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August 28 - September 3, 2013


TRIP BURNS

JACKSONIAN NOLAND SMITH

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n a sport where size and ability increasingly go hand in hand, its refreshing to meet someone whose talent shines at any size. Known as “Super Gnat” due to his small stature (5foot-7-inches and 154 pounds), Noland Smith proved he had the fight, drive and passion to play pro football. The Kansas City Chiefs picked the Jackson native up in the sixth round of the 1967 American Football League draft. “That was the first time in the history of the AFL that they drafted a player solely as a punt-kick return specialist,” Smith says. At the time, Smith was the smallest player in the league. However, he had proved during his tenure as a receiver at Tennessee State University—then called Tennessee A&I University. “I had an outstanding year my senior year there, which also enhanced my chances of making it in pro football,” Smith says. Smith led the AFL in kickoff return yardage with 1,360 yards while with the Chiefs. Smith is 18th on the NFL’s all-time kick-return average list with 26.06 yards per return. For Smith, football was a way to learn about life. “The summation of organized sports is that you learn to deal with different personalities while working for one common goal, and that’s to win,” he says. “You learn to agree to disagree and still work toward the same goal.” These days Smith, 69, works as the center coordinator at the Medgar Evers Community Center for the City of Jackson’s Parks and Recreation Department. He’s been at the center

CONTENTS

for 21 years and with the City of Jackson for a total of 43 years. He manages the gymnasium, community activities, a freestyle basketball program, community meetings and an afterschool tutorial program for school-age kids. “There are a percentage of my kids— sometimes it’s pretty high—that are being raised by their grandparents,” Smith says. “We want to make sure their homework is done here before they go home because sometimes the grandparents aren’t able to help them.” Family is important to Smith, and a major reason he returned to his home state after leaving pro football. “My parents were getting up in age and I really wanted to be around them. … And the atmosphere in the South was a lot more conducive to raising my kids,” he says. “I decided that I wanted to come back home.” Smith and his wife, Gloria, celebrated their 50th anniversary last year. They have three children: Noland Jr., Tonya and Kevin; and three grandchildren: Jade, Noland III and Nikey. As Smith prepares to retire from the City of Jackson at the end of September, he leaves with a positive view of his many years of service. “It’s been a labor of love, (and) I’m going to miss it,” he says. He is also happy to see the revitalization efforts happening throughout Jackson. “Jackson holds a vast amount of potential,” Smith says. “Some of the resources have not been tapped, yet.” —ShaWanda Jacome

Photos courtesy MSU, UM, USM and JSU

11 Follow the Money

District 4 Hinds supervisor candidate Alvin Woods believes supervisors should treat their constituents’ money as a sacred trust.

29 Fresh Spirits

Look beyond mere garnish—herbs can pack a big punch in unexpected foods and cocktails.

33 Pub Crawl Fulfillment

“At its best, ‘The World’s End,’ which was written by (Simon) Pegg and (Edgar) Wright, provides insight into the lonesome loser, compares the past and present, and condemns the impersonal mechanization of modernization. It doesn’t wallow in cheap sentimentality; instead, it gets drunk on alien invasions and empty-headed robots. Gary and his friends bash, wrestle and tear apart scores of alien robots on the path to fulfillment.” —Anita Modak-Truran, “Beers and ’Bots”

jacksonfreepress.com

4 ............................. EDITOR’S NOTE 8 ............................................ TALKS 13 ................................ EDITORIAL 15 .................................... OPINION 16 ............................ COVER STORY 27 ...................................... TRAVEL 29 ........................................... FOOD 30 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 31 .............................. DIVERSIONS 33 .......................................... FILM 34 ............................... EIGHT DAYS 35 ............................... JFP EVENTS 37 ....................................... MUSIC 38 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 39 .................................... PUZZLES 41 .............................. ASTROLOGY 41 ............................. CLASSIFIEDS 42 ............................................ GIG

COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES, R.L. NAVE, TRIP BURNS

AUGUST 28 - SEPTEMBER 3, 2013 | VOL. 11 NO. 51

3


REPORTER’S note

by Tyler Cleveland, reporter

The National Balance League

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ooking down at the spectacle of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans on a game day Sunday is one of the highlights of my career as a football junkie. When I was younger, I saw only the pure joy created by the atmosphere inside the dome, one of the loudest and rowdiest settings in sports. Of course, I hung on every movement from the players I’d come to idolize and imitate. These days, I’m 27 years old and officially a working man; I have a much different view on things. Now, all I see is dollar signs. I see 80,000 people who paid an average of $106 each to get in the gate. At least 40,000 of those fans are wearing an NFL officially licensed Drew Brees jersey ($99.95 at NFLshop.com). Roughly 20,000 paid $25 to park. At least 30,000 of them are drinking $7 Budweisers (and some will drink many, many of those), and sponsors are constantly reminded fans of the businesses around New Orleans that made this game possible. I think about the television contracts—extended in 2011—that pay the NFL $27 billion over nine years. According to Forbes, that’s $200 million per team, per year, before anyone buys the first ticket. The NFL would have dominated all 10 of the top spots on Nielson ratings list for 2012, if it weren’t for the opening ceremonies of the Summer Olympics and the Grammy Awards (spots nine and 10, respectively.) I look at all of this, and I think, “Man, these guys have got it figured out.” Then I realize this same scene is unfolding in 15 other stadiums around the country at the same time, and the money becomes mind-boggling.

Forbes reports that the NFL is worth $35 billion. The average NFL team, it says, is worth $1.04 billion. To the fans in the stands—who live and die with their players, follow them off of the field on Twitter and use their first names as if they are family members—I’d wager it’s worth even more.

The NFL’s success is its philosophy, which is inherently communist. So, how did the NFL grow to become part of the fabric of American life? The answer might surprise you, but if you look at the way the league is set up, you will see the secret to the league’s success is its philosophy, which is inherently communist. I hear you groaning, but stay with me on this. One word you’ll hear if you follow pro football long enough is parity. In football, parity is the idea that there cannot be one dominant team, or even a handful of them. In the NFL, any team can beat any other team on any given day. That kind of balance doesn’t happen overnight, and the methods the NFL

uses to achieve it are so red, it would make Lenin or Marx blush. The big secret to the NFL’s parity success is revenue sharing. The NFL takes the entire league’s massive amount of profits, puts it in one big commie pot and splits it evenly 32 ways—after paying the league’s front-office expenses, of course. What that has created is a league of 32 organizations that can all afford to invest in their brand, their stadiums, their talent on the field and the communities they play in. It’s why the Atlanta Falcons, the league’s 26th-ranked team in terms of revenue, are looking to build a new stadium to replace their current home, the 71,250-seat Georgia Dome. Major League Baseball, seeing the NFL’s success and scrambling to get their own act together, broke with 100-plus years of tradition and started making teams place 31 percent of their profits into their own commie pot and split it equally. But, since revenue sharing began in 2002, only one team outside the top 10 in payroll has won the World Series (Florida, 2003). By comparison, fans of 11 different NFL teams have watched their team lift the Lombardi Trophy after winning the Super Bowl in the 16 years since 1996. Then there’s the salary cap: Football teams can only spend a certain amount on their talent, and while that number is $123 million this season, every team can afford it. By setting a hard limit for the total dollar amount that teams can spend, it creates a situation where one team can’t out-spend another into insignificance. Not to pick on MLB, but its luxury tax, where the teams pay a hefty amount of extra money to pay more than the $170 million allowed by the league, only

affects the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox. It’s not all about dollar signs, though. The NFL has taken other practical steps to insure competitive balance, like how it set up its draft. Pro football has a cutand-dry system in place: The team with the worst record in the NFL gets the first pick of fresh talent from the college ranks, and the Super Bowl winner has the last pick. There’s also a rookie salary cap, to make sure none of the 32 teams get hamstrung having to pay a ridiculous amount of money to players who don’t pan out. The league started a Competitive Balance Committee in the late ‘90s that is still around. It consists of six league officials and six NFL coaches, who rotate (of course), and suggest rule changes to improve the league. (If you ever wondered where the after-the-play officials’ review came from, now you know.) The NFL has also set the mold on scheduling. If your team wins the Super Bowl, it will play the hardest schedule in the league the very next year. Finally, although the NFL player’s union may not be as strong as the MLB’s or the National Basketball Association’s, it did successfully survive a lockout last season and, in the end, it got most of what it wanted (you guessed it: more money). I say all that to say this: The NFL shows us that collective bargaining, revenue sharing and competitive balance are a lot more than marketing phrases. They are the formula that has turned a two-league merger in 1966 into the most popular brand in North America. Email reporter Tyler Cleveland at tyler@jacksonfreepress.com and follow on twitter at @TylerCleveland.

August 28 - September 3, 2013

CONTRIBUTORS

4

Bryan Flynn

ShaWanda Jacome

RL Nave

Rick Cleveland

Enrika Williams

Dawn Macke

Mark Braboy

David Rahaim

Lifelong Mississippian and freelance sportswriter Bryan Flynn is a husband and stay-athome father to a baby girl. He constantly wonders, if it didn’t happen on ESPN or Disney Jr., did it really happen? He wrote the cover package.

ShaWanda Jacome is an elementary librarian in JPS. She lives in Ridgeland with her husband, Mike, and son, Mateo. One of her favorite scriptures is: Psalm 34:4. She wrote the Jacksonian.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Call him at 601362-6121 ext. 12. He contributed to the talk section.

Rick Cleveland, winner of the 2011 Richard Wright Literary Excellence Award, is the executive director of the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. He wrote the opinion column.

Enrika loves food. A lot. Mississippi heart, ATL soul, she loves all things beautiful, sifting through record crates and eating food she doesn’t have to cook herself. She wrote the travel story.

Fondren resident Dawn Macke is a media junkie, reader, writer, laid-back mama and kitchen queen. She enjoys craft beer, upcycling and attempts at lesswasteful living. She wrote the food story.

Editorial Intern Mark Braboy loves to write and listen to hiphop music. A Jackson State University English major, he also writes for the college’s newspaper, the Blue & White Flash. He wrote the gig.

One day Marketing Consultant David Rahaim will finish his first novel. He promises. It may just be after he finishes his second.


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Hinds Community College offers equal education and employment opportunities and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability or veteran status in its programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Dr. Debra Mays-Jackson, Vice President for Utica, Vicksburg/Warren Campuses and Administrative Services, 34175 Hwy. 18, Utica, MS 39175; 601.885.7001.

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5


JESSICA KING

[YOU & JFP]

Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

Karen Parker Age: 55 How long have you lived in Jackson? Born and raised here. How long have you read the JFP? Since 2000 Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your favorite part of Jackson? Fondren Quote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre mindsâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Albert Einstein Secret to life: Always look at everything as a learning opportunity.

Write us: letters@jacksonfreepress.com Tweet us: @JxnFreePress Facebook: Jackson Free Press

WHAT IS THE MOST MEMORABLE FOOTBALL MOMENT IN YOUR LIFETIME? Joey Engelman The Meridian Wildcats breaking the 89game winning streak of South Panola and taking the state title. Leslie Thompson Raymond Shaw and I went to the State and Ole Miss game in Jackson in the late â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s and State won! Stacy Evans I have two: being in Miami for Saints victory and being at Ole Miss victory over Notre Dame. Troy Snider The Saints winning the Super Bowl. Tyler Cleveland The entire Superdome yelling â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deeeeuuuuuceâ&#x20AC;? as Lena, Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own Deuce McAllister salted a playoff game against the Philadelphia Eagles away by running it right at them late in the 4th quarter of a 27-24 win in 2006. Natalie Brooke Long In 1998, watching MSU beat #1ranked Arkansas at MSU! We all rushed the field! Olga Lynette Henderson Hanson Senior year, fall 1965, if I remember right, when we Provine Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;unappreciated in north Jackson and underdogs for sureâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;defeated the always-thought-they-were-it-on-stick Murrah Mustangs, 13-6. Then, later on during basketball season joining in as we Rams chanted â&#x20AC;&#x153;13 to 6â&#x20AC;? louder and louder, over and over, in our gym as we played the Mustangs. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember that score, but I vividly recall being a part of both special moments. Jerry Shelton Last game In Jackson between Ole Miss and Alabama, the first seven minutes into game and Ole Miss

was leading 21-0. Then Bama flexed their muscles. Final score: Bama 62 Ole Miss 28. Roll Tide! The year before, Ole Miss embarrassed Bama in Tuscaloosa, on national TV. It was Bamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Homecoming. I guess payback was hell â&#x20AC;Ś Ramona Savage Martin Miss. State 6, Alabama 3, 1980. Linda Castleberry Showah Saints winning the Super Bowl! Jo Ann Crooks Hall Most memorable moment for me, most embarrassing for my sons: Getting caught in stands reading Football for Dummies. Never underestimate a motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love! Keith Britt Ole Miss defeating eventual national champion Notre Dame on Sept. 17, 1977. 20-13. John Scanlon The Immaculate Deflection from the Egg Bowl of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;83. Proof that God is a Rebel. WC McClendon Egg Bowlâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2011, 2010, 2009... Ask next year and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be 2014 . Caroline Biedenharn When I finally admitted to everyone that I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really like watching football.

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Greg Russell Loyd Star beating Wesson, 1976. Lacy Ellinwood 2002 Ohio State vs. University of Illinois in Champagne-Urbana: The #1 Ohio State Buckeyes come to Illinois and win in overtime with the help of a controversial call. It was cold, and it was the weekend that made me swear off Rolling Rock for three years. Chris McGavic Brett Favreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Monday night football game right after his father passed away. It was an amazing display of his talents. Steven Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill Brett Favreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last game at Lambo Field in Green Bay against NY Giants for the NFC championship! The game went into overtime, and it was the most amazing experience! William Spell Jr. Archie Manning playing against LSU in Tiger Stadium in 1971 with a cast on his broken left arm. The Tigers trounced Ole Miss 61 to 17 on national TV. Bobby Cleveland Shagging punts for Ray Guy several days at USM football practices in the early â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s. I volunteered to do it and got no arguments from anybody. They came down like guided missiles, since they had such tight spirals.

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August 28 - September 3, 2013

       

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SUFFERING FROM LOWER BACK PAIN?

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If you answered yes to any of the above, then you might be suffering from SI joint pain. SI joint pain can contribute up to 30% of all lower back pain, yet is rarely evaluated.

7


Wednesday, Aug. 21 An Egyptian court orders the release of ousted President Hosni Mubarak. â&#x20AC;Ś Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is sentenced to up to 35 years in prison, the stiffest punishment ever handed out in the U.S. for leaks to the media.

Friday, Aug. 23 Syrian troops and opposition fighters clash in Damascus where the opposition claims a chemical weapons attack this week killed more than 130 people. â&#x20AC;Ś A court convicts Army Maj. Nidal Hasan on 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder for a 2009 mass shooting. He is now eligible for the death penalty. Saturday, Aug. 24 Tens of thousands march to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and down the National Mall to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. â&#x20AC;Ś Egyptâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s government shortens a widely imposed evening curfew, signaling that authorities sense turmoil is waning in the country.

August 28 - September 3, 2013

Sunday, Aug. 25 A senior administration official announces that there is â&#x20AC;&#x153;very little doubtâ&#x20AC;? that Syria used a chemical weapon against civilians, but the president has not yet decided how to respond. â&#x20AC;Ś Police in New Delhi, India, arrest the last of five men wanted in Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gang rape of a photojournalist.

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Monday, Aug. 26 Survivors of the attack and relatives of those killed in the Fort Hood shooting testify at the sentencing phase of Maj. Nidal Hasanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trial. Tuesday, Aug. 27 Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announces that the U.S. military is ready to strike Syria at once if President Barack Obama gives the order. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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City Council Mulls Budget Proposal by Tyler Cleveland

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n presenting his first budget to the city, Jackson Mayor Chokwe Lumumba banked on Jacksonians to understand that money doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grow on trees. Through the first few days of grilling from Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Council, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so far, so good for the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget proposal. At least by the time of this writing, Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s department heads have, one after another, made their presentations to the council without incident. They outlined the progressâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or lack of progressâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;of the past year, each explaining why their bottom lines are what they are. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been pleasantly surprised by the whole process,â&#x20AC;? Councilman Deâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keither Stamps, Ward 4, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had never seen (City Director of Public Works) Dan Gaillet give a presentation before, and he knocked it out of the park. The mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office has presented a solid budget, and I think the other members are on board.â&#x20AC;? That everyone seems to be in agreement to this point may surprise some, considering the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed budget includes steep rate increases for water and sewer services for Jackson residents and businesses, and expands funding for nearly every city-services department. Even Quentin Whitwell, Ward 1, a Republican opposed to tax increases, said he realizes the city must do something. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we need to have bigger conversation about the water and sewer structure in the metro area,â&#x20AC;? Whitwell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultimately, bigger decisions have to be made. I applaud the mayor for recognizing that we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep

doing the same thing and expect different results. So, right now, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in one of those postures where Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just analyzing the facts and asking questions, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see where we go from there.â&#x20AC;? Under the plan, the city will raise rates

revenue for the city. In addition, Lumumba said 5.53 mills originally set to go to JPS would not be used by the schools, and instead account for an additional $6.4 million to help the city balance its budget. JPS officials could not be TRIP BURNS

Thursday, Aug. 22 A medically equipped helicopter transports Hosni Mubarak from prison to his new home under house arrest. â&#x20AC;Ś A 22-year-old photojournalist is gang raped while her male colleague is tied up and beaten in an isolated, overgrown corner of Indiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business hub of Mumbai.

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Jackson Councilman DeKeither Stamps, Ward 4, is a proponent of Mayor Chokwe Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan to expand public works.

on sewer bills, effectively doubling them, and water bills would rise around $6 on average, from $15 to $21, said City Finance Department spokesman Rick Hill. Hill estimated that the increase will produce a little more than $30 million in additional

reached for comment, but the school district sued the city of Jackson last year over a millage dispute, saying they were being underfunded, and won. The additional money in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget, some $150 million more than

Little Leagues

A

s football season kicks into high gear, so do millions of Fantasy Football leagues all over the country. Some fantasy team managers carefully plan, draft and prune their rosterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;calculating trades and watching the waiver wire like a (Seattle Sea)hawk. But for others, the main goal is to invent the ultimate team

name. The world of fantasy team names is awash with puns, some combining pop culture with football references (such as The Gridiron Born) and others playing off classic football terminology (try The Fail Marys). You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go wrong with wordplay based on your favorite playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, though. Here are a few standouts this season:

Somewhere Over the Dwayne Bowe (Dwayne Bowe of the Kansas City Chiefs) Armed Rodgery (Aaron Rodgers of the Green Bay Packers) Kaepâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Crunch (Colin Kaepernick of the San Francisco 49ers) Weeden Start the Fire (Brandon Weeden of the Cleveland Browns) The Wrath of Kuhn (John Kuhn of the Green Bay Packers) Another Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brick in the Wall (Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brickashaw Ferguson of the New York Jets) The Blair Walsh Project (Blair Walsh of the Minnesota Vikings) Add your favorites at jfp.ms/fantasyfootballpuns


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last year, will begin to fund projects services, is moving under administration. meant to resolve the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s various chalThe mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget increases funds for lenges, including the $400 million consent employee benefits, cultural services, persondecree from the U.S. Environmental Pro- nel, planning and development. tection Agency. The city must include the City Council decreesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mandates in its Budget Committee budgets until the last Chairman Tony Yardebts are paid. Rebuildber, Ward 6, applauded ing and repairing other when Lumumba said crumbling infrastruche would put more ture, including roads, funds toward fixing are in addition to the Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drainage, cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regular expenses about which the city and duties, such as fire receives one complaint and police protection. a day, the mayor said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have to be bruFor anyone who tally honest about the followed the mayoral state of our beloved campaign, Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s city and what must be messageâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not done to make our city kicking the can down Ward 6 Councilman Tony Yarber the place we all know the road to meet the said he was impressed with the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s insistence on funding it can be,â&#x20AC;? Lumumba cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s challengesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is preessential infrastructure work. said during his budget dictable. Raising water presentation before the and sewer bills, on the city council. other hand, was a break from Lumumbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;This budget includes some solutions position of making sure the burden of paythat clearly are not going to be popularâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I ing for a big government-spending increase can tell by the looks on your facesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reach the wallets of Jackson residents. are necessary.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was almost speechless,â&#x20AC;? Yarber said. The mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget increases a hand- â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just to hear the resolve in his voice, and esful of departments by a small percentage, pecially knowing that he has always been a but, under the plan, the Public Works De- champion of being sure that people wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t partment would grow by a whopping $22 have to endure hardships that was placed on million to $398 million, which represents them by the government. To hear him unroughly 76 percent of a $29,386,861 increase derstand that the people and the municipal in city spending over the 2013 fiscal year. government, they need each other, and articIf that number sounds high, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s be- ulate it the way he did. â&#x20AC;Ś was impressive.â&#x20AC;? cause, comparatively, it is. The city council continued to hold Several city departments could see cuts hearings into this week, ahead of a Sept. in funding: parks and recreation is sched- 5 meeting at 6 p.m. The council will hear uled to see a cut of around $124,000; public from the public at that time, Yarber said. safety will lose $1.8 million; and fire safety The council is scheduled to approve a will lose $4.2 million. Constituency services, budget, adjusted or not, by Sept. 15. which connects Jackson residents with city Comment at www.jfp.ms..

9


TALK | environment

Ripple Effects of ‘One Lake’ by R.L. Nave

I

TOM BECK

ts pricetag aside, one of the main ob- have not seen the fish this far up the river vee Board will select a so-called “tentative River Watershed Conservation District. jections to oil wildcatter and would- in years. select plan” to present to the U.S. Army Since the reservoir was constructed, be developer John McGowan’s “Two “Don’t count the sturgeon out,” Corps of Engineers, the federal agency Griffin said the water table drops so low Lakes” idea was that damming and Whitehurst warned. “They’ve been chiefly responsible for flood protection. that some sections of the Lower Pearl bedredging the Pearl River would have in- at this for 270 million years. They’re Dallas Quinn, PRVF’s spokesman, come impassable in the fall, which threatundated Mayes Lake and a portion of its very adaptable.” said it’s still too early in the process to ens Gulf sturgeon and oyster beds that surrounding land as well as threaten enIn 2011, McGowan formed a non- know which option—a lake, expanding depend on water flow. dangered animals that make their homes profit called the Pearl River Vision Foun- the existing levees, building a dam or doGriffin opposes the proposed One on the river. dation to promote the revised lake project, ing nothing—would best mitigate flood- Lake plan, but said her concerns could be Though the retooled “One Lake” which he believes can reduce flooding and ing in the capital city. allayed if Jackson-area officials present a flood-control plan purports to be water-flow management plan that friendlier to the river’s ecology, condemonstrates minimal impacts on cerns about the environmental efthe Lower Pearl. fects of the proposed project persist “We’ve never really stood up in Jackson—and beyond. down here, so now I guess it’s time Andrew Whitehurst, assisfor us to stand up,” Griffin said. tant director of science and water The Levee Board and PRVF will policy at the Gulf Restoration hold a meeting Aug. 29 at 6 p.m. Network, said construction of at the Mississippi Agriculture and the Ross Barnett Reservoir, which Forestry Museum (1150 Lakeland concluded in 1963, changed the Drive, 601-432-4500). PRVF has Pearl River’s ecology; now only also scheduled a public meeting to 50 years later, damming the river hear concerns of down-river resito create a lake would change the dents for September. Pearl again, he warns. Citizens can make oral com“It’s an altered system, and this ments at the event, and submit comwill further alter it,” Whitehurst said ments through the mail and at www. of the lake project. pearlrivervisionms.com. The Levee The lake would destroy sweet Board’s address is: P.O. Box 320069, gum, sycamore and white oak trees Flowood, Miss., 39232-0069. Fifty years ago, completion of the Ross Barnett Reservoir changed the ecology of the Pearl River. that are more than 80 years old, Whitehurst, of the Gulf ResConservationists fear that a flood-control plan now underway would alter it again. Whitehurst said. The trees functoration Network, criticized the tion as a habitat for migratory birds format. “It seems they are just goand provide friction when the Pearl’s wa- attract economic investment from develDespite getting hit with a total of $1 ing for as much of a slam dunk as poster table rises. Without that friction, the opers. Under federal law and an agree- billion worth of damage resulting from sible while still fulfilling the need for the water’s velocity would increase, potentially ment with the Rankin-Hinds Pearl River floods in 1979 and 1983, Jacksonians meeting,” Whitehurst wrote in an email worsening flash flooding in already flood- Flood and Drainage Control District (aka aren’t the only residents keeping tabs on to supporters. plagued Jackson, he said. the Levee Board), PRVF is completing development along the 444-mile-long Levee Board officials said they seIn addition, damming the river for a engineering work on the environmental- Pearl River, which forms at the confluence lected a more controlled format for the lake would require overcoming the legal impact assessment required under the Na- of two creeks in Neshoba County. meeting to prevent people from making hurdle of the federal Endangered Species tional Environmental Policy Act. “We already feel effects of what they prolonged public speeches. Act. Along the capital-city section of the The survey, which should take anoth- have up there now at the Ross Barnett Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Pearl, the act protects the ringed sawback er year to complete, will consider various Reservoir,” said Janice Griffin, who lives Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com. See turtle, which nests in river sandbars, and flood-control plans and the environmental near the Pearl’s mouth in Louisiana, and the JFP’s past Pearl River coverage at jfp. the gulf sturgeon, even though biologists effects of each. Of the alternatives, the Le- is a member of the nonprofit Lower Pearl ms/pearlriver.

What is an “Old” Catholic? August 28 - September 3, 2013

Don’t let the name fool you . . .

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Learn more about this inclusive and progressive Independent Catholic Church and its origin . . .

St. Mary Magdalene the Apostle OId Catholic Church

WEEKLY MASS 1 P.M. Sunday COME JOIN US. ALL ARE WELCOME AT OUR LORD’S TABLE. St. Alexis Episcopal Church’s Building 650 East South St., Jackson, Miss.

www.occms.org

601-871-0601


DISH | supes

Brown: Aligning With Right by R.L. Nave

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How do you balance the needs of the inner city and rural residents of the district?

areas, one of the primary concerns would be the roads. I’ve ridden down through that area, and there are some bad roads.

TRIP BURNS

.R. “Bo” Brown names his two terms on the Jackson City Council, from 1997 to 2005, as among his chief qualifications to serve as a Hinds County supervisor. During his tenure on the Jackson City Council, where he served as president three times, Brown was involved with crafting the city’s roughly $300 million budget and regularly worked with many of the same people he would serve alongside on the county board. A Jackson native who resides in the Bel Air neighborhood, Brown recently spoke with the Jackson Free Press about his candidacy.

than we did at one time. In fact, they have markers around the city showing that.

much to develop that parkway. It’s essentially a county project.

What are the main economicdevelopment opportunities in the district?

What can the board do to fix problems at the jail?

Former Jackson Councilman Bo Brown wants to be a unifier on the often-divided Hinds County Board of Supervisors as District 2’s representative.

The county and city have perhaps one thing in common and that’s roads and streets. And I’ve found that to be something that’s very common between the two constituencies. … One of the biggest problems we have in Jackson is the streets—along with the infrastructure, water and sewer—and (in) rural

Should the county be paving roads in the city of Jackson?

They have in the past. Yes, it’s been a longtime practice. It wouldn’t be anything new. … We’re seeing it more recently now

From the county’s perspective, I see a void in new housing construction and neighborhood development and, certainly, we can try to attract more businesses to provide an economic boost. As far as the city of Jackson is concerned, you could say the same thing: Businesses are leaving, and we need to attract more businesses. We need to expand the tax base with more housing startups. And transportation infrastructure—you know, the ByramClinton parkway, great project. Where you have good roads and good streets, people are going to come—both housing and business.

Does it concern you that the parkway would not go through Jackson?

Well, certainly the county would benefit, and that would be part of my responsibility. I don’t think it’s going to cost the city very

We need to support the sheriff and not fight the sheriff, in terms of him doing his job, and provide the necessary resources to fix the jail. I also propose to bring the jail up to the standard so that we can attract federal dollars as a result of housing federal prisoners. We could make a lot of money from that. What’s your take on all the turnover among department directors?

Those offices serve at the will and pleasure of the board of supervisors, so from my perspective on the outside looking in, there’s got to be some political jockeying—personalities and things like that. It goes back to those five members of the board of supervisors sticking together for the overall benefit of the county. That’s difficult to do when you have five individuals with so much power, and everybody is guarding their turf. Read the rest of the interview and comment at www.jfp.ms. Email R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com

Woods: Sacred Trust by Ronni Mott

What’s the No. 1 thing the people of Hinds County in District 4 need from the county board?

I’ve never been an elected official. In the 10th grade, our ag teacher at Raymond High School here in Hinds County asked us to write a paper about what we wanted to do

We need to support public education in the best way that we can. I realize that the board of supervisors does not have complete control over public education, but we do hold the majority of the purse strings for public education. ... Crime is bad in Hinds County. This particular business, last year, was burglarized seven times. That’s terrible. Now, District 4 Hinds supervisor candidate Alvin I’m not criticizing the law enforcement Woods believes supervisors should treat their we have. Jackson police have worked very constituents’ money as a sacred trust. well with us. (Hinds County Sheriff) Tyrone Lewis has bent over backwards to be nice and help us with the resources they have. I with our life. My paper, in essence, said that don’t think they have enough. I wanted to establish myself in an agri-related business, and then I wanted to run for superYou look like a guy who would enjoy visor. My teacher was a very good man. He sitting in his rocker on a porch. What’s called me in his office, and he said, “Alvin, driving you to go into politics? you’re setting your sights too low.” And I said:

“Mr. Key, you don’t realize the effect that the board of supervisors (has) on daily life here in Hinds County.” It may be one of the most powerful elective offices in the state. The federal, the state, the local money—it goes through the board. They decide what’s going to happen. A good board of supervisors can do a terrible lot of good. They need to be frugal. They need to treat money—my money and your money—a lot like a sacred trust. … When I was 30, I ran for supervisor. This same deal, a special election. There were 14 men in the race; I came in third. I was devastated. Third was as bad as 14th (because) only one man (won). My friends said I should start toting a gun, because I thought I had more friends than I did. I didn’t start toting a gun. The opportunity came again. What did Ronald Reagan say? He said, “I won’t turn this into a campaign about my opponents’ lack of maturity and experience.” Read the rest of the interview and comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at 11 ronni@jacksonfreepress.com. jacksonfreepress.com

effectiveness of the board. “Let’s try to get down the road together and make this a better county,” he said. “The only way we can do it is to conduct our business in a professional manner.” TRIP BURNS

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inds County Board of Supervisors candidate Alvin Woods is an oldschool southern country gentleman. Warm and full of folksy charm, he can tell a story with the best. Now 65, Woods owns Woods Equipment, the No. 1 Cub Cadet dealer in the southeast this year. He seems as proud of the success of his business—located near Savannah Street in south Jackson—as he is of his 44-year marriage to his wife, Linda, and the numerous awards lining his office walls that he and his four children have won for their livestock. He also has five grandchildren. Woods works “half-days” at his business—from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., he said—and is active in the local Rotary Club, chamber of commerce and 4-H. He is a founder of Horses for the Handicapped and Mississippi Pet Therapy, Inc. Woods is an ordained Baptist deacon and goes to church at Hinds Independent Methodist Church. President Lyndon Johnson appointed Woods to serve as the conference parliamentarian. Woods is running as a Republican, one of two in the primary race Sept. 24, where he’ll face Tony Greer. Woods believes his experience and knowledge of parliamentary procedure will enhance the


TALK | business

UMMC Expands, Giving Back and New Outlet Tenants by Dustin Cardon

three optional 10-year renewals for a total of 50 years. Dr. James E. Keeton, UMMC vice chancellor for health affairs and dean of the School of Medicine, said in a statement that the lease will ensure that Grenada County and surCOURTESY UMMC

U

niversity of Mississippi Medical Center is considering purchase of the vacant Landmark Center at 175 E. Capitol St. to accommodate additional support staff. The Landmark Center once housed AT&T. The building is listed at $7.6 million, nearly half of its $14 million-plus price tag a few years ago. The state College Board would have to approve UMMC’s purchase. The state Department of Revenue was also looking to lease the Landmark Center at one point, but instead leased office space in the South Pointe Business Park in Clinton. UMMC has signed an agreement to lease the 156-bed Grenada Lake Medical Center from the Grenada County Board of Supervisors following approval from the State Institutions of Higher Learning Board of Trustees. The medical center will begin managing GLMC Sept. 1 and lease the facility beginning Jan. 1. UMMC will use patient-care revenue to pay Grenada County about $1.8 million annually toward the facility’s $37.4 million debt. The 20-year lease includes

The University of Mississippi Medical Center recently announced plans to expand to downtown Jackson.

rounding residents can receive high-quality local hospital care. Keeton said the arrangement will also allow UMMC to rotate some of its students and residents through GLMC.

“Education is a big part of what we do,” Keeton said. “We need more teaching venues so we can continue training more health professionals for Mississippi. Grenada brings that important element to the table.” The new relationship will give UMMC and GLMC opportunities to expand telemedicine services, which bring sub-specialtylevel care from Jackson to community hospitals via secure video connections. UMMC and GLMC will work toward obtaining the necessary licenses and certifications for various operations.

Twin Peaks Jackson, said in a statement. “We are always trying to seek out new ways to get involved locally, and giving to these local food shelters is a wonderful opportunity for us. “Here at Twin Peaks, all of our dishes are made from scratch and we use the freshest ingredients we can find,” Howard said. “We’re excited to lend a hand and donate to this cause.” Twin Peaks’ training period is from Aug. 27 until Sept. 1, the restaurant’s official opening day. For information, call 214-686-5095 or visit twinpeaksrestaurant.com.

Twin Peaks Gives Back Mountain-lodge-themed sports restaurant Twin Peaks is opening in Jackson next month at 6010 Interstate 55 Frontage Road. In the week leading up to the opening, Twin Peaks will give back to the city by donating a majority of food from its training week to local food shelters, providing meals to the homeless. “We’re so thrilled to be opening in Jackson! There’s no better way for us to start our journey here than by giving back to our community,” Paul Howard, operating partner of

Outlets Get 19 New Tenants Outlets of Mississippi (200 Bass Pro Drive, Pearl, 601-353-0617), a 325,000square-foot outlet shopping center set to open Nov. 14, announced the following additional merchants have joined its tenant roster: Adidas, Lane Bryant, Aeropostale, Maurices, China Wok Express, Nine West, Claire’s, Osh Kosh, Clarks Bostonian, Perfumes-4-U, Cole Haan, Reebok, Easy Spirit, Sbarro, Hanesbrands, Uniform Outlet, Hot Topic, Wilson’s Leather and Jones NY. Comment at www.jfp.ms.

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WeeklySchedule Npoebz

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• 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo

• 12-1 pm Level 1

• 5:30 pm Level 2

• 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

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Gsjebz

• 12-1 pm Level 1

• 12-12:45 pm Tabatas

• 5:15 pm Tabatas

• 5:30 Level 1

(6 for $50/$10 drop in) August 28 - September 3, 2013

• 6-7:15 pm Level 1

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Xfeoftebz • 10-10:45 am Tabatas • 12-1 pm Restorative Yoga • 5:30 Yoga from the Core

Tbuvsebz • 9-10:15 am Level I • 10:30 Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz • 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga (see Facebook for location) • 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

4136!Opsui!Tubuf!Tusffu!.!Gpoesfo!Ejtusjdu!.!712/6:5/3424


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jacksonfreepress.com


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If I Just Got a Job

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oneqweesha Jones: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome to another wonderful school year at Hair Did University School of Cosmetology and Vocational Education. I am so happy to see many new and returning students ready to learn and master their chosen career. Many of you are here at H.D.U. because the tuition is conveniently affordable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Recently, I discovered an alarming trend in the cost of obtaining a college or post-secondary education. All I know is that folk from places like the Ghetto Science Community cannot afford to pay $17,900 at public institutions, $15,200 at private for-profit institutions or $39,500 at private not-for-profit institutions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a concerned instructor, administrator and dean of students, I promise that Hair Did University students will not owe more than $26,000 after graduation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to hear discouraged students recite this verse from â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Messageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by Grand Master Flash and The Furious Five: My son said: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Daddy I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wanna go to school, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;cause the teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a jerk!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; He must think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a fool. And all the kids smoke reefer, I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be cheaper If I just got a job, learned to be a street sweeper. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, what happens to a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;dream deferredâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;? The answer is: Hair Did University School of Cosmetology and Vocational Education: excellent career education without the burden of financial obligation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, coming this fall is the new wave of financial aid: The Hair Did University Post Secondary Education Funding Kickstarter Program. See Brother Hustle for more details.â&#x20AC;?

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August 28 - September 3, 2013

°2ICHTON3CHOOL$ISTRICT3UPERINTENDENT.OAL#OCHRANINANINTERVIEW WITH4HE(ECHINGER2EPORTONTRYINGTORUNHISDISTRICT´SPUBLICSCHOOLS WITHACHRONICSHORTAGEOFFUNDS²

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Why it stinks: No schools should have to make the choices that Cochran and other superintendents in Mississippi are making due to the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s continual funding shortfall for public schools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When (Cochran) had an open teaching position in this quiet town, he looked for applicants at the bottom of the salary ladderâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;those with as little experience as possible,â&#x20AC;? states the Aug. 25 Hechinger story, titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back to school, but without books and basics in Mississippi.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;When he needed a new football coach, he wanted a rookie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;straight out of collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; who would accept a smaller stipend. And when he needed new textbooks, he chose history over physics or chemistryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;subjects less likely to need updating.â&#x20AC;? Based on an analysis from The Parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Campaign, a nonprofit advocacy group that supports public schools, the state has shorted funding for Cochranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s district by $5 million since 2011, the story continues. Richton public schools serve about 700 students. In all, legislators have shortchanged the Mississippi Adequate Education Program, the formula used to ensure poorer school districts get at least sufficient funds to provide their students a decent education, by more than $1 billion over the past four years alone.

50 Years Later, the Fight Goes On

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ne of the often-forgotten aspects of the 1963 March on Washington is its name. The full, original name of that Aug. 28, 1963, gathering was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Few could argue that America has come a long way since those dark and troubled days. When one looks solely at social justice, much of what the marchers stood forâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;along with the millions who waited back homeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;has come to fruition: Blacks are no longer legally relegated to segregated, second-rate schools, stores and neighborhoods; marriage between blacks, whites and across other racial and color lines is commonplace; outright voter suppressionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in the form of violent intimidation, poll taxes and incomprehensible testsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is mostly gone (although more subtle forms of suppression are still all too common). The playing field is hardly level, though. And 50 years after Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke his most famous words, the dream remains unrealized for many African Americans. Large pools of recalcitrant, entrenched economic inequality still exist. Marc Morial, president of the National Urban League, told The Washington Post, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you look at 50 years after the 1960s civil rights movement, the most stubborn and persistent challenge when it comes to the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s racial challenge remains in the areas of economics and wealth.â&#x20AC;? The Post story cites the following statistics: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fifty years ago, the unemployment rate was 5 percent for whites and 10.9 percent for blacks, accord-

ing to the Economic Policy Institute. Today, it is 6.6 percent for whites and 12.6 percent for blacks. Over the past 30 years, the average white family has gone from having five times as much wealth as the average black family to 6-1/2 times, according to the Urban Institute.â&#x20AC;? Unemployment in every sector of our working society is still higher for African Americans than it is for whites. For young people ages 16 to 20, the black unemployment rate is more than twice that of whites: 42.9 percent last month as opposed to 20.5 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. At the root of the 1963 march was a protest against job discrimination. Among its major sponsors was A. Philip Randolph, president of the Negro American Labor Council, and Walter Reuther, president of the United Automobile Workers union. Four of the marchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10 demands was about jobs: training programs, minimum wage, and fair labor and employment practice legislation. When a nation deprives its people of a fair, meaningful livelihood, we all lose: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Southern Democrats came to power by disenfranchising the Negro,â&#x20AC;? the final plans for the 1963 march stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They know as long as black workers are voteless, exploited and underpaid, the fight of the white workers for decent wages and working conditions will fail. They know that semi-slavery for one means semi-slavery for all.â&#x20AC;? What was true then is still true today.

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


RICK CLEVELAND

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer EDITORIAL News and Opinion Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Tyler Cleveland, R.L. Nave Music Editor Briana Robinson JFP Daily Editor Dustin Cardon Editorial Assistant Amber Helsel Events Editor Latasha Willis Music Listings Editor Tommy Burton Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Bryan Flynn, Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith, Micah Smith Bloggers Dominic DeLeo, Jesse Houston Editorial Intern Justin Hosemann Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Design Intern Lindsay Fox Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographer Tate K. Nations ADVERTISING SALES Advertising Director Kimberly Griffin Account Managers Gina Haug, David Rahaim BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Director of Operations David Joseph Bookkeeper Aprile Smith Distribution Manager Richard Laswell Distribution Raymond Carmeans, John Cooper Jordan Cooper, Clint Dear, Ruby Parks ONLINE Web Editor Dustin Cardon Web Designer Montroe Headd Multimedia Editor Trip Burns CONTACT US: Letters letters@jacksonfreepress.com Editorial editor@jacksonfreepress.com Queries submissions@jacksonfreepress.com Listings events@jacksonfreepress.com Advertising ads@jacksonfreepress.com Publisher todd@jacksonfreepress.com News tips news@jacksonfreepress.com Fashion style@jacksonfreepress.com Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2013 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

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s we enter another football season, it’s time to reflect on the best and worst I’ve ever seen—in more years than I can count—of going to games and getting paid to write about what I observed: • Best game I ever saw: State 6, Bama 3, 1980. No touchdowns, but all the drama you can imagine. • Best player I ever covered: Walter Payton, hands down. He could run, block, throw, catch and kick, and he played every play of every game of every season as if his life was on the line. • Best quote I ever got: Duane Thomas, when asked about playing in the ultimate game, meaning the Super Bowl: “If it’s the ultimate game, then how come they’ll play it again next year?” • Best story I ever covered: The New Orleans Saints’ run to the Super Bowl championship in 2009-10 with the Crescent City still reeling from Hurricane Katrina. • Only college football miracle I ever saw: Mother Nature, in the form of a sudden 60 mph gust of wind, blocked Artie Cosby’s field goal, preserving a 24-23 Egg Bowl victory for Ole Miss in 1983. • Emory Bellard’s immortal quote after the miracle: “God just decided that Mississippi State was not going to win this game today.” • Most poignant football moment I ever witnessed: Steve McNair set the NCAA record for most yardage gained in a career in 1994. They stopped the game, and McNair gave the football to his mother, who had raised him alone while working the overnight shift at a Simpson County factory. • Favorite TV announcer: The late, great and rarely straight Dandy Don Meredith. This was in the very first ABC “Monday Night Football” game in 1970: Browns vs. Jets. The Browns had a receiver named Fair Hooker. First name: Fair. Last name: Hooker. Dandy Don: “Fair Hooker, that’s a great name, isn’t it? But I haven’t met one, yet.” • Another Dandy Don moment, just for kicks: “We’re live tonight from the Mile High City, and I really am ...” • Favorite football radio announcer: Gotta be Jack Cristil. • Favorite Cristil line of all-time: After an Egg Bowl during which Ole Miss thoroughly drubbed Cristil’s Bulldogs, he said, “And the Sonic Drive of the game will be my drive home to Tupelo tonight.” • Best halftime show: Forget the Super

Bowl extravaganzas—just give me Jackson State’s Sonic Boom of the South and the Prancing J-Settes. • Best fight song: Michigan’s “The Victors,” as in, “Hail to the Victors.” Not even close, and I don’t even like Michigan. • Best college football-game atmosphere: Tiger Stadium on a Saturday night. • Best college football atmosphere where the visiting fans need to wear helmets: Tiger Stadium on a Saturday night. • Worst two minutes we’ll never get back: TV timeouts—all of them. I hate them. I really do. I despise them. I loathe them. Yes, and on deadline, I feared them. • Worst football cliché: Name a coach, any coach. They all said, “We’re gonna play them one game at a time,” as if any other coach on this planet ever had a choice. • Most helpless I ever felt on deadline: Arkansas beat Ole Miss 58-56 in seven overtimes in 2001. My deadline passed between the fifth and sixth overtimes and during the 47th $#@%&*^%$ TV timeout. • Worst injustice in college football: Coaches such as Nick Saban and Mack Brown make more than $5 million per year. Yet, Johnny Manziel (who singlehandedly beat Saban on his homefield) isn’t allowed to sell his autograph for five bucks. • Worst injustice in pro football: Ray Guy, the best punter in the history of the sport, is not in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. • Second worst injustice in pro football: In the Louisiana Superdome, even a watered-down Miller Lite costs $8. • Best place to tailgate: The Grove in Oxford. It really does live up to the hype. • Second best place to tailgate: Dreamland Barbecue in Tuscaloosa, then drive to Bryant-Denny Stadium. (Tip: Wear the bibs or wear the sauce.) • Best press-box food: Still waiting … • Best press-box post-game bar: Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge. And they’ll let you drink until the traffic clears, which is a long, long, long time. • Most famous newspaper lede of all-time: When Notre Dame beat Army in 1924, Grantland Rice wrote, “Outlined against a blue-gray October sky, the Four Horseman rode again.” Famous? Yes. Make sense? No. Rice watched from the press box, but seems to me he wrote from the perspective of an earthworm or a cricket. Rick Cleveland is executive director of the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame. Follow him on Twitter @rick_cleveland.

‘If it’s the ultimate game, then how come they’ll play it again next year?’

   

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jacksonfreepress.com

Pigskin POVs

15


JFP  College Football Preview /.4(%'2)$"29!.&,9..´3 3/0()34)#!4%$7),$ !33'5%33%3

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n America nowadays, we have two seasons: football season and waiting-for-football-to-return season. The waiting season is nearly over as the calendar slowly moves its way to fall. Soon, the air will get cooler, and football season will be in full swing. Teams hope the dog days of summer and their work through August rewards them on the field in victories. Hopes, as always, run high every year at this time on every college campus. This year, Mississippi teams are either building on success or rebuilding. Three of Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big four universities are hoping to build on last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success, and one university hopes the memories of a doomed 2012-13 campaign fade away quickly with a new coaching regime.

COURTESY MSU ATHLETICS

-ISSISSIPPI3TATE5NIVERSITY"ULLDOGS (EAD COACH 'DQ 0XOOHQ  RYHUDOO UHFRUGDQG068UHFRUGKHDGLQJLQWRWK VHDVRQ

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August 28 - September 3, 2013

Tyler Russell

16

/UTLOOK Mississippi State returns Tyler Russell at quarterback, but the Bulldogs have to rebuild their receiving corps after losing last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top receivers. Russell started out on fire last season but stumbled and struggled when the level of competition went up in the second half of the season. MSU returns most of its starting offensive line, which is good for returning running back LaDarius Perkins. The Bulldogs will need more ground production late in the year to avoid another late-season slide. Mississippi State also needs to rebuild its secondary now that cornerbacks Johnthan Banks and Darius Slay are in the NFL. MSU also must fill the linebacking shoes of Cameron Lawrence, who led the team in tackling last season. The Bulldogs have added a five-star defensive line-

Mississippi State started off last season with a bang, reeling off seven straight wins for a 7-0 record heading to the end of October. Then, the bottom fell out on the Bulldogs in the form of Alabama, Texas A&M and LSU. MSU feasted on the bottom feeders of the SEC and weaker conferences man, Chris Jones, and highly sought after junior-college player Justin Cox. MSU also returns budding linebacking star Benardrick McKinney. 0REDICTION Mississippi State returns 12 starters from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s squad: six on offense and six on defense. The Bulldogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; season will be made or broken early. MSU begins the season with a tough test against Oklahoma State in Houston, Texas. Mississippi State could use a big win in this kickoff classic game to set the tone for the season. The Bulldogs also went 0-for against teams in the final top 25 polls of last season. A win against the Cowboys in Houston would give MSU a win over a contender in the Big-12 and an early top-25 team. Mississippi State has some early wins available in its first seven games, including games against Alcorn State, Auburn, Troy, Bowling Green and Kentucky. MSU

when the Dawgs jumped out to their fast start. When the level of competition went up, the team didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t up their game to match its foes. The Bulldogs sleepwalked their way through a second-half butt-kicking by arch-rival Ole Miss in the Egg Bowl to end the regular season. MSU still didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look like they had woken up during their 34-20 loss to Northwestern in the TaxSlayer.com Gator Bowl. Even with the late-season slide, finishing fourth in the toughest division in college football is not bad. Now, Mississippi State needs to see the program take the next step and seriously challenge LSU, Alabama and Texas A&M, or MSU fans will start to rumble that Dan Mullen has hit his ceiling in Starkville.

hosts LSU in early October, which will be a tough game to winâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even at home. The final stretch of the season will be a major undertaking for the Bulldogs. Games against South Carolina, Alabama and Texas A&M await after the Kentucky game. MSU finishes the season against Arkansas and Ole Miss. The Egg Bowl this season could be the Bulldogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; last chance to get to six wins and go bowling for a fourth straight year, which would be a record bowl streak for the program.  3EASON0REDICTION 6-6 -ISSISSIPPI3TATESCHEDULE Aug. 31 Oklahoma State (neutral site); Sept. 7 Alcorn State; Sept. 14 at Auburn; Sept. 21 Troy; Oct. 5 LSU; Oct. 12 Bowling Green; Oct. 24 Kentucky; Nov. 2 at South Carolina; Nov. 9 at Texas A&M; Nov. 16 Alabama; Nov. 23 at Arkansas; Nov. 28 Mississippi


/UTLOOK Ole Miss returns Conerly Trophy-winning quarterback Bo Wallace this season, but Wallace hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t thrown the ball much since having shoulder surgery. The Rebels have a talented group of wide receivers for Wallace to play catch with including last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breakout star Donte Moncrief. Joining Moncrief in the receiving unit is five-star recruit Laquon Treadwell. The freshman could give Ole Miss a big one-two receiving punch with Moncrief. The Rebels need more production from their running game to keep building on last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success. Ole Miss returns senior running back

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like a team capable of winning a game, but even when the team did look like it had a chance to pull off a win, a lack of second-half coaching adjustments did in the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chances. Southern Miss was the only team in the Football Bowl Subdivision to fail to win even one game. Even bottom feeders such as Kansas, Akron, Massachusetts, Colorado, Idaho and New Mexico State all found some way to win a game. Somehow those teams figured out to achieve something Southern Miss couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do even after having 18 straight winning seasons. Now, USM has to hope a new coaching regime can start a consecutivewinning-season streak once again.

COURTESY USM/KYLE NEAVES

Not much went right for Southern Miss last year. In fact, it might be hard to find anything that went right for the Golden Eagles in their 0-12 debacle of a season. The hire of Ellis Johnson proved uninspired on the field. USM rarely looked

Jeff Scott and four starters on offense. Ole Miss should see defense improve right way adding the top high-school player in the country last season, defensive end Robert Nkemdiche, who teams up with his brother, linebacker Denzel Nkemdiche. 0REDICTION Ole Miss is not ready to challenge the big boys in the SEC just yet, but the way Freeze is recruiting, it could be only a matter of time. The early schedule is going to test the Rebels, with games at Vanderbilt, Texas, Alabama and Auburn, and a home game against Texas A&M in the first six games.

Tyre Bracken (left)

Things get easier for the Rebels in their final six games to make a move toward bowl eligibility. Ole Miss faces LSU, Idaho, Arkansas, Troy, Missouri and MSU, with all but LSU being winnable games. A bowl game hinges on Ole Miss getting wins in that first six-game stretchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with a record of 2-4 or worse, the margin for error in the second six games becomes nil.  3EASON0REDICTION7-5

Bo Wallace Bo Wallace

/UTLOOK Finding a quarterback will be Todd Monkenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first job after one of the most talented recruits in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, Anthony Alford, transferred. Quarterback Arsenio Favor transferred out as well. That leaves just junior Cole Weeks, sophomore Ricky Lloyd and senior Chris Campbell to battle for the starting quarterback job. Weeks, Campbell and Lloyd were three of the five quarterbacks (along with Alford and Favor) to play under center last season, and all three showed some flashes of ability. While quarterback is a weakness, the Golden Eagles return several good options at running back. Seniors Kendrick Hardy and Jeremy Hester will carry the rushing load with an assist from sophomores Tyre Bracken and Jalen Richard. The wide receiver unit must find some playmakers in the wide-open spread. Monkenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offensive system needs to make stars out of quarterbacks and wide receivers at Southern Miss. On defense, the Golden Eagles will miss superstar Jamie Collins as he headed to the NFL. Collins was the lone bright spot last season for Southern Miss. David Duggan returns to USM after one season with North Carolina and will have to rebuild a defense that was just as terrible as last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offense. The Golden Eagles return eight starters on defense.

/LE-ISSSCHEDULE Aug. 29 at Vanderbilt; Sept. 7 Southeast Missouri State; Sept. 14 at Texas; Sept. 28 at Alabama; Oct. 5 at Auburn; Oct. 12 Texas A&M; Oct. 19 LSU; Oct. 26 Idaho; Nov. 9 Arkansas; Nov. 16 Troy; Nov. 23 Missouri; Nov. 28 at Mississippi State

0REDICTION USM gets a chance to get a win in game one of the season at home against Texas State. After that, victories will be hard to come by for a while. To say that the Golden Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; September is brutal might be the understatement of this college football season. Southern Miss heads to Nebraska for the second year in a row. This was supposed to be a home game, but USM sold the game to the Cornhuskers to pay for the buyout in Ellis Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contract. Next, USM heads to Arkansas and Boise State. The rest of the schedule is manageable for Southern Miss if the team can find a quarterback and some playmakers on the defensive side of the ball. The hardest part for USM will be avoiding jet lag when playing seven games on the road. A bowl game might be possible for the Golden Eagles this season. It all depends on how quickly Monken can turn things around.  3EASON0REDICTION 6-6 3OUTHERN-ISSSCHEDULE Aug. 31 Texas State; Sept. 7 at Nebraska; Sept. 14 at Arkansas; Sept. 28 at Boise State; Oct. 5 Florida International; Oct. 19 at East Carolina; Oct. 26 North Texas; Nov. 2 at Marshall; Nov. 9 at Louisiana Tech; Nov. 16 Florida Atlantic; Nov. 23 Middle Tennessee; Nov. 30 at UAB

jacksonfreepress.com

The end of the first year of the Huge Freeze era was about as perfect as it could get for Ole Miss fans. The Rebels defeated in-state rival Mississippi State 41-24 in a secondhalf beatdown and went on to win the BBVA Compass

Bowl 38-17 over Pittsburgh. Last season saw Ole Miss lose close games to Texas A&M (30-27), Vanderbilt (27-26) and LSU (41-35). The Rebels also went 0-6 against teams ranked in the AP Top 25 final poll and USA Today Coaches final poll. Those losses were to Texas, Alabama and Georgia, along with the three close losses mentioned above. The Rebels took care of business against teams they were supposed to defeat, but couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get over the hump against the top teams on their schedule. In the end, most Ole Miss fans were still happy with a seven-win season plus a bowl win after the final two years of the Houston Nutt era.

COURTESY OLE MISS PHOTOGRAPHY

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FROM PAGE 17

COURTESY JSU ATHLETICS

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/UTLOOKUnder Rick Comegy, the Tigers have averaged seven wins a season. Coaches and media picked JSU to finish second in the Eastern Division behind Alabama State at SWAC Media Days. JSU returns senior quarterback Clayton Moore, who passed for 1,863 yards and rushed for 633 yards. Moore threw for 11 touchdowns and added 11 more rushing touchdowns as he hit his stride midway through the season to help the Tigers win the Eastern Division. The biggest hole in the Jackson State offense is finding a replacement for SWAC Offensive Player of the Year, wide receiver Rico Richardson, who is now in the NFL with the Kansas City Chiefs. The Tigers hope Zachary Pendleton can step up and replace Richardson. Last season, Pendleton had 33 catches for 457 yards. JSU also needs wide receivers DeSean McKenzie and Tobias Singleton to have big seasons in 2013-14. On defense, Qua Cox leads the Tigers. Cox, the SWAC Preseason Defensive Player of the Year, has led the SWAC in interceptions the last two seasons. Joining Cox is JSU defensive stars safety Cameron Loeffler, who led the Tigers in tackling last

No team in the state finished the regular season on a bigger roll than Jackson State did last year. The Tigers finished with five Tedderick Terrell straight wins to reach the Southwestern Athletic Conference championship game. The Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first win of their fivegame winning streak came against Alabama State. That win helped JSU earn the head-to-head tiebreaker to win the Eastern Division and put JSU in the SWAC championship game. JSU was two minutes away from a SWAC football championship when a 95yard touchdown pass by Arkansas-Pine Bluff quarterback Benjamin Anderson to wide receiver Willie Young tied the game at 21-21. Arkansas-Pine Bluff defeated the Tigers 24-21 in overtime to win the title.

season with 84 tackles and 4.5 sacks. JSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest hole on defense is replacing defensive end Joseph LeBeau. Jackson State is hoping defensive end Tedderick Terrell and linebackers Todd Wilcher and John McNabb fill the hole. 0REDICTION Jackson State has the talent to reach the SWAC championship game The Tigers return eight starters on offense and seven starters on defense. If the JSU receivers can fill the hole Richardson left, and the Tigers can find a back to lead the rushing attack, a stop in Houston is not out of the question. Jackson Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schedule is not dauntingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they face out-of-conference games against Tulane and Tennessee State.  3EASON0REDICTION 8-3 *ACKSON 3TATE SCHEDULE Aug. 29 at Tulane; Sept. 7 Alabama State; Sept 14 Tennessee State (neutral site); Sept. 19 Texas Southern (Thursday Night ESPN U Game); Sept. 28 at Southern; Oct. 5 Arkansas-Pine Bluff; Oct. 12 at Mississippi Valley State; Oct. 19 Grambling State; Oct. 26 Prairie View A&M (neutral site); Nov. 9 at Alabama A&M; Nov. 16 Alcorn State.

contact on the head of a defenseless player. This rule is for safety reasons. An ejected player will get the benefit of the doubt with a video review. The 15-yard penalty is not reviewableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just the ejection. A player who is ejected in the first half will miss the second half of the game. A player ejected in the second half or overtime will be ejected for the rest of that game and the first half of his next game. While this rule is designed to make play safer, it could potentially cause havoc three times: when teams play out of conferences to begin the season, at the start of conference play and, finally, when the bowl games start. Teams playing out-of-conference games are subject to officials from another conference, and those officials could call games differently than the officials of their conference. For example, Mississippi State opens the season against Oklahoma State. If the officials are from the Big-12 conference like Oklahoma State, the Bulldogs are at a disadvantage because they are not used to Big-12 officials, and vice versa for the Cowboys. In-conference games shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be affected too much because coaches will get in touch with conference officials about plays that could lead to an ejection. Playing a nonconference game and then returning to con-

A new rule change means making contact to a defenseless playerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head could result in ejection from the game.

ference play, however, could cause problems. This rule really could come into play during bowl season. Anyone who saw South Carolinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jadeveon Clowneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit on Michigan running back Vincent Smith in last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outback Bowl knows what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about. (If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen the hit, go Google it.) ACC Coordinator of Officials Doug

Rhoads said he would have called a penalty and ejected Clowney. Head of Big-12 officials Walt Anderson also said during conference media days that the Clowney hit might have been illegal. Mike Pereira, the former NFL vice president of officiating, added his two cents, saying the hit was illegal. That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean officials from the SEC, Pac-12, Big Ten or other conferences would consider the Clowney hit illegal, though. Video replay should help, but the penalty is so subjective that even replay might not save a player from an unfair ejection. If the penalty occurs in the second half or overtime, it could hurt a team in two different games. Mississippi State, Ole Miss, Southern Miss and Jackson State all play big out-ofconference games. All but JSU could play in important bowl games. A targeting penalty could prevent any of these teams from reaching a bowl game or pulling off a big win to help recruiting. Players and coaches might have to learn from experience to fully master this new rule. I like the idea of safety, and the rule forces defensive player to tackle properly. But the NCAA should have figured out a way for officials in every conference to be consistent 19 in every game. jacksonfreepress.com

T

he NCAA approved three rule changes that could cost your college football team a win this season. In college football, the game clock stops on first downs to allow the chain crew to reset the chains. Starting this season, if a team hits a big offensive play and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have three or seconds left on the clock after the official blows the play dead, the team on offense canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spike the ball to stop the clock. This is important if your team is down by one or two points late in the game. That means a team canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spike the ball with two seconds left and try for a game-winning field goal. The only thing the offensive team can do is snap the ball and try to score a touchdown. Coaches need to have a final play handy if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time for the field-goal attempt. Another rule that could affect the outcome of a game is a 10-second runoff if the clock stopped for an injured player (only in the final minute of the first half and at the end of the game). This is to keep teams from faking injuries late in the half and at the end of the game. The final rule change is most likely to affect teams this season. A player will be ejected, on top of a 15-yard penalty, if the officials believe that player was targeting or making

COURTESY JSU ATHLETICS

by Bryan Flynn


(EADCOACHJay Hopson (4-7 overall record all at Alcorn State, entering 2nd season)  RECORD 4-7 overall, 4-5 SWAC (season ended with a 37-11 loss to Jackson State) #ONFERENCESWAC 2ADIO 90.1 FM 3TADIUM Jack Spinks Stadium, Lorman ,ASTSEASONRECAP Alcorn State made history last season hiring the first white head coach in SWAC history. This season, Jay Hopson and the Braves hope to make news for their on-the-field play. The year was up and down for the Braves after starting the season with a win over Grambling State. Alcorn State ended the season with seven losses and five wins.  OUTLOOK Alcorn State needs to fix its offensive woes. Last season, ASU averaged just 16 points a game in an age of high-scoring offenses in college football. The Braves return several options at running back, including last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading rusher, Arnold Walker. ASUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offense might take off if Hopson can find a quarterback to get the ball to big-play receiver and Tavoris Doss. Alcorn State had one of the best pass defenses in the SWAC and the Football Championship Subdivision. The Braves led the SWAC and were fourth overall in the FCS, allowing just 156 yards per game. Devon Francois, Jamison Knox, Anthony Williams and Hendricks Taylor all return to Alcorn State, but the Braves have to get their front seven fixed. 0REDICTION 5-7 record The Braves should be even more competitive in the SWAC this season, but they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to surprise anyone. If Hopson can recruit, he might be a year or two away from challenging for a SWAC East title. !LCORN3TATESCHEDULE Aug. 31 Edward Waters; Sept. 7 at Mississippi State; Sept. 14 Mississippi Valley State; Sept. 21 at Arkansas-Pine Bluff; Sept. 28 at Alabama State; Oct. 5 Warner University; Oct. 12 Grambling State (neutral site); Oct. 19 at Texas Southern; Oct. 26 at Southern University; Nov. 2 Alabama A&M; Nov. 7 Prairie View A&M; Nov. 16 at Jackson State

2013 JFP Preseason Top 25

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(EADCOACH Norman Joseph (59-64 overall record, 38-44 Mississippi College record entering 9th season)  RECORD 2-8 overall, 1-7 ASC (season ended with a 59-0 loss to Mary-Hardin Baylor to end the regular season)

  

August 28 - September 3, 2013

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www.jsums.edu


(EADCOACH Aaron Pelch (18-12 overall record all at Millsaps, entering 4th season)  RECORD 7-3 #ONFERENCE Southern Athletic Association 2ADIO Online at gomajors.com 3TADIUM Harper Davis Field, Jackson ,ASTSEASONRECAP Millsaps jumped out to a quick 4-0 start, highlighted by a win over archrival Mississippi College. The Majorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first loss came at home in a 45-24 defeat to Huntington. Two more wins later, the Majors were 6-1 more than halfway through the season, but then stumbled, finishing the final three games with two losses and a win. A 35-21 loss to Birmingham Southern meant the Majors and the Panthers split the first football title in the inaugual season of the SAA.  SEASONOUTLOOK Millsaps will have to replace quarterback Garrett Pinciotti, who was the Offensive Player of the Year in the SAA conference. Pinciotti was a senior last season and put up big numbers in his final year under center for the Majors. Back this season for the Majors is star defensive lineman Zach Bell, named last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SAA conference Defensive Player of the Year and named to the Division3Football.comâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AllSouth Region Team. Bell terrorized opposing offenses with a conference-leading eight sacks to go along with 68 total tackles and 31 solo tackles. 0REDICTION7-4 record Millsapsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; season could depend on how well the Majors replace Pinciotti at quarterback. It helps the squad that a dominate defensive force like Bell is returning. One area the Majors could get better at this season is playing at home. Last season, Millsaps was 3-2 at home, which is not a great example of protecting your home field. Millsaps should still be in the mix for a conference championship this year. The Majors have a great leader in Pelchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kept Millsaps competitive each season he has been at the helm. -ILLSAPS#OLLEGESCHEDULE Sept. 7 at Mississippi College; Sept. 14 LaGrange; Sept. 21 Point University (GA); Oct. 5 Hendrix; Oct. 12 at Trinity (TX); Oct. 19 at Birmingham Southern; Oct. 26 at Sewanee; Nov. 2 Berry; Nov. 9 Centre; Nov. 16 at Rhodes

(EADCOACH Karl Morgan (6-26 record all at MVSU, entering 4th season)  RECORD 5-6 overall, 5-4 SWAC (season ended with a 34-3 win over Texas Southern to end the regular season) #ONFERENCE SWAC 2ADIO online radio (streema.com/radios/play/25093) 3TADIUM Rice-Totten Stadium, Itta Bena

bryanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rant

Memorable Football Moments

I

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,ASTSEASONRECAP The Delta Devils were the best defensive unit in the SWAC last season and the fourthbest defense in the FCS overall. Offense was another story. MVSU averaged 17 points a game last season and was shut out twice in losses to Alabama A&M and Arkansas-Pine Bluff. The high point came in the form of a three-game winning streak to end the regular season for the Delta Devils. Mississippi Valley State also had three close losses.  OUTLOOK Mississippi Valley State will rely on its defense once again this season even though they must replace seven starters from last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stellar unit. The Delta Devils still return AllSWAC defensive lineman Robert Simpson to lead the unit. Simpson led the nation in tackles for a loss last season with 22.5 and added seven sacks to go along with his 59 tackles. MVSU also boasts preseason All-SWAC safety Kevin Eugene. 0REDICTION6-5 record MVSU still doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the talent to compete with the top teams in the SWAC, but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean the Delta Devils havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come a long way in a short amount of time. It might be hard to keep Karl Morgan in Itta Bena if he keeps working his turn-around magic at a university not known for having a ton of financial resources. Expect the Delta Devils to be in the mix for their first winning season in seven years. -ISSISSIPPI6ALLEY3TATESCHEDULE Sept. 1 Florida A&M (neutral site); Sept. 7 Delta State; Sept. 14 at Alcorn State; Sept. 21 Southern University; Oct. 5 at Alabama A&M; Oct. 12 Jackson State; Oct. 19 at Prairie View A&M; Oct. 26 Arkansas-Pine Bluff; Nov. 2 at Grambling State; Nov. 9 Texas Southern; Nov. 16 Alabama State

(EADCOACH Joseph Thrasher (34-42 overall record, 21-23 Belhaven record entering 5th season)  RECORD 6-5 overall record, 4-2 MSC (season ended with a 21-17 loss to Bethel University to end the regular season) #ONFERENCE Mid-South Conference 2ADIO Online at blazers.belhaven.edu 3TADIUM H.T. Newell Field, Jackson

jacksonfreepress.com

#ONFERENCE American Southwest Conference 2ADIO Online at gochoctaws.com 3TADIUM Robinson-Hale Stadium, Clinton ,ASTSEASONRECAP It was a tough year for the Choctaws last season. After splitting the first two games of the year, things went sideways, and MC lost its next four games. Three of those losses werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even close, as the Choctaws went down 41-3, 31-0 and 75-42 before another loss 27-14. Mississippi College finally broke the losing streak against Texas Lutheran with a 24-21 win, but the Choctaws couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t string together any more wins after that.  OUTLOOK The Choctaws return starting quarterback Jonathon Redd from last season. Redd will try to get the ball to wide receiver Alex Archer, who was named to the 25th Annual USA College Football Preseason All-American First Team. On defense, the Choctaws will look for Keith Villafranco to be the playmaker he was last season. The defensive back was named to the 25th Annual USA College Football Preseason All-American First Team and was named D3football.com Preseason All-America Team. 0REDICTION5-5 record Mississippi College plays in one of the toughest D-III conferences. The Choctaws will have to be much better on offense and defense to compete in the ASC. MC will have to play incredibly well if the team hopes to make noise this season in the ASC. The Choctaws should have more than enough talent to improve on last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two wins, but maybe not enough talent to make the leap to the top of the conference. -ISSISSIPPI#OLLEGESCHEDULE Sept 7 Millsaps College; Sept. 14 Huntington; Sept. 28 at Webber International; Oct. 5 Hardin-Simmons; Oct. 12 at Sul Ross State; Oct. 19 Howard Payne; Oct. 26 Texas Lutheran; Nov. 2 at East Texas Baptist; Nov. 9 at Louisiana College; Nov. 16 Mary Hardin-Baylor

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21


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From page 21

(EADCOACHTodd Cooley (first season at Delta State and first season as a head coach)  RECORD 3-7 overall, 1-4 GSC (season ended with a 32-21 loss to Shorter University to end the regular season) #ONFERENCEGulf South Conference 2ADIO 930 AM 3TADIUM Parkerfield-McCool Stadium, Cleveland ,ASTSEASONRECAP Delta State went from playing for a national championship three years ago, to losing in the semifinals of the Division II playoffs two seasons ago, to bottoming out. The Statesmen finished last season with a miserable 3-7 record, ending on a four-game losing streak. It was a season to forget after DSU was once one of the best D-II football programs in the country.  OUTLOOK Under Ron Roberts, DSU went to the D-II playoffs in four of the five years he coached the team. Last season, Jamey Chadwell took over the program after Roberts left for Southeastern Louisiana. Chadwell resigned in early January after just one season in Cleveland. He left after the 3-7 season to take over Charleston Southern University. DSU is now on its third coach in three years with Cooley taking over the program. Before he took over at Delta State, Cooley was known as one of the top offensive coordinators in the country. While Cooley’s background is in offense, it might be defense that leads the Statesmen. Three members of the DSU defensive unit made the Preseason NCAA Division II All-America Team: linebacker Diego Lubin, defensive back Kenny Barnes and linebacker Rory Island. 0REDICTION5-5 records Cooley might not make the Division II Playoffs, or be one of the top teams in the Gulf South Conference this year, but talent still thrives in Cleveland. A year or two from now, if all goes well, Cooley should have the Statesmen back near the top of D-II programs. The main goal this season should be to try to get back to being a .500 football team. Next season, the Gulf South Conference should learn to “Fear the Okra” once more. $ELTA3TATESCHEDULE Sept. 7 at Mississippi Valley State; Sept. 13 Texas A&M—Commerce (neutral site); Sept. 21 at University of North Alabama; Sept. 28 Florida Institute of Technology; Oct. 3 at University of West Alabama; Oct. 19 Tarleton State University; Oct. 24 at Shorter University; Nov. 2 Valdosta State University; Nov. 9 Concordia College; Nov. 14 at University of West Georgia

(EADCOACH Gene Murphy (152-59-5 overall record)  SEASONRECORD 4-5, 2-4 conference 2ADIO 87.7 FM

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE by Bryan Flynn

THURSDAY, AUG. 29 College football (8-11 p.m., ESPN): Two up-and-coming SEC programs collide in the first game of the season as the Vanderbilt Commodores host the Ole Miss Rebels. FRIDAY, AUG. 30 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN): The Big-12 and Conference USA battle it out when Texas Tech travels to SMU. SATURDAY, AUG. 31 College football (2:30-6 p.m. ESPN 2 or ABC): Mississippi State looks to set the tone for the 2013 season against a very tough Oklahoma State squad in the first-ever Texas Kickoff Classic from Reliant Stadium in Houston. SUNDAY, SEPT. 1 College football (11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. ESPN U): Mississippi Valley State faces Florida A&M in the 2013 MEAC/ SWAC Challenge.

Congratulations to former Southern Miss and Oakland Raider punter Ray Guy on being named as one of two senior committee candidates for the Pro Hall of Fame. Guy joins other candidate Claude Humphrey. MONDAY, SEPT. 2 College football (7-10 p.m. ESPN): National title contender Florida State doesn’t want to trip up in the first game of the season on the road against Pittsburg. TUESDAY, SEPT. 3 Tennis (6-10 p.m. ESPN): Hopefully the second week of the 2013 US Open will showcase plenty of big-name contenders in the last Grand Slam of the year. WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 4 MLB (6-9 p.m. ESPN): The Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers face off in what could be a preview of the American League playoffs. Many people believe Ray Guy might be the best punter ever. As of right now, no punters are currently honored in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Follow Bryan Flynn at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports.

3TADIUM Joe Renfroe Stadium, Raymond ,ASTSEASONRECAP Hinds started the season off with two wins before suffering three straight losses. The Eagles squeezed out another win, followed by two losses before ending the season on a winning note in the final game of the season against Pearl River.  OUTLOOKANDPREDICTION6-3 record Hinds has been one of the top community-college programs, and Gene Murphy has led the program back to the top after periods of less-than-stellar seasons. Murphy will have the Eagles ready—breaking through this season will depend on the talent at other schools. (INDS#OMMUNITY#OLLEGESCHEDULE Aug. 29 at Delta; Sept. 5 at Coahoma; Sept. 12 Gulf Coast; Sept. 19 at Co-Lin; Sept. 26 East Central; Oct. 5 at Southwest; Oct. 10 at Jones; Oct. 17 Holmes; Oct. 24 Pearl River

(EADCOACH Jeff Koonz (7-11 overall record)  RECORD 5-4 overall, 4-2 conference 2ADIO 103.9 FM 3TADIUM Ras Branch Stadium, Goodman ,ASTSEASONRECAP Last season was a season of streaks for the Bulldogs. Holmes dropped its first two games, then went on to win its next three games before losing another two. Holmes finished with two wins to clinch a winning record for the season. The Bulldogs were strong at home, winning three of four games, but struggled on the road, going just one and three.  OUTLOOKANDPREDICTION6-3 record The Bulldogs’ biggest win came in a 35-34 upset of rival Hinds Community College last season. If the Bulldogs play better on the road and keep their strong home performances from last season, Holmes will be competitive all season. (OLMES#OMMUNITY#OLLEGESCHEDULE Aug. 29 Jones; Sept. 5 at Mississippi Gulf Coast; Sept. 12 at Northeast Mississippi; Sept. 19 Itawamba; Sept. 26 at Mississippi Delta; Oct. 3 East Mississippi; Oct. 12 Northwest Missis23 sippi; Oct. 19 at Hinds; Oct. 24 at Coahoma jacksonfreepress.com

,ASTSEASONRECAP Belhaven couldn’t have started rougher last season, opening the 2012-’13 campaign with three losses. The Blazers got back on track with two wins to keep their season meaningful. A loss against Kentucky Christian University interrupted the winning streak, but Belhaven came back with three wins to set up a chance to win the MSC West title with a win over Bethel University in the season finale. The Blazers fell 21-17 to Bethel, but still ended up with a 6-5 winning record. Belhaven’s five losses were only by a combined 35 points.  OUTLOOK Belhaven and Bethel University are co-favorites to win the MSC Western Division. The Blazers return last season’s MSC Defensive Player of the Year in linebacker Calvin Lewis to highlight some nice returning defensive starters. The Blazers turn the offense over to Raymond Cotton this season after Cotton split time with Alex Williams, who graduated, last year. Belhaven also returns first team All-MSC running back Kadero Edley and Patrick Wilson, an honorable-mention conference selection. 0REDICTION8-3 record Last season’s strong finish has paved the way for the Blazers to make a run at the MSC Western Division title and the NAIA Playoffs. Belhaven returns several players on both sides of the ball with plenty of experience from last year. A Western division crown and playoff hopes could come down to the final game of the regular season, when the Blazers meet co-favorite Bethel University on the road after playing the University of Pikeville on the road the week before this big conference showdown. "ELHAVENSCHEDULE Aug. 31 Texas College; Sept. 7 at Louisiana College; Sept. 14 University of Cumberlands (KY); Sept. 21 Cumberland University (TN); Sept. 28 at Campbellsville University (KY); Oct. 12 at Bluefield College (VA); Oct. 19 at Reinhardt University (GA); Oct. 26 Lindsey Wilson College; Nov. 2 Faulkner University (AL); Nov. 9 at University Pikeville; Nov. 16 at Bethel University (TN)


by Bryan Flynn

with Andrew McLarty

T /

Angel’s Share F /

Davis Coen S /

Lloyd Keller

Bo Wallace

M /

Karaoke w/ Matt T /

Open Mic

with A Guy Named George

!"# Try our

BLACK BOARD

August 28 - September 3, 2013

SPECIALS

24

Monday throug h

Friday. !"#

players win the award. A Millsaps College player has won the award once. "O7ALLACE QUARTERBACK /LE-ISS Bo Wallace is looking to become the first player in the history of the Conerly Trophy to win the award in back-to-back seasons. The Ole Miss single-caller was one of the main reasons the Rebels won six games to reach bowl eligibility last year. Last season, Wallace threw for 2,994 yards while completing 235 of 368 attempts with 22 touchdowns. Wallace could improve by cutting down on interceptions. During the 2012-13 season, Wallace threw 17 picks. Wallace also proved he has some mobility, finishing second on the team in rushing, going for 390 yards and adding eight touchdowns on the ground. $ONTE-ONCREIF WIDERECEIVER /LE-ISS It took a bit of time, but Donte Moncreif exploded against LSU and Mississippi State at the end of the season. Moncreif was nearly uncoverable against those schools. Moncreif ended last season with 66 catches for 979 yards, and 10 touchdowns. The Ole Miss receiver tied a school record with his 10 touchdown grabs. $ENZEL.KEMDICHE LINEBACKER /LE-ISS It might only be a matter of time before his brother Robert becomes the headliner of the Rebels’ defense, but last season’s defensive star was Denzel Nkemdiche. The Ole Miss linebacker was a force all over the field, terrorizing opposing offense for the Rebels.

/LE-ISSWILDCARDD.T. Shackelford, a linebacker returning from a knee injury. 4YLER2USSELL QUARTERBACK -35 Tyler Russell put his name all over the Mississippi State record book last season. The Bulldogs passing records aren’t like Florida’s, but Russell still put up some impressive numbers. Russell passed for 2,897 yards on 231 completions with 391 attempts. He also threw for 24 touchdowns with just 10 interceptions. The Conerly Trophy might have gone to Russell last year if not for his slump at the end of the season. The quarterback must play better against Alabama, LSU, Texas A&M and South Carolina if he hopes to win this year. ,A$ARIUS0ERKINS RUNNINGBACK -35 The return of last season’s top rusher, LaDarius Perkins, will help Russell in the passing game. The Bulldogs running back rushed for 1,024 yards on 205 carries with eight touchdowns. Perkins added 19 receptions for 160

Tyler Russell

yards with two touchdowns. He is also the leading returning receiver for the Bulldogs. "ENARDRICK-C+INNEY LINEBACKER -35 Teammate Cameron Lawrence, who led the Bulldogs in tackles, overshadowed Benardrick McKinney last season. He also got lost in the praise for Ole Miss linebacker Denzel Nkemdiche, but that doesn’t mean the Mississippi State linebacker wasn’t just as much of a play-maker. McKinney was second on the team last season with 102 tackles. He also added a sack and 4 1/2 tackles for a loss. -ISSISSIPPI3TATEWILDCARDSGabe Jackson, NFL-talent offensive guard, and Nickoe Whitley, who led teams with three picks last season.

COURTESY JSU ATHLETICS

Pub Quiz

COURTESY OLE MISS PHOTOGRAPHY

W /

1UA#OX CORNERBACK *35 Qua Cox led the SWAC in interceptions for the second year last season. Cox had five interceptions and proved a shutdown cornerback, earning AllSWAC honors.

Nkemdiche led Ole Miss with 82 tackles last season. The linebacker added three interceptions, three sacks, four forced fumbles and 13 tackles for a loss during a standout first year as a starter.

COURTESY MSU ATHLETICS

E

ach year since I began writing the college football preview, I have compiled a short list of the preseason players to watch for the Conerly Trophy, which the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame awards to the best football player in the state at a four-year college each year. Last season, Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace won the award. An Ole Miss player has won the award five times (Eli Manning won the award twice, in 2001 and 2003), the most from one school in the state. Mississippi State and Southern Miss have each seen a player win the award four years. Delta State University has seen two

Qua Cox

The Tigers defensive back is a NFLcaliber corner NFL scouts will watch closely this season. If Cox can make some gamechanging plays for Jackson State this season, he will stay on the Conerly voters’ minds. #LAYTON-OORE QUARTERBACK *35 Clayton Moore came into his own late last season, leading Jackson State to five straight victories to end the regular season and head into the SWAC championship game. The Tigers quarterback proved to be a dual threat with his arm and his legs. Moore threw for 1,863 yards with 11 touchdowns, added 633 yards on the ground and rushed for 11 more touchdowns. Another season like that, and Moore could be the first Tiger to win the Conerly. 3OUTHERN-ISSSLEEPERS Deron Wilson, NFL-caliber cornerback; Allan Bridgford, former four-star quarterback recruit; and Kendrick Hardy, senior running back. 2OBERT3IMPSON DEFENSIVELINEMAN -IS SISSIPPI6ALLEY3TATE Robert Simpson was a nightmare last season for opposing offenses. He was nearly impossible to block while leading the nation in tackles for a loss with 22.5. Simpson also had 59 tackles and added seven sacks. If he can repeat or better those numbers, he should be a finalist for the Conerly Trophy this year. +EITH6ILLAFRANCO DEFENSIVEBACK -# Mississippi College’s Keith Villafranco has earned just about every preseason honor a Division III player can garner, as well as several honors last season. Villafranco led MC with 76 total tackles and nine tackles for loss to go along with his American Southwest Conference-leading 59 solo stops. He also had five interceptions and finished second in D-III with six forced fumbles.


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jacksonfreepress.com

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25


Non-profits, churches, sports teams – Pushlocal is FREE for you to use

“even the state of Mississippi… will be transformed into an oasis of freedom & justice.” ~ Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Now you can send important alerts to your followers, schedule event updates, maintain a calendar of events and much more. You can even manage your Twitter and Facebook feeds from Pushlocal.

“Welcome to some of our new members!” Actor’s Playhouse, Alzheimer’s Association, Brain Injury Association, CARA, Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership, Hinds Community College, Jackson 2000, Jackson Education Support, Jackson Symphony League, Jackson Zoo, LSU Alumni Association, Magnolia Speech School, Mission Mississippi, Mississippi Children’s Museum, Mississippi Coalition for Citizens with Disabilities, Mississippi Museum of Art, Mississippi Opera, Mississippi Puppetry Guild, MS Boychoir, Operation Shoestring, Parents for Public Schools of Jackson, Phoenix Club of Jackson, Tougaloo College, USTA Mississippi - Jackson Metro and Word of Life Church.

Please Join Us On the South Steps Of the Capitol For The Day of Dignity Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

August 28 • 5:30-7:30 • 400 High Street, Jackson, MS

August 28 - September 3, 2013

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The ACLU of MS acknowledges the sacrifices made, and we salute the ambition and courage of those who participated in the March On Washington 50 years ago. We take pride as we continue moving towards Martin Luther King’s dream.

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FOOD p 29 GIRL ABOUT TOWN p 30

Rika in Rome

DO AS THE ROMANS DO

I

FLICKR/FROZENCHIPMUNK

SLEEP

Hotel Casa Valdese Via Alessandro Farnese casavaldeseroma.it Guest House Arco dei Tolomei Via dell’Arco de’Tolomei bbarcodeitolomei.com Hotel Campo De’ Fiori Via del Biscione hotelcampodefiori.com

EAT

Trattoria Da Lucia Vicolo del Mattonato trattoriadalucia.com Ristorante Ar Galletto Piazza Farnese ristoranteargalettoroma.com Gelatiria Caffè Pasticceria Giolliti Via Degli Uffici Del Vicario pasticceriagiolitti.com

SEE

Colosseum Piazza del Colosseo The Pantheon Piazza della Rotonda Spanish Steps Piazza di Spagna *Recommendations from ricksteves.com ENRIKA Y. WILLIAMS

never fully understood the context of the phrase “When in I found it in a bowl of bucatini pasta (hollow spaghetti nooRome, do as the Romans do” until I went there myself. Count- dles), tossed in crushed tomatoes, caramelized onions, pancetta less weeks leading up to the maiden voyage couldn’t prepare me and red pepper flakes. Perfect. It was a simple blend of straightforenough for my holiday abroad. Anyone traveling to far-off new ward, quality ingredients, with flavors melding while also standplaces has to make plans, which for me included packing the most ing out in each morsel. Each bite of pasta was wrapped perfectly minimal of bags. That came down to four pairs of shoes and enough with just enough sauce. The toothiness of the pasta, the carameloutfits for 11 days—all in a rolling carry-on. I also had to obtain a passport and a handy “Rick Steves’ Italy” tour book, exchange currency and my agenda. Sure, I had my sights set on wonders of the artistic and historic, but my plan was purely carnal and gluttonous and straightforward: to consume every single thing I encountered. Rome is pulsing with a great balance of preserved, romantic decay and cosmopolitan gloss. People rush everywhere, and everything is urgent, all against a backdrop of unearthed remains and ruins still intact from hundreds, if not thousands, of years ago. Newly constructed boutiques and storefronts sit across the street from a recently disThe Campo De’ Fiori area of Rome is a haven for foodies. covered and excavated site of an ancient bath house. The duality of the city is amazing and quite impressive. Everything is preserved and accessible to those who ized sweetness of the pancetta and onions, the acidity of the tomawant to explore Rome. toes, and the slight bite of the red pepper flakes and garlic made That meant museums and shopping, churches and comic this dish everything. And at around 15 euros, or about $20, for books, boutiques and ruins. Exploring made me hungry—not tomato bruschetta, a pasta of your choice and a glass of wine, it from the physical exertion of continuous walking and stair climb- definitely made a good impression on me and my budget. ing, but because it requires a lot of energy, and I like to eat. Making my way through Rome, my voracious appetite was Tons of touristy spots cater to those who want the standard continuously fed. I stayed at the Hotel Rosetta, nestled on the slice of pizza and a Coke, but going on a suggestion from my awe- Via Cavour—one of the main arteries of Rome, lined with shops, some tour advisers, Bob and Martha Pennebaker, I came upon a cafés, hotels and within walking distance of the major sights. I bohemian and colorful Roman neighborhood called Campo De’ could easily see the tremendous Colossuem from my hotel winFiori. It is fun and vibrant, with open-air markets, clothing bou- dow. Strolling along the Via Cavour helped to satiate my appetite tiques and restaurants all jumbled together in one funky puzzle. for all things lovely, which included consuming as much gelato as I fell in love. possible, which I did, at Gelateria La Dolce Vita. We found a cute spot called Ristorante Il Gabriello, where My favorite was stracciatella (dark chocolate laced in a vawe rested our tired limbs and ate some good food. We could nilla-cream base). If you’re feeling fancy, I would suggest the balorder red or white house wine by the liter, and waiters zoomed samic or the pistachio flavors. it out to the table. The menu is divided into courses, and I I saw breathtaking vision after breathtaking vision. The didn’t want to set the tone for my trip by ordering something sparkle in my eye dimmed in comparison to the wonder of safe and “light.” I wanted my first meal in Rome to be reflec- gazing at the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel or the dome of the tive of the attitude I had adopted since touching Roman ground: Pantheon. The soreness of feet and knees subsided into obscurity insatiable, robust and full. as I climbed towers and steps to see out onto the city itself.

Rome offers many wonderful sights, smells and tastes.

jacksonfreepress.com

by Enrika Y. Williams

27


JFPmenus.com Paid advertising section. Call 601-362-6121 x11 to list your restaurant

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE Primos Cafe (2323 Lakeland 601-936-3398/ 515 Lake Harbour 601-898-3400) A Jackson institution for breakfast, blue-plates, catfish, burgers, prime rib, oysters, po-boys & wraps. Famous bakery! Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Lunch. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) Coffeehouse plus lunch and more! Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches.

PIZZA 904 Basil’s (904 E. Fortification, 601-352-2002) Creative pizzas, italian food, burgers and much more in a casual-dining atmosphere in the heart of Belhaven. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Bring the kids for ice cream! Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza and beer. Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

ITALIAN BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Huntington Grille (1001 East County Line Road, Jackson Hilton, 601-957-2800) Mississippi fine dining features seafood, crayfish, steaks, fried green tomatoes, shrimp & grits, pizzas and more. Que Sera Sera (2801 N State Street 601-981-2520) Authentic cajun cuisine, excellent seafood and award winning gumbo; come enjoy it all this summer on the patio. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best.

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma. Vasilios Greek Cusine (828 Hwy 51, Madison 601-853-0028) Authentic greek cuisine since 1994, specializing in gyros, greek salads, baklava cheesecake & fresh daily seafood.

BARBEQUE Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads.

COFFEE HOUSES

7KDL)RRG $W,WV%HVW

PGG"OZPSEFS 'PSB-JNJUFE5JNF0OMZ

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi. Hazel Coffee Shop (2601 N. State St. Fondren Across from UMC) Fresh locally roasted coffee and specialty drinks to perk up your day!

Blue Plate Special

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music aug 28 - sept 3

wed aug 28 | 5:30 - 9:30

Jesse “Guitar” Smith Guitar Charlie fri | aug 30 | 6:00 - 10:00

Three Hour Tour sat | aug 31 | 6:00 - 10:00

August 28 - September 3, 2013

Scott Turner Trio

28

Happy Birthday Kimberly!

thur | aug 29 | 5:30 - 9:30

sun | sept 1 | 4:00 - 8:00

Aaron Coker mon | sept 2 | 6:00 - 9:00

Karaoke

601.664.7588

1002 Treetop Blvd • Flowood Behind the Applebee’s on Lakeland www.fusionjapanesethaicuisine.com

tue | sept 3 | 5:30 - 9:30

Jesse “Guitar” Smith !"#"$%$&'()*+$,-).$/01$-)$/-02.34)0 56.)$7()89:(;<$!!4=8!"6= >;-874*$!!4=8?-0)-2:*$@$#"!8ABB8""CA

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2013, plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or daily specials. Capitol Grill (5050 I-55 North, Deville Plaza 601-899-8845) Best happy hour & sports bar, kitchen open late, pub food with soul and live entertainment. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and Irish beers on tap. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, beer selection. Musician’s Emporium (642 Tombigbee St., 601-973-3400) Delicious appetizers, burgers, sandwiches, and more. Great food goes with great music! Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Live music. Opens 4 p.m., Wed-Sat Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot.

ASIAN AND INDIAN Crazy Ninja (2560 Lakeland Dr., Flowood 601-420-4058) Rock-n-roll sushi and cook-in-front-of-you hibachi. Lunch specials, bento boxes, fabulous cocktails. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance and signature asian fusion dishes and build-your-own stir-frys. Fusion Japanese and Thai Cuisine (1002 Treetop Blvd, Flowood 601-664-7588) Specializing in fresh Japanese and Thai cuisine, an extensive menu features everything from curries to fresh sushi


LIFE&STYLE | food

Cocktails with an Herbal Twist by Dawn Macke

G

Crust

2 cups all-purpose flour ½ cup confectioners’ sugar ½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon lemon zest 2 tablespoons lemon thyme, chopped 1 cup butter, softened

Combine dry ingredients. Cut in softened butter with a pastry cutter, large fork or two knives until dough resembles pie crust dough. Press into 9-inch by 13-inch pan. Bake 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown.

Filling

4 eggs 1-1/2 cups sugar 1/2 cup lemon juice 1/4 cup flour 1 tablespoon lemon zest 1 tablespoon Grand Marnier or triple sec

Beat together at least one minute until well combined. Pour mixture over the baked crust. Bake another 20 minutes or until lemon filling is set. When cooled sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar to serve.

Bloody Mary Basil Bread

Easy to make in a bread machine, this loaf has a chewy crust and dense texture, similar to French bread. Bursting with flavor, it is versatile enough for a number of toppings. The tang of tomato and breath of basil pair well for a hearty handful meatloaf or meatball sandwich, but it also glows with simpler fillings: caprese-style with fresh mozzarella, tomato slices and fresh leaves of more sweet basil; grilled with provolone cheese; or cut small and served as a canapé, spread with hummus, olive tapenade or pesto. Or, take some inspiration from Bloody Mary glass garnishes and try the Cocktail Garnish Cream below.

Cocktail Garnish Cream

I hate to get a Bloody Mary that has a huge celery tree sticking out of the glass. First, I don’t need celery to stir my drink; a straw will do just fine. Second, that’s just watery, reedy, stringy stuff taking up valuable space in my Bring all ingredients to room temperature. Bloody glass that could be occupied Mary mix should be at least 80 degrees Fahrenheit. by juice and alcohol. Third, Add ingredients in order according to bread maI just don’t particularly care chine directions* and set for Basic or French bread for celery anyway, least of all cycle. Remove immediately from pan when done. in my drinks. Rub with a tablespoon of cold butter while hot, That’s why I left it then allow to cool on a wire rack. out of this recipe and put a couple of my favorite *Most manufacturers suggest liquid, fats, salt, then Bloody Mary garnishes into dry ingredients, with yeast going in last. Add salt a tangy cream-cheese spread to the liquid and keep away from the yeast for opsprinkled with chives. Feel timal rising. free to add a few capers, thinly sliced pickled asparagus or some horseradish to taste as well. Or minced celery, if you must. 1-1/3 cups Bloody Mary mix 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/3 cup chopped fresh basil (1/3 cup packed leaves) 3/4 teaspoon salt 1-1/2 teaspoons sugar 3 tablespoons rye flour 4 cups bread flour 2-1/4 teaspoons dry yeast

FLICKR-WORDRIDDEN

8 ounces cream cheese, softened 2 teaspoons fresh chives, minced 3 tablespoons pimiento-stuffed green olives, sliced 3 tablespoons thinly sliced hot pickled green beans (such as Tabasco)

Gently combine all ingredients. Chill.

jacksonfreepress.com

Lemon Thymetini Bars

Lemon and traditional German or English thyme are intriguing complements in sweet recipes, but these bars are enhanced by the more delicate flavor of lemon thyme flecked throughout the shortbread crust. Orange liqueur and lemon zest create a rich and tangy bar cookie reminiscent of lemon pie. Powdered sugar is entirely optional, but does make for prettier presentation. Dust just before serving so that sugar doesn’t melt on top.

R.L. NAVE

rowing herbs in Mississippi’s hot, humid climate can be difficult, but it’s a fragrantly rewarding side of gardening and well worth the effort. Some plants such as sage and thyme can be persnickety, whining about wet feet when not well-drained and dying out mysteriously after three to four years (a good run for these generally short-lived perennials, nonetheless.) Others such as basil, chives, mint, German chamomile and Spanish lavender, however, love living here and do well. In the midst of harvest, you can store herbs for several days in the fridge if you prep well. Gather herbs early in the day when they are cool and fresh. Submerge in sinkfuls of cold water to wash well. When ready to store, wrap lightly in clean toweling or paper towels, leaving excess water on the leaves, and store in bags in the crisper. The moisture from the towels, confined by the bag, will keep the many varieties of herbs vibrant, green and flavorful for up to two weeks. If you don’t intend to cook with the herbs immediately, dry well and freeze immediately in freezer bags. I greatly prefer the color and flavor integrity of frozen herbs over dried ones and feel they maintain the essential oils much better, with less lost to the air. Basil tends to turn dark when frozen (although there is a school of belief that blanching beforehand helps keep the bright green better), but the flavor will still be fine. Chop herbs such as parsley, cilantro or chives before freezing, and you can easily break off portions as needed. Freeze fine and small-leaf herbs such as oregano, thyme, marjoram and rosemary directly on the stem; do not waste time stripping the leaves. As these herbs freeze, they become brittle and fall from the stems so stripping is unnecessary. Now that you know some easy ways to enjoy the bounty of your aromatic harvest at any time, try these recipes for a different twist on herbs and cocktails.

29

T f a b b b


LIFE&STYLE | girl about town by Julie Skipper

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 8/28:

2-for-1 EVERYTHING*

Tuesday-Friday from 4:00-7:00 (*excludes food and specialty drinks)

Wednesday, August 28th

CAROLE CANTRELL TRIO

(jazz standards) 6:30, No Cover

Thursday, August 29th

JV JAZZ LAB

(jazz) 8:00, No Cover

Friday, August 30th

CHRIS GILL & THE SOLE SHAKERS (blues) 9:00, $10 Cover

Saturday, August 31st

BRYAN LEE

(blues) 9:00, $10 Cover

THURSDAY 8/29:

Brian Jones (Restaurant) FRIDAY 8/30:

Restaurant Open As Usual SATURDAY 8/31:

CLOSED MONDAY 9/2:

CLOSED Happy Labor Day TUESDAY 9/3:

Pub Quiz with Erin Pearson & Friends (Restaurant)

BUY GROWLERS O F Y O U R F AV O R I T E BEER TO TAKE HOME

$24

for first time fill for high gravity beer Refills are $20.00

$19

for first time fill for regular beer Refills are $15.00

Tuesday, September 3rd

HOWARD JONES QUARTET

(jazz) 6:30, No Cover

August 28 - September 3, 2013

COMING SOON

30

Southern

Komfort Friday, September 6

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

UPCOMING: 9.5: ArdenLand presents: St. Paul & The Broken Bones (Red) 9.6: Swing de Paris (Rest) Visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888 200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

Y

ou may not know this, dear read- hood (not in a creepy, “Come here often?” ers, but I have a sixth sense. I can way, for the record). sit down at a bar and almost immeI discovered he had moved to downdiately pick out someone who just town Jackson a mere seven days prior to our moved to town or is visiting on business. I meeting, returning to Mississippi after a stint make it my mission to tell them all the great in Manhattan. He immediately started getthings about Jackson so they can take full advantage of local places. I like figuring out what people will most enjoy in Jackson and helping them find it. I want everyone to make the most of their time here, no matter how long they’re here. Then, not only will they enjoy their time here more, but they will also become an ambassador for our city. I’m notorious for doing this at my downtown neighborhood haunts, which are regularly populated with businesspeople staying at downtown hotels. Taking new Jackonians to experience fun events, such wine tastings, is a great way to get them to love Sometimes, I chat them up over as the city. a couple of drinks before we go our separate ways. Other times, it leads to real friendships. ting to know the city. He’d already been to Such was the case two and a half years several of my favorite restaurants and bars, ago when, one night at dinner with my joined the Mississippi Museum of Art and parents, I spotted a young woman at an found a place to worship. adjacent table whom I pegged as a recent Later that week, I got to know another transplant. I went over, introduced myself as new Jacksonian I’d met at a neighborhood a downtowner and started chatting with her association meeting—a transplant from and her parents. Sure enough, she had just California here for a fellowship at the Unimoved into my apartment building, and she versity of Mississippi Medical Center. We worked at a local television station. I invited immediately bonded over a shared extreme her to an upcoming neighborhood associa- aversion to Tory Burch flats. The fact that tion meeting. She came, went for dinner and she also spoke highly of about wine and my drinks with me and a couple of other friends long hair helped, too. afterward, and a friendship was born. She wanted to find local places to shop. The reporter was Erin Kelly. I quickly After pegging some of her favorite brands, I appreciated the commitment she had for directed her to Treehouse (3008 N. State St., her work, but also (perhaps more so) the 601-982-3433), Forty Four Fifty (4450 Inenthusiasm she had to experience Jackson. terstate 55 N., 601-366-3687), Libby Story She embraced living, working and play- (1000 Highland Colony Pkwy., Suite 5003, ing downtown with gusto. She befriended Ridgeland, 601-717-3300) and Red Square members of Raise Your Pints and the craft- (1000 Highland Colony Pkwy., Suite 9004, beer crowd, and while maintaining nothing Ridgeland, 601-853-8960). but the utmost journalistic integrity at work, I also invited her and her husband to Kelly was a staunch defender of downtown join me for a Sunday afternoon wine tasting and Jackson in her personal life. She recently at BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N. Frontleft Jackson for a new job in Virginia, and I age Road, Suite 244, 601-982-8111). Over will miss her friendship, her feisty reporting wine and conversation with another downand her appreciation of happy hour. town friend, we all quickly found common The same week I bid Kelly adieu, I met ground and shared the first of what I know new downtowners who are just the sort of will be many laughs together. people who we need to be part of our viEncountering folks who are so eager to brant community. One evening, I stopped get plugged in and meet people excites me by Wasabi Sushi and Bar (100 E. Capitol because I know that they’ll be an asset to the St., Suite 105, 601-948-8808, wasabims. city. Like Kelly, these new friends’ time here com) for takeout on my way home. While may not be forever. waiting for my food, I spotted a young man When fellowships end, real jobs can sitting alone with his sushi, and my new- take one elsewhere, after all. But I know that downtowner radar went off. I moved closer like her, the new downtowners will make the to him and asked if he lived in the neighbor- most of it however long it lasts.

JULIE SKIPPER

New Happy Hour!

Singer/Songwriter Night with Natalie Long (Restaurant) featuring: Richelle Putnam, Gregory Smith, Zach Lovett, Joe Carroll & Wes Lee

Sixth (Social) Sense


FILM p 33 | 8 DAYS p 34 | MUSIC p 37

Ingrid Cruz finds common ground between her immigration activism and her artwork. COURTESY INGRID CRUZ

The Art of Immigration by Mark Braboy

pening. I just didn’t know how or why.” Her love for art began at a young age. “Growing up, I would draw a lot, and my mom would encourage me to keep on going,” she says. I studied it (in college), and I just kept on doing as much as I could (after graduation).” Cruz says she likes to draw about subjects that mean something to her, such as human rights. She enjoys being able to make a living out of her passion. Cruz’s involvement in immigration reform and the adversities that the many immigrants among her friends and family faced inspired some of her art. “I have a lot of friends that have been arrested, and they are trying not to get deported right now,” Cruz says. “So a lot of what they go through right now inspires me to make stuff.” One of her most notable works is a piece titled, “Weep Not for Me, But for Our Collective Liberation.” It depicts an immigrant mother and her daughter touching hands, the soon-to-be-deported mother behind prison walls. Cruz created this piece to simplify and humanize the issues of deportation. Another piece, titled “Not1More Deported Mom,”

Cruz created for the National Day Laborer Organizing Network when the network put out a call for artists on notonemoredeportation.com. The project creates collaboration between businesses, individuals, artists and the like to combat unfair immigration laws. The piece, which Cruz created for Mother’s Day this year, depicts a mother holding her child with flowers and barbed wire around them. Its intent was to show the injustice that deported mothers regularly face. Cruz also creates art about race. “In Mississippi, black and white communities don’t have it together,” she says. “Nobody wants to admit the reason why race is such a huge issue here.” People tend to forget that white and black people were not the first to be on this land, Cruz says. “They deny the existence of Native Americans or ‘forget’ other groups besides black and white exist, and then they wonder why ‘we,’ who are not represented in this binary, don’t participate in these binary discussions on race in the state,” she says. “It’s because we don’t exist.” To see more of Cruz’s artwork, visit ingridisdrawing. 31 blogspot.com. jacksonfreepress.com

I

mmigration problems have affected artist Ingrid Cruz and her family. Her stepfather was unable to attend his father’s funeral in Aguilares, El Salvador, because he was undocumented. After he got a Green Card in 2001, he was able to return to El Salvador when his mother died. Cruz and her family became U.S. citizens in 2011. In her artwork, Cruz explores the issues of immigration and deportation. Cruz, who is from El Salvador, also creates art that reflects other issues such as private prisons, women’s rights and other world issues. She works tirelessly to organize the immigrant community in Mississippi and advocates for equal and fair human rights. Currently, she is working in Buenos Aires, Argentina, until December. Cruz, 27, first got involved in activism when she was a student at the Irvine campus of the University of California. After being exposed to campus issues such as the mistreatment of subcontracted workers, Cruz wanted to help. The subcontracted workers, many of whom were undocumented, were receiving no benefits or paid sick days. “(There was) a lot of stuff going on,” she says. “I felt that it was kind of important. I knew that this was hap-


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Beers and ‘Bots

South of Walmart in Madison

ALL STADIUM SEATING

by Anita Modak-Truran

Listings for Fri. 8/30 – Thur. 9/5

COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES

Getaway PG13

Paranoia

3-D One Direction: This Is Us PG

Elysium

One Direction: This Is Us (non 3-D) PG The Grandmaster PG13

S

of beer at each of the pubs. What happens in Newton Haven changes the world. That’s about as much as I’m going to tell you. Otherwise, you might not get the full shock-and-awe effect of the film’s mad descent into alien invasion and world destruction. Before THE END came up on the screen, this film reminded me of Eugene O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh,” a fourhour play I saw in Chicago years ago. It’s a difficult play. “The World’s End” is a difficult film. Everything in the pubs reeks of abandoned hope as Gary maintains his “pipe dream,” and his friends try to ground him in reality. There isn’t a bad performance in the film. The most notable is from Pegg. His eyes hold such wisdom and sadness, and his verbal outburst such pain that he makes the role almost tender—despite the foul language spewing from his mouth. Frost, as Andrew, has a more virtuoso role. He has reformed his ways, gotten up on the wagon and found peace. The other guys round out the interpersonal dynamics. At its best, “The World’s End,” which was written by Pegg and Wright, provides insight into the lonesome loser, compares the past and present, and condemns the impersonal mechanization of modernization. It doesn’t wallow in cheap sentimentality; instead, it gets drunk on alien invasions and empty-headed robots. Gary and his friends bash, wrestle and tear apart scores of alien robots on the path to fulfillment. The cinematic variations for killing alien robots exhausted me. Arms rip. Heads twist off. Blue ink spurts out. Pierce Brosnan pontificates. The film twirls through genres. It’s eclectic and strange and weird and patently ridiculous. If you have stamina to make it to the end, this film will leave you with two indelible impressions: beers and ‘bots. I had a hangover by THE END.

Planes (non 3-D) PG We’re The Millers R

Closed Circuit

R

You’re Next

R

2 Guns

R

Smurfs 2 (non 3-D)

Blue Jasmine PG13

atire or spoof? That is the question that nagged at me during the wretchedly long pub crawl through beer-drenched taverns in “The World’s End,” the final film in Edgar Wright’s trilogy of comedies that began with “Shaun of the Dead” (2004) and evolved into “Hot Fuzz” (2007). This last installment crashes and burns with apocalyptic fury. Like Wright’s earlier films, this comedy is about a loquacious loser whose life centers on the pub. In group therapy, Gary King (Simon Pegg) shares that the best moment in his forgettable life was a night of drunken debauchery on the day he and his four BFFs graduated from school and officially embarked on a journey into manhood. The kicker is that Gary and his mates failed to make it to the last bar on the list back in 1990. While Gary’s friends have made something of their lives, Gary is mounted and pinned like a barfly to that single night of failed ambition. He still squirms in his tedious little adolescent life, wearing Doc Martens, a black trench and a Sisters of Mercy T-shirt. Like J. Alfred Prufrock in T.S. Eliot’s poem, Gary’s “full of high sentence, but a bit obtuse; at times, indeed, almost ridiculous—almost, at times, the Fool.” Armed with a glib tongue and an arsenal of lies (“Mum’s dead”), Gary invites his old buddies for a weekend reunion. He first reels in Peter (Eddie Marsan), a car salesman at the family dealership. Then he lures in Oliver (Martin Freeman), a highend real-estate agent, Steven (Paddy Considine), a successful construction company owner and, finally, Andrew (Nick Frost), a curmudgeonly corporate lawyer. In the old jalopy of their spendthrift youth, the five “Musketeers” head for their hometown of Newton Haven, where they pledge to complete the Golden Mile, swilling pints

R

Percy Jackson: Sea Of Monsters (non 3-D) PG

The World’s End

“The World’s End” completes Edgar Wright’s trilogy of comedies.

PG13

Mortal Instruments: City Of Bones PG13 Lee Daniel’s The Butler PG13 Jobs

PG13

The Conjuring

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Grown Ups 2 PG13 Despicable ME 2 (non 3-D) PG Monster’s University (non 3-D)

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33


WEDNESDAY 8/28

FRIDAY 8/30

WEDNESDAY 9/4

Black Flag performs at Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge.

Volunteers de-weed Fondren in exchange for Rainbow Grocery gift certificates.

Margaret Haddix signs copies of “Risked” at Lemuria Books.

BEST BETS AUGUST 22 - 28, 2013

Day of Dignity: 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington, D.C., for Jobs and Freedom is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Mississippi State Capitol (400 High St.) on the south steps facing Mississippi Street. RSVP. Free; tinyurl.com/DayofDignity. … Black Flag performs at 10 p.m. at Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 S. State St.). For ages 21 and up. $20; call 800-745-3000; blackflagofficial.com.

Kerry Thomas performs at SippHop Summer Jam 2 Sept. 1 at Dreamz JXN.

COURTESY KERRY THOMAS

WEDNESDAY 8/28

THURSDAY 8/29

ELIZABETH WAIBEL

Museum After Hours: Blues and Brews is at 5 p.m. at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Admission applies for exhibit ($12, $10 seniors, $6 students, free for members and children under 5); call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. … “Contemplations” Art Exhibit ends today at Mississippi Library Commission (Education and Research Center, 3881 Eastwood Drive). Free; call 601432-4056 or 800-647-7542; mlc.lib.ms.us.

August 28 - September 3, 2013

William Winter speaks at History is Lunch at the Old Capitol Museum Sept. 4.

FRIDAY 8/30

Weedstock 2 is from 8-10 a.m. at Fondren Business District. Volunteers de-weed the district and exchange the weeds for gift certificates at Rainbow Natural Grocery Cooperative (2807 Old Canton Road). Free; call 601366-1602; rainbowcoop.org. … Alternative Christian-rock band SOMETHINGPOSITIVE performs at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts (835 Riverside Drive) in the concert hall. Doors open at 7 p.m. Free; call 34 601-974-6494; belhaven.edu.

SATURDAY 8/31

Homebuyer Education Class is from 8:30 a.m.5 p.m. at Jackson Housing Authority Homeownership Center (256 E. Fortification St.). Registration required. The class is required to qualify for a Jackson Housing Authority loan. Free; call 601-398-0446. … Ice Treat Enrichment Day is from 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. at Jackson Zoo (2918 W. Capitol St.). Free with admission; call 601-352-2580; jacksonzoo.org. … Blues & Bones is at noon at F. Jones Corner (303 N. Farish St.). Registration required for contests. $10, children under 12 free, $25 Blues Challenge entry fee, $100 barbecue contest entry fee; call 601-613-7377 (Blues Challenge), or 601212-7989 or 601-955-9078 (cooking competition, etc.); fjonescorner.com.

SUNDAY 9/1

Darius Rucker, Russell Dickerson and Liz Davis perform at the C Spire Concert Series at 6 p.m. at C Spire BY BRIANA ROBINSON Green Space (1018 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM $30-$60; call 800-745-3000. … SippHop Summer Jam FAX: 601-510-9019 2 is from 7 p.m.-11:30 p.m. DAILY UPDATES AT at Dreamz JXN (426 W. JFPEVENTS.COM Capitol St.). 5th Child, Kerry Thomas, Savvy & Gutta, Camino and Rashad Street perform. Tickets available at T-Mobile on County Line Road. $10, $20 VIP, $30$45 all-access pass; call 601-724-8953; eventbrite.com/ event/7601766087.

EVENTS@

MONDAY 9/2

Aziatikk Blakk Labor Day Festival and Birthday Celebration are from noon-8 p.m. at Farish Street Park (Farish and Hamilton streets). Free; call 601-862-9037 or 601862-2780; email aziatikkblakk@gmail.com or realdealjeremiahcarver@gmail.com. … Labor Day Concert is from 6 p.m.-10 p.m. at The Mosquito (133 Millsaps Ave.). Enjoy music from the Dime Bros, the Italian rock jazz trio Nohaybandatrio, the British funk jazz quintet WorldService Project and a DJ set from local group Spirituals. $5 suggested donation; email shelby.sifers@gmail.com.

TUESDAY 9/3

The Blues: Music, Stories and Photographs Sept. 3, 7 p.m. at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.). Rambling Steve Gardner, Mississippi’s blues ambassador to Japan, speaks and performs. $10, $5 students; call 601-974-1130; millsaps.edu/conted. … No Boundaries Beginner Training Information Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports (500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Registration required. $100 program (does not include race entry fee). Call 601-899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com.

WEDNESDAY 9/4

Former Mississippi Gov. William Winter talks about wartime governors of Mississippi during History Is Lunch at noon at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). Free; call 601-576-6998. … Margaret Haddix signs copies of “Risked” at 5 p.m. at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). $16.99 book. Call 601-366-7619; email info@ lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com.


Blues & Bones Aug. 31, noon, at F. Jones Corner (303 N. Farish St.). The annual event includes a barbecue competition, arts and crafts vendors, walking tours of the Farish Street District, domino tournaments and the Central Mississippi Blues Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Challenge. Registration required for contests. $10, children under 12 free, $25 Blues Challenge entry fee, $100 barbecue contest entry fee; call 601-613-7377 (Blues Challenge), or 601212-7989 or 601-955-9078 (cooking competition, etc.); fjonescorner.com. Jackson 2000 Dialogue Circles Program Saturdays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., at Professional Staffing Group (2906 N. State St., Suite 330). The program includes six two-hour sessions of dialogue and problem-solving encouraging racial harmony and community involvement. Six-week commitment. Free; email jackson2000circles@gmail.com.

#/--5.)49

Toastmasters Club Meetings. New members welcome. Call for membership information. â&#x20AC;˘ New Foundation Toastmasters Club #702994 Meetings Mondays, 6-7:30 p.m., at Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University (1230 Raymond Road), in the Nebraska Room. Practice impromptu speaking, active listening, evaluation and leadership skills. Call 601-502-8402 or 601-896-4400; email artmaat@aol.com; find â&#x20AC;&#x153;NewFoundation Linda Hartwellâ&#x20AC;? on Facebook. â&#x20AC;˘ Downtown Jackson Toastmasters Wednesdays, 6-7 p.m., at Plaza Building (120 N. Congress St.). Learn to communicate better in front of groups and with peers. Meetings are Wednesdays from 6-7 p.m. on the 12th floor in the Common Room. Call 601-940-5247; email downtownjackson@gmail.com; 1275010. toastmastersclubs.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Capital City Toastmasters Club #1684 Thursdays, 6-7 p.m., at Reformed Theological Seminary Library (5341 Clinton Blvd.). Join to improve your public speaking and leadership skills. Call 601-942-2154; 1684.toastmastersclubs.org. â&#x20AC;˘ Public Policy Toastmasters Club 8689 Meeting, at Universities Center (3825 Ridgewood Road). The group meets on first and third Tuesdays at 5:15 p.m. in the computer lab. Improve your communication skills, and become a better speaker and leader. Call 601-540-8472 or 601432-6277. â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guess Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Talking Nowâ&#x20AC;? Toastmasters Club 3284 Meetings Tuesdays, noon-1 p.m., at Woolfolk Building (501 N. West St.). The group meets from noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays in the conference room on the first floor. Improve your communication skills, and become a better speaker and leader. Membership required. Free to visitors; call 601-359-6653 or 601-359-2573. Artifact and Collectible Identification Pro-

Lunch and Learn Series Aug. 28, noon-1 p.m., at Mississippi Center for Nonprofits (201 W. Capitol St.). The topic is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grant Research Tools.â&#x20AC;? Lunch included; registration required. $15, members free; call 601-968-0061; msnonprofits.org. Back to School Night for Educators Aug. 29,

wear shoes with cleats at the event. Free; call 601-960-0471. Mississippi Jump$tart Coalition Poster and Essay Contest. The theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get Smart About Credit,â&#x20AC;? and students in grades 9-12 may participate. Submissions must be postmarked by Sept. 9. The first-place winner receives a $1,000 scholarship, and the second-place winner receives a $500 scholarship. Free; call 601-665-0447; email uthompson@mississippi.org; msjumpstart.org. Teacher Education Scholars Program Call for Applications. Incoming or current college students who plan to become teachers may apply for the $15,000 award through Sept. 15.

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out the opportunity to be have your nuptials featured in this inaugural issue of Hitched. This glossy edition of Hitched will be a keepsake for you, your family and friends.

*All payments and materials due by October 31

Two Page Announcement

Art All Night

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January 2014 Wedding Announcement

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Events at Ridgeland Public Library (397 Highway 51, Ridgeland). Free; call 601-856-4536. â&#x20AC;˘ Back to School Bash Aug. 29, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Welcome back the school year with playtime, LEGOs and more. â&#x20AC;˘ Rising Readers Story Time (Ages 3-5) Tuesdays, 4-4:30 p.m. through Nov. 19. The program incorporates songs, rhymes, movement and storytelling to strengthen early literacy skills and build enthusiasm for reading. â&#x20AC;˘ Baby Bookworms Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.11 a.m. through Nov. 20. Parents and caregivers interact with children ages 0-2 through a variety of nursery rhymes, action rhymes, songs and stories.

gram Aug. 28, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at William F. Winter Archives and History Building (200 North St.). The MDAH staff is on hand to review and assist in identifying documents and objects of historical value, including potential donations to the Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. Free; call 601576-6850.

$1,100 650-700 word announcement plus six photos.

One Page Announcement

Work. Live. Play. Prosper.

3-6 p.m. The Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, the Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum, the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum and the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame give educators free admission and stay open late to provide resources. Free; call 601-576-6000, 601981-5469, 601-982-8264 or 601-432-4500; mschildrensmuseum.com.

Applicants must have an ACT score of 28, a GPA of 3.5 and agree to teach in a Mississippi public school for five years. Free; call 601-4326997 or 800-327-2980; email sfa@mississippi. edu; mississippi.edu/rHuqP.

Trekkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the Trace Labor Day Ride Sept. 2, 8 a.m.-3 p.m., at Old Trace Park (Post Road, Ridgeland). Jackson Metro Cyclists hosts. $10, members free, $25 membership; call 601-8127018; jacksonmetrocyclists.com.

Caregiver Educational Series Sept. 3, 3:30-5:30 p.m., at St. Matthewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s United Methodist Church (7427 Old Canton Road, Madison). The Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association of Mississippi hosts. Topics include community resources and family dynamics. Free; call 601-987-0020.

Farm to Table 100 Sept. 4, 6-8 p.m., at Table 100 (100 Ridge Way, Flowood). Enjoy a four-course meal from Chef Mike RomhĂŻld paired with wine or beer selections from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wine Guyâ&#x20AC;? Paul Ruiter. Includes a meet-and-greet with Mississippi Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde Smith. Proceeds benefit Farm Families of Mississippi. $110 plus tax and tip; call 601-420-4202; tableonehundred.com. NFL Punt, Pass and Kick Competition Registration, at Metrocenter Mall (1395 Metrocenter Drive). at the Department of Parks and Recreation, suite 104. The program is for children ages 6-15. Birth certificate required. Register by Sept. 6 for the Sept. 12 competition at Hughes Field. Participants may not

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Kardio by Kimberly Mondays, 6:30 p.m., at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Kimberly Griffin instructs the weekly kickboxing fitness class. $30 for eight weeks, $5 drop-in fee; call 601-884-0316.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. Mississippi State Fair Talent Competition, at Mississippi State Fairgrounds (1207 Mississippi St.). The competition for cash prizes is for ages 6 and up. Ages 6-10 compete Oct. 3-4, ages 11-14 compete Oct. 5, ages 15-18 compete Oct. 12 and PRUH(9(176VHHSDJH

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$600 325-350 word announcement plus three photos.

Half Page Announcement

$375 225-250 word announcement plus one photo. For more information and to submit your information visit www.boomjackson.com/ hitched.html

jacksonfreepress.com

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35


IT PAYS TO BE BILINGUAL! On average bilingual employees make 5%-20% more. Classes start in August

Now registering for Fall semester, adults and children.

English and Spanish Free language demo and open house the first Friday of each month at 7 pm

)5203$*(

adults compete Oct. 11. The entry deadlines are Sept 13 for ages 6-14 and Sept. 20 for ages 15 and up. $50 plus $5 each additional person in a group, $15 late fee; email statefairtalentcompetition@gmail.com; actorsplayhouse.net.

-53)# Scott Holt Aug. 30, 8 p.m., at Duling Hall (622 Duling Ave.). Doors open at 9 p.m. All-ages show. $8 in advance, $10 at the door; call 601292-7121; ardenland.net.

NEW LOCATION! 6712 OLD CANTON RD SUITE 10 RIDGELAND | 601.500.7700 | LINGOFEST.COM

A Unified Praise Celebration Aug. 31, 5 p.m., at Tougaloo College (500 W. County Line Road, Tougaloo), in Woodworth Chapel. Adrian Lewis and Utmost Praise performs. Free; call 601-9062544 or 601-832-6444.

• Parties, Meetings, Concerts, Album Releases & Live Digital Recording Sessions • Onsite Catering and Full Service Bar • Call for Pricing and Availability

642 Tombigbee St. 601.973.3400 Thu, August 29th College Spaghetti Night All-You-Can-Eat $5.99 with school ID $7.99 without Live Music & Beer Specials

Sun, September 1st Open Mic Talent Showcase 3pm-7pm Larry Underwood and Hound Dog Lucy All Musicians Welcome

Tue, September 3rd Open Mic Jam with Ralph Miller 7pm-11pm

Music Writing

August 28 - September 3, 2013

The Jackson Free Press is looking for freelance writers interested in covering the city’s music scene.

36

Please e-mail inquiries to

briana@jacksonfreepress.com

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Events at Lemuria Books (4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). Call 601-366-7619; email info@ lemuriabooks.com; lemuriabooks.com. • “Click, Clack, Boo!: A Tricky Treat” Aug. 29, 4 p.m. Doreen Cronin signs books. $16.99 book. • “Island of Fire” Sept. 4, 5 p.m. Lisa McMann signs books. $16.99 book. • Lemuria Story Time Saturdays, 11 a.m. Children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free. “Vampire Defense” Aug. 31, 1-3 p.m., at Bay Window Books (5905 Old Brandon Road, Pearl). James D. Bell signs books. $14.95 book; call 601955-1807 or 601-936-0089; find Bay Window Books on Facebook.

August 30

Interested in interviewing musicians, reviewing albums and networking within Jackson’s music community?

C Spire Concert Series Sept. 1, 6 p.m., at C Spire Green Space (1018 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Darius Rucker, Russell Dickerson and Liz Davis perform. Gates open at 4:30 p.m. $30$60; call 800-745-3000.

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August 31

The Co

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824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com

601.487.8710

Poetry Out Loud National Recitation Contest. High school students at participating schools may compete. The winner advances to the national contest in Washington, D.C. Schools must register by Nov. 1. Free; call 601-327-1294; email poetryoutloud@arts.state.ms.us; arts.state.ms.us.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Events at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). • Hip Hop: Choreography and Techniques Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. Choreographer Roger L. Long is the instructor. All ages welcome. $10; call 601-213-6355; go-long-productions.com. • Zumba with Ashleigh Mondays, 5:45-6:30 p.m. through Dec. 30 Ashleigh Risher teaches the Latin-inspired dance and cardio class. For ages 18 and up. $5-$6; call 601906-0661; email zumbadancer7@yahoo.com. Date Night Painting Class Aug. 31, 7-9 p.m., at Easely Amused (7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1002, Ridgeland). Paint an abstract piece with your date in any colors you choose. Registration required; space limited. $60 per couple; call 601-707-5854; email paint@easelyamused.com; easelyamused.com. Writing to Change Your World Sept. 7-Nov. 16, at JFP Classroom (2727 Old Canton Road, Suite 224). Reserve your spot for Donna Ladd’s popular creative non-fiction six-class series. Meets every other Saturday from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Includes snacks and materials. Space limited. $150; call

601-362-6121, ext. 15; email class@ writingtochange.com. Hurry!

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Free; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. • Storytellers Ball Juried Art Exhibition through Aug. 31, in the main galleries. The theme is “Studio 54: I Love the Nightlife.” • Grace Orsulak Art Exhibit through Sept. 30. See Orsulak’s paintings and other creations in the upper and lower atriums. Free; call 601960-1557. Museum After Hours: Blues and Brews Aug. 29, 5 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Includes a cash bar at 5 p.m., and guided tours of the Mississippi Hill Country Blues exhibit at 6 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Intended for young professionals, but all ages welcome. Admission applies for exhibit ($12, $10 seniors, $6 students, free for members and children ages 5 and under). Call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. Greater Jackson Arts Council Call for Art, at Greater Jackson Arts Council (255 E. Pascagoula St.). The council seeks an artist to paint a mural on the side of Martin’s Lounge about Jackson’s music and entertainment. Collaborative work permitted. Submit concepts by Sept. 15. The commission is $5,000. Free; call 601-960-1557, ext. 224. Mississippi Watercolor Society Exhibit through Sept. 20, at Marie Hull Gallery (Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus, Katherine Denton Art Building, 501 E. Main St., Raymond). The theme is “Selected Works from Current Members.” Free; call 601-857-3276; hindscc.edu. For My People: A Tribute through Oct. 5, at Gallery1 (One University Place, 1100 John R. Lynch St., Suite 4). The art exhibit celebrates the lives of Elizabeth Catlett and Margaret Walker. Opening reception Aug. 30 from 6-8 p.m. Free; call 601-960-9250; jsums.edu/gallery1.

"%4(%#(!.'% Pour III Aug. 31, 9-3 a.m., at Kemistry Sports Bar and Hookah Lounge (3716 Interstate 55 N., Unit 2). Performers in the deejay showcase include the SysOps Crew, Radiologix Mark Lewis, Unkl Ryan, Skin_E Fingaz, Rob Roy and Monoxide. Proceeds benefit Stop CMV, a nonprofit dedicated to raising awareness about cytomegalovirus (CMV). For ages 18 and up. $10; call 713-1500; find “POUR III-stopcmv.org-BENEFIT/EDM DJ SHOWCASE” on Facebook. Eastside Son Run Aug. 31, 7 a.m., at Mac & Bones Golf and Grill (1 Mac and Bones Blvd., Pearl). Eastside Baptist Church hosts the race that includes a 5K run/walk and a one-mile fun run. Check-in is at 5:54 a.m. Proceeds benefit the Christian Men and Women’s Job Corps in Rankin County. Registration required. $20 in advance, $25 race day, $15 fun run and ghost runners, special rates for groups, police officers, firefighters and members of the military; call 601-942-1887; email eastsidesonrun@yahoo.com; eastsidebaptist.org. Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601-510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.


DIVERSIONS | music

‘Modoc’: Live Charm by Micah Smith

Courtesy Modoc

roles that they would during an actual performance, “MODOC” creates a convincing replica of a live recording with all the charm and none of the coarseness. MODOC also succeeds (most of the time) in one especially challenging area for its genre: providing variety between songs. While obviously not all rock songs sound the same, to pretend that there isn’t at least a general formula for most contemporary rock is to ignore a blatant truth. For examMODOC’s new album chooses authenticity and restraint over spectacle. ple, if the Black Keys is your go-to for the good stuff, you can usually root out a handful of guitar riffs in the band’s MODOC is an upstart group on the cusp of an expandearlier music, repeated as the duo saw fit. That doesn’t make it ing musical movement toward neo-classic rock. The band bad, but it does explain why the Black Keys has so frequently has a live show that easily treads the main stage with some experimented with styles and instruments over the years. of today’s rock greats. While a static recording can only go While a select few tracks on “MODOC”—such as so far in delivering the members’ skills as spirited performers “Coward” and “I Want You”—apply this riff-based method and entertainers, “MODOC” showcases some of the band’s of building songs, others, such as the single “Devil on My best work to date and updates some older tunes, capably enShoulder,” keep a memorable loop on hand without being capsulating the titular group’s five-years-and-counting stint chained to it. “Devil on My Shoulder” was even featured on creating robust, authentic rock ‘n’ roll. ABC’s promo for “666 Park Avenue.” “MODOC” hit stores Aug. 27. Visit modocmusic.com. Solomon Davis / Solo Photography

S

elf-titled albums can be mixed bags at times. Some bands step into a studio with the well-intentioned mindset of creating the eponymous CD that perfectly encompasses what the band is like—stylistically and thematically. The problem with this outlook is that it’s pretty darn hard to achieve. Over-produced drivel can drown material that the band enjoys in an attempt to make “good” into “gold.” Then you have bands like Nashville-rock revivalists MODOC who see the self-titled record as an introduction to its particular brand of bold-andbuoyant songwriting that revels in rock-classicism without being mired in it. In this way, “MODOC,” the album, plays like a “nice to meet you” to new listeners and a high-quality, yet deliciously raw, refresher for previous fans. The record taps into a little Cage the Elephant, a little Kings of Leon, a little Black Keys— but most of all, a whole lot of MODOC. Combining previously unreleased songs with fan favorites from the “Passive/Aggressive” EP and “Fortune and Fame”—the title track of which appears on the new fulllength—“MODOC” works to capture the band’s high-energy, jolting live performances. Wherein most contemporary releases feature layers of vocals and effects, MODOC feels comfortable with letting the studio imitate the stage. Lead guitarist Kyle Addison, bassist Caleb Crockett and drummer John Carlson often use harmonies or group vocals to intensify singer Clint Culberson’s organic, grit-toglass vocals. In allowing the members to perform the same

In the Mix

by Tommy Burton

Trip Burns

Listening to records has become an integral part of Tommy Burton’s life.

S

ometimes I wish that I was wired like everyone else. I’ve never been content to simply turn on the radio and be entertained. I’ve certainly never been one to like something just because it’s popular. As a child, I probably recognized my faulty internal wiring when, instead of Superman or G.I. Joe, my heroes were the

members of KISS; I associated more with KISS guitarist Ace Frehley than Peter Parker. Here was a superhero who played rocking guitar solos and shot sparks from the end of his instrument. It wasn’t just KISS that floated my musical boat, though. I also had imaginary tea parties with the likes of Rod Stewart and Mick Jagger. My box of 45-rpm singles not only contained Disney storybooks, but artists as diverse as Blondie, Gary Numan and George Benson. When my cousin bought the 12-inch single of Sugarhill Gang’s “Rapper’s Delight,” I had never heard anything like it. It was like an alien landed in my radio. I remember my plastic, portable turntable and listening to albums such as KISS’ “Love Gun” and Queen’s “News of the World.” Those records still are special to me. By the time I reached middle school, I joined the legions of AC/DC fans, mostly 12-year-old boys like myself. In seventh grade, my aunt took me to the Mississippi Coliseum to see Whitesnake. It was loud

and obnoxious: just the thing a boy in junior high should see. Also during that time, I discovered R.E.M. The band was different and smart. This was just as R.E.M. was about to break big, so liking the music was akin to being a member of a secret club. Run-D.M.C. and the Beastie Boys were bringing rap music to new audiences, and my friends were no exception. Our parents hated it, which was just fine by me. I figured parents were supposed to hate their kids’ music. By the time I got to high school, I had gone completely off the deep end, by listening to everything from Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musicals to Metallica. I also went back in time a little and discovered the music of The Beatles—for any fan of music that is equivalent to hearing music for the first time. When I was in college in the mid ’90s, it was sort of a golden age for alternative music. Bands like Nirvana and Pearl Jam sent Warrant and Poison to the unemployment line, and the amount of guitar-based music

exploded. In addition to this really cool new music, I was also exposing myself to composers from Igor Stravinsky to Frank Zappa. In another lifetime, perhaps I would have pursued my trombone playing to become a jazz player. Instead, my friend, Danny, thought it would be a good idea for me to learn how to play bass guitar, which turned my sights to being in a band. If R.E.M. taught me what role people should play in a band, then Big Star taught me what kind of band I wanted to be in. When I started writing songs, I began to appreciate the obvious stars like Bob Dylan and Pete Townshend, but I also gained an affinity for Michael Nesmith and Elvis Costello. One thing has remained constant in my life: music. I’ve always been drawn to its uplifting qualities. I think music should always make people happy and be a source of joy, whether it’s from classical, hip-hop or metal. When someone says the music of Brian Wilson helped them through hard times, I can relate: It happened to me.

jacksonfreepress.com

The Soundtrack to My Life

37


MUSIC | live

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UPCOMING SHOWS 9.6: Static Ensemble 9.13: Flowtribe 9.27: Up Until Now (on tour with STS9 & Umphreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s McGee) 9.28: Good Enough For Good Times (Members Of Galactic) 10.4: Cosby Sweater 10.19: The Revivalists 11.1: Toubab Krewe 11.8: Unknown Hinson

August 28 - September 3, 2013

11.23: Zoogma

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214 S. STATE ST. 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

Tuesday September 2 Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

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Wednesday September 3

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601-960-2700

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39


!" #$%%&' ()$% %&$# *"+,'&-'""%.!/-0"' !"#$%&'()*+ H A S Y O U R TA I L G AT E C O V E R E D Stop in and pick up our ready-to-go pasta salad, cheese straws, chicken tenders or one of our signature cakes to score big at your next tailgate. Or, call ahead to place your order!

PRIMOSCAFE.COM

Mention this ad for

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Trish Hammons, ABOC 661 Duling Ave. 601.362.6675 www.customoptical.net

August 28 - September 3, 2013

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE HAVING A LITTLE WORK DONE.

40

Mississippi's only full service Hilton Hotel has kicked off a major renovation project. The renovation plan calls for updates in the hotel lobby, restaurants, 276 guest rooms, and a few more exciting enhancements. Entire project is scheduled to wrap up by the end of the year. We are excited about our renovation and look forward to providing you with an even better hotel!

!/0)%"1/(%#2',31%4*.%$05/ !"#$%%&'&()"*$(#"+%"'&,!-&",)+'&

! " ! #$ % & ' ( ) 67.8/*+,+-./45-./9/:;<8/6=>.=?@=A/0<B

For room reservations please visit hilton.com or call 601-957-2800 STAY HILTON. GO EVERYWHERE.

*+,+-./01.2/3/45-. !"#$%&'()*+,

Something for Everyone!

Specializing in upscale clothing and home decor

/4UBUF4USFFUt+BDLTPO .4 .JMMTBQT"WFOVFt+BDLTPO .4     .POEBZ'SJEBZBNQN 8FEOFTEBZ'SJEBZBNQN 4BUVSEBZBNQN 4BUVSEBZBNQN NUTS is a fundraiser for The Good Samaritan Center, helping families in crisis for 40 years!

1001 East County Line Road | Jackson | MS 39211 | USA Š2013 Hilton Worldwide

Untitled - Page: 1

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TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: Post an ad at

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call 601-3626121, ext. 11 or fax to 601-5109019. Deadline: Mondays at noon.

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41


BULLETIN BOARD: JOBS

advertise here starting at $50 a week

601.362.6121 x11

COURTESY LANITRA TURNER

Gig: Cake Queen by Mark Braboy

As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the strangest aspect of your job?

I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recall. Even to this day, I still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what I want to be when I grow up.

Well I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say strange, but the fact that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m making cake on a stick is different. When people see them, most people think that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lollipops, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re taken back when I say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cake.

Describe your workday in three words. I would say tedious, creative and fulfilling.

What tools could you not live or work without? Cake ingredients, fondant, lollipop sticks and icing.

What steps brought you to this position?

NAME: LANITRA TURNER AGE: 23 JOB: OWNER OF TOOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CAKE POPS

I think I just needed an outlet, I needed a hobby. Something other than the regular 9-to-5 work schedule, something that allows me to be creative. It was at a Halloween Party for a kindergarten class and I was going to make something to take and it blossomed from there. Anybody can do them but what I think people like about mine is the creativity and the fact that they are very unique.

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best thing about your job? The best thing about what I do is the fact that I own it. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not working for anyone else, I do what I want to do and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m allowed to be this creative.

What advice do you have for others who are interested in making their own baked goods and selling them? Just do it (laughs). Practice makes perfect and, although it can be tedious and time consuming at times, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun! If you have a great job, or know someone who does, suggest it to kathleen@jacksonfreepress.com.

EXTENDED HOURS

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DRINK

Maywood Mart Shopping Center (Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm • 1220 E. Northside Dr. • 601-366-5676 www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com Always Drink Responsibly

jacksonfreepress.com

LOCAL

43


The Little Big Store Vinyl Records +45’s & 78’s

Your

Fashion

Inspiration Location

• CDs & Tapes Mon, Fri & Sat: • Posters 10am - 5pm • Back Issue Music Sun: 1 - 5pm Magazines & Books • T-Shirts & Memorabilia • Blu-Rays, DVDs, & VHS

Danny

Located at Jackson, 2809 Greenview Drive

2 LOCATIONS FOR THE FOOD YOU LOVE

3BR/1BA Single Family 1142 sqft, Fixer Upper Lease or Sale $750 Down, $234/mo

601.857.8579 201 E. Main Street Raymond, Ms www.littlebigstore.com

“Let Us Fight Your Battle For You!”

HOME FOR SALE

2481 Lakeland Drive | Flowood 601.932.4070

Call 877-500-1540

900 Suite E. County Line Rd. Former AJ’s | 769.251.2657

Banjo, Mandolin Guitar, Drums, Bass, Piano & Voice

1260 E. County Line Rd. Ridgeland platosclosetridgeland.com 601.487.8207

The Law Offices of Charlie A. Carr, PLLC Attorney and Counselor At Law Criminal Defense & Civil Litigation Phone: 601.398.8663 Fax: 601.510.9643

Lessons

Start Rocking Today 601.362.0313 607 Fondren Place | Jackson, MS

www.fondrenguitars.com

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GET HIM ON THE LINE. LINE. 1220 E Northside Dr, Jackson, MS • 601-499-5277

TRY FOR FREE!

601-709-7084

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15% Off Repairs & Accessories

More local numbers: 1.800.777.8000 Ahora en Español / 18+

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