RIWHQ\RXUH\HVUHOD[\RXUEUDLQ DZD\IURPWKHHGJHRI\RXUVNXOO Â&#x2021;%UHDWKHVWHDGLO\DQGHDVLO\ '21¡7Â&#x2021;:RUU\ Â&#x2021;+ROG\RXUEUHDWK %(1(),76Â&#x2021;5HOD[HVWKHERG\ Â&#x2021;5HOLHYHVVWUHVVDQG LQVRPQLD Â&#x2021;5HGXFHVIDWLJXH Â&#x2021;/RZHUVEORRGSUHVVXUH

Salamba Paschimottanasana (Supported Seated Forward Fold) Coming into the pose: your torso on the bolster. Place Sit on the floor with your legs a folded blanket under your together and straight out in forehead. Rest your hands on front of you. Align your legs the floor or, if possible, hold so that your knees and toes your feet with your hands point toward the ceiling. If it is '2Â&#x2021;(OHYDWH\RXUKLSVZLWKDEODQNHW WRWDNHWHQVLRQRXWRIWKH uncomfortable or difficult to KDPVWULQJV do with a straight spine, place Â&#x2021;8VHHQRXJKEODQNHWVWRUHVW\RXU a folded blanket or two under WRUVRDQGIRUHKHDGFRPIRUWDEO\ your sitting bones to elevate Â&#x2021;%UHDWKHVWHDGLO\DQGHDVLO\ your hips. Place a bolster (or '21¡7Â&#x2021;'RWKLVSRVHLI\RXKDYHEDFN LVVXHVRULQMXU\ firm pillow) on top of your legs Â&#x2021;+ROG\RXUEUHDWK and draw it to your abdomen %(1(),76Â&#x2021;6WUHWFKHVWKHEDFNKDP for support. Press your thigh VWULQJVDQGFDOYHV bones down, inhale and Â&#x2021;6RRWKHVWKHQHUYRXV lengthen your spine. As you V\VWHPDQGFDOPVWKHPLQG Â&#x2021;5HOLHYHVVWUHVVDQGDQ[LHW\ exhale, flex your hips to rest Â&#x2021;7KHUDSHXWLFIRULQVRPQLD


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8 DAYS p 30 | FILM p 31 | MUSIC p 32 | SPORTS p 34

PUBLIC DOMAIN

Vermeer: Love and Leisure by Genevieve Legacy

October 2 - 8, 2013

I

26

n the 20-plus years since I was an art student thumbing the dense pages of “Janson’s History of Art,” textbook educational tools have changed dramatically. Computer science has intervened, enhancing both the learning experience and what can be learned. Technology has revealed the field of art, artwork an its history, similar to the drops used to dilate the pupil for a closer look inside the eye. Through analysis and theory, we can deconstruct the linear narrative of art’s development. This art-technology interface has expanded the study of painting in particular, shifting analysis from symbolic to forensic. Using X-ray, ultraviolet light and high-powered microscopes, art researchers can reveal the miniature terrain created by layers of pigment, oil and brushstroke. They have revealed the painter’s hand at work, along with the boars’ hairs left by an overused paintbrush or the dust adhered to a long-drying canvas. “Jansen’s History of Art” textbook has seen considerable upgrades. The latest edition includes ebooks, digital imagery and interactive labs. As windows open on the scientific front, long-established museums and galleries work to keep pace. Museums with pioneering spirits, such as the National Gallery in London, have embraced the brave new world and, as a result, are reaching new audiences through the medium of high-definition cinematography and satellite broadcasting. Collaborating with documentary filmmaker Phil Grabsky and live digital-cinema provider By Experience, London’s National Gallery is virtually opening its doors to viewers from around the globe. As Grabsky explains in a video press release, his highdefinition documentaries give viewers the opportunity to view recent art exhibitions with expert commentary, artist biography and an insider look at the curatorial process without traveling to a foreign country. Much like a digital art-history class, the audience learns about the life and times of the artist, as well as the artist’s techniques, materials and creative idiosyncrasies. In the last three years, Grabsky has produced four exhibition documentaries, including “Leonardo Live,” “Manet, Portraying Life,” and “Munch 150,” and his newest film, “Vermeer and Music: The Art of Love and Leisure.” During the satellite broadcasts, people from up to 30 countries can simultaneously watch the same film about the same artist.

Filmmaker Phil Grabsky’s newest exhibition film “Vermeer and Music:The Art of Love and Leisure” allows viewers to see Vermeer—artist of “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” above—in a new way.

“Vermeer and Music: The Art of Love and Leisure” premieres this month. The Vermeer exhibition at the National Gallery, London, includes three of Vermeer’s 36 known paintings, two belonging to the gallery’s permanent collection and one on loan for the exhibit. As the title suggests, the theme of the exhibit is music and the role it played in Dutch 17th-century life. Original and highquality reproductions of the instruments depicted in the painting—virginals (a smaller version of a harpsichord), harpsichords, lutes and oboes—are also on display. Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675) was the son of a tavern owner. He lived his 43 years in Delft, Netherlands. Vermeer’s paintings, a third of which include instruments,

are a testament to the presence of music in everyday life from the tavern to the parlor. Unlike 17th-century Italy and France, where music was generally limited to the church and the aristocracy, the Netherlands had a more egalitarian society, and music—as seen through the eyes of painters like Vermeer, Jan Steen and Pieter de Hooch—was at the heart of it. The Exhibition On Screen event, “Vermeer and Music: The Art of Love and Leisure” will be at the Cinemark Tinseltown movie theater (411 Riverwind Drive, Pearl, 601936-5856 ) Oct. 10 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $11.50, $10.50 for seniors and students, $9.50 for children. For more information, go to exhibitsonscreen.com.


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Jackson Restaurant Week 2013 through Oct. 12, at participating local Jackson restaurants . Order from the Restaurant Week menu, and vote at the end of the meal for one of five selected charities to receive $10,000. Food prices vary; jacksonrestaurantweek.com.

#/--5.)49 Events in Fondren. â&#x20AC;˘ Fondren After 5 Oct. 3, 5-8 p.m. This monthly event is a showcase of the local shops, galleries and restaurants of the Fondren neighborhood. Free; call 601-981-9606; fondren.org. â&#x20AC;˘ fondRUN Oct. 4, 6 p.m. Run two miles, and end the run with drinks at a different restaurant each month. Runners must sign a waiver. Free; liverightnowonline.com. Events at Jackson State University (1400 John R. Lynch St.). â&#x20AC;˘ 30th Annual Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Symposium Oct. 2-3. The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crusade, 1963-2013: From Youth Activism to Youth Advocacy.â&#x20AC;? The opening reception is Oct. 2 at 6 p.m. at Gallery1, and the symposium is Oct. 3 at 10 a.m. at the Liberal Arts Building. Register online. Free; call 601-979-1562 or 601-979-1563; email hamer. institute@jsums.edu; jsums.edu/hamer.institute. â&#x20AC;˘ JSU Sports Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Oct. 4, 7 p.m., in the Student Center Ballroom. Harrison B. Wilson and Lindsey Hunter are among the inductees. $50, $500 tables; call 601-979-2272. Events at Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland Drive). â&#x20AC;˘ Mississippi Bike Summit Oct. 2, 9 a.m.5 p.m. Bike Walk Mississippi is the host. The focus is on how the investment in biking and walking can lead to increased economic development and quality of life for Mississippians. Registration required. $40, discounts available; email bikewalk@bikewalkmississippi.org; msbikesummit.com.

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â&#x20AC;˘ Pumpkin Adventure Wednesdays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-noon through Oct. 25. $6 from 9 a.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201C; noon (reservations required), $9 from 1-3 p.m., Oct. 12 and Oct. 19, children under 2 free ; call 601-432-4500; msagmuseum.org. Events at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). â&#x20AC;˘ Mississippi Urban Forest Conference Oct. 2-4. The Mississippi Urban Forest Council hosts the annual event. Includes workshops and an awards ceremony. Registration required. Limited registration scholarships and CEU credits available. $115, $20 awards lunch; email dyowell@aol.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Water Journey Festival Oct. 5, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The interactive event is an educational experience on the water cycle and water conservation. The event is designed for Girl Scouts but all are welcome. $2 per girl (10 or more), $6 per adult (one adult per 10 girls free); call 601-576-6000; msnaturalscience.org. Events at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch Oct. 2, noon. F Jeff Rogers and Alanna Patrick present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Searching the

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Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.), in the Art Garden. No outside food or beverages. Blankets and chairs welcome. Free admission, food options starting at $5; call 601960-1515; msmuseumart.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Art Remix Oct. 4, 7 p.m. The annual event includes food from The Palette CafĂŠ by Viking, a cash bar and live music. Latinismo! performs. â&#x20AC;˘ Town Creek Arts Festival Oct. 5, noon-6 p.m. Enjoy art, crafts, food and music. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities in garden rooms and BankPlus Green.

Roz Roy inspires kids as Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visiting artist for the month of October. SULYDWHOHVVRQVIRUFKLOGUHQ6KHUHFHQWO\VSHQWWLPH DVWKHDUWLVWLQUHVLGHQFHDW%R\G(OHPHQWDU\6FKRRO DIWHU WKH )RQGUHQ 5HQDLVVDQFH )RXQGDWLRQ PDGH D JUDQWWRWKHVFKRRO5R\HQMR\VZRUNLQJZLWKFKLOGUHQ DQGVD\VWKHEHVWWKLQJDERXWWKHPLVÂłWKH\DUHRSHQ WRQHZLGHDVDQGWKH\ORYHFUHDWLQJWKHLURZQDUW´  5R] 5R\ WHDFKHV DW WKH 0&0  +LJKODQG 'ULYH HYHU\6DWXUGD\LQ2FWREHUIURP DPWRSP+HUFODVVHVDUHIUHHZLWKUHJXODUDG PLVVLRQRUIUHHIRULQIDQWVDJHVDQG\RXQJHU 9LVLW PLVVLVVLSSLFKLOGUHQVPXVHXPFRP IRU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ ²6KD:DQGD-DFRPH

Online Catalog.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998. â&#x20AC;˘ History Is Lunch Oct. 9, noon. Archaeologist Sam Brookes will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aspects of Mississippi Delta Prehistory.â&#x20AC;? Free; call 601-576-6998. Becoming a Better Board Volunteer: A Serious Look at Board Service Oct. 3, 6-7:30 p.m., at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Joe Donovan of the MS Center for Nonprofits and Millsaps Else School of Management instructs. Topics include best practices, strategic planning and fundraising. Classes are Thursdays through Oct. 17. $75; call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted. Pumpkins in the Park Oct. 5, 5:30 p.m., at Belhaven Park (Poplar Boulevard). The event features Belhaven artist Rachel Misenar and songwriter David Womack. Free, donations welcome; call 601-352-8850; email info@greaterbelhaven.com; greaterbelhaven.com.

7%,,.%33 Power of Pink: Celebrating Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Day Oct. 4, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.). At Baptist for Women. Women receive preventive health screen-

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ings such as glucose, total cholesterol, blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). Appointment required. Free; call 601-948-6262; mbhs.org. On the Road to Health’s Zoo Run Oct. 5, 8 a.m., at New Horizon Church International (1770 Ellis Ave.). The 5K run/walk ends at the Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Kids’ run for ages 12 and under is at 9:30 a.m. Awards given to top walkers and for best animal costume. T-shirts for first 150 registrants. $25; call 371-1427; active.com.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. America’s Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway Oct. 3, 7 p.m., at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). The series includes documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions of 20th-century American popular music. Light refreshments served. Free; call 601-9245684; email kcorbett@jhlibrary.com. Movie in the Park Oct. 5, 8 p.m., at Brighton Park (530 S. Frontage Road, Clinton). Enjoy a family-friendly indoor movie. Free; call 601924-6082; clintonparksandrec.com.

-53)# Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. • Live at Lunch Oct. 2, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Enjoy live music in the Art Garden. Bring lunch or buy food from the Palette Cafe by Viking. • Music in the City Oct. 8, in Trustmark Grand

Hall. Enjoy a cash bar at 5:15 p.m. and music from Jackie McGinnis with John Paul at 5:45 p.m. Donations welcome. An Evening with Leo Kottke Oct. 4, 8 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The acoustic guitarist is a Georgia native. Cocktails at 7 p.m. All-ages show. $35 in advance, $40 at the door; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

dren enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3

“Chamber I: Brandenburg 3” Oct. 5, 7:30 p.m., at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral (305 E. Capitol St.). Enjoy pieces from Vivaldi and Telemann, and Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3. $16; call 601-960-1565; msorchestra.com.

Events at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). $8, children under 12 months and museum members free; call 601-981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum.com. • Global Cardboard Challenge Oct. 5, 10 a.m.2 p.m. Children use their imagination to create anything they want from cardboard. • Visiting Artist: Roz Roy Oct. 5, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The artist gives a finger-painting workshop. Bread Baking Class Oct. 6, 1-6 p.m., at Gil’s Bread (655 Lake Harbour Drive, Suite 500, Ridgeland). Students receive a bench knife and apron, and get to take home the bread they bake. Registration required. $125 per session; call 601-863-6935; email gil@gilsbread.com; gilsbread.com.

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Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). call 601-366-7619; email info@ lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. • “The Tilted World” Oct. 2, 5 p.m. Beth Ann Fennelly and Tom Franklin sign books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.99 book. • “William F. Winter and the New Mississippi: A Biography” Oct. 9, 5 p.m. Charles C. Bolton signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $35 book. • Lemuria Story Time Saturdays, 11 a.m. Chil-

Events at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. • JSU Faculty Art Exhibit through Oct. 31, See works from Jackson State instructors in the main galleries. • Mississippi World Trade Center Student Art Exhibit through Oct. 31. See works from students in the upper and lower atriums. Opening reception Oct. 8 from 3-6 p.m.

Brandon Opry Oct. 5, 6 p.m., at Brandon Civic Center (1000 Municipal Drive, Brandon). The organization honors Thomas “Fender” Fortenberry of Prentiss, who performs. The Brandon Opry Stage Band and Country Jack Harper also perform. Concessions and dance floor included. Enjoy a meet-and-greet before the show. $5; call 601-992-4716.

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Andrew Burkitt Art Exhibition through Oct. 30, at Lewis Art Gallery (Millsaps College, Ford

Academic Complex, 1701 N. State St.). The artist exhibits several etchings, drawings on paper and small sculptures assembled from etchings. Oct. 10, the collage and book binding workshop is at 11 a.m., and the gallery talk is at 6 p.m. in room AC215. Free; call 601-497-7454; email om_ peace2you@hotmail.com or aab_cobra@yahoo. com; andrewburkitt.com.

"%4(%#(!.'% Delta Paranormal Project: A Paranormal and Metaphysical Event Oct. 4, 7-10 p.m.Oct. 5, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., at Kepler’s Italian Grill (533 Highway 82 E., Greenville). Proceeds benefit the Spina Bifida Association and Susan G. Komen for the Cure. $15 conference, $75 conference and investigations, $125 VIP, $25 vendors; call 662332-1225; email kepler@keplersitaliangrill.com; deltaparanormalproject.com. Brandon Craft Fair Oct. 5, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., at Nativity Lutheran Church (495 Crossgates Blvd., Brandon). Sale proceeds benefit organizations such as the Center for Violence Prevention, Grace House and Stewpot. Free admission; call 601-825-5125, 601-825-2026 or 601-942-3369; email nativitylc@att.net or ansonedwards@ hotmail.com. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

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29


Thursday 10/3

Sunday 10/6

Monday 10/7

Kerry Thomas performs at the Artisan Mixer at Ice House Alley Warehouse.

Mississippi’s Walk for Diabetes is at Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance.

Poetry Reading: Julie Kane is at Belhaven University Center for the Arts.

BEST BETS OCT, 2 - 9, 2013

ALLISTER ANN

WEDNESDAY 10/2

Jackson Restaurant Week 2013 is through Oct. 12 at participating restaurants. Food prices vary; jacksonrestaurantweek.com. … Mississippi State Fair starts today at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). $5, free admission and parking 10 a.m.-1 pm. weekdays; call 601-961-4000 or 601-353-0603; msfair.net.

THURSDAY 10/3

COURTESY BLACK POWER MIXTAPE

“The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975” Film Screening is at 6 p.m. at Gallery1 (1100 John R. Lynch St., Suite 4). Free; call 601-960-9250; blackpowermixtape.com. … The Main Squeeze performs at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St.). For ages 18 and up. $5 in advance, $8 at the door; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net. … Artisan Mixer is from 6-9 p.m. at Ice House Alley Warehouse (251 W. South St.). Free; theartisanmixer.eventbrite.com.

Casting Crowns performs as part of Faith and Family Night on Oct. 5 at the Mississippi Coliseum.

jbentertainmentgroup@gmail.com; firstfridayjxn.eventbrite. com. … Jeffy D, Monoxide, Bullet, 360 Degrees, Mr. Fluid and DJ Repercussion perform at the Submerged Drum and Bass Showcase at 10 p.m. at North Midtown Arts Center (121 Millsaps Ave.). $5-$10; call 601-259-5318; email 1dj360@gmail.com.

SATURDAY 10/5

Michael Rubenstein Memorial Kidney Walk is at 9 a.m. BY BRIANA ROBINSON at Mississippi Kidney Foundation (3000 Old Canton Road, Suite 110). Call 601-981-3611. JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM … Town Creek Arts Festival is FAX: 601-510-9019 from noon-6 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 DAILY UPDATES AT S. Lamar St.) in the Art GarJFPEVENTS.COM den. Free admission; call 601960-1515; msmuseumart.org. … Faith and Family Night featuring Casting Crowns, Britt Nicole and Warren Barfield is at 7 p.m. at Mississippi Coliseum (1207 Mississippi St.). $14-$48; call 800-745-3000; awakeningevents.com.

EVENTS@

October 2 - 8, 2013

“The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975,” featuring clips of Stokely Carmichael, film screening is at 6 p.m. Oct. 3 at Gallery1.

FRIDAY 10/4

Art Remix is at 7 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.) in the Art Garden. Free; call 601960-1515; msmuseumart.org. … First Friday: The Absolut Seduction Edition is at 9 p.m. at ISH Grill and Bar (333 N. Mart Plaza). For ages 21 and up. $10, $80 tables, 30 $120 VIP (includes four passes); call 713-0442; email

SUNDAY 10/6

Pistons and Props exhibition of classic motor vehicles is at 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at John Bell Williams Airport (4100 Airport Road, Bolton). Free; call 601-857-3884 or 601-946-1950; email mmjackson@hindscc.edu or mike_ marsh@bellsouth.net; hindscc.edu. … Mississippi’s Walk for Diabetes is at 2 p.m. at Southern Farm Bureau Life

Insurance (1401 Livingston Lane). Registration required. $20; call 877-DFM-CURE; msdiabetes.org.

MONDAY 10/7

Poetry Reading: Julie Kane is at 5:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive) in the Student Center Theater. Free; call 601-965-7026; belhaven.edu. … History of Beer Dinner is at 6 p.m. at Sal & Mookie’s New York Pizza and Ice Cream Joint (565 Taylor St.). Reservations required. $60 plus tax and tip; call 601-368-1919; salandmookies.com.

TUESDAY 10/8

Moonlight Attitude: An Evening of Elegance and Fun is from 6-10 p.m. at Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St.). Enjoy ballroom dance lessons at 6 p.m., and refreshments and dancing at 7 p.m. The Capital City Stage Band performs. For ages 21 and up. $75; call 601-355-0547; usaibc. com. … Valerie June performs at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s (200 Commerce St.). $8 in advance, $10 at the door; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

WEDNESDAY 10/9 “SURGE” is at 7 p.m. at Malco Grandview Theatre (221 Grandview Blvd., Madison). $12.50; call 601898-7819; surgeexperience.com. … fun. performs at 8 p.m. at Mississippi State University (Highway 12, Starkville) in Humphrey Coliseum. $30-$35; call 662325-2930; msuconcerts.com.


COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES

DIVERSIONS | film

‘Rush’: Fast, Furious Boys by Anita Modak-Truran

“R

ush,” Ron Howard’s biopic on the 1976 Formula 1 race season and the rivalry between two rich boy-men, brought back memories of kicking back on Saturday afternoons and watching ABC’s “Wide World of Sports.” Howard captures the adrenaline rush of low-slung cars droning like angry wasps around the track. The drivers blur behind high speed, big wheels, fancy carcasses in bright hues and snug-fitting helmets. Who were these fast boys of grand prix racing? What type of person squeezes into the pit of a tiny trap of a car and waits for the steering wheel to be bolted in? I never thought much about the drivers who sought the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat—that is, until this film, which wasn’t on my list of must-sees. I saw it only because I walked out of “Don Jon,” a trussed-up porn film faking as a rom-com. Even with the movie pedigree making “Rush,” I had no desire to see a “true story” of fast and furious. Screenwriter Peter Morgan has developed a unique niche of spinning real-life stories into memorable films, such as “The

Queen,” “Frost/Nixon,” and “The Last King of Scotland.” In “Rush,” Morgan provides a character study on two men who pursue the same sport in the bicentennial year of this country. His script is far better than the subject matter. James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) is a wealthy British playboy. Hunt possesses raw talent on the track, but he’s undisciplined, a hedonist gorging on sexy women, booze and late-night debauchery, and then racing during the day for the simple reason that he can afford it. It comes as no surprise that Hunt has a hard time finding a sponsor. He’s described in racing circles as “a loose cannon,” but he puts on a good show, and he’s telegenic. He also has a disastrously bad marriage to model Suzy Miller (Olivia Wilde), who dumps him for Richard Burton. Possibly because it would irrevocably taint anything remotely likeable about Hunt, Howard and Morgan do not explore the tabloid story of Hunt selling Miller to Burton for a $1 million in alimony. The bottom line is that Hunt sells tickets. He’s good for the sport, because he’s ballsy, brash and Thor-ishly beautiful. Hunt’s game-changing rival is Austrian

Chris Hemsworth plays a Formula 1 racecar driver in Ron Howard’s “Rush.”

Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl), another rich young guy. Lauda lacks Hunt’s charm and good looks and speaks with the conviction of artificial intelligence. Lauda analyzes life and racing in terms of risks and benefits. “I will take a 20 percent risk of death,” he says. Lauda knows the ins and outs of his craft. He understands cars and racing—and did I mention that he is very disciplined? On his honeymoon, Lauda tells his wife Marlene (Alexandra Maria Lara) that “happiness is the enemy.” He only wants to win, even if he must be unhappy, but only if the odds are statistically acceptable. The conceit of this movie is that these men are different. They are not. They both love to roll the dice of death. Their happiness rides on the edge of “here today, gone tomor-

row.” And they are competitive to a bitter fault. Forty-two days after surviving a searing inferno of an 800-degree crash and burn, Lauda returns to racing. He tells Hunt that he found the will to live because his single purpose was to beat Hunt. Howard infuses the film with adrenaline-charged car races, which is likely to please all fans of Formula 1, NASCAR, “Talladega Nights,” Indy 500 and more. The actors do a fine job, at times even channeling the real drivers, whose visages we see at the end. But who really cares about these two selfish guys? It’s a race. You win. You lose. You live. You die. That’s the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. Don’t expect “Chariots of Fire.” There’s nothing about the film’s nominal subjects that make a larger statement about human nature.

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING Listings for Fri. 10/4 – Thur. 10/10

3-D Gravity PG13

Rush

R

Gravity (non 3-D) PG13

Don Jon

R

Runner Runner R Grace Unplugged Parkland

PG PG13

3-D Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2 PG Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2 (non 3-D) PG Tickets Available Night of Event at Door and at www.ticketmaster.com Door Opens at 8:30

Baggage Claim PG13 Prisoners

R

The Family

R

Insidious: Chapter 2

PG13

Instructions Not Included PG13 Lee Daniel’s The Butler PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

824 S. State St. Jackson

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM

601.487.8710

Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

www.clubmagoos.com

Movieline: 355-9311

jacksonfreepress.com

October 18th Jamie Johnson

31


DIVERSIONS | music

Modern A Cappella by Alexis Moody

ALLEN CLARK PHOTOGRAPHY

“T

he Sing-Off” on NBC wasn’t on Street Corner Symphony’s radar until a friend randomly called the group during the summer of 2010. “A friend of ours from high school named John McLemore told us about it. I used to sing with him in the high school choir at Madison Central High School,” Richie Lister says. “Hey, there is this reality TV show called ‘The Sing-Off’ having auditions in Nashville,” Lister recalls McLemore saying. Street Corner Symphony, a modernday a cappella group—meaning the music only features vocals—made it to second place on the show’s second season in 2010, giving the group extra leverage to finish its second album. Since then, Street Corner Symphony has sung with talented musicians from Ben Folds to Alison Krauss. Based in Nashville, the group consists of Mark McLemore, Adam Chance, Kurt Zimmerman, and the Madison-born Lister brothers: Jeremy, Jonathan and Richie. The Lister brothers grew up in a musical family. Richie and Jeremy were

A cappella group Street Corner Symphony performs Oct. 11 at Duling Hall.

in a Jackson-based rock band, Geronimo Rex. Richie was also in Sunshine and the Rival Band. In July, the group released its second album, “Southern Autumn Nostalgia,”

by Micah Smith

October 2 - 8, 2013

I

32

n modern music, instruments such as tambourines, trumpets or acoustic guitars can seem like an afterthought—hardly necessary in the minds of average listeners. Amidst the center-stage singing, drumming and attention-grabbing guitar playing in contemporary songs, other items get added as flourishes rather than musts. For Jackson-based songwriter, singer and harmonica master Scott Albert Johnson, however, the alternatives to this sidelining of instruments are simple: Write smart, know your instrument and play exceptionally well. “By and large, harmonica players are terrible musicians,” Johnson says. “Harmonica has gotten a bad name because so many people toy around and (call) themselves harmonica players without knowing what they’re doing. They’ll be in rock or blues groups, struggling to make something sound good because they won’t even know what key the band is playing in.” Johnson, whom Jackson Free Press readers named “Best Musician” in 2009 and 2010, had his fair share of experience with the music world before finding his niche with the oft-misunderstood harmonica. As a child, he tried his hand at violin, and he sang in his middle- and high-school choirs at St. Andrew’s Episcopal School. During his freshman year of high school, a friend gave him a bass guitar, and another friend asked him to join a band, The Strangers, within days

of each other. The Strangers had a booked gig coming up in of his 2007 full-length album “Umbrella Man,” Johnson a couple of weeks, and Johnson agreed to play bass. is now preparing his sophomore album, “Going SomeDuring his college years at Harvard University, he set where,” for an early 2014 release. continued to play the bass and sing “I’m definitely in the homefor bands while also focusing on stretch of releasing the new record, his commitment as kicker for the which I’ve been at work on in fits football team. and starts for years,” Johnson says. Years later in Washington, He combined his different skills D.C., a musician co-worker heard and interests to create the record. that Johnson had a good voice and “I consider myself a jazz player but suggested they play together. This a pop and rock songwriter. There’s pairing brought up the harmonica. also some futuristic-sounding stuff “I remembered goofing off with mixed in, which sounds more like one before, and I figured out a few 21st-century music with synthethings like major scales and bending sizer and samples.” notes,” Johnson says. “I learned pretJohnson gives a curious qualty quickly that it was my instrument. ity to portions of the recording by I had more natural ability on it than adding digital effects to his playany other instrument.” ing—without marring his topJohnson came back to Jackson notch harmonica chops, of course. to visit family and play music in Johnson says the album questions 2003, believing it to be a temporary where society is going as well as Scott Albert Johnson’s personal history in stay. Then he met photographer Su- music led him to playing the harmonica. where he’s going as musician and san Margaret Barrett. The two are as a person. now married and have three children: While songs such as the catchy Charlie, 8, Benjamin, 6, and Lily funk track, “All,” and the bouncMargaret, 4. Johnson says he also instantly felt accepted in ing pianos of “A Bigger Gun” deal with tough topics such as Mississippi, a state with several successful harmonica players expanding materialism and snowballing violence, they boast in its history, including Lester Davenport of Tchula, Sonny fun melodies and a tongue-in-cheek delivery that keep the Boy Williamson II of Glendora and James Cotton of Tunica. album far from being a somber affair. Johnson started playing shows frequently, both within the Scott Albert Johnson performs at 10 p.m. Oct. 5 at Ole Jackson area and regionally. Tavern on George Street (416 George St., 601-960-2700). After making the United Kingdom’s The Harmonica Visit scottalbertjohnson.com, or find Scott Albert Johnson Company’s “Hot 100” list in early 2012 and the success Music on Facebook. COURTESY SCOTT ALBERT JOHNSON

A Maverick of Harmonica

making a bold move in the a cappella genre by going with original tracks. “We approach the a cappella genre in a different way than a lot of groups,” Richie Lister says. “I think we approach it more

as a rock band than an a cappella group. Our songwriting is all original songs. I think that sets us apart.” The album starts off with a bloodpumping number called “Voodoo,” a sultry New Orleans-inspired tune. “Those devilish eyes, girl, they blow my mind, and you’re pouring me a glass of your blood-red wine. There’s no use trying to resist your wicked ways,” the group sings. Songs such as “Frozen in Time” and “Picturing You” bring out the barbershop side of the album. For the last two tracks of the record, the group displays a type of old-world chant with “Sicut Tempus Fugit” that goes into the a cappella metal song, “Dragon Rider.” “We don’t take ourselves too seriously; we have a good time with it. We wanted to have something on there that’s a little funny,” Lister says. Street Corner Symphony performs at 9 p.m. Oct. 11 at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Buy “Southern Autumn Nostalgia” online. Visit streetcornersymphony.com.


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9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials

$ 2happyfor 1 well drinks hour m-f 4-7 pm Open for dinner Sat. 4-10 2 for 1 house wine

starting at â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

â&#x20AC;¢

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WEDNESDAY 10/2:

Leo Moriera (Restaurant) Ardenland Presents Jim White (Red Room) THURSDAY 10/3:

Monty Russell (Restaurant) The Main Squeeze (Red Room) FRIDAY 10/4:

Thursday October 3

Swing de Paris (Restaurant) Downtown Drawdown Benefitting LLS (Patio)

W/ DJ Stache â&#x20AC;¢ Ladies Drink Free

SATURDAY 10/5:

LADIES NIGHT Friday October 4

Country Fried

XtremeZ (Restaurant) MONDAY 10/7:

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday (Restaurant)

TUESDAY 10/8:

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant)

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THIS WEEK

Saturday October 5

Scott Albert Johnson

Ardenland Presents Valarie June (Red Room)

BUY GROWLERS O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

$19

Tuesday October 8

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

2 for 1 Highlife & PBR

Open Mic

with Wesley Edwards

Wednesday October 9

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE FREE WiFi 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

jacksonfreepress.com

/#4 7%$.%3$!9

COURTESY SID THOMPSON

MUSIC | live

33


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

ALL NEW LUNCH & DINNER MENU

by Bryan Flynn

PLATTERS STARTING AT $10 WEDNESDAYS

10/2

LADIES NIGHT 2-for-1 Wells & Domestic 5pm - close

THURSDAYS

10/3

$4 APPETIZERS â&#x20AC;˘ 5 -9PM 2 FOR 1 DRAFT

FRIDAY

10/4

COSBY SWEATER SATURDAY

10/5

SOUTHERN KOMFORT BRASS BAND

MONDAY

10/7

OPEN MIC/ TALENT

SEARCH NIGHT Local bands tryout for gigs On stage w/ pro sound & lights Both bars open

1.50 Pick & Grab Beers & 2 for 1 draft TUESDAY

10/8

SHRIMP BOIL 5 - 10 PM

MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S KARAOKE 5 - 9 & 10 - close

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

UPCOMING SHOWS 10.12: Big Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Funky Nation (Big Sam formerly of Dirty Dozen Brass Band)

September 11 - 17, 2013

10.17: DrFameus (Allen of Disco Biscuits) 10.19: The Revivalists 10.24: Nadis Warriors 10.26: Cedric Burnside Project 11.8: The Unknown Hinson 11.9: Black Taxi

34

SCAN

ME! SEE OUR NEW MENU

W W W. M A R T I N S L O U N G E . N E T

214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

Wď?Ľď?¤ď?Žď?Ľď?łď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;/ď&#x2122;&#x2026;

Pub Quiz

with Andrew McLarty

Tď?¨ď?ľď?˛ď?łď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;/ď&#x2122;&#x2020;

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Static Ensemble Sď?Ąď?´ď?ľď?˛ď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;/ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;

Wink and the Signal Mď?Żď?Žď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;/ď&#x2122;&#x160;

Karaoke w/ Matt Tď?ľď?Ľď?łď?¤ď?Ąď?š ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x192;/ď&#x2122;&#x2039;

Open Mic with Jason Bailey

!"# Join Us For

IRISH NIGHT

Every Thursday 8pm - 11pm

This Week Featuring

EMERALD ACCENT. !"#

THURSDAY, OCT. 3 College football (6:30-9 p.m., ESPN): The Texas Longhorns look to get their season back on track against fellow Big12 team the Iowa State Cyclones. FRIDAY, OCT. 4 College football (8-11 p.m., ESPN): Nevada hopes to keep pace with Mountain West Conference Western Division leader Fresno State in a key conference game against San Diego State. SATURDAY, OCT. 5 College football (6-9 p.m., ESPN): Mississippi State comes off their bye week looking to upset the LSU at home after the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; emotional loss against Georgia. â&#x20AC;Ś College football (6-9 p.m. ESPN U) Ole Miss looks to score some points against the other SEC team from Alabama, the Auburn Tigers. SUNDAY, OCT. 6 NFL (12-3 p.m., Fox): After a short rest week due to Monday Night Football, the New Orleans Saints hit the road to face an impressive Chicago Bears team.

Folks should feel some hope around Hattiesburg this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just about finally getting a winner in the mayoral electionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but on the football field. MONDAY, OCT. 7 NFL (7:30-11 p.m., ESPN): The New York Jets travel south to meet the Atlanta Falcons, who face their secondstraight AFC East opponent at home in primetime on Monday Night Football. TUESDAY, OCT. 8 Documentary (7-8 p.m., ESPN): ESPNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 30 for 30 series continues with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Free Spirit,â&#x20AC;? the unusual story of how two brothers were able to stay in pro basketball after the ABA merged with the NBA. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9 NHL (7-9 p.m., NBC Sports Network): Dream of winter while watching a preseason regular season NHL game between the Chicago Blackhawks and the St. Louis Blues. This week the Southern Miss Golden Eagles host Florida International in a game between two 0-4 teams. Somebody is walking out of M.M. Roberts Stadium with a win, and it could be USM. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant Remember the 1992 NLCS

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See this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College Football Top 25 poll at jfp.ms/2013pollweekfive and look for it to return to the paper in the coming weeks.


• Laptop & iPads screen replacement • Data backup,DC Jack repair • Small business service calls • Same day service • We sell and buy used computers Reviews & photos at www.kismar.com “Work was completed as promised and price was lower than other stores. This is the second time I have used them and am very satisfied” Ernest V.

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Always Drink Responsibly

Stir-fry cash… Mmmm! One winner hourly will receive up to $1,000 in chips and is eligible for the $5,000 Cash grand prize drawing on December 13 at 12:30am!

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TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: Post an ad at jfpclassifieds.com, call 601-362-6121, ext. 11 or fax to 601-510-9019. Deadline: Mondays at noon.

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jacksonfreepress.com

3#/20)//CT .OV 

As low as $20! jfpclassifieds.com

37


Butler’s

SOUTHLAND

AUTO SERVICE

20% OFF complete pair of glasses with mention of this ad

In Business since 1971

5448 North State Street Jackson, MS 39206

601-362-2253 Monday-Friday 7:30 - 5:30

SERVICES • A/C & Heating • Starting & Charging • Electrical Problems • Brakes & Clutches • General Maintenance • Tune-Ups & Oil Changes • Transmission Service and much more!

Trish Hammons, ABOC Fondren • 661 Duling Ave.

601.362.6675 www.customoptical.net

YOUR UNITED WAY SUPPORT HELPED ME PROVIDE A STABLE HOME FOR MY KIDS

October 2 - 8, 2013

When Marcus received custody of his two children, he had no job, no high school diploma, and no idea how he would take care of them. Marcus turned to one of United Way’s partners for help. Six months later he had his GED, a new job, and is currently working on his associate’s degree at a local community college.

38

Your United Way’s initiatives are changing lives, right here, right now. Each of us can be the one who helps turn a life into a success story. Together, person by person, we can make lasting change.


WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE HAVING A LITTLE WORK DONE. Mississippi's only full service Hilton Hotel has kicked off a major renovation project. The renovation plan calls for updates in the hotel lobby, restaurants, 276 guest rooms, and a few more exciting enhancements. Entire project is scheduled to wrap up by the end of the year. We are excited about our renovation and look forward to providing you with an even better hotel! For room reservations please visit hilton.com or call 601-957-2800 STAY HILTON. GO EVERYWHERE.

1001 East County Line Road | Jackson | MS 39211 | USA Š2013 Hilton Worldwide

2013-06-27 15:51:19 +0100

facebook.com/rainbowcoop

twitter.com/rainbowcoop

jacksonfreepress.com

Untitled - Page: 1

39


MARKET PLACE

adver tise here star ting at $75 a week 601.362.6121 x11

Kickboxing Fitness Class

Fondren’s Newest Nail Salon

K AR DI O

The Little Big Store Vinyl Records +45’s & 78’s

morrison brothers music 127 Dyess Road Ridgeland, MS 39157

• Band & String Instrument Rentals • Lessons Programs

BY KIMBERLY

• In-House Repairs Guitars • Keyboards • Recording • Pro Audio Drums • Band • Orchestra • Print Music

Specializing In Natural Nails

• CDs & Tapes Mon, Fri & Sat: • Posters 10am - 5pm • Back Issue Music Sun: 1 - 5pm Magazines & Books • T-Shirts & Memorabilia • Blu-Rays, DVDs, & VHS

NOW

Shellac

Every Monday at 6:30 $30 for 8 Weeks OR $5 Drop In

Healthy Nails Pedicures 2947 Old Canton Road | 601.366.6999

605 Duling Ave. Jackson, MS

601.884.0316

601.857.8579 201 E. Main Street Raymond, Ms www.littlebigstore.com

www.morrisonbrothersmusic.com

Your

Fashion

Inspiration Location

1220 E Northside Dr, Jackson, MS • 601-499-5277

Mention JFP2013 for

Certified Makeup Artist

15% Off

Candice Davis Homecoming Courts •Bridal Parties Photo Shoots • And More

Repairs & Accessories

Free Strip Lashes For Groups

398 Hwy. 51 • Ridgeland, MS (601) 853-3299 • www.villagebeads.com

601-672-5139 cadavis2005@hotmail.com

Priority 1 Data System, LLC

Solutions for your computer are our FIRST Priority. 1260 E. County Line Rd. Ridgeland platosclosetridgeland.com 601.487.8207

• Install/Configure Hardware/Software • Removal of Malware/Spyware Viruses • Data Recovery • Networking Installations • Other services upon request

John Wilkerson Information Security Technician Consultant

769-218-0062 • www.p1ds.com

Supplements…

Not just for baseball. (Every player wants to enhance their performance. Try a supplement and watch your batting average go up!)

175 Hwy 80 East in Pearl * 601.932.2811 M­Th: 10­10p F­Sa 10­Mid Su: 1­10p * www.shopromanticadventures.com


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