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September 18 - 24, 2013

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TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN MUKESH KUMAR

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he first time this reporter met Mukesh Kumar, he led me through the winding halls of Jackson State University’s Urban and Regional Planning Department to his office. It was late on a Tuesday afternoon, well after 5 p.m., and Kumar was the lone soul left at work. He wore a white dress shirt, a blue blazer and a gold bow tie. He looked, for all intents and purposes, like a college professor. He had stayed late in his office, which is lined with interesting books and smells as if you just walked into Lemuria Books, to talk with the Jackson Free Press about his idea of what he calls “complete streets.” The national initiative is a plan he thinks Jackson can adopt to become more pedestrian-friendly, and won’t cost too much money. Kumar, the interim director of Jackson State’s urban and regional planning program, has emerged as one of the most respected authorities on the city of Jackson. Aside from being a go-to commentator for the Jackson Free Press, Kumar serves as an associate professor at JSU, and lends his voice to a blog on The Clarion-Ledger’s Jackson Voices project. Kumar is naturally skeptical. He has voiced his concerns about projects such as two-waying Capitol Street (he says it won’t bring business back), he called for relaxed zoning laws to let citizens address blight on their own, and he tried to explain the correlation

CONTENTS

between population growth and commercial demand in downtown Jackson. His ideas are edgy; his criticism fair. The knowledge of cities, and his written commentary, both come naturally to one of JSU’s favorite professors. Born in Bihar, India, the 40-year-old Kumar moved to the United States in 1996 and moved to Iowa to get a master’s degree from the University of Northern Iowa. After graduating, Kumar attend Cleveland State University in Ohio, where he earned his doctorate in Urban Public Affairs. Jackson State lured him to Mississippi to teach in 2004, and he’s grown to love the capital city. “It’s a city with great potential,” Kumar said. “There are some fundamental obstacles we must overcome, but it has its own personality. I must know the city that I live in, because learning and teaching about cities is what I do.” Kumar stops short of describing his career choice of teaching as a calling, but says he wouldn’t do anything else. “To be a professor, you must be able to profess,” he said. “But first, you have to decide what it is you want to profess. For me, it is city and urban planning. It’s what gets me excited.” Kumar’s parents still reside in Bihar, and he has a younger brother who lives in New Jersey. —Tyler Cleveland

Cover photograph by Trip Burns

9 District 2 Duel

Alberta Ross Gibson and Darrel McQuirter, both of District 2, have put jobs and passion projects on pause in order to run for Hinds County supervisor.

33 Full Spectrum

The Mississippi Watercolor Society’s multicolored works are on display through the end of the week at Hinds Community College.

39 A Dandy Fest

“People are like, ‘Are you a bluegrass band? Are you a folk band? What are you?’ I just have to say, ‘We’re folk. At the basis of that, I’d like to say we’re singer/songwriters because that’s what Spencer (Thomas) and I do. That’s how all the songs begin—with words, usually.” —Zach Lovett of Dandy & the Lions, which performs at Otherfest in Cleveland, Miss., Sept. 21, “Lion Around ‘A Quiet Town’

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 6 ............................................ TALKS 10 .................................. BUSINESS 12 ................................ EDITORIAL 13 .................................... OPINION 14 ............................ COVER STORY 33 .............................. DIVERSIONS 35 .......................................... FILM 36 ............................... JFP EVENTS 38 ....................................... 8 DAYS 39 ....................................... MUSIC 40 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 42 ..................................... SPORTS 43 .................................... PUZZLES 45 ....................................... ASTRO

MATT MORSE PHOTOGRAPHY ; TRIP BURNS; TRIP BURNS

SEPTEMBER 18 - 24, 2013 | VOL. 12 NO. 2

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

The Devil Is In the Questions

J

ust this weekend, I was in a meeting with a business adviser. “Allow me to play devil’s advocate for a minute,” she said in response to an idea we’d had for our business. The question gave me a slight pause because I was in the middle of assembling this “GOOD Ideas: What Jackson Needs” issue and thinking about Jackson’s potential, as well as what holds us back. A huge hurdle is the lack of devil’s advocacy in Jackson’s world of ideas. Or, more accurately, we do not encourage questioning enough as a tried-and-true way to vet and test and discuss and perhaps even evolve big ideas. It’s unusual to hear someone pushing a big public project to say: “Tell me what is wrong with my idea. Question me. Test me. Try me. Vet me. Make me prove the concept.” Too often, it’s just the opposite. If you dare to question many big ideas, the folks who want it most are just as likely to bad mouth you as to look at you. I hear many good people—Jackson warriors, I call them—sit around sipping a craft beer and bemoaning how hard it is to question some or another big, hairy idea without being demonized for their efforts. Inevitably, the project they want to probe involves tax dollars and would be cool if it happened. But it also has major obstacles that we need to identify and address early in the process to determine whether the idea is feasible at all, how to pay for it and how it fits into a larger vision for the city. For daring to question, many Jacksonians are tagged “naysayers” who “need to get with the program.” The worst things I won’t repeat. Jackson has a disturbingly long history of a fairly small handful of people coming up with ambitious ideas and allowing absolutely no dissent, meaning that the citizenry ends up expecting the projects to come to fruition, while not understanding the sugarcoated

challenges. When they don’t happen, citizens grow increasingly cynical at, supposedly, the city’s inability to make things happen. I’ve known situations where a smart young thinker questions a project on a public website, and their boss gets an angry phone call from project supporters. I’ve known people who get belittled and disparaged personally because they ask questions about

I really don’t get hating people because they ask vital questions.

big public projects. I’ve met people (in additional to myself) who get long, scolding, angry letters and inappropriate emails because they dare to criticize development efforts, whether it’s an unfeasible lakes project, an expensive arena or handing over conventioncenter hotel land to a controversial company as late Mayor Frank Melton and friends did (and which took years to get unlocked). My own newspaper has been threatened, cursed and boycotted because we dared to report that people pushing large projects had undisclosed conflicts of interest. One local leader still refuses to talk to us on the record until we apologize publicly for reporting factual information about a public effort. Obviously, we can’t and won’t ethically apologize for reporting the truth, so we’re blacklisted. Needless to say, these attempts to squelch questioning of public projects is

dumb at best, and self-defeating for the city at the worst. If there is anything that citizens of a city should do, it is to ask questions until a project is fully vetted. We should all raise concerns and express dissent anytime we feel like it (as we did for years with Melton’s convention-center hotel deal until we were proved dramatically right years later). That kind of accountability builds trust, not suspicion. I really don’t get hating people because they ask vital questions. I am in the business of asking questions, and I teach others to find their voices and question. My own work, and that of my business, are made stronger by good questions. Even the nastiest dissent over the years has helped us improve: There is often a modicum of truth hidden in the ugliest of comments and even when surrounded by lies. I’ve learned to look for the truth and use it. And if there is no truth in the dissent, I’ve taught myself how to ignore it and stay focused on the helpful and the positive. When I decided to write about this topic for this GOOD Ideas issue, I initially worried that the column would come across too negative. But that is not my intention. I actually see Jackson’s renaissance efforts as much more positive than negative. My message is that we can’t allow a few folks with thin skins to keep us from asking a lot of tough questions about expensive, ambitious projects, and I know that squelching happens too often, especially as more and more people tell me how they’re ostracized when they dare to question. Before I sat down to write about it, I did a search on “community” and “dissent” and actually turned up information about something called “Delphi Technique”—basically a system some policy-makers use to try to manufacture “consensus” by not allowing a lot of dissent in the first place. The Rand Corp. came up with this method in

the 1950s to maneuver segments of the public into accepting certain public policies with minimal dissent. The goal, it seems, is to hold supposedly “public” forums where input from the public is actually very limited in order to look accountable and open to ideas. Sure, this sounds like conspiracy-theory stuff, and it may be. But as I read about it, I thought of a recent “forum” on the “One Lake” project in which interested residents had to go station to station to talk to project supporters and write down comments rather than stand up and ask questions. A critic of the process, Andrew Whitehurst, said that the Mississippi Development Authority has also employed such a closed approach to public commenting. It sure felt like the folks behind “One Lake” weren’t dying to answer questions in front of a people who might (or might not) dissent. A better approach for “One Lake” supporters is to hold a real public forum and answer real questions for all to hear. This lake idea may well be the right one; they must prove it with real accountability. Limiting public input and dodging hard questions just delays a public hearing of answers to important questions—or maybe even the inevitable failure of the project years after we should have known better. Making good policy isn’t about easy consensus; vetting and questioning must be at the center or we end up with problematic ideas “Peter Principled” to the top of the pile, leaving better ones in the trash pile. I found a website (jfp.ms/Delphi) that recommended three responses to efforts to squelch your question: 1) Always be charming, courteous, smiling. 2) Stay focused with written questions and don’t respond defensively to attempts to belittle your questions. And 3) be persistent. Always be willing to say, “…but you didn’t answer my question.” Then, ask it again. It matters. So does the willingness to answer it.

September 18 - 24, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

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Tyler Cleveland

Amber Helsel

R.L. Nave

Briana Robinson

Trip Burns

Andrea Thomas

Tommy Burton

Kristin Brenemen

JFP City Reporter Tyler Cleveland loves sports, good music and soul food. He can be found around Fondren when he’s not running to and fro across the Jackson Free Press offices. He contributed to the cover package.

Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel graduated from Ole Miss with a journalism degree. She is short, hungry and always thinking. She contributed to the cover package.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Call him at 601-3626121 ext. 12. He contributed to the cover package.

Music Editor Briana Robinson wants to become an expert on all things music. Her other passions are dance and photography. Send her music scoop at briana@jacksonfreepress. com. She worked on the event listings.

Staff Photographer Trip Burns is a graduate of the University of Mississippi where he studied English and sociology. He enjoys the films of Stanley Kubrick. He took photos for the issue.

Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas is a native of Ridgeland. Andrea is a lover of music, fashion and good food. She spends her free time exploring everything Jackson has to offer. She designed many of the ads for the issue.

Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton plays bass with Lately David, collects records, sees movies and travels a lot with his wife, Michelle. He did the music listings.

Art Director Kristin Brenemen is an otaku with a penchant for dytopianism. She can’t imagine a world without fresh eggs. Holla @wyldkyss if you’re playing #ACNL too! At night, she fights crime. She designed much of the issue.


Museum of Mississippi History

Mississippi Civil Rights Museum

Please join us for our

GROUNDBREAKING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 10AM

.VTJDt'PPEt$IJMESFOTBDUJWJUJFT /PSUI4USFFU +BDLTPOt MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY

DUVALL DECKER A R C H I T E C T S , P. A .

ARCHITECTURE . PLANNING . INTERIORS

2915 NORTH STATE STREET . JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39216 . PHONE 601.713.1128 . FAX 601.713.1168 W W W. D U VA L L D E C K E R .C O M . R O Y T. D E C K E R , A I A . A N N E M A R I E D E C K E R , A I A

Millsaps College

Driving the Conversation “Across the Street and Around the Globe� Summers Lecture: “The Harmony of Liturgy & Life: A Day with Don & Emily Saliers� Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Lectures are free and open to the public. Registration required. Lunch: $10.

September 20, 12:30 p.m.

Friday Forum: Around the World: Students Share Their Experiences in Travel Abroad Programs Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

September 21, 1 p.m.

Millsaps v. Point University (Football) Millsaps College, Harper Davis Field Admission: $10

www.millsaps.edu

September 25, 8:30 a.m.

Else School of Management Fall Forum: Economists Darrin Webb and Greg Daco Robert and Dee Leggett Special Events Center Admission: Free

September 27, 12:30 a.m.

Friday Forum: Nguvu ya Sauti: Voice in Tanzanian Education Gertrude C. Ford Academic Complex, Room 215 Admission: Free

October 1, 7 p.m.

Arts & Lecture Series: Southern Writers, Michael Kardos and Matthew Guinn Gertude C. Ford Academic Complex, Recital Hall Admission: $10

jacksonfreepress.com

September 17, 9:30 a.m.

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Friday, Sept. 13 An Indian court sentences four men to death for the gang rape and murder of a young New Delhi woman, ordering them to the gallows. Saturday, Sept. 14 Police officers in North Carolina taze and shoot an unarmed man running toward them seeking help after a car crash. ‌ Negotiations between U.S. and Russian diplomats in Switzerland produce a sweeping agreement involving making an inventory and seizing all components of Syria’s chemical weapons program and imposing penalties if President Bashar Assad’s government fails to comply.

September 18 - 24, 2013

Sunday, Sept. 15 The Pakistani Taliban demand that the government release militant prisoners and begin withdrawing troops from the group’s tribal sanctuary before they participate in peace talks.

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Monday, Sept. 16 A gunman opens fire inside the Washington Navy Yard, killing at least 12 people in an attack on office workers. ‌ U.N. inspectors say there is “clear and convincing evidenceâ€? that Syria used chemical weapons on a relatively large scale in Damascus. Tuesday, Sept. 17 Activists from Newtown, Conn., head to Washington to lobby again for gun control in the wake of the Washington Navy Yard shooting. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

by Tyler Cleveland

J

ackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba is aware that his controversial budget, which the city council passed Sept. 12 with a 5-2 vote, would ruffle some feathers. But he’s OK with that. He didn’t run for office to win any popularity contests. In the end, he convinced the Jackson City Council that his plan to raise rates on water and sewer services and drastically increase funding for the public works department is the responsible move for the city. After weeks of deliberation, the vote went relatively smoothly, with just one amendment added. Councilman Tony Yarber, Ward 6, proposed that $12,500 be reallocated from the $100,000 fund to pay for an audit of city departments, and instead use the funds for Alignment Jackson, a nonprofit group aimed at facilitating community-wide collaboration in support of Jackson schools. The council adopted Yarber’s amendment with the mayor’s blessing. It then proceeded to pass Lumumba’s $502.5 million budget for the 2014 fiscal year, which starts Oct. 1, leading to applause from the crowd that filled the council chambers. The new budget increases the city’s total expenditures a whopping 43.5 percent from last year. Voting against approving the budget were Councilman Quentin Whitwell, Ward 1, who opposes what he perceives to be tax increases on the citizens of Jackson, and Councilwoman LaRita Cooper-Stokes, Ward 3, who opposes the rate increases for water and sewer services. Whitwell tried to break the approval process into three separate votes: one for the millage increase the council already passed

last week; one for the rate increases on water and sewer services; and another for the balance of the budget. After the city attorney’s office said that was not possible, Whitwell suggested that the budget be broken into two parts—the capitol budget and the operational budget—so the council could vote

city to spend $390 million over 17 years to upgrade its wastewater management system. Councilman De’Keither Stamps, Ward 4, echoed Barrett-Simon’s concerns. “It’s time for Jackson to stop buying what it wants and begging for what it needs,� Stamps said. “We’re going around begging TRIP BURNS

Thursday, Sept. 12 Syria’s top rebel commander calls for putting regime officials on trial for an alleged chemical weapons attack near Damascus. ‌ U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his team open two days of meetings with their Russian counterparts to outline a plan for securing and destroying vast stockpiles of Syrian chemical weapons.

Council Passes $502.5 Million Budget

Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba convinced the Jackson City Council to pass his massive $502.5 million budget by holding town-hall meetings and public hearings to address the finer points of his plan.

on them separately. His motion failed for lack of a second. “This is something that we’ve avoided for such a long time,� Ward 7 Councilwoman Margaret Barrett-Simon said. “We’re trying to ease the pain as much as we can. I think it would be terribly irresponsible for us to not pass these rate increases, given what we know about the Environmental Protection Agency and the consent decree.� At issue is a consent decree the city entered into with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2009, which requires the

for money to fix the things that we should do as a government, and I think it’s time for us to stand up and take responsibility and start fixing stuff in Jackson.� Whitwell explained that his opposition wasn’t an indictment of the mayor. “Yes, we have kicked the can down the road, and yes, we have some major infrastructure issues we need to address,� Whitwell said. “But we’re talking about putting all this money into fixing a water system, and we aren’t sure how many customers we have or will have in the future.�

Her Idea: Public Art by Nicole Wyatt

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Nicole Wyatt is inspired by the Blind Whino project in Washington, D.C.


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Having the Truancy Discussion by Tyler Cleveland

J

ackson Public Schools Superintendent Cedrick Gray is on a professional island. As the highest-ranking educator in Jackson, he has no peers he can look to—at least in Mississippi—as a model for how to fix the ailing school system. That’s because there isn’t another school district in the state that faces the challenges JPS faces. Neither does the state have a school system with as much potential as his district. Last week, the Jackson Free Press reported on an ordinance, proposed by Ward 6 Councilman Tony Yarber, that would put penalties on the parents of JPS students caught skipping school in an effort to get parents more involved in making sure their children attend school. This week, we learned just how big the truancy problem is in the district. JPS has 30,000 students, 9,000 of which are in high school. That number, alone, helps to explain why truancy laws are so hard to enforce in the capital city. The truancy rate—the percentage of students who record five or more un-excused absences during the last school year—was 39 percent for elementary schools, 48 percent for middle schools and a startling 71 percent for high school JPS students, according to Gray. “For me, and for all of us, it’s a major concern,� Gray said. “Truancy leads to unexcused absences, and when you have those, that leads to a failing grade. Unfortunately, that path ultimately leads to negative activity and, based on conversations I’ve had with our youth court and detention center, the disengaged and disenfranchised student turns to non-productive activity.� The logic is simple. If a student is not in

class, he or she isn’t learning. What isn’t simple is finding the solution to the problem, as evidenced by a discussion at the United Way’s Jackson offices Sept. 12. At that meeting, representatives from the Jackson Police Department, the Hinds County Sheriff’s office, the American Civil Liberties Union, the Southern Poverty Law TRIP BURNS

How many customers are currently on the city’s system was not available by press time, but a few of them attended a city-hosted town-hall meeting at Progressive Missionary Baptist Church Sept. 4. After an opening speech from Lumumba and Public Works Director Dan Gaillet, the audience peppered the mayor with questions, most of which concerned personal problems that residents were having—undrinkable water from one man’s taps, inconsistent water billing sent to a woman’s home and complaints of unusually high billing among them. The mayor answered them all. But the mayor’s explanation and Gaillet’s presentation that night, designed to show how little people pay for water now and how little they will pay after the increase, did little to sway the opinion of those in attendance who spoke up. “(The presentation) didn’t do much for me,� former Ward 3 city council candidate Zachary Williams said. “They could have made things simpler and just talked about the nuts and bolts.� Another Ward 3 resident, Joe Harvey, came out to express his displeasure with the water treatment he receives at his home at 4031 California Ave. “The water is undrinkable,� Harvey said after the meeting. “I have to go to the store and buy $40 of water to drink during the week, and now they are talking about raising the bill on the water I use through the system. My whole thought is, if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it.� “I’m going to turn that around on you a little bit,� Lumumba responded. “The water and sewer systems are broke, and we’re going to fix them. Alright? OK.� Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

Jackson Public Schools Superintendent Cedrick Gray is supportive of an ordinance that would levy penalties against parents of truant students.

Center, the city of Jackson, the NAACP, and various other groups hashed out questions and concerns about the ordinance Councilman Yarber proposed. The consensus? It is no silver bullet. Yarber opened the meeting by sharing his story of property crime taking place in his ward during the day. He said he has had a long list of property stolen from his house and, in one instance, he came face-to-face with a 16-year-old who kicked in his door. Although the Jackson Police Department was still in the process of gathering data, the officer at the meeting predicted that minors commit 85 percent of property

crimes in south Jackson. Yarber is convinced his ordinance will help by holding parents or guardians responsible for their child’s attendance through fines and responsible parenting classes. Thursday’s group had concerns about the measure the way it stands. Some at the meeting thought the fines ($150 for second offense, $250 for third and subsequent offenses) are too low. Others showed concern for the parents of children who have been in and out of youth court and who have done everything they can do to no avail. “One of our biggest concerns is that (the ordinance) does not address the root problem of why these students are not in school in the first place,� ACLU of Mississippi Executive Director Jennifer Riley-Collins said. “Also, this seems to be a solution for the entire city that addresses a neighborhood problem.� Superintendent Gray said he applauded Yarber’s effort to take action on the issue, and said he likes to think of the ordinance as one part of a two-part plan. “There’s first-order change and secondorder change,� Gray said. “Mr. Yarber realizes that we must do something now, and that’s the first-order change. The second-order change comes from the people in this room when we try to address the reasons why these students are not attending school.� Yarber said he believes those skeptical of his ordinance should focus on the big picture. “Everybody in the room is right,� Yarber said. “We play different roles, but we need to be working together. It’s like the offense and defense are fighting with each other when we are all on the same team.� Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com.

     



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SEPTEMBER 24TH

“If elected your next Supervisor of District 2 I promise to continue the Legacy of Leadership and be accountable to all the citizens‌ and you can count on that!â€? For More information visit www.electbobrown.com or call (601)983-9105 Paid for by the Committee to Elect Bo Brown

COMING UP AT MMA

     

JACKSON ACADEMY

Art Remix Friday, October 4

Thursday, September 26, 2013 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Tours start at 4:30 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center.

Jackson Academy’s Raider Night features guided tours showcasing the 7 –12 grade innovative learning September 18 - 24, 2013

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community, including new STEM and robotics labs.

Preregister online by Monday, September 23, to be entered to win an iPad Mini (must be present to win) or register at the event. Scan the QR code or visit jacksonacademy.org/raidernight to register now.

For more information, call us at 601.362.9676 or email raidernight@jacksonacademy.org.

Siptember

Thursday, September 19 5PM 6PM

cash bar pub trivia scavenger hunt through The Mississippi Story

T O W N CREEK

ARTS FESTIVAL

A N N U A L

AFTER HOURS

T H I R D

7PM featuring Latinismo!

Saturday, October 5 noon til 6PM free admission n family fun artists and craftsmen performances all day

MISSISSIPPI MUSEUM of ART 601.960.1515 1.866.VIEWART 380 SOUTH LAMAR STREET JACKSON, MS 39201


DISH | supes

Gibson: Unique Perspective by R.L. Nave

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TRIP BURNS

lberta Ross Gibson, 61, has her ear to focus on her candidacy. She recently made most cases, they cannot bid on the job—unto the ground when it comes to the her pitch to the Jackson Free Press. til they show proof of insurance. economy of Hinds County. I’m always lenient in trying to Having worked in insurwork with them to finance their preance sales for three decades, she claims miums. There are individuals that she can tell which way the economy is have been in my office that have said, headed based on the number of poli“I can’t get this job without having cies she writes in a given month. When insurance, and I don’t have $1,000 to times are good, she might sell an average pay as a down payment.” of two policies per day (a good rule of So what I do there is look for other thumb is to aim to write one insurance options: Can you pay half of your policy per day, she says). When times down payment and set the other half are hard, agents write fewer than the up on an installment? 30-policy-per-month minimum goal. What are your thoughts on Right now, times are hard for the proposed Byram-Clinton Gibson’s customers, who include conParkway? tractors and other business people who Alberta Ross Gibson says she can sell investors and frequently have to purchase pricey in- developers on doing business in Hinds County. I want to make sure, with Jackson surance plans before they can bid on a being the capital city, that Jackson will project or start a new venture. Gibson, be included. In order for Jackson to reap who is divorced and has one daughter, besome benefits, it must be inclusive. lieves having her finger on the pulse of the You say your experience as an problems facing business owners makes her insurance agent provides unique What are some economic-development uniquely qualified to “sell” Hinds County to insight into the county’s economic projects that you’re excited about? problems. Could you explain? prospective developers. I have a serious concern about downGibson has also been the chairwoman In the property and casualty line of in- town. I am the chairperson for the (Farish of the Farish Street Heritage Festival for the surance, I meet small-business owners almost Street Heritage) festival and have been for past 13 years. on a daily basis. We have general contractors the last 13 years. That event has contributed She believes so strongly that she is the right that are required to carry general-liability in- to the tax base of Hinds County. I call it my person for the job of District 2 Hinds County surance, workers comp or both. In a lot of baby because I love Farish Street. We bring supervisor that she called off the festival this year cases, the contractors cannot get the job—in the community out. We coordinate with the

colleges and bring vendors. The vendors make money, and we collect taxes from the vendors. That’s one of the reasons I’m interested in making some other things work on Farish Street. I have some things in mind, but I’m not ready to give everyone my plan. Would those replace the festival this year?

No, (it’s) something to add. We did not do the festival this year because of my priority of running for the District 2 supervisor seat. I could not produce the festival because the festival takes a good six months out of the year for me to solicit funds, make preparations—it consists of a lot. Do you see serving District 2 as being in a tug of war of priorities between the city and rural parts of the district?

It doesn’t have to be because it’s going to take a collaborative effort on the part of urban supervisors as well as rural and urban (areas). As a board, we have to make sure that we are unified, and put ourselves on the back burner. Read the full interview and comment at www.jfp.ms.

McQuirter: Planting the Seeds by R.L. Nave

One of the biggest concerns is crime. Whether you’ve been hit directly by a criminal element or just seeing it, (crime) makes you cautious.

Where are the growth opportunities?

Whether you like it or don’t like it, there’s nothing you can do about it. Whether you delay it or pay it outright, you’re going to pay that contact. Whether you pay it through the courts, you’re going to pay that contract. Do we need a bigger jail?

Yes, but we don’t have the money to pay for a bigger jail … Right now, we have an overloaded prison and jail system. We have an undermanned jail and sheriff’s department, but the courts and sheriff’s department eats up over half of the budget. So even if they need more money, where are you going to get it?

Hinds County is unique. It’s in the center of the state. It’s at the crossroads between New Orleans and Memphis. It’s between Dallas and At- Darrel McQuirter, a Hinds County department lanta, and we’re not taking advantage head, who took a leave of absence to run for the of (traffic). It comes through here, but District 2 supervisor’s seat, believes he can help the county run better. it doesn’t stop. We need to figure out a It is not my intention to dictate to the way to get things to stop here. It is also sheriff how he should run his department. the seat of state government. I’m a support- velopments can come in and create growth It is my intention to work with not only er of the lake project to create some type of for Hinds County. this (Hinds County) sheriff but also the othdestination downtown. er sheriffs in the community and come up What has Hinds County done so that What needs to happen to make the with some regional solutions. I don’t know the next development comes here? I’m not county’s emergency management all of his plans, but I’m willing to listen to any upset with Madison or Rankin County work better than it is now? good plan. I’m not sure how to answer that one about what they’re doing; I’m upset beRead the full interview at www.jfp.ms. Email cause Hinds County is not doing enough being that I’m still a county employee. The R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. to put itself in a position so that those de- airwaves contract is just that—it is contract.

jacksonfreepress.com

What are people saying is top priority for the district?

The other item that comes up is the lack of new business, the deterioration of businesses, lack of maintenance on the roads (and) grass cutting. I hear a lot of complaints from small towns in getting assistance in the rural areas. Quite a few feel that they have been abandoned and/or neglected.

TRIP BURNS

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arrel McQuirter, 51, has a way of describing his job as the city of Clinton’s fire chief from 1998 to 2005: mission impossible. In moments of crises, the fire department had a seemingly blank check to squelch whatever emergency arose, but in times of relative calm, the bean counters at city hall pressed the department to cut costs. In McQuirter’s next mission—to be the next Hinds County supervisor for District 2—he hopes to use his experience managing tight budgets as a former emergency-operations manager and as the current director of the county’s planning and zoning department (he took a leave of absence to run for office). McQuirter and his wife, Janice, have six children and two granddaughters. He spoke with the Jackson Free Press about making Hinds County a better place for his “grandbabies.”

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TALK | business

Mad Genius, Museums and Hospitals by Dustin Cardon

September 24th

JAMES “LAP” BAKER Hinds County District 4 Supervisory District Seat

Let’s put Hinds County into its rightful position among all 82 MS Counties.

September 18 - 24, 2013

Experience

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-17 years as Director of Planning and Administration, Hinds County Department of Public Works. (1996-2013) -Supervised all solid waste activities in Hinds County (1998-2013) -Wrote and supervised the development of the Hinds County 4Year Road and Bridge Construction and Maintenance Plan. (19962013) -Created the first surveillance system for illegal dumping in the history of Hinds County and Mississippi. -Created the first rubberized-asphalt project in the history of Hinds County. -Wrote and received approval for grants totaling over $5 Million for Hinds County and the Hinds County Dept. of Public Works. -Represented Hinds County before the Chancery Court, State Supreme Court appointed Judge and Mississippi, Dept. of Environmental Quality on all Solid Waste Cases. Paid for by Friends to Elect James A. Baker

tract award could go as high as $40 million. Groundbreaking for the two museums is scheduled for Oct. 24. The total construction cost for the museums is estimated at close to $80 million. The first phase of construction will involve building the shell for the structures and completing exterior landscaping; however, Kevin Upchurch, executive director of the Mississippi Department of Finance & Administration, told legislators that the next phase will require additional money. The DFA is asking legislators to put $30 million for the build-out phase in the 2014 general bond bill. The museums need about $20 million to cover the cost of exhibits, $10 million of which will come from the state. Museum officials plan to get the rest through private fundraising and corporate sponsorships of exhibits. When completed, the museums and their common space will cover 319,000 square feet on four floors. Shared space includes the lobby, meeting rooms, a 200-space COURTESY 2MISSISSIPPIMUSEUMS.COM

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dvertising companies Deane, Smith Jackson groups such as the Butler Snow law and Partners of Nashville and Mad firm and Waggoner Engineering. The comGenius of Ridgeland have an- pany began in 1999. nounced a partnership to grow the two companies’ public relations, marketing, advertising and branding efforts. The companies plan to open four new offices nationwide staffed by more than 30 employees. “Public relations is an area we have not been active in,” Rick Moore, CEO of Mad Genius, told the Jackson Free Press. “We established a strategic alliThe state will choose a general contractor for the ance to shore up those lines. We are Mississippi Museum of History and Mississippi Civil now able to offer all our clients every Rights Museum by Sept. 26. service imaginable for all their advertising needs. Mad Genius, which focuses on print For information call Mad Genius at and digital and video production, opened in 601-605-6234 or Deane, Smith and Partners Ridgeland in 2005. The firm’s clients include at 615-618-8277. insurance companies, banks, restaurants, hospitals and more. Its top accounts include Museum Contracts Underway Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Co. Mississippi is set to choose a general and Bruce Foods. contractor for the Mississippi Museum of DS&P, which recently opened an office History and the accompanying Mississippi in Jackson, creates branding campaigns for Civil Rights Museum by Sept. 26. The con-

below-ground garage and an auditorium that will seat 300. The two museums will be located next to the William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 N. St.). HMA/Blue Cross Resolution Mississippi House Insurance Committee Chairman Gary Chism told representatives of Health Management Associates and Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi that if the two companies don’t resolve a dispute between them by January, legislators might consider a bill that would essentially eliminate insurance networks for hospitals in the state. HMA, a Florida-based company that owns 10 Mississippi hospitals, sued Blue Cross in June on charges that Blue Cross broke contract terms by underpaying for procedures. Blue Cross countered by accusing HMA of overcharging. HMA hospitals have been out-of-network for Blue Cross since Sept. 1, which could result in patients facing higher out-ofpocket expenses; however, HMA has said it will not charge BC/BS clients higher fees for the moment.


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Mississippi’s Gumbo

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love history. I can spend hours reading about it and watching documentaries. To me, the present isn’t understandable without historical context. History is one of the things that drew me to Mississippi, a state steeped in rich, diverse and groundbreaking past. What saddens me is how often Mississippians get tangled in the blackwhite dichotomy of oppression. I thought about this recently when a reporter asked me about the lack of African American appointments to the state’s charterschool board. I responded that the board didn’t have other people of color, either. I understand why people often don’t think about other minorities. We are a state where the majority minority, African Americans, make up more than 37 percent of the population. It is easy to think that blacks and whites are the only people here—or at least the only ones that matter. But Mississippi history says otherwise. Before whites or blacks arrived, our Native American brothers and sisters were here. They were part of the Trail of Tears. And Spain and France occupied this land. Mississippi has always had a diverse group of people. Think of an ethnic group and, in all likelihood, its people reside here. Though their numbers may be smaller, all of them matter. Their history and cultures matter. They are part of the Mississippi gumbo that makes us great. Their history is our history. It’s time for us to do some history homework. I tell my children: “There is no shame in being ignorant. To be ignorant means you just don’t know.� For those of us with technology at our fingertips, ignorance is often a choice. We have access to wide amounts of knowledge and information—and I’m not just talking about YouTube videos of dancing cats and babies. In 2013, if you know nothing of people unlike yourself, it is because you choose not to know. Sept. 15 marks the start of Hispanic Heritage Month. It’s a chance to pause and take time to learn some history that has been left out of the history books regarding 2.7 percent of our state population. With all the hate and bigotry some in this state are whipping up regarding Hispanic people and undocumented immigrants, it wouldn’t hurt for us to learn about our neighbors. Here’s your first fact: The U.S. government defines Hispanic or Latino as people who can trace their origins to Spanish cultures, such as Puerto Rico, and countries in South or Central America, regardless of race. For the 2010 Census, the form did not define the term. Happy learning, y’all!

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September 18 - 24, 2013

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Why it stinks: Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann has been pushing for a voter ID law in Mississippi for years. Instead of taking responsibility for the law’s passage, he put the onus for the law on the state Legislature, and said he was merely the guy responsible for enforcing it. Since the U.S. Supreme Court in June overturned the portion of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that required many states to gain pre-clearance, Hosemann has been going full speed ahead with voter ID implementation. The problem is, as Hosemann’s quote so eloquently puts it, the issue the law seeks to address—voter fraud—doesn’t seem to exist. Voter ID is a costly, punitive law that serves no one except those who wish to limit voter rights.

Lumumba: Telling Unpopular Truths

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ne of the difficulties every politician will face, sooner or later, is the choice between telling the people the truth or couching issues in terms of easy-to-digest pabulum and paternalistic “everything will be OK� talk. While the second path might get them reelected (or at least make them popular), it’s not particularly effective for getting things accomplished. Telling the truth is a much harder—and unpopular—road. Just ask one-term former President Jimmy Carter how well telling tough truths works out in the political arena. In Jackson, Mayor Chokwe Lumumba seems willing to tell the truth. The city is faced with hundreds of millions in infrastructure repair, as decreed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. And citizens need only to drive down one of Jackson’s pockmarked roads to feel the need for massive road repairs deep in their spines. None of that is conjecture, and all of it costs money. A big part of Lumumba’s solution to raise those funds comes in the form of raising Jacksonians’ water and sewer rates. This past week, the Jackson City Council passed the mayor’s proposed budget of $502.5 million, an increase of 43.3 percent from the previous fiscal year. During his campaign, the mayor promised to

involve the people of Jackson in his decisions. He also said that leaders need to do the right things, even when some people disagree. Lumumba took his budget proposal to the people in the form of town-hall meetings. We’re fairly certain that many of the citizens remain unconvinced that the rate increases are actually necessary; in fact, some are downright annoyed. Nonetheless, Lumumba did not back down on what he believes is the right course of action for the city. We applaud Mayor Lumumba for standing his ground on this issue. Regardless of how unpopular tough measures may be for Jackson, the city must improve its infrastructure if it hopes to attract the kinds of businesses and young, creative professionals that will put Jackson firmly on a path of economic growth and prosperity. The Jackson Free Press did not endorse Lumumba, as is well documented. The mayor comes with a good bit of controversial baggage that may yet be difficult to overcome. He has not faced the state Legislature to fight for the city’s financial well-being, a difficult, and sometimes impossible feat for former mayors. Time will tell whether Lumumba will find success in that arena. Still, while it is very early in his tenure as Jackson’s mayor, Lumumba’s willingness to swim against a popular tide and speak truth bodes well for his tenure and for the city of Jackson.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word “Your Turn� and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


DOMINIC DELEO

Disrupting the Status Quo

EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Interns Justin Hosemann, Mo Wilson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Intern Lindsay Fox Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. Š Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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baker’s dozen of good ideas: That’s what I came up with when asked to contribute a pithy set of good ideas to this issue. (By the way, with rare exception, I think all of the ideas that I’ve published in this newspaper so far, are at a minimum, good. ‌ Just saying.) So, here goes: Good Idea #1: Let every member on every mayor-appointed and council-confirmed city commission and board hand in his or her resignation—immediately. Let’s be clear, with rare exceptions, most of these commissions and boards have not distinguished themselves, and in business or other organizations, their poor performance and meager results would have targeted them a long time ago for replacement. I have more. As a condition of his or her appointment or reappointment, every board or commission member must participate in a diversity-training curriculum. Bring in the company that does the training for Leadership Jackson, but add a twist: You must graduate from the training to be eligible for service. Good Idea #2: Flood control. What say we tell the new mayor to put together a group of folks to come up with a floodcontrol plan, once and for all? They’ll have to include everyone who might be affected by the plan, upstream and downstream. They must concentrate on a governmental solution, and it must be open and transparent. What other self-respecting city would allow a private developer to hijack a vital process like this? Good Idea #3: Let’s invite JR, the semi-anonymous (that’s how TED Talks describes him) French photo artist to come to Jackson, and involve him in the city and state commemoration of the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer. And then see what he comes up with. Or do it on our own. Good Idea #4: Let’s eliminate Downtown Jackson Partners. It’s one more entity that ostensibly encourages development and revitalization, and it’s the least publicly accountable and—how shall I put this—democratic. Can anyone make a valid argument that DJP serves the interests of the entire city, and that the useful things it does couldn’t be done by another group or city agency? Good Idea #5: Let’s do a Jackson Lip Dub (see the Grand Rapids, Mich., version at jfp.ms/lipdub). We can change the song, but the whole city has to be involved and come together on one day to do this. Grand Rapids got 5,000 people involved. Good Idea #6: Let’s do away with the tax on real-estate improvements. It’s a

bit too complicated to explain here, so go to jfp.ms/rei to read up on it. Essentially a land value tax (or site valuation tax) is a levy on the unimproved value of land only. It’s been used in other places, most notably Pittsburgh, Pa., in the 1970s. Good Idea #7: Create a StoryCorps booth centrally located in Jackson, or outfit a StoryCorps van that can drive around the city. The StoryCorps folks “do this to remind one another of our shared humanity, strengthen and build the connections between people, teach the value of listening, and weave into the fabric of our culture the understanding that every life matters.� Good Idea #8: Become a City of Service (see citiesofservice.org). The Cities of Service initiative tasks cities to develop “a comprehensive service plan focused on matching volunteers and community partners to the areas of greatest local need.� Appoint a chief service officer to lead the effort, who would report to the mayor as other department heads. And hold her or him accountable. Good Idea #10: We need a municipal sports team. No, not that kind, I mean a municipal sports team. The mayor and the city council could field, say, a basketball team. Team members have to work together if they want to win. Have them play other municipal teams from towns and maybe even some state agencies. Good Idea #11: Let’s get Aereo (aereo.com) to come here, making television affordable ($8 to $12 a month) again. “Aereo lets you watch regular TV on any device, not just your TV, and lets you record shows for later viewing with DVR,� the website states. “You can get all this without a cable box or antenna, because Aereo has created tiny antennas and connected them to the Internet.� Good Idea #12: “Let a hundred flowers bloom,� Mao Zedong said. That’s self-explanatory. Good Idea #13: “Nobody’s free till everybody’s free.� —Fannie Lou Hamer Put it on the city seal, the city website, the city letterhead and business cards. Conduct a day of mass city chanting: nobody’s free till everybody’s free, nobody’s free till everybody’s free, nobody’s free till everybody’s free. Dominic DeLeo is a communications consultant, has managed political campaigns, served two terms as a councilman in upstate New York, and is a survivor of 20 years in the advertising industry. He writes the “All Politics is Local� blog for the Jackson Free Press

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We have all colors & ages

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Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

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What Our City Needs

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September 18 - 24, 2013

nyone who has lived in Jackson for a while, and gotten involved even marginally in the community, knows that there is no shortage of ideas on how to improve our city floating around. Sometimes it seems that everyone has a plan, or at least an ambitious thought. And we have creative, determined people here who care about our future, and that passion goes a long way. But let’s face it: The ideas aren’t always, well, good. Often, they’re not feasible or cost too much or rely on the same pool of public

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“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” — Margaret Mead

money that umpteen other projects want to share. They’re not always vetted well, or compared to best practices in other parts of the country to see what worked and what didn’t. They often don’t get enough community feedback early enough in the process. Sometimes, they’re even ideas that haven’t worked and that have lingered because some people wouldn’t let them go—or were brought back with little study of why they didn’t work in the first place. Or, worse, past elected officials tabled a great idea, and it is sitting in someone’s desk gathering dust.

We think there is a better way for Jackson warriors to make a difference. Jackson needs to be a city where all good ideas, big and small, are encouraged. We also must be mature enough as a community to demand and welcome full discussion of all projects, including from dissenters who might not agree with a particular idea or folks who simply have questions that should be answered. And we must be open to shelving ambitious plans that prove too expensive or feasible and moving to the next idea on the list, or changing an idea to make it work for more people. Building a great city is a messy, fruitful process. We need to hear questions and concerns early in development processes—when ideas are still on the drawing table and certainly before any public money is committed. A strong city is possible when passionate people can sit around a table and brainstorm, disagree, question, vet, and turn the idea inside out and upside down. All must be welcome at that table—and even more so when even one dollar of public money is needed. This GOOD Ideas issue is dedicated to the idea that many different people have great ideas to contribute about our city. We may not agree or disagree with every idea, but we urge you to consider, debate and vet all of these ideas, and come up with your own.

“Citizens who use their power to convene other citizens are what create an alternative future.” — Peter Block in “Community: The Structure of Belonging” The Jackson Free Press will soon launch a series of community forums to discuss ideas for the city and to give you-the-stakeholder a chance to be heard. We urge you to ask real questions and leave the ego at the house (as should the idea generators). Many of the best ideas in history have resulted from a group of people brainstorming ways to make a flawed idea better. Or finding something better to replace it with—which often happens in early discussion phases. Building a great city takes all of us. Let’s get started. Before you read about the ideas in the pages ahead, do some brainstorming of your own and fill in the circles on this page with your own ideas for Jackson. When you’re done, head to jfp.ms/ jacksonideas and share an image of your map, post your ideas or comment on others’. Your voice is welcome.

_________________’s Plan for Jackson * Remember! Take a picture of your map and post it at jfp.ms/jacksonideas.


A Regional Vision by Tyler Cleveland

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he greater metropolitan area of Jackson is a collection of loosely aligned, often-at-odds cities, towns and communities worthy of a university-sanctioned study on diversity and race politics. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roughly 540,000 people from almost every walk of life. From the shores of the Ross Barnett Reservoir to Westland Plaza to the Civil War battlefields of Raymond, there are â&#x20AC;&#x153;havesâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;have-nots.â&#x20AC;? We have sensible folks and absurd sensationalists; we have honest politicians and self-serving narcissists. Jackson also has saintsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; both self-proclaimed and humbleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and more than a few sinners. Most Brandon and Madison residents donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to care what happens to Jackson, and in the same vein, your average Jackson resident doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trust his suburbanite counterparts. The race element is strong, and so is the class element. Divides are wide. The truth about the bigger picture in Jackson is complex, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not pretty. Anyone who has history in and around Jackson knows the story, or shouldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the end of the Jim Crow laws and forced integration of public schools led to white flight in the

early 1970s, and through the following decades, Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suburbs grew faster than kudzu on a sunny hillside. Thus, regionalism became the dream of a few who wanted to expand the scope of Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shrinking populace, bringing the population that left city limits back into the fold, both to re-strengthen the city and to help those who fled reclaim power in the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital. Enter the Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership, a conglomeration of metro businesses and civic leaders, and its 10-year strategic plan, Vision 2022, finalized in July 2012 by Market Street Services of Atlanta. Most chambers of commerce have a plan of some kind for the city or county in which they serve, but Vision 2022 casts a wide, ambitious net in a metro with difficult, unresolved power dynamics. Fresno, Calif., has a 10-year plan to combat homelessness. Baltimore has a 10year plan to repair broken inner-city schools. Anchorage, Alaska, has a 10-year plan to fight obesity. Vision 2022, if ever fully implemented, would serve all of those functions and much more. Think of it this way: If regionalism is the bus weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to ride into the future,

Vision 2022 is the roadmap the chamber wants us to follow. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Game-Changing Thingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Vision 2022 plan has a 10-point strategy, with broad goals for each point.

It includes improving educational opportunities in the region, promoting arts and culture, attracting talent, building regional trails to connect communities, turning

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not for relinquishing Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s control over water, transportation or communication resources, and I never will be.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba

Market Street relied on interviews with Jackson stakeholders, focus groups and surveys to develop these four strategic themes for the Vision 2022 plan.

â&#x20AC;˘ Creating PLACES: A reality of this talent-driven economy is that communities are increasingly competing for talent as aggressively as for companies. One differentiator in this competition is the attractiveness of a region as a place to live, work, and retire. While fast becoming an economic development clichĂŠ, place does matter when it comes to communitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; successful futures. Thus, improving its â&#x20AC;&#x153;quality of placeâ&#x20AC;? must be a concern of all local leaders. â&#x20AC;˘ Creating WEALTH: More than anything else, economic development is about improving residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives. This is done through the pursuit of employment that provides good wages and opportunities for advancement that will enable local workers to build wealth and contribute positively to the regional economy. Development strategies must be balanced between the retention and expansion of existing businesses, development of small businesses, and attraction of outside firms. â&#x20AC;˘ Creating TALENT: The best jobs in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy go to those with the advanced skills necessary to perform them. Companies in technology-intensive

sectors therefore show preference for communities with the workforce capacity to sustain the growth of their firms. It is critical that regions develop â&#x20AC;&#x153;cradle to careerâ&#x20AC;? talent pipelines to serve the businesses that areâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and willâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;create the jobs that increase local incomes and overall wealth. This process must begin as early as possible to instill the value and importance of a quality education in every child and within every family. â&#x20AC;˘ Creating CONNECTIONS: The most successful regions are those that work together across all boundaries, be they geographic, demographic, racial and ethnic, generational, or political. According to public input participants, Greater Jackson still has numerous gulfs to be bridged, relationships to be built and nurtured, and partnerships to be developed. Suburban and rural stakeholders must also understand and acknowledge that their futures are manifestly tied to those of the City of Jackson. Read the full plan at jfp.ms/vision2022plan and leave comments at jfp.ms/vision2022..

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Vision 2022â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Principal GOAL AREAS

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Jackson into a destination city, developing a 1,500-acre lake between downtown Jackson and Rankin County, creating an innovative marketing plan for the region, creating a market for aerospace technology, repairing and maintaining regional infrastructure, and helping the region become more healthy. If that sounds like a mouthful, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because it is. And they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just bullet pointsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for each initiative, Vision 2022 calls for a committee and several subcommittees. Take the Core City Committee, chaired by restaurateur Jeff Good. Focused on Jackson proper, it branches off into subcommittees focused on neighborhoods, beautification, implementing one-stop service models, volunteer programs, housing, building a destination/events park, opening â&#x20AC;&#x153;healthy in a hurryâ&#x20AC;? stores, designing a streetcar system to serve downtown, expanding downtown Jackson boundaries, creating activity centers called â&#x20AC;&#x153;livable centers,â&#x20AC;? improving and promoting Farish Street, building a downtown arena, supporting small businesses, developing a convention-center hotel, and starting a blues and civil-rights tour. Each of those goals has a team of volunteers working under a subcommittee chairman or chairwoman, and Core City is just one of the 10 tenets of Vision 2022. Chamber organizers put the number of people involved at around 350. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grown since the first coalition of private and public interests, including mayors and metro-area business leaders, travelled to cities around the southeast and midwest to steal ideas from other challenged metropolitan areas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the key here is that this is something that has never been done before,â&#x20AC;? Greater Jackson Chamber President Duane Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a comprehensive plan. Health care has done its own plan, cities have had their own plans, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had our own economic plans in the past, but now, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re putting all of that together so we can work off of everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s synergy to really do some game-changing things.â&#x20AC;? Like Jackson, the metro areas visited, such as Oklahoma City and Nashville, have suffered from infrastructure problems, economic concerns, poverty-stricken communities and under-funded education systems. Oklahoma City suffered greatly from its tax base emigrating to smaller bedroom communities, but Mayor Mick Cornett passed a $777-million infrastructure-investment bill that greatly improved the quality of life for residents by adding a 70-acre downtown park, improved sidewalks, hike and bike trails, a modern streetcar system, a new convention center, senior wellness and aquatic centers, and other amenities. Now, the city is on just about every top-five list you can find. Tornadoes wrecked Nashville in 1998, but the disaster spurred a strong sense of solidarity and a flood of insurance money.

Slowly but surely, cheap rent and innovative city planning led to an influx of young creatives. Entrepreneurs followed, and they transformed the city into a hub for the culturally savvy. Helped along by big ideas and passionate citizens, those cities, along with others such as Memphis and Little Rock, are in the process of digging themselves out of holes that resembled the greater Jackson areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current situation.

Lee, who lived in Rankin County the majority of his life, ran as a business-savvy young gun who would open up Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resources to collaboration with surrounding communities, including allowing them to buy into the Savannah Street Water Treatment Facility and creating a board, made up of shares based on usage, to govern the facility. He also promised to send the 1-cent sales tax to a vote, regardless of the makeup of the commission that would decide how

4.3: Leveraging Diversity Greater Jackson is one of the most diverse places in the south, but stakeholders say more could be done to capture the benefits of this diversity for the overall wellbeing of the region. Many diverse U.S. communities have developed programming to leverage the dynamism of their local diversity; the Jackson area already has ongoing diversity-and-inclusivity focused efforts that could be enhanced and formalized into a broader campaign.

â&#x20AC;˘ Inventory existing diversity programs at the government, corporate, institutional, and organizational levels. â&#x20AC;˘ Determine how to best weave existing programs together with new efforts into a cohesive and coordinated component of the regional campaign. â&#x20AC;˘ Potential new diversity focused programs and events could include: a regional diversity council; hosting regular diversity summits; holding annual diversity festivals; and others. â&#x20AC;˘ Publish regular diversity-focused articles and images in the regional unity campaign e-newsletter. 4.3.1: INTEGRATE DIVERSITY PROGRAMMING INTO THE PROPOSED REGIONAL UNITY CAMPAIGN (4.1.1).

equity

Leveraging Diversity

SOURCE:VISION 2022 PLAN (SEE JFP.MS/VISION2022PLAN

The Vision 2022 plan (jfp.ms/vision2022) breaks down priorities, such as Leveraging Diversity, into possible actions.

Challenge of Regionalism Jackson could be a unique case, though. Race politics are a divisive issue here, and the hostility these intertwined communities have for each other can be overwhelming, as evidenced by Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent election of Chokwe Lumumba, a mayor who is willing to unapologetically stand up for Jackson and negotiate with its bedroom communities with the same disdain their leaders have shown for the capital city in the past. Research for Vision 2022 began long before Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 mayoral race, but that election could prove to be a turning point for the project. Former Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr. sat on the Core City subcommittee, and Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary run-off opponent, Jonathan Lee, still does.

the money would be spentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a sticking point for both candidates Johnson and Lumumba. (Lumumba has since reversed his stance on the 1-percent tax issue, saying the GJCP has agreed to allow the city to appoint its members to the committee, effectively giving the city a super-majority on the commission.) That message of making concessions to bring other communities to the table, plus his ties to Rankin County and strong support by Republican campaign donors, ultimately sunk Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s candidacy. Instead, Jackson handily elected Lumumba, who vowed to vigorously protect Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interests. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Regionalism has sometimes not played a good role,â&#x20AC;? Lumumba said in a recent interview. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you have

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson is the trunk of the tree. Without it, all the branches will die, so we have to work together to make it, and us, as strong as possible.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Flowood Mayor Gary Rhoads

VISION 2022 TIP:

Visit jfp.ms/vision2022plan and scroll to page 81 to read a variety of initiatives in other cities that Jackson could emulate. Then tell us at jfp.ms/vision2022 which ones youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see in Jackson. populations like ours, where the so-called minorities are in the majority, and people try to divest that population of the ability to make authoritative decisions, they do that in a number of ways. One is to disenfranchise the voters, and the other is to take all the issues that you really make decisions over, and transfer them to another regional form of government. That, I will not accept.â&#x20AC;? Lumumba might play ball on some of the Vision 2022 components that will benefit Jackson, but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quick to point out that any shared projects between Jackson and its bedroom communities will have to be even-handed and fair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not for relinquishing Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s control over water, transportation or communication resources. At no point will I be willing to relinquish our control,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But once we respect Jackson enough and give Jackson the power itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entitled to over this city, we can have inter-local agreements where we can work together on some things â&#x20AC;Ś so long as weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be contributing on a relatively equal level, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be making decisions on a level proportionate to our size and numbers.â&#x20AC;? The Jackson mayor said he likes the breadth of ideas in the plan for Jackson, including the business communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acknowledgement about educationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many of the things they are talking about were things that, without knowing about this plan, I came up with in my platform when I ran for mayor. Two of the things that come immediately to mind are the importance of education campaign. Now I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know specifically how far theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone with their research and what their goals are, but I think emphasizing the importance of education is critical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of course Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about city-wide and they are talking about region-wide,â&#x20AC;? Lumumba added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, the infrastructure issuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;my focus has been on Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructure, but they address that as well.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Trunk of the Treeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Despite regional distrust, Vision 2022 architects such as Duane Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill and Greater Jackson Chamber Chairman Socrates Garrett, have worked to get the various civic and business leaders to work together. Flowood Mayor Gary Rhoads has been on board since the beginning and, when he talks about the future of the metro area, all the phrases he uses sound like they are


coming from a man who is ready to work with Jackson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jackson is the trunk of the tree,â&#x20AC;? Rhoads said in June. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without it, all the branches will die, so we have to work together to make itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and usâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as strong as possible. The key is finding ways to work together that are mutually beneficial. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what makes (Vision 2022) so appealing; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something in there for everyone.â&#x20AC;? For Flowood, that means flood protection and development from the lake project and a business boom from a proposed aviation and aerospace technology park near the Jackson-Medgar Wiley Evers International Airport. The lake project, which was known first as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two Lakesâ&#x20AC;? project in an earlier iteration developed by oilman John McGowan, before becoming a scaled-down â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Lakeâ&#x20AC;? plan due to cost and environmental roadblocks, promises to provide flood protection for Jackson and West Flowood. The Vision 2022 organizers and materials also make no secret that One Lake is at the core of their overall vision. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the component getting the most resources so far, with the GJCP investing $250,000 and the Mississippi Development Authority throwing in $1 million to help with its feasibility studies. Vision 2022 leaders are adamant that the rest of the plan can and will proceed even if this lake project ultimately fails.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one part of Vision 2022 is tied to another,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The master plan isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tied to the lake, and while itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the biggest project, it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the most ambitious in my opinion.â&#x20AC;? The proposed 1,500-acre lake would run next to downtown, south of the fairgrounds and east of Jefferson Street, creating waterfront residential and commercial space. In the past, the problem that has confronted the creation of the lake has been getting the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the Levee Board, and the mayors of Jackson, Pearl and Flowood to agree that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best idea for flood control and worth the public money and controversy over taking property by eminent domain, not to mention environmental and downstream lawsuits sure to ensue. An early salvo came on Sept. 5, when the St. Tammany Parish, La., Council passed a resolution opposing the project. Specifically, the council expressed concerns that the lake would lower water flows to the Lower Pearl, which are vital oyster beds and coastal marshes, and let in more salt water from the Gulf of Mexico. Levee Board officials called the move premature because the plan is still under development and no final decisions have been made about which measure would be best to reduce flooding. As part of the federally requirement environmental impact study, developers must consider several flood-reduction options.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we were only looking for lowhanging fruit, we wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make a very big difference in this community. We would be a little bit better, but we wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be great.â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Greater Jackson Chamber President Duane Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill

GJCP brass claims to have positioned all of its proverbial ducks into the right row to gain a consensus on the project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I know is that the (Levee) Board is fully united in its goal to get this accomplished,â&#x20AC;? said Garrett, a building contractor and newspaper owner who represents the Hinds County Board of Supervisors on the Levee Board and who supported Two Lakes as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have implementation plans and a strategy to move the plan forward. We are getting unanimous votes to help move it forward. Hopefully, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to overcome whatever shows up.â&#x20AC;? Lumumba said he thinks the lake would be great for downtown, and could spur growth for Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dwindling tax base. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a chance to meet with the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the Two Lakes project and now the One Lake project, Mr. McGowan,â&#x20AC;? Lumumba said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I agree that something needs to be done on the development of a lake. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been successful for many cities across the country, and I know there has been some skepticism about how much waterfront property Jackson would have. But if we will benefit from it as much as our neighbors will, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be something we are going to support, going forward.â&#x20AC;? That kind of support, even if it is on one issue, is something Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill and the GJCP sees as an opportunity to build on. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The hardest part is something that is already being achieved,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That part is getting everyone to believe it can be done. We have more enthusiasm around this than anything Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen around here in the last 20 years. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the big first step.â&#x20AC;? Big, Hairy Goals Make no mistake: Jackson stands to benefit greatly from Vision 2022â&#x20AC;&#x201D;probably more than any other city in the fivecounty footprint of the GJCP, which includes Hinds, Rankin, Madison and Warren counties. The Core City plan is ambitious, so

much so that some of the initiatives will take the full 10-year implementation schedule to complete, at least. A long-elusive convention-center hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;stalled by a deal to give prime land to a poorly vetted Texas developer and a long struggle to get it backâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is the first major piece of the puzzle, but other Vision 2022 plans include planning and building a major destination and events park downtown, constructing a state-of-the-art arena and finishing the Farish Street Entertainment District development. Those goals are going to require resources, which are going to be harder and harder to come by through taxes due to fiscal crunches brought on by

FEEDBACK 2022: We want to hear your suggestions and concerns about Vision 2022. Click on jfp.ms/vision2022 and post them under the PDF to help guide our coverage going forward. a federal consent decree from the Environmental Protection Agency and education bonds that come must be paid next year. All are reliant on large pots of taxpayer money mixed with degrees of private support. This reliance on big, hairy, expensive municipal projects for Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future draws dissent from some other big thinkers in the area. Architect and developer Roy Decker told the Jackson Free Press recently that the city needs to get past its obsession with huge projects, warning about â&#x20AC;&#x153;utopian planning.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need one big project here and another there,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What downtown really needs is a coordinated, strategic plan that can build consensus among the city leaders.â&#x20AC;? Because â&#x20AC;&#x153;thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no connectivity among the projects,â&#x20AC;? he added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;they end up creating buzz, but produce no results.â&#x20AC;? Certainly, words like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Capitol Green,

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KEY INITIATIVES of Vision 2022 Health Care â&#x20AC;&#x201C; grow our existing health care infrastructure, establishing the region as a center of excellence in health care service at reasonable costs as well as bio medical and clinical research. Regional Infrastructure â&#x20AC;&#x201C; develop important regional infrastructure projects such as the creation of regional water and wastewater systems as well as transportation improvements like a future trolley (light rail service) to position the region for future growth. Aerospace â&#x20AC;&#x201C; establish Jackson International Airport as the Southâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new location for the aerospace industry thanks to new opportunities presented by the opening of the East Metro Parkway.

2. 3.

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Lake Development â&#x20AC;&#x201C; work with local/state/ federal officials, the U.S. Army Corp. of Engineers, and the Pearl River Vision Foundation to build a 1,500-acre lake in the heart of the region for flood protection, economic development and quality of place benefits. Regional Marketing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; utilize top CEOs as marketing ambassadors proclaiming Greater Jackson as the best location for business in the nation. Core City â&#x20AC;&#x201C; build a convention center hotel and support a quality housing initiative for Downtown Jackson. Regional Trails System â&#x20AC;&#x201C; establish a comprehensive bike and pedestrian

5. 6. 7.

trails system throughout the region. Talent Attraction â&#x20AC;&#x201C; design and implement a plan to attract â&#x20AC;&#x153;talentâ&#x20AC;? to the region, with a special emphasis on retaining our homegrown local talent. Arts and Culture â&#x20AC;&#x201C; establish the region as an arts and culture destination, including opportunities to grow our regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film industry. Education â&#x20AC;&#x201C; launch an â&#x20AC;&#x153;importance of educationâ&#x20AC;? campaign beginning at the grassroots level and carried through higher education.

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9. 10.

Read the full plan at jfp.ms/vision2022 and leave your comments under the PDF.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Farish Streetâ&#x20AC;? and any project involving the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;lakeâ&#x20AC;? so far proves Deckerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s point. But the 2022 visioneers promise to change the Jackson landscape where the Next Huge Thing proves to be an empty promise. And, at least on paper and in committees, 2022 brainstorming is devoted to smaller efforts (although stories of lake proponents bursting in and taking over an unrelated meeting with cheers about the lake component are not uncommon among participants). The GJCP already provided the city funds $1.1 million to begin paving the Museum to Market Trail, the first stretch of a planned system of walking and biking trails that will eventually connect the metro areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s communities. Another project slated for 2013 is the development of a trolley service that would connect various Jackson attractions. But all the work isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in the downtown area, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just about bringing Jackson into a larger regional system, Vision 2022 leaders are quick to emphasize. Vision 2022 calls for strengthening Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighborhoods by developing an â&#x20AC;&#x153;enhancement programâ&#x20AC;? and an â&#x20AC;&#x153;infill development strategyâ&#x20AC;? for disinvested Jackson-area neighborhoods, leveraging property code enforcement and aesthetic improvement programs to enhance the metro area aesthetically and financially. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only one city (in the metro) that has its own commit-

tee and initiative, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jackson,â&#x20AC;? Good said during a Chamber presentation to the JFP in March. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything else is a big, hairy goal or a softer goal like talent retention or place-making.â&#x20AC;? Good co-owns several Jackson restaurants, including Sal and Mookieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, BRAVO! and Broad Street CafĂŠ. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll add to that,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill followed up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every single one of the other initiatives are things that will benefit Jackson greatly. The health-care corridor is going to be 80 percent in Jackson, and the lake project is going to be good for both Rankin county and Hinds county, but it should benefit Jackson tremendously.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true, but the divisiveness that has derailed other attempts to unify the greater metro area and Vision 2022â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own ambition are obvious stumbling blocks that will take more than â&#x20AC;&#x153;consensusâ&#x20AC;? by the people crafting Vision 2022 to overcome. In the last public update of the planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s implementation on the GJCP web site, many statuses included the words â&#x20AC;&#x153;attended a meeting,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;met to discussâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;continued to research.â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill points out that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only year one of a 10-year plan, and many of Vision 2022â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest projectsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;beyond priorities like lake developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t begin for years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we were only looking for low-hanging fruit, we wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make a very big difference in this community,â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We would be a little bit better, but we wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be great.â&#x20AC;?

What Could Flood Control Look Like?

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looding is a persistent problem in Jackson, as residents are aware. And, as more time passes since the 1979 Easter flood, more residents and officials fear that the capital city could fall victim to an equally devastating, if not worse, flood. Varying degrees of controversy have met flood-control proposals over the years because of costs or potential for environmental harm. Here are some of the plans developers, planners and environmentalists have considered: â&#x20AC;˘ Shoccoe dam: Involved creating a dry dam near Carthage that would only kick in during a 100-year flood, when the dam would create a lake in Leake, Madison and Scott counties. â&#x20AC;˘ Two Lakes: Transforming the Pearl River into 4,500-acre lake with developable shoreline and 700 acres of islands, formed by dredging. The islands could also be developed. â&#x20AC;˘ One Lake: A proposed 1,500-acre, sixmile-long lake from Lakeland Drive south to the town of Richland. The plan would also feature dredging of the lake area to build developable islands. â&#x20AC;˘ A different kind of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;One Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: A single lake from just below Interstate 20 upstream to the low-head dam at Water Works curve on Interstate 55 just downstream from LeFleurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluff State Park. Under the plan,

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I-55 Lakeland Drive

Mississippi State Fairgrounds

US 80

I-20 This map shows the â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Lakeâ&#x20AC;? plan as of June 2011.

the lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water surface would not exceed the top of the low-head dam. â&#x20AC;˘ Property removal: Structures and other property that flooding might damage could be moved out of the floodplain. â&#x20AC;˘ Building moratorium: No new construction would be permitted in the floodplain. â&#x20AC;˘ Lend a helping fin: Build a fish-passage structure at the proposed dam, which would reduce harm to fish such as the endangered Gulf sturgeon. â&#x20AC;˘ Levees and floodwalls: Build additional

levees, floodwalls, and gate closures, and install pump stations. â&#x20AC;˘ Storage and channel improvements: Build dams and other water-retention facilities upstream to hold water during floods (e.g. Shoccoe Dam). â&#x20AC;˘ Do nothing: Without a federal project in place, local officials would continue responding to floods by temporarily raising or closing levees, sandbagging and evacuating low-lying areas. SOURCES: PEARL RIVER BASIN COALITION, PEARL RIVER VISION FOUNDATION.


Green Space by Donna Ladd

I

Festival Park at LeFleur’s Landing

T

CDFL

his green-space concept was a favorite of former Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., and CDFL Architects in Jackson designed it about a decade ago. The challenge, according to a CDFL concept sketch, was to “remediate” an ugly Brownfield Recovery Zone along the Pearl on South Jefferson just above Interstate 55. The 43-acre site is the only landbased access to the Pearl River inside the Jackson city limits. Public use of Festival Park could include recreational uses including boating and fishing. The public riverfront park was slated to include an amphitheater, retail space, a nature center, a pavilion and a riverside CDFL rendering of the fabled Festival Park. trail, as well as an overlook to the Woodrow Wilson bridge. CDFL predicted the cost to be $1.4 million, and Johnson said in his 2004 State of the City address that park construction would begin in 2005. The city had $1.5 million in federal clean-up funds in place, which would have paid to clean up the chemicals left over from the area’s use for a landfill, a refueling station and an asphalt plant. Robert Farr of CDFL said this week that the landfill was too expensive to remove. The plan would have capped the landfill and armored the river’s banks, he said. However, the city lost the funding—some blame Johnson, others former Mayor Frank Melton. Farr warns, though, that the work to cap the landfill will have to be done eventually. “The river will overrun the landfill one day, and all that 100-year-old stuff will go into the river,” he said.

A key place-based asset that is regularly cited by companies and professionals as critical to their community-selection criteria is the presence of top quality parks and recreation amenities. Because of this, cities and counties are investing hundreds of millions of dollars in the planning and construction of new parks, greenways, disc golf courses, and numerous other projects. To not do so puts communities at risk of falling behind their competitors in their capacity for these amenities. • Support local leaders as they move forward with final decision-making on a plan to advance a preferred development scenario. • Ensure that development scenarios are consistently informed by datasupported analysis on Greater Jackson’s protection against flooding events and the overall economic benefit of each proposal. • Seek information on national best practices to inform the planning and development of the preferred project. 1.5.1: CONTINUETO SUPPORTTHE LEADERSHIP OF THE RANKIN/ HINDS PEARL RIVER FLOOD AND DRAINAGE CONTROL DISTRICT TO PROTECTTHE REGION FROM FLOODING AND ENJOY THE BENEFITS OF RECREATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. (BP)

inspiration Parks & Recreation

SOURCE:VISION 2022

The Vision 2022 plan focuses its parks attention on big projects like the “One Lake” plan.

Convention Center

Art Museum Proposed Arena

Proposed Marina

In 2010, Watkins Development unveiled an “unbelievable” Riverwalk Canal and Town Lake plan for downtown that would reroute Town Creek into a scenic, man-made canal stretching from Mill Street to the creek’s Pearl River confluence.

PENDING IDEA

Riverwalk Canal and Town Lake

I

n 2009, David Watkins—a fan of big, audacious projects who helped bring the renovation of the King Edward Hotel to fruition—announced plans for a downtown canal and lake that would work in concert with the now-abandoned Two Lakes project. Watkins hopes that the project will happen, now in concert with the “One Lake” proposal that replaced the “Two Lakes” plan, but not by the 2014 completion date he promised then. The Jackson Free Press described Watkins’ vision in December 2009: “Watkins’ project, called Riverwalk Canal and Town Lake, consists of two parts. The Riverwalk Canal would wind through downtown Jackson from the top of Farish Street to Court Street, near the new federal courthouse. The canal would create a concrete-lined channel roughly 10 feet below street level, so that existing streets could cross it without arched bridges. The riverwalk would include landscaped paths on both sides of the canal. “The canal’s southern end would open onto the project’s other main feature: a 35-acre lake connected to the Pearl River. At the lake’s northern edge, near the Mississippi Museum of Art, the project calls for a marina. Watkins envisions luxury and mixed-income residential developments along the lake’s western edge. For the eastern side of the lake, Watkins wants an outdoor music amphitheater and green space with infrastructure to host music and arts festivals.” The predicted cost then was $50 million to $200 million. See rendering of the concept at jfp.ms/townlake.

jacksonfreepress.com

OLD IDEA

1.5: Parks and Recreation

COURTESY WATKINS DEVELOPMENT

f you want to see how differently various people approach the idea of planning for Jackson’s future, listen to a discussion of parks and green space. To see the generational gap on a “green space” discussion, look no further than the desire for canoes and trails by younger residents, and motor boats and marinas by more seasoned locals. The Vision 2022 plan targets “Parks and Recreation” under its “Inspiration” priority, but the ideas underneath it focus on the idea of large, expensive “parks” that also provide flood control (and development space) such as ideas included in its lake centerpiece or the Town Lake project, conceived by Watkins Development. As of press time, members of the Vision 2022 Core City Destination/Event Park committee tell us that open space/event parks, other than talk of reviving the Town Lake idea, don’t seem to be on the radar. Alternatively, Mayor Chokwe Lumumba’s transition team included a Parks and Recreation Committee that honed in on the availability and free use of public outdoor-recreation and green spaces as a way to improve the health of the city, and even to steer young people in positive directions and away from crime. One idea, for instance, is to put business incubators into public parks around Jackson, a potentially far-reaching idea presented by businessman Jason Thompson. We’ve also pulled one big idea, Festival Park, from the Jackson shredder because a bunch of smart folks told us it deserves one more look—for inspiration, if nothing else.

19


More Than Sports

September 18 - 24, 2013

PEOPLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ASSEMBLIES

20

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REVISITED: Town Creek COURTESY BREZACK & ASSOCIATES PLANNING

Defined:

â&#x20AC;˘ Home ownership â&#x20AC;˘ Learning rights from tenantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights to disabilities to the workplace â&#x20AC;˘ Healthy living, nutrition â&#x20AC;˘ Civic leadership â&#x20AC;˘ Green education, including eco-friendly homes and urban agriculture â&#x20AC;˘ More soccer fields â&#x20AC;˘ Language and citizenship classes â&#x20AC;˘ Cultural awareness events (ethnic, religious, sexual orientation, etc.)

COURTESY BERGIN & GARVEY PUBLISHERS

W

hen Jed Oppenheim of the Southern Poverty Law Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mississippi Youth Justice Project ended up as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;quasi-memberâ&#x20AC;? of Mayor Chokwe Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parks and Rec transition team, he decided to offer a different direction to the conversation focusing on sports and facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which inevitably ended up â&#x20AC;&#x153;male and able bodied-centric.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I decided to take it upon myself to make recommendations for non-athletic usage of the department facilities,â&#x20AC;? he said last week. After talking to community people and getting young people to â&#x20AC;&#x153;workshopâ&#x20AC;? how they use community centers (which are part of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parks and Recreation Department), he compiled various recommendations for parks and rec facilities that ended up part of the overall parks transition report. The program ideas included: â&#x20AC;˘ Mentoring programs for young people â&#x20AC;˘ Maternal well-being â&#x20AC;˘ Healthy relationship/young marriage mentoring â&#x20AC;˘ Educational drop-in/re-engagement centers, including: â&#x20AC;˘ Academic tutoring after school, on weekends and during summer â&#x20AC;˘ Comprehensive sex education â&#x20AC;˘ Job training and resume/interviewing tips â&#x20AC;˘ Art, music and dance classes for all ages â&#x20AC;˘ Financial literacy â&#x20AC;˘ Business incubators

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Oppenheim said he gave the most input on the educational drop-in/reengagement center, where he suggests that credit recovery and GED classes be included, as well as a place for young people suspended from school to go, rather than hanging out on the street and getting in more trouble. He wrote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are communitybased (sometimes school-based, but not always) programs that essentially take our most vulnerable youth who have already been pushed out and engage them holisticallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just in education (where they can get a high-school diploma, not just a GED like most non-school programs), but with mental health, job skills, etc. With a high dropout rate, a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;drop-inâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; center could do wonders to re-engage many young adults. Educationally, whatever curriculum would be used could be much more culturally sensitive and learnercentered (Paulo Friere), which could potentially engage young adults in a different way than school did. There is a lot that can be done in these centers.â&#x20AC;?

by Pleas J. McNeel IV, PE GRU´ SDVWWKH-DFNVRQ=RRWRZKHUHLWĂ&#x20AC;RZVXQGHU GRZQWRZQ -DFNVRQ GD\OLJKWLQJ DJDLQ MXVW WR WKH VRXWKRIWKH0LVVLVVLSSL0XVHXPRI$UW1XPHURXV SODQQLQJ VNHWFKHV KDYH EHHQ GUDZQ IRU WKH GRZQ WRZQSRUWLRQRI7RZQ&UHHNVWUHWFKLQJIURPWKHDUW PXVHXPWRLWVFRQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHZLWKWKH3HDUO5LYHU7KH IXWXUHRIWKHÂł7RZQ/DNH´DQGÂł5LYHU:DON´SRUWLRQV RIWKHFUHHNKRZHYHUDUHODUJHO\WLHGWRĂ&#x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

BIG IDEAS

Getting Jacksonians into City Parks TRIP BURNS

NEW IDEA

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washing oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Paulo Friere, from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Politics of Educationâ&#x20AC;?

Lurny Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food truck is one new business helping reinvigorate interest in Jackson parks.

M

ayor Chokwe Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parks and Rec Transition Team compiled the following suggestions to get more residents into Jackson Parks and Recreation Department (PRD) facilities throughout the city: â&#x20AC;˘ Bring arts into parks: museums, musical performances, movie screenings, art installations, theater, poetry, spoken word. â&#x20AC;˘ Hold events in city parks, including festivals, cook-out competitions, fashion shows, peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assemblies by ward, voter registration drives and education. â&#x20AC;˘ Make infrastructure improvements. â&#x20AC;˘ Work with neighborhood groups to beautify local parks. â&#x20AC;˘ Allow cafes, diners and food trucks to local inside PRD facilities. â&#x20AC;˘ Make facilities compliant with Americans with Disabilities Act â&#x20AC;˘ Move city service centers into facilities. â&#x20AC;˘ Create more walking and biking trails. â&#x20AC;˘ Add water parks and water features. â&#x20AC;˘ Install shaded seating. â&#x20AC;˘ Promote PRD facilities through social media, schools, retirement communities and through PSAs in local media. â&#x20AC;˘ Make it easier to get insurance for events using PRD facilities. â&#x20AC;˘ Add more park ranger patrols for security. WEIGH IN: Read â&#x20AC;&#x153;Recommendations for the City of Jackson Parks and Recreation Department at jfp.ms/ PRDideas and post your thoughts underneath the PDF.


! Magic, N O

Heroclix, & More #21 ATMANAM

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BRIGHT IDEA:

Conserve Energy, Create Jobs

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s Des tin y t Ste ps Tow ard Tak es His Firs Bru ce Wa yne

by Brent Bailey, 25xâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;25 State Facilitator #!   $   (!#    $%    # %' 

The Economic Opportunity Value Chain of Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Measures (job, local and high quality)

Energy Bill Savings (consumer cost savings)

Productive Spending / Local Investments (jobs, local)

SOURCE: AMERICAN COUNCIL FOR AN ENERGY-EFFICIENT ECONOMY

R S N Y D EP CA ULLO     



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The new storyline

begins in BATMAN

#21

JUNE 2013

   

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TM and Š DC Comics.

IN PROGRESS:

Earlier this year, the Kellogg Foundation awarded The Green & Healthy Homes Initiative $400,000 for vital work here in Jackson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through this grant, GHHI will increase access to greener, healthier, and more affordable homes in Jackson and the region that yield reductions in energy costs and housing-related injuries and illnesses such as asthma and lead poisoning for families, children and seniors. GHHI will also build a pathway to community-based green and healthy housing rehabilitation jobs,â&#x20AC;? GHHI said in a release (see jfp.ms/Kellogg_green).

In Baltimore, Md., GHHI helped residents in the grant area achieve a 67 percent decrease in emergency department visits and hospitalizations and watched their average annual energy costs drop more than $400 per household.

COMIC COMMANDER

Hilco takes styling to a new level! Available in Team Colors, Team Initials or Jersey Numbers! The finest of sports eyewear.

Comics, Toys, Collectibles, Supplies & More 579 HWY 51, Suite D Ridgeland 601.856.1789 comiccommander@gmail.com

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jacksonfreepress.com

their energy bills, while still maintaining comfort, security and productivity. The economic benefits of energy efficiency extend far beyond lowering energy bills for consumers. Efficiency also contributes to economic development and job creation. Designing efficiency programs to achieve these goals, in addition to saving energy, can have benefits that ripple throughout the economy. The natural gas and electric utilities are currently in the process of developing their energy-efficiency program portfolios. Jacksonians need to be ready to embrace these early programs (lighting improvements; appliance replacements; HVAC upgrades; insulation and window improvements; etc.) and lay the groundwork for long-term energy savings, economic development and a local workforce. Read more at jfp.ms/energyrules and jfp.ms/aceee.

FILE PHOTO

FILE PHOTO

ou want to reduce your energy bills, improve your in-home air quality, increase the value of your home and help create jobs in the local community? Then invest in energyefficiency improvements at your home or business. Getting the correct information is one way to unlock the large, undiscovered potential for energy savings in Jackson. Very soon you will go directly to your natural gas and electric utilities for that information. Earlier this summer, the Mississippi Public Service Commission adopted new rules guiding the development and implementation of energy-efficiency programs. Now regulated natural gas and electric utilities and electric power associations must design and deliver energy-efficiency programs that will help residential, commercial, and industrial consumers reduce their energy usage and

AT AVAILABLE

21


Art of Business Filling the Emptiness

Cities With Storefront Projects: Robin Schwartzmann displayed handmade neon signs at of Blacklist Vintage. in Whittier, Minn.

STEVEN LANG

remain vacant for months, maybe even years. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a sad sightâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the dusty boxes, papers and boards lying everywhereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and it makes an otherwise great place look gritty. While Jackson has yet to jump on this bandwagon, cities from Seattle, Wash., to Asheville, N.C., are taking initiative with empty storefronts. Instead of letting them gather dust for months and years, the cities bring in artists and artisans to display and often sell their wares, creating an excellent daytime-nighttime vibe for visitors and residents alike. In some programs, artists actually renovate the storefronts and make something unique out of the emptiness. STEVEN LANG

W

hen family or friends say Jackson is a bad place, I always want to take them on a trip to the city Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve grown to know over the last six months. Jackson has bad places, just like any other city or town, but it also has a lot of good places. I love my trips to Butterfly Yoga some Saturday mornings, most of which are followed by a turtle frappe from Cups. I love the trip I take to Pizza Shack once a week because I pass Belhaven and Midtown, and I love hearing about all the strides the city is taking to be a better place. What I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t love is seeing empty storefronts along city streets. They are an eyesore on a beautiful street, an ouchie on a thriving community. A lot of the empty storefronts

STEVEN LANG

by Amber Helsel

Why Art Up Storefronts?

â&#x20AC;˘ Creates GOOD for the city

Mary Gibney and Noah Harmon exhibited their work at 2615 Stevens Ave. in Whittier, Minn.

STEVEN LANG

September 18 - 24, 2013

22

Artist Andy Baird made an exhibit at Black Forest Inn in Whittier, Minn.

What Not to Do:

What Are the Problems?

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Artist Aaron Dysart created lighting installations at 19 E. 26th St in Whittier, Minn.

INSPIRATION:

â&#x20AC;˘ Fights the urbanization of historic retail areas â&#x20AC;˘ Improves a falling economy â&#x20AC;˘ Fosters an art community â&#x20AC;˘ Gives awareness to empty spaces â&#x20AC;˘ Beautifies an urban landscape â&#x20AC;˘ Essentially creates a mini art gallery â&#x20AC;˘ Gives artists a new way to market themselves

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â&#x20AC;˘ Whittier, Minn., Artists in Storefronts, artistsinstorefronts.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Seattle, Wash., Storefronts Seattle, storefrontsseattle.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Springfield, Mass., Eugene Springfield Art Project, eugenestorefrontartproject. com. â&#x20AC;˘ Pittsfield, Mass., Storefront Artist Project (project closed in 2011, but Pittsfield experienced a massive improvement in their art community over the last decade).

How It Happened â&#x20AC;˘ Whittier, Minn.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Twin Cities artist Joan Vorderbruggen started the project in 2012. More than 120 artists showcased their art in area storefronts, including six permanent murals. â&#x20AC;˘ Seattle, Wash.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Shunpike, a local arts group, launched the program in 2010 as a neighborhoodrevival program designed to combat the urbanization of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic retail core. Hundreds of artists have worked with the project. It recently expanded to neighboring areas, such as Mt. Vernon and Auburn, Wash.

â&#x20AC;˘ Springfield, Mass.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;founded in 2010 after a disappointing turnout at a weekend art event. The founders wanted to foster the art community and beautify downtown. â&#x20AC;˘ Pittsfield, Mass.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;launched in 2002. The projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission was to â&#x20AC;&#x153;forge a community of artists, entrepreneurs, businesses and residents.â&#x20AC;? Though the project closed down in 2011, the city made great changes, seeing new businesses open, such as theater, galleries, restaurants, pop-up stores and coffee shops.

How Do We Improve Jackson Storefronts? Â&#x2021; $SSO\IRUDJUDQWIURPWKH*UHDWHU-DFNVRQ $UWV&RXQFLO Â&#x2021; &RQYLQFHFLW\OHDGHUVWRJHWEHKLQGWKLV NLQGRIEHDXWLÂżFDWLRQ Â&#x2021; )LQGYROXQWHHUVDQGLQWHUHVWHGUHDOWRUV VWRUHRZQHUV

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What the Heck Is An IBA?

RADICAL IDEA: Vacancy Tax

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YOUR JXN IDEA &AITH$OSTER3TAUSS)LUVWZHQHHGWR UHGXFHFULPH1HLJKERUKRRGZDWFKXVHG WREHDSURJUDPWKDWUHDOO\EURXJKWWKH FRPPXQLW\WRJHWKHUWRÂżJKWFULPH1HYHU KHDUDERXWLWDQ\PRUH  -DFNVRQGRHVQRWKDYHDPRYLHWKH DWHU EXW ,KHDUWKHUHZLOOEHRQHFRPLQJ VRRQ$Q,0$;WKHDWHUZRXOGEHZKDW HYHU\ODUJH FLW\KDV  'RZQWRZQKDVWREHUHQRYDWHGDQG PXVWSURVSHU7KHSURMHFWGRZQWRZQ KDVIDLOHG

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It definitely has an impact.â&#x20AC;? Cities such as San Jose, Calif., also impose additional taxes for blighted properties. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a hint: If a no-more-taxes type tells you a new tax is wrong, ask them if they support using public money for big developments such as a lake or riverfront project, or a commercial development. That tax money doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grow on trees, you know.

BEST PRACTICE: MID-SOUTH MINORITY BUSINESS COUNCIL CONTINUUM PPEFPHPSKLVRUJ

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Established in 1973 as the Mid-South Minority Business Council (MMBC), a component of the Memphis Area Chamber of Commerce, the MMBC Continuum now serves as a minority business-development organization and a source of expertise in advancing minority economic development. The organization became independent of the Chamber in 1989 after GOALS for Memphis, a think tank of Memphis business executives identified minority economic development as one of four strategic priorities for the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future growth. The mission of the MMBC Continuum is to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;proactively develop a climate of inclusion where 

business-to-business relationships and developmental programs foster increased growth and success of minority businesses.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The well-established organization provides training and development, matchmaking services, and a working-capital loan fund to its members. In addition, the Continuum provides Strategic Business Advisors to its members that assist with business assessment and keep up with global market and industry trends for its members.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Reprinted from Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vision 2022 plan, Best Practices, page 87, jfp.ms/vision2022

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bright Lights, Belhaven Nightsâ&#x20AC;? !NNIE3CHULER6SODVKSDG "RETT(ENNINGTON$ULYHUZDON -O7ILSON7UXHFROOHJHUDGLRVWDWLRQ !SHLEE4HEODORE6RPHWKLQJOLNH Âł%ULJKW/LJKWV%HOKDYHQ1LJKWV´ HYHU\ZHHNHQG 2OBERT6AN:ANDT/RZHUWD[HV DFURVVWKHERDUG%RRP

jacksonfreepress.com

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ArreguĂ­n told berkeleyside.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My concern, and the concern I have heard from others, is that holding out for that ideal tenant and then leaving the space vacant for six months to a year or even longerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that decision has a cost to the community, making commercial districts look like they are in decline and creating the appearance of an unsafe area.

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BRIGHT LIGHTS BELHAVEN NGIHTS

TRIP BURNS

YOUR JXN IDEA

COURTESY TOM HEAD

FILE PHOTO

o, just how do we unlock the empty buildings that are â&#x20AC;&#x153;warehousedâ&#x20AC;? downtown by landlords, often absentee, who let their spaces rot waiting for the huge rent check of the future rather than do something creative in them to help Jackson develop a more â&#x20AC;&#x153;creative classâ&#x20AC;? vibe? Why not tax them? Other cities do it. It works like this: If a property is vacant for, say, three to six months (and around here, it can be decades), the owner is assessed, say, an additional 1 percent in addition to taxes already owed. This should provide an incentive for a landlord not to hold out for an artificially high rent, thus lowering the value of the community around it. (The same tax could be applied to non-commercial property owners as well.) Berkeley, Calif., Councilman Jesse ArreguĂ­n argued for a storefront vacancy tax there in 2011: Landlords â&#x20AC;&#x153;have the right to rent their space to anyone they want,â&#x20AC;?

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23


Learn more about Central Mississippi Non-Profits and How You Can Get Involved! - Paid Advertising Section

Please Join The ACLU of Mississippi for our 2013 Annual Meeting

Saturday, October 12 4:30 - 10:00 pm

...plus open bar, cuisine from local restaurants & silent auction!

Jackson Covention Center 105 E. Pascagoula Street

201 East Pascagoula Street, Jackson

4:30 Annual Meeting of Members 6:00 Annual Meeting of the Board 6:00 Art Auction and Cocktails 7:00 Dinner 8:30 Dancing

$150 per Couple Insurance additional $25 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Party Up, No Draw Downâ&#x20AC;? Option $80 per Couple (Not entered in Draw Down)

For more information

office@aclu-ms.org or 601.354.3408

For details, contact Amanda Holder (601) 922-5530 amanda.holder@magnoliaspeechschool.org

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Are you ready to make a difference? A group of engaged merchants and citizens in LeFluer East & Fondren are making magic happen at the Exit 100 Northside Drive/I-55 interchange. On more days than not, this interchange looks overgrown and unkempt. The Exit 100 interchange beautification project will give it the face-lift it deserves.

September 18 - 24, 2013

Before

24

After

Please contact Kelly Headley at 601.376.9973 to learn more about how to get involved. You may also make a contribution to this great project by mailing it to the address below. LeFleur East Foundation P.O. Box 12290 Jackson, MS 39236-2290 kelly@lefleureast.org




benefiting the harold t. white scholarship fund

“Keep Calm &  Hal  On ” Honey Island Swamp Band The Wild Magnolias Good Enough For Good times (featuring members of Galactic)

Earphunk

Jimbo Mathus  !  Star & Micey Southern Halo  !  Fondren Guitars Rock band 

11am ­10pm

Remember this, my friends:

  

jacksonfreepress.com

DOWNTOWN JACKSON,

25


Build a Bicycle- and Pedestrian-Friendly Jackson by Melody Moody

YOUR JXN IDEA

The key to change is finding simple, affordable tools that are easily accessible for people of all ages, races, socio-economic levels and abilities. When you look at cities around the U.S. and the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;places with some of

streets that accommodate all road usersâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; not just motorists. These efforts provide for a more inclusive Jackson with an environment and infrastructure that supports motorists as well as pedestrians, runners, bicyclists, disabled people, children, and others who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t or donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drive.

the happiest, healthiest people, and places where people most want to live and raise familiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they are also some of the most bicycle-friendly places. It is hard to argue with facts that demonstrate that cities around the nation that have invested in biking and pedestrian infrastructure have seen dramatic increases in local economic development and quality of life. â&#x20AC;˘ Businesses see increased profits, and residents see increased property values around areas with trails and multi-use paths. Mississippi examples include the Longleaf Trace in Hattiesburg, and the Tanglefoot Trail in north Mississippi. Locally, the creation of the Museum to Market and Lefleur East Trail in Jackson promise renewed economic activity. â&#x20AC;˘ Communities thrive when its citizens walk or ride bicycles. People experience their city first-hand and not from the window of a car. They invest in local businesses and help foster a city that attracts and retains young talent. â&#x20AC;˘ Investing in a bicycle- and pedestrianfriendly city benefits everyone. Better infrastructure includes sidewalks and improved roads in addition to bike lanes and trails. â&#x20AC;˘ Statistically, more people on bikes create safer streets for everyone using the roads. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Complete streetsâ&#x20AC;? policies lay the foundation for smart, long-term strategies to create

To create a connected, more livable communityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;instead of one based around cars and urban sprawlâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;people must speak out for a viable alternative. If citizens want to safely cross streets, ride with their children or simply go for a walk, then they must speak up for a bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly city. Jackson needs infrastructure and policies that support biking and walking. It needs businesses that encourage pedestrian traffic and provide bike racks to encourage people to ride bikes. It needs events that support a biking and pedestrian-friendly

Jackson has a thriving bike culture with a lot of ways to get involved: â&#x20AC;˘ The Jackson Bike Advocatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; monthly community bike rides start in the Rainbow Whole Foods Grocery parking lot on the last Friday of every month at 6 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘ The JXN Community Bike Shop in Midtown provides opportunities to learn about bike repair and maintenance. â&#x20AC;˘ JBA hosts a Museum to Market Trail clean-up day. â&#x20AC;˘ The statewide â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bike Summitâ&#x20AC;? is Oct. 2 at the Agriculture and Forestry Museum. Meet and mingle with bike advocates from around the state. â&#x20AC;˘ JBA advocates to demand changes that leads to a more bicycle- and pedestrianfriendly Jackson. Keep up with these opportunities and get involved through Bike Walk Mississippi, a statewide bicycle- and pedestrianadvocacy organization headquartered in Jackson. Visit bikewalkmississippi.org for more info. Melody Moody is a co-founder of the Jackson Bike Advocates and now serves as executive director of Bike Walk Mississippi. Bicycling Magazine recently featured Moody as a 2013 Innovator in Bicycle Advocacy. Jackson Biking Advocates received the 2013 Advocacy Organization of the Year award from the National Alliance for Biking and Walking.

YOUR JXN IDEA MISSPRESERVATION.COM/

September 18 - 24, 2013

26

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culture. It needs safer roads to ride on, more sidewalks to walk on, and it needs people to stand up and to make it part of the economic conversation. When you see a bicyclist riding down the streets of Jackson, remember that they are not just there to slow down your commute. They are a part of what is making our city a better place to live.

The Biking Community

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Beyond Cars

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Join Dr. James Bowley, Religious Studies professor at Millsaps College, and Lucas Simmons, Brew Master at Lucky Town Brewing Co., for this very special, one of a kind, beer event at Sal & Mookie’s!

BEER!

DO WE OWE CIVILIZATION TO BEER? What did you drink after a long day of building a pyramid? And, hey, why isn’t beer in ‘the Bible’? Come to a fascinating romp through the history of beer and learn some fun facts and drink some delicious brews, especially made for this ONCE IN A LIFETIME EVENT!

Monday, October 7, 2013 | 6 PM | $60 per person Course 1: Ancient Beer in Mesopotamia Course 2: Beer in Egypt, of course Course 3: Those crazy Irish Beer drinkers Course 4: Germans, taking Beer and food seriously Course 5: As American as Beer and Apple Pie!

Call 601.368.1919 or MaggieB@SalandMookies.com to reserve your spot TODAY!

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The Problem of Affordable Housing

Everyone Needs a Roof

What Works to End Homelessness

The old paradigm is that people with unsolved issuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as lack of a job or a drug addictionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;had to address their problems before they could obtain a permanent home. Research now shows that a stable home allows a person to solve his or her problems much fasterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and it keeps them off the streets. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also much cheaper. Homeless individuals are a huge burden on the emergency health-care system, for example. The Colo-

Who is Homeless?

SOURCES: THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE TO END HOMELESSNESS AND THE HOMELESSNESS RESEARCH INSTITUTE, â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE STATE OF HOMELESSNESS IN AMERICA 2012â&#x20AC;?; UNITED STATES INTERAGENCY COUNCIL ON HOMELESSNESS



 

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rado Coalition for the Homeless found that a Housing First approach reduced emergency medical costs by 66 percent and detox costs by 85 percent. Even factoring in the cost of providing comprehensive supportive housing and services, a cost-benefit analysis found a net saving of $4,745 per person, while improving physical and mental health as well as quality of life. To end homelessness, communities must develop a long-term plan. They may manage homelessness in the short run, but wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t end it. Effective community plans include: â&#x20AC;˘ Coordinated Access among providers to have a single, uniform method to access housing resources. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The aim is to ensure that (people) in crisis have the same experience as they seek housing services and that they are directed to the best housing solution for their situation.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) â&#x20AC;˘ Housing First: Develop permanent alternatives to systems comprised of shelters and transitional housing progressions, and

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move homeless people immediately from the streets or shelters into their own apartments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Housing First approaches are based on the concept that a homeless individual or householdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first and primary need is to obtain stable housing and that other issues that may affect the household can and should be addressed once housing is obtained.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;CSH â&#x20AC;˘ Retool Shelters and Transitional Housing: Shelters provide important emergency and immediate resources. Especially for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, shelters can provide a safe harbor from their abusers. But shelters are an ineffective and expensive method to address the needs of most homeless people in any long-term, permanent way. Even for chronically homeless people, supportive permanent housing in the community is a better solution to homeless shelters or living on the street. Support can include helping those individuals get the financial aid theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re eligible for, dealing with the disease of addiction, and

What Factors Contribute to Homelessness? â&#x20AC;˘ Job loss and insufficient wages. â&#x20AC;˘ Substance abuse, which includes both alcohol and illegal drug use. â&#x20AC;˘ Family disruptions, including separations and deaths. â&#x20AC;˘ Domestic violence. â&#x20AC;˘ Chronically homeless people are those with severe mental or physical disabilities who are unable to work. Alcohol and/or drug addictions often exacerbate their issues. They are unlikely to ever make a meaningful contribution to society.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Severely cost-burdened renters and homeowners with mortgages are at risk of homelessness because a single financial setback could result in a housing crisis.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mississippi Development Authority, â&#x20AC;&#x153;2010-2015 Mississippi Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Developmentâ&#x20AC;? Ideally, rent or mortgage payments should make up no more than 30 percent of household income. A household has a cost burden when that payment is between 30.1 percent and 50 percent of income. A severe burden is when housing costs are more than half of household income. â&#x20AC;˘ In Mississippi, more than a quarter of all people were severely cost burdened in 2000 (16.4 percent of renters and 10.6 percent of homeowners with mortgages), meaning they put more than half their income into housing. â&#x20AC;˘ The average rent in Mississippi for a two-bedroom apartment was $663 a month in 2009. To be under the 30 percent cost-burden level, monthly net income would need to be $2,210 a month or more, or $26,520 annually. â&#x20AC;˘ In 2011, more than 20 percent of Mississippians lived in poverty, with annual gross incomes of $22,350 or less. SOURCE: MISSISSIPPI DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

teaching money management and other life skills. In such supportive environments, many chronically homeless people may even find productive work. â&#x20AC;˘ A permanent solution requires prevention. Communities must invest in affordable rental housing, emergency assistance for household expenses, and in programs that build stronger people and families. Teach children and adults effective money management and life skills so that an unexpected emergency doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t turn into a life on the streets.

SOURCES: INSTITUTE FOR CHILDREN, POVERTY AND HOMELESSNESS; THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE TO END HOMELESSNESS

SOURCES: DENVER HOUSING FIRST COLLABORATIVE; CORPORATION FOR SUPPORTIVE HOUSING; URBAN INSTITUTE; NATIONAL ALLIANCE TO END HOMELESSNESS;

jacksonfreepress.com

Y

ouâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard it before: For many Americans, homelessness is just a couple of paychecks away. In an economy where peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finances are often stretched thin to the breaking point, losing a job, developing a chemical dependency, a serious illness or even having a car that needs major work can be the difference between paying the rent (or mortgage) or not. Any financial setback can be a long step toward being on the street with nowhere to live. Once homeless, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not easy to get back to permanent housing. Employers, landlords and banks all take a dim view of people with bad credit and no permanent address. For the men and women coming out of prisons, the road is even tougher. People who are chronically homelessâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;those with combinations of mental and physical disabilities in addition to drug or alcohol addictionsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;most often come to mind when we think of homeless people. But losing oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home can happen to almost anyone under the right set of crappy conditions. Veterans make up a big percentage of the homeless population, as they often return home sick, traumatized and unable to reintegrate into society and â&#x20AC;&#x153;regularâ&#x20AC;? jobs.

FILE PHOTO

by Ronni Mott

29


NEEDED:

Jackson Planning Map

J

ackson is a unique city with great potential. What makes this city great are her people, their passions and their visions. They create opportunities to make Jackson great. There is, however, a defeatist undertone that comes from a sense of the many promising projects that never quite made it. Too often, it seems, these “failed” projects are relegated to a dusty archive, where all the vision and the hard work that went into them is essentially lost. A great vision might never be realized for uncountable reasons—an idea whose time may not have yet come, supporting systems may not be in place, it may be incompatible with current physical context. But whatever the cause for a proposed project to be shelved, the work that went into illustrating the vision and attempting its implementation continues to be valuable. A vision “seed” could take root at a different location or in a future political environment. The project or its implementation may have contained fatal flaws that should be identified as constraints to future proposals. Or it could be a simple clerical error that brought a project’s funding to a premature halt. One idea is to create a “Planning Map” that links to plans and studies currently being considered, or that have been proposed in the past. Ideally, this would serve as the interface for an annotated bibliography of planning and development-related documents. Such a tool has the potential to help inspire future vision for Jackson, facilitate the identification of synergies between proposed plans, reconsider good ideas from the past and protect against repeating failed strategies. — Pleas McNeel IV, PE, and Mukesh Kumar, Ph.D., Jackson State University

September 18 - 24, 2013

An example of an interactive planning map that can provide access to archives of planning documents, current and past.This particular map shows examples of links to Midtown and Festival Park.

30


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JJ Gormley-Etchells has been a student of yoga since 1979 and a teacher since 1989. She began teaching teachers and using yoga therapeutically in 1994. She has studied from many traditions including Ashtanga, Iyengar, Kundalini, Anusara and Viniyoga. She calls her yoga education well-rounded and draws from each tradition that which she loves.

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Lead cross functional teams on projects to improve electrical transmission substation operations. In this regard, will update & track changes using AMST tool; update the capital blanket prioritization database on regular basis & reprogram as needed; develop & optimize programs to increase substation reliability; perform substation risk assessment & modeling; evaluate & recommend system best practices; evaluate capital reliability budgets & make recommendations to improve safety & reliability; prioritize substation projects; access outage/work management databases for trends & evaluation; research best practices; develop & implement best management plans for process changes; manage assigned substation asset program. Requirements: BS, EE; in depth knowledge of electrical energy transmission, including: capital projects prioritization, AMST & maintenance risk assessments. Employer: Entergy Services, Inc. Job location: Jackson, MS. Send resume & credentials to: Lori Hendler, Entergy Services, Inc., 639 Loyola Ave., 22nd Floor, New Orleans, LA 70113. Refer to job #12518.


FILM p 35 | 8 DAYS p 38 | MUSIC p 39

A Colorful Society A by Marilyn Trainor Storey

TRIP BURNS

The show, featuring artists in the Mississippi Watercolor Society hangs through Sept. 20.

ation. Susan Wellington’s “Just Hitched,” a rather poignant painting of three labor animals in their harnesses is striking in its bold oranges, reds and purples. Across the gallery, Martha André’s “Sunset in the Swamp” uses the same bold colors as a backdrop for hauntingly stark and dark cypress trees, as does Elke Briuer with her more abstract twined and knarled tree limbs in “Trees #1.” Atkinson hung two of artist Sally Todd’s paintings together: William Faulkner’s tombstone with bottles placed

Sue Wellington’s “Just Hitched” is one of many multicolored watercolors on display at Hinds Community College now.

on it, titled “The Unvanquished,” and “Eudora Welty’s House,” a painting of the writer’s home in Belhaven. They make an interesting and thought-provoking juxtaposition of the two famous Mississippi authors. The gallery’s season features six exhibits throughout the school year. Kelley Walters’ show, called “Synaptic Sketches: Night,” and a Hinds Community College Art Faculty Show, “New Works, New Thoughts” are coming this fall. In the spring semester, Atkinson will gather works from the Hinds Community College permanent collection, including pieces by Hull and one of her mentors, Sammy Britt, for “Twenty-five of Mississippi’s Best.” The season closes with Steve Cook’s “Fondren and Other Works” and, finally, the Hinds Community College Student Show and Competition. “Selected Works from Current Members” is at the Marie Hull Gallery in the Katherine Denton Art Building (505 East Main St., Raymond, 601-857-3275) through Sept. 20. The gallery is open Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Friday 8 a.m. until noon. Admission to the gallery 33 is free. Go to hindscc.edu for more information. jacksonfreepress.com

TRIP BURNS

grouping of three paintings hangs on one wall of the Marie Hull Gallery at Hinds Community College’s Raymond campus. The focal center, Mississippi artist Sherry Ferguson’s beautifully and boldly watercolored painting “Center,” is a large close-up of a flower center—done in vivid, saturated, velvety tonal colors, from cranberry to shrimp pink to peach—you can almost feel. On the left hangs Laurel Schoolar’s still-life of gourds titled “Big Guy,” painted in a plum, scarlet and golden-orange palette. On the right is Wanda Monk’s zebra painting, titled “The Division.” The siennas and oranges contrast against the graphic black and white of the zebra, making the animal come to life. “The gorgeous colors in the center floral painting hanging between the gourds and the zebra all together make a wonderful abstraction,” says Melanie Atkinson, chairwoman of the college’s fine art department. “The colors in the gourd and the zebra really play off the vibrant flower in the middle. I hang the exhibits myself, and I try to create something special in how I combine the sometimes thematically and stylistically unrelated pieces of art.” These three watercolors are just a sampling from the Mississippi Watercolor Society exhibit titled “Selected Works from Current Members.” The event kicks off the 2013-2014 season at The Marie Hull Gallery. The spacious, soothingly quiet gallery takes its name from the prominent 20th century Jackson artist known working with many mediums, including watercolor. “Marie Hull had a very wide hand,” Atkinson says. “We are very fortunate to have several pieces of her work spread out around campus. The gallery that bears her name is a wonderful component of our art program, the largest community college art program in the southeast.” More than two dozen Mississippi Watercolor Society members created the watercolor paintings. Atkinson visited the Mississippi Museum of Art during a competitive national watercolor show and was so impressed with the quality of the work that she was compelled to ask the society to join this fall’s schedule. The subject matter of the paintings varies widely. It includes still lifes, portraits, abstracts, animals and architecture. Many of the paintings are quite vivid in their color-


DIVERSIONS | film

September 18

A Lingering Mood

6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

by Anita Modak-Truran

Listings for Fri. 9/20 – Thur. 9/26

COURTESY RELATIVITY MEDIA

Prisoners

Jamey n Johnso

September 27

3-D Battle Of The Year PG13 Battle Of The Year (non 3-D) PG13 The Family Insidious: Chapter 2

Michelle Pfieffer (pictured) co-stars with Robert De Niro in “The Family.”

September 18 - 24, 2013

T

34

he mobster comedy “The Family,” bumbles along like a bull in a china shop. Director Luc Besson’s script, which he co-wrote with Michael Caleo, sets the film in a village in Normandy, a place known for overripe cheese. Things break, go wrong and end predictably. After I saw the movie, the characters’ mood lingered within me. It was a mood of family and blood bonds, of furtive nostalgia for Martin Scorsese’s great gangster movies, and for acting legends Robert De Niro, Michelle Pfieffer, and Tommy Lee Jones, who look older, wiser and at peace here. They also look like they had fun making this film. What holds the picture together is the cast’s conviviality. De Niro and Pfieffer, as father and mother of the Manzoni family unit, are much better than the material. The Manzoni offspring, Belle (Dianna Agron) and Warren (John D’Leo), freshen up the dull edges of a worn and silly story. The movie opens with a bang. A chisel-faced killer with a big schnoz (Jimmy Palumbo) blasts through the front door of a home where an Italian American family slurps soup. After murdering the family, the killer slices a finger off dear old dad. The finger winds its way through a distribution chain into the ice bucket of a convicted mob leader holed up in the federal penitentiary. “Not Manzoni,” the crime boss barks. “How much is a man’s life worth,” Giovanni Manzoni (De Niro) asks in a voice over. Manzoni’s life is worth $20 million after he stabbed the mob family in the back by flipping evidence to the feds. Special agent Robert Stansfield (Jones) heads the effort to keep the Manzoni family safe, and it’s a challenging job. “The Family” is a sometimes-funny memoir of Manzoni’s life in the witness-protection program. Like many wise guys before him, from his earliest teens Manzoni’s only ambition was to be a part of a gangster family. He had a knack for mob life, along with the right amount of psychopathic urges, that proved useful. Maggie (Pfieffer), Manzoni’s spouse, is

R PG13

Instructions Not Included PG13

Frank F

oster

The Spectacular Now R Riddick

the perfect mob wife. She takes life on the road in stride. She loves her family, although she recognizes them for sinners. She chats up the FBI protection squad and cooks their favorite treats. Like their parents, Belle and Warren know how to game the system. They assess their peers’ threat levels in the new school and whack their opponents with powerful swinging baseball bats. Belle falls in love with her math tutor, a geek with glasses. Belle’s seduction of her tutor has little to do with the plot, but it was the most powerful scene in the entire movie. It’s about the feeling of walls closing in and life careening out of control. The idea of love is Belle’s only safety net in a crazy life. This film isn’t based on a true story, but rather collects cinematic sentiments. Giovanni and his family intersperse life lessons from the mafia days with domestic problem solving in witness protection. How do you deal with a plumber who disrespects you? Beat him up. How do you deal with the head of a chemical fertilizer company dumping waste into the water supply who disrespects you? Beat him up. How do you deal with boys and girls who disrespect you? Beat them up. How do you deal with clerks who disrespect you? Bomb their store. It’s all about respect and how you deal with disrespect. Henry Hill, a real mobster, disappeared into the anonymity of the federal government’s witness-protection program. Hill told everything he knew about the gangster life to reporter Nicholas Pileggi, whose “Wiseguy: Life in a Mafia Family” became a best-seller and then a fine movie called “GoodFellas.” This movie does not retell Hill’s story, but it endlessly riffs on it. “The Family” is brazen, brash and forgettable trash. But I did not hate it like some critics. It appealed to my sense of family and dysfunction, and to sentimental attachments to aging actors and a new generation of talent molded in their images.

R

R

The Ultimate Life PG You’re Next

One Direction: This Is UsExtended Fan Cut (non 3-D) PG Lee Daniel’s The Butler PG13 Planes (non 3-D) PG We’re The Millers

R

Percy Jackson: Sea Of Monsters (non 3-D) PG 2 Guns

R

Despicable ME 2 (non 3-D) PG

R

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25th Anniversary

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 A SPECIAL limited edition Commemorative Medal will be awarded to ALL race finishers.

ROUTE: The 5-mile race starts at the Old Mississippi River Bridge located at I-20 and Washington Street, crosses the Old Mississippi River Bridge, and ends back at Vicksburg.

RACE TIMES: 8:00 am for 5-Mile Run and 5-Mile Walk & 1-Mile Fun Run will follow (No headphones, rollerblades, strollers, bicycles or animals allowed on the course)! DIRECTED BY: The Mississippi Track Club, Grand Prix Event Proceeds to benefit The Southern Cultural Heritage Foundation

For more information www.southernculture.org Additional Support: Budweiser | City of Vicksburg | Coca-Cola | Coomes Produce | Gulf States Golf Cars Waste Management | Woodmen of the World


VOTE TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 24, 2013

Priorities:

â&#x20AC;˘CRIME PREVENTION â&#x20AC;˘ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT â&#x20AC;˘EFFECTIVE COUNTY GOVERNMENT â&#x20AC;˘DEPENDABLE LEADERSHIP

With over 30 years of public service with the municipal and county government, I have the proven leadership and vision to move Hinds County forward.

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35




*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Jackson Restaurant Week VIP Party Sept. 23, 6:30 p.m., at Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St.). Enjoy craft beer tastings, food samples from Jackson Restaurant Week menus and music from Raphael Semmes. The 10 charity finalists are also revealed. Wear cocktail attire. Limited tickets. $27; vip.eatjackson.com. WellsFest Art Night Sept. 24, 5:30 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). The art preview is at 5:30 p.m., and the live auction is at 7 p.m. Barry Leach performs. Proceeds benefit the Good Samaritan Center. Free admission, art for sale; call 601-353-0658; wellsfest.org.

#/--5.)49 Events at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). • Fall Community Enrichment Series. Most classes begin the week of Sept. 23 and fall into the categories of art, music, fitness, design, business and technology. Fees vary; call 601974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted. • Else School of Management Fall Forum Sept. 25, 8 a.m., in the Leggett Center. The speakers are Greg Daco, senior principal economist for the U.S. Macroeconomics Group of IHS, and state economist Darrin Webb. Continental breakfast. Free; call 601-974-1254. Events at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Call 601-981-5469. • After Hours Adventures Sept. 20, 5:30-8 p.m. The children-only event for ages 6-12 includes art and science activities, and a pizza dinner. Online pre-registration required. $40 per child. • Jim Henson’s Birthday Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Celebrate the puppeteer’s legacy with arts and crafts, story time and music. $8, children 12 months and under free. Events at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). • History Is Lunch Sept. 25, noon. Historian Clarence Hunter presents “Marshall and Medgar in Mississippi.” Free; call 601-576-6998. • Artifact and Collectible Identification Program Sept. 25, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The MDAH staff is on hand to assist in identifying documents and objects of historical value, including potential donations to the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. Free; call 601-576-6850. Minority Male Leadership Initiative (M2M) Seminar Sept. 19, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (501 E. Main St., P.O. Box 1100, Raymond), at Cain-Cochran Hall. Dr. Steve Perry speaks on ways to help disadvantaged students in the classroom. Free; call 800-HINDS-CC; hindscc.edu. Precinct 3 COPS Meeting Sept. 19, 6 p.m., at Jackson Police Department, Precinct 3 (3925 W. Northside Drive). The forum is designed to help resolve community issues, from crime to potholes. Free; call 601-960-0003.

September 18 - 24, 2013

Young Business Leaders of Jackson’s Fall Banquet Sept. 20, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at Hilton Jackson (1001 E. County Line Road). The keynote speaker is Bill Yeargin, CEO of Correct Craft. Sponsorships available. $35, $280 table of eight; call 601-201-5489; email dowen@ybljackson.org; ybljackson.org.

36

calling 601-213-5301

Cruzin’ the Boulevard Sept. 21, 7:30 a.m.-noon, in Clinton. Includes pancakes at 7:30 a.m. at 303 Jefferson (303 Jefferson St.), a parade at 9:30 a.m. to Clinton Plaza (200 Clinton Blvd.), a car show at 10 a.m., the Pinewood Derby at 10:30 a.m. and a trunk show from 8 a.m.-noon at Care Plus. Free; car show: $15 in advance, $20 day of

event; $5 trunk show booth space; call 601924-5472; email mainstreet@clintonms.org. Jump Start Jackson Fall Farmers Market Sept. 21, 8 a.m.-noon, at Lake Hico Park (4801 Watkins Drive). Free; call 601-898-0000, ext. 118; email jcollins@mbk-inc.org.

7%,,.%33 Events at Baptist Medical Center (1225 N. State St.). Call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262; mbhs.org. • Better Together: The Way Through Cancer Sept. 18, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., at the Hederman Cancer Center Conference Room. Learn how to encourage someone with cancer from leukemia survivor Wanda Vinson and community counselor Kathy Mumbower. Registration required. Free, $5 optional lunch. • Peripheral Arterial Disease Screening Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at the Cardiovascular Center. Recommended for people ages 65 and older, or ages 50 and older with a history of smoking, coronary disease, diabetes or a strong family history of vascular disease. Appointment required. Free. Events at Jackson Medical Mall (350 W. Woodrow Wilson Ave.). • Breast Cancer Conference Sept. 21, 9 a.m.1 p.m. The topic is “What’s New in Her2+/ Triple– Breast Cancer.” The conference brings together medical experts, survivors and others to discuss an aggressive form of breast cancer. Registration required. Sponsorships and vendor booths available. $20 donation, free for Her2+, Triple-, BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer survivors; call 601-966-7252; rebirthalliance.org. • Sickle Cell Seminar Sept. 23, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., at the UMMC Conference Center. Dr. Paula Tannebee of Duke University is the keynote speaker. Nurses, social workers, teachers and other interested health professionals welcome; seven CEUs available. Registration required. $125, $100 UMMC personnel; call 601984-1300; email basmith2@umc.edu; cvent. com/d/4cqhk5.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. “Sherlock Homes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club” Sept. 18-21, 7:30 p.m., and Sept. 22, 2 p.m., at New Stage Theatre (1100 Carlisle St.). The comic mystery thriller is about the famous detective’s experiences after joining a suicide club. $28, $22 seniors and students; call 601-948-3533, ext. 222; newstagetheatre.com. Free Movie Night Sept. 19, 7:30-9 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). AIA Mississippi is the host. Enjoy an outdoor screening of the documentary “Citizen Architect: Samuel Mockbee and the Spirit of the Rural Studio.” Concessions sold. Free; call 960-1515; aiamississippi.org. “Winnie the Pooh” Auditions Sept. 20, 6:30 p.m., and Sept. 21, 2 p.m., at Black Rose Theatre (103 Black St., Brandon). Production dates are Nov. 14-17 and Nov. 21-24. Free; call 601-825-1293; blackrosetheatre.org. Mississippi Greek Weekend Step Show Sept. 20, 7 p.m., at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.). Teams representing fraternities and sororities perform as part of Mississippi Greek Weekend (Sept. 19-22), and the winning team receives $5,000. Chapters must register via email to be in the show. $10 in advance, $20 at the door, included in $40 all-access pass; call 601-706-YARD (9273); email msgreekweekend@ gmail.com; msgreekweekend.com.




-53)# Events at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive), in the concert hall. Doors open at 7 p.m. Call 601-974-6494; belhaven.edu. • Guest Artist Guitar Concert Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m. English guitarist Andrew Stroud performs. $10, $5 seniors and students, free for Belhaven students and employees. • Faculty and Artist-in-Residence Piano Recital Sept. 24, 7:30 p.m. Pianists Sylvia Hong and Dr. Michael Rector perform. Free. Events at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $3 service charge for ticket holders under age 21; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net. • Son Volt Sept. 19, 8 p.m. The alternative country band from Minneapolis performs. Doors open at 7 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. • Willie Sugarcapps Sept. 20, 8:30 p.m. Will Kimbrough, Grayson Capps, Corky Hughes, Anthony Crawford and Savana Lee make up the Americana band. Lisa Mills also performs. Cocktails at 7:30 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Symphony at Sunset Sept. 19, 7 p.m., at The Cedars Historic Home (4145 Old Canton Road). Mississippi Symphony Orchestra performs. Bring blankets, lawn chairs and picnic baskets. Reserved seating with dinner available for sponsors. Free; call 601-981-9606; fondren.org.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; email info@ lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. • “Lookaway, Lookaway” Sept. 25, 5 p.m. Wilton Barnhardt signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25.99 book. • “Charlie Goes to School” Sept. 25, 5 p.m. Ree Drummond signs books. $17.99 book. • “The Education of a Lifetime” Sept. 24, 3 p.m. Robert Khayat signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $24.95 book. • “The Maid’s Version” Sept. 19, 5 p.m. Daniel Woodrell signs books. Reading at 5:30 p.m. $25 book. Brown Bag Lunch Sept. 18, noon-1 p.m., at Brandon Civic Center (1000 Municipal Drive, Brandon). Mississippi author Ellen Williamson is the speaker. Door prizes included. Free; call 601824-7095; email cerwin@ci.brandon.ms.us.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Mostly Monthly Céilí Sept. 22, 2-5 p.m., at Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St.). Jackson Irish Dancers teaches traditional dances; beginners welcome. Food for sale. Free; call 601-592-9914; email maggie@jacksonirishdancers.org; jacksonirishdancers.org. Tree of Life Painting Class Sept. 25, 7-9 p.m., at Easely Amused (7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland). Learn to paint a whimsical tree with curly branches. Registration required; space limited. $15; call 601-707-5854; email paint@ easelyamused.com; easelyamused.com.

Bread Baking Class Sept. 22, 1-6 p.m., at Gil’s Bread (655 Lake Harbour Drive, Suite 500, Ridgeland). Students receive a bench knife and apron, and get to take home the bread they bake. Limit of 10 students. Dress comfortably and wear closed-toe shoes with non-slip soles - no loose jewelry. Registration required. $125 per session; call 601-863-6935; email gil@gilsbread.com; gilsbread.com.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. • Museum After Hours Sept. 19, 5 p.m. Enjoy a cash bar at 5 p.m. and exhibition tours at 6 p.m. or 6:30 p.m. Intended for young professionals, but all ages welcome. Admission varies per exhibit. • Look and Learn with Hoot Sept. 20, 10:30 a.m. This educational opportunity for 45 year olds and their parents features a hands-on art activity and story time. Dress for mess. Free. Third Thursday Art Reception Sept. 19, 5-8 p.m., at View Gallery (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 105, Ridgeland). The event features new artwork. Wine and cheese served. Free; call 601-856-2001; viewgalleryart.com.

"%4(%#(!.'% Events at Country Club of Jackson (345 St. Andrews Drive). • 25th Anniversary Bottom Line for Kids Benefit Dinner and Auction Sept. 24, 6:309:30 p.m. Individuals inducted into the 1988 Cornerstone Society. Proceeds benefit Southern Christian Services for Children and Youth, a nonprofit that supports abused, neglected and abandoned children. $100; call 601-354-0983; email scscylisa@bellsouth.net; scscy.org. • An Evening with the Sickle Stars Gala Sept. 20, 7 p.m. This year’s honorees are Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Young of New Hope Baptist Church. Proceeds benefit the Mississippi Sickle Cell Foundation. $80, $650 table of eight; call 601-366-5874; mssicklecellfoundation.com.

Join us for Happy Hour Tuesday-Saturday 5-7pm

Best of Jackson 2008 - 2013 Visit www.ceramis.net for specials & hours.

601-919-2829 5417 Lakeland Drive ~ Flowood, MS 39232

COMING SOON

Festival Express Fri | September 27 9 pm | $5 Cover

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson www.cherokeedrivein.com

A Night Under the Stars Sept. 20, 5:30-10 p.m., at Underground 119 (119 S. President St.). The fundraiser with live music, a cash bar and a raffle benefits the Farish Street YMCA. For ages 21 and up. $25 admission, $10 raffle ticket; call 601720-5282 or 601-951-5522; email rthompson@ thompsonwa.com or jmiller@metroymcams.org. Partners to End Homelessness’ Second Annual Honors Tribute Gala Sept. 20, 7 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road). PTEH pays tribute to area supporters, community activists, and those working everyday to end homelessness in central Mississippi. Includes, music, food and a guest speaker. For ages 18 and up. Reserved tables available (up to eight seats). $30; call 601-260-0657; email msecenter@msecenter.com; ptehms.org. Madison House Party Sept. 24, 6-8 p.m., at the home of Susan and Tony Bailey (call for address). The fundraiser for Habitat for Humanity includes cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. Free; call 601353-6060; habitatjackson.org. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

jacksonfreepress.com

“A Mother’s Prayer” Casting Call and Acting Workshop Sept. 21, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at Anointed Arts Ministries (5846 N. Commerce Plaza). Phoenix Fellowship and Alvin Moore Entertainment host. The workshop is from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and the auditions are from 2:30-4 p.m. $25; call 601376-8954; email mspat_926@msn.com.

37


FRIDAY 9/20

MONDAY 9/23

TUESDAY 9/24

Learn about hummingbirds at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science.

Dance for Parkinson’s Class is at Millsaps College.

WellsFest Art Night at Duling Hall features a live art auction.

BEST BETS SEPT. 18 - 26 2013

Women’s Fund of Mississippi Annual Meeting is from 5:30 p.m.-7 p.m. at Jackson Convention Complex (105 E. Pascagoula St.) in the Trustmark Ballroom. Free; call 601-326-3002; email lafawn@womensfundms.org; womensfundms.org. … Lisa Marie Presley performs at 7:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). $25 in advance, $30 at the door; call 601-292-7121; ardenland.net.

Artist Tony Davenport leads 30-minute workshops from 1-4 p.m. Sept. 22 at the Mississippi Children’s Museum.

ELIZABETH WAIBEL

WEDNESDAY 9/18

THURSDAY 9/19

COURTESY BILLY MCGUIGAN

Project Homeless Connect Homeless Conference is at 8:30 a.m. at Galloway Memorial United Methodist Church (305 N. Congress St.). Free; call 601213-5301; ptehms.org. … “America’s Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway” is at 7 p.m. at Quisenberry Library (605 E. Northside Drive, Clinton). Free; call 601924-5684; email kcorbett@jhlibrary.com.

Billy McGuigan allows the audience to choose songs during Rock Legends at 2 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall.

SATURDAY 9/21

Rock Legends is from 2-3:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). $20-$63; call 601981-1847 or 800-745-3000; kesslerbroadway.com. … Behind the Scenes: Big Cats is from 5-6 p.m. at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Registration required. $65, $50 members; call 601-352-2580, ext. 240; jacksonzoo.org.… Windy City Wind Down Comedy Show is from 6-8 p.m. at Word and Worship Church (6286 HangBY BRIANA ROBINSON ing Moss Road). $10 in advance, $15 at the door; call 601713-3597 or 708-625-5724; JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM windycitywinddown.eventbrite. FAX: 601-510-9019 com. … Dance for Peace conDAILY UPDATES AT cert in honor of International JFPEVENTS.COM Peace Day is at 11 p.m. at F. Jones Corner (303 N. Farish St.). Free before 11:59 p.m., $10 after; call 601-983-1148; email janetschriver@aol.com.

MONDAY 9/23

Ellen Stimson signs “Mud Season” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). $23.95 book; call 601-366-7619; email lemuriabooks.com. … Dance for Parkinson’s Class is at 6 p.m. at Millsaps College (1701 N. State St.). Free; call 974-1000; email mamoonm@millsaps. edu. … Jackson Restaurant Week VIP Party is at 6:30 p.m. at Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St.). Limited tickets. $27; vip.eatjackson.com.

EVENTS@ TUESDAY 9/24

September 18 - 24, 2013

SUNDAY 9/22

FRIDAY 9/20

Arts on the Square is from 4-8 p.m. at Historic Canton Square (Courthouse Square, Canton). Free; call 601859-5816; canton-mississippi.com. … Hummingbird experts and banders Bob and Martha Sargent speak at 7 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside 38 Drive). Free; call 601-925-0245.

Study “The Art of Cool” with Visiting Artist Tony Davenport from 1-4 p.m. at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Free with museum admission; call 601-981-5469; mississippichildrensmuseum. com. … Cure Sickle Cell Foundation’s Walk, Run and Ride is at 4 p.m. at Jackson State University, Walter Payton Recreation and Wellness Center (32 Walter Payton Drive). $20, $15 per team (of at least 10) member; call 601-853-3402; email contact@curesicklecell. org; curesicklecell.org.

WellsFest Art Night is at 5:30 p.m. at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Free, art for sale; call 601-353-0658; wellsfest.org. … New Collectors Club Panel Discussion with Jason Bouldin, Ginger Williams-Cook and William Goodman is at 6 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free for members; email ngravesgoodman@ msmuseumart.org. Call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. … Sound Healing with Paradiso and Rasamayi is at 7 p.m. at Joyflow Yoga Studio (7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 2F, Ridgeland). Didjeridoo artist Paradiso and singing bowl master alchemist Rasamayi perform. $25 in advance, $30 at the door; call 601-613-4317; joyflowyoga.com.

WEDNESDAY 9/25

Jobs for Jacksonians Job Fair: Graduation Matters is from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Metrocenter Mall (1395 Metrocenter Drive). Free; call 601-960-0377; jacksonms. gov. … The Black Crowes performs at 8 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall (255 E. Pascagoula St.). $39.50-$65; call 800-745-3000; ardenland.net.


DIVERSIONS | music

Lion Around ‘A Quiet Town’ by Jacquelynn Pilcher

Z

MATT MORSE PHOTOGRAPHY

ach Lovett and Spencer Thomas of Dandy & the Lions always dress to impress and are all around dapper, humble fellows. But beneath the bright smiles, well-combed hair and trendy threads are talented southern souls. These gentlemen are true musicians, taking the stage and spreading the love of music one show at a time. This month, Dandy & the Lions is one of 18 bands performing at Mississippi’s Otherfest in Cleveland. Dandy & the Lions formed in January 2011 in Lovett and Thomas’ Delta State dorm room. The two Dandy & the Lions (from left: Carson Braymer, Caleb Hollingsworth, Beth Allmon, Zach Lovett, Spencer Thomas and Geoff Fowler) performs at Otherfest Sept. 21. met through their involvement in theater and have been inseparable since. Lovett, 21, took interest in the banjo, and Thomas, Since then, the band has been hard at work, writing 21, knew the basics of guitar. They enjoyed singing together one original song after another and performing every given and sharing their songwriting capabilities; however, they were chance. The band began recording its first album, “A Quiet certain they needed more instruments to form a band. Town,” summer 2012 with Nashville-based sound engineer Within the first few months, the duo welcomed Michael Freeman. They released the album last January. vocalist and tambourine player Beth “Dandy” Allmon; The record features the band’s homegrown talent. upright bassist Carson Braymer; accordion player and Its creative content is based on the overall love from their drummer Geoff “Baby Geoffrey” Fowler; and mandolin family and town members’ support. The album has the and violin player Caleb Hollingsworth. fun kick and twang of Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys

with a side of elegant sultriness similar to Hazel Dickens. “A Quiet Town” is a conglomeration of catchy melodies, instrumental incredibility, and heart-melting harmonies and lyrics that easily enforce each song’s emotion. “This album is a folk record, but it’s a mixture of all the things that have influenced us up to this point,” Lovett says. He and Thomas note a broad range of musical influences, including Conor Oberst of Bright Eyes, Emmylou Harris, Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Iron & Wine, M. Ward, Band of Horses and Dan Fogelberg. “People are like, ‘Are you a bluegrass band? Are you a folk band? What are you?’ I just have to say, ‘We’re folk,’” Lovett says. “At the basis of that, I’d like to say we’re singer/ songwriters because that’s what Spencer and I do. That’s how all the songs begin—with words, usually.” With a strong fan base, especially in Cleveland, Miss., among their friends and family, the band has high hopes for the future. “We hope to sell plenty of albums on our own,” Thomas says. The band also would like to gain more fans in the Jackson area and put together a southeast regional tour. Dandy & the Lions performs on the Abita Beer stage at this year’s Otherfest (4015 Highway 61 N., Cleveland) Sept. 21 at 3:45 p.m. Admission is $15. Stream “A Quiet Town” on Spotify, or buy it from Amazon, CD Baby or iTunes. Listen to the singles “Twice the Man” and “Passion Dance” on the band’s Facebook page.

music in theory

by Micah Smith

album, “Saloon,” or maybe it was the fact that the band members dressed like extras COURTESY SOLID STATE RECORDS

I

f I say, “I’m an avid news reader,” you might expect that I have substantial opinions on the country’s economic state, political problems, or other significant yet dreary information from sources such as CNN, Fox or NBC. Not exactly. “I’m an avid entertainment news reader” sounds much less impressive. I may not know about the latest scandal in Washington, D.C., but if you need to know which comic-book characters will be featured in “Avengers 2,” I’m your man. Two or three times a day, I find myself perusing the Internet for briefs on which bands burned out, which album is out next and which singer left to pursue a hip-hop career. Typically, I read Alternative Press (altpress.com) if I want to know about pop-rock or metal, Under the Radar (undertheradarmag.com) if I want to know about the independent sector, and SPIN Magazine (spin.com) if I, for whatever reason, want updates from people who think music peaked in the ’90s. While on the Alternative Press website, I unearthed a band that looked intriguing: a quartet called The Ongoing Concept. Maybe it was the hand-drawn cover of its newest

Judging a band by its album cover means you might miss out on a new gem.

from the musical “Newsies,” but my hopes skyrocketed. I was soon disappointed to discover that The Ongoing Concept was quite different than their presentation would suggest. Now, I don’t dislike metal or hardcore, but I realized that I placed those genres in a specific corner, like badly behaved kindergartners. Dressing like a turn-of-the-century paperboy and exuding a tasteful, homemade vibe seemed completely contradictory to the

band’s chaotic tunes. Immediately, I turned “Saloon” off and went back to my newsfeed with a bad taste in my mouth. A few hours later, I thought about my reaction to The Ongoing Concept’s music. It unnerved me that I hadn’t given it a proper chance. I couldn’t even recall what the group sounded like. Branding works in music just as much as in any other market. We all know that Starbucks has a giant green mermaid and McDonald’s has arches that look like they might be formed from the restaurant’s artificially yellow French fries. In the same way, we know that heavy metal uses fonts that look like barbed wire, fierce-sounding band names and, generally, anything that can be described as “brutal.” For better or worse, that’s the power of brand image. The issue with placing such unwavering restrictions on a band is that music isn’t a morning coffee or a slice of potato confused about its country of origin. It’s an art form, and a single image, name, or the way that the band members dress shouldn’t define it. Unfortunately, we live in a world where the clothes make the band. We’ve seen elaborate costumes do wonders for a career. Lady

Gaga had a rather bland reception before she took up the almighty “Freak Flag.” Most people are aware that the largest difference between pop artists is in our perception, but that doesn’t apply in independent music, does it? After all, indie is a “more mature, more advanced” genre. But imagine the members of Youth Lagoon or even Arcade Fire shedding their plaid pelts for a go at Jimmy Buffet button-ups and cargo shorts, and it’ll get easier to see where you draw the line. Careful brand image and strategic marketing are criminally sad necessities of music, as our consumer natures can’t handle freeing music to flourish or fade based completely on merits. To an extent, there’s nothing wrong with having a specific ideology for what you believe is acceptable for a genre. But a preconceived, exterior expectation should not affect your ability to appreciate a musician’s creative expression. If we want to lessen the death-grip that brand image has on the music community, we’re going to have to think bigger than those factors. However ingrained imagebased marketing may be for music, ask yourself what you’re more likely to remember—a 39 great brand or a good band.

jacksonfreepress.com

Bigger Than a Brand


MUSIC | live

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(*excludes food and specialty drinks)

Wednesday, September 18th

BROWN HAT MAN

(Delta Blues) 6:30, No Cover

Thursday, September 19th

LISA MILLS

(Blues) 8:00, No Cover

Friday, September 20th

YMCA FUNDRAISER

(Various Artists) 9:00, $25 Tickets

Saturday, September 21st

JAREKUS SINGLETON

Open Mic with Jason Turner

Wednesday September 25

KARAOKE

with DJ STACHE

Tuesday, September 24th

UpComing Show

(Genre) 6:30, No Cover

COMING SOON September 18 - 24, 2013

Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

(Blues) 9:00, $10 Cover

TBA

40

Tuesday September 24

VOO DAVIS Saturday, September 28, Blues, 8pm, $10 Cover

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

September 27th

Gaslight Street

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FREE WiFi 416 George Street, Jackson Open Mon-Sat Restaurant Open Mon-Fri 11am-10pm & Sat 4-10pm

601-960-2700

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Danny

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ALL NEW LUNCH & DINNER MENU PLATTERS STARTING AT $10 WEDNESDAYS

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9/19

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9/23

SEARCH NIGHT Local bands tryout for gigs On stage w/ pro sound & lights Both bars open

1.50 Pick & Grab Beers & 2 for 1 draft TUESDAY

9/24

SHRIMP BOIL 5 - 10 PM

MATT’S KARAOKE 5 - 9 & 10 - close

$1 PBR & HIGHLIFE $2 MARGARITAS 10 - 12pm

UPCOMING SHOWS 9.27: Up Until Now

(on tour with STS9 & Umphrey’s McGee)

9.28: Good Enough For Good Times (Members Of Galactic) 10.4: Cosby Sweater 10.18: Lord T & Eloise 10.19: The Revivalists

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41


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports the best in sports over the next seven days

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 9/18:

Barry Leach (Restaurant)

THURSDAY 9/19:

Baby Jan & All That Chaz (Restaurant)

FRIDAY 9/20:

Southern Grass (Restaurant) Taylor Farrell (Patio) SATURDAY 9/21:

The Vernons(Restaurant) MONDAY 9/23:

Central MS Blues Society presents Blue Monday (Restaurant)

TUESDAY 9/24:

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant)

BUY GROWLERS O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

$19

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

SLATE

by Bryan Flynn

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play a game: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll give you the records for a starting NFL quarterback and a quarterback looking for a job. Can you name them? The first quarterback has a 5-20 record in three years as a starter, and this guy still has a job. Our second quarterback has an 8-6 record with a playoff win, yet he is looking for work.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 19 College football (6:30-10 p.m., ESPN U): Jackson State looks for a second SWAC win against winless Texas Southern. FRIDAY, SEPT. 20 College football (8-11 p.m., ESPN): This should be a high-scoring affair to keep you up on a Friday night when Boise State and Fresno State collide. SATURDAY, SEPT. 21 College football (2:30-6 p.m., CBS): The Florida Gators host the Tennessee Volunteersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;once a must-see rivalry that has lost some of its luster. SUNDAY, SEPT. 22 NFL (noon-3 p.m., Fox): The New Orleans Saints host the suddenly dangerous Arizona Cardinals after both teams escaped with late wins last week. MONDAY, SEPT. 23 NFL (7:30-11 p.m., ESPN): The Oakland Raiders are better than expected this season, but can they stop the high-powered Denver Broncos offense? TUESDAY, SEPT. 24 Documentary (7-8:30 p.m., ESPN): Archie Manning and his family are the focus in the new ESPN Filmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SEC Storied series: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Book of Manning.â&#x20AC;?

UPCOMING 9.25

September 18 - 24, 2013

Come get some food and drink before the Black Crowes Show!!

42

New Bourbon St. Jazz Band Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25 MLB (6-11 p.m., ESPN): Check out the to-be-announced teams in the playoff hunt in Major League Baseball.

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant "E#AREFUL7HAT9OU!SK&OR

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Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

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â&#x20AC;˘ Laptop & iPads screen replacement â&#x20AC;˘ Data backup,DC Jack repair â&#x20AC;˘ Small business service calls â&#x20AC;˘ Same day service â&#x20AC;˘ We sell and buy used computers Reviews & photos at www.kismar.com â&#x20AC;&#x153;Work was completed as promised and price was lower than other stores. This is the second time I have used them and am very satisfiedâ&#x20AC;? Ernest V.

6712 Old Canton Rd Suite 10, Ridgeland M - F 9 am - 7 pm Sat. 9 am - 5 pm

601.500.7700

$10 Daily Lunch Specials Happy Hour Everyday 4p-7p

Late Night Happy Hour Sun - Thur, 10p - 12a

Daily Lunch Specials â&#x20AC;˘ Sept 18 - 24

Includes: Dessert, Iced Tea, & tax. Take Out Orders are welcomed.

Wed | Pulled Pork BBQ Sandwich or Country Fried Steak Thu | Chicken & Bowtie Pasta or Corned Beef & Cabbage Fri | Catfish Parmesan or Grilled Shoulder Steak

601.978.1839

6270 Old Canton Rd. Jackson, MS 39211


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Always Drink Responsibly

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Untitled - Page: 1

2013-06-27 15:51:19 +0100


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Obama’s Massive $100M Brain Research Initiative Targets Memory Loss Drug-free memory discovery yields ‘shocking’ results in clinical trial; restores brainpower equal to those up to 15 years younger, all within 30 days!

Science Attacks Memory Loss The multi-year program called Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies, or BRAIN, will as part of its initiative, target the symptoms premature mental decline, including poor memory, the inability to maintain focus and concentration, mental fatigue, and brain fog. It has been called the “next great American project,” drawing comparisons to the !"#$#%&'())*''+(#&,--.&')"*/0"1)& discovery initiative, the Human Genome Project. Over an estimated ten-year period, Brain Research scientists will ‘map’ the human brain in an unprecedented quest to unravel its mysteries.

What’s the Catch? What President Obama and 2$3"/"'0420"5/& 5+1)"2#'& +2"#*$& to tell Americans is that, for many, they don’t have to spend $100 million or wait ten-plus %*24'& +54& 2& 16& +54& 07*"4& +588%9& forgetful mind. In fact, evidence of a genuine, clinically tested, real, memory pill is here, now.

Real Memory Pill Exists! & & & & & :& ;<=>2'*$& 4*'*24)7& 1439& Brain Research Labs, has developed and conducted successful human testing on a genuine memory pill. Over a period of a few weeks in a landmark, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, published in a peer-reviewed journal, scientists observed the formula helping older brains function more youthfully. In many cases, the formula allowed users to match the memory recall speed and brainpower of those up to 15 years younger, all within a

30-day time period. It’s no secret either. The US ?20*/0&2/$&@42$*324A&B+1)*&72'& granted the drug-free natural formula a United States patent. Over the years, the sophisticated three-part formulation has gained the trust of medical doctors, a top clinical pharmacist, and is even a recommended component in an updated version of a legendary Medicare-reimbursed brain health protocol. Preventive Gerontologist, Dr. Arnold Bresky, the man responsible for the Medicarereimbursed brain tune-up protocol recommends this prescription-free memory compound as an integral part of his new Four Pillars of Brain Health program. With more than 45 years behind a pharmacist’s counter, and 25 years in a radio show booth, if Dr. Gene Steiner had a nickel for every time someone asked, “Do you have anything that can improve my memory,” he would be a rich man today.

A Crystal-Clear Memory It’s a question he’s heard many times. “This natural memory pill is to an aging, sluggish brain, what a breath of fresh air is to your lungs,” he says. Before prescribing the pill to patients, Dr. Steiner decided to 14'0&04%&"0&7"3'*#+C “Within a few days, I can tell you without reservation that my memory became crystal clear,” he says. “I had such marvelous results that I not only started recommending it to my customers, I even shared it with other physicians!”

macy and customers were returning to thank me for introducing them to it.” “It felt great to see so many people whose lives were enriched by taking a simple, natural formula.” “With this simple, drug-free for3(#29&!*&1/2##%&72D*&'53*07"/8& that we can recommend that is safe and effective. And you don’t need a prescription either!” Recently, Dr. Steiner relocated to another state and was apprehensive about taking the state board of pharmacy jurisprudence examination, a daunting examination that tests a candidate’s mastery of pharmacy law. “I began taking the natural memory compound for two weeks prior to the test, and I passed with E%"/8&)5#54'FG&H@7*&4*)2##&I&J*4sonally experienced was fantastic,” says Steiner. “It’s a unique process,” he adds, “that pumps the brain full of energizing oxygen, helping improve blood circulation to the brain, while helping to boost key neurotransmitters in the brain responsible for cognitive functioning.” Alternative medicine pioneer, and retired medical school professor, Dr. Robert Heller, personally uses and recommends the formula.

bering things. After only one week, I felt mentally energized 2/$& 354*& )5/1$*/0& "/& 3%'*#+F& Now, I enjoy reading again. I’ve 4*82"/*$&)5/1$*/)*&"/&3%'*#+FG

Perks Up Tired, Sluggish Brains

“It’s not a drug,” smiles Dr. Heller, “it’s a nutritional supplement that can help a foggy, sluggish brain become sharper, quicker, and healthier.” Head and neck surgeon and psychologist, Paul Nemiroff, PhD, MD, FACS, agrees, adding, “It is truly an amazing breakthrough for memory!” Kasey L.* from Olathe, Kansas says, “I was hav"/8& 045(>#*& 1/$"/8& words in my brain and remembering things. Now I am as sharp as a tack and ‘Pharmacist of the Year,’ Dr. Gene Steiner, I have a memory recommends a patented, natural memory like an elephant. I compound will never stop taking it.” Grace K.* of Alabama was A Pharmacy Best-Seller “It became the best-selling in the same boat. “I was having concentration brain health product in my pharJ45>#*3'& 2/$& $"+1)(#0%& 4*3*3-

9.25 X 12 Jackson Free Press BrainMapping V2.indd 1

On April 11, 2013, President Barack Obama announced a ten-year, $100 million brain research project.

Many are asking the question, does the government’s $100 million scientific discovery initiative ignore the existence of a patented memory restorer? Crossword puzzle fanatic, Bobby D.* from western Nevada can’t say enough about his superfast mental abilities. “Working four crossword puzzles in the morning paper, quicker, has amazed me with the answers just popping into my head! I stand outside myself and wonder where those answers come from!” Anyone who has ever stood in front of a crowd and then, forgot what they were about to say, knows the horror of “drawing a blank.” Professional speaker Sylvia. P.* from California found Brain Research Labs’ memory discovery just in time. “I started having a hard time

staying focused and remembering important information.” “As a professional speaker in front of hundreds of people, I found these senior moments very embarrassing. Plus, it was threatening my career. Since taking this, I can now conduct a whole seminar without relying on my notes. I feel like my old self again!” You don’t have to spend million of dollars or wait ten years to do what Brain Research Labs has already done for you. If you are ready to do something about your mind and memory, here’s your risk-free chance.

Get a Free 30-Day Supply of this PharmacistRecommended Memory Formula! Call the toll-free number below to see how you can reserve your free 30-day supply of the same, patented memory formula used by Dr. Steiner. It is the #1-selling memory formula in the US, and it is also mentioned in the medically acclaimed book, 20/20 Brainpower: 20 Days to a Quicker, Calmer, Sharper Mind!

Claim Your Free Copy of the Top-Selling Book, 20/20 Brainpower When you call the toll-free number below, ask how you can also receive a free copy of the medically acclaimed book, 20/20 Brainpower: 20 Days to a Quicker, Calmer, Sharper, Mind! It’s a $20 value, yours free! But don’t wait, supplies are limited!

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*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Everyone is different and you may not experience the same results. Results can depend on a variety of factors including overall health, diet, and other lifestyle factors. Doctors Steiner, Heller, and Nemiroff were not compensated for their statements, which attest to personal and professional experience. They were compensated for the right to include their statements here.

9/1/13 1:25 PM

jacksonfreepress.com

PHOENIX, ARIZONA — For readers who fret about their less-than-perfect memory, or worry about steadily worsening mental powers, your life is about to change. Thanks to President Obama’s massive $100 million B.R.A.I.N. initiative, millions of frustrated Americans who not only lose their car keys, but also forget where they have parked may soon have real, lasting relief.

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